Science.gov

Sample records for aromatic hydrocarbon content

  1. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content and risk assessment from edible oils in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bomi; Lee, Byung-Mu; Shin, Han-Seung

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) content and a risk assessment from consumption of Korean edible oils were investigated. Liquid-liquid extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy were used to measure eight PAH in edible oils commonly consumed in Korea. The total average PAH concentration was 0.548 ?g/kg from edible oils and the content of the 8 PAH was lower than 2 ?g/kg, which is the maximum tolerable limit reported by the commission regulation. The contents of the eight PAH were converted to exposure assessment and risk characterization values. Dietary exposure to PAH from edible oils was 0.025 ng-TEQBaP/kg/d, and margin of exposure (MOE) was 4 10(6), which represents negligible concern. Although PAH were detected from edible oils in Korea, their contribution to human exposure to PAH is considered not significant. PMID:25343286

  2. The polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content of herbage from a long-term grassland experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, S. R.; Jones, K. C.; Johnston, A. E.

    Herbage samples harvested and stored from a long-term agricultural experiment started in the 1850s at Rothamsted Experimental Station (U.K.) have been analysed for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The changing PAH content of samples since 1900 is thought to reflect broadly changes in the PAH content of air. Herbage concentrations ranged between 580 and 2750 μg ΣPAH kg -1 (total of 15 compounds). The lowest concentrations since 1900 were measured in the most recent samples (since the 1960s), with the highest between 1930 and 1955. Samples taken before 1956 contain statistically lower PAH contents than samples taken after this date, suggesting a reduction in PAH emissions from local and/or national sources. Samples taken between 1860 and 1900 contained much higher concentrations of ΣPAH (between 3620 and 6550 μg ΣPAH kg -1) and a different mixture of compounds. These samples may have been contaminated in the drying process after harvesting and prior to storage. The ΣPAH contents of these samples therefore probably do not reflect the atmospheric burden of PAHs at that time.

  3. The total and freely dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons content in residues from biogas production.

    PubMed

    Stefaniuk, Magdalena; Oleszczuk, Patryk

    2016-01-01

    In the situation of increasing agricultural utilization of residues from biogas production (RBP) it is important to determine the concentration of contaminants, which could occur in these materials. The group of contaminants that requires special attention are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The objective of the study was to determine the total and freely dissolved (Cfree) of PAHs in RBP from 6 different biogas plants operating under various temperature conditions and without or with the separation into the solid and liquid fractions. The freely dissolved PAHs were determined using polyoxymethylene (POM method). The total content of the ?16 PAHs in RBP varied from 449 to 6147?g/kgdw, while that of Cfree PAHs was at the level from 57 to 653ng/L. No significant differences were noted in the content of the ?16 PAHs (total) between the solid and the liquid fractions. This indicates that in the course of the separation, the PAHs are distributed proportionally between the fractions. However in the case of Cfree, PAHs content in the solid fraction was over twice as high as in the liquid fraction. This was probably due to the greater affinity of the particles present in the liquid fraction to the analysed PAHs than to the particles of the solid fraction. Higher affinity to liquid fraction was also confirmed by the distribution coefficients KTOC determined on the basis of Cfree. PMID:26586628

  4. Changes in the contents of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils of various types.

    PubMed

    Banach-Szott, Magdalena; Debska, Bozena; Wisniewska, Alicja; Pakula, Jaroslaw

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the paper was to determine the stability and the decomposition intensity of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (fluorene, anthracene, pyrene, and chrysene) in soils that are under agricultural use. Soil was sampled from the arable layer that is representative of the Kujawy and Pomorze Provinces, which are located in the northwestern part of Poland. The soil samples were polluted with selected PAHs at an amount corresponding to 10 mg PAHs/kg. PAH-polluted soil samples were incubated for 10, 30, 60, 120, 180, and 360 days at a temperature of 20-25 C and a fixed moisture of 50% field water capacity. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to determine the content of PAHs. It was found that the process of the degradation of PAHs was most intensive during the first 30 days of the experiment; however, three-ring PAHs (fluorene and anthracene) definitely decomposed faster than the four-ring ones (pyrene and chrysene). The results also confirm the significant role of soil organic matter in sorption and activation processes of PAHs. PMID:25586610

  5. Influence of soil fertilization by sewage sludge on the content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in crops.

    PubMed

    Oleszczuk, Patryk; Baran, Stanis?aw

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was an evaluation of the influence of the addition of different sewage sludge doses on the uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from fertilized soil. Sewage sludge was introduced into the soil in the following doses: 30, 75, 150, 300, and 600 Mg/ha. The content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was determined by means of HPLC-UV method. The addition of increasing doses of sludge into the soil resulted in a gradual increase in the amount of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contained therein. During the period of the study, continuous changes in the content of all the compounds studied were found in all the experimental variants. Finally, on the last day of the study, the highest degree of degradation (73%) of 16 PAHs' sum (US EPA) was noted for sludge doses of 30 and 300 Mg/ha. In the case of individual PAHs, the change in their content differed and clearly depended on the sewage sludge dose. The introduction of sewage sludge into the soil influenced the increase of the sum of 16 PAHs in the plants grown in this soil. The influence mentioned above depended on the sewage sludge dose and the plant species grown, as well as the PAH content in the soil. The evaluation of individual PAHs in plants showed an increase in their content with the increase of the amount of sewage sludge. A statistically significant increase in their content was most often observed for sewage sludge doses above 150 Mg/ha. Moreover, it was found that fertilization of the soil with sewage sludge resulted in pollution of the plants with PAHs of high molecular weight. PMID:16287643

  6. Impact of using fishing boat fuel with high poly aromatic content on the emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan-Chung; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Li, Hsing-Wang; Chen, Chung-Ban; Fang, Guor-Cheng; Tsai, Perng-Jy

    Because of the fishery subsidy policy, the fishing boat fuel oil (FBFO) exemption from commodity taxes, business taxes and air pollution control fees, resulted in the price of FBFO was 50% lower than premium diesel fuel (PDF) in Taiwan. It is estimated that 650,000 kL FBFO was illegally used by traveling diesel-vehicles (TDVs) with a heavy-duty diesel engine (HDDE), which accounted for 16.3% of the total diesel fuel consumed by TDVs. In this study, sulfur, poly aromatic and total-aromatic contents in both FBFO and PDF were measured and compared. Exhaust emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their carcinogenic potencies (BaP eq) from a HDDE under transient cycle testing for both FBFO and PDF were compared and discussed. Finally, the impact caused by the illegal use of FBFO on the air quality was examined. Results show that the mean sulfur-, poly aromatic and aromatic-contents in FBFO were 43.0, 3.89 and 1.04 times higher than that of PDF, respectively. Emission factors of total-PAHs and total-BaP eq obtained by utilizing FBFO were 51.5 and 0.235 mg L -1-Fuel, which were 3.41 and 5.82 times in magnitude higher than obtained by PDF, respectively. The estimated annual emissions of total-PAHs and total-BaP eq to the ambient environment due to the illegally used FBFO were 23.6 and 0.126 metric tons, respectively, which resulted in a 17.9% and a 25.0% increment of annual emissions from all mobile sources, respectively. These results indicated that the FBFO used illegally by TDVs had a significant impact on PAH emissions to the ambient environment.

  7. [Content analysis and assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments from Beijiang River, China].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Ren, Ming-Zhong; Du, Gou-Yong; Zhang, Su-Kun; Xu, Zhen-Cheng

    2009-11-01

    In the present study, 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the surface sediment from Beijiang River in China were quantitatively determined by GC/MS. The concentration of PAHs varied from 38.2 to 6470 ng x g(-1) dry weight, with average 1071 ng x g(-1), which was in moderate level compared with other rivers in Pear River Basin. The PAHs distribution in Bejiang River was obviously affected by point source emissions. The high PAHs concentrations of 6470 ng x g(-1) and 4 470 ng x g(-1) were found at the outfalls of Shaoye and the Shakou town, respectively, where PAHs probably derived from local mining/smelting and related industrial actives. The ecological risk of surface sediment in Beijiang River was assessed with the methods of sediment quality guidelines (SQGs), sediment quality standards (SQSs) and contamination factors (CFs) . The result shows that the adverse biological toxicity effect might occasionally happen in more than half of sampling stations. By comparison with the background area, the contamination degrees of PAHs in 20 sampling stations were at very high level, which should arrest the local governments' attentions. The highest ecological risk areas occurred at the outfalls of Shaoye and the Shakou town in which the ecological risks derived from PAHs were within between probable effect level (PEL) and frequent effect level (FEL). The future research was suggested mainly focusing on the status of benthos, sources of pollutants and ways to control pollution in high-risk areas. PMID:20063739

  8. Mutagenicity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content of fumes from heated cooking oils produced in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chiang, T A; Wu, P F; Wang, L F; Lee, H; Lee, C H; Ko, Y C

    1997-11-28

    According to epidemiologic studies, exposure of women to fumes from cooking oils appears to be an important risk factor for lung cancer. Fume samples from three different commercial cooking oils frequently used in Taiwan were collected and analyzed for mutagenicity in the Salmonella/microsome assay. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were extracted from the samples and identified by HPLC chromatography. Extracts from three cooking oil fumes were found to be mutagenic in the presence of S9 mix. All samples contained dibenz[a,h]anthracene (DB[a,h]A) and benz[a]anthracene (B[a]A). Concentration of DB[a,h]A and B[a]A were 1.9 and 2.2 micrograms/m3 in fumes from lard oil, 2.1 and 2.3 micrograms/m3 in soybean oil, 1.8 and 1.3 micrograms/m3 in peanut oil, respectively. Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) was identified in fume samples of soybean and peanut oil, in concentrations of 19.6 and 18.3 micrograms/m3, in this order. These results provide experimental evidence and support the findings of epidemiologic observations, in which women exposed to the emitted fumes of cooking oils are at increased risk of contracting lung cancer. PMID:9434872

  9. Analysis of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content of airborne particulate pollutants in a Sderberg paste plant.

    PubMed

    Bjorseth, A; Lunde, G

    1977-05-01

    A method of enrichment and separation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in air samples is described. Airborne particulate samples from the work atmosphere of a Soderberg carbon-paste plant were collected on glass fiber and Acropor filters using high volume samplers. The filters were Soxhlet-extracted using cyclohexane and extractable matter was subject to a liquid/liquid separation. The PAH-fraction was concentrated and separated on a gas chromatographic system with the possibility of mass spectrometric identification. More than 40 PAH compounds and some heterocyclic compounds having from 3-6 rings have been separated and identified. Quantitative determinations show that some of the PAH-components are 2-3 decades more abundant than recently reported data from urban air samples. The results are presented as a PAH-profile. It is suggested that the PAH-profile may be a characteristic of the process involved. Furthermore, the profile has a potential use of the profile in evaluating potentially hazardous risk of the PAH's. PMID:868762

  10. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  11. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials play an important role in space. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a ubiquitous component of the carbonaceous materials. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands. They are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge is to reproduce in the laboratory the physical conditions that exist in the emission and absorption interstellar zones. The harsh physical conditions of the ISM -low temperature, collisionless, strong UV radiation fields- are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions and radicals are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature and probed with high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy in the NUV-NIR range. Carbon nanoparticles are also formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma and are characterized with time-offlight mass spectrometry. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of large carbonaceous molecules and ions in the gas phase that can now be directly compared to interstellar and circumstellar observations (IR emission bands, DIBs, extinction curve). These findings also hold great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar carbonaceous grains. We will review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical studies of PAHs, compare the laboratory data with astronomical observations and discuss the global implications.

  12. THE PHOTOTOXICITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues to be interested in developing methods for the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) in the environment. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) are common contaminants in our environment. Being major product...

  13. AROMATIC HYDROCARBON DEGRADATION: A MOLECULAR APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aromatic hydrocarbons have a ubiquitous distribution in nature. he majority of these compounds are formed through the pyrolysis of organic matter. yrolysis at high temperatures leads to the information of unsubstituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (1). yrolysis at low tempera...

  14. Evaluation of Chemical Analysis Method and Determination of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Content from Seafood and Dairy Products.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Young; Lee, Jee-Yeon; Shin, Han-Seung

    2015-09-01

    This study was carried out to investigate contents of 8 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from frequently consumed seafood and dairy products and to evaluate their chemical analysis methods. Samples were collected from markets of 9 cities in Korea chosen as the population reference and evaluated. The methodology involved saponification, extraction with n-hexane, clean-up on Sep-Pak silica cartridges and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry analysis. Validation proceeded on 2 matrices. Recoveries for 8 PAHs ranged from 86.87 to 103.57%. The limit of detection (LOD) 8 PAHs was 0.04~0.20 g/kg, and limit of quantification (LOQ) of 8 PAHs was 0.12~0.60 g/kg. The mean concentration of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) was 0.34 g/kg from seafood and 0.34 g/kg from dairy products. The total PAHs concentration was 1.06 g/kg in seafood and 1.52 g/kg in dairy products. PMID:26483885

  15. Evaluation of Chemical Analysis Method and Determination of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Content from Seafood and Dairy Products

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So-Young; Lee, Jee-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate contents of 8 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from frequently consumed seafood and dairy products and to evaluate their chemical analysis methods. Samples were collected from markets of 9 cities in Korea chosen as the population reference and evaluated. The methodology involved saponification, extraction with n-hexane, clean-up on Sep-Pak silica cartridges and gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry analysis. Validation proceeded on 2 matrices. Recoveries for 8 PAHs ranged from 86.87 to 103.57%. The limit of detection (LOD) 8 PAHs was 0.04~0.20 µg/kg, and limit of quantification (LOQ) of 8 PAHs was 0.12~0.60 µg/kg. The mean concentration of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) was 0.34 µg/kg from seafood and 0.34 µg/kg from dairy products. The total PAHs concentration was 1.06 µg/kg in seafood and 1.52 µg/kg in dairy products. PMID:26483885

  16. PHOTOREACTIVITY OF SELECTED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative data concerning photoreactions of aromatic hydrocarbons were obtained in distilled water and several natural water samples. The reactions were studied at concentrations lower than the solubility limits of the aromatics, which in some cases were less than 1 microgram ...

  17. Assessing the contents of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the tollbooths of a highway toll station via direct and indirect approaches.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Perng-Jy; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Chen, Hsiao-Lung; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Lai, Ching-Huang; Liou, Saou-Hsing

    2002-11-15

    The present study was set out to assess the contents of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in three types of tollbooths at a highway toll station via direct and indirect approaches. Direct sampling results show that no significant difference could be found in the PAH homologue distributions for samples collected from the car lane/ticket-payment and car lane/cash-payment tollbooths, but both were significantly different from that for the bus/ truck lane tollbooth. The above results could be due to the former two types of tollbooths that were designed for the same type of traffic (i.e., cars and vans), but the latter was designed for a different type of traffic (i.e., buses and trucks). For any given type of tollbooth, the total-PAH content (C(Total-PAHs)) found during the day shift (= 9,370-15,500 ng/m3) were not significantly different from that found during the night shift (= 9,550-14,900 ng/m3), but both were significantly higher than that found during the late-night shift (= 5,560-11,100 ng/m3). During any given work shift we found C(Total-PAH5) for the three types of tollbooths as the following: bus/truck lane (= 11,100-15,500 ng/m3) > car lane/ticket-payment (= 7,260-13,500 ng/m3) > car lane/ cash-payment (= 5,560-9,550 ng/m3). After conducting multivariate regression analyses, we found that none of the three environmental factors (i.e., wind speed,temperature, and relative humidity), except for the vehicle flow rate (Q(Vehicle)) had a significant effect on C(Total-PAHs) for any given type of tollbooth. Considering directly measuring PAH contents was labor-consuming and costly, and the above results suggest the possibility of using Q(Vehicle) to predict C(Total-PAHs) for any given type of tollbooth. After conducting simple linear regression analyses, we found that (1) all resultant regression coefficients were found with positive values indicating that an increase in the Q(Vehicle) would lead to an increase in the C(Total-PHHs). (2) from the magnitude of the resultant regression coefficients indicating that an increase in C(Total-PAHs) caused by per unit Q(Vehicle) for the three types of tollbooths were the following: bus/truck lane > car lane/cash-payment > car lane/ticket-payment, and (3) the resultant R2 values fell to the 0.54-0.75 range indicating that the variations in C(Total-PAHs) could be explained well by Q(Vehicle) for the three types of tollbooths. It is concluded that measuring Q(Vehicle) can be regarded as an effective indirect method for estimating PAH contents in various types of tollbooths. PMID:12487295

  18. Deuterated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doney, K. D.; Candian, A.; Mori, T.; Onaka, T.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: The amount of deuterium locked up in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has to date been an uncertain value. We present a near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic survey of Hii regions in the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Cloud, and Small Magellanic Cloud obtained with AKARI, which aims to search for features indicative of deuterated PAHs (PAD or Dn-PAH) to better constrain the D/H ratio of PAHs. Methods: Fifty-three Hii regions were observed in the NIR (2.5-5 μm), using the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board the AKARI satellite. Through comparison of the observed spectra with a theoretical model of deuterated PAH vibrational modes, the aromatic and (a)symmetric aliphatic C-D stretch modes were identified. Results: We see emission features between 4.4-4.8 μm, which could be unambiguously attributed to deuterated PAHs in only six of the observed sources, all of which are located in the Milky Way. In all cases, the aromatic C-D stretching feature is weaker than the aliphatic C-D stretching feature, and, in the case of M17b, this feature is not observed at all. Based on the weak or absent PAD features in most of the observed spectra, it is suggested that the mechanism for PAH deuteration in the ISM is uncommon.

  19. Nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contents of fumes from heated cooking oils and prevention of mutagenicity by catechin.

    PubMed

    Wu, P F; Chiang, T A; Wang, L F; Chang, C S; Ko, Y C

    1998-07-17

    According to earlier studies, fumes from cooking oils were found to be mutagenic and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), (benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), benz(a)antracene (B(a)A), and dibenz(a,h)anthracene (DB(ah)A)) were identified. Fume samples from three different commercial cooking oils frequently used in Taiwan were collected and nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) were extracted from the samples and identified by HPLC chromatography. Extracts from three cooking oil fumes contained 1-nitropyrene (1-NP) and 1,3-dinitropyrene (1,3-DNP). Concentrations of 1-NP and 1,3-DNP were 1.1 +/- 0.1 and 0.9 +/- 0.1 micrograms/m3 in fumes from lard oil, 2.9 +/- 0.3 and 3.4 +/- 0.2 micrograms/m3 in soybean oil, 1.5 +/- 0.1 and 0.4 +/- 0.1 micrograms/m3 in peanut oil, respectively. The preventive effect of three natural antioxidants (gamma-tocopherol (TOC), lecithin (LEC), and catechin (CAT)) for the reduction of mutagenicity and amounts of PAHs and NPAHs of fumes from cooking oils were evaluated. Mutagenicity of cooking oil fumes occurred, and the concentration of B(a)P were significantly reduced (p < 0.05), by adding CAT into cooking oils before heating. B(a)A, DB(ah)A, and two NPAHs were not detected when the concentration of CAT was 500 ppm in all three cooking oil fumes. These results indicate that fumes of cooking oils contained PAHs and NPAHs that may be a risk factor for lung cancer among cooks and the carcinogens could be reduced by adding the natural antioxidant, catechin. PMID:9726003

  20. Birds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, P.H.

    2006-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are present throughout the global environment and are produced naturally and by activities of humans. Effects of PAH on birds have been determined by studies employing egg injection, egg immersion, egg shell application, single and multiple oral doses, subcutaneous injection, and chemical analysis of field-collected eggs and tissue. The four-to six-ring aromatic compounds are the most toxic to embryos, young birds, and adult birds. For embryos, effects include death, developmental abnormalities, and a variety of cellular and biochemical responses. For adult and young birds, effects include reduced egg production and hatching, increased clutch or brood abandonment, reduced growth, increased organweights, and a variety of biochemical responses. Trophic level accumulation is unlikely. Environmental exposure to PAH in areas of high human population or habitats affected by recent petroleum spills might be sufficient to adversely affect reproduction. Evidence of long-term effects of elevated concentrations of environmental PAH on bird populations is very limited and the mechanisms of effect are unclear.

  1. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons for fullerene synthesis in flames

    DOEpatents

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.

    2006-12-19

    This invention provides improved methods for combustion synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, employing multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels selected for high carbon conversion to extractable fullerenes. The multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels include those that contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. More specifically, multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels contain a substantial amount of indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof. Coal tar and petroleum distillate fractions provide low cost hydrocarbon fuels containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including without limitation, indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof.

  2. Shallow sublittoral meiofauna communities and sediment polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) content on the Galician coast (NW Spain), six months after the Prestige oil spill.

    PubMed

    Veiga, P; Rubal, M; Besteiro, C

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this work was to detect the impact of Prestige oil spill on meiobenthic community structure at higher levels of taxonomic aggregation. In addition, the relationship between sediment individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentration and meiofauna community structure was investigated. Six months after the Prestige oil spill, meiobenthos community and sediment PAHs content from seven shallow subtidal localities along the Galician coast were studied. Two sites presented differences in community structure, characterized by high densities of nematodes, gastrotrichs and turbellarians, and low densities of copepods. Chrysene and triphenylene were only found at these two disturbed sites and could be responsible for differences of meiobenthos community structure. However, differences in community structure of sites could be linked with sedimentary parameters, and discrimination between the effect of PAHs and sedimentary parameters was impossible due to the lack of baseline studies on meiobenthos and PAHs contents in this area. PMID:19091356

  3. (High temperature chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons)

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, L.T.

    1989-11-01

    This project focuses on the molecular transformations of aromatic hydrocarbons at high temperatures. Some of the studies make use of readily available compounds; however, others require lengthy organic syntheses. Two studies of each type are summarized herein.

  4. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    2000-01-01

    We have computed the synthetic infrared spectra of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons containing up to 54 carbon atoms. The species studied include ovalene, circumcoronene, dicoronylene, and hexabenzocoronene. We report spectra for anions, neutrals, cations, and multiply charged cations.

  5. PROTONATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Ricca, Alessandra; Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr; Allamandola, Louis J. E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov

    2011-02-01

    We reconsider the contribution that singly protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; HPAH{sup +}s) might make to the Class A component of the 6.2 {mu}m interstellar emission feature in light of the recent experimental measurements of protonated naphthalene and coronene. Our calculations on the small HPAH{sup +}s have a band near 6.2 {mu}m, as found in experiment. While the larger HPAH{sup +}s still have emission near 6.2 {mu}m, the much larger intensity of the band near 6.3 {mu}m overwhelms the weaker band at 6.2 {mu}m, so that the 6.2 {mu}m band is barely visible. Since the large PAHs are more representative of those in the interstellar medium, our work suggests that large HPAH{sup +}s cannot be major contributors to the observed emission at 6.2 {mu}m (i.e., Class A species). Saturating large PAH cations with hydrogen atoms retains the 6.2 {mu}m Class A band position, but the rest of the spectrum is inconsistent with observed spectra.

  6. Decreased Mitochondrial DNA Content in Association with Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in House Dust during Wintertime: From a Population Enquiry to Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Pieters, Nicky; Koppen, Gudrun; Smeets, Karen; Napierska, Dorota; Plusquin, Michelle; De Prins, Sofie; Van De Weghe, Hendrik; Nelen, Vera; Cox, Bianca; Cuypers, Ann; Hoet, Peter; Schoeters, Greet; Nawrot, Tim S.

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread environmental pollutants that are formed in combustion processes. At the cellular level, exposure to PAHs causes oxidative stress and/or some of it congeners bind to DNA, which may interact with mitochondrial function. However, the influence of these pollutants on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content remains largely unknown. We determined whether indoor exposure to PAHs is associated with mitochondrial damage as represented by blood mtDNA content. Blood mtDNA content (ratio mitochondrial/nuclear DNA copy number) was determined by real-time qPCR in 46 persons, both in winter and summer. Indoor PAH exposure was estimated by measuring PAHs in sedimented house dust, including 6 volatile PAHs and 8 non-volatile PAHs. Biomarkers of oxidative stress at the level of DNA and lipid peroxidation were measured. In addition to the epidemiologic enquiry, we exposed human TK6 cells during 24 h at various concentrations (range: 0 to 500 M) of benzo(a)pyrene and determined mtDNA content. Mean blood mtDNA content averaged (SD) 0.950.185. The median PAH content amounted 554.1 ng/g dust (25th75th percentile: 390.7767.3) and 1385ng/g dust (25th75th percentile: 10001980) in winter for volatile and non-volatile PAHs respectively. Independent for gender, age, BMI and the consumption of grilled meat or fish, blood mtDNA content decreased by 9.85% (95% CI: ?15.16 to ?4.2; p?=?0.002) for each doubling of non-volatile PAH content in the house dust in winter. The corresponding estimate for volatile PAHs was ?7.3% (95% CI: ?13.71 to ?0.42; p?=?0.04). Measurements of oxidative stress were not correlated with PAH exposure. During summer months no association was found between mtDNA content and PAH concentration. The ability of benzo(a)pyrene (range 0 M to 500 M) to lower mtDNA content was confirmed in vitro in human TK6 cells. Based on these findings, mtDNA content can be a target of PAH toxicity in humans. PMID:23658810

  7. Decreased mitochondrial DNA content in association with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in house dust during wintertime: from a population enquiry to cell culture.

    PubMed

    Pieters, Nicky; Koppen, Gudrun; Smeets, Karen; Napierska, Dorota; Plusquin, Michelle; De Prins, Sofie; Van De Weghe, Hendrik; Nelen, Vera; Cox, Bianca; Cuypers, Ann; Hoet, Peter; Schoeters, Greet; Nawrot, Tim S

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread environmental pollutants that are formed in combustion processes. At the cellular level, exposure to PAHs causes oxidative stress and/or some of it congeners bind to DNA, which may interact with mitochondrial function. However, the influence of these pollutants on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content remains largely unknown. We determined whether indoor exposure to PAHs is associated with mitochondrial damage as represented by blood mtDNA content. Blood mtDNA content (ratio mitochondrial/nuclear DNA copy number) was determined by real-time qPCR in 46 persons, both in winter and summer. Indoor PAH exposure was estimated by measuring PAHs in sedimented house dust, including 6 volatile PAHs and 8 non-volatile PAHs. Biomarkers of oxidative stress at the level of DNA and lipid peroxidation were measured. In addition to the epidemiologic enquiry, we exposed human TK6 cells during 24 h at various concentrations (range: 0 to 500 µM) of benzo(a)pyrene and determined mtDNA content. Mean blood mtDNA content averaged (± SD) 0.95 ± 0.185. The median PAH content amounted 554.1 ng/g dust (25(th)-75(th) percentile: 390.7-767.3) and 1385 ng/g dust (25(th)-75(th) percentile: 1000-1980) in winter for volatile and non-volatile PAHs respectively. Independent for gender, age, BMI and the consumption of grilled meat or fish, blood mtDNA content decreased by 9.85% (95% CI: -15.16 to -4.2; p = 0.002) for each doubling of non-volatile PAH content in the house dust in winter. The corresponding estimate for volatile PAHs was -7.3% (95% CI: -13.71 to -0.42; p = 0.04). Measurements of oxidative stress were not correlated with PAH exposure. During summer months no association was found between mtDNA content and PAH concentration. The ability of benzo(a)pyrene (range 0 µM to 500 µM) to lower mtDNA content was confirmed in vitro in human TK6 cells. Based on these findings, mtDNA content can be a target of PAH toxicity in humans. PMID:23658810

  8. On the aromatic stabilization of benzenoid hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Arkadiusz; Stepień, Dorota K; Dobrowolski, Michał A; Dobrzycki, Łukasz; Cyrański, Michał K

    2012-10-18

    A general scheme for estimation of aromatic stabilization energies of benzenoid hydrocarbons based on selected topological features has been presented. The reactions have been applied to benzene, naphthalene, anthracene, phenanthrene, pyrene, tetracene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, [4]-helicene, anthanthrene and coronene. PMID:22962659

  9. 40 CFR 721.10259 - Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10259 Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (PMN P-09-540) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10258 - Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10258 Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic hydrocarbon (PMN...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10259 - Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10259 Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (PMN P-09-540) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10258 - Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10258 Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic hydrocarbon (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10258 - Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10258 Aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as aromatic hydrocarbon (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10259 - Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10259 Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical substance... halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (PMN P-09-540) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  15. Carbon fibers from aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Mochida, Isao; Yoon, S.H.; Korai, Yozo; Kanno, Koichi; Sakai, Yukio; Komatsu, Makoto

    1995-02-01

    Carbon filter is widely used as a lightweight and high-strength material for composite structures. Its uses are expected to expand in the next century. Currently the best precursor for making these fibers is polyacrylonitrile (PAN). This is a relatively expensive feedstock. Carbon fibers also have been made starting with so-called mesophase pitch fractions derived from low-cost hydrocarbons such as petroleum residuum. But these fibers suffer from low mechanical strength. In the past few years, significant advances have been made in understanding the mechanism of formation of mesophase pitch, which may lead to improved performance for carbon fibers and other specialty carbons. This article introduces such advances, based principally on the authors` recent results.

  16. Monitoring of vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.

    2004-06-01

    An apparatus for monitoring vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a high-temperature environment has an excitation source producing electromagnetic radiation, an optical path having an optical probe optically communicating the electromagnetic radiation received at a proximal end to a distal end, a spectrometer or polychromator, a detector, and a positioner coupled to the first optical path. The positioner can slidably move the distal end of the optical probe to maintain the distal end position with respect to an area of a material undergoing combustion. The emitted wavelength can be directed to a detector in a single optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration, in a dual optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration or in a dual optical probe 90.degree. side scattered configuration. The apparatus can be used to monitor an emitted wavelength of energy from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon as it fluoresces in a high temperature environment.

  17. Reduction of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content of charcoal smoke during grilling by charcoal preparation using high carbonisation and a preheating step.

    PubMed

    Chaemsai, Suriyapong; Kunanopparat, Thiranan; Srichumpuang, Jidapa; Nopharatana, Montira; Tangduangdee, Chairath; Siriwattanayotin, Suwit

    2016-03-01

    Charcoal-grilling may lead to contamination of food with carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during the grilling process. The objective of this work was to determine the effect of charcoal preparation on 16 USEPA priority PAHs in the smoke produced during the grilling process. Firstly, mangrove charcoal was prepared at carbonisation temperatures of 500, 750 and 1000°C. The charcoal were then preheated by burning at 650°C. This preheating step is usually used to prepare hot charcoal for the grilling process in the food industry. In this study, charcoal was preheated at different burning times at 5, 20 min and 5 h, at which time partial and whole charcoal glowed, and charcoal was completely burnt, respectively. Finally, PAHs in the smoke were collected and determined by GC/MS. The result showed that charcoal prepared at a carbonisation temperature of 500°C had higher levels of PAHs released into the smoke. In contrast, charcoal produced at 750 and 1000°C had lower PAHs released for all burning times. In addition, PAHs released for 5, 20 min and 5 h of burning time were about 19.9, 1.2 and 0.7 µg g(-1) dry charcoal for charcoal produced at 500°C, and about 0.9-1.4, 0.8-1.2 and 0.15-0.3 µg g(-1) dry charcoal for charcoal produced at 750 and 1000°C, respectively. Therefore, this research suggests that food grilled using charcoal carbonised at a high temperature of about 750°C presents a lower risk of PAH contamination. In addition, in the preheating step, whole charcoal should fully glow in order to reduce the PAH content in charcoal before grilling. PMID:26785749

  18. 40 CFR 721.10676 - Aromatic hydrocarbon mixture (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aromatic hydrocarbon mixture (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10676 Aromatic hydrocarbon mixture (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... hydrocarbon mixture (PMN P-12-551) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  19. THE UPTAKE OF AROMATIC AND BRANCHED CHAIN HYDROCARBONS BY YEAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of the hydrocarbon utilizing yeasts, Candida maltosa and C. lipolytica, have shown that both were capable of reducing recoverable amounts of branched chain and aromatic hydrocarbons in a mixture of naphthalene, tetradecane, hexadecane, pristane (tetra-methylpentadecane). ...

  20. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN LIQUID FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNAs), formed in combustion processes with liquid hydrocarbon fuels, contribute to mobile source exhaust emissions. Because correlation between PNA levels in automobile exhaust and pre-existent PNAs in fuel has been demonstrated in previous work...

  1. High temperature chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, L.T.

    1991-01-01

    We have not only gained new insight into the mechanism and generality of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) thermal automerization reactions, we have also uncovered several new high temperature reactions and added a third dimension to our program by applying high temperature chemistry to problems in organic synthesis. Our synthesis of corannulene has attracted much recent attention; however, we believe that the uncatalyzed cyclodehydrogenation reactions'' which form 5-membered rings and 6-membered rings at high temperatures may prove to be of greater general importance in the long term. This bias is reflected in the accompanying proposal.

  2. High temperature chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, L.T.

    1991-12-31

    We have not only gained new insight into the mechanism and generality of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) thermal automerization reactions, we have also uncovered several new high temperature reactions and added a third dimension to our program by applying high temperature chemistry to problems in organic synthesis. Our synthesis of corannulene has attracted much recent attention; however, we believe that the uncatalyzed ``cyclodehydrogenation reactions`` which form 5-membered rings and 6-membered rings at high temperatures may prove to be of greater general importance in the long term. This bias is reflected in the accompanying proposal.

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in insular and coastal soils of the Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abakumov, E. V.; Tomashunas, V. M.; Lodygin, E. D.; Gabov, D. N.; Sokolov, V. T.; Krylenkov, V. A.; Kirtsideli, I. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    The content and individual component compositions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in polar soils of the Russian Arctic sector have been studied. The contamination of soils near research stations is identified from the expansion of the range of individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the abrupt increase in the content of heavy fractions, and the accumulation of benzo[ a]pyrene. Along with heavy hydrocarbons, light hydrocarbons (which are not only natural compounds, but also components of organic pollutants) are also accumulated in the contaminated soils. Heavy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are usually of technogenic origin and can serve as markers of anthropogenic impact in such areas as Cape Sterligov, Cape Chelyuskin, and the Izvestii TsIK Islands. The content of benzo[ a]pyrene, the most hazardous organic toxicant, appreciably increases in soils around the stations, especially compared to the control; however, the level of MPC is exceeded only for the soils of Cape Chelyuskin.

  4. Laboratory Investigation of Organic Aerosol Formation from Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Molina, Luisa T.; Molina, Mario J.; Zhang, Renyi

    2006-08-23

    Our work for this DOE funded project includes: (1) measurements of the kinetics and mechanism of the gas-phase oxidation reactions of the aromatic hydrocarbons initiated by OH; (2) measurements of aerosol formation from the aromatic hydrocarbons; and (3) theoretical studies to elucidate the OH-toluene reaction mechanism using quantum-chemical and rate theories.

  5. Continuous removal of polynuclear aromatics from hydrocarbon recycle oil

    SciTech Connect

    Bosserman, P.J.; Taniguchi, V.T.

    1992-06-23

    This patent describes an oil refining process. It comprises forming a liquid capable of solubilizing aromatic compounds having at least about 5 fused aromatic rings; and catalytically hydrocracking a hydrocarbon feedstock by: contacting the feedstock in a hydrocracking zone with added hydrogen and a hydrocracking zone with added hydrogen and a hydrocracking catalyst at a temperature and pressure sufficient to give a substantial conversion to lower boiling products; and condensing a hydrocarbon effluent from the hydrocracking zone and separating the condensed effluent into (AA) a low boiling hydrocarbon product and (BB) an unconverted hydrocarbon oil containing one or more fused polynuclear aromatic compounds.

  6. Metabolism of nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by human intestinal microflora

    SciTech Connect

    Cerniglia, C.E.; Howard, P.C.; Fu, P.P.; Franklin, W.

    1984-08-30

    Anaerobic bacterial suspensions from human and rat feces and intestinal contents, and pure cultures of anaerobic bacteria metabolized 1-nitropyrene and 6-nitrobenzo(a)pyrene to 1-aminopyrene and 6-aminobenzo(a)pyrene, respectively. The metabolites were isolated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography and identified by comparison of their chromatographic and mass spectral properties with those of authentic compounds. The results suggest that anaerobic intestinal bacteria could play a significant role in the metabolism of potentially carcinogenic nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. 28 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and cancer in man.

    PubMed Central

    Mastrangelo, G; Fadda, E; Marzia, V

    1996-01-01

    Various substances and industrial processes, surrogates of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), are currently classified as human carcinogens. This paper reviews recent epidemiological studies reporting direct evidence of the carcinogenic effects of PAHs in occupationally exposed subjects. Risks of lung and bladder cancer were dose dependent when PAHs were measured quantitatively and truly nonexposed groups were chosen for comparison. These new findings suggest that the current threshold limit value of 0.2 mg/m3 of benzene soluble matter (which indicates PAH exposure) is unacceptable because, after 40 years of exposure, it involves a relative risk of 1.2-1.4 for lung cancer and 2.2 for bladder cancer. Images p1166-a PMID:8959405

  8. Simplified determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Avery, M J; Richard, J J; Junk, G A

    1984-01-01

    Accurate quantitative analysis for selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present on urban dust can be obtained by using a simple procedure consisting of sonic-probe extraction with cyclohexane; clean-up with Florisil((R))-XAD-4((R)), and measurement by high-resolution gas chromatography with flame-ionization detection (HRGC/FID). The analysis can be further simplified by eliminating the clean-up step if HRGC/electron-impact mass-spectrometry (MS) is available. Both the FID and MS methods give results consistent with those obtained by standard procedures. The direct HRGC/MS procedure, combined with chemical ionization, can also be applied to the determination of polycyclic organic materials present in solvent-refined coal, shale oil and crude oil. PMID:18963526

  9. Structural Evolution of Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammonds, Mark; Candian, Alessandra; Mori, Tamami; Usui, Fumihiko; Onaka, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important reservoir for molecular carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM), and investigations into their chemistry and behaviour may be important to the understanding of how carbon is processed from simple forms into complex prebiotic molecules such as those detected in chondritic meteorites. In this study, infrared astronomical data from AKARI and other observatories are used together with laboratory and theoretical data to study variations in the structure of emitting PAHs in interstellar environments using spectroscopic decomposition techniques and bands arising from carbon-hydrogen bond vibrations at wavelengths from 3 - 14 microns. Results and inferences are discussed in terms of the processing of large carbonaceous molecules in astrophysical environments.

  10. Risk assessment of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, L. ); Lax, I. ); Torndal, U.B.; Eriksson, L.C. )

    1993-06-01

    Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) constitute a group of substances formed during incomplete combustion. Sources include diesel vehicles, heating, smoking, certain types of food-processing, and incomplete combustion in general. 2-Nitrofluorene (NF) represents a model substance for the nitro-PAHs. An attempt has been made to estimate the lifetime human cancer risk due to background exposure to nitro-PAHs by two different models. The first model is based on genotoxic lesions produced by gamma-irradiation and the second model is based on an earlier published mega study (24,000 animals) on the carcinogenicity of the major metabolite of NF. Both models agreed well -- representing a yearly human cancer risk in the range of 0.15--49 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] for an urban citizen. The weaknesses and strengths of the models are discussed. 55 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and cancer in man

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrangelo, G.; Marzia, V.; Fadda, E.

    1996-11-01

    Various substances and industrial processes, surrogates of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), are currently classified as human carcinogens. This paper reviews recent epidemiological studies reporting direct evidence of the carcinogenic effects of PAHs in occupationally exposed subjects. Risks of lung and bladder cancer were dose dependent when PAHs were measured quantitatively and truly nonexposed groups were chosen for comparison. These new findings suggest that the current threshold limit value of 0.2 mg/m{sup 3} of benzene soluble matter (which indicates PAH exposure) is unacceptable because, after 40 years of exposure, it involves a relative risk of 1.2-1.4 for lung cancer and 2.2 for bladder cancer. 33 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Correlations between local aromaticity indices of bipartite conjugated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Balaban, Alexandru T; Durdevi?, Jelena; Gutman, Ivan; Jeremi?, Svetlana; Radenkovi?, Slavko

    2010-05-13

    Local aromaticity in rings of conjugated hydrocarbons can be measured in a variety of ways. In the present paper, we concentrate on two of these, namely, EC, i.e., the pi-electron content or pi-electron partition, and ef, the energy effect of cycles. For the central ring in five bipartite conjugated hydrocarbons (anthracene, triphenylene, perylene, coronene, and biphenylene), it was found that EC and ef values are modified in a consistent and predictable manner by annelation with benzenoid rings. Equations are presented for computing EC and ef values for the central ring in terms of three integers representing the numbers of annelated benzenoid rings (A, L, and G for angular, linear, and geminal annelation, respectively). The coefficients of A and G are positive (A > G) and the coefficient of L is negative for benzenoids, but for biphenylene, the situation is reversed for coefficients in the correlation for ef values. PMID:20397682

  13. BIODEGRADATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS BY PHANEROCHAETE CHRYSOSPORIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) that are present in anthracene oil (a distillation product obtained from coal tar) was demonstrated. nalysis by capillary gas chromatography and high-performance liq...

  14. ENGINEERED ANTIBODIES FOR MONITORING OF POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this multidisciplinary project is to use molecular biological techniques to derive a set of antibodies with useful affinities and selectivities for recovery and detection of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in environmental and biological samples. The lon...

  15. ORIGINS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to determine the origin of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediments from Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, the PAH assemblages from the sediments and from possible origin materials were analyzed by gas chromatographic and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric ...

  16. POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ESTUARINE AND NEARSHORE ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNAH) are ubiquitous and are found in waters, soil, and bottom sediments throughout the world, although the concentrations are higher in industrialized locations. Interest in these compounds is generated by their carcinogenic and mutagenic prope...

  17. PHOTOTOXICITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN COASTAL GREAT LAKES WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photoinduced toxicity is the exacerbated toxicity of environmental contaminants by UV radiation. Photoinduced toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been well established in the laboratory for numerous aquatic species including larval fish. The contaminants sub-p...

  18. NATURAL BIOLOGICAL ATTENUATION OF AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS UNDER ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is little consistent difference in the calculated half-lives of aromatic hydrocarbons in different anaerobic environments, but methanogenic environments might be generally the least supportive of rapid biotransformation. Toluene was usually the most rapidly biotransformed...

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Parisa; Peters, Kamau O; Bidad, Katayoon; Strickland, Paul T

    2015-02-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic illness in children living in developed countries and the leading cause of childhood hospitalization and school absenteeism. Prevalence rates of asthma are increasing and show disparities across gender, geographic regions, and ethnic/racial groups. Common risk factors for developing childhood asthma include exposure to tobacco smoke, previous allergic reactions, a family history of asthma, allergic rhinitis or eczema, living in an urban environment, obesity and lack of physical exercise, severe lower respiratory tract infections, and male gender. Asthma exacerbation in children can be triggered by a variety of factors, including allergens (e.g., pollen, dust mites, and animal dander), viral and bacterial infections, exercise, and exposure to airway irritants. Recent studies have shown that exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a major component of fine particulate matter from combustion sources, is also associated with onset of asthma, and increasing asthmatic symptoms. In this paper, we review sources of childhood PAH exposure and the association between airborne PAH exposure and childhood asthma prevalence and exacerbation. PMID:25600297

  20. Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in China

    SciTech Connect

    Shanshan Xu; Wenxin Liu; Shu Tao

    2006-02-01

    Emission of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) listed as U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) priority pollutants from major sources in China were compiled. Geographical distribution and temporal change of the PAH emission, as well as emission profiles, are discussed. It was estimated that the total PAH emission in China was 25,300 tons in 2003. The emission profile featured a relatively higher portion of high molecular weight (HMW) species with carcinogenic potential due to large contributions of domestic coal and coking industry. Among various sources, biomass burning, domestic coal combustion, and the coking industry contributed 60%, 20%, and 16% of the total emission, respectively. Total emission, emission density, emission intensity, and emission per capita showed geographical variations. In general, the southeastern provinces were characterized by higher emission density, while those in western and northern China featured higher emission intensity and population-normalized emission. Although energy consumption in China went up continuously during the past two decades, annual emission of PAHs fluctuated depending on the amount of domestic coal consumption, coke production, and the efficiency of energy utilization. 47 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Ultrasonic degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.K.; Yen, T.F.

    1995-12-31

    Trace amounts of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in the environment are of concern due to their hazardous nature. Conventional processes for degrading PAH are time consuming and inefficient, and they require costly equipment; furthermore, they contribute to other problems. Ultrasound can provide the highly energetic hydrogen atom and hydroxyl radicals, whose reactivity accounts for the destruction of organic solutes, in a very short time. The degradation mechanisms and the degradation efficiency for 1-methylnaphthalene, anthracene, phenanthrene, pyrene, 1,12-benzoperylene, and coronene, in dilute organic solvent-water solutions, were studied under ultrasound on a laboratory scale. The extent of degradation is followed by ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectrometry. The effects of additional agents, such as hydrogen peroxide, sodium borohydride, and dissolved gas, were investigated. The catalytic effects of ferrous chloride and nickel chloride were investigated. A total of 70 to 83% of PAH was degraded as a result of the additional agents and 2 hours of ultrasound. The higher percentage of degradation was caused by the greater abundance of free radicals, especially hydroxyl, for cleavage. However, with the catalysts, the added PAH degradation efficiency was not significant.

  2. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in the water environment*

    PubMed Central

    Andelman, Julian B.; Suess, Michael J.

    1970-01-01

    Many polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are known to be carcinogenic to animals and probably to man. This review is concerned with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic PAH in the water environment, with emphasis on 3,4-benzpyrene (BP) because it is ubiquitous, is one of the most potent of the carcinogenic PAH and has been widely studied. Although PAH are formed in combustion and other high-temperature processes, there is also evidence for their endogenous formation in plants, which may explain their ubiquity therein. Although the solubility of these compounds in pure water is very low, they may be solubilized by such materials as detergents, or they may otherwise occur in aqueous solution associated with or adsorbed on to a variety of colloidal materials or biota, and thereby be transported through the water environment. A notable characteristic of PAH is their sensitivity to light. PAH have been found in industrial and municipal waste effluents, and occur in soils, ground waters and surface waters, and their sediments and biota. With the exception of filtration or sorption by activated carbon, conventional water treatment processes do not efficiently remove them, and they have been found in domestic water supplies. Because of the ubiquity of PAH in the environment, it is impossible to prevent completely man's exposure to them; nevertheless their surveillance should be continued and their concentrations in the environment should be reduced where practicable. PMID:4100719

  3. [Gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Harbin air].

    PubMed

    Ma, Wan-Li; Li, Yi-Fan; Sun, De-Zhi; Qi, Hong; Liu, Li-Yan; Zhang, Zhi; Tian, Chong-Guo; Shen, Ji-Min

    2009-11-01

    Polyurethane foam passive air samplers (PUF PAS) were fixed at eight sampling sites in Harbin Region concurrently to research atmospheric concentration and distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Spring of 2007 (January to April). Results showed that the PUF PAS mostly absorbed the 3-4 ring PAHs, which accounted for 91.22%-96.37% comparing to total concentration. Total PAHs concentration had obvious area difference from urban to remote areas, such as 356.49 ng/d for urban, 162.65 ng/d for suburban, 278.35 ng/d for rural and 183.99 ng/d for background, with ratios of urban atmospheric concentration to rural concentration more than 2, three times higher than that of remote area. The atmospheric concentration was significantly affected by sources. Sources of PAHs in air of Harbin Region were investigated by diagnostic ratios, which indicated that coal and biofuel combustion were the main sources of PAHs in air of urban and rural area, respectively. The toxic equivalence factor (TEF) was used for health risk assessment, with similar area difference to concentration distribution, which implying bigger potential heath risk for urban and rural people than other areas. Good reproducibility of PUF passive air sampler was confirmed by one pair of passive samplers deployed at an urban site. The results of the study demonstrated the capability of PUF PAS to monitor atmospheric PAHs in a city scale at the same time. PMID:20063724

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the soils of Moscow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinskaya, E. A.; Zykova, G. V.; Semenov, S. Yu.; Finakov, G. G.

    2015-06-01

    The contents of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil samples taken in the city of Moscow have been determined. A sixfold excess of the maximum permissible concentration (MPC) for benzo[ a]pyrene has been found in 66% of the studied samples; an excess of the European standard for benzo[ a]pyrene has been observed in 31% of the samples. The found weight fraction of benzo[ a]pyrene in soil samples varies in the range of 10-740 ?g/kg. The content of the ecotoxicant in the soil increases from west to east. The total concentrations of 10 indicative PAH compounds in the soils of Moscow are usually lower than the European standard. An excess of the European standard by 2-6 times has been noted in the Southeastern, Eastern, and Central administrative districts of Moscow, with separate sites of high contamination up to 6118 ?g/kg.

  5. Conversion process of aromatic hydrocarbon from low molecular paraffin hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, T.

    1987-11-03

    This patent describes a process for conversion of low molecular paraffin hydrocarbon to aromatic hydrocarbon which comprises bringing the low molecular paraffin hydrocarbons into contact with a metallo-silicate catalyst (Si/Me) wherein the atomic ratio of Si/Me is 25-3200, and Me is one selected from the group consisting of Al, Ga, Ti, Zr, Ge, La, Mn, Cr, Sc, V, Fe, W, Mo and Ni, which is impregnated or ion-exchanged with 0.25-1.5% by weight of platinum or gallium, based on the catalyst, or a gallium-silicate cataylst. The atomic ratio of Si/Ga is 20-3200. The catalyst is prepared by the following steps; a first step of preparing solutions of (A), (B), and (C), the (A) being an aqueous solution containing (a) a quaternary lower alkylammonium cation R, (b) an alkaline metal of sodium or potassium, and (c) an aqueous solution of a water soluble salt of a metal Me selected from the group consisting of Al, Ga, Ti, Zr, Ge, La, Mn, Cr, Sc, V, Fe, W, Mo and Ni; (B) an aqueous silicate solution, and (C) an aqueous solution of an ion modifier. Add the solution (A) and solution (B) to the solution (C) at a constant speed until a gelly mixture having a pH of around 10. Then grind the resulting gel mixture. Heat the gel mixture to a temperature of 150/sup 0/-190/sup 0/C at a constant speed followed by heating to 190/sup 0/-200/sup 0/C at a constant speed or an exponential speed to obtain a precourser synthetic metallosilicate having the following chemical composition in molar ratio: Si/Me: 25-3200 OH-SiO/sub 2/: 0.3-1.0 H/sub 2/O/SiO/sub 2/: 30-100 R/R+alkalimetal: 0.05-0.15 NaCl/H/sub 2/O: 0.01-0.06 wherein R is a quaternary alkylammonium cation, the alkali metal is sodium or potassium and Me is Al, Ga, Ti, Zr, Ge, La, Mn, Cr, Sc, V, Fe, W, Mo or Ni and fourth step of calcining the precourser.

  6. Mechanisms for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation by ligninolytic fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, K.E.

    1995-06-01

    Ligninolytic fungi accomplish the partial degradation of numerous aromatic organopollutants. Their ability to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is particularly interesting because eukaryotes were previously considered to be unable to cleave fused-ring aromatics. Recent results indicate that extracellular peroxidases of these fungi are responsible for the initial oxidation of PAHs. Fungal lignin peroxidases oxidize certain PAHs directly, whereas fungal manganese peroxidases co-oxidize them indirectly during enzyme-mediated lipid peroxidation. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Ex situ bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in laboratory systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pott, B.M.; Henrysson, T.

    1995-12-31

    Biological remediation of soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is a promising innovative technology. This project was started to get a better understanding of the parameters that influence the degradation of PAHs of different molecular weights. The degradability of those substances that are the most recalcitrant will be crucial for the success of a biological treatment system. Four substances, naphthalene, anthracene, benzo(a)anthracene, and dibenzo-(a,h)anthracene (2, 3, 4, and 5 aromatic rings respectively), were chosen as model contaminants. Water content and addition of nutrients were varied to determine the effects of these parameters on the degradation. The biological degradation of the four PAHs was followed. Removal of the substances with 2, 3, and 4 rings, respectively, was successful. No difference in the rate of removal of the five-ringed member (dibenzo-(a,h)anthracene) compared to the control was detected. Neither naphthalene nor anthracene was affected by water addition, but small effects were detected when nutrients were added. Degradation of benzo(a)anthracene (4 aromatic rings) was clearly stimulated by addition of water, but the effects of nutrient addition were inconclusive and need further study.

  8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from motorcycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hsi-Hsien; Hsieh, Lien-Te; Liu, Hsu-Chung; Mi, Hsiao-Hsuan

    Emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, 2-7 ring) and regulated air pollutants (CO, HC, NO x, PM) from 2-stroke carburetor (2-Stk/Cb), 4-stroke carburetor (4-Stk/Cb) and 4-stroke fuel injection (4-Stk/FI) motorcycles were investigated by testing these vehicles on a chassis dynamometer. Exhaust samplings were carried out on diluted exhausts in a dilution tunnel connected to a constant volume sampling system. Measurements were performed on a standard driving cycle. The results reveal that low molecular weight PAHs (especially naphthalene) dominated in the exhaust gas. The averages of soluble organic fractions were 86.4%, 46.3% and 48.9% for the 2-Stk/Cb, 4-Stk/Cb and 4-Stk/FI motorcycles, respectively. PAH emissions are greater from cold-start driving than those from hot-start driving cycle for all these three kinds of motorcycles. Total PAH emission factors were 8320, 5990 and 3390 ?g km -1 for the in-used 2-Stk/Cb, 4-Stk/Cb and 4-Stk/FI motorcycles, respectively. PAH emission factors were the largest for the 2-Stk/Cb motorcycles. Besides, the 2-Stk/Cb motorcycle had the largest total BaP equivalent emission factor of 10.8 ?g km -1, indicating that the emission exhaust from the 2-Stk/Cb motorcycle was most carcinogenic. HC, PM and PAH emissions were the lowest for the 4-Stk/FI motorcycles. The correlation coefficient between CO and total PAH emissions for all the test motorcycles was 0.51, indicating that CO and PAH emissions are not highly correlated.

  9. Investigation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coal gasification.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong-cang; Jin, Bao-sheng; Zhong, Zhao-ping; Huang, Ya-ji; Xiao, Rui; Li, Da-ji

    2005-01-01

    The hazardous organic pollutants generated from coal gasification, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons(PAHs), are highly mutagenic and carcinogenic. More researchers have paid particular attention to them. Using air and steam as gasification medium, the experiments of three kinds of coals were carried out in a bench-scale atmospheric fluidized bed gasifier. The contents of the 16 PAHs specified by US EPA in raw coal, slag, bag house coke, cyclone coke and gas were measured by HPLC to study the contents of PAHs in raw coal and the effects of the inherent characters of coals on the formation and release of PAHs in coal gasification. The experimental results showed that the distributions of PAHs in the gasified products are similar to raw coals and the total-PAHs content in coal gasification is higher than in raw coal(except Coal C). The total-PAHs contents increase and then decrease with the rise of fixed carbon and sulfur of coal while there has an opposite variation when volatile matters content increase. The quantities of PAHs reduce with the increase of ash content or the drop of heating value during coal gasification. PMID:15900777

  10. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments of China Sea.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanxia; Duan, Xiaoyong

    2015-10-01

    Increasing pollution pressures were placed in the coastal and estuarine ecosystems in China because of the elevated pollutants discharged from various sources. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment were closely linked to human activities, which have been intensively studied for their geochemical interest as markers. In this review, the status of PAH contamination in China Sea was assessed by comprehensive reviews of the concentrations, sources, and fates of PAHs in sediments of China Sea. PAH concentrations in China Sea sediments decreased from north to south due to the higher emissions in North China. Atmosphere was probably the main carrier of PAHs in the north due to the higher contents of atmospheric fine particles and higher wind speeds. However, riverine inputs were probably the most important sources of PAHs in the coastal sediments of South China due to higher rainfall. PMID:26341340

  11. In vitro toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons to cetacean cells and tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Carvan, M.J. III.

    1993-01-01

    Cetaceans bioaccumulate high aromatic hydrocarbon tissue residues, and elevated levels of PCB residues in tissues are proposed to have occurred concurrently with recent epizootic deaths of dolphins. The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop and characterize an epithelial cell line derived from dolphin tissues, (2) to investigate the effects of hydrocarbon pollutants on those cells, and (3) to analyze the toxicity of hydrocarbon pollutants on cetacean tissues in vitro. An epithelial cell line, Carvan dolphin kidney (CDK), isolated from a spontaneously aborted female bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus, grew rapidly. These cells were neither transformed nor immortal. Velocity sedimentation analysis showed CDK cells contained nuclear aryl hydrocarbon receptor, suggestive of cytochrome P450 inducibility. BaP inhibited mitosis in CDK cells in a dose-dependent manner. Data indicate that CDK cells metabolize BaP, that BaP metabolites bind to cellular DNA initiating unscheduled DNA synthesis, and that the inhibition of cytochrome P450 metabolism decrease the BaP-associated inhibition of mitosis in dolphin cells. The data also suggest that TCDD acts synergistically to increase the levels of DNA damage by the procarcinogen BaP. Cetacean liver microsomes was isolated and evaluated for the presence of cytochrome P450 proteins by SDS-PAGE, apparent minimum molecular weight determination, and immunoblot analysis. P450 activity was induced in cetacean tissue samples and CDK cells by exposure in vitro to one of several cytochrome P450-inducing chemicals. The data suggest that cetacean tissues and cells can be utilized to study the in vitro induction of cytochrome P450, resultant metabolism of xenobiotic contaminants, and the subsequent cellular and molecular responses. However, the identity of specific P450 isozymes involved in this process will remain undetermined until monoclonal antibodies that recognize cetacean P450s can be generated.

  12. AROMATIC AND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION IN A LAMINAR PREMIXED N-BUTANE FLAME. (R825412)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling work has been performed to investigate aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation pathways in a premixed, rich, sooting, n-butane¯oxygen¯argon burner s...

  13. AROMATIC AND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION IN A LAMINAR PREMIXED N-BUTANE FLAME. (R825412)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling work has been performed to investigate aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation pathways in a premixed, rich, sooting, n-butaneoxygenargon burner s...

  14. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Far-infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersma, C.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Ricca, A.; Mattioda, A. L.; Peeters, E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2011-03-01

    The far-IR characteristics of astrophysically relevant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) averaging in size around 100 carbon atoms have been studied using the theoretical spectra in the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. These spectra were calculated using density functional theory. Selections of PAH species are made, grouped together by common characteristics or trends, such as size, shape, charge, and composition, and their far-IR spectra compared. The out-of-plane modes involving the entire molecule are explored in detail, astronomical relevance is assessed, and an observing strategy is discussed. It is shown that PAHs produce richer far-IR spectra with increasing size. PAHs also produce richer far-IR spectra with increasing number of irregularities. However, series of irregular-shaped PAHs with the same compact core have common "Jumping-Jack" modes that "pile up" at specific frequencies in their average spectrum. For the PAHs studied here, around 100 carbon atoms in size, this band falls near 50 ?m. PAH charge and nitrogen inclusion affect band intensities but have little effect on far-IR band positions. Detailed analysis of the two-dimensional, out-of-plane bending "drumhead" modes in the coronene and pyrene "families" and the one-dimensional, out-of-plane bending "bar" modes in the acene "family" show that these molecular vibrations can be treated as classical vibrating sheets and bars of graphene, respectively. The analysis also shows that the peak position of these modes is very sensitive to the area of the emitting PAH and does not depend on the particular geometry. Thus, these longest wavelength PAH bands could provide a unique handle on the size of the largest species in the interstellar PAH family. However, these bands are weak. Observing highly excited regions showing the mid-IR bands in which the emission from classical dust peaks at short wavelengths offers the best chance of detecting PAH emission in the far-IR. For these regions sensitivity is not an issue, spectral contrast is maximized and the PAH population is only comprised of highly stable, compact symmetric PAHs, such as the members of the pyrene and coronene "families" discussed in detail here.

  15. Distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Osaka Bay, Japan.

    PubMed

    Miki, Shizuho; Uno, Seiichi; Ito, Kazuki; Koyama, Jiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    2014-08-30

    Contaminations in sediments by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkylated PAHs were investigated at 44 sites in Osaka Bay, Japan. Concentrations of total PAHs and alkylated PAHs were in the range 6.40-7800 ng/g dry weights and 13.7-1700 ng/g dry weights, respectively. The PAH concentrations tended to be higher along the shoreline in the vicinities of big ports, industrialized areas, and densely populated regions such as the cities of Osaka and Kobe. The major sources appeared to be pyrogenic or both pyrogenic and petrogenic at most of the sites. PAH concentrations were remarkably high at a site near Kobe, where the concentrations of dibenzo(a,h)anthracene and benzo(g,h,i)perylene exceeded the effects-range-medium concentration and eight PAHs were above the corresponding effects-range-low concentrations. Those PAHs may have been derived from the great fire associated with the large earthquake in 1995. PMID:24775067

  16. Environmental Behaviors and Toxicities of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Nitropolycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2016-01-01

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) has been collected at four cities in Japan starting in the late 1990s, at five or more major cities in China, Korea and Russia starting in 2001 and at the Noto Peninsula starting in 2004. Nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and eleven nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) were determined by HPLC with fluorescence and chemiluminescence detections, respectively. Annual concentrations of PAHs and NPAHs were in the order, China>Russia≫Korea=Japan, with seasonal change (winter>summer). During the observation period, concentrations of PAHs and NPAHs in Japanese cities significantly decreased but the increases in the PAH concentration were observed in Chinese and Russian cities. Concentrations of PAHs and NPAHs were higher in the Northern China than those in the Southern China. At the Noto peninsula, which is in the main path of winter northwest winds and a year-round jet stream that blow from the Asian continent to Japan, the concentrations were high in winter and low in summer every year. A cluster analysis and back trajectory analysis indicated that PAHs and NPAHs were long-range transported from Northeastern China, where coal burning systems such as coal-heating boilers are considered to be the major contributors of PAHs and NPAHs. A dramatic change in atmospheric concentrations of PAHs and NPAHs in East Asia suggests the rapid and large change of PM2.5 pollution in East Asia. Considering the adverse health effects of PM2.5, continuous monitoring of atmospheric PAHs and NPAHs is necessary in this area. PMID:26833435

  17. Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus opacus Strain R7, a Biodegrader of Mono- and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Zampolli, J.; Presti, I.; Cappelletti, M.; D’Ursi, P.; Orro, A.; Mezzelani, A.; Milanesi, L.

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus opacus strain R7 (CIP107348) degrades several mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Here, we present the high-quality draft genome sequence of strain R7, consisting of 10,118,052 bp, with a G+C content of 67.0%, 9,602 protein-coding genes, and 62 RNAs genes. PMID:25146139

  18. Closed-Shell Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Cations: A New Category of Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Allamandola, Louis J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Density functional theory has been employed to calculate the harmonic frequencies and intensities of a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) cations that explore both size and electronic structure effects of the infrared spectroscopic properties of these species. The sample extends the size range of PAH species considered to more than 50 carbon atoms and includes several representatives from each of two heretofore unexplored categories of PAH cations: (1) fully benzenoid PAH cations whose carbon skeleton is composed of an odd number of carbon atoms (C(sub odd) PAHs); and (2) protonated PAH cations (HPAH+). Unlike the radical electronic structures of the PAH cations that have been the subject of previous theoretical and experimental work, the species in these two classes have a closed-shell electronic configuration. The calculated spectra of circumcoronene, C54H18 in both neutral and (radical) cationic form are also reported and compared with those of the other species. Overall, the C(sub odd) PAHs spectra are dominated by strong CC stretching modes near 1600 cm(exp -1) and display spectra that are remarkably insensitive to molecular size. The HPAH+ species evince a more complex spectrum consistent with the added contributions of aliphatic modes and their generally lower symmetry. Finally, for both classes of closed-shell cations, the intensity of the aromatic CH stretching modes is found to increase with molecular size far out of proportion with the number of CH groups, approaching a value more typical of neutral PAHs for the largest species studied.

  19. [Aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons in plants using bituminous materials].

    PubMed

    Benvenuti, F; Lepore, L

    1977-01-01

    In recent years bituminous materials have been frequently used in several industrial works for waterproofing, protection and insulation of many amterials such as paper, (asphalted) cardboard, wood, etc. Constant components of these materials are the polyciclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), of which we know the biological activity and, for some of them, the cancerogenic effects. The aim of this work is to evaluated the possible risk from exposure to polycicilic aromatic hydrocarbons for workers in operations with bituminous materials. By an analytical method for the determination of PAH, we have examined the polycicilic aromatic hydrocarbons in asphalt, air-blown asphalt, tars and, then, in fumes from hot treatments of those materials. After analysing the fumes developed under controlled conditions, in laboratory, and those taken from work-environment, we have reported the results of our search. PMID:603127

  20. Woodburning as a source of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, D.J.; Cattell, F.C.R. )

    1990-10-01

    Airborne particulate matter containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons derived from burning natural vegetation and paper products in a variety of ways was collected and analyzed by HPLC. Similar profiles of compounds resulted from most of the combustion sources that do not involve fossil fuels and that are likely to contribute to Sydney's atmospheric particulates. In addition, the profiles did not change markedly as a result of reactions occurring in the atmosphere or from reactions occurring on the filter after collection. Concentrations of benzo(a)pyrene and coronene were higher in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons derived from bush fires than from other sources. Bush fires are likely to be a significant source of exposure of the Sydney population to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  1. Manufacture of aromatic hydrocarbons from coal hydrogenation products

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Maloletnev; M.A. Gyul'malieva

    2007-08-15

    The manufacture of aromatic hydrocarbons from coal distillates was experimentally studied. A flow chart for the production of benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylenes was designed, which comprised the hydrogen treatment of the total wide-cut (or preliminarily dephenolized) fraction with FBP 425{sup o}C; fractional distillation of the hydrotreated products into IBP-60, 60-180, 180-300, and 300-425{sup o}C fractions; the hydro-cracking of middle fractions for increasing the yield of gasoline fractions whenever necessary; the catalytic reform of the fractions with bp up to 180{sup o}C; and the extraction of aromatic hydrocarbons.

  2. Determination of low concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons in multicomponent mixtures with iso-octane and n-heptane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesnin, V. L.; Muradov, V. G.

    2011-11-01

    We have experimentally studied the absorption spectra of hydrocarbon mixtures based on n-heptane and isooctane with small (1%-2%) additions of aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, xylene). The study was conducted in the region of the first overtones of the vibrational spectra for the hydrocarbon groups CH3, CH2, CH. We show that four-component modeling of the absorption spectrum of the hydrocarbon mixture and minimization of the deviation of the model spectrum from the experimental spectrum allow us to separately determine the content of the aromatic additives for concentrations from 1%.

  3. Experimental and modeling investigation of aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation in a premixed ethylene flame

    SciTech Connect

    Castaldi, M.J.; Marinov, N.M.; Melius, C.F.

    1996-02-01

    Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling has been performed to investigate aromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbon formation pathways in a rich, sooting, ethylene-oxygen-argon premixed flame. An atmospheric pressure, laminar flat flame operated at an equivalence ratio of 2.5 was used to acquire experimental data for model validation. Gas composition analysis was conducted by an on-line gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) technique. Measurements were made in the flame and post-flame zone for a number of low molecular weight species, aliphatics, aromatics and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranging from two to five-aromatic fused rings. The modeling results show the key reaction sequences leading to aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon growth involve the combination of resonantly stabilized radicals. In particular, propargyl and 1-methylallenyl combination reactions lead to benzene and methyl substituted benzene formation, while polycyclic aromatics are formed from cyclopentadienyl radicals and fused rings that have a shared C{sub 5} side structure. Naphthalene production through the reaction step of cyclopentadienyl self-combination and phenanthrene formation from indenyl and cyclopentadienyl combination were shown to be important in the flame modeling study. The removal of phenyl by O{sub 2} leading to cyclopentadienyl formation is expected to play a pivotal role in the PAH or soot precursor growth process under fuel-rich oxidation conditions.

  4. AGRONOMIC OPTIMIZATION FOR PHYTOREMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoremediation is a low-cost method of using plants to degrade, volatilize or sequester organic and metal pollutants that has been used in efforts to remediate sites contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) refinery wastes. Non-native plant species aggressivel...

  5. THE RATES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS FROM INCENSE BURNING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents the results of experiments performed to determine the amounts of gas- and particle-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) in incense smoke. Ten brands of incense, 3 of stick, 2 of joss stick, and one each of cone, smudge bundle, rope, powder, and rock, w...

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in workplace atmospheres: Occurrence and determination

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorseth, A.; Becher, G.

    1986-01-01

    This book examines the occupational health hazards imposed by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Topics considered include: PAH as occupational carcinogens; mode of formation; physical and chemical properties of PAH; sources and exposure; sampling of PAH in work atmospheres; analytical methods for airborne PAH; biological monitoring of PAH exposure; PAH in different workplace atmospheres; PAH profiles and proxy methods; and methods of analysis.

  7. METHODOLOGY OF AMBIENT AIR MONITORING FOR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the last decade, several studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in ambient air in the U.S. specifically investigated (1) the sampling efficiency of two sorbents for PAH in air: XAD-2 and polyurethane foam (PUP); (2) the storage stability of PAH on quartz fiber fil...

  8. COHERENT ANTI-STOKES RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) was used to obtain Raman spectra of thirteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) composed of between three and seven fused rings. The compounds were pumped in the resonance and preresonance regions to obtain the sensitivity neces...

  9. Toxicological profile for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). update

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This statement was prepared to give one information about polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and to emphasize the human health effects that may result from exposure to them. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has identified 1,408 hazardous waste sites as the most serious in the nation. PAHs have been found in at least 600 of the sites on the NPL.

  10. Bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals in estuarine organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This standard makes use of four marine species, two fish and two shellfish, in a study to determine the bioavailability of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and two metals artificially incorporated in the sediment, and the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the PAHs after uptake from the sediment or from food.

  11. EVALUATION OF SENSITIZED FLUORESCENCE FOR POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBON DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of a fluorescent spot test for detecting the presence of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as a screening technique for samples to be analyzed by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). The test is based on the phenomenon of ...

  12. 75 FR 8937 - Development of a Relative Potency Factor (RPF) Approach for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... AGENCY Development of a Relative Potency Factor (RPF) Approach for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH...) Approach for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Mixtures'' (EPA/635/R-08/012A). The draft document was... of a Relative Potency Factor (RPF) Approach for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Mixtures''...

  13. In situ biodegradation potential of aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic groundwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, D. W.; Barker, J. F.

    1992-04-01

    Three types of experiments were conducted to assess the potential for enhancing the in situ biodegradation of nine aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic, leachate-impacted aquifers at North Bay, Ontario, and at Canada Forces Base Borden. Laboratory micrososms containing authentic aquifer material and groundwater from the North Bay site were amended with nitrate and glucose. No significant losses of aromatic hydrocarbons were observed compared to unamended controls, over a period of 187 days. A total of eight in situ biodegradation columns were installed in the North Bay and Borden aquifers. Remedial additions included electron acceptors (nitrate and sulphate) and primary substrates (acetate, lactate and yeast extract). Six aromatic hydrocarbons [toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, o-xylene, cumene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene ( 1,2,4-TMB)] were completely degraded in at least one in situ column at the North Bay site. Only toluene was degraded in the Borden aquifer. In all cases, aromatic hydrocarbon attenuation was attributed to biodegradation by methanogenic and fermentative bacteria. No evidence of aromatic hydrocarbon degradation was observed in columns remediated with nitrate or primary substrates. A continuous forced gradient injection experiment with sulphate addition was conducted at the North Bay site over a period of 51 days. The concentration of six aromatic hydrocarbons was monitored over time in the injection wells and at piezometer fences located 2, 5 and 10 m downgradient. All compounds except toluene reached injection concentration between 14 and 26 days after pumping began, and showed some evidence of selective retardation. Toluene broke through at a subdued concentration ( 50% of injection levels), and eventually declined to undetectable levels on day 43. This attenuation was attributed to adaptation and biodegradation by anaerobic bacteria. The results from these experiments indicate that considerable anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in landfill leachate plumes does occur. The acclimatized population rapidly biodegraded toluene, much more rapidly than reported in other laboratory studies. This biodegradation is selective, at least in the time frame of our experiments, with benzene and chlorobenzene remaining recalcitrant.

  14. Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaars, K.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Venter, A. D.; Josipovic, M.; Pienaar, J. J.; Vakkari, V.; Aaltonen, H.; Laakso, H.; Kulmala, M.; Tiitta, P.; Guenther, A.; Hellén, H.; Laakso, L.; Hakola, H.

    2014-07-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are associated with direct adverse human health effects and can have negative impacts on ecosystems due to their toxicity, as well as indirect negative effects through the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol, which affect human health, crop production and regional climate. Measurements of aromatic hydrocarbons were conducted at the Welgegund measurement station (South Africa), which is considered to be a regionally representative background site. However, the site is occasionally impacted by plumes from major anthropogenic source regions in the interior of South Africa, which include the western Bushveld Igneous Complex (e.g. platinum, base metal and ferrochrome smelters), the eastern Bushveld Igneous Complex (platinum and ferrochrome smelters), the Johannesburg-Pretoria metropolitan conurbation (> 10 million people), the Vaal Triangle (e.g. petrochemical and pyrometallurgical industries), the Mpumalanga Highveld (e.g. coal-fired power plants and petrochemical industry) and also a region of anticyclonic recirculation of air mass over the interior of South Africa. The aromatic hydrocarbon measurements were conducted with an automated sampler on Tenax-TA and Carbopack-B adsorbent tubes with heated inlet for 1 year. Samples were collected twice a week for 2 h during daytime and 2 h during night-time. A thermal desorption unit, connected to a gas chromatograph and a mass selective detector was used for sample preparation and analysis. Results indicated that the monthly median (mean) total aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations ranged between 0.01 (0.011) and 3.1 (3.2) ppb. Benzene levels did not exceed the local air quality standard limit, i.e. annual mean of 1.6 ppb. Toluene was the most abundant compound, with an annual median (mean) concentration of 0.63 (0.89) ppb. No statistically significant differences in the concentrations measured during daytime and night-time were found, and no distinct seasonal patterns were observed. Air mass back trajectory analysis indicated that the lack of seasonal cycles could be attributed to patterns determining the origin of the air masses sampled. Aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations were in general significantly higher in air masses that passed over anthropogenically impacted regions. Inter-compound correlations and ratios gave some indications of the possible sources of the different aromatic hydrocarbons in the source regions defined in the paper. The highest contribution of aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations to ozone formation potential was also observed in plumes passing over anthropogenically impacted regions.

  15. Formation, metabolism, and mechanism of action of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Dipple, A.

    1983-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are generated through inefficient combustion and, while initially released largely into the atmosphere, they are subsequently deposited in soil and water. They contaminate marine sources of food as well as vegetables and plants and can be generated during the smoking or broiling of fish and meat. The metabolic fate of hydrocarbons in mammalian systems has been extensively studied and, while many hydrocarbons are noncarcinogenic and efficiently detoxified, small fractions of some hydrocarbons are converted to electrophilic metabolites which are not effectively further metabolized and which are probably responsible for the carcinogenic properties of these hydrocarbons. These electrophilic metabolites are probably the bay-region dihydrodiol-epoxides, but at present the tumorigenic properties of the bay-region dihydrodiol-epoxides that have been tested are not as great as might be expected.

  16. Aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation in a laminar premixed n-butane flame

    SciTech Connect

    Marinov, N.M.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.; Vincitore, A.M.; Castaldi, M.J.; Senkan, S.M.; Melius, C.F.

    1998-07-01

    Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling work has been performed to investigate aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation pathways in a premixed, rich, sooting, n-butane-oxygen-argon burner stabilized flame. An atmospheric pressure, laminar flat flame operated at an equivalence ratio of 2.6 was used to acquire experimental data for model validation. Gas composition analysis was conducted by an on-line gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer technique. Measurements were made in the main reaction and post-reaction zones for a number of low molecular weight species, aliphatics, aromatics, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranging from two to five-fused aromatic rings. Reaction flux and sensitivity analysis were used to help identify the important reaction sequences leading to aromatic and PAH growth and destruction in the n-butane flame. Reaction flux analysis showed the propargyl recombination reaction was the dominant pathway to benzene formation. The consumption of propargyl by H atoms was shown to limit propargyl, benzene, and naphthalene formation in flames as exhibited by the large negative sensitivity coefficients. Naphthalene and phenanthrene production was shown to be plausibly formed through reactions involving resonantly stabilized cyclopentadienyl and indenyl radicals. Many of the low molecular weight aliphatics, combustion by-products, aromatics, branched aromatics, and PAHs were fairly well simulated by the model. Additional work is required to understand the formation mechanisms of phenyl acetylene, pyrene, and fluoranthene in the n-butane flame. 73 refs.

  17. Biodegradation of aliphatic vs. aromatic hydrocarbons in fertilized arctic soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braddock, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    A study was carried out to test a simple bioremediation treatment strategy in the Arctic and analyze the influence of fertilization the degradation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, e.g., pristine, n-tetradecane, n-pentadecane, 2-methylnaphthalene, naphthalene, and acenaphthalene. The site was a coarse sand pad that once supported fuel storage tanks. Diesel-range organics concentrations were 250-860 mg/kg soil at the beginning of the study. Replicate field plots treated with fertilizer yielded final concentrations of 0, 50, 100, or 200 mg N/kg soil. Soil pH and soil-water potentials decreased due to fertilizer application. The addition of fertilizer considerably increased soil respiration potentials, but not the populations of microorganisms measured. Fertilizer addition also led to ??? 50% loss of measured aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in surface and subsurface soils. For fertilized plots, hydrocarbon loss was not associated with the quantity of fertilizer added. Losses of aliphatic hydrocarbons were ascribed to biotic processes, while losses of aromatic hydrocarbons were due to biotic and abiotic processes.

  18. Effect of fluorine substitution on the aromaticity of polycyclic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Kaipio, Mikko; Patzschke, Michael; Fliegl, Heike; Pichierri, Fabio; Sundholm, Dage

    2012-10-18

    The effect of fluorine substitution on the aromaticity of polycyclic hydrocarbons (PAH) is investigated. Magnetically induced current densities, current pathways, and current strengths, which can be used to assess molecular aromaticity, are calculated using the gauge-including magnetically induced current method (GIMIC). The degree of aromaticity of the individual rings is compared to those obtained using calculated nucleus-independent chemical shifts at the ring centers (NICS(0) and NICS(0)(zz)). Calculations of explicitly integrated current strengths for selected bonds show that the aromatic character of the investigated polycyclic hydrocarbons is weakened upon fluorination. In contrast, the NICS(0) values for the fluorinated benzenes increase noteworthy upon fluorination, predicting a strong strengthening of the aromatic character of the arene rings. The integrated current strengths also yield explicit current pathways for the studied molecules. The current pathways of the investigated linear polyacenes, pyrene, anthanthrene, coronene, ovalene, and phenanthro-ovalene are not significantly affected by fluorination. NISC(0) and NICS(0)(zz) calculations provide contradictory degrees of aromaticity of the fused individual ring. Obtained NICS values do not correlate with the current strengths circling around the individual rings. PMID:22994485

  19. Mutagenicity (micronucleus test in Vicia faba root tips), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metal content of sediments collected in Tiber river and its tributaries within the urban area of Rome.

    PubMed

    Minissi, S; Caccese, D; Passafiume, F; Grella, A; Eleonora, C; Rizzoni, M

    1998-12-01

    Sediments collected in Tiber river and in its main tributary water courses within the urban area of Rome were tested for mutagenicity by means of Vicia faba root tips micronucleus (MN) test. Representative samples were scored for micronucleus generating events (chromosome/chromatid loss and fragments) too. Sediments were assayed for content of the thirteen most important chemicals of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) group and for some heavy metal ions (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn). Samples were collected in four tributary rivers (Prima Porta, Acqua Traversa, Aniene and Magliana) just before their confluence with Tiber river and at different stations along the Tiber river itself upstream and downstream the sites of confluence of the sampled tributaries. All samples were collected in July 1992. An alarming level of mutagenicity was reached in most of the tested stations, with an effect comparable to an X-rays exposure up to 0.4 Gy. Chemical analysis showed that the total amount of identified PAHs ranged from 4.5 to 625.2 ng/g of dry matrix in the different stations and the total amount of heavy metals ranged from 130 to 570 ppm. Tiber mutagenicity is likely to be mainly due to local factors such as the confluence of a small polluted tributary rather than to large scale effect due to an upstream-downstream relationship. PMID:9838054

  20. Exciton properties of selected aromatic hydrocarbon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Friedrich; Mahns, Benjamin; Hampel, Silke; Nohr, Markus; Berger, Helmuth; Bchner, Bernd; Knupfer, Martin

    2013-02-01

    We have examined the singlet excitons in two representatives of acene-type (tetracene and pentacene) and phenacene-type (chrysene and picene) molecular crystals, respectively, using electron energy-loss spectroscopy at low temperatures. We show that the excitation spectra of the two hydrocarbon families significantly differ. Moreover, close inspection of the data indicates that there is an increasing importance of charge-transfer excitons at lowest excitation energy with increasing length of the molecules.

  1. Occupational exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in wood dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, C. K.; Schpfer, P.; Boiteux, P.

    2009-02-01

    Sino-nasal cancer (SNC) represents approximately 3% of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology (ORL) cancers. Adenocarcinoma SNC is an acknowledged occupational disease affecting certain specialized workers such as joiners and cabinetmakers. The high proportion of woodworkers contracting a SNC, subjected to an estimated risk 50 to 100 times higher than that affecting the general population, has suggested various study paths to possible causes such as tannin in hardwood, formaldehyde in plywood and benzo(a)pyrene produced by wood when overheated by cutting tools. It is acknowledged that tannin does not cause cancer to workers exposed to tea dust. Apart from being an irritant, formaldehyde is also classified as carcinogenic. The path involving carcinogenic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted by overheated wood is attractive. In this study, we measured the particle size and PAHs content in dust emitted by the processing of wood in an experimental chamber, and in field situation. Quantification of 16 PAHs is carried out by capillary GC-ion trap Mass Spectrometric analysis (GC-MS). The materials tested are rough fir tree, oak, impregnated polyurethane (PU) oak. The wood dust contains carcinogenic PAHs at the level of ?g.g-1 or ppm. During sanding operations, the PU varnish-impregnated wood produces 100 times more PAHs in dust than the unfinished wood.

  2. Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in lime spray dryer ash

    SciTech Connect

    Ping Sun; Panuwat Taerakul; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker

    2005-10-01

    Four lime spray dryer (LSD) ash samples were collected from a spreader stoker boiler and measured for their concentrations of 16 U.S. EPA specified polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Results showed that the total measured PAH concentration correlated with the organic carbon content of the LSD ash. Each LSD ash sample was then separated using a 140 mesh sieve into two fractions: a carbon-enriched fraction ({gt}140 mesh) and a lime-enriched fraction ({lt}140 mesh). Unburned carbon was further separated from the carbon-enriched fraction with a lithiumheteropolytungstate (LST) solution. PAH measurements on these different fractions showed that unburned carbon had the highest PAH concentrations followed by the carbon-enriched fraction, indicating that PAHs were primarily associated with the carbonaceous material in LSD ash. However, detectable levels of PAHs were also found in the lime-enriched fraction, suggesting that the fine spray of slaked lime may sorb PAH compounds from the flue gas in the LSD process. 37 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by a mixed bacterial culture

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, G.; Koenig, J.; Ringpfeil, M.

    1995-12-31

    Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are a complex mixture of organic compounds, was demonstrated using a bacterial mixed culture selected from a contaminated site by the BIOPRACT GmbH. The investigations were carried out in a laboratory fermenter using emulsified tar oil as the substrate to determine the following: (1) concentration of the single PAH and of the sum of PAHs relative to fermentation time, (2) carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and oxygen (O{sub 2}) content in the outflowing air during fermentation, (3) chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the broth, and (4) toxicity of the broth before and after fermentation according to the bioluminescence test (DIN 38412, part 34/1). The results of this model experiment indicated that the investigated mixed culture is able to effectively metabolize the PAHs contained in tar oil, including the higher condensed compounds such as benzo(a)pyrene. In the first 8 days of fermentation, the PAH sum decreased to below 5% of the starting concentration connected with a five-fold reduction of the toxic effect on Vibrio fischeri. The PAH degradation rate correlated with the rate of COD decrease, the rate of evolving CO{sub 2}, and the consumption of O{sub 2}.

  4. Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaars, K.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Venter, A. D.; Josipovic, M.; Pienaar, J. J.; Vakkari, V.; Aaltonen, H.; Laakso, H.; Kulmala, M.; Tiitta, P.; Guenther, A.; Hellén, H.; Laakso, L.; Hakola, H.

    2014-02-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are associated with direct adverse human health effects and can have negative impacts on ecosystems due to their toxicity, as well as indirect negative effects through the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol that affect human health, crop production and regional climate. Measurements were conducted at the Welgegund measurement station (South Africa) that is considered to be a regionally representative background site. However, the site is occasionally impacted by plumes from major anthropogenic source regions in the interior of South Africa, which include the western Bushveld Igneous Complex (e.g. platinum, base metal and ferrochrome smelters), the eastern Bushveld Igneous Complex (platinum and ferrochrome smelters), the Johannesburg-Pretoria metropolitan conurbation (>10 million people), the Vaal Triangle (e.g. petrochemical and pyrometallurgical industries), the Mpumalanga Highveld (e.g. coal-fired power plants and petrochemical industry) and also a region of anti-cyclonic recirculation of air mass over the interior of South Africa. The aromatic hydrocarbon measurements were conducted with an automated sampler on Tenax-TA and Carbopack-B adsorbent tubes with heated inlet for one year. Samples were collected twice a week for two hours during daytime and two hours during night-time. A thermal desorption unit, connected to a gas chromatograph and a mass selective detector was used for sample preparation and analysis. Results indicated that the monthly median total aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations ranged between 0.01 to 3.1 ppb. Benzene levels did not exceed local air quality standards. Toluene was the most abundant species, with an annual median concentration of 0.63 ppb. No statistically significant differences in the concentrations measured during daytime and night-time were found and no distinct seasonal patterns were observed. Air mass back trajectory analysis proved that the lack of seasonal cycles could be attributed to patterns determining the origin of the air masses sampled. Aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations were in general significantly higher in air masses that passed over anthropocentrically impacted regions. Interspecies correlations and ratios gave some indications of the possible sources for the different aromatic hydrocarbons in the source regions defined in the paper. The highest contribution of aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations to ozone formation potential was also observed in plumes passing over anthropocentrically impacted regions.

  5. Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund, South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Jaars, K.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Venter, A. D.; Josipovic, M.; Pienaar, J. J.; Vakkari, Ville; Aaltonen, H.; Laakso, H.; Kulmala, M.; Tiitta, P.; Guenther, Alex B.; Hellen, H.; Laakso, L.; Hakola, H.

    2014-07-11

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are associated with direct adverse human health effects and can have negative impacts on ecosystems due to their toxicity, as well as indirect negative effects through the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol that affect human health, crop production and regional climate. Measurements were conducted at the Welgegund measurement station (South Africa) that is considered to be a regionally representative background site. However, the site is occasionally impacted by plumes from major anthropogenic source regions in the interior of South Africa, which include the western Bushveld Igneous Complex (e.g. platinum, base metal and ferrochrome smelters), the eastern Bushveld Igneous Complex (platinum and ferrochrome smelters), the Johannesburg-Pretoria metropolitan conurbation (>10 million people), the Vaal Triangle (e.g. petrochemical and industries), the Mpumalanga Highveld (e.g. coal-fired power plants and petrochemical industry) and also a region of anti-cyclonic recirculation of air mass over the interior of South Africa. The aromatic hydrocarbon measurements were conducted with an automated sampler on Tenax-TA and Carbopack-B adsorbent tubes with heated inlet for one year. Samples were collected twice a week for two hours during daytime and two hours 1 during night-time. A thermal desorption unit, connected to a gas chromatograph and a mass 2 selective detector was used for sample preparation and analysis. Results indicated that the 3 monthly median total aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations ranged between 0.01 to 3.1 ppb. 4 Benzene levels did not exceed local air quality standards. Toluene was the most abundant 5 species, with an annual median concentration of 0.63 ppb. No statistically significant 6 differences in the concentrations measured during daytime and night-time were found and no distinct seasonal patterns were observed. Air mass back trajectory analysis proved that the lack of seasonal cycles could be attributed to patterns determining the origin of the air masses sampled. Aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations were in general significantly higher in air masses that passed over anthropocentrically impacted regions. Interspecies correlations and ratios gave some indications of the possible sources for the different aromatic hydrocarbons in the source regions defined in the paper. The highest contribution of aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations to ozone formation potential was also observed in plumes passing over anthropocentrically impacted regions.

  6. Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from selected processes in steelworks.

    PubMed

    Baraniecka, Joanna; Pyrzy?ska, Krystyna; Szewczy?ska, Ma?gorzata; Po?niak, Ma?gorzata; Dobrzy?ska, Elzbieta

    2010-11-15

    The emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from selected processes in steelworks in southern Poland was investigated. Size-segregated samples of air particulate matter (<0.25, 0.25-0.5, 0.5-1.0, 1.0-2.5 and 2.5-10 ?m) were collected at the electric arc furnace and rolling mill. The PAHs were sampled with the personal cascade impactor and identified by HPLC with fluorescence detector. The obtained results showed that collected PAH contents were significantly higher at the electric arc furnace. The highest content of total PAHs (93 ng m(-3)) was present in the smallest particles of 0.5 ?m aerodynamic diameter or less, indicating that the ultrafine particles have a high contribution in the overall PM(2.5) fine fraction. Concentrations of Py, CH, BbF, BaP and BghiP came to 76% of total PAHs content in <0.25 ?m fraction. The five- and six-ring compounds (BbF, BkF, BaP, DBA, BghiP) with 4-ring chrysene presented typical unimodal size distribution with one predominant peak for this particles' diameter. Phenanthrene and fluoranthene exhibited highest concentrations on coarse particles in the range of 10-2.5 ?m, decreasing with decrease of a particle size fraction. Using the toxic equivalent factor (TEF), the mean contributions of the carcinogenic potency of BaP to the air samples collected at the arc furnace and rolling mill (fraction below 0.25 ?m) were determined to be 66.3% and 50.3%, respectively. PMID:20675043

  7. Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons among Dutch children

    SciTech Connect

    Wijnen, J.H. van; Slob, R.; Jongmans-Liedekerken, G.

    1996-05-01

    We determined the urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-HP) concentration and the creatinine-adjusted 1-HP concentration in 644 randomly selected Dutch children, aged 1-6 years and living in five areas with roughly different levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil and ambient air. The presence of other factors that might influence the exposure to PAHs was studied using a questionnaire. To evaluate the reliability of a single urinary 1-HP determination, measurements were repeated after 3 weeks for approximately 200 children. The mean urinary 1-HP content of the total study population was 2.06 nmol/1. This varied from 1.58 nmol/l in the reference area (Flevoland) to 2.71 nmol/l in the valley of the Geul. Only indoor sources of PAHs showed a small, positive association with urinary 1-HP. The urinary 1-HP concentrations of children from the valley of the Geul were higher (p<0.01) and those of children from a suburb of Amsterdam were lower (p<0.01) than those of children from the reference area. The possible ambient environment-related differences were probably too small to be detected in the variations of the intake of PAHs from the daily diet. The reliability of a single 1-HP measurement was low. Similar results were obtained with the creatinine-adjusted data. In one neighborhood built on coal-mine tailings, the urinary 1-HP content in children was weakly but positively associated with the PAH content in the upper soil layer of the garden of their homes. However, this association was not found for the children from the other neighborhood built on coal-mine tailings and with similar PAH levels in soil. 25 refs., 4 tabs.

  8. Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons among Dutch children.

    PubMed Central

    van Wijnen, J H; Slob, R; Jongmans-Liedekerken, G; van de Weerdt, R H; Woudenberg, F

    1996-01-01

    We determined the urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-HP) concentration and the creatinine-adjusted 1-HP concentration in 644 randomly selected Dutch children, aged 1-6 years and living in five areas with roughly different levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil and ambient air. The presence of other factors that might influence the exposure to PAHs was studied using a questionnaire. To evaluate the reliability of a single urinary 1-HP determination, measurements were repeated after 3 weeks for approximately 200 children. The mean urinary 1-HP content of the total study population was 2.06 nmol/l. This varied from 1.58 nmol/l in the reference area (Flevoland) to 2.71 nmol/l in the valley of the Geul. Only indoor sources of PAHs showed a small, positive association with urinary 1-HP. The urinary 1-HP concentrations of children from the valley of the Geul were higher (p < 0.01) and those of children from a suburb of Amsterdam were lower (p < 0.01) than those of children from the reference area. The possible ambient environment-related differences were probably too small to be detected in the variations of the intake of PAHs from the daily diet. The reliability of a single 1-HP measurement was low. Similar results were obtained with the creatinine-adjusted data. In one neighborhood built on coal-mine tailings, the urinary 1-HP content in children was weakly but positively associated with the PAH content in the upper soil layer of the garden of their homes. However, this association was not found for the children from the other neighborhood built on coal-mine tailings and with similar PAH levels in soil. PMID:8743441

  9. Estrogenic Activity of Mineral Oil Aromatic Hydrocarbons Used in Printing Inks.

    PubMed

    Tarnow, Patrick; Hutzler, Christoph; Grabiger, Stefan; Schn, Karsten; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The majority of printing inks are based on mineral oils (MOs) which contain complex mixtures of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons. Consumer exposure to these oils occurs either through direct skin contacts or, more frequently, as a result of MO migration into the contents of food packaging that was made from recycled newspaper. Despite this ubiquitous and frequent exposure little is known about the potential toxicological effects, particularly with regard to the aromatic MO fractions. From a toxicological point of view the huge amount of alkylated and unsubstituted compounds therein is reason for concern as they can harbor genotoxicants as well as potential endocrine disruptors. The aim of this study was to assess both the genotoxic and estrogenic potential of MOs used in printing inks. Mineral oils with various aromatic hydrocarbon contents were tested using a battery of in vitro assays selected to address various endpoints such as estrogen-dependent cell proliferation, activation of estrogen receptor ? or transcriptional induction of estrogenic target genes. In addition, the comet assay has been applied to test for genotoxicity. Out of 15 MOs tested, 10 were found to potentially act as xenoestrogens. For most of the oils the effects were clearly triggered by constituents of the aromatic hydrocarbon fraction. From 5 oils tested in the comet assay, 2 showed slight genotoxicity. Altogether it appears that MOs used in printing inks are potential endocrine disruptors and should thus be assessed carefully to what extent they might contribute to the total estrogenic burden in humans. PMID:26771904

  10. Estrogenic Activity of Mineral Oil Aromatic Hydrocarbons Used in Printing Inks

    PubMed Central

    Tarnow, Patrick; Hutzler, Christoph; Grabiger, Stefan; Schön, Karsten; Tralau, Tewes; Luch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The majority of printing inks are based on mineral oils (MOs) which contain complex mixtures of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons. Consumer exposure to these oils occurs either through direct skin contacts or, more frequently, as a result of MO migration into the contents of food packaging that was made from recycled newspaper. Despite this ubiquitous and frequent exposure little is known about the potential toxicological effects, particularly with regard to the aromatic MO fractions. From a toxicological point of view the huge amount of alkylated and unsubstituted compounds therein is reason for concern as they can harbor genotoxicants as well as potential endocrine disruptors. The aim of this study was to assess both the genotoxic and estrogenic potential of MOs used in printing inks. Mineral oils with various aromatic hydrocarbon contents were tested using a battery of in vitro assays selected to address various endpoints such as estrogen-dependent cell proliferation, activation of estrogen receptor α or transcriptional induction of estrogenic target genes. In addition, the comet assay has been applied to test for genotoxicity. Out of 15 MOs tested, 10 were found to potentially act as xenoestrogens. For most of the oils the effects were clearly triggered by constituents of the aromatic hydrocarbon fraction. From 5 oils tested in the comet assay, 2 showed slight genotoxicity. Altogether it appears that MOs used in printing inks are potential endocrine disruptors and should thus be assessed carefully to what extent they might contribute to the total estrogenic burden in humans. PMID:26771904

  11. Phenalenyl-based open-shell polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    The phenalenyl radical is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) radical. Owing to its widely distributed spin structure, phenalenyl is relatively stable compared to other hydrocarbon radicals and has been studied from the viewpoint of its application to electroconductive and magnetic materials. In addition, a strong intermolecular spin-spin coupling nature is another feature of phenalenyl. This account summarizes my studies so far into PAH radicals containing the phenalenyl scaffold in terms of their amphoteric redox properties and singlet biradical character, which strongly rely on the characteristic electronic structure, that is, non-bonding character and sixfold symmetry of a singly occupied molecular orbital of the phenalenyl radical. PMID:25345729

  12. Incremental aerosol reactivity: Application to aromatic and biogenic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, R.J.; Cocker, D.R. III; Seinfeld, J.H. )

    1999-07-15

    The concept of incremental aerosol reactivity is introduced, and the incremental aerosol reactivities of a number of important anthropogenic and biogenic hydrocarbons are investigated for four ambient scenarios. The incremental aerosol reactivity, defined as a change in the secondary organic aerosol mass produced (in [micro]g m[sup [minus]3]) per unit change of parent organic reacted (in ppb), is a measure of the aerosol-forming capability of a given parent organic in a prescribed mixture of other organic compounds. The base-case scenario is a mixture of both aromatic and biogenic organics. Reactivity values depend on the choice of the initial organic mixture, so cases are also examined in which all biogenic hydrocarbon concentrations are set to zero and all aromatic concentrations are set to zero. The influence of additional organic aerosol is also investigated.

  13. Determination of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in tree bark

    SciTech Connect

    Douce, D.S.; Clench, M.R.; Cooke, M.

    1995-12-31

    Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) are released into the environment from a variety of sources, including the combustion of diesel, gasoline and other organic fuels. The most important source or nitro`PAHs, is believed to be the emissions from diesel fuelled vehicles. Monitoring of this class of compound is important due to their carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. Sturaro et al have shown that tree bark acts as a passive absorbent for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). They proposed that the use of a natural and passive sampler such as tree bark might lead to a less complex overall analytical strategy for environmental measurements. It was decided to modify the method proposed by Sturaro et al, in an attempt to monitor nitro-PAH levels absorbed into the tree bark from diesel emissions.

  14. Influence of humic substances on the formation of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during chlorination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon polluted water

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsen, S.; Gribbestad, I.S.

    1988-08-01

    Chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are present at nanogram per liter levels in lake water. Some of these compounds are known to be mutagenic in the Ames Salmonella test. The PAH compounds fluorene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene were dissolved in lake water with low humus content and in humus water with 9.17 mg of total organic carbon/L, followed by sodium hypochlorite chlorination at different concentrations. Reaction of PAH and formation of chlorinated PAH were measured by cyclohexane extraction of the samples 3 days after chlorination and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses of the extracts. The PAH-chlorine reaction was found to be dependent upon the concentration of free active chlorine in the water, and the presence of humic substances was found to affect the formation of chlorinated PAH. Chlorinated PAH were formed in the lake water samples of fluoranthene and benzo(a)pyrene, but no chlorinated PAH were detected in the presence of humic substances.

  15. Electron energy loss spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, John W.; Coplan, M. A.; Goruganthu, R.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of the electron energy-loss spectroscopy is reported of gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules consisting of up to seven rings where the study is limited to the more thermodynamically stable pericondensed systems. The aim of this work is to obtain absorption profiles (proportional to the oscillator strengths) from the visible to the soft X-ray region near 30 eV.

  16. Oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under sulfate-reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, J.D.; Anderson, R.T.; Lovley, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    [14C]naphthalene and phenanthrene were oxidized to 14CO2 without a detectable lag under strict anaerobic conditions in sediments from San Diego Bay, San Diego, Calif., that were heavily contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) but not in less contaminated sediments. Sulfate reduction was necessary for PAH oxidation. These results suggest that the self-purification capacity of PAH-contaminated sulfate-reducing environments may be greater than previously recognized.

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in some grounded coffee brands.

    PubMed

    Grover, Inderpreet Singh; Sharma, Rashmi; Singh, Satnam; Pal, Bonamali

    2013-08-01

    Potentially toxic 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in four brands of grounded coffee. Four to 13 PAHs were detected. Concentrations of total PAHs in different brands of coffee samples were in the range of 831.7-1,589.7 μg/kg. Benzo[a]pyrene (2A: probable human carcinogen) was found in Nescafe Premium whereas naphthalene (2B: possible human carcinogen) was found in all the samples of coffee. PMID:23242460

  18. THE INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF NEUTRAL POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Ricca, Alessandra; Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr.; Allamandola, Louis J. E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov

    2013-10-10

    The mid-infrared spectra of neutral homogeneous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters have been computed using density functional theory including an empirical correction for dispersion. The C-H out-of-plane bending modes are redshifted for all the clusters considered in this work. The magnitude of the redshift and the peak broadening are dependent on PAH size, shape, and on the PAH arrangement in the cluster.

  19. [Assessment of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during road paving].

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Cavallo D; Fustinoni S; Buratti M; Prandi E; Longhi O; Cirla P; Martinotti I; Foà V

    2003-07-01

    Asphalt is a mixture of bitumen, (its fumes contain about 1% of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH), and mineral matter. 18 Workers were investigated during road paving to assess PAH exposure by environmental air-monitoring (the 16 most relevant, according to the American Environmental Protection Agency, EPA) and biological monitoring (urinary 1-hydroxypyrene excretion). Our results show that PAH exposure in these workers is not higher than that observed in traffic policemen working in urban areas.

  20. Metabolic Pathways for Degradation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ladino-Orjuela, Guillermo; Gomes, Eleni; da Silva, Roberto; Salt, Christopher; Parsons, John R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this revision was to build an updated collection of information focused on the mechanisms and elements involved in metabolic pathways of aromatic hydrocarbons by bacteria. Enzymes as an expression of the genetic load and the type of electron acceptor available, as an environmental factor, were highlighted. In general, the review showed that both aerobic routes and anaerobic routes for the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons are divided into two pathways. The first, named the upper pathways, from the original compound to central intermediate compounds still containing the aromatic ring but with the benzene nucleus chemically destabilized. The second, named the lower pathway, begins with ring de-aromatização and subsequent cleavage, resulting in metabolites that can be used by bacteria in the production of biomass. Under anaerobic conditions the five mechanisms of activation of the benzene ring described show the diversity of chemical reactions that take place. Obtaining carbon and energy from an aromatic hydrocarbon molecule is a process that exhibits the high complexity level of the metabolic apparatus of anaerobic microorganisms. The ability of these bacteria to express enzymes that catalyze reactions, known only in non-biological conditions, using final electron acceptors with a low redox potential, is a most interesting topic. The discovery of phylogenetic and functional characteristics of cultivable and non-cultivable hydrocarbon degrading bacteria has been made possible by improvements in molecular research techniques such as SIP (stable isotope probing) making trace of (13)C, (15)N and (18)O into nucleic acids and proteins. PMID:26613990

  1. Spectroscopic properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and astrophysical implications.

    PubMed

    d'Hendecourt, L; Ehrenfreund, P

    1997-01-01

    PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) are probably present as a mixture of neutral and ionized species and are responsible for the set of infrared emission bands in the 2-15 microns regions, which are observed in many different objects like reflection and planetary nebulae and external galaxies. PAHs are suggested to be the most abundant free organic molecules and ubiquitous in space. PAHs might also exist in the solid phase, included in interstellar ices in dense clouds. A complex aromatic network is expected on interstellar grains in the diffuse interstellar medium. The existence of an aromatic kerogen-like structure in carbonaceous meteorites and its similarity with interstellar spectra suggests a link between interstellar matter and primitive Solar System bodies. PMID:11541329

  2. MODELING GALACTIC EXTINCTION WITH DUST AND 'REAL' POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mulas, Giacomo; Casu, Silvia; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Zonca, Alberto E-mail: silvia@oa-cagliari.inaf.it E-mail: azonca@oa-cagliari.inaf.it

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the remarkable apparent variety of galactic extinction curves by modeling extinction profiles with core-mantle grains and a collection of single polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Our aim is to translate a synthetic description of dust into physically well-grounded building blocks through the analysis of a statistically relevant sample of different extinction curves. All different flavors of observed extinction curves, ranging from the average galactic extinction curve to virtually 'bumpless' profiles, can be described by the present model. We prove that a mixture of a relatively small number (54 species in 4 charge states each) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons can reproduce the features of the extinction curve in the ultraviolet, dismissing an old objection to the contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the interstellar extinction curve. Despite the large number of free parameters (at most the 54 Multiplication-Sign 4 column densities of each species in each ionization state included in the molecular ensemble plus the 9 parameters defining the physical properties of classical particles), we can strongly constrain some physically relevant properties such as the total number of C atoms in all species and the mean charge of the mixture. Such properties are found to be largely independent of the adopted dust model whose variation provides effects that are orthogonal to those brought about by the molecular component. Finally, the fitting procedure, together with some physical sense, suggests (but does not require) the presence of an additional component of chemically different very small carbonaceous grains.

  3. QSARs for aromatic hydrocarbons at several trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Di Marzio, Walter; Saenz, Maria Elena

    2006-04-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) with aromatic hydrocarbons were obtained. Biological response was measured by acute toxicity of several aquatic trophic levels. The chemicals assayed were benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene, m-xylene, p-xylene, isopropylbenzene, n-propylbenzene, and butylbenzene. Acute toxicity tests were carried out with Scenedesmus quadricauda, as representative of primary producers; Daphnia spinulata, a zooplanctonic cladoceran; Hyalella curvispina, a benthic macroinvertebrate; and Bryconamericus iheringii, an omnivorous native fish. The EC50 or LC50 was calculated from analytical determinations of aromatic hydrocarbons. Nonlinear regression analysis between the logarithm of the octanol-water partition coefficient (log Kow) of each compounds and the toxicity end points was performed. QSARs were positively related to increases in log Kow at all trophic levels. Intertaxonomic differences were found in comparisons of algae with animals and of invertebrates with vertebrates. We observed that these differences were not significant with a log Kow higher than 3 for all organisms. Aromatic hydrocarbons with log Kow values of less than 3 showed different toxicity responses, with algae more resistant than fish and invertebrates. We concluded that this was a result of the narcotic mode of action related to liposolubility and the ability of the compound to reach its target site in the cell. The bioconcentration factor (BCF) achieved to start nonpolar narcosis fell almost 1 order of magnitude below the BCF expected from the log Kow. Predicted critical body residues for nonpolar narcosis ranged between 2 and 1 mM. PMID:16528686

  4. Selective conversion of aromatic hydrocarbons to fine chemical intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Zong, Z.; Zhang, W.; Jiang, Q.; Wei, X.

    1997-12-31

    The use of aromatic hydrocarbons derived from coal liquids including coal tar is an important process for nonfuel utilization of coal. Many fine chemical intermediates, which can be used to synthesize dyes, agricultural chemicals, medicines, paints, engineering plastics and so on, can be obtained by the addition and conversion of some functional groups on aromatic rings. Therefore, selective conversion of aromatic hydrocarbons to fine chemical intermediates has been paid great attention. Selective photobromination, dehydrogenation and oxidation of some arenes and hydrolysis of the resulting bromomethylarenes were investigated. The results show that under nitrogen atmosphere, side-chain methyl groups on the aromatic ring can be brominated selectively with visible light and N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) in benzene at room temperature. Fluorene and {alpha},{omega}-diphenylalkanes are also photobrominated, whereas tetralin and 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene are mainly dehydrogenated under the same reaction condition. Acenaphthene and 9,10-dihydroanthracene are first dehydrogenated and then photobrominated. The resulting bromomethylarenes can be converted to the corresponding hydroxymethylarenes in alkaline or acidic aqueous solutions. Under an oxygen atmosphere, methylarenes are converted to carboxylic arenes with visible light and NBS in benzene at room temperature. The related reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  5. Biodegradation for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, R.C.; Brake, E.N.; Rothenburger, S.J.

    1996-10-01

    Bioremediation promises to be a cost-effective remediation option for hydrocarbon contaminated soils and sediments, but much remains to be determined about the molecular fate of specific molecules in spilled oil and refined products. We have examined the biodegradation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons with two to five rings, in aqueous flask systems, and in soils where the hydrocarbons have been present for many years. We have used consortia of indigenous organisms, and have attempted to use optimal nutrient strategies to stimulate microbial growth. We find that all the alkylated forms of naphthalene with 0-4 methyl groups, and of phenanthrene and dibenzothiophene with 0-3 methyl groups are biodegradable, and that parent compounds such as naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, dibenzothiophene, benz[a]anthracene, pyrene, chrysene and benz[a]anthracene are all degradable under conditions that mimic field application of nutrient-assisted bioremediation.

  6. Microbial metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: isolation and characterization of a pyrene-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Heitkamp, M A; Franklin, W; Cerniglia, C E

    1988-01-01

    Microbiological analyses of sediments located near a point source for petrogenic chemicals resulted in the isolation of a pyrene-mineralizing bacterium. This isolate was identified as a Mycobacterium sp. on the basis of its cellular and colony morphology, gram-positive and strong acid-fast reactions, diagnostic biochemical tests, 66.6% G + C content of the DNA, and high-molecular-weight mycolic acids (C58 to C64). The mycobacterium mineralized pyrene when grown in a mineral salts medium supplemented with nutrients but was unable to utilize pyrene as a sole source of carbon and energy. The mycobacterium grew well at 24 and 30 degrees C and minimally at 35 degrees C. No growth was observed at 5 or 42 degrees C. The mycobacterium grew well at salt concentrations up to 4%. Pyrene-induced Mycobacterium cultures mineralized 5% of the pyrene after 6 h and reached a maximum of 48% mineralization within 72 h. Treatment of induced and noninduced cultures with chloramphenicol showed that pyrene-degrading enzymes were inducible in this Mycobacterium sp. This bacterium could also mineralize other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and alkyl- and nitro-substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons including naphthalene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, 3-methylcholanthrene, 1-nitropyrene, and 6-nitrochrysene. This is the first report of a bacterium able to extensively mineralize pyrene and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons containing four aromatic rings. Images PMID:3202633

  7. Aromatic gold and silver "rings": hydrosilver(I) and hydrogold(I) analogues of aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Tsipis, Constantinos A; Karagiannis, Eustathios E; Kladou, Panagiota F; Tsipis, Athanassios C

    2004-10-13

    Quantum chemical calculations suggest that a series of molecules with the general formula cyclo-Mn(mu-H)n (M = Ag, Au; n = 3-6) are stable. All cyclo-MnHn species, except cyclo-Au(3)H(3), have the same symmetry with the respective aromatic hydrocarbons but differ in that the hydrogen atoms are in bridging positions between the metal atoms and not in terminal positions. The aromaticity of the hydrosilver(I) and hydrogold(I) analogues of aromatic hydrocarbons was verified by a number of established criteria of aromaticity, such as structural, energetic, magnetic, and chemical criteria. In particular, the nucleus-independent chemical shift, the relative hardness, Deltaeta, the electrophilicity index, omega, and the chemical reactivity toward electrophiles are indicative for the aromaticity of the hydrosilvers(I) and hydrogolds(I). A comprehensive study of the structural, energetic, spectroscopic (IR, NMR, electronic, and photoelectron spectra), and bonding properties of the novel classes of inorganic compounds containing bonds that are characterized by a common ring-shaped electron density, more commonly seen in organic molecules, is presented. PMID:15469289

  8. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in dry tea.

    PubMed

    Adisa, Afolabi; Jimenez, Angelica; Woodham, Cara; Anthony, Kevin; Nguyen, Thao; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-eight different tea samples sold in the United States were evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection (FLD) for their contamination with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Many PAHs exhibit carcinogenic, mutagenic, and teratogenic properties and have been related to several kinds of cancer in man and experimental animals. The presence of PAHs in environmental samples such as water, sediments, and particulate air has been extensively studied, but food samples have received little attention. Eighteen PAHs congeners were analyzed, with percentage recovery higher than 85%. Contamination expressed as the sum of the 18 analyzed PAHs was between 101 and 1337 ?g/kg on dry mass and the average contents in all of the 28 examined samples was 300 ?g/kg on dry mass. Seven of the congeners were found in all samples with wide ranges of concentrations as follows: fluorene (7-48 ?g/kg), anthracene (1-31 ?g/kg), pyrene (1-970 ?g/kg), benzo(a)anthracene (1-18 ?g/kg) chrysene (17-365 ?g/kg), benzo(a)pyrene (1-29 ?g/kg), and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene (4-119 ?g/kg). The two most toxic congeners benzo(a)pyrene and dibenzo(a,h)anthracene were found at high concentrations only in Earl Grey Twinnings, Earl Grey Harney& Sons Fine Teas, and Chai Ultra Spice Black Tea Twinnings. Six PAH congeners are considered as suspected carcinogens (U.S.EPA), formed the basis of the estimation of the toxic equivalent (TEQ), Chai Ultra-Spice Black Tea Twinnings had the highest TEQ (110.9) followed by two grey tea samples, Earl Grey Harney & Sons Fine Tea (57.7) and Earl Grey Twinnings (54.5). Decaffeinated grey teas had the lowest TEQs, decaffeinated Earl Grey Bigelow (9.4) and Green Tea Honey Lemon Decaffeinated Lipton (9.6). PMID:26065515

  9. Procedure for and results of simultaneous determination of aromatic hydrocarbons and fatty acid methyl esters in diesel fuels by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kami?ski, M; Gilgenast, E; Przyjazny, A; Romanik, G

    2006-07-28

    The content of aromatic hydrocarbons in diesel fuels is regulated by appropriate standards, and a further reduction in the allowed concentration of these hazardous substances in these fuels is expected. The content of aromatic hydrocarbons in diesel fuels is most often determined using standard methods EN-12916 or ASTM D-6591. The content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is determined from a single peak obtained using normal phase high-performance liquid chromatography (NP-HPLC), a column of the NH2 type, n-heptane as the eluent, refractive index detector (RID) and backflushing of the eluent. However, the methods mentioned above cannot be applied when the fuel contains fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), which lately has become more common. The content of FAME in diesel oils is determined using mid-IR spectrophotometry based on the absorption of carbonyl group. However, no standard procedure for the determination of classes of aromatic hydrocarbons in diesel fuels containing FAME is yet available. The present work describes such a modification of methods EN-12916/ASTM D-6591 that provides a simultaneous determination of individual groups of aromatic hydrocarbons, total content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and the FAME content in diesel fuels. The refractive index detector (RID) and n-heptane as the mobile phase are still used, but backflushing of the eluent is applied after the elution of all polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Additionally, ultraviolet diode array detection is used for the exact determination of low contents of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and to confirm the presence of FAME in the analyzed fuel. PMID:16704869

  10. The high-temperature oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brezinsky, K.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical mechanisms of the atmospheric pressure, high-temperature (875-1500 K) gas-phase oxidation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and propylbenzene are described and discussed. Oxidation trends evident from turbulent flow reactor experiments serve as the basis for the mechanisms of the oxidation of benzene and alkylated aromatics. The potential effects of very high temperatures and pressures on the chemistry of oxidation of aromatics are described. The oxidation of benzene and phenyl radical has been found to proceed in a stepwise C6-C5-C4 sequence. Species profiles obtained from flow-reactor experiments suggest that the oxidation of benzene and phenyl radical follows the generalized route via phenoxy, cyclopentadienyl and butadienyl radical. The oxidation of the C4 species branches into multiple pathways that yield copious amounts of ethylene and acetylene. Certain major trends are evident: the alkylated aromatics on initial attack either form styrene, benzyl radical or benzene. The styrene reacts further to produce a benzyl radical or benzene. The oxidation of an alkylated aromatic hydrocarbon appears eventually to reduce to the oxidation of either phenyl radical or benzene.

  11. Composition, distribution, and characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil in Linfen, China

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, S.; Cheng, H.X.; Liu, Y.H.; Xia, X.J.; Xu, X.B.

    2009-02-15

    A total of 10 surface soil samples representing the entire area of Linfen City were collected and analyzed for the presence of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentration ranged from 1.1 to 63.7 {mu} g g{sup -1}. Analysis of the sources of contamination revealed that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the soil were derived from combustion sources. Specifically, the primary source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was coal combustion, but the samples were also effected to varying degrees by traffic emissions. Furthermore, increased levels of contamination were observed in northeast Linfen due to the distribution of industrial plants.

  12. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, tobacco smoke, and epigenetic remodeling in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Klingbeil, E. C.; Hew, K. M.; Nygaard, U. C.; Nadeau, K. C.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental determinants including aerosolized pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and tobacco smoke have been associated with exacerbation and increased incidence of asthma. The influence of aerosolized pollutants on the development of immune dysfunction in asthmatics has been suggested to be mediated through epigenetic remodeling. Genome accessibility and transcription are regulated primarily through DNA methylation, histone modification, and microRNA transcript silencing. Epigenetic remodeling has been shown in studies to be associated with Th2 polarization and associated cytokine and chemokine regulation in the development of asthma. This review will present evidence for the contribution of the aerosolized pollutants PAH and environmental tobacco smoke to epigenetic remodeling in asthma. PMID:24760221

  13. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons residues in sandstorm depositions in Beijing, China

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, S.; Li, K.; Xia, X.J.; Xu, X.B.

    2009-02-15

    This study was conducted to determine the concentration of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sandstorm depositions in Beijing, China. The PAH concentrations in 13 samples collected in Beijing ranged from 0.18 to 3.52 {mu} g g{sup -1}. Analysis of the sources of contamination revealed that the PAHs were derived from a coal combustion source, although various effects of traffic emissions were also observed. Furthermore, the PAH levels in Beijing tended to be higher in the southeast. Finally, the Nemerow composite index revealed that the degree of pollution in the sandstorm depositions varied widely among sampling sites.

  14. Anharmonicity and the interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon infrared emission spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, John R.; Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1987-01-01

    The hypothesis that interstellar infrared emission originates from vibrationally excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) requires that emission can arise from all vibrational levels that are energetically accessible. Due to anharmonicity, the emission from the upper vibrational levels is shifted to longer wavelengths from that of the v = 1-0 transition. It is shown that structure in the 3-micron region is readily and quantitatively explained by emission from upper vibrational levels of excited PAHs that contain a maximum of 20-30 carbon atoms. The asymmetrical broadening of the 11.3-micron emission band may also be due to anharmonicity.

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and the diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Der Zwet, G. P.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons which make them attractive candidates as carriers of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs). It is pointed out that, in the diffuse medium, many of these species will be partially hydrogenated and positively charged, and will absorb in the visible. The observed lineshapes and widths of the DIBs can be explained by rovibronic band contours and linebroadening due to internal conversion. Since little information is available concerning the spectroscopic properties of such species in the gas phase, a considerable amount of laboratory and theoretical work is needed.

  16. Extraction Techniques for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Soils

    PubMed Central

    Lau, E. V.; Gan, S.; Ng, H. K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a review of the analytical extraction techniques for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils. The extraction technologies described here include Soxhlet extraction, ultrasonic and mechanical agitation, accelerated solvent extraction, supercritical and subcritical fluid extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, solid phase extraction and microextraction, thermal desorption and flash pyrolysis, as well as fluidised-bed extraction. The influencing factors in the extraction of PAHs from soil such as temperature, type of solvent, soil moisture, and other soil characteristics are also discussed. The paper concludes with a review of the models used to describe the kinetics of PAH desorption from soils during solvent extraction. PMID:20396670

  17. Accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crankcase oil.

    PubMed

    Pruell, R J; Quinn, J G

    1988-01-01

    The concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in automotive crankcase oils. PAHs were not detected in the new oil; however, concentrations increased rapidly with usage in the gasoline engine of an automobile. The PAH distributions found were dominated by alkylated two- and three-ring compounds. The concentrations of these compounds increased until about 4000 miles and then levelled out. Four-ring compounds continually increased with miles driven, and the five-ring benzopyrenes were only detected in the oil used for the longest distance (about 5800 miles). PMID:15092665

  18. Synthesis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in He nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschliesser, D.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Bartl, P.; Denifl, S.; Scheier, P.

    2012-11-01

    Here we report the first mass spectrometric study of the synthesis of larger polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules (PAHs) out of weakly bound triphenylene agglomerates in cold helium droplets upon electron ionization. A highly abundant single reaction product is observed which indicates an extremely efficient and selective process. We propose that the synthesis of large molecules like fullerenes in interstellar clouds may proceed via similar reactions. Future work on different PAHs like benz[a]anthracene or chrysene will give more insight into this fascinating synthesis process.

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adduct formation in prostate carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Nock, Nora L.; Savera, Adnan T.; Tang, Deliang; Rundle, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The evidence for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) playing a role in prostate carcinogenesis comes mainly from associations between reported PAH exposures and prostate cancer in epidemiologic studies. Associations between prostate cancer and DNA repair genotypes and phenotypes have also been reported, lending further credence to a PAH-induced carcinogenesis pathway in prostate cancer. Recent work that demonstrates the human prostate has metabolic enzyme activity necessary for PAH activation and will form DNA adducts upon exposure to PAH further supports PAH carcinogenesis. We have demonstrated the presence of PAH-DNA adducts in prostate cancer cases, but further validation of this biomarker as a carcinogenic agent in human prostate is needed. PMID:16154258

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons - Primitive pigment systems in the prebiotic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deamer, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The chemical evolution of meteoritic organics in the primitive earth is examined experimentally with attention given to the photochemical effects of hydrocarbon/water mixtures. Also addressed are the generation of amphiphilic products by photochemical reactions and the transduction of light energy into potentially useful forms. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) absorb light and exist in carbonaceous chondrites; PAHs are therefore examined as primitive pigments by means of salt solutions with pyrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene derivatives with hexadecane. The hexadecane undergoes photochemical oxidation and yields long-chain amphiphiles with oxygen supplied by water, and acid pH shifts also occur. PAHs are also tested in lipid bilayer membranes to examine light-energy transduction. Protons are found to accumulate within the membrane-bounded volume to form proton gradients, and this reaction is theorized to be a good model of primitive photochemical reactions that related to the transduction of light energy into useable forms.

  1. Effects of co-occurring aromatic hydrocarbons on degradation of individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in marine sediment slurries.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, J E; Capone, D G

    1988-01-01

    Rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation and mineralization were influenced by preexposure to alternate PAHs and a monoaromatic hydrocarbon at relatively high (100 ppm) concentrations in organic-rich aerobic marine sediments. Prior exposure to three PAHs and benzene resulted in enhanced [14C]naphthalene mineralization, while [14C]anthracene mineralization was stimulated only by benzene and anthracene preexposure. Preexposure of sediment slurries to phenanthrene stimulated the initial degradation of anthracene. Prior exposure to naphthalene stimulated the initial degradation of phenanthrene but had no effect on either the initial degradation or mineralization of anthracene. For those compounds which stimulated [14C]anthracene or [14C]naphthalene mineralization, longer preexposures (2 weeks) to alternative aromatic hydrocarbons resulted in an even greater stimulation response. Enrichment with individual PAHs followed by subsequent incubation with one or two PAHs showed no alteration in degradation patterns due to the simultaneous presence of PAHs. The evidence suggests that exposure of marine sediments to a particular PAH or benzene results in the enhanced ability of these sediments to subsequently degrade that PAH as well as certain other PAHs. The enhanced degradation of a particular PAH after sediments have been exposed to it may result from the selection and proliferation of specific microbial populations capable of degrading it. The enhanced degradation of other PAHs after exposure to a single PAH suggests that the populations selected have either broad specificity for PAHs, common pathways of PAH degradation, or both. PMID:3415231

  2. Fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during composting of oily sludge.

    PubMed

    Kriipsalu, M; Marques, M; Hogland, W; Nammari, D R

    2008-01-01

    In order to assess the effectiveness of aerobic degradation with emphasis on the 16 U.S. EPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), oily sludge generated by a dissolved air flotation flocculation unit of a wastewater treatment plant in a petroleum refinery was amended with remediated oil-contaminated soil and non-mature garden waste compost 40:40:20 (wet weight) respectively. About 21 t of the mixture with a top-layer formed by 30 cm of remediated soil was treated in a 28 m3 air-forced reactor. The PAH concentration was monitored for 370 days. In the top-layer, a reduction of 88 % of the total extractable PAH was measured at day 62 and a final reduction of 93% at day 370. In the mixture, a reduction of 72% in total PAH was measured at day 62, followed by fluctuation in concentration with a final measured reduction of 53% at day 370. The analysis of individual PAH in the mixture suggested that volatilization and biodegradation are the main mechanisms responsible for the reduction of 2 ring PAH and 3-4 ring PAH, respectively. Fluctuation of 5-6 ring PAH concentrations with increase observed at the end of the period might result from a combination of the following: (i) sequestration of large PAH in the organic matrix (reducing bioavailability, biodegradability and eventually, extractability) and desorption as composting progresses; (ii) heterogeneous distribution of the stable large PAH in the mixture, thus affecting sampling. It was concluded that one-time composting in static-aerated biopiles with organic amendments as the sole strategy to treat oily sludge is very effective in reducing the content of 2-4 ring PAH, but it is not effective in reducing the content of 5-6 ring PAHs, even after a relatively long time span (370 d). The concentrations measured in the remediated soil that formed the top layer after 62 days of composting suggests that further relevant reduction of residual PAH (89% of total PAH and 69% of 5-6 ring PAH) can be obtained if the contaminated masses are exposed to a second thermophilic phase. This could be achieved by adding new easily biodegradable organic amendments to the contaminated masses after some months of composting, remixing and composting again for a minimum additional period of 2 months. PMID:18610544

  3. The effect of aromatization on the isotopic compositions of hydrocarbons during early diagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, K. H.; Boreham, C. J.; Summons, R. E.; Hayes, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with varying degrees of aromatization were isolated from the Eocene Messel Shale (Rheingraben, Germany). The high abundances of these compounds and their structural resemblances to cyclic triterpenoid lipids are consistent with derivation from microbial rather than thermal processes. Compounds structurally related to oleanane contain from five to nine double bonds; those within a series of aromatized hopanoids contain from three to nine. All are products of diagenetic reactions that remove hydrogen or methyl groups, and, in several cases, break carbon-carbon bonds to open rings. Aromatized products are on average depleted in 13C relative to possible precursors by l.2% (range: l.5% enrichment to 4% depletion, n = 9). The dependence of 13C content on the number of double bonds is not, however, statistically significant and it must be concluded that there is no strong evidence for isotopic fractionation accompanying diagenetic aromatization. Isotopic differences between series (structures related to ursane, des-A-ursane, des-A-lupane, des-A-arborane, and possibly, des-A-gammacerane are present) are much greater, indicating that 13C contents are controlled primarily by source effects. Fractionations due to chromatographic isotope effects during HPLC ranged from 0.1 to 2.8%.

  4. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in oyster tissue around three coastal marinas

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, J.M.; Stokes, T.P.

    1985-12-01

    Marinas present the potential for introduction of various pollutants into the surrounding waters such as coliform bacteria, primary pathogens, heavy metals, and petroleum hydrocarbons. Little data have been presented specifically addressing the effects of recreational marinas on petroleum hydrocarbon levels or, for that matter, other constituent levels in oysters near those marinas. In order to obtain such data, a comprehensive assessment of water and oyster quality around three coastal marinas was conducted by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental control (SCDHEC) during 1983. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were selected as the petroleum hydrocarbon fraction of interest since they are mainly of pyrogenic origin; have been shown to be the most toxic/carcinogenic fraction of oil; have been shown to affect the respiration and heart rates of mussels; and have been shown to be linked to neoplasia in clams and proliferative disorders in mussels. C. virginica was chosen as the mollusc of interest because of its widespread distribution in the estuaries of South Carolina, its importance as an economic and recreational resource, and its suitability as a sentinel organism for monitoring coastal pollution.

  5. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as Plausible Prebiotic Membrane Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groen, Joost; Deamer, David W.; Kros, Alexander; Ehrenfreund, Pascale

    2012-08-01

    Aromatic molecules delivered to the young Earth during the heavy bombardment phase in the early history of our solar system were likely to be among the most abundant and stable organic compounds available. The Aromatic World hypothesis suggests that aromatic molecules might function as container elements, energy transduction elements and templating genetic components for early life forms. To investigate the possible role of aromatic molecules as container elements, we incorporated different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the membranes of fatty acid vesicles. The goal was to determine whether PAH could function as a stabilizing agent, similar to the role that cholesterol plays in membranes today. We studied vesicle size distribution, critical vesicle concentration and permeability of the bilayers using C6-C10 fatty acids mixed with amphiphilic PAH derivatives such as 1-hydroxypyrene, 9-anthracene carboxylic acid and 1,4 chrysene quinone. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) spectroscopy was used to measure the size distribution of vesicles and incorporation of PAH species was established by phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy. We employed conductimetric titration to determine the minimal concentration at which fatty acids could form stable vesicles in the presence of PAHs. We found that oxidized PAH derivatives can be incorporated into decanoic acid (DA) vesicle bilayers in mole ratios up to 1:10 (PAH:DA). Vesicle size distribution and critical vesicle concentration were largely unaffected by PAH incorporation, but 1-hydroxypyrene and 9-anthracene carboxylic acid lowered the permeability of fatty acid bilayers to small solutes up to 4-fold. These data represent the first indication of a cholesterol-like stabilizing effect of oxidized PAH derivatives in a simulated prebiotic membrane.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as plausible prebiotic membrane components.

    PubMed

    Groen, Joost; Deamer, David W; Kros, Alexander; Ehrenfreund, Pascale

    2012-08-01

    Aromatic molecules delivered to the young Earth during the heavy bombardment phase in the early history of our solar system were likely to be among the most abundant and stable organic compounds available. The Aromatic World hypothesis suggests that aromatic molecules might function as container elements, energy transduction elements and templating genetic components for early life forms. To investigate the possible role of aromatic molecules as container elements, we incorporated different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the membranes of fatty acid vesicles. The goal was to determine whether PAH could function as a stabilizing agent, similar to the role that cholesterol plays in membranes today. We studied vesicle size distribution, critical vesicle concentration and permeability of the bilayers using C(6)-C(10) fatty acids mixed with amphiphilic PAH derivatives such as 1-hydroxypyrene, 9-anthracene carboxylic acid and 1,4 chrysene quinone. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) spectroscopy was used to measure the size distribution of vesicles and incorporation of PAH species was established by phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy. We employed conductimetric titration to determine the minimal concentration at which fatty acids could form stable vesicles in the presence of PAHs. We found that oxidized PAH derivatives can be incorporated into decanoic acid (DA) vesicle bilayers in mole ratios up to 1:10 (PAH:DA). Vesicle size distribution and critical vesicle concentration were largely unaffected by PAH incorporation, but 1-hydroxypyrene and 9-anthracene carboxylic acid lowered the permeability of fatty acid bilayers to small solutes up to 4-fold. These data represent the first indication of a cholesterol-like stabilizing effect of oxidized PAH derivatives in a simulated prebiotic membrane. PMID:22798228

  7. Relative rates of coke formation from hydrocarbons in steam cracking of naphtha: 3. Aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kopinke, F. . Section of Remediation Research); Zimmermann, G. ); Reyniers, G.C.; Froment, G.F. )

    1993-11-01

    Relative rate constants of coke formation (k) from 18 aromatic hydrocarbons during steam cracking of naphtha at 810 C were determined by application of [sup 14]C-labeled compounds. Benzene is a poor coke precursor (k = 0.3), whereas polycyclic structures like acenaphthylene, anthracene, and chrysene have a high coking potential in the pyrolysis reactor (k = 4.5--6) as well as in the TLE section (k = 12--30). The relation between structure and coke formation rate of aromatic hydrocarbons can be interpreted on the basis of their reactivity in radical reactions. Constituents of the fuel fraction ([ge] C[sub 9]) derived from nonaromatic feed components are more efficient in the TLE fouling than those stemming from benzene derivatives.

  8. Formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, Michael; Feigelson, Eric D.

    1989-01-01

    Production of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes was investigated using a kinetic approach. A detailed chemical reaction mechanism of gas-phase PAH formation and growth, containing approximately 100 reactions of 40 species, was numerically solved under the physical conditions expected in cool stellar winds. The chemistry is based on studies of soot production in hydrocarbon pyrolysis and combustion. Several first-ring and second-ring cyclization processes were considered. A linear lumping algorithm was used to describe PAH growth beyond the second aromatic ring. PAH production using this mechanism was examined with respect to a grid of idealized constant velocity stellar winds as well as several published astrophysical models. The basic result is that the onset of PAH production in the interstellar envelopes is predicted to occur within the temperature interval of 1100 to 900 K. The absolute amounts of the PAHs formed, however, are very sensitive to a number of parameters, both chemical and astrophysical, whose values are not accurately known. Astrophysically meaningful quantities of PAHs require particularly dense and slow stellar winds and high initial acetylene abundance. It is suggested that most of the PAHs may be produced in a relatively small fraction of carbon-rich red giants.

  9. Partition characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on soils and sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Mcgroddy, S.E.; Kile, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    The partition behavior was determined for three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), i.e., naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene, from water to a range of soil and sediment samples. The measured partition coefficients of the individual PAHs between soil/sediment organic matter (SOM) and water (i.e., K(oc) values) are relatively invariant either for the 'clean' (uncontaminated) soils or for the clean sediments; however, the mean K(oc) values on the sediments are about twice the values on the soils. This disparity is similar to the earlier observation for other nonpolar solutes and reflects the compositional differences between soil and sediment organic matters. No significant differences in K(oc) are observed between a clean coastal marine sediment and freshwater sediments. The coastal sediments that are significantly impacted by organic contaminants exhibit higher K(oc) values. At given K(ow) values (octanol-water), the PAHs exhibit much higher K(oc) values than other relatively nonpolar solutes (e.g., chlorinated hydrocarbons). This effect is shown to result from the enhanced partition of PAHs to SOM rather than from lower K(ow) values of PAHs at given supercooled liquid solute solubilities in water. The enhanced partition of PAHs over other nonpolar solutes in SOM provides an account of the markedly different correlations between log K(oc) and log K(ow) for PAHs and for other nonpolar solutes. The improved partition of PAHs in SOM stems apparently from the enhanced compatibility of their cohesive energy densities with those of the aromatic components in SOM. The approximate aromatic fraction in soil/sediment organic matter has been assessed by solid-state 13C-NMR spectroscopy.The partition behavior was determined for three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), i.e., naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene, from water to a range of soil and sediment samples. The measured partition coefficients of the individual PAHs between soil/sediment organic matter (SOM) and water (i.e., Koc values) are relatively invariant either for the `clean' (uncontaminated) soils or for the clean sediments; however, the mean Koc values on the sediments are about twice the values on the soils. This disparity is similar to the earlier observation for other nonpolar solutes and reflects the compositional differences between soil and sediment organic matters. No significant differences in Koc are observed between a clean coastal marine sediment and freshwater sediments. The coastal sediments that are significantly impacted by organic contaminants exhibit higher Koc values. At given Kow values (octanol-water), the PAHs exhibit much higher Koc values than other relatively nonpolar solutes (e.g., chlorinated hydrocarbons). This effect is shown to result from the enhanced partition of PAHs to SOM rather than from lower Kow values of PAHs at given supercooled liquid solute solubilities in water. The enhanced partition of PAHs over other nonpolar solutes in SOM provides an account of the markedly different correlations between log Koc and log Kow for PAHs and for other nonpolar solutes. The improved partition of PAHs in SOM stems apparently from the enhanced compatibility of their cohesive energy densities with those of the aromatic components in SOM. The approximate aromatic fraction in soil/sediment organic matter has been assessed by solid-state 13C-NMR spectroscopy.

  10. Secondary organic aerosol from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Southeast Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Ying, Qi

    2012-08-01

    Recent chamber studies show that low-volatility gas phase precursors such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be a significant source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this work, formation of SOA from the photo-oxidation products of PAHs is added to the SOA modeling framework of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to determine the regional distribution of SOA products from PAHs (PAH-SOA) and the contributions from sources in Southeast Texas during the Texas Air Quality Study 2006 (TexAQS 2006). Results show that PAHs released from anthropogenic sources can produce SOA mass as much as 10% of that from the traditional light aromatics or approximately 4% of total anthropogenic SOA. In areas under the influence of wildfire emissions, the amount of PAH-SOA can be as much as 50% of the SOA from light aromatics. A source-oriented modeling framework is adopted to determine the major sources of PAH-SOA by tracking the emitted PAHs and their oxidation products in the gas and aerosol phases from different sources separately. Among the eight sources (vehicles, solvent utilization, residential wood, industries, natural gas combustion, coal combustion, wildfire and other sources) that are tracked in the model, wildfire, vehicles, solvent and industries are the major sources of PAH-SOA. Coal and natural gas combustion appear to be less important in terms of their contributions to PAH-SOA.

  11. Peat fires as source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsibart, Anna

    2013-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) arrive from pyrogenic sources including volcanism and the combustion of oil products and plant materials. The production of PAHs during the combustion of plant materials was considered in a number of publications, but their results were mainly obtained in laboratory experiments. Insufficient data are available on the hightemperature production of PAHs in environmental objects. For example, natural fires are frequently related to the PAH sources in landscapes, but very little factual data are available on this topic. On Polistovskii reserve (Russia, Pskov region) the soil series were separated depending on the damage to the plants; these series included soils of plots subjected to fires of different intensities, as well as soils of the background plots. The series of organic and organomineral soils significantly differed in their PAH distributions. In this series, the concentration of PAHs in the upper horizons of the peat soils little varied or slightly decreased, but their accumulation occurred at a depth of 5-10 or 10-20 cm in the soils after the fires. For example, in the series of high moor soils, the content of PAHs in the upper horizons remained almost constant; significant differences were observed in the subsurface horizons: from 2 ng/g in the background soil to 70 ng/g after the fire. In the upper horizons of the oligotrophic peat soils under pine forests, the total PAH content also varied only slightly. At the same time, the content of PAHs in the soil series increased from 15 to 90 ng/g with the increasing pyrogenic damage to the plot. No clear trends of the PAH accumulation were recorded in the organomineral soils. The content of PAHs in the soddy-podzolic soil subjected to fire slightly decreased (from 20 to 10 ng/g) compared to the less damaged soil. In peat fires, the access of oxygen to the fire zone is lower than in forest fires. The oxygen deficit acts as a factor of the organic fragments recombination and PAH production; therefore, larger amounts of PAHs are formed in peat fires. In addition, the peat fires occur directly in the soil layer; therefore, larger amounts of the resulting polyarenes remain in the soils of the fire sites. PAHs also can be formed at the heating of organic matter on the areas adjacent to the fire sites. After the combustion of peat in fires, phenanthrene, chrysene, benz[a]pyrene, and tetraphene accumulate in soils. This is mainly the group of 4-nuclear compounds with the participation of 3-nuclear phenanthrene and 5-nuclear benz[a]pyrene. The formation of high-molecular weight compounds like benz[a]pyrene and, in some places, benzo[ghi]perylene is possible during smoldering under a low oxygen supply.

  12. Combination processing of pyrolysis naphtha to obtain aromatic hydrocarbons and high-octane gasolines

    SciTech Connect

    Guseinova, A.D.; Asker-Zade, S.M.; Mubarak, A.R.M.

    1994-07-01

    In the pyrolysis of hydrocarbon feedstocks, production of the desired monomer - ethylene - is accompanied by the formation of pyrolysis naphtha, which has a high content of benzene (30%) and hence is processed solely for benzene recovery. In view of the increased demand for automotive gasolines, this processing scheme is extremely illogical. One of the possible means for rational utilization of pyrolysis naphtha is the combined production of high-octane unleaded gasolines and aromatic hydrocarbons, mainly benzene. With such a scheme, the pyrolysis naphtha and the fractions segregated from the naphtha can be processed separately. Another problem that requires a fast solution is the production of ecologically clean modified gasolines. The production and use of leaded gasolines are being phased out universally, in the interest of improving environmental health. For the improvement of octane number, tetraethyllead is being replaced by oxygen-containing compounds, mainly methyl tert-butyl ether and methyl tert-amyl ether. These oxygenates are used at concentrations of 2.0-2.7% in the gasoline. The content of aromatic hydrocarbons (particularly benzene) is limited to 1%. In this article we will describe an optimal scheme for processing pyrolysis naphtha, yielding benzene and AI-93 high-quality unleaded gasoline.

  13. IDENTIFICATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF NITROPOLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN AMBIENT AND INDOOR AIR PARTICULATE SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and nitro-substituted polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (NO2-PAH) have been identified in organic extracts of ambient air particulate matter. Many of the identified PAH and NO2-PAH are potent carcinogens and/or mutagens. Therefore the deter...

  14. Synthesis of condensed phases containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons fullerenes and nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2004-10-19

    The invention relates to methods for producing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fullerenes, and nanotubes, comprising: a. heating at least one carbon-containing material to form a condensed phase comprising at least one polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon; b. collecting at least some of the condensed phase; c. reacting the condensed phase to form fullerenes and/or nanotubes.

  15. Role of methyl group number on SOA formation from aromatic hydrocarbons photooxidation under low NOx conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Tang, P.; Nakao, S.; Chen, C.-L.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2015-11-01

    Substitution of methyl groups onto the aromatic ring determines the SOA formation from the aromatic hydrocarbon precursor. This study links the number of methyl groups on the aromatic ring to SOA formation from aromatic hydrocarbons photooxidation under low NOx conditions (HC / NO > 10 ppb C : ppb). Aromatic hydrocarbons with increasing numbers of methyl groups are systematically studied. SOA formation from pentamethylbenzene and hexamethylbenzene are reported for the first time. A decreasing SOA yield with increasing number of methyl groups is observed. Linear trends are found in both f44 vs. f43 and O / C vs. H / C for SOA from aromatic hydrocarbons with zero to six methyl groups. An SOA oxidation state predictive method based on benzene is used to examine the effect of added methyl groups on aromatic oxidation under low NOx conditions. Further, the impact of methyl group number on density and volatility of SOA from aromatic hydrocarbons is explored. Finally, a mechanism for methyl group impact on SOA formation is suggested. Overall, this work suggests as more methyl groups are attached on the aromatic ring, SOA products from these aromatic hydrocarbons become less oxidized per mass/carbon.

  16. CHEMICAL INDUCTION OF TUMORS IN OYSTERS BY A MIXTURE OF AROMATIC AND CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS, AMINES, AND METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tumors were induced in eastern oysters (Crassotrea virginica) by a mixture f aromatic hydrocarbons, an aromatic amine, polychlori-nated biphenyls, chlorinated hydrocarbons, a nitrosoamine and heavy metals. idney and nteric tumors developed in oysters following exposure to a mixtu...

  17. Contamination of soils in the urbanized areas of Belarus with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukharchyk, T. I.; Khomich, V. S.; Kakareka, S. V.; Kurman, P. V.; Kozyrenko, M. I.

    2013-02-01

    The content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the soils of urbanized areas, including the impact zones of Belarus, were studied. The concentrations of 16 PAHs in the soils were determined for individual and high-rise building zones, forests, and forest parks of Belarus. The levels of the PAH accumulation in the soils of different industrial enterprises and boiler stations were analyzed. Possible sources of soil contamination with PAHs were considered, and the structure of the PAHs in the soils was shown. The levels of the soil contamination were determined from the regulated parameters for individual compounds and the sum of 16 PAHs.

  18. Aliphatic hydrocarbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon geochemistry of twelve major rivers in the Northwest Territories

    SciTech Connect

    Backus, S.; Swyripa, M.; Peddle, J.; Jeffries, D.S.

    1995-12-31

    Suspended sediment and water samples collected from twelve major rivers in the Northwest Territories were analyzed for aliphatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to assess the sources and transport of hydrocarbons entering the Arctic Ocean. Three stations on the Mackenzie River and one station near the mouth of eleven other northern rivers were selected for sampling. Samples were collected on the Mackenzie River on four occasions to characterize spring, summer and fall flow conditions and once on the remaining eleven rivers during high flow conditions. The Mackenzie River is distinctively different then the other eleven rivers. Naturally occurring hydrocarbons predominate in the river. These hydrocarbons include biogenic alkanes, diagenic PAHs, petrogenic alkanes, and PAHs from oil seeps and/or bitumens. Anthropogenic inputs of PAHs are low as indicated by low concentrations of combustion PAHs. Alkyl PAH distributions indicate that a significant component of the lower molecular weight PAH fraction is petrogenic. The majority of the high molecular weight PAHs, together with the petrogenic PAHs have a principal source in the Mackenzie River.

  19. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and the Diffuse Interstellar Bands: a Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Krelowski, J.; Allamandola, L. J.; Musaev, F. A.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We discuss the proposal relating the origin of some of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) to neutral and ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in interstellar clouds. Laboratory spectra of several PAHs, isolated at low temperature in inert gas matrices, are compared with an extensive set of astronomical spectra of reddened, early type stars. From this comparison, it is concluded that PAN ions are good candidates to explain some of the DIBs. Unambiguous assignments are difficult, however, due to the shift in wavelengths and the band broadening induced in the laboratory spectra by the solid matrix. Definitive band assignments and, ultimately, the test of the of the proposal that PAH ions carry some of the DIB must await the availability of gas-phase measurements in the laboratory. The present assessment offers a guideline for future laboratory experiments by allowing the preselection of promising PAH molecules to be studied in jet expansions.

  20. Relative decay index and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masclet, P.; Mouvier, G.; Nikolaou, K.

    An optimized method for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in atmospheric aerosols with short sampling times (1h) has been used to determine the daily variations of PAH in the atmosphere. Of the various physicochemical parameters controlling the disappearance of PAH, the most important seem to be the thermic dependence and the chemical reactions with gaseous pollutants ( NOx, O 3, HNO 3, OH). The RDI is used to identify the different sources of urban pollution: domestic heating, vehicle traffic (petrol and diesel), refineries, foundries, incinerators and power stations (coal, gas and oil) and to quantify the results for standard conditions. The characteristic concentration ratios from each source are often different from those in the literature, where the data are based on long sampling times and are affected by PAH reactivity differences. The results obtained are parameters for setting up a mathematical model for calculating concentrations of PAH at any receptor site.

  1. Failure of hydrogenation in protecting polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatchell, M.; Stockett, M. H.; de Ruette, N.; Chen, T.; Giacomozzi, L.; Nascimento, R. F.; Wolf, M.; Anderson, E. K.; Delaunay, R.; Vizcaino, V.; Rousseau, P.; Adoui, L.; Huber, B. A.; Schmidt, H. T.; Zettergren, H.; Cederquist, H.

    2015-11-01

    A recent study of soft x-ray absorption in native and hydrogenated coronene cations, C24H12+m +m =0 -7 , led to the conclusion that additional hydrogen atoms protect (interstellar) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules from fragmentation [Reitsma et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 053002 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.053002]. The present experiment with collisions between fast (30-200 eV) He atoms and pyrene (C16H10+m + , m =0 , 6, and 16) and simulations without reference to the excitation method suggests the opposite. We find that the absolute carbon-backbone fragmentation cross section does not decrease but increases with the degree of hydrogenation for pyrene molecules.

  2. Destruction and survival of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voit, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    Infrared spectra of dusty galactic environments often contain emission features attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or PAHs, which can be considered to be very small grains or very large molecules. Although IR spectra of starburst galaxies almost always show these emission features, similar spectra of active galaxies are usually featureless. Even in those active galaxies that do exhibit PAH emission, the PAHs still appear to be eradicated from the nuclear region. This dichotomy suggests that PAHs are destroyed by the intense hard radiation field from an AGN. Laboratory experiments show that certain PAHs are, in fact, so effectively destroyed by individual EUV and X-ray photons that they cannot survive even at kiloparsec distances from active nuclei. Regions within active galaxies that do show PAH emission must therefore be shielded from the central X-ray source by a substantial column density of X-ray absorbing gas.

  3. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in roasted coffee.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Angelica; Adisa, Afolabi; Woodham, Cara; Saleh, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are suspected to be carcinogenic and mutagenic. This study describes the presence of PAHs in light, medium and dark roasted coffee including instant and decaffeinated brands. Total PAHs concentration was related to the degree of roasting with light roasted coffee showing the least and dark roasted coffee showing the highest level. Both instant and decaffeinated coffee brand showed lower levels of PAHs. Naphthalene, acenaphthylene, pyrene and chrysene were the most abundant individual isomers. The concentrations ranged from 0 to 561 ng g(-1) for naphthalene, 0 to 512 ng g(-1) for acenaphthylene, 60 to 459 ng g(-1) for pyrene and 56 to 371 ng g(-1) for chrysene. Thus, roasting conditions should be controlled to avoid the formation of PAHs due to their suspected carcinogenic and mutagenic properties. PMID:25190557

  4. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fish from the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect

    DouAbdul, A.A.Z.; Abaychi, J.K.; Al-Edanee, T.E.; Ghani, A.A.; Al-Saad, H.T.

    1987-03-01

    Emphasis has been placed upon the identification and qualification of compounds with potential adverse health effects on humans. Prominent among this group are polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), several of which are known or suspected carcinogens. PAHs enter the marine environment from a variety of sources including petroleum pollution, industrial and domestic effluents, atmospheric particles, and biosynthesis by plants and microorganisms. Although one-third of the world's oil is produced around the Arabian Gulf, no detailed analysis have been conducted to determine PAHs in this region. Nevertheless, numerous investigations have shown the ability of marine organisms including fish to accumulation PAHs from solution or dispersion in seawater. When fish are harvested, a human health hazard may result. In the present communication, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to identify and measure sixteen PAHs priority pollutants issued by US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in fourteen species of commercially significant fish from the NW Arabian Gulf.

  5. Modeling the fate of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in the rhizosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Santharam, S.K.; Erickson, L.E.; Fan, L.T.

    1994-12-31

    Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are major contaminants associated with wastes from manufactured gas plants, wood treating operations, and petroleum refining; they are potentially carcinogenic and mutagenic. It has been known that vegetation can enhance the rate and extent of degradation of PAHs in contaminated soil. Plant roots release exudates capable of supplying carbon and energy to microflora for degrading PAHs. It has also been well established that the population of microorganisms in the rhizosphere is significantly greater than that in the non-vegetated soil; these microorganisms are apparently responsible for the enhanced biodegradation of PAHs. A model has been derived for describing the rate of disappearance of a non-aqueous phase contaminant in the rhizosphere, which takes into account dissolution, adsorption, desorption and biodegradation of the contaminant, without neglecting the size distribution of the organic-phase droplets; the rate of biodegradation is expressed in terms of the Monod kinetics. The model is validated with the available experimental data for pyrene.

  6. Simulated transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in artificial streams

    SciTech Connect

    Bartell, S.M.; Landrum, P.F.; Giesy, J.P.; Leversee, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    A model was constructed to predict the pattern of flow and accumulation of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) (anthracene, naphthalene, and benzo(a)pyrene) in artificial streams located on the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. Predictions were based upon the premise that the fundamental chemistry of individual PAH contains useful information for predictive purposes. Model processes included volatilization, photolysis, sorption to sediments and particulates, and net accumulation by biota. Simulations of anthracene transport were compared to results of an experiment conducted in the streams. The model realistically predicted the concentration of dissolved anthracene through time and space. Photolytic degradation appeared to be a major pathway of anthracene flux from the streams.

  7. INFRARED SPECTRA OF ISOLATED PROTONATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Knorke, Harald; Langer, Judith; Dopfer, Otto; Oomens, Jos

    2009-11-20

    Gas-phase infrared (IR) spectra of larger protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules, H{sup +}PAH, have been recorded for the first time. The ions are generated by electrospray ionization and spectroscopically assayed by IR multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer using a free electron laser. IRMPD spectra of protonated anthracene, tetracene, pentacene, and coronene are presented and compared to calculated IR spectra. Comparison of the laboratory IR spectra to an astronomical spectrum of the unidentified IR emission (UIR) bands obtained in a highly ionized region of the interstellar medium provides for the first time compelling spectroscopic support for the recent hypothesis that H{sup +}PAHs contribute as carriers of the UIR bands.

  8. NMR shifts for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from first-principles

    SciTech Connect

    Thonhauser, Timo; Ceresoli, Davide; Marzari, Nicola N.

    2009-09-03

    We present first-principles, density-functional theory calculations of the NMR chemical shifts for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, starting with benzene and increasing sizes up to the one- and two-dimensional infinite limits of graphene ribbons and sheets. Our calculations are performed using a combination of the recently developed theory of orbital magnetization in solids, and a novel approach to NMR calculations where chemical shifts are obtained from the derivative of the orbital magnetization with respect to a microscopic, localized magnetic dipole. Using these methods we study on equal footing the 1H and 13C shifts in benzene, pyrene, coronene, in naphthalene, anthracene, naphthacene, and pentacene, and finally in graphene, graphite, and an infinite graphene ribbon. Our results show very good agreement with experiments and allow us to characterize the trends for the chemical shifts as a function of system size.

  9. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Infrared Astrophysics with Spitzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, thanks to significant, parallel advancements in observational, experimental, and theoretical techniques, tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of the role that carbon-rich plays in the interstellar medium (ISM). Twenty years ago, the possible existence of an abundant population of large, carbon-rich molecules in the ISM was unthinkable. Today, the unmistakable spectroscopic signatures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) - shockingly large molecules by the standards of traditional interstellar chemistry -are recognized throughout the Universe. In this presentation, we will examine the current state of the interstellar PAH model and explore how this data, in conjunction with the unparalleled observational data provided by the Spitzer Space Telescope, can be used to draw ever-deeper insights into the physical and chemical natures of a wide range of astrophysical environments.

  10. [Exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in rubber forming industry].

    PubMed

    Cirla, P E; Martinotti, I; Mossini, E; Tieghi, S; Antoniazzi, E; Galli, L; Pavesi, D; Fustinoni, S; Campo, L; Fo, V; Cirla, A M

    2007-01-01

    Among various chemical agents present at the workplaces in the rubber industry, a particular attention was adressed to the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) contained in oil and carbon black, but some questions regarding level of exposure are also controversially discussed. The literature reports that PAH may have irritant effects; moreover some of these have been recognized as probably or possibly carcinogenic to human by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the European Union, and other institutions. In Lombardy, a study aimed to evaluate the occupational exposure in Benzo[b]fluorantene the rubber forming industry was planned during last two years. The results of environmental air monitoring (the 16 most relevant, according to the American Environmental Protection Agency, EPA) and biological monitoring (urinary 1-hydroxypyrene excretion) show that PAH exposure in these workers is not higher than that observed in other study regarding low level and acceptable exposure. PMID:18409687

  11. Phototoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at varying light intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Ankley, G.T.; Phipps, G.L.; Mattson, V.R.; Erickson, R.J.; Kosian, P.A.; Cox, J.S.; Sheedy, B.R.; Mount, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    Conceptual models suggest that the toxicity of photoactivated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) should be a function both of chemical (PAH) dose, and intensity of the ultraviolet (UV) light to which the organism is exposed (photon dose). However, there have been no systematic studies with aquatic organisms to quantify the relationship between PAH dose and UV intensity in producing phototoxicity. In these studies, oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) were exposed, via the water, to multiple concentrations of individual PAHs known to be photoactivated (fluoranthene, pyrene, anthracene), and then placed under UV light of three different intensities. The resultant phototoxicity clearly was a function both of PAH dose and light intensity. A joint toxicity model relating toxicity to PAH concentrations and light intensity will be presented.

  12. Shock-Induced Chemical Reactions of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elert, Mark; Zybin, Sergey; Revell, Shannon; White, Carter

    2006-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been found in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Titan, and also in meteorites, interplanetary dust, and circumstellar graphite grains. The ubiquity of these complex organic structures and their stability under extreme conditions make them a significant factor in discussions of brebiotic chemistry in the solar system. To study the shock-induced chemistry of PAHs under conditions appropriate for astrophysical impacts, molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out for solid naphthalene and anthracene using a reactive empirical potential. The major reaction channels for these two closely related compounds were found to be substantially different. Product distributions were also found to depend strongly on the orientation of the PAH crystal relative to the shock propagation direction.

  13. Palladium-catalyzed pentannulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Lütke Eversloh, Christian; Avlasevich, Yuri; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus

    2011-11-01

    We present a new and versatile one-step synthesis of a series of small molecular chromophores based on cyclopentannulated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Easily available pyrene, anthracene, and perylene bromides serve as starting materials for the reactions. The formation of the five-membered ring is achieved by the straightforward palladium(0)-catalyzed carbannulation with various substituted acetylenes. This approach is applicable either to single or multiple annulation procedures leading to hitherto inaccessible PAH topologies. According to the resulting products of the diverse reactions, a mechanistic explanation is proposed. UV/Vis absorption as well as cyclovoltammetric measurements were performed for characterization demonstrating the value of this annulation technique. Optical absorptions of up to 780 nm and absorption coefficients ranging from 8000 to 34,000 M(-1) cm(-1) were detected. PMID:21956345

  14. Heterogeneous ozonation kinetics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on organic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahan, T. F.; Kwamena, N.-O. A.; Donaldson, D. J.

    The room temperature heterogeneous reaction rates of gas-phase ozone with naphthalene, anthracene, fluoranthene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo[ a]pyrene were measured over a range of ozone concentrations from 3.5×10 14 to 2.3×10 16 molec. cm -3. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were dissolved in organic mixtures composed of octanol or decanol along with proxies for compounds known to be present in "urban grime" films. In all cases, the reaction kinetics were well-described by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, which suggests a surface reaction. The adsorption of PAHs to the air-organic interface was confirmed by an adsorption isotherm of anthracene. The presence of the additional organic compounds generally did not affect the reaction rates; however, unsaturated species such as oleic acid and squalene reduced the observed rates significantly.

  15. Adsorption and STM imaging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dappe, Y. J.; Andersen, M.; Balog, R.; Hornekær, L.; Bouju, X.

    2015-01-01

    The structural characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on graphene is of fundamental importance in view of the use of graphene or graphene nanoribbons for electronic applications. Before reaching this point, one has to determine the structure of the adsorbed molecules. Here, we study the case of benzene, coronene, and hexabenzocoronene on a graphene layer. First, the adsorption properties of single molecules are calculated using first-principles calculations at the level of density functional theory. We benefit from a recent scheme, particularly adapted for weakly adsorbed molecules, allowing us to precisely calculate the van der Waals contribution. Then, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is used to produce images of self-assembled molecules comparing different theoretical approaches to experimental observations. Finally, we consider the imaging of isolated molecules, and we show how the STM tip influences the molecule position by soft mechanical interaction during the scanning process.

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons' formation and occurrence in processed food.

    PubMed

    Singh, Lochan; Varshney, Jay G; Agarwal, Tripti

    2016-05-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emerged as an important contaminant group in a gamut of processed food groups like dairy, nuts, herbs, beverages, meat products etc. Different cooking processes and processing techniques like roasting, barbecuing, grilling, smoking, heating, drying, baking, ohmic-infrared cooking etc. contribute towards its formation. The level of PAHs depends on factors like distance from heat source, fuel used, level of processing, cooking durations and methods, whereas processes like reuse, conching, concentration, crushing and storage enhance the amount of PAHs in some food items. This review paper provides insight into the impact of dietary intake of PAHs, its levels and formation mechanism in processed food items and possible interventions for prevention and reduction of the PAHs contamination. The gaps and future prospects have also been assessed. PMID:26776034

  17. Urinary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biomarkers and diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Alshaarawy, Omayma; Zhu, Motao; Ducatman, Alan M; Conway, Baqiyyah; Andrew, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the current study is to investigate the association of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a group of environmental pollutants, with diabetes mellitus. Animal studies link PAHs to inflammation and subsequent development of diabetes mellitus. In addition, occupational studies suggest that exposure to other aromatic hydrocarbons such as dioxins may be associated with diabetes risk in humans. Design We examined participants from the merged National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 20012002, 20032004 and 20052006. Exposures of interest were eight urinary monohydroxy-PAHs. Our outcome was diabetes mellitus defined as a glycohemoglobin level (HbA1c) ?6.5%, a self-reported physician diagnosis of diabetes or use of oral hypoglycaemic medication or insulin. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, race, alcohol consumption, povertyincome ratio, total cholesterol and serum cotinine. Results We observed a positive association between urinary biomarkers of 1 and 2-hydroxynapthol, 2-hydroxyphenanthrene and summed low molecular weight (LMW) PAH biomarkers, and diabetes mellitus. Compared with participants with summed LMW PAH biomarkers in the lowest quartile, the multivariable-adjusted OR of diabetes mellitus among those in the highest quartile was 3.1 (95% CI 1.6 to 5.8). Conclusions Urinary biomarkers of 1 and 2-hydroxynapthol, 2-hydroxyphenanthrene and summed LMW PAH biomarkers are associated with diabetes mellitus in US adults 2065 years of age. The association of a one-time biomarker of PAH exposure has limitations commonly associated with cross-sectional studies, yet is consistent with experimental animal data and is worthy of additional consideration. PMID:24638887

  18. Theoretical properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon clusters of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapacioli, M.; Joblin, C.; Calvo, F.; Spiegelman, F.; Parneix, P.

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been proposed as the carriers of the aromatic infrared bands observed in many places of the interstellar medium. However the main difficulty faced by the PAH model is the identification of individual species. We have analyzed spectro-imagery data obtained with the camera CAM on board of the Infrared Space Observatory, applying the singular value decomposition method. This work (Rapacioli et al. (2005)) strongly suggests that PAHs are produced by photoevaporation of very small carbonaceous grains which could be PAH clusters. This result motivated the following theoretical work. We have performed a parallel tempering Monte Carlo search of the structures with lowest energy of PAH clusters ranging from two to thirty molecules (Rapacioli et al. (2005b)). We found evidence that stacking the PAH molecules generally yields the most stable structures. After some critical size, one-dimensional pattern is replaced by two and three-dimensional growth, again with small stacks as the building block. The collision of a PAH molecule with a PAH cluster has been studied. The resulting excited cluster can loose one or more molecules or relax through infrared emission. The competition between the IR emission rate and the evaporation rate calculated with a statistical method allows to characterize the astrophysical environments that are favourable to the PAH clusters growth.

  19. LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Dinelli, B. M.; Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E.; Moriconi, M. L.; Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2013-06-20

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  20. Thermochemical Properties and Phase Behavior of Halogenated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of vapor pressure of organic pollutants is essential in predicting their fate and transport in the environment. In the present study, the vapor pressures of 12 halogenated polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs), i.e. 9-chlorofluorene, 2,7-dichlorofluorene, 2-bromofluorene, 9-bromofluorene, 2,7-dibromofluorene, 2-bromoanthracene, 9-chlorophenanthrene, 9-bromophenanthrene, 9,10-dibromophenanthrene, 1-chloropyrene, 7-bromobenz[a]anthracene and 6,12-dibromochrysene, were measured using the Knudsen effusion method over the temperature range of 301 to 464 K. Enthalpies and entropies of sublimation of these compounds were determined via application of the Clausius–Clapeyron equation. The data were also compared with earlier published literature values to study the influence of halogen substitution on vapor pressure of PACs. As expected, the halogen substitution decreases vapor pressure compared to parent compounds, but does not necessarily increase the enthalpy of sublimation. Moreover, the decrease of vapor pressure also depends on the substitution position and the substituted halogen, and the di-substitution of chlorine and/or bromine decreases the vapor pressure compared to single halogen substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Additionally, the enthalpy of fusion and melting temperature of these 12 PACs were determined using differential scanning calorimetry and melting point analysis. PMID:22139714

  1. Synthesis and applications of several curved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Matthew

    2008-07-01

    This thesis describes the synthesis and applications of two curved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, hexabenzocoronene (HBC) and pentabenzocoronene (PBC). In Chapter 2, a monolayer of a carboxylic acid functionalized HBC is incorporated into an ultra small nanotube junction ( 2 to 6 nm). The junction is formed by cutting a single carbon nanotube using both electron beam lithography and oxygen plasma. These HBC-filled junctions are effective organic field effect transistor devices when the two ends of the nanotube are used as electrodes. As the molecules are exposed, they are sensitive to the environment and are capable of detecting electron deficient aromatic compounds such as TCNQ. In Chapter 3, the synthesis of PBC and several of its derivatives is described. The application of alkoxylated derivatives of PBC as discotic liquid crystals and as n-type organic field effect transistors is discussed. In Chapter 4, possible methods for incorporating HBC and PBC into the templated growth of carbon nanotubes are described. If successful, this would allow for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes samples with a single chiral index. For accurate spectroscopic characterization of single carbon nanotubes, unbundled carbon nanotubes are desired. Nanoparticle size has a strong correlation to carbon nanotube diameter. As such, for this project, well separated and uniformly sized nanoparticles are necessary. Arrays of catalyst nanoparticles have been synthesized using diblock copolymer templates, which allow the size and separation to be tuned. The stability and carbon nanotube growth activity of copper, ruthenium and cobalt nanoparticle arrays are presented.

  2. Alkyl polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emissions in diesel/biodiesel exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casal, Carina S.; Arbilla, Graciela; Corrêa, Sergio M.

    2014-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widely studied in environmental matrices, such as air, water, soil and sediment, because of their toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Because of these properties, the environmental agencies of developed countries have listed sixteen PAHs as priority pollutants. Few countries have limits for these compounds for ambient air, but they only limit emissions from stationary and mobile sources and occupational areas. There are several studies to specifically address the 16 priority PAHs and very little for the alkyl PAHs. These compounds are more abundant, more persistent and frequently more toxic than the non-alkylated PAHs, and the toxicity increases with the number of alkyl substitutions on the aromatic ring. In this study, a method was developed for the analysis of PAHs and alkyl PAHs by using a GC-MS and large injection volume injection coupled with program temperature vaporisation, which allows for limits of detection below 1.0 ng μL-1. Several variables were tested, such as the injection volume, injection velocity, injector initial temperature, duration of the solvent split and others. This method was evaluated in samples from particulate matter from the emissions of engines employing standard diesel, commercial diesel and biodiesel B20. Samples were collected on a dynamometer bench for a diesel engine cycle and the results ranged from 0.5 to 96.9 ng mL-1, indicating that diesel/biodiesel makes a significant contribution to the formation of PAHs and alkyl PAHs.

  3. Large Abundances of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Titan's Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Dinelli, B. M.; Adriani, A.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Moriconi, M. L.; D'Aversa, E.; Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 micron in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al.We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 micron. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) × 10(exp 4) particles / cubic cm. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is approx 430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 sq. nm; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  4. Insight into unresolved complex mixtures of aromatic hydrocarbons in heavy oil via two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Weng, Na; Wan, Shan; Wang, Huitong; Zhang, Shuichang; Zhu, Guangyou; Liu, Jingfu; Cai, Di; Yang, Yunxu

    2015-06-12

    The aromatic hydrocarbon fractions of five crude oils representing a natural sequence of increasing degree of biodegradation from the Liaohe Basin, NE, China, were analyzed using conventional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC). Because of the limited peak capability and low resolution, compounds in the aromatic fraction of a heavily biodegraded crude oil that were analyzed by GC-MS appeared as unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) or GC "humps". They could be separated based on their polarity by GC×GC. UCMs are composed mainly of aromatic biomarkers and aromatic hydrocarbons with branched alkanes or cycloalkanes substituents. The quantitative results achieved by GC×GC-FID were shown that monoaromatic hydrocarbons account for the largest number and mass of UCMs in the aromatic hydrocarbon fraction of heavily biodegraded crude oil, at 45% by mass. The number and mass of diaromatic hydrocarbons ranks second at 33% by mass, followed by the aromatic biomarker compounds, triaromatic, tetraaromatic, and pentaaromatic hydrocarbons, that account for 10%, 6%, 1.5%, and 0.01% of all aromatic compounds by mass, respectively. In the heavily biodegraded oil, compounds with monocyclic cycloalkane substituents account for the largest proportion of mono- and diaromatic hydrocarbons, respectively. The C4-substituted compounds account for the largest proportion of naphthalenes and the C3-substituted compounds account for the largest proportion of phenanthrenes, which is very different from non-biodegraded, slightly biodegraded, and moderately biodegraded crude oil. It is inferred that compounds of monoaromatic, diaromatic and triaromatic hydrocarbons are affected by biodegradation, that compounds with C1-, C2-substituents are affected by the increase in degree of biodegradation, and that their relative content decreased, whereas compounds with C3-substituents or more were affected slightly or unaffected, and their relative content also increased. The varying regularity of relative content of substituted compounds may be used to reflect the degree of degradation of heavy oil. Moreover, biomarkers for the aromatic hydrocarbons of heavily biodegraded crude oil are mainly aromatic steranes, aromatic secohopanes, aromatic pentacyclotriterpanes, and benzohopanes. According to resultant data, aromatic secohopanes could be used as a specific marker because of their relatively high concentration. This aromatic compound analysis of a series of biodegraded crude oil is useful for future research on the quantitative characterization of the degree of biodegradation of heavy oil, unconventional oil maturity evaluation, oil source correlation, depositional environment, and any other geochemical problems. PMID:25939738

  5. Mineralization of polycyclic and n-heterocyclic aromatic compounds in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Grosser, R.J.; Warshawsky, D.; Vestal, J.R.

    1995-03-01

    The comparative mineralization of eight polycyclic aromatic compounds in five soils collected from an abandoned coal tar refinery in eastern Ohio was determined. The soils showed differences only in total extractable hydrocarbon content of the soil chemical characteristics measured. The compounds studied included five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene, and carcinogenic benz[a]anthracene and benzo[a]pyrene) and three N-heterocyclic aromatics (9H-carbazole, and carcinogenic 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole and dibenz[a,j]acridine). Mineralization was measured by serum bottle radiorespirometry. Only phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, and carbazole were mineralized in the soils after 64 d. Two of the soils with eight to 15 times the hexane -extractable hydrocarbon content consistently showed more rapid initial rates and higher overall extents of mineralization compared to the other three soils. Overall extents of mineralization ranged from 38 to 55% for phenanthrene, 10 to 60% for anthracene, 25 to 70% for pyrene, background to 40% for benz[a]anthracene, and 25 to 50% for carbazole after 64 d. Extents of mineralization by indigenous soil microbiota appear to be more dependent on the chemical characteristics of the soil and not soil total biomass and activity. Cultures capable of degrading phenanthrene, anthracene, and pyrene were obtained following enrichment techniques. A Mycobacterium sp. capable of degrading these three compounds was isolated and reintroduced into two of the soils, resulting in mineralization enhanced above that of the indigenous soil microbial population. These data indicate that the future success of bioremediation methods relies on the characterization of environmental parameters affecting microbial degradation as well as the isolation of microbial populations that can reduce toxicity in the environment.

  6. Effect of bioremediation on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon residues in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoping; Yu, Xiaobing; Bartha, R. )

    1990-07-01

    Soil contamination (60 mg/g of soil) by a diesel oil (DO) spill was simulated in outdoor lysimeter units and the effect of bioremediation treatment consisting of liming, fertilization, and tilling on the persistence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) components of DO was measured. After solvent extraction from soil and class separation on silica gel, PAH components were identified and partially quantified by GC-ITD analysis. Residual mutagenicity and acute toxicity of the contaminated soil was also assessed by Ames and Microtox tests. Bioremediation treatment, while increasing the rate of total hydrocarbon degradation, had an even greater effect on PAH persistence, almost completely eliminating these compounds in 12 weeks. Without bioremediation, 12.5-32.5% of the higher molecular weight PAH were still present at 12 weeks. Mutagenicity and toxicity tests corroborated the above results. After substantial initial mutagenicity and toxicity, the contaminated soil approached the background level of uncontaminated soil after 12 weeks of bioremediation. Detoxification was complete in 20 weeks.

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and cytochrome P450 in HIV pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rao, P S S; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    High prevalence of cigarette smoking in HIV patients is associated with increased HIV pathogenesis and disease progression. While the effect of smoking on the occurrence of lung cancer has been studied extensively, the association between smoking and HIV pathogenesis is poorly studied. We have recently shown the possible role of cytochrome P450 (CYP) in smoking/nicotine-mediated viral replication. In this review, we focus on the potential role of CYP pathway in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), important constituents of cigarette smoke, mediated HIV pathogenesis. More specifically, we will discuss the role of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, which are the major PAH-activating CYP enzymes. Our results have shown that treatment with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) increases viral replication in HIV-infected macrophages. CSC contains PAH, which are known to be activated by CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 into procarcinogens/toxic metabolites. The expression of these CYPs is regulated by aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AHR), the cellular target of PAH, and an important player in various diseases including cancer. We propose that PAH/AHR-mediated CYP pathway is a novel target to develop new interventions for HIV positive smokers. PMID:26082767

  8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and cytochrome P450 in HIV pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, P. S. S.; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    High prevalence of cigarette smoking in HIV patients is associated with increased HIV pathogenesis and disease progression. While the effect of smoking on the occurrence of lung cancer has been studied extensively, the association between smoking and HIV pathogenesis is poorly studied. We have recently shown the possible role of cytochrome P450 (CYP) in smoking/nicotine-mediated viral replication. In this review, we focus on the potential role of CYP pathway in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), important constituents of cigarette smoke, mediated HIV pathogenesis. More specifically, we will discuss the role of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, which are the major PAH-activating CYP enzymes. Our results have shown that treatment with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) increases viral replication in HIV-infected macrophages. CSC contains PAH, which are known to be activated by CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 into procarcinogens/toxic metabolites. The expression of these CYPs is regulated by aryl hydrocarbon receptors (AHR), the cellular target of PAH, and an important player in various diseases including cancer. We propose that PAH/AHR-mediated CYP pathway is a novel target to develop new interventions for HIV positive smokers. PMID:26082767

  9. Autothermal reforming of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Voecks, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented from a study of the autothermal reforming of paraffins and aromatics over nickel catalysts. The trials were performed to examine the carbon products that appear when steam is passed over hydrocarbon liquids to form H2-rich gases, i.e., the autothermal process (ATR). Attention was given to n-hexane, n-tetradecane, benzene, and benzene solutions of naphthalene with reactant preheat to 1000-1150 F. The carbon-formation limit was sought as a function of the steam-to-carbon and oxygen to carbon molar ratios at constant pressure and the preheat temperatures. The catalyst bed was examined after each trial to identify the locations and types of carbon formed using SEM, thermal gravimetric analysis, and X ray diffraction techniques. The hydrocarbon fuels each had a separate temperature and reaction profile, as well as carbon formation characteristics. No carbon formation was observed in the upper layer of the reactor bed, while both gas phase and surface-grown deposits were present in the lower part. The results are concluded of use in the study of No. 2 fuel oil for ATR feedstock.

  10. Diversity of metabolic capacities among strains degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchez, M.; Besnaienou, B.; Blanchet, D.; Vandecasteele, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    Strains of Pseudomonas and Rhodococcus genera were isolated for their capacity to use, as a sole carbon and energy source, one of the following polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): naphthalene (NAP), fluorene (FLU), phenanthrene (PHE), anthracene (ANT), fluoranthene (FLT), and pyrene (PYR). The range of PAHs supporting growth of these pure strains was usually restricted, but several other hydrocarbons were used by Rhodococcus sp. All strains could grow on simple organic acids. Maximal specific growth rates ({mu}{sub max}) of all strains on their PAH growth substrates were determined by respirometry. No clear relationships between {mu}{sub max} values and the molecular weight or water solubility of PAHs were apparent, but Pseudomonas sp. exhibited the highest {mu}{sub max} values. Carbon balances for PAH biodegradation were established. Differences between strains were observed, but high mineralization rates and low production of soluble metabolites were obtained for all PAHs. Bacterial biomass represented 16% to 35% of the carbon consumed. Strain diversity was also apparent in the interactions observed in the degradation of a mixture of two PAHs by individual strains, which often involved inhibition of PAH substrate degradation, with or without cometabolization of the second PAH.

  11. Reduction of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Zero-Valent Iron and Palladium Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Hun; Shin, Won Sik; Ko, Seok-Oh; Kim, Myung-Chul

    2004-03-31

    Permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is an alternative technology for soil and groundwater remediation. Zero valent iron, which is the most popular PRB material, is only applicable to halogenated aliphatic organics and some heavy metals. The objective of this study was to investigate reductive dechlorination of halogenated compounds and reduction of non-halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons using zero valent metals (ZVMs) and catalysts as reactive materials for PRBs. A group of small aromatic hydrocarbons such as monochlorophenols, phenol and benzene were readily reduced with palladium catalyst and zero valent iron. Poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also tested with the catalysts and zero valent metal combinations. The aromatic rings were reduced and partly reduced PAHs were found as the daughter compounds. The current study demonstrates reduction of aromatic compounds by ZVMs and modified catalysts and implicates that PRB is applicable not only for halogenated organic compounds but nonhalogenated aromatic compounds such as PAHs.

  12. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in an industrialized urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachada, A.; Pereira, R.; Ferreira da Silva, E.; Duarte, A. C.

    2009-04-01

    Urbanization, agricultural intensification and industrialization are contributing to erosion, local and diffuse contamination and sealing of soil surfaces, resulting in soil quality degradation. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in urban environments and considered good markers of anthropogenic activities such as traffic, industry, domestic heating and agriculture. Although they are subject to biodegradation and photodegradation, once in the soil, they tend to bind to the soil organic fraction. Estarreja is a small coastal town in the Northwestern Portuguese coast, with a close relation with the lagoon of Aveiro which supports a variety of biotopes (channels, islands with vegetation, mudflats, salt marshes and agricultural fields) of important ecological value. It supports an intensive and diversified agriculture, a variety of heavy and light industries and a population of about half a million people which is dependent on this resource. This is a very industrialized area, due to its five decades of chemical industry. This study aims to assess the impact of the urbanization and of the chemical industry in PAHs distribution. The survey and sampling method were based on pre-interpreted maps, aerial photographs, and directly checked in the field, in order to get an overall characterization of the area. Topsoils were collected from 34 sites, considering different land uses. Five land uses were chosen: ornamental gardens, parks, roadsides, forest and agricultural. Parameters such as soil pH (ISO method 10390:1994), total C, N, H, S percentages (microanalyser LECO, CNHS-932), organic matter (LOI at 430°), particle size distribution (Micromeritics® Sedigraph 5100), cation exchange capacity and exchangeable bases, were determined in order to have a general characterization of soil. Determination of the 16 EPA PAHs in soils was performed by GC/MS after a Soxhlet extraction and an alumina clean-up of extracts. Procedure blanks, duplicates and reference material were used in each extraction batch for quality control assessment. In what concerns the general parameters, Estarreja soils were characterized as slightly acid, with a median pHCaCl2 of 5.15, ranging from 3.12 and 6.88. The content in organic matter observed was relatively high, with a median of 4.6% and ranging from 1.8 to 45%. The median concentration of PAHs was 98 µg kg-1, ranging from 27 to 2,016 µg kg-1. The former value was found in an agricultural area and, together with another agricultural soil (with 1121 µgPAHs/kg), were considered heavily contaminated according to the classification given by Maliszewska-Kordybach. Moreover, eight samples were classified as weakly contaminated (PAHs between 200 and 600 µg/kg) and the remaining ones were not contaminated. The relative abundance of individual PAHs in Estarreja soils was evaluated, being the most abundant Fluoranthene and Pyrene followed by Benzo(b)fluoranthene, Phenanthrene and Crysene. These PAHs are the ones usually associated with the combustion of fossil fuel and other burnable materials, being this composition is typical for topsoil of European industrialized countries. Geostatistical methods were used to show the spatial variability of contaminants and the probability of exceeding the risk-based standards. The plots of concentration of PAHs on GIS highlight areas where the highest elements concentrations occur and the land use associated. These soil maps assemble important information for decision-making, allowing identifying possible sources of contamination, assess the suitability of soil to its use and to contribute for land use planning in accordance to soil characteristics. Acknowledgements: This work was supported by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (SFRH/BD/38418/2007) and by CESAM

  13. Effects of sulfur and aromatic contents in gasoline on motorcycle emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yung-Chen; Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Chang, An-Lin; Jeng, Fu-Tien

    By investigating the effect of sulfur and aromatic contents in gasoline on the criteria pollutant emissions [CO, total hydrocarbons (THCs), and NO x] and on air toxics in the exhaust from a non-catalyst four-stroke motorcycle engine, inferences can be made concerning the effect of fuel composition on motorcycle emissions. The fuels were blended with different contents of sulfur (40 and 150 ppmw) and aromatics (20 and 30 vol%). The data indicate that the sulfur content does not correlate with the emissions of the criteria pollutants from the catalyst free engine. Instead, lowering aromatic content in gasoline reduced the THC emission by over 30%, especially in the cruising test. The NO x emission, however, showed an inverse correlation with the aromatic content in gasoline. While a reduction of aromatic content in gasoline may decrease emissions of benzene and toluene, it will increase the emission of aldehyde. Since the percentage changes of emission factor of THC and air toxics in the motorcycle were larger than those in passenger cars, the benefit of emission reduction due to fuel composition changes in motorcycles may have significant impacts in health risk analysis.

  14. ExBox: a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon scavenger.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Jonathan C; Juríček, Michal; Strutt, Nathan L; Frasconi, Marco; Sampath, Srinivasan; Giesener, Marc A; McGrier, Psaras L; Bruns, Carson J; Stern, Charlotte L; Sarjeant, Amy A; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2013-01-01

    A template-directed protocol, which capitalizes on donor-acceptor interactions, is employed to synthesize a semi-rigid cyclophane (ExBox(4+)) that adopts a box-like geometry and is comprised of π-electron-poor 1,4-phenylene-bridged ("extended") bipyridinium units (ExBIPY(2+)). ExBox(4+) functions as a high-affinity scavenger of an array of different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), ranging from two to seven fused rings, as a result of its large, accommodating cavity (approximately 3.5 Å in width and 11.2 Å in length when considering the van der Waals radii) and its ability to form strong non-covalent bonding interactions with π-electron-rich PAHs in either organic or aqueous media. In all, 11 PAH guests were observed to form inclusion complexes with ExBox(4+), with coronene being the largest included guest. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data for the 11 inclusion complexes ExBox(4+)⊂PAH as well as UV/vis spectroscopic data for 10 of the complexes provide evidence of the promiscuity of ExBox(4+) for the various PAHs. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetric analyses of 10 of the inclusion complexes are employed to further characterize the host-guest interactions in solution and determine the degree with which ExBox(4+) binds each PAH compound. As a proof-of-concept, a batch of crude oil from Saudi Arabia was subjected to extraction with the water-soluble form of the PAH receptor, ExBox·4Cl, resulting in the isolation of different aromatic compounds after ExBox·4Cl was regenerated. PMID:22928610

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the atmospheres of Titan and Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Sagan, C; Khare, B N; Thompson, W R; McDonald, G D; Wing, M R; Bada, J L; Vo-Dinh, T; Arakawa, E T

    1993-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are important components of the interstellar medium and carbonaceous chondrites, but have never been identified in the reducing atmospheres of the outer solar system. Incompletely characterized complex organic solids (tholins) produced by irradiating simulated Titan atmospheres reproduce well the observed UV/visible/IR optical constants of the Titan stratospheric haze. Titan tholin and a tholin generated in a crude simulation of the atmosphere of Jupiter are examined by two-step laser desorption/multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry. A range of two- to four-ring PAHs, some with one to four alkylation sites are identified, with net abundance approximately 10(-4) g g-1 (grams per gram) of tholins produced. Synchronous fluorescence techniques confirm this detection. Titan tholins have proportionately more one- and two-ring PAHs than do Jupiter tholins, which in turn have more four-ring and larger PAHs. The four-ringed PAH chrysene, prominent in some discussions of interstellar grains, is found in Jupiter tholins. Solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy suggests approximately equal to 25% of the total C in both tholins is tied up in aromatic and/or aliphatic alkenes. IR spectra indicate an upper limit in both tholins of approximately equal to 6% by mass in benzenes, heterocyclics, and PAHs with more than four rings. Condensed PAHs may contribute at most approximately 10% to the observed detached limb haze layers on Titan. As with interstellar PAHs, the synthesis route of planetary PAHs is likely to be via acetylene addition reactions. PMID:11539501

  16. Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from gasohol and ethanol vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Abrantes, Rui; Vicente de Assunção, João; Pesquero, Célia Regina; Bruns, Roy Edward; Nóbrega, Raimundo Paiva

    The exhaust emission of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) considered toxic to human health were investigated on two spark ignition light duty vehicles, one being gasohol (Gasohol, in Brazil, is the generic denomination for mixtures of pure gasoline plus 20-25% of anhydrous ethyl alcohol fuel (AEAF).)-fuelled and the other a flexible-fuel vehicle fuelled with hydrated ethanol. The influence of fuel type and quality, aged lubricant oil type and use of fuel additives on the formation of these compounds was tested using standardized tests identical to US FTP-75 cycle. PAH sampling and chemical analysis followed the basic recommendations of method TO-13 (United States. Environmental Protection Agency, 1999. Compendium Method TO-13A - Determination of polycyclic Aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in Ambient Air Using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (CG/MS). Center for environmental research information, Cincinnati, p. 78), with the necessary modification for this particular application. Results showed that the total PAH emission factor varied from 41.9 μg km -1 to 612 μg km -1 in the gasohol vehicle, and from 11.7 μg km -1 to 27.4 μg km -1 in the ethanol-fuelled vehicle, a significant difference in favor of the ethanol vehicle. Generally, emission of light molecular weight PAHs was predominant, while high molecular weights PAHs were not detected. In terms of benzo( a)pyrene toxicity equivalence, emission factors varied from 0.00984 μg TEQ km -1 to 4.61 μg TEQ km -1 for the gasohol vehicle and from 0.0117 μg TEQ km -1 to 0.0218 μg TEQ km -1 in the ethanol vehicle. For the gasohol vehicle, results showed that the use of fuel additive causes a significant increase in the emission of naphthalene and phenanthrene at a confidence level of 90% or higher; the use of rubber solvent on gasohol showed a reduction in the emission of naphthalene and phenanthrene at the same confidence level; the use of synthetic oil instead of mineral oil also contributed significantly to a decrease in the emission of naphthalene and fluorene. In relation to the ethanol vehicle, the same factors were tested and showed no statistically significant influence on PAH emission.

  17. The Exobiological Role of Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of interstellar material over the past twenty years thanks to significant, parallel developments in observational astronomy and laboratory astrophysics. Before this time, the composition of interstellar dust was largely guessed-at, the presence of ices in interstellar clouds ignored, and the notion that large, gas phase, carbon rich molecules might be abundant and widespread throughout the interstellar medium (ISM) considered impossible. Today, the composition of dust in the ISM is reasonably well constrained to micron-sized cold refractory materials comprised of amorphous and crystalline silicates mixed with an amorphous carbonaceous material containing aromatic structural units and short, branched aliphatic chains. Shrouded within the protective confines of cold, opaque molecular clouds--the birthplace of stars and planets--these cold dust particles secrete mantles of mixed molecular ices whose compositions are also well constrained. Finally, amidst the molecular inventory of these ice mantles are likely to be found polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), shockingly large molecules by the standards of interstellar chemistry, the telltale infrared spectral signature of which is now recognized throughout the Universe. In the first part of this talk, we will review the spectroscopic evidence that forms the basis for the currently accepted abundance and ubiquity of PANs in the ISM. We will then look at a few specific examples which illustrate how experimental and theoretical data can be applied to interpret the interstellar spectra and track how the PAN population evolves as it passes from its formation site in the circumstellar outflows of dying stars, through the various phases of the ISM, and into forniing planetary systems. Nevertheless, despite the fact that PANs likely represent the single largest molecular reservoir of organic carbon in evolving planetary systems, they are not what would be considered "biogenic" molecules. Although interesting from a chemical and astrophysical standpoint, in the absence of a mechanism by which this population can be dislodged from the precipitous thermodynamic well afforded by their extensive aromatic networks, they are of little Astrobiological significance. Consequently, for the remainder of the talk, we will consider the photochemical evolution of PANS under conditions similar to those found in the ISM and in proto-planetary systems with an eye toward means by which this rich repository of pre-biotic organic "ore" might be converted into materials of greater importance to Astrobiology.

  18. ASSAYING PARTICLE-BOUND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAH) FROM ARCHIVED PM2.5 FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airborne particulate matter contains numerous organic species, including several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are known or suspected carcinogens. Existing methods for measuring airborne PAHs are complex and costly, primarily because they are designed to collect...

  19. Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shiyong; Stock, L.M.

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the results of research on the development of new catalytic pathways for the hydrogenation of multiring aromatic hydrocarbons and the hydrotreating of coal liquids at The University of Chicago under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-91PC91056. The work, which is described in three parts, is primarily concerned with the research on the development of new catalytic systems for the hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen. Part A discusses the activation of dihydrogen by very basic molecular reagents to form adducts that can facilitate the reduction of multiring aromatic hydrocarbons. Part B examines the hydrotreating of coal liquids catalyzed by the same base-activated dihydrogen complexes. Part C concerns studies of molecular organometallic catalysts for the hydrogenation of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under mild conditions.

  20. Evidence for the extraterrestrial origin of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Clemett, S J; Dulay, M T; Gillette, J S; Chillier, X D; Mahajan, T B; Zare, R N

    1998-01-01

    Possible sources of terrestrial contamination are considered for the observation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Contamination is concluded to be negligible. PMID:9809015

  1. COMPUTATIONAL METHODS FOR STUDYING THE INTERACTION BETWEEN POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND BIOLOGICAL MACROMOLECULES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational Methods for Studying the Interaction between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Biological Macromolecules .

    The mechanisms for the processes that result in significant biological activity of PAHs depend on the interaction of these molecules or their metabol...

  2. PHOTOACTIVATION AND TOXICITY OF MIXTURES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON COMPOUNDS IN MARINE SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The direct toxicity and photoinduced toxicity of sediment-associated acenaphthene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene were determined for the marine amphipod Rhepoxynius abronius. The four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were spiked into sediment in a concentration se...

  3. DIGESTIVE BIOAVAILABILITY TO A DEPOSIT FEDDER (ARENICOLA MARINA) OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS ASSOCIATED WITH ANTHRPOGENIC PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Marine sediments around urban areas serve as catch basins for anthropogenic particles containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Using incubations with gut fluids extracted from a deposit-feeding polychaete (Arenicola marina), we determined the digestive bioavailability ...

  4. SCREENING METHODS FOR PAH (POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBON) PRIORITY POLLUTANTS IN WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A screening method for the determination of total polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentration in industrial effluents was developed. The method employs solvent extraction, alumina column chromatographic cleanup, and UV absorbance determination. The UV detection step util...

  5. INDUCTION OF NUCLEAR ANOMALIES IN GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT BY POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A selective list of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) with varied carcinogenic and mutagenic potencies, which are identified as common contaminants at superfund clean up sites and neighboring ground water, are investigated for their ability to induce nuclear anomalies (NA) i...

  6. THE PHOTOTOXOICITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS: A THEORETICAL STUDY OF EXCITED STATES AND CORRELATION TO EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigators using models to determine the phototoxic effects of sunlight on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) have invoked the excited states of the molecule as important in elucidating the mechanism of these reactions. Energies of actual excited states were calculated fo...

  7. QSARS FOR PREDICTING REDUCTIVE TRANSFORMATION RATE CONSTANTS OF HALOGENATED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ANOXIC SEDIMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) are developed relating initial and final pseudo-first-order disappearance rate constants of 45 halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons in anoxic sediments to four readily available molecular descriptors: the carbon-halogen bond stre...

  8. METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND OTHER SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN HOUSE DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical methods were validated to determine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and other semivolatile organic compounds in house dust. e also examined the storage stability of three potential markers (solanesol, nicotine, and continine) for particulate-phase environmental ...

  9. MULTISUBSTRATE BIODEGRADATION KINETICS FOR BINARY AND COMPLEX MIXTURES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biodegradation kinetics were studied for binary and complex mixtures of nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): naphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene, 2-methylnaphthalene, 2-ethylnaphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene, fluorene and fluoranthene. Discrepancies between the ...

  10. EVALUATION OF POLYURETHANE FOAM CARTRIDGES FOR MEASUREMENT OF POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project was to evaluate polyurethane foam (PUF) cartridges as collection media for quantification of vapor phase polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in air. Two cleanup methods for PUF cartridges--compression rinsing and combined compression rinsing and...

  11. Modeling the Role of Alkanes, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, and Their Oligomers in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A computationally efficient method to treat secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from various length and structure alkanes as well as SOA from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is implemented in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to predict aerosol concentrations ...

  12. COMBINED CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL OXIDATION OF SLURRY PHASE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioslurry treatment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-impacted soils was demonstrated under the Superfund Innovative Technologies Evaluation (SITE)/Emerging Technologies Program (ETD) as an extension of research previously funded by IT Corporation (IT) (Brown and Sanseveri...

  13. STUDIES ON BIOREMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS: BIOAVAILABILITY, BIODEGRADABILITY, AND TOXICITY ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The widespread contamination of aquatic sediments by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has created a need for cost-effective bioremediation processes, on which the bioavailability and the toxicity of PAHs often have a significant impact. This research investigated the biode...

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in frying oils and snacks.

    PubMed

    Purcaro, Giorgia; Navas, Jos A; Guardiola, Francesc; Conte, Lanfranco S; Moret, Sabrina

    2006-01-01

    The high incidence of lung cancer observed among Chinese women has been associated with exposure to fumes from cooking oil. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of potentially mutagenic substances emitted from cooking oils heated at high temperatures. The objective of this study was to investigate whether deep frying with different oils under different conditions leads to the development of PAHs either in the oil or in the fried product (snacks). PAH analysis was carried out with solid-phase extraction followed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and spectrofluorometric detection. Different oils were used to fry chips and extruded snacks in different industrial plants (continuous frying) at temperatures between 170 and 205 degrees C, and peanut oil was used to fry French fries and fish (discontinuous frying) at temperatures between 160 and 185 degrees C. No appreciable differences in PAH load was observed in the same oil before and after frying. Both before and after frying, the benzo[a]pyrene concentration in oils ranged from trace to 0.7 ppb. All the analyzed samples, including oils from fried snacks, had benzo[a]pyrene concentrations well below the 2 ppb limit recently proposed by the European Community. PMID:16416919

  15. Vibrational spectroscopic study of vinyl substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Anju; Rastogi, Shantanu

    2015-12-01

    The mid infrared emission features observed in various astrophysical sources are attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. The models of emission spectra from a collection of PAHs show uncertainty in matching the 6.2 ?m feature. This indicates the need to consider a larger variety of PAHs and PAH derivatives. Chemical pathways towards formation of PAHs in the astrophysical environments involve vinyl substituted PAHs as intermediate products. Vibrational spectroscopic study of vinyl-PAHs is reported in the present work. The vinyl group is substituted at similar positions in eight different PAHs. The obtained optimized structures show that vinyl substitution at 2 position in acenes gives planar geometry, while all other vinyl-PAHs are non-planar. Infrared spectra is simulated for neutrals as well as for cations. The results are compared with the spectra of corresponding plain PAHs and analyzed for possible match with astrophysical observations. New features, due to vinyl group in the composite spectra, identified at 6.64, 6.92, 7.27, 8.77 and 10.35 ?m fall close to some sub features of the observed emission spectra. The paper provides data that may be used in the emission models particularly along proto planetary nebulae type cool objects. PMID:26117194

  16. Selective fluorescence quenching of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by aliphatic amines

    PubMed

    Goodpaster; McGuffin

    2000-03-01

    The ability of primary, secondary, and tertiary mono- and diamines to serve as fluorescence quenchers for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been evaluated in acetonitrile and methanol. In general, the efficiency of quenching increases with the electron-donating ability of the amine and with the number of amine groups. The selectivity for nonalternant PAHs relative to the alternant isomers appears to decrease as the quenching efficiency increases. Nevertheless, all of the amines exhibit greater selectivity than 1,2,4-trimethoxybenzene, a previously characterized selective quencher for nonalternant PAHs. The experimentally measured rate constants for dynamic quenching show good agreement to those predicted by Rehm-Weller electron-transfer theory in the solvent acetonitrile. In contrast, the rate constants in methanol are anomalously low and do not conform well to Rehm-Weller theory. Presumably this is due to explicit hydrogen bonding between the solvent and quencher, which decreases the concentration of the free amine that is available for fluorescence quenching. PMID:10739214

  17. Infrared Spectroscopy of Matrix-Isolated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Cations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, D. M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    Gaseous, ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are thought to be responsible for a very common family of interstellar infrared emission bands. Here the near- and mid-infrared spectra of the cations of the five most thermodynamically favored PAHs up to coronene: phenanthrene, pyrene, benzo(e)pyrene, benzo-(ghi)perylene, and coronene, are presented to test this hypothesis. For those molecules that have been studied previously (pyrene, pyrene-d(sub 10), and coronene), band positions and relative intensities are in agreement. In all of these cases we report additional features. Absolute integrated absorbance values are given for the phenanthrene, perdeuteriophenanthrene, pyrene, benzo(ghi]perylene, and coronene cations. With the exception of coronene, the cation bands corresponding to the CC modes are typically 2-5 times more intense than those of the CH out-of-plane bending vibrations. For the cations, the CC stretching and CH in-plane bending modes give rise to bands that are an order of magnitude stronger than those of the neutral species, and the CH out-of-plane bends produce bands that are 5-20 times weaker than those of the neutral species. This behavior is similar to that found in most other PAH cations studied to date. The astronomical implications of these PAH cation spectra are also discussed.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in stormwater runoff from sealcoated pavements.

    PubMed

    Watts, Alison W; Ballestero, Thomas P; Roseen, Robert M; Houle, James P

    2010-12-01

    Coal-tar based sealcoat has been identified as a source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment. This study measured the long-term release of PAHs in parking lot runoff and found that the presence of coal tar sealant increased the mass of PAHs released in runoff by over an order of magnitude. PAH concentrations in stormwater from two coal tar sealed parking lots and one unsealed parking lot (control) were monitored over a two-year period. The measured flow volume and concentrations were used to calculate a mass of 9.8-10.8 kg total ?16 PAHs per hectare exported in stormwater runoff from the two sealed parking lots and 0.34 kg total ?16 PAHs per hectare from the unsealed control. The study also measured sediment PAH concentration changes in a receiving drainage and found that even partial coverage of a drainage area by coal tar sealant resulted in measurable increases in PAH sediment concentrations; PAH concentrations in sediment in a stormwater swale receiving runoff from both sealed and unsealed lots increased near the outfall from less than 4 mg/kg prior to sealing to 95.7 mg/kg after sealing. Compound ratio plots and principal components analysis were examined and were able to clearly differentiate between pre- and postsealant samples. PMID:21047119

  19. Molecular Spectroscopy in Astrophysics: The Case of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincent, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The role of molecular spectroscopy in astrophysics and astrochemistry is discussed in the context of the study of large, complex, carbon-bearing molecules, namely, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons or PAHs. These molecular species are now thought to be widespread in the interstellar medium in their neutral and ionized forms. Identifying the carriers responsible for unidentified interstellar spectral bands will allow to derive important information on cosmic elemental abundances as well as information on the physical conditions (density, temperature) reigning in specific interstellar environments. These, in turn, are key elements for a correct understanding of the energetic mechanisms that govern the origin and the evolution of the interstellar medium. A multidisciplinary approach - combining astronomical observations with laboratory simulations and theoretical modeling - is required to address these complex issues. Laboratory spectra of several PAHs, isolated at low temperature in inert gas matrices or seeded in a supersonic jet expansion, are discussed here and compared to the astronomical spectra of reddened, early type, stars. The electronic spectroscopy of PAHs in the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared domains is reviewed and an assessment of the potential contribution of PAHs to the interstellar extinction in the ultraviolet and in the visible is discussed.

  20. Anharmonicity and infrared bands of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrignani, Annemieke; Maltseva, Elena; Candian, Alessandra; Mackie, Cameron; Huang, Xinchuan; Lee, Timothy J.; Tielens, Alexander; Oomens, Jos; Buma, Wybren Jan

    2015-08-01

    We present a systematic laboratory study of the CH stretching region in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules of different shapes and sizes to investigate anharmonic behaviour and address the reliability of the never-validated but universally accepted scaling factors employed in astronomical PAH models. At the same time, new anharmonic theoretical quantum chemistry studies have been performed with the software program Spectro using our experimental data as benchmark. We performed mass and conformational-resolved, high-resolution spectroscopy of cold (~10K) linear and compact PAH molecules starting with naphthalene (C10H8) in the 3-m CH stretching region. Surprisingly, the measured infrared spectra show many more strong modes than expected. Measurements of the deuterated counterparts demonstrate that these bands are the result of Fermi Resonances. First comparisons with harmonic and anharmonic DFT calculations using Gaussian 09 show that both approximations are not able to reproduce in detail the observed molecular reality. The improved anharmonic calculations performed with Spectro now include the effects of Fermi resonances and have been applied to PAHs for the first time. The analysis of the experimental data is greatly aided by these new theoretical quantum chemistry studies. Preliminary assignments are presented, aided by comparison between the observed rotational contour and the symmetry of candidate bands.

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and fatal ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Burstyn, I.; Kromhout, H.; Partanen, T.; Svane, O.; Langard, S.; Ahrens, W.; Kauppinen, T.; Stucker, I.; Shaham, J.; Heederik, D.; Ferro, G.; Heikkila, P.; Hooiveld, M.; Johansen, C.; Randem, B.G.; Boffetta, P.

    2005-11-01

    Several toxicologic and epidemiologic studies have produced evidence that occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is a risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, a clear exposure-response relation has not been demonstrated. We studied a relation between exposure to PAH and mortality from IHD (418 cases) in a cohort of 12,367 male asphalt workers from Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Israel, The Netherlands and Norway. Exposures to benzo(a)pyrene were assessed quantitatively using measurement-driven exposure models. Exposure to coal tar was assessed in a semiquantitative manner on the basis of information supplied by company representatives. We carried out sensitivity analyses to assess potential confounding by tobacco smoking. Both cumulative and average exposure indices for benzo(a)pyrene were positively associated with mortality from IHD. The highest relative risk for fatal IHD was observed for average benzo(a)pyrene exposures of 273 ng/m{sup 3} or higher, for which the relative risk was 1.64(95% confidence interval = 1.13-2.38). Similar results were obtained for coal tar exposure. Sensitivity analysis indicated that even in a realistic scenario of confounding by smoking, we would observe approximately 20% to 40% excess risk in IHD in the highest PAH-exposure categories. Our results lend support to the hypothesis that occupational PAH exposure causes fatal IHD and demonstrate a consistent exposure-response relation for this association.

  2. Accumulation and cycling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Berrojalbiz, Naiara; Lacorte, Silvia; Calbet, Albert; Saiz, Enric; Barata, Carlos; Dachs, Jordi

    2009-04-01

    Planktonic food webs play an important role driving the environmental fate of persistent organic pollutants, and POP accumulation in phytoplankton has been previously studied for its importance as a first step in the aquatic food webs. However, little is known about the accumulation and cycling of organic pollutants between zooplankton and water. The present study shows the results of laboratory experiments on the bioconcentration (by passive uptake) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in phytoplankton (Rhodomonas salina) and accumulation in copepods (Paracartia(acartia) granm), by ingestion and diffusion. Both bioconcentration (BCF) and bioaccumulation (BAF) factors show significant correlation with the octanol-water partition coefficient (Kow) for phytoplankton and zooplankton. The BCF values for phytoplankton were 2 orders of magnitude higher than those for copepods. The analysis of fecal pellets shows that elimination by defecation is mainly significant for PAHs taken up from ingested phytoplankton but not due to passive uptake. However, the dominant elimination mechanisms are by far metabolism and diffusive depuration. Indeed, the mass balance suggests that metabolism of PAHs by copepods is a significant process that could play a role in the fate of PAHs in the water column. Uptake, depuration, eggestion, and ingestion rates increased with hydrophobicity of the chemical, while the metabolism rate was slightly higher for the less hydrophobic compounds. Passive partitioning dominated the accumulation of POPs in zooplankton. The derivation of all the uptake and loss rate constants for PAHs opens the doorto future modeling studies of the role of zooplankton in PAH cycling in the marine environment. PMID:19452877

  3. DUSTY WINDS: EXTRAPLANAR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FEATURES OF NEARBY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, Alexander; Veilleux, Sylvain; Rupke, David S. N. E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2013-09-10

    Recent observations have shown the presence of dust and molecular material in galactic winds, but relatively little is known about the distribution of these outflow components. To shed some light on this issue, we have used IRAC images from the Spitzer Space Telescope archive to investigate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission from a sample of 16 local galaxies with known winds. Our focus on nearby sources (median distance 8.6 Mpc) has revealed detailed PAH structure in the winds and allowed us to measure extraplanar PAH emission. We have identified extraplanar PAH features on scales of {approx}0.8-6.0 kpc. We find a nearly linear correlation between the amount of extraplanar PAH emission and the total infrared flux, a proxy for star formation activity in the disk. Our results also indicate a correlation between the height of extraplanar PAH emission and star formation rate surface density, which supports the idea of a surface density threshold on the energy or momentum injection rate for producing detectable extraplanar wind material.

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ions and the diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    Neutral naphthalene (C10H8), phenanthrene (C14H10), and pyrene (C16H10) absorb strongly in the ultraviolet and may contribute to the extinction curve. High abundances are required to produce detectable structures. The cations of these Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) absorb in the visible. C10H8(+) has 12 discrete absorption bands which fall between 6800 and 5000 A. The strongest band at 6741 A falls close to the weak 6742 A diffuse interstellar band (DIB). Five other weaker bands also match DIBs. The possibility that C10H8(+) is responsible for some of the DIBs can be tested by searching for new DIBS at 6520, 6151, and 5965 A, other moderately strong naphthalene cation band positions. If C10H8(+) is indeed responsible for the 6742 A feature, it accounts for 0.3% of the cosmic carbon. The spectrum of C16H10(+) is dominated by a strong band at 4435 A in an Ar matrix and 4395 A in a Ne matrix, a position which falls very close to the strongest DIB, that at 4430 A. If C16H10(+), or a closely related pyrene-like ion is indeed responsible for the 4430 A feature, it accounts for 0.2% of the cosmic carbon. We also report an intense, very broad UV-to-visible continuum which is associated with both ions and could explain how PAHs convert interstellar UV and visible radiation into IR.

  5. Mild extractability and bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.; Alexander, M.

    1999-12-01

    A study was conducted to determine the relationship between bioavailability of unaged and aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil and the amounts detected by mild solvent extraction. More aged than unaged anthracene remained in Lima loam following introduction of earthworms (Eisenia foetida), a mixed culture containing anthracene-degrading microorganisms, or earthworms or wheat after bacterial biodegradation of the compound. Aging decreased the percentage of anthracene recovered by mild extraction with n-butanol from soil following introduction of earthworms, growth of wheat, biodegradation by bacteria, or when maintained sterile. Biodegradation resulted in a marked decrease in the percentage of aged and unaged anthracene recovered from soil by mild extraction with n-butanol or ethyl acetate. Aging of fluoranthene and pyrene decreased the amount removed by mild extraction with n-butanol, ethyl acetate, and propanol. The uptake of aged and unaged anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene by earthworms was correlated with the amounts recovered from soil by mild extraction with n-butanol, propanol, and ethyl acetate. The retention of aged and unaged anthracene by wheat and barley was correlated with the amounts recovered from soil by the same procedure. The authors suggest that mild extraction with organic solvents can be used to predict the bioavailability of PAHs in soil.

  6. FT-IR spectroscopic studies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, D. W.; Allen, J. E., Jr.; Donn, B.; Moore, W. J.; Khanna, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    Proper assessment of the hypothesis which correlates polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with the unidentified infrared emission bands requires additional experimental laboratory data. In order to address this need, thermal infrared emission studies were performed on a subset of PAHs suggested to be of astrophysical importance. It was proposed that infrared emission from interstellar PAHs occurs following absorption of an ultraviolet photon. Since energy transfer to the ground electronic state can be rapid for a species in which intersystem crossing is negligible, the emission spectrum may be viewed as resulting from an equilibrium vibrational temperature (Leger and d'Hendecourt, 1987). This has been the basis for using infrared absorption spectra to calculate the corresponding emission spectra at various temperatures. These calculations were made using room temperature infrared absorption coefficients instead of those at the temperature of interest because of the latter's unavailability. The present studies are designed to address the differences between the calculated and experimental thermal emission spectra and to provide information which will be useful in future ultraviolet induced infrared fluorescence studies. The emission spectra have been obtained for temperatures up to 825K using an emission cell designed to mount against an external port of an FT-IR spectrometer. These spectra provide information concerning relative band intensities and peak positions which is unavailable from previous calculations.

  7. Fullerenes, fulleranes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, L.; Bunch, T. E.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we confirm our earlier observations of fullerenes (C60 and C70) in the Allende meteorite (Becker et al., 1994a, 1995). Fullerene C60 was also detected in two separate C-rich (approximately 0.5-1.0%) dark inclusions (Heymann et al., 1987) that were hand picked from the Allende sample. The amounts of C60 detected were approximately 5 and approximately 10 ppb, respectively, which is considerably less than what was detected in the Allende 15/21 sample (approximately 100 ppb; Becker et al., 1994a, 1995). This suggests that fullerenes are heterogeneously distributed in the meteorite. In addition, we present evidence for fulleranes, (C60Hx), detected in separate samples by laser desorption (reflectron) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (LDMS). The LDMS spectra for the Allende extracts were remarkably similar to the spectra generated for the synthetic fullerane mixtures. Several fullerane products were synthesized using a Rh catalyst (Becker et al., 1993a) and separated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also observed ppm levels) that included benzofluoranthene and corannulene, a cup-shaped molecule that has been proposed as a precursor molecule to the formation of fullerenes in the gas phase (Pope et al., 1993).

  8. Measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemett, S. J.; Maechling, C. R.; Zare, R. N.; Swan, P. D.; Walker, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    We report here the first definitive measurements of specific organic molecules (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's)) in interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). An improved version of the microbeam-two-step laser mass spectrometer was used for the analysis. Two IDP's gave similar mass spectra showing an abundance of PAH's. Control samples, including particles of probable terrestrial origin from the same stratospheric collector, gave either null results or quite different spectra. We conclude that the PAH's are probably indigenous to the IDP's and are not terrestrial contaminants. The instrument used to study the particles is a two-step laser mass spectrometer. Constituent neutral molecules of the sample are first desorbed with a pulsed infrared laser beam focussed to 40 micrometers. In the second step, PAH's in the desorbed plume are preferentially ionized by a pulsed UV laser beam. Resulting ions produced by resonant absorption are extracted into a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. This instrument has high spatial resolution, high ion transmission, unlimited mass range, and multichannel detection of all ion masses from a single laser shot.

  9. Bioaccessibility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: relevance to toxicity and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kelly L; Banks, Leah D; Mantey, Jane A; Huderson, Ashley C; Ramesh, Aramandla

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Bioaccessibility is a growing area of research in the field of risk assessment. As polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants, they are the toxicants of focus to establish cancer risks in humans. Orally ingested PAHs also cause toxicity and even affect the pharmacokinetic behavior of some therapeutic agents. Toward this end, bioaccessibility is being used as a tool to assess the risk of PAHs via dietary exposures. Areas covered This review covers some in vitro bioaccessibility models for PAHs that have been used for the past one-and-a-half decade. This review also considers the factors that influence bioaccessibility and debates the merits and limitations of using a bioaccessibility concept for estimating risk from ingestion of PAH-contaminated soil and food. Finally, the authors discuss the implications of bioaccessibility for PAH-induced toxicity and cancers in the context of risk assessment. Expert opinion So far, much of the focus on PAH bioaccessibility is centered on soil as a preferential matrix. However, ingestion of PAHs through diet far exceeds the amount accidentally ingested through soil. Therefore, bioaccessibility could be exploited as a tool to assess the relative risk of various dietary ingredients tainted with PAHs. While bioaccessibility is a promising approach for assessing PAH risk arising from various types of contaminated soils, none of the models proposed appears to be valid. Bioaccessibility values, derived from in vitro studies, still require validation from in vivo studies. PMID:23898780

  10. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in rhizosphere soil

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, A.P.; Banks, M.K.; Arunachalam, M.

    1995-12-31

    Increased contaminant biodegradation in soil in the presence of plants has been demonstrated for several classes of organic compounds. Although enhanced dissipation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was observed previously in the rhizosphere of several plant species, the mechanism of this effect has not been assessed. A laboratory experiment was conducted to test the importance of cometabolism and the presence of common rhizosphere organic acids on the loss of PAHs (pyrene and phenanthrene) from soil. The role of cometabolism in the mineralization of pyrene was tested by observing the impact of adding phenanthrene to soil containing {sup 14}C-pyrene and observing the effects on {sup 14}CO{sub 2} generation. Adding phenanthrene apparently induced cometabolism of pyrene, particularly in the presence of organic acids. In a subsequent experiment, mineralization of pyrene to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was significantly greater in soil from the rhizospheres of warm-season grasses, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) and bermuda grass (Cynodon dactylon L.), compared to soil from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), which did not differ from sterilized control soil. A highly branched, fine root system appears to be more effective in enhancing biodegradation than taproots, and the presence of organic acids increases rates of PAH mineralization.

  11. Enhancement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation in the rhizosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.C.; Banks, M.K.; Schwab, A.P.

    1994-12-31

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of potentially hazardous chemicals that exhibit toxic, mutagenic or carcinogenic properties. Microbial degradation is the major route through which PAHs are removed from contaminated environments although other mechanisms such as volatilization, leaching and photodegradation may also be effective. The rhizosphere contains a diversity of microorganisms that contribute to plant health and soil homeostasis. Recent studies indicate that microorganisms in the rhizosphere can degrade toxicants of concern to human health and the environment. The increased density and diversity of rhizosphere microflora may be an important factor for enhanced microbial degradation of PAHs. The objective of this study is to evaluate degradation of a number of different PAHs in rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soil. It has been shown that the biodegradation rates of PAHs increase as the number of PAH rings decrease, but there is little information about the biodegradation in rhizosphere soil. The study will provide results from a microcosm experiment designed to evaluate degradation of PAHs in rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere. Also, kinetic models will be developed to represent data collected.

  12. Photochlorination of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Acidic Brine Solution.

    PubMed

    Ohura, Takeshi; Miwa, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    The potential for the formation of chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons via photochlorination of PAHs has been investigated in milli-Q water/synthetic water containing NaCl and PAHs with either UV or visible light. The photochlorination of pyrene occurred under acidic conditions in the presence of both UV and visible light, resulting in 1-chloropyrene as the main product. Benzo[a]pyrene yielded 6-chlorobenzo[a]pyrene following visible light irradiation; however the reaction was dependent upon solution pH. The photochlorination of PAHs was proposed to proceed via a consecutive reaction model. The rate constants associated with the photochlorination and photodecay processes were determined with the observed and theoretical values displaying similar trends, whereas the observed values were approximately 50-1000 times lower than the theoretical values. The lower observed values could be due to undergo photodecay rather than photochlorination of PAHs. Therefore, as photochlorination of PAHs appears to be significantly affected by solution pH, this information may allow for minimizing the impact on the environment. PMID:26728279

  13. Atmospheric transport and outflow of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from China

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Lang; Shu Tao; Wenxin Liu; Yanxu Zhang; Staci Simonich

    2008-07-15

    A potential receptor influence function (PRIF) model, based on air mass forward trajectory calculations, was applied to simulate the atmospheric transport and outflow of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from China. With a 10 day atmospheric transport time, most neighboring countries and regions, as well as remote regions, were influenced by PAH emissions from China. Of the total annual PAH emission of 114 Gg, 92.7% remained within the boundary of mainland China. The geographic distribution of PRIFs within China was similar to the geographic distribution of the source regions, with high values in the North China Plain, Sichuan Basin, Shanxi, and Guizhou province. The Tarim basin and Sichuan basin had unfavorable meteorological conditions for PAH outflow. Of the PAH outflow from China (8092 tons or 7.1% of the total annual PAH emission), approximately 69.9% (5655 tons) reached no further than the offshore environment of mainland China and the South China Sea. Approximate 227, 71, 746, and 131 tons PAHs reached North Korea, South Korea, Russia-Mongolia region, and Japan, respectively, 2-4 days after the emission. Only 1.4 tons PAHs reached North America after more than 9 days. Interannual variation in the eastward PAH outflow was positively correlated to cold episodes of El Nino/Southern Oscillation. However, trans-Pacific atmospheric transport of PAHs from China was correlated to Pacific North America index (PNA) which is associated with the strength and position of westerly winds. 38 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Atmospheric transport and outflow of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from China.

    PubMed

    Lang, Chang; Tao, Shu; Liu, Wenxin; Zhang, Yanxu; Simonich, Staci

    2008-07-15

    A potential receptor influence function (PRIF) model, based on air mass forward trajectory calculations, was applied to simulate the atmospheric transport and outflow of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from China. With a 10 day atmospheric transport time, most neighboring countries and regions, as well as remote regions, were influenced by PAH emissions from China. Of the total annual PAH emission of 114 Gg, 92.7% remained within the boundary of mainland China. The geographic distribution of PRIFs within China was similar to the geographic distribution of the source regions, with high values in the North China Plain, Sichuan Basin, Shanxi, and Guizhou province. The Tarim basin and Sichuan basin had unfavorable meteorological conditions for PAH outflow. Of the PAH outflow from China (8092 tons or 7.1% of the total annual PAH emission), approximately 69.9% (5655 tons) reached no further than the offshore environment of mainland China and the South China Sea. Approximate 227, 71, 746, and 131 tons PAHs reached North Korea, South Korea, Russia-Mongolia region, and Japan, respectively, 2-4 days after the emission. Only 1.4 tons PAHs reached North America after more than 9 days. Interannual variation in the eastward PAH outflow was positively correlated to cold episodes of El Niño/Southern Oscillation. However, trans-Pacific atmospheric transport of PAHs from China was correlated to Pacific North America index (PNA) which is associated with the strength and position of westerly winds. PMID:18754369

  15. Aromatized arborane/fernane hydrocarbons as biomarkers for cordaites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auras, Stefan; Wilde, Volker; Scheffler, Kay; Hoernes, Stephan; Kerp, Hans; Pttmann, Wilhelm

    2006-12-01

    Previous palaeobotanical and palynological studies on coals from Euramerican Pennsylvanian (? Late Carboniferous) coal basins indicate a major change in coal-swamp floras, especially at the Westphalian Stephanian (?Kasimovian Gzhelian, according to Geological Time Scale 2004) boundary. A flora dominated by arborescent lycophytes was replaced by a vegetation dominated by marattialean tree ferns in various Euramerican coal basins. Earlier combined palynological and organic geochemical studies on Westphalian/Stephanian coals and shales from the Saar-Nahe Basin (Germany) revealed that the distribution of aromatized arborane/fernane hydrocarbons in solvent extracts reflects the increasing importance of seed plants, especially cordaites (extinct group of gymnosperms), conifers and pteridosperms. However, the biological source of the precursor molecules could not be specified. To clarify if the arborane/fernane derivatives MATH, MAPH, DAPH 1, and DAPH 2 in Westphalian/Stephanian coals can be assigned to one of the three potential source plant groups, we analyzed coals, sediments and fossil plant remains from different Euramerican locations with respect to their biomarker composition and stable carbon isotopic composition. Thereby, stable carbon isotopic ratios showed only insignificant variations between Westphalian and Stephanian samples and proved to be an unsuitable tool to describe floral changes during the Westphalian/Stephanian of the Saar-Nahe Basin. In contrast, we were able to show for the first time that MATH, MAPH, DAPH 1 and DAPH 2 are prominent constituents only in extracts of cordaitean macrofossils and can therefore be regarded as biomarkers for this group of gymnosperms.

  16. New insights into thermal decomposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon oxyradicals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Lin, He; Yang, Yang; Shao, Can; Gu, Chen; Huang, Zhen

    2014-12-01

    Thermal decompositions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) oxyradicals on various surface sites including five-membered ring, free-edge, zigzag, and armchair have been systematically investigated by using ab initio density functional theory B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) basis set. The calculation based on Hckel theory indicates that PAHs (3H-cydopenta[a]anthracene oxyradical) with oxyradicals on a five-membered ring site have high chemical reactivity. The rate coefficients of PAH oxyradical decomposition were evaluated by using Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and solving the master equations in the temperature range of 1500-2500 K and the pressure range of 0.1-10 atm. The kinetic calculations revealed that the rate coefficients of PAH oxyradical decomposition are temperature-, pressure-, and surface site-dependent, and the oxyradical on a five-membered ring is easier to decompose than that on a six-membered ring. Four-membered rings were found in decomposition of the five-membered ring, and a new reaction channel of PAH evolution involving four-membered rings is recommended. PMID:25386793

  17. Particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in transportation microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Douglas; Wu, Jun; Yang, Dongwoo; Jaimes, Guillermo

    2013-06-01

    This study is one of the first case studies to characterize the exposure of urban residents to traffic-related air pollution across locations and transportation microenvironments during everyday activities. Twenty-four adult residents of Boyle Heights, a neighborhood near downtown Los Angeles, carried a portable air pollution monitor and a Global Positioning Systems (GPS) tracking device for a total of 96 days. We found significant spatial and temporal variation in the particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pPAH) concentrations in transportation microenvironments. Average pPAH concentrations were higher while walking outdoors (190 ng m-3) compared to traveling in private passenger vehicles (138-155 ng m-3) or traveling in public transportation (61-124 ng m-3). Although travel comprised 5% of participant days, it was associated with 27% of overall daily pPAH exposure. Regression models explained 40-55% of the variation in daily average pPAH concentrations, and 40-44% of the variation in 1-min interval concentrations. Important factors included time spent traveling, travel speed, meteorological and nearby land use factors, time of day, and proximity to roadways. Although future research is needed to develop stronger predictive models, our study demonstrates portable tracking devices can provide a more complete, diurnal characterization of air pollution exposures for urban populations.

  18. Outflow of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from Guangdong, southern China.

    PubMed

    Lang, Chang; Tao, Shu; Zhang, Gang; Fu, Jiamo; Simonich, Staci

    2007-12-15

    The atmospheric outflow of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from Guangdong, China, a region of high PAH emission, was modeled using a potential receptor influence function (PRIF) probabilistic model which was based on a spatially resolved PAH inventory and air mass forward-trajectory calculations. Photochemical degradation and deposition (dry and wet) of PAHs during atmospheric transport were taken into consideration. On average, 48% of the PAHs (by mass) remained in the atmosphere for a transport period of 5 days, staying within the boundary of the source region. The medium molecular weight PAHs (four rings) were predicted to travel longer distances in the atmosphere than the low (three rings) or high molecular weight PAHs (five rings) because they are less photodegradable than the lower molecular weight, gas-phase PAHs and less likelyto undergo wet and dry depositions than the higher molecular weight, particulate phase PAHs. Under the strong influence of the East Asian monsoons in winter, the predominant outflow pattern of PAHs from Guangdong was to the South China Sea and Southeast Asian countries. In summer, PAHs were transported primarily to northern mainland China. Under particular weather conditions in winter, the PAH-containing air masses were lifted by cold fronts or convection and transported toward the Pacific Ocean by westerly winds. In addition to the distinct seasonality in PAH dispersion and outflow, interannual long-term variation in the outflow is likely influenced by El Nio and southern oscillation. PMID:18200865

  19. Remediation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Soil Using Cosolvent Flushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birak, P. S.; Hauswirth, S.; Miller, C. T.

    2010-12-01

    The ability of cosolvents to increase the solubility of hydrophobic organic contaminants has been well documented in the literature; however, few studies have examined its effectiveness with respect to field contaminated media. In this work, we examine the use of methanol flushing as a possible in-situ remediation technology using an aged, tar-contaminated field soil from a former manufactured gas plant containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). For 15 PAHs, batch experiments were used to determine the change in the equilibrium partitioning coefficient with cosolvent fraction based on a log-linear cosolvency model. Column experiments were conducted to examine the removal of PAHs using methanol solutions as a function of pore volumes flushed. Experiments were conducted in a 25-cm long glass column. Effluent concentrations were determined for PAHs. Methanol concentrations in effluent samples were also determined. A numerical model with coupled flow and transport equations was used to predict effluent concentrations of methanol and PAHs. During cosolvent flushing with 95% methanol solutions, approximately 80% of the total PAH mass was removed in the first four pore volumes. The remaining mass in the column appeared to be mass transfer limited, particularly for the low molecular weight PAHs.

  20. Aromatic hydrocarbons emissions in diesel and biodiesel exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrêa, Sérgio Machado; Arbilla, Graciela

    Regulated emissions of biodiesel blends are reasonably well documented in several works, non-regulated emissions, on the contrary, lack research. In this work, mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs and PAHs, respectively) emission tests were performed with a heavy-duty diesel engine, fueled with pure diesel (D) and biodiesel blends (v/v) of 2% (B2), 5% (B5) and 20% (B20%). The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of the biodiesel addition on the emission profile of MAHs and PAHs. The tests were conducted using a six cylinder heavy-duty engine, typical of the Brazilian fleet of urban buses, in a steady-state condition under 1500 rpm. The PAHs were sampled with Teflon filters and XAD-2 cartridges and were identified by gaseous chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer (GC/MS) and quantified by flame ionization detection (GC/FID). The MAHs were sampled with active charcoal cartridges and analyzed by GC/FID. Both MAHs and PAHs filters and cartridges were extracted with dichloromethane in an ultrasonic bath. Ten PAHs and eight MAHs were identified and the average reduction of MAHs was 4.2% (B5), 8.2% (B5), and 21.1% (B20). The average reduction for PAHs was 2.7% (B2), 6.3% (B5), and 17.2% (B20). However, some PAHs and MAHs emissions increased because of/due to the biodiesel blends like phenanthrene, ethyl benzene, and trimethyl benzenes.

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) removal by sorption: A review.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Shanti; Bal Krishna, K C; Sarukkalige, Ranjan

    2016-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are organic micro pollutants which are persistent compounds in the environment due to their hydrophobic nature. Concerns over their adverse effects in human health and environment have resulted in extensive studies on various types of PAHs removal methods. Sorption is one of the widely used methods as PAHs possess a great sorptive ability into the solid media and their low aqueous solubility property. Several adsorbent media such as activated carbon, biochar, modified clay minerals have been largely used to remove PAHs from aqueous solution and to immobilise PAHs in the contaminated soils. According to the past studies, very high removal efficiency could be achieved using the adsorbents such as removal efficiency of activated carbon, biochar and modified clay mineral were 100%, 98.6% and >99%, respectively. PAHs removal efficiency or adsorption/absorption capacity largely depends on several parameters such as particle size of the adsorbent, pH, temperature, solubility, salinity including the production process of adsorbents. Although many studies have been carried out to remove PAHs using the sorption process, the findings have not been consolidated which potentially hinder to get the correct information for future study and to design the sorption method to remove PAHs. Therefore, this paper summarized the adsorbent media which have been used to remove PAHs especially from aqueous solutions including the factor affecting the sorption process reported in 142 literature published between 1934 and 2015. PMID:26820781

  2. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in drinking water of Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Distribution and seasonal variation of sixteen priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in the drinking water of Tehran, the capital of Iran. Detected single and total PAHs concentrations were in the range of 2.01-38.96 and 32.45-733.10ng/L, respectively, which were quite high compared to the values recorded in other areas of the world. The average occurrence of PAHs with high molecular weights was 79.55%; for example, chrysene occurred in 60.6% of the samples, with a maximum concentration of 438.96ng/L. In addition, mean carcinogen to non-carcinogen PAHs ratio was 63.84. Although the concentration of benzo[a]pyrene, as an indicator of water pollution to PAHs, was lower than the guideline value proposed by World Health Organization (WHO) as well as that of Iranian National Drinking Water Standards for all of the samples, the obtained results indicated that carcinogen PAHs present in the drinking water of Tehran can cause threats to human health. PMID:24499505

  3. Absorption Spectroscopy of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons under Interstellar Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Bradley M.

    1996-01-01

    The presence and importance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, a large family of organic compounds containing carbon and hydrogen) in the interstellar medium has already been well established. The Astrochemistry Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center (under the direction of Louis Allamandola and Scott Sandford) has been the center of pioneering work in performing spectroscopy on these molecules under simulated interstellar conditions, and consequently in the identification of these species in the interstellar medium by comparison to astronomically obtained spectra. My project this summer was twofold: (1) We planned on obtaining absorption spectra of a number of PAHs and their cations in cold (4K) Ne matrices. The purpose of these experiments was to increase the number of different PAHs for which laboratory spectra have been obtained under these simulated interstellar conditions; and (2) I was to continue the planning and design of a new laser facility that is being established in the Astrochemistry laboratory. The laser-based experimental set-up will greatly enhance our capability in examining this astrophysically important class of compounds.

  4. Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction from Occupational Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Sun; Magari, Shannon; Christiani, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exposures have been associated with cardiopulmonary mortality and cardiovascular events. This study investigated the association between a biological marker of PAHs exposure, assessed by urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), and heart rate variability (HRV) in an occupational cohort of boilermakers. Methods Continuous 24-hour monitoring of the ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) and pre and post shift urinary 1-OHP were repeated over extended periods of the work week. Mixed effects models were fit for the 5-minute standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN) in relation to urinary 1-OHP levels pre and post workshift on the day they wore the monitor, controlling for potential confounders. Results We found a significant decrease in 5-min SDNN during work of −13.6% (95% confidence interval, −17.2% to −9.8%) for every standard deviation (0.53 microgram/gram [μg/g] creatinine) increase in the next-morning pre-shift 1-OHP levels. The magnitude of reduction in 5-min SDNN were largest during the late night period after work and increased with every standard deviation (0.46 μg/g creatinine) increase in post-shift 1-OHP levels. Conclusion This is the first report providing evidence that occupational exposure to PAHs is associated with altered cardiac autonomic function. Acute exposure to PAHs may be an important predictor of cardiovascular disease risk in the work environment. PMID:21172795

  5. Multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuanyuan; Imasaka, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Shigekazu; Imasaka, Totaro

    2015-08-01

    In order to suppress the fragmentation and improve the sensitivity for determination of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs), the mechanism of multiphoton ionization was studied for the following representative NPAHs, 9-nitroanthracene, 3-nitrofluoranthene, and 1-nitropyrene. The analytes were extracted from the PM2.5 on the sampling filter ultrasonically, and were measured using gas chromatography/multiphoton ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry with a femtosecond tunable laser in the range from 267 to 405 nm. As a result, a molecular ion was observed as the major ion and fragmentation was suppressed at wavelengths longer than 345 nm. Furthermore, the detection limit measured at 345 nm was measured to be the subpicogram level. The organic compounds were extracted from a 2.19 mg sample of particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5), and the extract was subjected to multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry after gas chromatograph separation. The background signals were drastically suppressed at 345 nm, and the target NPAHs, including 9-nitroanthracene and 1-nitropyrene, were detected, and their concentrations were determined to be 5 and 3 pg/m(3), respectively. PMID:26048831

  6. Magnetic Beads-based Bioelectrochemical Immunoassay of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ying-Ying; Liu, Guodong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-07-01

    A simple, rapid, and sensitive bioelectrochemical immunoassay method based on magnetic beads (MBs) has been developed to detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The principle of this bioassay is based on a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using PAH-antibody-coated MBs and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled PAH (HRP-PAH). A magnetic process platform was used to mix and shake the samples during the immunoreactions and to separate free and unbound reagents after the liquid-phase competitive immunoreaction among PAH-antibody-coated MBs, PAH analyte, and HRP-PAH. After a complete immunoassay, the HRP tracers attached to MBs were transferred to a substrate solution containing 3, 3, 5, 5- tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for electrochemical detection. The voltammetric characteristics of the substrate were investigated, and the reduction peak current of TMB was used to quantify the concentration of PAH. The different parameters, including the amount of HRP-PAH conjugates, the enzyme catalytic reaction time, and the pH of the supporting electrolyte that governs the analytical performance of the immunoassay have been studied in detail and optimized. The detection limit of 50 pg mL-1 was obtained under optimum experimental conditions. The performance of this bioelectrochemical magnetic immunoassay was successfully evaluated with tap water spiked with PAHs, indicating that this convenient and sensitive technique offers great promise for decentralized environmental applications.

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon adsorption on selected solid particulate matter fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozek, Frantisek; Huzlik, Jiri; Pawelczyk, Adam; Hoza, Ignac; Naplavova, Magdalena; Jedlicka, Jiri

    2016-02-01

    This article is directed to evaluating the proportion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) captured on particulate matter (PM) classified as PM2.5-10 and PM2.5, i.e. particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter 2.5-10 μm and 2.5 μm. During three week-long and one 2-day campaigns, 22 paired air samples were taken in parallel of PM10 and PM2.5 fractions inside the Mrázovka tunnel in Prague, Czech Republic. Following sample preparation, concentrations of individual PAHs were determined using gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry. Concentrations of individual pairs of each PAH were tested by the nonparametric method using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. At significance level p < 0.01, it was demonstrated that all individual PAHs, including their totals, were bound to the PM2.5 fraction. Exceptions were seen in the cases of acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, the concentrations of which fluctuated around the detection limit, where increased measurement error can be expected.

  8. Fibrous adsorbent for removal of aqueous aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong-Jun; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Oguchi, Tatsuo; Yamada, Toshiro; Takagi, Hiroo; Nishimura, Kazuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Bundles of a strongly hydrophobic fibrous material (p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole; PBO; Zylon) were employed as an adsorbent for the removal of aqueous aromatic compounds, because the PBO fibers are too rigid to be woven and did not entrap suspended solids. The removal performance for nine kinds of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was evaluated. PAHs and DEHP at initial concentrations of 50 microg L(-1) were removed at 72.5-99.9% and ca. 95%, respectively, although the removal efficiencies were affected by the phase ratio (fiber weight/solution volume). The logarithm of the partition coefficient (log K) for planar PAHs was linearly correlated with the logarithm of the n-octanol/water partition coefficient (log P), but nonplanar PAHs, such as cis-stilbene, p-terphenyl, and o-terphenyl, showed significantly lower adsorption performance. The adsorbed PAHs were not desorbed effectively with CH3CN, CH2Cl2, and toluene. On the other hand, DEHP was effectively desorbed with methanol. PMID:17585293

  9. Contributions of deposited particles to pine needle polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Chen, Jingwen; Wang, Zhen; Qiao, Xianliang; Cai, Xiyun; Tian, Fulin; Ge, Linke

    2007-11-01

    The contributions of deposited particles (P) to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels in pine (Cedrus deodar) needles sampled from the Dalian region were evaluated by washing off the particles from pine needle surfaces. P values ranged from 4.4 +/- 2.2% for fluorene to 69.9 +/- 4.0% for indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, and positively correlated with the logarithm of octanol-air partition coefficients (log K OA) of each PAH significantly. P and the total levels of 14 PAHs under study ( summation PAHs), that ranged from 490 to 3241 ng g(-1) dw (dry weight) with median value of 1521 ng g(-1) dw, were high for traffic areas, and low for residential or park areas, implying the significant contributions of PAHs in both gas and particle phases emitted by vehicles. However, PAH profiles in pine needles were not significantly altered by the washing, due to the low fractions (2-5%) of the 5- and 6-ring PAHs in summation PAHs. The high wind speed and frequently alternating wind directions in the Dalian spring could quicken the depuration processes of pine needle PAHs. Thus, the local meteorological conditions and source variations should be taken into account when using pine needles to implicate seasonal variations of atmospheric semi-volatile organic compounds. PMID:17968452

  10. Plant bioindicators for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon toxicity in aquatic microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Gensemer, R.W.; Solomon, K.R.; Day, K.E.; Hodson, P.V.; Servos, M.R.; Greenberg, B.M.

    1994-12-31

    Plant bioindicators are being developed to assess the effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in experimental aquatic ecosystems. The approach is to develop and test biomarker assays that are specifically predictive of ecological events at the population and/or community levels of organization in artificial aquatic microcosms. PAH mixtures were introduced into a series of aquatic microcosms using the wood preservative creosote as a PAH source. The authors applied creosote at five dosage levels designed to simulate conductions observed at highly contaminated sites. The growth and biomass of phytoplankton, periphyton, and macrophytes were then measured throughout the growing season, and compared to one or more biomarker assays used to detect PAH contamination. Preliminary results using fluorescence induction on aquatic macrophytes suggest that PAHs can significantly inhibit photosynthesis at even modest concentrations 1--4 hours after exposure. This assay thus is not only a sensitive indicator of PAH exposure, but may also describe mechanisms of PAH toxicity that ultimately reduce biomass or population growth for aquatic plants in these microcosms.

  11. Bacterial oxidation of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons acenaphthene and acenaphthylene.

    PubMed Central

    Schocken, M J; Gibson, D T

    1984-01-01

    A Beijerinckia sp. and a mutant strain, Beijerinckia sp. strain B8/36, were shown to cooxidize the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons acenaphthene and acenaphthylene. Both organisms oxidized acenaphthene to the same spectrum of metabolites, which included 1-acenaphthenol, 1-acenaphthenone, 1,2-acenaphthenediol, acenaphthenequinone, and a compound that was tentatively identified as 1,2-dihydroxyacenaphthylene. In contrast, acenaphthylene was oxidized to acenaphthenequinone and the compound tentatively identified as 1,2-dihydroxyacenaphthylene by the wild-type strain of Beijerinckia. Both of these products were also formed when the organism was incubated with synthetic cis-1,2-acenaphthenediol. A metabolite identified as cis-1,2-acenaphthenediol was formed from acenaphthylene by the mutant Beijerinckia sp. strain B8/36. Cell extracts prepared from the wild-type Beijerinckia strain contain a constitutive pyridine nucleotide-dependent dehydrogenase which can oxidize 1-acenaphthenol and 9-fluorenol. The results indicate that although acenaphthene and acenaphthylene are both oxidized to acenaphthenequinone, the pathways leading to the formation of this end product are different. PMID:6089663

  12. Engineered Antibodies for Monitoring of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Karu; Alexander E.; Roberts, Victoria A.; Li, Qing X.

    2000-03-06

    Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a large class of structurally similar pollutants. Rapid, inexpensive, and high-throughput methods to identify and monitor PAHs are needed in several DOE focus areas, including human and ecosystem health effects, risk and exposure assessment, decontamination and decommissioning, and remediation. DOE has sponsored and participated in several demonstration projects in which commercial immunoassay kits proved useful and cost-effective for detection of PAHs and other pollutants. The emerging generation of sensors and residue recovery methods will require panels of antibodies with relatively subtle differences in cross-reactivity. This project is based on the premise that genetic engineering should be much more successful than conventional polyclonal and monoclonal antibody methods for developing these antibody panels. One objective of this project has been to define the structural basis and mechanisms by which antibodies bind and cross-react with various PAHs. A second objective has been to use this information to produce recombinant antibodies with improved performance in analytical procedures that DOE can use. A third objective has been development of PAH residue recovery and cleanup methods that will be compatible with immunoassays, and make instrumental analysis faster, more accurate, and less expensive.

  13. Some carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, R. K.; Kumar, Pardeep; Ram, R. S.; Zaidi, Zahid H.

    1999-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have attracted spectroscopists, astrophysicts and environmentalist because of their importance in our day to day life. It is well known that epoxides are produced during the metabolism of PAHs and have the requisite chemical reactivity to qualify them for the role as an ultimate carcinogenic form of PAHs. Several carcinogenic PAHs such as 3.4-benzopyrene, 1.2,3.4-dibenzopyrene, 3.4,9.10- dibenzopyrene etc. are found to be present in tobacco smoke and among air pollutants. Although PAH molecules are being studied for last several years by using conventional spectroscopy but no systematic attempt has been made to study non-radiative transitions. In our laboratory, we have studied many PAH molecules by a non-destructive technique with unique capability and sensitivity, known as Photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy. PA spectroscopy is an analytical and research tool to get information about non-radiative transitions and singlet-triplet electronic transitions, where the conventional spectroscopic technique fails. The study of electronic transitions of some carcinogenic molecules are reported using PA and optical absorption spectra in boric acid glass in the region 250 - 400 nm. The electronic transitions of these molecules observed experimentally, have been interpreted using the optimized geometries and CNDO/S-CI method. A good agreement is found between the experimental and calculated results. Assignments of observed electronic transitions are made on the basis of singlet-triplet electronic transitions. Vibrations attached to these electronic transitions are attributed to the ground state vibrational modes.

  14. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Ionization Energy Lowering in Water Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    2004-01-01

    In studying various interstellar and solar system ice analogs, we have recently found that upon vacuum ultraviolet photolysis, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) frozen in water ice at low temperatures are easily ionized and indefinitely stabilized as trapped ions (Gudipati; Gudipati & Allamandola). Here we report the first experimental study that shows that PAH ionization energy is significantly lowered in PAH/H2O ices, in agreement with recent theoretical work (Woon & Park). The ionization energy (IE) of the PAH studied here, quaterrylene (C40H20, IE = 6.11 eV), is lowered by up to 2.11 eV in water ice. PAH ionization energy reduction in low-temperature water ice substantially expands the astronomical regions in which trapped ions and electrons may be important. This reduction in ionization energy should also hold for other types of trapped species in waterrich interstellar, circumstellar, and solar system ices. Subject headings: ISM: clouds - methods: laboratory - molecular processes - radiation mechanisms: nonthermal -ultraviolet: ISM - ultraviolet: solar system

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from joss paper furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hsi-Hsien; Jung, Ray-Chen; Wang, Ya-Fen; Hsieh, Lien-Te

    The emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were quantified for two joss paper furnaces burning two kinds of joss papers (recycled paper made and virgin bamboo made). A cyclone and a wet scrubber were installed in series on one of the two furnaces. Particulate and gaseous PAHs were collected with a sampling system meeting the criteria of U.S. EPA Modified Method 5. Twenty-one species of PAH were analyzed by GC/MS. Individual PAH emission factors vary from less than 1 mg kg -1 fuel to several tens of mg kg -1 fuel. The total (sum of 21 compounds) and the carcinogenic PAH (benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, indeno[1,2,3,-cd]pyrene, dibenz[a,h]anthracene) emission factors were not statistically different for the two furnaces and averaged 71.0 and 3.2 mg kg -1, respectively. The PAH profiles showed a predominance of naphthalene (58.1%), phenanthrene (11.7%) and fluorene (7.5%). Of the two joss papers examined, bamboo-made joss paper showed less emission in both particulate and gaseous PAHs. For particulate and gaseous PAHs, the removal efficiencies of total PAHs by the air pollution control devices were 42.5% and 11.7%, respectively. PAH emission factors in high airflow conditions were generally lower than those in low airflow condition.

  16. Aqueous leaching of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from bitumen and asphalt.

    PubMed

    Brandt, H C; de Groot, P C

    2001-12-01

    The application of bitumen in, e.g. asphalt roads, roofs and hydraulic applications will lead to the leaching of compounds from the bitumen/asphalt into the environment. Because polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in bitumen, static and dynamic leach tests have been performed to study the leaching behaviour of this class of compounds. Nine petroleum bitumens covering a representative range of commercially available products and one asphalt made from one of the bitumens have been tested in a static leach test. The asphalt has been also subjected to a dynamic leach test. The main conclusions are that a 30h dynamic leach test is sufficient to determine the equilibrium concentration that will be reached after bitumen or asphalt has been in contact with the water for more than 3-6 days. As an alternative to performing a leach test, this concentration can be calculated from the PAH concentrations in the bitumen, and their distribution coefficients, as calculated here, or from their aqueous solubilities. The equilibrium PAH concentrations in the leach water from bitumens stay well below the surface water limits that exist in several EEC-countries and are also more than an order of magnitude lower than the current EEC limits for potable water. PMID:11791850

  17. Atmospheric deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons onto Massachusetts Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Golomb, D.; Ryan, D.; Underhill, J.

    1997-12-31

    Wet and dry atmospheric deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was measured at biweekly intervals from 15 September 1992 to 16 September 1993 at two sites on Massachusetts Bay, Nahant, near Boston, and Truro, near the tip of Cape Cod. Wet and dry deposition was measured using a conventional wet/dry collector, except that the dry bucket contained a layer of water in order to simulate the uptake of dry deposition onto a water surface. The PAHs were extracted from the aqueous solution/suspension by methylene chloride and analyzed by GC-ECD and GC-MS. Dry and wet depositions of PAHs were significantly greater at Nahant than at Truro, due to the proximity of emission sources in the metropolitan Boston area. Highest deposition of PAHs was observed in the winter season. At Nahant, the total deposition (wet + dry) of PAHs amounted to 970 {mu}g m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1}, at Truro 350 {mu}g m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1}. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were not found above the detection limit of the analytical procedure.

  18. Bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Utvik, T.I.R. . Environmental Section); Johnsen, S. )

    1999-06-15

    Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) were used to determine the bioavailable fraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from oil field produced water in the North Sea. The SPMDs and mussels were deployed at 5, 10, and 50 m depth; 100 and 300 m downstream the discharge point; and at a reference site 16 km away. In both SPMDs and mussels, the concentration of PAHs increased significantly toward the discharge point, with the strongest contribution from the lower molecular weight compounds (naphthalene, phenanthrene, dibenzothiophene, and their C1-C3 alkyl homologues). The relative increase in PAH concentration from the reference site to the site at 100 m was higher for mussels than for the SPMDs. The SPMDs reflect the water-soluble fraction of the PAHs, which is probably the most important route of exposure for organisms at lower trophic levels and presumably also the fraction available for uptake by a respiratory route. Residues in the mussels represent both the water-soluble and particle-bound fraction and give information about bioavailability of the PAHs for organisms at higher trophic levels. The results of this study suggest that both techniques give important information about the bioavailability of PAHs to marine organisms.

  19. Role of iron catalyst on hydroconversion of aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, E.; Horie, Kazuyuki; Wei, Xain-Yong

    1995-12-31

    A symposium on iron-based catalysts for coal liquefaction was held at the 205th ACS National Meeting, and some of the papers have been published in Energy & Fuels. Reviews of the development of catalysts for coal liquefaction were also published in Journal of the Japan institute of Energy, and Ozaki reviewed the results of the studies of upgrading residual oils by means of thermal cracking and coking under reduced pressures, catalytic cracking over nickel ores and iron oxides, and hydrodesulfurization, as well as hydrodemetallization. We reported that catalysis of metallic iron and iron-sulfide catalysts were affected by the S/Fe ratio; the activity increased with pyrrhotite formation and the activity was accelerated by the presence of excess sulfur. Activity of pyrite FeS{sub 2} for phenanthrene hydrogenation and activity of natural ground pyrites for cow liquefaction decreased with storage under air. On the other hand, the NEDOL process for a coal liquefaction pilot plant of 150 t/d which is one of the national projects in Japan, will use pyrites as one of the catalysts for the first-stage because FeS{sub 2} has high activity and is low in price. In this paper, we describe in detail the role of iron catalysts in hydroconversion of aromatic hydrocarbons.

  20. Pollutants in Hong Kong soils: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Chung, M K; Hu, R; Cheung, K C; Wong, M H

    2007-03-01

    An extensive soil survey was carried out to study the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminations in 138 soil samples collected throughout Hong Kong. Results demonstrated that there were low levels of PAH contaminations (median of summation operator 16US EPA PAHs=140 microg kg(-1)) for all land uses (urban park, greening area, country park, rural area, restored landfill, agricultural farmland, orchard farm, crematorium, industrial and near highway area). However, localized hotspots were identified with summation operator 16PAH concentrations as high as 19,500 microg kg(-1) in one urban park. These findings were also confirmed by multivariate analysis. Comparison of PAH profiles showed a widespread domination of its 4-ring member. The major contribution was vehicular emissions from petroleum, and however at the hotspots, the improper disposal of used motor oils. In general, the pollution levels for all the land uses were below the recommended values for residential and general purposes stated in soil quality guidelines such as Netherlands and Denmark except certain identified hotspots. The potential health hazards imposed by these hotspots were alarming, and their existence (3 out of 138 samples) suggested that sole monitoring of atmospheric PAHs may not adequately address the hidden risks to human in urban city. PMID:17109918

  1. Occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in dust emitted from circulating fluidized bed boilers.

    PubMed

    Kozielska, B; Konieczy?iski, J

    2008-11-01

    Occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in granulometric fractions of dust emitted from a hard coal fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler was investigated. The dust was sampled with the use of a Mark III impactor. In each fraction of dust, by using gas chromatography (GC), 16 selected PAHs and total PAHs were determined and the toxic equivalent B(a)P (TE B(a)P) was computed. The results, recalculated for the standard granulometric fractions, are presented as concentrations and content of the determined PAHs in dust. Distributions of PAHs and their profiles in the granulometric dust fractions were studied also. The PAHs in dust emitted from the CFB boiler were compared with those emitted from mechanical grate boilers; a distinctly lower content of PAHs was found in dust emitted from the former. PMID:18975852

  2. Evaluation of occupational exposure to mixed dusts and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in silicon carbide plants

    SciTech Connect

    Dufresne, A.; Lesage, J.; Perrault, G.

    1987-02-01

    Workers in the silicon carbide industry have experienced occupational health diseases, particularly lung disorders such as silicosis. The silicon carbide production process employs petroleum coke, sawdust, pure crystalline silica and graphite. Since crystalline silica is present in the occupational environment, the airborne dust content of various polymorphs of silica, especially quartz, cristobalite and tridymite, was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The analytical method was modified to eliminate graphite, since it overlaps with the main diffraction plane of quartz. Exploratory field surveys were conducted to identify the minerals present in that occupational environment and to evaluate the validity of the analytical method. The surveys provided information on the mineralogical nature of the dust, its respirable content and the concentration of silica polymorphs. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons also were measured, and the effect of their absorption on graphite was evaluated.

  3. Separation of {sup 32}P-postlabeled DNA adducts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by HPLC

    SciTech Connect

    King, L.C.; Gallagher, J.E.; Lewtas, J.; George, M.

    1994-07-01

    The {sup 32}P-postlabeling assay, thin-layer chromatography, and reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) were used to separate DNA adducts formed from 10 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and 6 nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NO{sub 2}-PAHs). The PAHs included benzo[j]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene, chrysene, 6-methylchrysene, 5-methylchrysene, and benz[a]anthracene. The NO{sub 2}-PAHs included 1-nitropyrene, 2-nitrofluoranthene, 3-nitrofluoranthene, 1,6-dinitropyrene, 1,3-dinitropyrene, and 1,8-dinitropyrene. Separation of seven of the major PAH-DNA adducts was achieved by an initial PAH HPLC gradient system. The major NO{sub 2}-PAH-DNA adducts were not all separated from each other using the initial PAH HPLC gradient but were clearly separated from the PAH-DNA adducts. A second NO{sub 2}-PAH HPLC gradient system was developed to separate NO{sub 2}-PAH-DNA adducts following one-dimensional TLC and HPLC analysis. HPLC profiles of NO{sub 2}-PAH-DNA adducts were compared using both adduct enhancement versions of the {sup 32}P-postlabeling assay to evaluate the use of this technique on HPLC to screen for the presence of NO{sub 2}-PAH-DNA adducts. To demonstrate the application of these separation methods to a complex mixture of DNA adducts, the chromatographic mobilities of the {sup 32}P-postlabeled DNA adduct standards (PAHs and NO{sub 2}-PAHs) were compared with those produced by a complex mixture of polycyclic organic matter (POM) extracted from diesel emission particles. The diesel-derived adducts did not elute with the identical retention time of any of the PAH or NO{sub 2}-PAH standards used in this study. HPLC analyses of the NO{sub 2}-PAH-derived adducts (butanol extracted) revealed the presence of multiple DNA adducts.

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exhaust emissions from different reformulated diesel fuels and engine operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrás, Esther; Tortajada-Genaro, Luis A.; Vázquez, Monica; Zielinska, Barbara

    2009-12-01

    The study of light-duty diesel engine exhaust emissions is important due to their impact on atmospheric chemistry and air pollution. In this study, both the gas and the particulate phase of fuel exhaust were analyzed to investigate the effects of diesel reformulation and engine operating parameters. The research was focused on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds on particulate phase due to their high toxicity. These were analyzed using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methodology. Although PAH profiles changed for diesel fuels with low-sulfur content and different percentages of aromatic hydrocarbons (5-25%), no significant differences for total PAH concentrations were detected. However, rape oil methyl ester biodiesel showed a greater number of PAH compounds, but in lower concentrations (close to 50%) than the reformulated diesel fuels. In addition, four engine operating conditions were evaluated, and the results showed that, during cold start, higher concentrations were observed for high molecular weight PAHs than during idling cycle and that the acceleration cycles provided higher concentrations than the steady-state conditions. Correlations between particulate PAHs and gas phase products were also observed. The emission of PAH compounds from the incomplete combustion of diesel fuel depended greatly on the source of the fuel and the driving patterns.

  5. Fate of Soil Organic Carbon and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a Vineyard Soil Treated with Biochar.

    PubMed

    Rombolà, Alessandro G; Meredith, Will; Snape, Colin E; Baronti, Silvia; Genesio, Lorenzo; Vaccari, Francesco Primo; Miglietta, Franco; Fabbri, Daniele

    2015-09-15

    The effect of biochar addition on the levels of black carbon (BC) and polcyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a vineyard soil in central Italy was investigated within a two year period. Hydropyrolysis (HyPy) was used to determine the contents of BC (BCHyPy) in the amended and control soils, while the hydrocarbon composition of the semi-labile (non-BCHyPy) fraction released by HyPy was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, together with the solvent-extractable PAHs. The concentrations of these three polycyclic aromatic carbon reservoirs changed and impacted differently the soil organic carbon over the period of the trial. The addition of biochar (33 ton dry biochar ha(-1)) gave rise to a sharp increase in soil organic carbon, which could be accounted for by an increase in BCHyPy. Over time, the concentration of BCHyPy decreased significantly from 36 to 23 mg g(-1) and as a carbon percentage from 79% to 61%. No clear time trends were observed for the non-BCHyPy PAHs varying from 39 to 34 μg g(-1) in treated soils, not significantly different from control soils. However, the concentrations of extractable PAHs increased markedly in the amended soils and decreased with time from 153 to 78 ng g(-1) remaining always higher than those in untreated soil. The extent of the BCHyPy loss was more compatible with physical rather than chemical processes. PMID:26263378

  6. Study of the adsorption of aromatic hydrocarbons by marine sediments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Henrichs, S.M.; Luoma, M.; Smith, S.

    1997-08-01

    Three aromatic hydrocarbons--benzene, naphthalene, and phenanthrene--were rapidly and strongly adsorbed by intertidal sediments from Jakolof Bay, lower Cook Inlet. Adsorption of phenanthrene was more than twice that of naphthalene and benzene. Adsorption was not completely, rapidly reversible by suspension of the sediment in clean seawater. Longer adsorption reaction times led to decreased desorption, except for benzene. All sites for adsorption on the sediment surface appeared to be equivalent, and availability of adsorption sites did not limit adsorption over the concentration range studied. Adsorption coefficients for phenanthrene varied among sediment samples by as much as a factor of 3. This variability was not correlated with sediment organic carbon content, indicating that organic matter was not solely responsible for the adsorption properties of these sediments. The bioavailability of phenanthrene was decreased by adsorption to sediment. Combined with the finding that adsorption is not completely reversible, these results indicate that adsorption could contribute to the persistence of aromatic hydrocarbons in lower Cook Inlet sediments.

  7. Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compouns as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

  8. Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline

    DOEpatents

    Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

    1993-01-19

    The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compounds as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation in carbon-rich stellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherchneff, Isabelle; Barker, John R.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed chemical kinetic scheme is applied to stellar envelope profiles of gas density and temperature profiles in order to study the formation of PAH molecules in carbon-rich stellar outflows. Chemical concentration profiles are calculated for several envelope models by integrating the coupled continuity equations that include spherically expanding flows from an inner boundary at the shock formation radius. The influence of the 'inverse greenhouse' effect experienced by small PAHs is investigated and shown to increase the PAH yield by many orders of magnitude. It is shown that the route through propargyl radicals could be an important channel to produce benzene. PAH formation yields are found to be extremely sensitive to gas density and temperature and are much smaller than values inferred from the observed dust content of late-type carbon-rich stellar envelopes. It is therefore unlikely that aromatic molecules are generated in the stellar outflow itself.

  10. 40 CFR Table 2c to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reactivity Factors for Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2C Table 2C to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Boiling range(degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor (g O3/g VOC) 21...

  11. 40 CFR Table 2c to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reactivity Factors for Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2C Table 2C to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Boiling range (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor 21 280-290...

  12. 40 CFR Table 2c to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reactivity Factors for Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2C Table 2C to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Boiling range(degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor (g O3/g VOC) 21...

  13. 40 CFR Table 2c to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reactivity Factors for Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2C Table 2C to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Boiling range(degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor (g O3/g VOC) 21...

  14. 40 CFR Table 2c to Subpart E of... - Reactivity Factors for Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reactivity Factors for Aromatic Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures 2C Table 2C to Subpart E of Part 59 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Hydrocarbon Solvent Mixtures Bin Boiling range (degrees F) Criteria Reactivityfactor 21 280-290...

  15. Persistence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge-amended soil.

    PubMed

    Oleszczuk, Patryk

    2006-11-01

    The application of sewage sludge as a fertilizer is a common method used to improve soil properties. However, sewage sludge may contain various organic pollutants including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In the present study, the persistence of PAHs in soils fertilized with different sewage sludge doses was compared in relation to the sewage sludge dose applied (30, 75, 150, 300 and 600 Mgha(-1)) and the content of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in them. The experiment was carried out in two blocks of experimental plots divided according to the type of plants grown: field plants and perennial-willow. Sewage sludge addition to soils resulted in an increase in the content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in these soils. This increase was proportional to the quantity of sewage sludge applied. The results obtained showed that during a 42/54-month period, more than half of the individual PAHs introduced into the soil with sewage sludge were degraded. The scope of dissipation depended on the sewage sludge dose and the use to which the area was put. In the experiment with the willow only in the case of the highest sludge dose was a decrease in the PAH content above 50% noted; whereas in the case of the experiment with the field plants, it was higher by 50% for all sewage sludge doses. In experiment with field plants the highest scope of individual PAH disappearance was observed in the soil with the sewage sludge dose amounting to 300 Mgha(-1). In experiment with willow a relatively high dissipation of individual PAHs (>50%) was found in the treatment with the highest sludge dose (600 Mgha(-1)). A wider PAH dissipation range in the experiment with field plants was conditioned by the more favourable conditions created as a result of the breeding treatments applied. Agrotechnical treatments clearly increased the disappearance of the PAHs in those soils fertilized with the lowest sewage sludge doses (30 and 75 Mgha(-1)). The results obtained showed that the preferred method of treating a light soil fertilised with sewage sludges should be a one-year system, with a sludge application of 75 Mgha(-1). PMID:16624376

  16. UV irradiation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ices: production of alcohols, quinones, and ethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, M. P.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.; Gillette, J. S.; Clemett, S. J.; Zare, R. N.

    1999-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water ice were exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation under astrophysical conditions, and the products were analyzed by infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Peripheral carbon atoms were oxidized, producing aromatic alcohols, ketones, and ethers, and reduced, producing partially hydrogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, molecules that account for the interstellar 3.4-micrometer emission feature. These classes of compounds are all present in carbonaceous meteorites. Hydrogen and deuterium atoms exchange readily between the PAHs and the ice, which may explain the deuterium enrichments found in certain meteoritic molecules. This work has important implications for extraterrestrial organics in biogenesis.

  17. Aromatic hydrocarbon optrodes for groundwater monitoring applications. Final report, September 1988-February 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Tabacco, M.B.

    1993-12-01

    Research documented in this report produced a fiber-optic sensor utilizing a porous optical waveguide. This offered the advantage of improved sensitivity and specificity by impregnating fiber with a chemical indicator whose optical transmission properties change in the presence of aromatic species. The concept was adequately demonstrated the laboratory and a prototype optrode was developed which was sensitive for aromatic hydrocarbons to 50 ppb. The basic concept was proven. Fiber-optic sensor, Groundwater monitoring, Aromatic hydrocarbon optrodes, Porous glass xylene sensor, Chemical sensors, Evanescent fiber-optic sensor.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals in Kostrena coastal area.

    PubMed

    Linsak, Dijana Tomi?; Linsak, Zeljko; Besi?, Denis; Vojci?, Nina; Telezar, Mirna; Coklo, Miran; Susni?, Sasa; Mi?ovi?, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine pollution by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and heavy metals in seawater and sediment in Kostrena coastal area, as well as their toxicity using bioluminescence based tests. Total PAH concentration in seawater ranged 1.7-155.3 ng/L. The share of carcinogenetic PAH was relatively high, ranging 22-48.3%. Nickel concentrations in seawater were beyond detection limits (< 0.1 microg/L), vanadium concentrations ranged 0.66-1.96 microg/L, chrome concentrations were beyond detection limits, and copper concentrations were also beyond detection limits or extremely low (up to 0.32 microg/L). EC50 values in seawater ranged 23.80-90.90 ng/L. Correlation between total PAH concentration and toxicity of seawater showed strong connection between them (r = 0.9579). Total PAH concentration in marine sediment ranged 58.02-1116 microg/kg dry weight (d.w.). The share of carcinogenetic PAH was extremely high ranging 10-53%. Nickel concentrations in marine sediment ranged 8-24 mg/kg d.w., vanadium concentrations ranged 24-42 mg/kg d.w., chrome concentrations ranged 11-19 mg/kg d.w., and copper concentrations ranged 7-25 mg/kg d.w. EC50 values in marine sediment ranged 818-4596 microg/kg d.w. Correlation between total PAH concentration and toxicity of marine sediment showed weak connection between them (r = 0.2590). Previous studies of seawater samples from areas of the Adriatic sea under the direct influence of oil industry did not include concentrations of heavy metals, which makes our study the first to present such comprehensive results. Our results point out the need for further evaluations and following of marine environment pollution and its consequences on living organisms and marine ecosystem in whole. PMID:22397258

  19. Ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and pulmonary function in children

    PubMed Central

    Padula, Amy M.; Balmes, John R.; Eisen, Ellen A.; Mann, Jennifer; Noth, Elizabeth M.; Lurmann, Frederick W.; Pratt, Boriana; Tager, Ira B.; Nadeau, Kari; Hammond, S. Katharine

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pulmonary function in children. Major sources include vehicular emissions, home heating, wildland fires, agricultural burning, and power plants. PAHs are an important component of fine particulate matter that has been linked to respiratory health. This cross-sectional study examines the relationship between estimated individual exposures to the sum of PAHs with 4, 5, or 6 rings (PAH456) and pulmonary function tests (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of vital capacity) in asthmatic and non-asthmatic children. We applied land-use regression to estimate individual exposures to ambient PAHs for averaging periods ranging from 1 week to 1 year. We used linear regression to estimate the relationship between exposure to PAH456 with pre- and postbronchodilator pulmonary function tests in children in Fresno, California (N =297). Among non-asthmatics, there was a statistically significant association between PAH456 during the previous 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year and postbronchodilator FEV1. The magnitude of the association increased with the length of the averaging period ranging from 60 to 110 ml decrease in FEV1 for each 1 ng/m3 increase in PAH456. There were no associations with PAH456 observed among asthmatic children. We identified an association between annual PAHs and chronic pulmonary function in children without asthma. Additional studies are needed to further explore the association between exposure to PAHs and pulmonary function, especially with regard to differential effects between asthmatic and non-asthmatic children. PMID:24938508

  20. Infrared Spectroscopy of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Cations. 3; The Members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, D. M.; Allamandola, L. J.; Wittebon, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In spite of the fact that the infrared spectroscopic properties of only a few isolated ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known, gaseous, ionized PAHs are thought to be responsible for a very common family of infrared interstellar emission bands. In order to provide a data base to test this hypothesis and, if borne out, to use this emission band family as a probe of many different interstellar environments, we are carrying out a thorough study of the infrared spectroscopic properties of neutral and ionized PAHs in argon matrices. Here we present the near and mid-infrared spectra of the cations of the five most thermodynamically favored PAHs up to coronene: phenanthrene, pyrene, benzo[e]pyrene, benzo[ghilperylene, and coronene. The properties of naphthalene, the first member of the series, are given elsewhere. The spectra of perdeuterated phenanthrene and pyrene are also reported. For those molecules which have been previously studied (pyrene, d(10)-pyrene, and coronene), band positions and relative intensities are in agreement. In all cases we report additional features. Absolute integrated absorbance values are given for the phenanthrene, perdeutero-phenanthrene, pyrene, benzo[ghi]perylene, and coronene cations. With the exception of coronene,the cation bands corresponding to the CC modes are typically 2-5 times more intense than those of the CH out-of-plane bending vibrations. For the cations the CC stretching and CH in-plane bending modes give rise to bands which are an order of magnitude stronger than for the neutral species, and the CH out-of-plane bends produce bands which are 5-20 times weaker than in the neutral species. This behavior is similar to that found in most other PAH cations studied to date. The astronomical implications of these PAH cation spectra are also discussed.

  1. Carcinogenic activity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons bounded on particle fraction.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevi?, Ivana; Pehnec, Gordana; Vadji?, Vladimira; iovi?, Anica; Davila, Silvije; Beli?, Ivan

    2015-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) originate from a variety of natural and industrial processes. In this paper, concentrations of nine PAHs in PM10 particle fraction were measured concurrently at four different sites (rural, urban residential, urban traffic, and residential-industrial) in continental Croatia. Measurements at all of the four sites showed much higher average concentrations for all of the PAHs in the winter period. The highest winter average values were measured at the industrial site and the lowest at the rural and the urban residential site. In the summer, the highest average values were also measured in the industrial area, except for benzo(ghi)perylene and indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, which showed the highest average values in the rural area. Factor analysis has been applied to PAH concentrations to identify their potential sources. Extracted factors have been interpreted on basis of previous studies and weather conditions. The diagnostic ratios calculated in this study indicated mixed sources at all of the sites. The contribution of gasoline and diesel from traffic was significant at all of the sites except for the urban industrial. In the winter, potential PAH sources also arose from wood combustion. The industrial site differed from the other sites with the highest influence of diesel sources and refinery during the summer months. The contribution of BaP in total carcinogenic activity exceeded 50% in both seasons at all of the measured sites, which suggests that BaP could be suitable as a marker of the carcinogenic potential of a PAH mixture. PMID:26050151

  2. Simulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons transport in multimedia

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Chu, C.J.

    1999-07-01

    Many studies have indicated that the threat from toxic air pollutants such as VOCs comes not through inhalation by humans while the pollutants are in a gaseous state but through absorption when the pollutants are in a solid state such as in an aerosol or particulate form. Pollutants such as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) usually exist in a semi-volatile state. To assess the risk of the PAHs, one needs to estimate the dose of the pollutants to which a human would be exposed through various pathways. In this study, the authors modified a Spatial Multimedia Compartmental Model (SMCM) originally developed by UCLA Professor Cohen to predict the PAHs distribution among multimedia such as air, water, soil and sediment in the Taipei metropolitan area. Three PAHs were considered in this study. They are Benzo(a)pyrene, Pyrene and Chrysene. When PAHs are emitted into atmosphere, physical and chemical mechanisms may redistribute the PAHs among multimedia. Five cases of PAHs distribution in multimedia were simulated: (1) PAHs distribution in a dry condition, (2) PAHs distribution when there are different dry deposition velocities, (3) PAHs distribution under a single rainfall event, (4) PAHs distribution when there are different soil properties, (5) PAHs distribution under a random rainfall case. The simulation results are concluded: (1) In the dry case, the PAHs accumulate mostly in soil and air compartments, (2) Different dry depositing velocities will affect the PAHs distribution among compartments. (3) Different soil properties affect the PAHs concentration in the soil and sediment compartments, (4) The soil PAHs concentrations usually increase for those PAHs with a high solid/gas ratio. (5) The random rainfall only affects the PAHs concentration in the soil.

  3. Human Colon Microbiota Transform Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons to Estrogenic Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wiele, Tom; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Boeckaert, Charlotte; Peru, Kerry; Headley, John; Verstraete, Willy; Siciliano, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Ingestion is an important exposure route for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to enter the human body. Although the formation of hazardous PAH metabolites by human biotransformation enzymes is well documented, nothing is known about the PAH transformation potency of human intestinal microbiota. Using a gastrointestinal simulator, we show that human intestinal microbiota can also bioactivate PAHs, more in particular to estrogenic metabolites. PAH compounds are not estrogenic, and indeed, stomach and small intestine digestions of 62.5 nmol naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene showed no estrogenic effects in the human estrogen receptor bioassay. In contrast, colon digests of these PAH compounds displayed estrogenicity, equivalent to 0.31, 2.14, 2.70, and 1.48 nmol 17?-ethynylestradiol (EE2), respectively. Inactivating the colon microbiota eliminated these estrogenic effects. Liquid chromatographymass spectrometry analysis confirmed the microbial PAH transformation by the detection of PAH metabolites 1-hydroxypyrene and 7-hydroxybenzo(a)pyrene in colon digests of pyrene and benzo(a)pyrene. Furthermore, we show that colon digests of a PAH-contaminated soil (simulated ingestion dose of 5 g/day) displayed estrogenic activity equivalent to 0.58 nmol EE2, whereas stomach or small intestine digests did not. Although the matrix in which PAHs are ingested may result in lower exposure concentrations in the gut, our results imply that the PAH bioactivation potency of colon microbiota is not eliminated by the presence of soil. Moreover, because PAH toxicity is also linked to estrogenicity of the compounds, the PAH bioactivation potency of colon microbiota suggests that current risk assessment may underestimate the risk from ingested PAHs. PMID:15626640

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ecotoxicity data for developing soil quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Jensen, John; Sverdrup, Line E

    2003-01-01

    With the overall perspective of calculating soil quality criteria (SQC) for the group of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the existing ecotoxicity data for the soil compartment have been reviewed. The majority of data useful in the context of deriving SQC are of recent origin. Soil quality criteria are considered valuable tools for assessing the environmental risk of contamination, as they may give guidance on concentration limits for various chemicals to protect the function and structure of ecosystems. Soil quality criteria for soil-dwelling species were calculated using various assumptions and two internationally accepted methods, i.e., application of assessment factors and species sensitivity distributions, respectively. It was suggested to derive ecotoxicological soil quality criteria, which focus on the lower molecular weight PAHs, i.e., those with log Kow values lower than 5.5 or 6; this is the log Kow range where a cutoff in toxicity for terrestrial species is expected for narcotic substances. Predicted values from the two methods were similar. Calculations showed that, for four individual PAHs of three or four rings, SQC fall in the range of 1.0 and 2.5 mg kg(-1). However, as no individual PAH is fond alone it is suggested to use a sum criterion for a group of PAHs instead. The different possibilities to calculate such a sum criterion are discussed. Based on toxicity data presented here and the average abundance of different PAHs in nearly 1000 Danish soil samples, an ecotoxicological soil quality criterion of 25 mg kg(-1) dry weight for the sum of the eight PAHs acenaphthene, fluorene, anthracene, phenanthrene, pyrene, fluoranthene, benz[a]anthracene, and chrysene is suggested. PMID:15366584

  5. Generation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during woodworking operations

    PubMed Central

    Bruschweiler, Evin D.; Danuser, Brigitta; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Wild, Pascal; Schupfer, Patrick; Vernez, David; Boiteux, Philippe; Hopf, Nancy B.

    2012-01-01

    Occupational exposures to wood dust have been associated with an elevated risk of sinonasal cancer (SNC). Wood dust is recognized as a human carcinogen but the specific cancer causative agent remains unknown. One possible explanation is a co-exposure to; wood dust and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs could be generated during incomplete combustion of wood due to heat created by use of power tools. To determine if PAHs are generated from wood during common wood working operations, PAH concentrations in wood dust samples collected in an experimental chamber operated under controlled conditions were analyzed. In addition, personal air samples from workers exposed to wood dust (n = 30) were collected. Wood dust was generated using three different power tools: vibrating sander, belt sander, and saw; and six wood materials: fir, Medium Density Fiberboard (MDF), beech, mahogany, oak and wood melamine. Monitoring of wood workers was carried out by means of personal sampler device during wood working operations. We measured 21 PAH concentrations in wood dust samples by capillary gas chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Total PAH concentrations in wood dust varied greatly (0.24–7.95 ppm) with the lowest being in MDF dust and the highest in wood melamine dust. Personal PAH exposures were between 37.5–119.8 ng m−3 during wood working operations. Our results suggest that PAH exposures are present during woodworking operations and hence could play a role in the mechanism of cancer induction related to wood dust exposure. PMID:23087908

  6. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and digestive tract cancers - a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Diggs, Deacqunita L.; Huderson, Ashley C.; Harris, Kelly L.; Myers, Jeremy N.; Banks, Leah D.; Rekhadevi, Perumalla V.; Niaz, Mohammad S.; Ramesh, Aramandla

    2011-01-01

    Cancers of the colon are most common in the Western world. In majority of these cases, there is no familial history and sporadic gene damage seems to play an important role in the development of tumors in the colon. Studies have shown that environmental factors, especially diet, play an important role in susceptibility to GI tract cancers. Consequently, environmental chemicals that contaminate food or diet during its preparation becomes important in the development of GI cancers. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are one such family of ubiquitous environmental toxicants. These pollutants enter the human body through consumption of contaminated food, drinking water, inhalation of cigarette smoke, automobile exhausts, and contaminated air from occupational settings. Among these pathways, dietary intake of PAHs constitutes a major source of exposure in humans. Although many reviews and books on PAHs and their ability to cause toxicity and breast or lung cancer have been published, aspects on contribution of diet, smoking and other factors towards development of digestive tract cancers and strategies to assess risk from exposure to PAHs have received much less attention. This review, therefore, focuses on dietary intake of PAHs in humans, animal models, and cell cultures used for GI cancer studies along with epidemiological findings. Bioavailability and biotransformation processes, which influence the disposition of PAHs in body and the underlying causative mechanisms of GI cancers, are also discussed. The existing data gaps and scope for future studies is also emphasized. This information is expected to stimulate research on mechanisms of sporadic GI cancers caused by exposure to environmental carcinogens. PMID:22107166

  7. Ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and pulmonary function in children.

    PubMed

    Padula, Amy M; Balmes, John R; Eisen, Ellen A; Mann, Jennifer; Noth, Elizabeth M; Lurmann, Frederick W; Pratt, Boriana; Tager, Ira B; Nadeau, Kari; Hammond, S Katharine

    2015-05-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between ambient polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pulmonary function in children. Major sources include vehicular emissions, home heating, wildland fires, agricultural burning, and power plants. PAHs are an important component of fine particulate matter that has been linked to respiratory health. This cross-sectional study examines the relationship between estimated individual exposures to the sum of PAHs with 4, 5, or 6 rings (PAH456) and pulmonary function tests (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of vital capacity) in asthmatic and non-asthmatic children. We applied land-use regression to estimate individual exposures to ambient PAHs for averaging periods ranging from 1 week to 1 year. We used linear regression to estimate the relationship between exposure to PAH456 with pre- and postbronchodilator pulmonary function tests in children in Fresno, California (N=297). Among non-asthmatics, there was a statistically significant association between PAH456 during the previous 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year and postbronchodilator FEV1. The magnitude of the association increased with the length of the averaging period ranging from 60 to 110?ml decrease in FEV1 for each 1?ng/m(3) increase in PAH456. There were no associations with PAH456 observed among asthmatic children. We identified an association between annual PAHs and chronic pulmonary function in children without asthma. Additional studies are needed to further explore the association between exposure to PAHs and pulmonary function, especially with regard to differential effects between asthmatic and non-asthmatic children. PMID:24938508

  8. Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in cooking oil fumes.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Pan, D; Wang, G

    1994-01-01

    Various samples of cooking oil fumes were analyzed to an effort to study the relationship between the high incidence of pulmonary adenocarcinoma in Chinese women and cooking oil fumes in the kitchen. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in samples of cooking oil fumes were extracted, chromatographed, and measured by fluorescence spectrophotometer. The samples included oil fumes from three commercial cooking oils and fumes from three catering shops. All samples contained benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and dibenzo (a,h)anthracene (DBahA). In addition, the concentration of DBahA was 5.7 to 22.8 times higher than that of BaP in the fume samples. Concentrations of BaP and DBahA were, respectively, 0.463 and 5.736 micrograms/g in refined vegetable oil, 0.341 and 3.725 micrograms/g in soybean oil, and 0.305 and 4.565 micrograms/g in vegetable oil. Investigation of PAH concentrations at three catering shops showed that the level of BaP at a Youtiao (deep-fried twisted dough sticks) shop was 4.18 micrograms/100 m3, 2.28 micrograms/100 m3 at a Seqenma (candied fritters) workshop, and 0.49 micrograms/100 m3 at a kitchen of a restaurant; concentrations of DBahA were 33.80, 14.41, and 3.03 micrograms/100 m3, respectively. The high concentration of carcinogens, such as BaP and DBahA, in cooking oil fumes might help explain why Chinese women, who spend more time exposed to cooking oil fumes than men, have a high incidence of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. PMID:8161241

  9. Background'' soil concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from Burlington, Vermont

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, R.L.; Sparks, M.K. )

    1993-03-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH's) were identified in soils from waterfront industrial land in Burlington prior to conversion to a park. PAH's ranged from 2,457 to 16,005 ppb. As a result, this area was placed on the Vt. DEC list of active'' hazardous sites. The few studies available regarding background concentrations of PAH's (i.e. ATSDR, 1990), suggested that the waterfront PAH values were low for urban soils. To provide a context for evaluating the waterfront PAH concentrations, a background study of soils in the City of Burlington was conducted. Twelve composite soil samples were collected from within a 1-mile radius of the proposed park; an area that encompasses a large portion of the City. To correlate PAH concentrations with land-uses, three samples were collected from each of four zones: industrial, mixed commercial-residential, residential and recreational. Samples (and one field blank) were analyzed via EPA method 8100. Total PAH's from the study ranged from 105.7 to 122,035 ppb. The minimum value was from a baseball field; the maximum value from a residential lawn. The arithmetic mean for the Burlington study was 19,380 ppb (compared to 10,530 ppb for the waterfront). The background'' values indicate that the waterfront park soils are below the study background'' mean. It is difficult to assess the origin of the elevated PAH values because of the numerous contributors of environmental PAH. One common element that appears to characterize soils with the highest background'' PAH values is linkage to recent or historic building fires. In many instances building combustion may be a dominant local source of soil PAH's.

  10. Intraperitoneal mesotheliomas induced in mice by a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, J.M.; Anderson, L.M. ); Kovatch, R.M. )

    1989-01-01

    Female mice of 6 strains (C3H/HeN, BALB/c, C57BL/6N, DBA/2, NIH Swiss, and AKR/N) were given the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogen 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) intragastrically in olive oil at a dose of 20 mg/kg, weekly for 12 wk. Half were pretreated 24 h before each MC administration with intraperitoneal {beta}-naphthoflavone ({beta}-NF, 150 mg/kg in olive oil), a noncarinogenic inducer of certain cytochrome P-450 isozymes. Remaining mice were given olive oil prior to MC in the same fashion, or {beta}-NF in olive oil or olive oil alone without subsequent exposure to MC. All mice were killed when moribund or 13 mo after the start of treatment. Most of the mice, irrespective of treatment, exhibited signs of peritoneal injury, including inflammation, necrosis, granuloma formation, and mineralization. Mice of some of the strains also presented peritoneal mesotheliomas, in addition to a variety of other tumors. {beta}-NF pretreatment reduced the frequency of mesotheliomas: there was only one definite mesothelioma in any of the {beta}-NF-MC groups, in a C3H/He mouse. Most of the measotheliomas were mixed fibro-mesothelial type, sometimes with papillary epithelial excrescences. They typically grew in a botryoid pattern within the peritoneal cavity, coating the abdominal organs and sometimes actively invading these organs and the diaphragm. Some lesions exhibited pleomorphism, prominent giant cells, and frequent mitoses. In addition, several lesions consisting of severe mesothelial hyperplasia associated with tissue necrosis and inflammation were considered as possible early stages of mesothelioma development. It was postulated that peritoneal injury imposed by repeated intraperitoneal injection of oil acted as an enhancing factor for mesothelioma induction by MC.

  11. Sorption characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aluminum smelter residues

    SciTech Connect

    Gijs D. Breedveld; Emilien Pelletier; Richard St. Louis; Gerard Cornelissen

    2007-04-01

    High temperature carbon oxidation in primary aluminum smelters results in the release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) into the environment. The main source of PAH are the anodes, which are composed of petroleum coke (black carbon, BC) and coal tar pitch. To elucidate the dominant carbonaceous phase controlling the environmental fate of PAH in aluminum smelter residues (coke BC and/or coal tar), the sorptive behavior of PAHs has been determined, using passive samplers and infinite-sink desorption methods. Samples directly from the wet scrubber were studied as well as ones from an adjacent 20-year old storage lagoon and roof dust from the smelter. Carbon-normalized distribution coefficients of native PAHs were 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected based on amorphous organic carbon (AOC)/water partitioning, which is in the same order of magnitude as reported literature values for soots and charcoals. Sorption isotherms of laboratory-spiked deuterated phenanthrene showed strong (about 100 times stronger than AOC) but nonetheless linear sorption in both fresh and aged aluminum smelter residues. The absence of nonlinear behavior typical for adsorption to BC indicates that PAH sorption in aluminum smelter residues is dominated by absorption into the semi-solid coal tar pitch matrix. Desorption experiments using Tenax showed that fresh smelter residues had a relatively large rapidly desorbing fraction of PAH (35-50%), whereas this fraction was strongly reduced (11-16%) in the lagoon and roof dust material. Weathering of the coal tar residue and/or redistribution of PAH between coal tar and BC phases could explain the reduced availability in aged samples. 38 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments of the Jialu River.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jie; Sheng, Sheng; Wen, Teng; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Qing; Hu, Qiu-Xiang; Li, Qing-Shan; An, Shu-Qing; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2011-07-01

    The Jialu River, an important branch of the Huaihe River in China, was seriously polluted because of rapid economic growth and urbanization. In order to evaluate the potential for serious environmental consequences as a result of anthropogenic contamination, the distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been investigated in surface sediment samples collected in connection with field surveys of 19 sites along the Jialu River. The total concentration of the 16 USEPA priority PAHs ranged from 466.0 to 2605.6 ng/g dry weight with a mean concentration of 1363.2 ng/g. Sediment samples with the highest PAH concentrations were from the upper reaches of the river, where Zhengzhou City is located; the PAH levels in the middle and lower reaches were relatively low. According to the observed molecular indices, PAHs originated largely from the high-temperature pyrolytic process. According to the numerical effect-based sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) of the United States, the levels of PAHs in the Jialu River should not exert adverse biological effects. The total benzo[a]pyrene toxicity equivalent (TEQ) values calculated for samples varied from 50.4 to 312.8 ng/g dry weight with an average of 167.4 ng/g. The relationships between PAHs and environmental factors, including chemical properties of sediments, water quality, aquatic organisms, hydrological conditions, and anthropogenic activities, are also discussed. PAHs exerted a potential negative impact on the benthos. Settlement percentage, population density and industrial GDP per capita had a significant influence on the distribution of PAHs. PMID:21451950

  13. Rapid assessment of total and polycyclic aromatic contents in heavy oils.

    PubMed

    Luna, F Murilo T; Pontes Filho, Antonio A; Trindade, Eduardo D; Cavalcante, Celio L

    2016-04-01

    The monitoring of the content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is important for evaluating heavy oil products, especially those most likely to cause environmental impacts. In this study, a comparison between samples of heavy petroleum fractions, using different methods, was carried out. The calculation of carbon distribution and polycyclic aromatic contents was compared with other methods using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Therefore, it was possible to quickly estimate the aromatic content by the FTIR method, and the results showed consistency with those obtained through traditional methods. A rapid method, using extraction with dimethyl sulfoxide followed by FTIR measurements, was proposed and shown as particularly useful and reliable for a quick quantification of the PAH content, when compared to the traditional IP 346 method. Furthermore, the difference in total aromatic and PAH concentrations may be more clearly established. This rapid method may be used for the evaluation of PAH content in samples obtained from studies for their removal from complex heavy oil fractions. PMID:26956013

  14. Petroleum alteration by thermochemical sulfate reduction - A comprehensive molecular study of aromatic hydrocarbons and polar compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Clifford C.; Wang, Frank C.; Qian, Kuangnan; Wu, Chunping; Mennito, Anthony S.; Wei, Zhibin

    2015-03-01

    Thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) alters petroleum composition as it proceeds towards the complete oxidation of hydrocarbons to CO2. The effects of TSR on the molecular and isotopic composition of volatile species are well known; however, the non-volatile higher molecular weight aromatic and polar species have not been well documented. To address this deficiency, a suite of onshore Gulf coast oils and condensates generated from and accumulating in Smackover carbonates was assembled to include samples that experienced varying levels of TSR alteration and in reservoir thermal cracking. The entire molecular composition of aromatic hydrocarbons and NSO species were characterized and semi-quantified using comprehensive GC GC (FID and CSD) and APPI-FTICR-MS. The concentration of thiadiamondoids is a reliable indicator of the extent of TSR alteration. Once generated by TSR, thiadiamondoids remain thermally stable in all but the most extreme reservoir temperatures (>180 C). Hydrocarbon concentrations and distributions are influenced by thermal cracking and TSR. With increasing TSR alteration, oils become enriched in monoaromatic hydrocarbons and the distribution of high molecular weight aromatic hydrocarbons shifts towards more condensed species with a decrease in the number of alkyl carbons. Organosulfur compounds are created by the TSR process. In addition to the increase in benzothiophenes and dibenzothiophenes noted in previous studies, TSR generates condensed species containing one or more sulfur atoms that likely are composed of a single or multiple thiophenic cores. We hypothesize that these species are generated from the partial oxidation of PAHs and dealkylation reactions, followed by sulfur incorporation and condensation reactions. The organosulfur species remaining in the TSR altered oils are "proto-solid bitumen" moieties that upon further condensation, oxidation or sulfur incorporation result in highly sulfur enriched solid bitumen, which is chemically distinct from pyrobitumen formed by thermal cracking reactions. Although TSR involves the oxidation of hydrocarbons to CO2, prior studies of TSR-altered oils have not identified intermediate products. Using NESI-FTIRC-MS, the presence and distribution of oxygenated species become evident. All oils possess minor amounts of O2 and O4 species, presumable mono- and di-naphthenic acids originating from the source. As TSR progresses, the distribution of oxygenated species shifts towards increasing species with higher oxygen content, up to O8. Similar trends are observed for the SOx species. We hypothesize that these are partially oxidized condensed hydrocarbons and that these species are likely formed by the reaction proposed by Pttmann et al. (1989) for the oxidation of PAHs associated with Kupferschiefer mineralization, whereby hydrocarbons with aryl-aryl bonds incorporate sulfur to form thiophenic species. The rate of TSR is influenced by reservoir temperature and the presence of H2S. Typically, high reservoir temperatures (>140 C) are needed for extensive TSR alteration to occur. Oil from the Gin Creek Field appears to have received a charge of H2S, presumably from TSR alteration of a down dip reservoir, which has accelerated the TSR reaction within a relatively cold reservoir (?109 C). This condition has allowed for the generation and preservation of abundant sulfur containing species that would be thermally cracked at higher temperatures.

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-phase associations in Washington coastal sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, Fredrick G.; Carpenter, Roy

    1983-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic (PAH) and aliphatic hydrocarbon compositions, organic carbon, nitrogen and lignin contents were determined in whole, unfractionated sediment from the Washington continental shelf and in discrete sediment fractions separated by particle size and density. At least 20 to 25% of perylene and PAH derived from pyrolytic processes and 50% of the retene measured in whole sediment are contained within organic C- and lignin-rich panicles of density ≤ 1.9 g/cc. These particles, which include primarily vascular plant remains and bits of charcoal, comprise less than 1% of the total sediment weight. In contrast, a series of methylated phenanthrene homologs, possibly of fossil origin, are concentrated in some component of the more dense, lithic matrix of the sediment. Equilibrium models of PAH sorption/desorption from aqueous phase onto small particles of high surface area do not appear applicable to the behavior of the major PAH types identified in this aquatic environment.

  16. Sidestream tobacco smoke as the main predictor of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Lodovici, M; Akpan, V; Evangelisti, C; Dolara, P

    2004-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in mainstream and sidestream tobacco smoke from 14 commercial brands of cigarettes purchased in Italy during 2001-2002. The PAHs detected in smoke and analysed with HPLC and a fluorimetric detector were: fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[b] fluoranthene, benzo[k] fluoranthene, benzo[g,h,i]perylene and dibenzo[a,h]anthracene. The PAH levels in mainstream smoke from different cigarette brands obtained using an official smoking machine varied by about threefold (from 118 to 374 ng per cigarette for total PAHs and from 23.5 to 100 ng per cigarette for carcinogenic PAHs). Total PAH levels in mainstream smoke were correlated with tar content (r = 0.615, P < 0.05, n = 14). Total PAH content in sidestream smoke, measured by collection of all the smoke produced by a lit cigarette in a glass chamber, was about tenfold higher compared with mainstream smoke. The PAH content in sidestream smoke was relatively uniform (2.3-3.9 and 0.49-1.21 micro g per cigarette for total and carcinogenic PAHs, respectively) and was not correlated with tar content. These results indicate that cigarette manufacturing and filter characteristics influence the PAH composition of mainstream smoke, but have no effect on the PAH content in sidestream smoke, which is the main determinant of smokers' and non-smokers' exposure to PAHs in environmental tobacco smoke. PMID:15300715

  17. Optimization and determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in biochar-based fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Zhou, Hui; Gan, Jay; Sun, Mingxing; Shang, Guofeng; Liu, Liang; Shen, Guoqing

    2015-03-01

    The agronomic benefit of biochar has attracted widespread attention to biochar-based fertilizers. However, the inevitable presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in biochar is a matter of concern because of the health and ecological risks of these compounds. The strong adsorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to biochar complicates their analysis and extraction from biochar-based fertilizers. In this study, we optimized and validated a method for determining the 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in biochar-based fertilizers. Results showed that accelerated solvent extraction exhibited high extraction efficiency. Based on a Box-Behnken design with a triplicate central point, accelerated solvent extraction was used under the following optimal operational conditions: extraction temperature of 78°C, extraction time of 17 min, and two static cycles. The optimized method was validated by assessing the linearity of analysis, limit of detection, limit of quantification, recovery, and application to real samples. The results showed that the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exhibited good linearity, with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. The limits of detection varied between 0.001 (phenanthrene) and 0.021 mg/g (benzo[ghi]perylene), and the limits of quantification varied between 0.004 (phenanthrene) and 0.069 mg/g (benzo[ghi]perylene). The relative recoveries of the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were 70.26-102.99%. PMID:25546393

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in US and Swedish smokeless tobacco products

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Debate about the health implications of using smokeless tobacco products (STPs) has prompted considerable interest in characterising their levels of toxic and carcinogenic components. In the present study seventy smokeless tobacco products from the US and Sweden, categorized as chewing tobacco, dry and moist snuff, hard and soft pellets, plug, and loose and portion snus, were analysed for twenty one polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The tested brands represented 80-90% of the 2008 market share for the major STP categories in these two countries. Results There were significant differences in the total and individual PAH concentrations in the different styles of product. Substantially higher levels of total PAHs (1060 fold) were found in moist and dry snuff and soft pellets than in the other smokeless tobacco styles. The individual PAH concentrations followed the same patterns as total PAHs except for naphthalene, for which the highest concentrations were found in snus and moist snuff. Good correlations were obtained between benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and all the other PAHs except naphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene, providing evidence for the first time that it can be used as a good marker for PAHs in STPs. Results were generally in good agreement with two previous studies of PAHs in STPs, except for naphthalene for which significantly lower concentrations were found than previously reported. Analysis of the ratios of different PAHs confirmed that the use of fire-cured tobaccos in the snuffs and soft pellet were the major source of PAHs in these product styles, and provided, for the first time, some indications as to the source of PAHs in the other STP styles, including petrogenic and other combustion sources. Conclusions This study confirms the presence of PAHs in STPs, and identifies substantial differences between the levels in different STP categories. Since previous studies of naphthalene concentrations in STPs differed so markedly from those found in this study, it is recommended that further work on PAH determination is undertaken to investigate the source of this discrepancy. PMID:24011230

  19. Exposure of Firefighters to Particulates and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, C. Stuart; Hoffman, Joseph D.; Knipp, Michael J.; Reponen, Tiina; Haynes, Erin N.

    2015-01-01

    Firefighting continues to be among the most hazardous yet least studied occupations in terms of exposures and their relationship to occupational disease. Exposures are complex, involving mixtures of particles and chemicals such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Adverse health effects associated with these agents include elevated incidences of coronary heart disease and several cancers. PAHs have been detected at fire scenes, and in the firehouse rest area and kitchen, routinely adjoining the truck bay, and where firefighters spend a major part of each shift. An academic-community partnership was developed with the Cincinnati Fire Department with the goal of understanding active firefighters' airborne and dermal PAH exposure. PAHs were measured in air and particulates, and number and mass concentrations, respectively, of submicron (0.021 ?m) and PM2.5 (2.5 ?m diameter and less) particles during overhaul events in two firehouses and a University of Cincinnati administrative facility as a comparison location. During overhaul firefighters evaluate partially combusted materials for re-ignition after fire extinguishment and commonly remove Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA). Face and neck wipes were also collected at a domestic fire scene. Overhaul air samples had higher mean concentrations of PM2.5 and submicron particles than those collected in the firehouse, principally in the truck bay and kitchen. Among the 17 PAHs analyzed, only naphthalene and acenaphthylene were generally detectable. Naphthalene was present in 7 out of 8 overhaul activities, in 2 out of 3 firehouse (kitchen and truck bay) samples, and in none collected from the control site. In firefighter face and neck wipes a greater number of PAHs were found, several of which have carcinogenic activity, such as benzofluoranthene, an agent also found in overhaul air samples. Although the concentration for naphthalene, and all other individual PAHs, was very low, the potential simultaneous exposure to multiple chemicals even in small quantities in combination with high ultrafine particle exposure deserves further study. It is recommended that personal respiratory and skin protection be worn throughout the overhaul process. PMID:24512044

  20. Intermediates in the Formation of Aromatics in Hydrocarbon Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The formation of the first benzene ring is believed to be the rate limiting step in soot formation. Two different mechanisms have been proposed for formation of cyclic C6 species. The first involves the reaction of two acetylenes to give CH2CHCCH (vinyl acetylene), the loss of a H to give CHCHCCH (n-C41-13) or CH2CCCH (iso-C4H3), and addition of another acetylene to n-C4H3, followed by ring closure to give phenyl radical. Miller and Melius argue that only n-C4H3 leads to phenyl radical and since iso-C4H3 is more stable than n-C4H3 this mechanism is unlikely. An alternative mechanism proposed by them is formation of benzene from the dimerization of two CH2CCH (propargyl) radicals (formed by the reaction of singlet methylene with C2H2). We report reaction pathways and accurate energetics (from CASSCF/internally contracted CI calculations) for the reactions of CH(pi-2) and CH2-1 with acetylene, the reaction of vinylidene with acetylene, and the reaction of n-C4H3 and iso-C4H3 with acetylene. These calculations identify two new reactive intermediates CHCHCH ( a A"-2 ground state in Cs symmetry; spin coupling is a doublet from three singly occupied orbitals) and CHCCH (B-3 ground state in C2 symmetry) from the reaction of CH with acetylene. These species dimerize with no barrier to form benzene and para-benzyne, respectively. CHCCH is proposed as a reactive intermediate which can add to benzene to give higher polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons or fullerenes. The addition of a C3H2 unit releases two C-C bond energies and thus the resulting addition product contains sufficient energy to break several CH bonds leading to a reduction in the H to C ratio as the cluster size increases. It is found that iso-C4H3 adds to acetylene to initially give a fulvene radical but that this species rearranges to phenyl radical. Thus, the reaction of acetylene with iso-C4H3 does lead to phenyl radical and the cyclization pathway may also contribute to formation of the initial benzene ring.

  1. Aromatic hydrocarbons in the atmospheric environment. Part III: personal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilgen, E.; Levsen, K.; Angerer, J.; Schneider, P.; Heinrich, J.; Wichmann, H.-E.

    As part of a larger study, personal sampling of the aromatic hydrocarbons benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and the isomeric xylenes (BTEX) was carried out by 55 nonsmoking volunteers for a period of 14 days. Thirty-nine persons lived in a rural area near Hannover (Germany) with hardly any traffic at all, while 16 persons lived in a high-traffic city street in Hannover. The personal exposure level of the persons in the rural area (some commuting to Hannover) was: 2.9, 24.8, 2.4 and 7.7 ?g m -3 for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and the sum of xylenes, respectively, while the corresponding data for the high traffic city streets were 4.0, 22.2, 2.8 and 9.7 ?g m -3 (geometric means). Four microenvironments have been monitored which contribute to the total exposure to BTEX, i.e. the home, the outdoor air, the workplace and the car cabin. The most important microenvironment for non-working persons is the private home. The concentration of most BTEX in the private home is almost equal to the personal exposure level, demonstrating that the indoor pollution in the home makes by far the highest contribution to the total exposure. For working people (mostly office workers), the workplace is the second most important microenvironment contributing to the total BTEX exposure. Taking all working persons into consideration (independent of the location of their private home) the personal exposure level is higher by a factor of 1.2-1.4 than that of the workplace (for toluene this factor is 2.2). As already found by others, very high BTEX concentrations may be found in car cabins, in particular, if the engine is gasoline-driven. In the cabin of 44 cars in the rural/urban area average benzene concentrations (geometric mean) of 12/14 ?g m -3 and a maximum value of 550 ?g m -3 were found. On average, the participating volunteers drove their car for 45 min day -1 (i.e. 3% of the day). Nevertheless, the car cabin constitutes about 10% of the total benzene exposure. Refueling of the car during the 14-day sampling period has only a small effect on the personal exposure level.

  2. The Origins of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Are They Everywhere?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    During the past 15 years considerable progress in observational techniques has been achieved in the middle-infrared region (5000-500 per centimeter, 2-20 micron), the region where most diagnostic molecular vibrations occur. Spectra of many different astronomical infrared sources, some deeply embedded in dark molecular clouds and others at their edges, are now available. These spectra provide a powerful probe, not only for the identification of interstellar molecules in both the gas and solid phases, but also of the physical and chemical conditions which prevail in these two very different domains. The two lectures will focus on the evidence that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important, ubiquitous and abundant interstellar species. PAHs are. extremely stable species which can range in size from a few angstroms across to several hundred angstroms (PAHs are also the building blocks of amorphous carbon particles). This identification rests on the suggestive agreement between the laboratory spectra of PAHs with a set of IR emission bands which emanate from many different sources where ultraviolet starlight impinges on a "dusty" region. The picture is that individual PAHs are first pumped into highly vibrationally excited states and relax by fluorescence at their fundamental vibrational frequencies. That PAHs are a ubiquitous interstellar component has serious ramifications in other spectral regions as well, including the strong extinction in the ultraviolet, and the classic visible diffuse interstellar bands discovered more than 50 years ago (but unexplained to this day) The first part of the course will focus on the interpretation of astronomical spectra. The second lecture will start by showing how recent laboratory data on PAHs taken under realistic interstellar conditions has con borated the PAH hypothesis and led to great insight into the conditions in the PAH containing regions. This lecture will end by reviewing the ever-increasing evidence for interstellar PAHs in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles. This in conjunction with the recent suggestion that PAHs are abundant in Jupiter's atmosphere will make the point that "PAHs are Everywhere".

  3. DNA adducts and carcinogenicity of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, P.P.; Herreno-Saenz, D.; Von Tungeln, L.S.

    1994-10-01

    We have been interested in the structure-activity relationships of nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs), and have focused on the correlation of structural and electronic features with biological activities, including mutagenicity and tumorigenicity. In our studies, we have emphasized 1-, 2-, 3-, and 6-nitrobenzo[a]pyrenes (nitro-B[a]Ps) and related compounds, all of which are derived from the potent carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene. While 1-, 2-, and 3-nitro-B[a]P are potent mutagens in Salmonella, 6-nitro-B[a]P is a weak mutagen. In vitro metabolism of 1- and 3-nitro-B[a]P has been found to generate multiple pathways for mutagenic activation. The formation of the corresponding trans-7,8-dihydrodiols and 7,8,9,10-tetrahydrotetrols suggests that 1- and 3-nitro-B[a]P trans-7,8-diol-anti-9, 10--epoxides are ultimate metabolites of the parent nitro-B[a]Ps. We have isolated a DNA adduct from the reaction between 3-nitro-B[a]P trans-7,8-diol-anti-9, 10-epoxide and calf thymus DNA, and identified it as 10-(deoxyguanosin-N{sup 2}-yl)-7,8,9-trihydroxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-3-nitro-B[a]P. The same adduct was identified from in vitro metabolism of [{sup 3}H]3-nitro-B[a]P by rat liver microsomes in the presence of calf thymus DNA. A DNA adduct of 3-nitro-B[a]P formed from reaction of N-hydroxy-3-amino-B[a]P, prepared in situ with calf thymus DNA was also isolated. This adduct was identified as 6-(deoxyguanosin-N{sup 2}-yl)-3-amino-B[a]P. The same adduct was obtained from incubating DNA with 3-nitro-B[a]P in the presence of the mammalian nitroreductase, xanthine oxidase, and hypoxanthine. 48 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. An Emission Inventory of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Xilong; Zhu, Xianlei; Wang, Xuesong

    2015-04-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are among the most dangerous compounds due to their high carcinogenic and mutagenic character. Emission inventory provides the primary data to account for the sources of ambient PAHs and server as a necessary database for effective PAHs pollution control. China is experiencing fast economic growth and large energy consumption, which might result in a large amount of PAHs anthropogenic emissions. Therefore, based on the previous studies and combined recently field emission measurements as well as socio-economic activity data, the development of a nationwide PAHs emission inventory is needed. In this work, the emission inventory of 16 PAHs listed as U.S. Environmental Protection Agency priority pollutants in China in the year 2012 is compiled. The emission amounts of PAHs were estimated as annual rates of emission-related activities multiplied by respective emission factors. The activities such as fuel consumption, including fossil fuel and biofuel, and socio-economic statistics were obtained from yearbook released by Chinese central government and/or provincial governments, as well as related industry reports. Emission factors were derived from the related literature. Recently reported emission factors from local measurements were used. The total emissions of PAHs were 120611 ton in 2012. In China, PAHs were emitted predominantly from domestic combustion of coal and biofuel, coking industry and motor vehicles, accounting for 72% of the total amount. PAHs emission profiles were significantly different between China and the other countries. The emission profile in China featured a relatively higher portion of high molecular weight species with carcinogenic potential due to large contributions of domestic combustion and coking industry. Domestic combustion of straw, coal and firewood emitted 19464 ton, 8831 ton, and 5062 ton of PAHs, respectively, which were much higher than those in other countries. Emission per capita showed geographical variations. In general, the southeastern provinces of China were characterized by higher emission per capita. The PAHs emissions were higher in the winter than those in the summer. In the following work, the above emission inventory will be used as an input to Chemical Transport Model to simulate the ambient PAHs concentrations in China, and the uncertainty of the inventory will be assessed based on the comparisons between simulated concentrations and available observations. Acknowledgement This work was financially supported by the Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41175102). Corresponding author: Xuesong Wang

  5. Biomarkers in humans exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Binkova, B.; Topinka, J.; Mrackova, G.

    1997-10-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) have been identified as a major source of carcinogenic risk in the coke-oven industry. This study evaluates following markers: personal exposure to PAH, DNA adducts, chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) polymorphisms. 23 top side coke-oven workers and 13 unexposed workers employed in the same plant at Kosice, Slovakia were studied. Personal monitors were used to measure carcinogenic PAH exposure during 8 h of working shift prior the collection of blood and urine samples. Personal exposure to eight carcinogenic PAHs ranged from 0.6 to 632 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and from 0.07 to 0.62 {mu}g/m{sup 3} for exposed and control groups, respectively. Based on the values of individual persons, the positive significant correlations were found between DNA adducts detected in WBC and LYM (Spearman r=0.451, p=0.044), between DNA adducts and SCE (r=0.363, p=0.034) and between AB.C. and SCE-H (SCE evaluated as the index of heterogeneity H-variance/mean: r=0.381, p=0.024). Using individual PAH exposure data the following significant correlations between exposure and biomarkers were found: WBC-DNA adducts (r=0.325;p=0.058);SCE-H (r=0.467, p=0.007). Groupwise comparison of the exposed and control groups (Mann-Whitney U-test) showed significantly increased values of SCE (6.71{+-}1.20 vs. 5.20 {+-}1.16, respectively) and DNA adducts in WBC and LYM (2.70{+-}0.74 vs 1.94{+-}0.51 adducts/10{sup 8} nucleotides; 2.46{+-}0.83 vs. 1.60{+-}0.32 adducts/10{sup 8}nucleotides, respectively). No influence of the smoking habits on the biomarkers was detectable in exposed or unexposed individuals. Multifactor analysis of variance taking into account confounding factors such as GSTM1, NAT2, diet and adjusting the data for age and smoking clearly showed the effect of exposure on DNA adducts, AB.C and SCE-H.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Pavanello, Sofia; Dioni, Laura; Hoxha, Mirjam; Fedeli, Ugo; Mielzynska-vach, Danuta; Baccarelli, Andrea A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) is a biological response to mtDNA damage and dysfunction predictive of lung cancer risk. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are established lung carcinogens and may cause mitochondrial toxicity. Whether PAH exposure and PAH-related nuclear DNA (nDNA) genotoxic effects are linked with increased mtDNAcn has never been evaluated. Methods We investigated the effect of chronic exposure to PAHs on mtDNAcn in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) of 46 Polish male non-current smoking cokeoven workers and 44 matched controls, who were part of a group of 94 study individuals examined in our previous work. Subjects PAH exposure and genetic alterations were characterized through measures of internal dose (urinary 1-pyrenol), target dose [anti-benzo[a]pyrene diolepoxide (anti-BPDE)-DNA adduct], genetic instability (micronuclei, MN and telomere length [TL]) and DNA methylation [p53 promoter] in PBLs. mtDNAcn (MT/S) was measured using a validated real-time PCR method. Results Workers with PAH exposure above the median value (>3 mol 1-pyrenol/mol creatinine) showed higher mtDNAcn [geometric means (GM) of 1.06 (unadjusted) and 1.07 (age-adjusted)] compared to controls [GM 0.89 (unadjusted); 0.89 (age-adjusted)] (p=0.029 and 0.016), as well as higher levels of genetic and chromosomal [i.e. anti-BPDE-DNA adducts (p<0.001), MN (p<0.001) and TL (p=0.053)] and epigenetic [i.e., p53 gene-specific promoter methylation (p<0.001)] alterations in the nDNA. In the whole study population, unadjusted and age-adjusted mtDNAcn was positively correlated with 1-pyrenol (p=0.043 and 0.032) and anti-BPDE-DNA adducts (p=0.046 and 0.049). Conclusions PAH exposure and PAH-related nDNA genotoxicity are associated with increased mtDNAcn. Impact The present study is suggestive of potential roles of mtDNAcn in PAH-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:23885040

  7. Bioremediation of Mixtures of High Molecular Weight Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Wu, J.; Shi, X.; Sun, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Although bioremediation has been considered as one of the most promising means to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from polluted environments, the efficacy of PAHs bioremediation still remains challenged, especially for high molecular weight PAHs (HMW PAHs) and their mixtures. This study was focused on (a) isolation and characterization of pure strain and mixed microbial communities able to degrade HMW PAHs and (b) further evaluation of the ability of the isolated microbes to degrade HMW PAHs mixtures in the absence and presence of indigenous flora. Fluoranthene, benzo[b]fluoranthene and pyrene were selected as the representative HMW PAHs in this study. A pure bacterial strain, identified as Herbaspirillum chlorophenolicum FA1, was isolated from activated sludge. A mixed bacterial community designated as consortium-4 was isolated from petroleum contaminated soils, containing Pseudomonas sp. FbP1、Enterobacter sp. FbP2、Hydrogenophaga sp. FbP3 and Luteolibacter pohnpeiensis. FbP4. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that bacterial strains of Herbaspirillum chlorophenolicum FA1 and Luteolibacter pohnpeiensis. FbP4 can also degrade fluoranthene, benzo[b]fluoranthene and pyrene. Experiment results showed that both strain FA1 and consortium-4 could degrade fluoranthene, benzo[b]fluoranthene and pyrene within a wide range of temperature, pH and initial PAHs concentration. Degradation of HMW PAHs mixtures (binary and ternary) demonstrated the interactive effects that can alter the rate and extent of biodegradation within a mixture. The presence of indigenous flora was found to either increase or decrease the degradation of HMW PAHs, suggesting possible synergistic or competition effects. Biodegradation kinetics of HMW PAHs for sole substrates, binary and ternary systems was evaluated, with the purpose to better characterize and compare the biodegradation process of individual HMW PAH and mixtures of HMW PAHs. Results of this study could advance our understanding of HMW PAHs biodegradation and help to develop successful bioremediation strategies. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41102148), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (20110091120063).

  8. Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from medical waste incinerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wen-Jhy; Liow, Ming-Chu; Tsai, Perng-Jy; Hsieh, Lien-Te

    This study was conducted on two batch-type medical waste incinerators (MWIs), including the one with a mechanical grate (MG-MWI) and the other with a fixed grate (FG-MWI) for the disposal of general medical waste and special medical waste, respectively. Both incinerators shared the same air-pollution control devices which were installed in series, including one electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and one wet scrubber (WSB). In addition to the investigated emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from both types of MWIs, the PAH removal efficiencies of air-pollution control devices were also included. In this study, the GC/MS technique was used to analyze the concentrations of 21 PAH species contained in the stack flue gas, ESP fly ash, WSB effluent, and incinerating ash. Results show that total-PAHs (i.e., the sum of 21 PAH species) in stack flue gas were dominated by LM-PAHs (i.e., two- to three-ringed PAHs), but in incinerating ash, ESP fly ash and WSB effluent we found that they were dominated by MM-PAHs (i.e., four-ringed PAHs) and HM-PAHs (i.e., five- to seven-ringed PAHs) for both types of MWIs. The above results due to air-pollution control devices used in both types of MWIs had much higher removal efficiencies on both MM-PAHs and HM-PAHs (>78%) than on LM-PAHs (<5%). The emission factors of total-PAHs for MG-MWI (=252,000 μg/kg-waste) were lower than FG-MWI (=856,000 μg/kg-waste), which was probably due to more complete combustion involved in the combustion process of the former than the latter. Nevertheless, the above two emission factors were found consistently higher than the only municipal waste incinerator that was located in the same city (=871 μg/kg-waste, respectively). The above results warrant the need for seeking better technologies for disposing medical waste in the future.

  9. Exposure of firefighters to particulates and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Baxter, C Stuart; Hoffman, Joseph D; Knipp, Michael J; Reponen, Tiina; Haynes, Erin N

    2014-01-01

    Firefighting continues to be among the most hazardous yet least studied occupations in terms of exposures and their relationship to occupational disease. Exposures are complex, involving mixtures of particles and chemicals such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Adverse health effects associated with these agents include elevated incidences of coronary heart disease and several cancers. PAHs have been detected at fire scenes, and in the firehouse rest area and kitchen, routinely adjoining the truck bay, and where firefighters spend a major part of each shift. An academic-community partnership was developed with the Cincinnati Fire Department with the goal of understanding active firefighters' airborne and dermal PAH exposure. PAHs were measured in air and particulates, and number and mass concentrations, respectively, of submicron (0.02-1?m) and PM2.5 (2.5?m diameter and less) particles during overhaul events in two firehouses and a University of Cincinnati administrative facility as a comparison location. During overhaul firefighters evaluate partially combusted materials for re-ignition after fire extinguishment and commonly remove Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA). Face and neck wipes were also collected at a domestic fire scene. Overhaul air samples had higher mean concentrations of PM2.5 and submicron particles than those collected in the firehouse, principally in the truck bay and kitchen. Among the 17 PAHs analyzed, only naphthalene and acenaphthylene were generally detectable. Naphthalene was present in 7 out of 8 overhaul activities, in 2 out of 3 firehouse (kitchen and truck bay) samples, and in none collected from the control site. In firefighter face and neck wipes a greater number of PAHs were found, several of which have carcinogenic activity, such as benzofluoranthene, an agent also found in overhaul air samples. Although the concentration for naphthalene, and all other individual PAHs, was very low, the potential simultaneous exposure to multiple chemicals even in small quantities in combination with high ultrafine particle exposure deserves further study. It is recommended that personal respiratory and skin protection be worn throughout the overhaul process. PMID:24512044

  10. Applications of electrochemically-modulated liquid chromatography (EMLC): Separations of aromatic amino acids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, L.

    1998-03-27

    The research in this thesis explores the separation capabilities of a new technique termed electrochemically-modulated liquid chromatography (EMLC). The thesis begins with a general introduction section which provides a literature review of this technique as well as a brief background discussion of the two research projects in each of the next two chapters. The two papers which follow investigate the application of EMLC to the separation of a mixture of aromatic amino acids and of a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The last section presents general conclusions and summarizes the thesis. References are compiled in the reference section of each chapter. The two papers have been removed for separate processing.

  11. Combined ozonation and biodegradation for remediation of mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil.

    PubMed

    Nam, K; Kukor, J J

    2000-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of a combined treatment (i.e., ozonation and biodegradation) to overcome the inherent bacterial bioavailability limitation, and hence bioremediation limitation, of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil. Ozonation was very efficient in the removal of naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, and anthracene, but not for pyrene, chrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene from soil freshly spiked with the hydrocarbons. A similar result was obtained from coal tar-contaminated soil. Elimination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons increased appreciably in sand containing 0.03% organic carbon, indicating the adverse effect of organic carbon on the efficiency of ozone treatment. In spiked and coal tar-contaminated soils, ozonation followed by biodegradation significantly increased the degradation of various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons including chrysene and benzo(a)pyrene which were not degraded by the test bacterial consortium alone. In particular, the effect of the combined treatment was more pronounced in coal tar-contaminated soil than in sterile soil spiked with hydrocarbons, probably due to the augmented biological activity of the introduced consortium. The results suggest that a combined treatment including ozonation and biodegradation may be a promising bioremediation technology in soil contaminated with mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as former manufactured gas plant sites. PMID:11194968

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Marinomonas sp. Strain D104, a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium from the Deep-Sea Sediment of the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chunming; Bai, Xiuhua; Lai, Qiliang; Xie, Yanrong; Chen, Xin; Shao, Zongze

    2014-01-01

    Marinomonas sp. strain D104 was isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading consortium enriched from deep-sea sediment from the Arctic Ocean. The draft genome sequence of D104 (approximately 3.83Mbp) contains 62 contigs and 3,576 protein-encoding genes, with a G+C content of 44.8%. PMID:24459272

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Marinomonas sp. Strain D104, a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium from the Deep-Sea Sediment of the Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chunming; Bai, Xiuhua; Lai, Qiliang; Xie, Yanrong; Chen, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Marinomonas sp. strain D104 was isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading consortium enriched from deep-sea sediment from the Arctic Ocean. The draft genome sequence of D104 (approximately 3.83Mbp) contains 62 contigs and 3,576 protein-encoding genes, with a G+C content of 44.8%. PMID:24459272

  14. Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus sp. 4J2A2, a Desiccation-Tolerant Bacterium Involved in Biodegradation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Garca-Fontana, Cristina; Vlchez, Juan Ignacio; Gonzlez-Lpez, Jess

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence for Rhodococcus sp. 4J2A2, a newly described desiccation-tolerant strain that removes aromatic hydrocarbons, is reported here. The genome is estimated to be around 7.5Mb in size, with an average G+C content of 60.77% and a predicted number of protein-coding sequences of 6,354. PMID:26044434

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated pesticides in background air in central Europe - investigating parameters affecting wet scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahpoury, P.; Lammel, G.; Holubov mejkalov, A.; Klnov, J.; P?ibylov, P.; V?a, M.

    2015-02-01

    Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and chlorinated pesticides (CPs) were measured in air and precipitation at a background site in central Europe. ∑ PAH concentrations in air and rainwater ranged from 0.7 to 327.9 ng m-3 and below limit of quantification (< LOQ) to 2.1 103 ng L-1. The concentrations of PCBs and CPs in rainwater were < LOQ. ∑ PCB and ∑ CP concentrations in air ranged from < LOQ to 44.6 and < LOQ to 351.7 pg m-3, respectively. The potential relationships between PAH wet scavenging and particulate matter and rainwater properties were investigated. The concentrations of ionic species in particulate matter and rainwater were significantly correlated, highlighting the importance of particle scavenging process. Overall, higher scavenging efficiencies were found for relatively less volatile PAHs, underlining the effect of analyte gas-particle partitioning on scavenging process. The particulate matter removal by rain, and consequently PAH wet scavenging, was more effective when the concentrations of ionic species were high. In addition, the elemental and organic carbon contents of the particulate matter were found to influence the PAH scavenging.

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated pesticides in background air in central Europe - investigating parameters affecting wet scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahpoury, P.; Lammel, G.; Holubov mejkalov, A.; Klnov, J.; P?ibylov, P.; V?a, M.

    2014-10-01

    Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and chlorinated pesticides (CPs) were measured in air and precipitation at a background site in central Europe. ? PAH concentrations in air and rainwater ranged from 0.7 to 327.9 ng m-3 and below analytical method detection limit (< MDL) to 2.1 103 ng L-1. The concentrations of PCBs and CPs in rainwater were < MDL. ? PCB and ? CP concentrations in air ranged from < MDL to 44.6 and < MDL to 351.7 pg m-3, respectively. The potential relationships between PAH wet scavenging and particulate matter and rainwater properties were investigated. The concentrations of ionic species in particulate matter and rainwater were significantly correlated, highlighting the importance of particle scavenging process. Overall, higher scavenging efficiencies were found for relatively less volatile PAHs, underlining the effect of analyte gas-particle partitioning on scavenging process. The PAH wet scavenging was more effective when the concentrations of ionic species were high. In addition, the elemental and organic carbon contents of the particulate matter were found to influence the PAH scavenging.

  17. Determination of aromatic hydrocarbons in bituminous emulsion sealants using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bing; Isacsson, Ulf

    2006-12-22

    The possibility of quantitative determination of aromatic hydrocarbons in bituminous emulsion sealants was investigated using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The target analytes studied were benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, p-, m-, and o-xylene (BTEX) as well as 1,3,5- and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. Experimental factors influencing HS-SPME efficiency were studied (sample-headspace equilibration time, extraction time and sample matrix effects). A HS-SPME method using surrogate matrix was developed. The detection limit was estimated as approximately 0.1 ppmw for the target analytes investigated. Good linearity was observed (R(2)>0.997) for all calibration curves obtained. The repeatability of the method (RSD, relative standard deviation) was found less than 10%. The accuracy of the method given by recovery of spiked samples was between 99 and 116%. The HS-SPME method developed was applied to two commercially available bituminous emulsion sealants. External calibration and standard addition approaches were investigated, and statistical paired t-test was performed. The contents of target aromatic hydrocarbons in the sealants studied varied from approximately 0.4 to 150 ppmw. The method developed shows potential as a tool for the determination of aromatic hydrocarbons in emulsified bituminous materials. PMID:17069821

  18. The bioaccumulation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons by benthic invertebrates in an intertidal marsh

    SciTech Connect

    Maruya, K.A.; Risebrough, R.W.; Horne, A.J.

    1997-06-01

    Biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAF; concentration in organism lipid/concentration in sediment on an organic carbon basis) of polyaromatic hydrocarbons varied with season and along an intertidal gradient in a coastal marsh in San Francisco Bay. The BSAFs were lowest during the local rainy season. During the dry season, BSAFs were lowest in the high intertidal zone closest to shore. Significant differences among species groups were also observed; BSAFs were lowest in polychaetes and highest in the Asian clam (Potamocorbula amurensis), varying over almost three orders of magnitude. The BSAFs decreased with increasing percent fines in the sediments and with PAH concentrations on an organic carbon basis. The authors suggest that a determining variable is the content of highly aromatic soot particles, which increases during periods of surface runoff and which is expected in the dry season to be highest in the high intertidal zone where these finer particles preferentially accumulate. Correlations of BSAFs with the ratio of the logarithm of the activity coefficients in porewaters to those in sediments were generally stronger than with log K{sub ow}, indicating a limitation of octanol as a surrogate for sediment organic carbon or organism lipid. These observations qualify but also strengthen the concept of equilibrium partitioning as the determining factor in bioaccumulation by benthic organisms of nonpolar organic compounds for sediments; the assumption that organic carbon can be considered in generic terms without allowance for aromaticity and probably other factors as well, must, however, be reconsidered.

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments and mussels of the western Mediterranean Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Baumard, P.; Budzinski, H.; Garrigues, P.

    1998-05-01

    The distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been investigated in superficial sediments and mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) of the western Mediterranean sea. The analyses were performed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The PAH concentrations ranged from 1 to 20,500 ng/g in the sediments. Different molecular indices allowed differentiation between the different pollutant sources. On the French coast, PAHs originated mainly from incomplete combustion of organic matter (pyrolytic origin), whereas for some sites in Corsica and Sardinia an overimposition of petrogenic PAHs occurred. The mussel PAH concentrations ranged from 25 to 390 ng/g. The total and individual PAH bioaccumulation factors were calculated. The correlation between sediment and mussel PAH content was discussed in terms of bioavailability. It was possible to distinguish different absorption routes for the xenobiotics according to their physicochemical properties. Because the mussel distribution of phenanthrene and anthracene seems to be governed by their water solubility, these compounds were probably mainly absorbed as the water-dissolved form, whereas the heavier molecular weight PAHs (more than four aromatic rings), whose sediment and mussel concentrations are correlated with higher correlation coefficients than for phenanthrene and anthracene, were probably mainly absorbed as adsorbed on particles. Furthermore, a possible preferential biotransformation of benzo[a]pyrene over benzo[e]pyrene is discussed.

  20. Production of aromatic hydrocarbons through catalytic pyrolysis of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural from biomass.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Pan, Tao; Zuo, Yong; Guo, Qing-Xiang; Fu, Yao

    2013-11-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) was conducted on a fixed bed reactor at atmospheric pressure. HMF could be converted into aromatic hydrocarbons through catalytic pyrolysis. The catalysts and reaction conditions were both critical in maximizing the aromatic hydrocarbons selectivity. Four catalysts, β-zeolite, HZSM-5, Ga/HZSM and In/HZSM were tested in this study. HZSM-5 (Si/Al=50) was found to be the most effective catalyst in both reactivity and selectivity among these catalysts. Under the reaction temperature of 600 °C, the highest carbon yield of 48.99% of aromatic hydrocarbons was achieved from catalytic pyrolysis HMF with HZSM-5 (Si/Al=50) as catalyst. Moreover, the HZSM-5 (Si/Al=50) catalyst was recycled for five times without shown deactivation of the catalyst. PMID:23994304

  1. Formation mechanism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons beyond the second aromatic ring.

    PubMed

    Kislov, V V; Sadovnikov, A I; Mebel, A M

    2013-06-13

    The formation mechanism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) with three fused aromatic rings starting from naphthalene has been studied using accurate ab initio G3(MP2,CC)//B3LYP/6-311G** calculations followed by the kinetic analysis of various reaction pathways and computations of relative product yields. The results reveal new insights into the classical hydrogen abstraction-C2H2 addition (HACA) scheme of PAH growth. The HACA mechanism has been shown to produce mostly cyclopentafused PAHs instead of PAHs with six-member rings only, in contrast to the generally accepted view on this mechanism. Considering naphthalene as the initial reactant, the HACA-type synthesis of higher PAHs with all six-member rings, anthracene and phenanthrene, accounts only for 3-6% of the total product yield at temperatures relevant to combustion (1000-2000 K), whereas cyclopentafused PAHs, including acenaphthalene (41-48%), 4-ethynylacenaphthalene (∼14%), 3-ethynylacenaphthalene (∼7.5%), 1-methylene-1H-cyclopenta[b]naphthalene (∼6%), and 3-methylene-3H-cyclopenta[a]naphthalene (∼5%), account for another ∼75%. It has been shown that acetylene addition to the radical site adjacent to the bay region in naphthalene (as in 1-naphthyl radical) or other similar PAH with a bay region is highly unlikely to be followed by the addition of a second acetylene molecule; alternatively, the bay region closure with a buildup of a new five-member ring occurs. Acetylene addition to a nonbay carbon atom (as in 2-naphthyl radical) can be followed by the second acetylene addition only at T < 1000 K, producing anthracene and phenanthrene. However, at temperatures relevant to combustion, such pathways give negligible contributions to the total product yield, whereas the dominant reaction product, 2-ethynylnaphthalene, is formed by simple hydrogen atom elimination from the attached ethenyl group. An additional six-member ring buildup may occur only after intermolecular hydrogen abstraction from ethynyl-substituted PAH (2-ethynylnaphthalene), in particular, from the carbon atoms adjacent to the existing ethynyl (C2H) fragment, followed by C2H2 addition producing adducts with two ethynyl C2H and ethenyl C2H2 groups next to each other, which then undergo a fast six-member ring closure. Nevertheless, this process has been shown to be relatively minor (∼25%), whereas the major process is a five-member ring closure involving the same C2H and C2H2 groups and leading to a cyclopentafused PAH molecule. Although the computed product yields show a good agreement with experimentally observed concentrations of acenaphthalene and anthracene in various aliphatic and aromatic flames, the yield of phenanthrene, which exhibits an order of magnitude higher concentration than anthracene both in combustion flames and environmental mixtures, via the considered pathways is significantly underpredicted. This result points at the possible existence of another mechanism responsible for the formation of phenanthrene and other all-six-member-ring PAHs. The overall kinetic scheme for the HACA buildup process leading to various three-ring PAHs (both with six-member rings only and cyclopentafused) from naphthalene, which can be included in flame kinetic models, has been constructed, with rate constants for all individual reaction steps provided. PMID:23672431

  2. Early-Life Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and ADHD Behavior Problems

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Frederica P.; Chang, Hsin-wen; Tang, Deliang; Roen, Emily L.; Herbstman, Julie; Margolis, Amy; Huang, Tzu-Jung; Miller, Rachel L.; Wang, Shuang; Rauh, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Importance Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are widespread urban air pollutants from combustion of fossil fuel and other organic material shown previously to be neurotoxic. Objective In a prospective cohort study, we evaluated the relationship between Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder behavior problems and prenatal polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure, adjusting for postnatal exposure. Materials and Methods Children of nonsmoking African-American and Dominican women in New York City were followed from in utero to 9 years. Prenatal polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure was estimated by levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon- DNA adducts in maternal and cord blood collected at delivery. Postnatal exposure was estimated by the concentration of urinary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites at ages 3 or 5. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder behavior problems were assessed using the Child Behavior Checklist and the Conners Parent Rating Scale- Revised. Results High prenatal adduct exposure, measured by elevated maternal adducts was significantly associated with all Conners Parent Rating Scale-Revised subscales when the raw scores were analyzed continuously (N = 233). After dichotomizing at the threshold for moderately to markedly atypical symptoms, high maternal adducts were significantly associated with the Conners Parent Rating Scale-Revised DSM-IV Inattentive (OR = 5.06, 95% CI [1.43, 17.93]) and DSM-IV Total (OR = 3.37, 95% CI [1.10, 10.34]) subscales. High maternal adducts were positivity associated with the DSM-oriented Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Problems scale on the Child Behavior Checklist, albeit not significant. In the smaller sample with cord adducts, the associations between outcomes and high cord adduct exposure were not statistically significant (N = 162). Conclusion The results suggest that exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons encountered in New York City air may play a role in childhood Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder behavior problems. PMID:25372862

  3. Neurobehavioral performance in volunteers after inhalation of white spirits with high and low aromatic content.

    PubMed

    Juran, S A; Johanson, G; Ernstgård, L; Iregren, A; van Thriel, C

    2014-05-01

    The content of aromatic hydrocarbons in solvent mixtures, such as white spirits (WS), has been assumed a major contributor to the neurotoxic effects of these compounds. Hence, dearomatized WS have been introduced to the market rapidly in the last decade. Studies investigating other aromatic hydrocarbons (toluene) and animal models have supported the aforementioned assumption, but the current study is the first one to compare acute neurobehavioral effects of exposure to aromatic and dearomatized WS (aWS, daWS) content in human volunteers at current occupational exposure limit values. In a pseudo-randomized crossover design, six female and six male healthy volunteers were exposed to aWS and daWS at two concentrations (100 and 300 mg/m(3)) and to clean air for 4 h at rest. During each of the five exposure conditions, volunteers performed five neurobehavioral tasks that were selected following a multidisciplinary approach that accounted for findings from the cognitive neurosciences and mechanisms of solvent toxicity. Two of the tasks indicated performance changes during aromatic WS exposure, the working memory (WM) and the response shifting task, but both effects are difficult to interpret due to low mean accuracy in the WM task and due to a lack of dose-response relationship in the response shifting task. Healthy human volunteers showed weak and inconsistent neurobehavioral impairment after 4-h exposures to 100 and 300 mg/m(3) aromatic or dearomatized WS. Our multidisciplinary approach of selecting neurobehavioral test methods may guide the test selection strategies in future studies. PMID:24714767

  4. Emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from combustion of agricultural and sylvicultural debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, Francisco J.; Ayala, Juan H.; Afonso, Ana M.; González, Venerando

    In this work, 28 parent and substituted-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been quantified in 76 smoke samples produced by burning pine wood, pine needles, prickly pear and almond skin using two different kinds of combustion devices. The results show a great variability in the total concentrations of the PAHs, while their proportions in the different samples are practically independent of the type of biomass that is burned. Just a few PAHs with low molecular weight—naphthalene, 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene, acenaphthylene and phenanthrene—are the most common in the different smoke samples, representing between 61% and 72% of the total. The high correlation coefficients between naphthalene and the total concentrations of PAHs, or between naphthalene and the concentrations of PAHs grouped by number of rings, demonstrate that all combustion processes studied are equally affected by the variables that regulate those processes. The results underscore the important role that naphthalene plays in the formation of higher molecular weight PAHs by pyrosynthesis and show that the naphthalene concentration can be used as an indicator of the total hydrocarbons content in the smoke.

  5. A novel integrative technique for locating and monitoring polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon discharges to the aquatic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Black, J.J.; Hart, T.F. Jr.; Black, P.J.

    1982-05-01

    A simple integrative technique for locating and monitoring polynuclear aromatic hydrogen discharges to aquatic environments is described. The technique involves anchoring artificial substrates cut from a commercial oil-adsorbant cloth (3M Co.) near suspected sources of contamination. Analytical methodology involves mild ethanolic extraction and liquid-liquid partitioning to isolate a polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon containing fraction that is amenable to analysis by high-pressure liquid chromatography.

  6. Non-linear, cata-Condensed, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Materials: A Generic Approach and Physical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Haire, Barnaby T; Heard, Kane W J; Little, Mark S; Parry, Adam V S; Raftery, James; Quayle, Peter; Yeates, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    A generic approach to the regiospecific synthesis of halogenated polycyclic aromatics is made possible by the one- or two-directional benzannulation reactions of readily available (ortho-allylaryl)trichloroacetates (the “BHQ” reaction). Palladium-catalysed cross-coupling reactions of the so-formed haloaromatics enable the synthesis of functionalised polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with surgical precision. Overall, this new methodology enables the facile mining of chemical space in search of new electronic functional materials. PMID:26059760

  7. Determination of total and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aviation jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Bernabei, M; Reda, R; Galiero, R; Bocchinfuso, G

    2003-01-24

    The aviation jet fuel widely used in turbine engine aircraft is manufactured from straight-run kerosene. The combustion quality of jet fuel is largely related to the hydrocarbon composition of the fuel itself; paraffins have better burning properties than aromatic compounds, especially naphthalenes and light polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are characterised as soot and smoke producers. For this reason the burning quality of fuel is generally measured as smoke fermation. This evaluation is carried out with UV spectrophotometric determination of total naphthalene hydrocarbons and a chromatographic analysis to determine the total aromatic compounds. These methods can be considered insufficient to evaluate the human health impact of these compounds due to their inability to measure trace (ppm) amounts of each aromatic hyrcarbon and each PAH in accordance with limitations imposed because of their toxicological properties. In this paper two analytical methods are presented. Both are based on a gas chromatographic technique with a mass detector operating in be selected ion monitoring mode. The first method was able to determine more than 60 aromatic hydrocarbons in a fuel sample in a 35-min chromatographic run, while the second was able to carry out the analysis of more than 30 PAHs in a 40-min chromatographic run. The linearity and sensitivity of the methods in measuring these analytes at trace levels are described. PMID:12580487

  8. Remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated soil or water. The chemical or biological processes that destroy these contaminants or reduce their toxicity are discussed. Techniques include treatments used in above-ground reactors or in situ detoxification of contaminated sites. The citations examine the relationship between the chemical structure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and rate of decomposition; selection of the most effective microorganisms for biological degradation; and factors which can accelerate or inhibit degradation.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  9. Remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated soil or water. The chemical or biological processes that destroy these contaminants or reduce their toxicity are discussed. Techniques include treatments used in above-ground reactors or in situ detoxification of contaminated sites. The citations examine the relationship between the chemical structure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and rate of decomposition; selection of the most effective microorganisms for biological degradation; and factors which can accelerate or inhibit degradation. (Contains a minimum of 108 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. (Ltest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated soil or water. The chemical or biological processes that destroy these contaminants or reduce their toxicity are discussed. Techniques include treatments used in above-ground reactors or in situ detoxification of contaminated sites. The citations examine the relationship between the chemical structure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and rate of decomposition; selection of the most effective microorganisms for biological degradation; and factors which can accelerate or inhibit degradation. (Contains a minimum of 82 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. Remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated soil or water. The chemical or biological processes that destroy these contaminants or reduce their toxicity are discussed. Techniques include treatments used in above-ground reactors or in situ detoxification of contaminated sites. The citations examine the relationship between the chemical structure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and rate of decomposition; selection of the most effective microorganisms for biological degradation; and factors which can accelerate or inhibit degradation.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  12. Shakedown operation of group of units for aromatic hydrocarbon production at the Novopolotsk petroleum refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Rudkovskii, A.D.; Chesnovitskii, K.G.; Koroleva, M.I.; Sulimov, A.D.; Teteruk, V.G.

    1983-03-01

    This article describes how technical xylene and C/sub 9/ aromatic hydrocarbons are produced in catalytic reformers operated in conjunction with diethylene glycol extraction units. In the operation of the unit, the greatest difficulties were encountered in purification of the p-xylene, owing to frequent mechanical failures of the equipment of the pulsed columns due to hydraulic shock and unstable operation under the process conditions required to obtain a product with a purity above 99%. As a result of the successful shakedown operations of individual aromatic hydrocarbons, the yields of commercial products (ethylbenzene, p-xylene, o-xylene, pseudocumene) have amounted to 76.9% of the technical xylene feed.

  13. Remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from contaminated soil or water. The chemical or biological processes that destroy these contaminants or reduce their toxicity are discussed. Techniques include treatments used in above-ground reactors or in situ detoxification of contaminated sites. The citations examine the relationship between the chemical structure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and rate of decomposition; selection of the most effective microorganisms for biological degradation; and factors which can accelerate or inhibit degradation.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  14. Modular Synthesis of Aromatic Hydrocarbon Macrocycles for Simplified, Single-Layer Organic Light-Emitting Devices.

    PubMed

    Ikemoto, Koki; Yoshii, Asami; Izumi, Tomoo; Taka, Hideo; Kita, Hiroshi; Xue, Jing Yang; Kobayashi, Ryo; Sato, Sota; Isobe, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-15

    A method for the modular synthesis of aromatic hydrocarbon macrocycles has been developed for base materials in single-layer organic light-emitting devices. The method with Ir-catalyzed direct C-H borylation and Suzuki-Miyaura coupling was concise and scalable, which allowed for a gram-scale preparation of aromatic hydrocarbon macrocycles that have bulky substituents at the periphery. The new arylated hydrocarbon macrocycles enabled a quantitative electro-optical conversion in organic light-emitting devices with a phosphorescent emitter, which is, notably, in a single-layer architecture consisting of two regions of doped and undoped materials. The highest external quantum efficiencies reached 24.8%, surpassing those of previous hydrocarbon base materials. PMID:26651618

  15. Biosurfactant production by a soil Pseudomonas strain growing on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Deziel, E.; Paquette, G.; Villemur, R.; Lepine, F.

    1996-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous pollutants occurring mostly as a result of fossil fuel combustion and as by-products of industrial activities. The bioremediation of soils contaminated with PAHs is limited by the poor availability of dyrophobic contaminants to microorganisms. Surfactants can help. Recent studies indicate that addition of surfactants can enhance hydrocarbon biodegradation. This study examines whether production of surfactants by PAH-metabolizing microorganisms is part of their strategy for growing on such poorly available substrates.

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in vegetables and fruits produced in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Muhammad Waqar; Salam, A

    2012-04-01

    Popular varieties of vegetables were collected from major cities of Saudi Arabia and analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) contents. Eight important PAH congeners were analyzed. Total PAH contents of the root vegetables like potato and carrot showed higher values (11?gkg(-1)), whereas turnip showed relatively lower contents at 9.26?gkg(-1). For the fruit vegetables, all the peels were found to be more contaminated than cores. For leafy vegetables, maximum PAH level was shown by cabbage (8.34?gkg(-1)), which turned out to be more than any of the cores of fruit vegetables. Among individual PAH congeners, anthracene showed higher levels in all vegetables. For benzo(a)anthracene, maximum concentration (2.211.75?gkg(-1)) was encountered in turnip cores. Highest benzo(e)pyrene concentration was found in potato (2.901.10?gkg(-1)) followed by turnip (2.101.09?gkg(-1)). Benzo(b)fluoranthene and benzo(k)fluoranthene showed relatively lower levels in all samples studied. Human exposure to PAH by consumption of these vegetables is estimated, by using typical Saudi intake rates. The study revealed that cumulative dietary exposure of Saudi population to PAHs ranges from 0.20 to 0.85?gp(-1)d(-1). PMID:22278406

  17. Predicting Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Bioavailability to Mammals from Incidentally Ingested Soils Using Partitioning and Fugacity.

    PubMed

    James, Kyle; Peters, Rachel E; Cave, Mark R; Wickstrom, Mark; Lamb, Eric G; Siciliano, Steven D

    2016-02-01

    Soil and dust ingestion is one of the major human exposure pathways to contaminated soil; however, pollutant transfer from ingested substances to humans cannot currently be confidently predicted. Soil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bioavailability is likely dependent upon properties linked to chemical potential and partitioning such as fugacity, fugacity capacity, soil organic carbon, and partitioning to simulated intestinal fluids. We estimated the oral PAH bioavailability of 19 historically contaminated soils fed to juvenile swine. Between soils, PAH blood content, with the exception of benzo(a)pyrene, was not linked to fugacity. In contrast, between individual PAHs, using partitioning explained PAH blood content (area under the curve = 0.47 log fugacity + 0.34, r(2) = 0.68, p < 0.005, n = 14). Soil fugacity capacity predicts PAH soil concentration with an average slope of 0.30 (μg PAH g(-1) soil) Pa(-1) and r(2)'s of 0.61-0.73. Because PAH blood content was independent of soil concentration, soil fugacity correlated to PAH bioavailability via soil fugacity's link to soil concentration. In conclusion, we can use fugacity to explain PAH uptake from a soil into blood. However, something other than partitioning is critical to explain the differences in PAH uptake into blood between soils. PMID:26741299

  18. Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments from Yellow River Estuary and Yangtze River Estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Hui, Yamei; Zheng, Minghui; Liu, Zhengtao; Gao, Lirong

    2009-01-01

    Surface sediment samples collected from twenty-one sites of Yellow River Estuary and Yangtze River Estuary were determined for sixteen priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by isotope dilution GC-MS method. The total PAH contents varied from 10.8 to 252 ng/g in Yellow River Estuary sediment, and from 84.6 to 620 ng/g in Yangtze River Estuary sediment. The mean total PAH content of Yangtze River Estuary was approximately twofold higher than that of Yellow River Estuary. The main reasons for the difference may be the rapid industrial development and high population along Yangtze River and high silt content of Yellow River Estuary. The evaluation of PAH sources suggested that PAHs in two estuaries sediments estuaries were derived primarily from combustion sources, but minor amounts of PAHs were derived from petroleum source in Yellow River Estuary. PAHs may be primary introduced to Yellow River Estuary via dry/wet deposition, wastewater effluents, and accidental oil spills, and Yangtze River Estuary is more prone to be affected by wastewater discharge. PMID:20131590

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and phenolic substances in meat products smoked with different types of wood and smoking spices.

    PubMed

    Hitzel, Alexander; Phlmann, Margarete; Schwgele, Fredi; Speer, Karl; Jira, Wolfgang

    2013-08-15

    The contents of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (15+1 EU PAH) and phenolic substances (guaiacol, 4-methylguaiacol, syringol, eugenol, and trans-isoeugenol) were investigated in smouldering-smoked Frankfurters and mini-salamis. For the 51 smoking experiments wood chips of oak, poplar, hickory, spruce, fir, alder, beech, and beech with an apple-smoking spice mix, cherry-smoking spice mix, and a mix of juniper berries and bay leaves were tested. The use of poplar and hickory led to a decrease in the PAH contents in the range of 35-55% compared to the commonly used beech wood. Higher PAH contents by using softwood were not observed. The use of the rapidly growing poplar seems to be a reasonable approach for reducing the PAH contents in smoked meat products. Furthermore, the sum contents of the five phenolic substances in sausages smoked with poplar were higher, or only slightly lower, when compared to the use of beech. PMID:23561196

  20. Role of methyl group number on SOA formation from monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons photooxidation under low-NOx conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Tang, P.; Nakao, S.; Chen, C.-L.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2016-02-01

    Substitution of methyl groups onto the aromatic ring determines the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon precursor (SOA yield and chemical composition). This study links the number of methyl groups on the aromatic ring to SOA formation from monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons photooxidation under low-NOx conditions (HC/NO > 10 ppbC : ppb). Monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with increasing numbers of methyl groups are systematically studied. SOA formation from pentamethylbenzene and hexamethylbenzene are reported for the first time. A decreasing SOA yield with increasing number of methyl groups is observed. Linear trends are found in both f44 vs. f43 and O / C vs. H / C for SOA from monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with zero to six methyl groups. An SOA oxidation state predictive method based on benzene is used to examine the effect of added methyl groups on aromatic oxidation under low-NOx conditions. Further, the impact of methyl group number on density and volatility of SOA from monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is explored. Finally, a mechanism for methyl group impact on SOA formation is suggested. Overall, this work suggests that, as more methyl groups are attached on the aromatic ring, SOA products from these monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons become less oxidized per mass/carbon on the basis of SOA yield or chemical composition.

  1. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and molecular asphaltenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, A. Ballard; Wang, Dongxing; Marzec, Katarzyna M.; Mullins, Oliver C.; Crozier, Kenneth B.

    2015-01-01

    We describe, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the acquisition of surface enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of asphaltenes. SERS is an especially sensitive probe for aromatic carbon making it ideal to investigate the enigmatic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of asphaltenes, the heaviest, most aromatic components of crude oil. SERS spectra of a known PAH model compound and of asphaltene samples are compared to density functional theory (DFT) calculations of PAH structures. This combination of experimental and theoretical methods represents an advance in the characterization of asphaltenes and other complex mixtures.

  2. PERSONAL EXPOSURES TO POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS ASSOCIATED WITH THE NHEXAS PILOT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal exposure monitoring for select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was performed as part of the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS) Pilot Study in Baltimore, MD. Twenty-four hour PM10 sample collections (~5.7 m3) were performed using personal envi...

  3. CHEMISTRY OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL FORMATION FROM THE OXIDATION OF AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The experimental data obtained in this project will include reaction rate constants, product branching ratios, and yields of gas-phase and particle-phase products and SOA from OH radical-initiated reactions of aromatic hydrocarbons. These data will be used by atmospheric model...

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF EMISSIONS OF PAH'S (POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBON) FROM RESIDENTIAL COAL-FIRED SPACE HEATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a joint emissions testing and analysis program--the U.S. EPA and the State of Vermont--to determine polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), particulate, sulfur dioxide (SO2), and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from two coal-fired residential space heate...

  5. THE PHOTOTOXOICITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS: A THEORETICAL STUDY OF EXCITED STATES AND CORRELATION TO EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory



    Investigators using models to determine the phototoxic effects of sunlight on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) have invoked the excited states of the molecule as important in elucidating the mechanism of these reactions. Energies of actual excited states were calcu...

  6. Sediment porewater partitioning of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in three cores from Boston Harbor, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mcgroddy, S.E.; Farrington, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations were measured in sediments and porewaters isolated from three cores from Boston Harbor, MA. Measured porewater PAH concentrations were significantly lower than the concentrations predicted by two- and three-phase equilibrium partitioning models. We hypothesize that only a fraction of the measured sediment PAH concentrations was available to partition rapidly into sediment porewaters. ?? 1995 American Chemical Society.

  7. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND PHENOLICS IN FERROUS AND NON-FERROUS WASTE FOUNDRY SANDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 43 sets of waste sand were collected from ferrous and non-ferrous foundries in the eastern United States. The concentration of organic compounds known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and phenolics were determined. These compounds are known to be toxic to humans. Since there ...

  8. Production of aromatic hydrocarbons via catalytic pyrolysis of biomass over fe-modified HZSM-5 zeolites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron modified HZSM-5 catalysts were prepared by partial ion exchange of NH4ZSM-5 with Fe (II) at three different loadings (1.4, 2.8 and 4.2 wt%), and their effectiveness for producing aromatic hydrocarbons from cellulose, cellobiose, lignin and switchgrass by catalytic pyrolysis were screened using ...

  9. Public Health Impacts of Secondary Particulate Formation from Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Gasoline

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Aromatic hydrocarbons emitted from gasoline‐powered vehicles contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which increases the atmospheric mass concentration of fine particles (PM2.5). Here we estimate the public health burden associated w...

  10. Particle in a Disk: A Spectroscopic and Computational Laboratory Exercise Studying the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Corannulene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, E. Ramsey; Sygula, Andrzej; Hammer, Nathan I.

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise introduces undergraduate chemistry majors to the spectroscopic and theoretical study of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), corannulene. Students explore the spectroscopic properties of corannulene using UV-vis and Raman vibrational spectroscopies. They compare their experimental results to simulated vibrational…

  11. Immunological disorders associated with polychlorinated biphenyls and related halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noguchi, G.E.

    1998-01-01

    This review characterizes immunological disorders in fish associated with the widespread environmental contaminants, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and related halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs). Special attention is devoted to comparing the sensitivity of fish species, identifying sensitive immunological endpoints and postulating mechanisms of action.

  12. EXTRACTION AND DETERMINATION OF SELECTED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN PLANT TISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A procedure has been developed for analysis of plant material for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Sonication is used to extract the PAHs from homogenized plant material into acetonitrile and then the PAHs are partitioned into pentane. The pentane extract is fractionated ...

  13. Hydrometal analogues of aromatic hydrocarbons: a new class of cyclic hydrocoppers(I).

    PubMed

    Tsipis, Athanassios C; Tsipis, Constantinos A

    2003-02-01

    A new class of cyclic hydrocoppers(I) with the general formula CunHn (n = 3-6), resembling the cyclic hydrocarbon analogues, were predicted by means of DFT calculations to be stable molecules adopting a perfect planar configuration of high-symmetry characteristic of the aromatic systems. PMID:12553793

  14. MEASUREMENTS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN AMBIENT AIR PARTICULATES IN NORTHERN NEW ENGLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of measuring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ambient air particulates in Northern New England. Standard high-volume filter samples of ambient-air particulates were collected during several heating seasons in a semi-rural village, a rural area, a...

  15. FIELD COMPARISON OF POLYURETHANE FOAM AND XAD-2 RESIN FOR AIR SAMPLING FOR POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study of the sampling efficiency of two adsorbents, XAD-2 resin and polyurethane foam (PUF), for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in air, was performed under summer and winter ambient conditions. Two aspects were investigated: the collection efficiency for ambient PAH va...

  16. EVALUATION OF HVS3 SAMPLER FOR SAMPLING POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to determine whether the High Volume Small Surface Sampler (HVS3) can quantitatively collect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) will polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) adsorbed onto house dust from nine houses in Seattle, Washington. In two of the houses, a...

  17. Public Health Impacts of Secondary Particulate Formation from Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Gasoline

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Aromatic hydrocarbons emitted from gasoline?powered vehicles contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which increases the atmospheric mass concentration of fine particles (PM2.5). Here we estimate the public health burden associated w...

  18. COMPARISON OF QUANTUM MECHANICAL METHODS TO COMPUTE THE BIOLOGICALLY RELEVANT REACTIVITIES OF CYCLOPENTA POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In computational studies to understand the interaction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) with biomolecular systems, the semi-empirical method AM1 has been used to determine the geometry of the PAH, its metabolites and relevant intermediates. umber of studies have shown t...

  19. Enumeration and phylogenetic analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria from Puget Sound sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Geiselbrecht, A.D.; Herwig, R.P.; Deming, J.W.; Staley, J.T.

    1996-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are primarily released into the environment through anthropomorphic sources. PAH degradation has been known to occur in marine sediments. This paper describes the enumeration, isolation, and preliminary characterization of PAH-degrading strains from Puget Sound sediments. 38 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. DEGRADATION OF POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS UNDER BENCH-SCALE COMPOST CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between biomass growth and degradation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil, and subsequent toxicity reduction, was evaluated in 10 in-vessel, bench-scale compost units. Field soil was aquired from the Reilly Tar and Chemical Company Superfund site...

  1. EVALUATION OF SAMPLING AND ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR NICOTINE AND POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBON IN INDOOR AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the project was to evaluate a potential collection medium, XAD-4 resin, for collecting nicotine and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and to determine whether one collection system and one analytical method will allow quantification of both compound classes ...

  2. Genome Sequence of Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1, a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Strain

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qiang; Wang, Wei; Peng, Huasong; Zhang, Xuehong

    2015-01-01

    Sphingobium yanoikuyae B1 can utilize biphenyl, naphthalene, phenanthrene, toluene, and m-/p-xylene as sole sources of carbon and energy. Here, we present a 5.2-Mb assembly of its genome. An analysis of the genome can provide insights into the mechanisms of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation and potentially aid in bioremediation applications. PMID:25657282

  3. METHOD DEVELOPMENT AND MONITORING OF POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN SELECTED U.S. WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method for concentration of trace quantities of the six representatives of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) family has been developed and successfully applied to PAH monitoring in finished and raw waters. PAH are collected by passing water through polyurethane foam plugs....

  4. COMPARATIVE STUDIES OF THE EFFECT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON GEOMETRY ON THE HYDROLYSIS OF DIOL EPOXIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative studies of the effect of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon geometry on the hydrolysis of diol epoxides

    The interaction of the diol epoxides (DEs) of both planar and non-planar PAHs with water have been examined using quantum mechanical and molecular dynamics. Th...

  5. Coal-tar-based pavement sealcoat, polycyclic aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), and environmental health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, B.J.; Van Metre, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have identified coal-tar-based sealcoat-the black, viscous liquid sprayed or painted on asphalt pavement such as parking lots-as a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in urban areas for large parts of the Nation. Several PAHs are suspected human carcinogens and are toxic to aquatic life.

  6. New SERS Substrates For Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Detection: Towards Quantitative SERS Sensors For Environmental Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Peron, O.; Rinnert, E.; Compere, C.; Toury, T.; Lamy de la Chapelle, M.

    2010-08-06

    In the investigation of chemical pollutions, such as PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) at low concentration in aqueous medium, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) stands for an alternative to the inherent low cross-section of normal Raman scattering. Indeed, SERS is a very sensitive spectroscopic technique due to the excitation of the surface plasmon modes of the nanostructured metallic film.

  7. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON BIODEGRADATION AS A FUNCTION OF OXYGEN TENSION IN CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the effect of soil gas oxygen concentration on the degradation and mineralization of spiked 14C-pyrene and nonspiked 16 priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) present in the soil. The soil used for the evaluation was...

  8. PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO FINE PARTICLE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS: OUTDOOR SOURCE TRACERS

    EPA Science Inventory


    The most carcinogenic and toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are the 4-5 ring PAH found preferentially adsorbed to the fine particles (<2.54u in urban ambient air and personal air. Personal exposure to the carcinogenic particle bound PAH is also highly correlated ...

  9. ELECTRON AFFINITIES OF POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND NEGATIVE ION CHEMICAL IONIZATION SENSITIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Negative-ion chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NICI MS) has the potential to be a very useful technique in identifying various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil and sediment samples. Some PAHs give much stronger signals under NICI MS conditions than others. On ...

  10. CALCULATION OF ELECTRON AFFINITIES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND SOVATION ENERGIES OF THEIR ANIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electron affinities (EAs) and free energies for electron attachment have been calculated for 42 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and related molecules by a variety of theoretical models, including Koopmans' theorem methods and the L1E method from differences in energy between th...

  11. Particle in a Disk: A Spectroscopic and Computational Laboratory Exercise Studying the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Corannulene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, E. Ramsey; Sygula, Andrzej; Hammer, Nathan I.

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise introduces undergraduate chemistry majors to the spectroscopic and theoretical study of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), corannulene. Students explore the spectroscopic properties of corannulene using UV-vis and Raman vibrational spectroscopies. They compare their experimental results to simulated vibrational

  12. ANALYSIS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS BY ION TRAP TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ion-trap mass spectrometer with a wave board and tandem mass spectrometry software was used to analyze gas chromatographically separated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by using collision-induced dissociation (CID). The nonresonant (multiple collision) mode was used to...

  13. SELECTIVE ENUMERATION OF AROMATIC AND ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBON DEGRADING BACTERIA BY A MOST-PROBABLE-NUMBER PROCEDURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A most-portable-number (MPN) procedure was developed to separately enumerate aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon degrading bacteria, because most of the currently available methods are unable to distinguish between these two groups. Separate 96-well microtiter plates are used to ...

  14. THE EFFECT OF IRRADIANCE SPECTRA ON THE PHOTOACTIVATED TOXICITY OF THREE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photoinduced toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is dependent on the concentration of compounds present and the dose of light recieved. Of the light present, only those wavelengths absorbed by the compound have the potential to initiate the photochemical events un...

  15. EFFECT OF IRRADIANCE SPECTRA ON THE PHOTOINDUCED TOXICITY OF THREE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photoinduced toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is dependent on the concentration of compounds present and the dose of light received. Of the light present, only those wavelengths absorbed by the compound have the potential to initiate the photochemical events un...

  16. Field comparison of polyurethane foam and XAD-2 resin for air sampling for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, J.C.; Hannan, S.W.; Wilson, N.K.

    1987-01-01

    A study of the sampling efficiency of two adsorbents, XAD-2 resin and polyurethane foam (PUF), for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in air, was performed under summer and winter ambient conditions. Two aspects were investigated: the collection efficiency for ambient PAH vapor and the retention efficiency for PAH spiked onto the adsorbents before sampling.

  17. SOLAR RADIATION DOSE AND PHOTOTOXICITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons increases by as much as three orders of magnitude in the presence of solar radiation. The risk of this photoactive toxicity is thus based on both tissue concentrations of potentially photo activated compounds and the levels of subs...

  18. Toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the toxicity and biochemical effects of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons. Citations discuss air, water, soil, and sediment pollution and control. Topics include vehicle emissions and control, pollutant pathways, carcinogens and mutagenic activity, and photoinduced toxicity. Food contamination, environmental monitoring, and soil contamination along highways are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in biochar and biochar amended soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method for the determination of the 16 USEPA polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in biochar and soil amended with biochar was developed. Samples were Soxhlet extracted with acetone:cyclohexane 1:1, and PAHs were analysed by GC-MS after silica gel clean-up. In a comparative study based on reflu...

  20. Fluorescence, Absorption, and Excitation Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as a Tool for Quantitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera-Figueroa, A. M.; Ramazan, K. A.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    A quantitative and qualitative study of the interplay between absorption, fluorescence, and excitation spectra of pollutants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is conducted. The study of five PAH displays the correlation of the above-mentioned properties along with the associated molecular changes.

  1. Hybrid membranes of metal-organic molecule nanocages for aromatic/aliphatic hydrocarbon separation by pervaporation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cui; Wang, Naixin; Wang, Lin; Huang, Hongliang; Zhang, Rong; Yang, Fan; Xie, Yabo; Ji, Shulan; Li, Jian-Rong

    2014-11-21

    Hybrid membranes composed of porous metal-organic molecule nanocages as fillers embedded in a hyperbranched polymer (Boltorn W3000) were fabricated, which exhibit excellent pervaporation separation performances towards aromatic/aliphatic hydrocarbons. The unique nature of the molecule-based fillers and their good dispersion and compatibility in/with the polymer are responsible for the good membrane properties. PMID:25260031

  2. Toxicity of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the toxicity and biochemical effects of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons. Topics include effects on metabolism and liver activity, cellular responses, binding characteristics, and the occurrence and path of the compounds in food chains. Bioaccumulation studies in specific areas, and isolation and detection techniques are also considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. Toxicity of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the toxicity and biochemical effects of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons. Topics include effects on metabolism and liver activity, cellular responses, binding characteristics, and the occurrence and path of the compounds in food chains. Bioaccumulation studies in specific areas, and isolation and detection techniques are also considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. EPOXIDE RING OPENING AND RELATED REACTIVITIES OF CYCLOPENTAL POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS: QUANTUM MECHANICAL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    For a series of cyclopenta-polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, epoxidated in the cyclopenta ring, semi-empirical AM1 calculations, and single point ab initio calculations using the 3-21g split valence basis set, have been performed for the each carbocation that might be formed by ...

  5. QSAR ESTIMATED OF EXCITED STATES AND PHOTOINDUCED ACUTE TOXICITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Direct calculation of the energy of excited states for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using semi-empirical methods on a supercomputer were inadequate in explaining spectroscopic data or measured phytotoxicity. he energy difference between frontier orbitals HOMO-LUMO gap of "ave...

  6. Dry deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and its influence on surface soil contamination in Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinrong; Tao, Shu; Liu, Wenxin; Li, Xiqing; Chen, Haitao; Wu, Shuiping

    2010-04-01

    ISCLT3 dispersion model was applied to calculate the flux of dry deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Tianjin, China based on a high resolution emission inventory. Field observations of dry deposition at 22 sampling sites were used for model validation. The mean deposition flux densities (and standard deviation) of 15 PAHs were 4.62 +/- 2.99 microg m(-2) d(-1) and 2.75 +/- 1.78 microg m(-2) d(-1) in the heating and the non-heating seasons, respectively, with a time-weighted annual mean of 3.37 +/- 1.81 microg m(-2) d(-1) (based on the durations of the heating and non-heating seasons). High fluxes occurred in the urbanized areas as well as near two coke and gasification facilities. It was revealed that PAH concentrations in surface soil were correlated significantly with both dry deposition and soil organic matter content. Accordingly, a linear regression model was developed for predicting surface soil PAH concentration based on deposition flux density and soil organic matter content. PMID:20383377

  7. Persistence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in biochar-amended soil.

    PubMed

    Kuśmierz, Marcin; Oleszczuk, Patryk; Kraska, Piotr; Pałys, Edward; Andruszczak, Sylwia

    2016-03-01

    In the present study the persistence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) applied with biochar to acidic soil (loamy sand) was studied in two and half year field experiment. An experiment was carried out in three experimental plots (15 m(2) each). The biochar was introduced in the following doses: soil without fertilization - control (C-BC00), soil with 30 t ha(-1) (B-BC30) and soil with 45 t ha(-1) (A-BC45) of biochar. Biochar addition to soils resulted in an increase in the PAHs content from 0.239 μg g(-1) in control soil to 0.526 μg g(-1) and 1.310 μg g(-1) in 30 and 45 t ha(-1) biochar-amended soil respectively. However during the experimental period the PAHs content decreased to a level characteristic for the control soil. The highest losses of PAHs were observed during the first 105 days of the experiment. Three and four rings PAHs were the most susceptible for degradation and leaching. Migration of PAHs from 0-10 cm to 10-20 cm soil horizon was also observed. PMID:26735727

  8. Identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in carbon black with reference to cancerogenic risk in tire production.

    PubMed

    Locati, G; Fantuzzi, A; Consonni, G; Li Gotti, I; Bonomi, G

    1979-07-01

    Carbon blacks used in tire production have been examined for their polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (P.A.H.) content. The analytical procedures commonly adopted are discussed. The results obtained show that, A benzene extraction time of 250 hours is necessary to obtain complete extraction, but for practical purposes, an extraction time of 150 hours is sufficient to extract more than 95% of the PAH. It is possible to identify two classes of blacks in regard to extractables. The one class provides extractables in the range of 200--400 micrograms/g; the second class, in the range of 1000--2000 micrograms/g. No P.A.H. were detected by direct injection of carbon black into the mass spectrograph at 200 degrees C, 10(-6) torr. This was probably due to the very strong bonding to the black particles. The P.A.H. contribute a relative constant percentage of the benzene extracts. It is reasonably possible to exclude any carcinogenic risk to personnel, in a working environment, with an airborne carbon black concentration equal to or less than 3.5 mg/m3, due to the very low P.A.H. content of carbon black and to the very strong P.A.H. bonding to the black particles. PMID:484489

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions from a coal-fired pilot FBC system.

    PubMed

    Liu, K; Han, W; Pan, W P; Riley, J T

    2001-06-29

    Due to the extensive amount of data suggesting the hazards of these compounds, 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Priority Pollutant List. Emissions of these PAHs in the flue gas from the combustion of four coals were measured during four 1000h combustion runs using the 0.1MW heat-input (MWth) bench-scale fluidized bed combustor (FBC). An on-line sampling system was designed for the 16 PAHs, which consisted of a glass wool filter, condenser, glass fiber filter, Teflon filter, and a Tenax trap. The filters and Tenax were extracted by methylene chloride and hexane, respectively, followed by GC/MS analysis using the selective ion monitoring (SIM) mode. In this project, the effects of operating parameters, limestone addition, chlorine content in the coal, and Ca/S molar ratio on the emissions of PAHs were studied. The results indicated that the emissions of PAHs in an FBC system are primarily dependent on the combustion temperature and excess air ratio. The injection of secondary air with high velocity in the freeboard effectively reduces PAH emissions. The addition of extra limestone can promote the formation of PAHs in the FBC system. Chlorine in the coal can possibly lead to large benzene ring PAH formation during combustion. The total PAH emission increases with an increase in the sulfur content of coal. Incomplete combustion results in PAHs with four or more benzene rings. High efficiency combustion results in PAHs with two or three benzene rings. PMID:11406305

  10. Aliphatic/aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbon emissions control with a fixed-bed catalytic oxidizer

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.; Brook, L.; Shirley, R.

    1996-12-31

    A fixed-bed catalytic oxidation system with caustic scrubbing was used to cost-effectively control emissions of aliphatic/aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons during soil remediation at McClellan Air Force Base (McAFB), Sacramento, California. Soil gas extracted by a soil vapor extraction (SVE) system contained trichloroethane (TCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE), methylene chloride, and a variety of petroleum-based hydrocarbons. Catalytic oxidative treatment of these chlorinated hydrocarbons creates acid gases (hydrochloric acid [HCl] and hydrofluoric acid [HF]), which were removed in a caustic scrubber. Testing for hydrocarbon destruction and removal efficiency (DRE), acid gas scrubbing efficiency, dioxin/furan formation, and criteria pollutant emission rates (process byproducts) was conducted. Over 175,000 pounds of hydrocarbons have been treated/biodegraded in a nine-month operating period.

  11. Elimination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from smoked sausages by migration into polyethylene packaging.

    PubMed

    Semanová, Jana; Skláršová, Božena; Šimon, Peter; Šimko, Peter

    2016-06-15

    The objective of this work was a study of interactions between a smoked meat product and plastic packaging to find a possibility of elimination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from smoked sausages by migration into the packaging. Smoked meat sausages were packed into o-polyamide/low density polyethylene laminated film and content of four PAH was determined at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120, 150 and 180min by HPLC. During this time, total PAH4 content decreased from 30.1 to 5.7μg/kg, benzo[a]anthracene decreased from 11.5 to 2.1μg/kg, chrysene from 9.4 to 1.9μg/kg, benzo[b]fluoranthene from 5.3 to 0.6μg/kg and benzo[a]pyrene from 3.9 to 1.1μg/kg while PAH4 content in non-packed sausages remained at a constant level. So, while sausages did not meet European safety limits set for PAH4 content of 12μg/kg and 2μg/kg for benzo[a]pyrene before packaging, these limits were met at the end of the experiment. This decrease was brought about by migration of PAH4 from sausages into low density polyethylene packaging bulk and the measure of decrease can be predicted by a kinetic equation, making it possible to calculate PAH content equal to any time of experiment as well as the time of interaction necessary to fulfil EU legislative limits. PMID:26868540

  12. Environmental assessment of aromatic hydrocarbons-contaminated sediments of the Mexican Salina Cuz Bay.

    PubMed

    Gonzlez-Macas, C; Schifter, I; Lluch-Cota, D B; Mndez-Rodrguez, L; Hernndez-Vzquez, S

    2007-10-01

    Concentrations of total aromatic hydrocarbons and extractable organic matter in the water column and sediment were determined in samples collected in the course of the last 20 years from the Salina Cruz Harbor, Mxico, to assess the degree of organic contamination. In sediments, organic compounds accumulate in shallow areas mostly associated with extractable organic matter and fine fractions. Calculated geocumulation index and enrichment factors suggest that contamination could be derived from anthropogenic activities attributed to harbor and ship scrapping activities, as well as transboundary source. Concentration of total aromatic hydrocarbons (as chrysene equivalents) ranged from 0.01 to 534 microg l(-1) in water, and from 0.10 to 2,160 microg g(-1) in sediments. Total aromatic concentration of 5 microg g(-1) is proposed as background concentration. PMID:17295107

  13. Graphene etching on SiC grains as a path to interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, P.; vec, M.; Martinez, J. I.; Jelinek, P.; Lacovig, P.; Dalmiglio, M.; Lizzit, S.; Soukiassian, P.; Cernicharo, J.; Martin-Gago, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as well as other organic molecules appear among the most abundant observed species in interstellar space and are key molecules to understanding the prebiotic roots of life. However, their existence and abundance in space remain a puzzle. Here we present a new top-down route to form polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in large quantities in space. We show that aromatic species can be efficiently formed on the graphitized surface of the abundant silicon carbide stardust on exposure to atomic hydrogen under pressure and temperature conditions analogous to those of the interstellar medium. To this aim, we mimic the circumstellar environment using ultra-high vacuum chambers and investigate the SiC surface by in situ advanced characterization techniques combined with first-principles molecular dynamics calculations. These results suggest that top-down routes are crucial to astrochemistry to explain the abundance of organic species and to uncover the origin of unidentified infrared emission features from advanced observations.

  14. Toxic effects of unresolved complex mixtures of aromatic hydrocarbons accumulated by mussels, Mytilus edulis, from contaminated field sites.

    PubMed

    Donkin, Peter; Smith, Emma L; Rowland, Steven J

    2003-11-01

    Exposure of marine mussels (Mytilus edulis) to an unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of aromatic hydrocarbons isolated from a crude oil has been shown to reduce their feeding rate by 40%. The present study was undertaken to determine whether UCMs bioaccumulated by mussels in the field are also toxic. The feeding rate of mussels derived from polluted sites increased when they were placed in clean water, pointing to a loss of toxic agents from the tissues. At the end of the depuration period, water in which mussels from an oil-polluted site had been held contained a UCM. Steam-distillation extracts of the tissues of mussels taken from several polluted sites were shown to be highly toxic to the feeding activity of juvenile mussels. The tissues of mussels from these sites contained UCMs. Nontoxic steam distillates from clean mussels did not. Steam-distillation extracts of mussels from an oil-polluted site were fractionated by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. A fraction, largely comprising a "monoaromatic" UCM, reduced the feeding rate of juvenile mussels by 70%. Two later-eluting fractions containing aromatic UCMs also produced smaller depressions in feeding rate. These results support our contention that some aromatic UCM hydrocarbons constitute a forgotten pollutant burden in the marine environment. PMID:14620806

  15. Stimulated anoxic biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons using Fe(III) ligands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Woodward, J.C.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1994-01-01

    Contamination of ground waters with water-soluble aromatic hydrocarbons, common components of petroleum pollution, often produces anoxic conditions under which microbial degradation of the aromatics is slow. Oxygen is often added to contaminated ground water to stimulate biodegradation, but this can be technically difficult and expensive. Insoluble Fe(III) oxides, which are generally abundant in shallow aquifers, are alternative potential oxidants, but are difficult for microorganisms to access. Here we report that adding organic ligands that bind to Fe(III) dramatically increases its bioavailability, and that in the presence of these ligands, rates of degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anoxic aquifer sediments are comparable to those in oxic sediments. We find that even benzene, which is notoriously refractory in the absence of oxygen, can be rapidly degraded. Our results suggest that increasing the bioavailability of Fe(III) by adding suitable ligands provides a potential alternative to oxygen addition for the bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated aquifers.Contamination of ground waters with water-soluble aromatic hydrocarbons, common components of petroleum pollution, often produces anoxic conditions under which microbial degradation of the aromatics is slow. Oxygen is often added to contaminated ground water to stimulate biodegradation, but this can be technically difficult and expensive. Insoluble Fe(III) oxides, which are generally abundant in shallow aquifers, are alternative potential oxidants, but are difficult for microorganisms to access. Here we report that adding organic ligands that bind to Fe(III) dramatically increases its bioavailability, and that in the presence of these ligands, rates of degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anoxic aquifer sediments are comparable to those in oxic sediments. We find that even benzene, which is notoriously refractory in the absence of oxygen, can be rapidly degraded. Our results suggest that increasing the bioavailability of Fe(III) by adding suitable ligands provides a potential alternative to oxygen addition for the bioremediation of petroleum-contamined aquifers.

  16. Dermal exposure to jet fuel suppresses delayed-type hypersensitivity: a critical role for aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gerardo; Limon-Flores, Alberto Yairh; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2007-12-01

    Dermal exposure to military (JP-8) and/or commercial (Jet-A) jet fuel suppresses cell-mediated immune reactions. Immune regulatory cytokines and biological modifiers, including platelet activating factor (PAF), prostaglandin E(2), and interleukin-10, have been implicated in the pathway of events leading to immune suppression. It is estimated that approximately 260 different hydrocarbons are found in jet fuel, and the exact identity of the active immunotoxic agent(s) is unknown. The recent availability of synthetic jet fuel (S-8), which is refined from natural gas, and is devoid of aromatic hydrocarbons, made it feasible to design experiments to address this problem. Here we tested the hypothesis that the aromatic hydrocarbons present in jet fuel are responsible for immune suppression. We report that applying S-8 to the skin of mice does not upregulate the expression of epidermal cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) nor does it induce immune suppression. Adding back a cocktail of seven of the most prevalent aromatic hydrocarbons found in jet fuel (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, 1,2,4-trimethlybenzene, cyclohexylbenzene, and dimethylnaphthalene) to S-8 upregulated epidermal COX-2 expression and suppressed a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction. Injecting PAF receptor antagonists, or a selective cycloozygenase-2 inhibitor into mice treated with S-8 supplemented with the aromatic cocktail, blocked suppression of DTH, similar to data previously reported using JP-8. These findings identify the aromatic hydrocarbons found in jet fuel as the agents responsible for suppressing DTH, in part by the upregulation of COX-2, and the production of immune regulatory factors and cytokines. PMID:17890764

  17. Simulated non-contact atomic force microscopy for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelikowsky, James; Kim, Minjung

    2014-03-01

    Theoretical simulations of non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) play an important role in analyzing measured images. Recent non-contact AFM studies on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons have achieved atomic resolution that is not observed in other imaging techniques such as scanning tunneling microscopy. In particular, AFM images for these hydrocarbons have resolved bond orders of individual carbon-carbon bonds. Here we present simulated AFM images for several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and explain the role of molecular functionalized AFM tips. Our work is based on solving the electronic structure problem using real space pseudopotentials constructed within density functional theory. Our work is supported by the DOE under DOE/DE-FG02-06ER46286. Computational resources were provided by NERSC and XSEDE.

  18. Effect of three aromatic hydrocarbons on respiration and heart rates of the mussel, mytilus californianus

    SciTech Connect

    Sabourin, T.D.; Tullis, R.E.

    1981-06-01

    The effects of petroleum derivatives on morality of marine invertebrates is now well established. Aromatics are considered to be the most toxic of all oil fractions. Recent studies of marine invertebrates have focused mainly upon respiration, locomotion, and growth. The filter feeding marine bivalves have received primary attention due to their proximity to coastal oil spills, importance in human food consumption and possible role in petroleum hydrocarbon bioconcentration. If these organisms are to be used as monitors in the future, then it is important to learn something of how quickly the bivalve responds metabolically to changes in ambient levels of petroleum hydrocarbons. Respiration and heart activity reveal a great deal of information concerning the physiological state of the bivalve. We report measrements of these two variables in the mussel, Mytilus californianus (Conrad), under conditions of exposure to, and recovery from, three aromatic hydrocarbons.

  19. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals in ashes released from a forest fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, I.; Abrantes, N.; Pereira, P.; Vale, C.; Ferreira, A.; Keizer, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    Wildfires have become a permanent source of environmental and societal concerns. Whilst the impacts of wildfire on hydrological and erosion processes are well documented, the stocks and export of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals have received considerably less research attention. The ashes produced by wildfires, which include polluting substances such as PAHs and metals, are subject to transport processes by wind and especially by overland flow and water infiltrating into the soil and possibly reaching ground water bodies. In the framework of the FIRECNUTS project, we are studying the stocks of PAHs and selected metals in recently burnt forest stands in north-central Portugal, and their subsequent export by overland flow. The present work, however, will focus on the stocks in the ashes, both immediately after wildfire and three months later. These ashes were collected at two burnt slopes with contrasting forest types, i.e. a eucalypt and a maritime pine stand, the two pre-dominant forest types in the study region. The sixteen PAHs identified by US EPA as priority contaminants were analysed by gas chromatograph, after extraction and column clean up. The contents of vanadium (V), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) were analysed by inductively coupled plasma- mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), after an acid digestion, while mercury (Hg) was analysed by pyrolysis atomic absorption spectrometry with gold amalgamation. The total concentration of PAHs immediately after the wildfire ranged from 314 ng/g dry weight in the maritime pine stand to 597 ng/g dry weight in the eucalypt stand. Three months later, the total concentration has decreased with 33% in the pine stand but only half (16%) in the eucalypt stand. The composition the PAHs by ring size was dominated by three-rings PAHs. This was true for all samples. The concentrations of various metals differed for the two sampling occasions but not in straightforward manners. Some metals (Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb and Hg) revealed higher contents immediately after the fire, whereas others (V, Cr and As) did three months later. The present results underline the importance of furthering the knowledge about contamination of soil and water by ashes from wildfires and the associated risks in terms of ecotoxicological effects, both in-situ and in downstream aquatic systems. Keywords: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); heavy metals; stocks; ash; wildfires

  20. Aromatic hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The various operational wells were sampled on a monthly basis for the yield of the cryocondensate hydrocarbons. The total cryocondensate concentration as well as the concentrations in the brine and the gas after passing the separator system are summarized. The total cryocondensate yield is displayed.

  1. HETEROGENEOUS PHOTOCATALYTIC DECOMPOSITION OF POLY- AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS OVER TITANIUM DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The photocatalytic degradation of a mixture of 16 polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was investigated in aqueous suspensions of high surface area TiO2 illuminated with 310–380 nm ultraviolet light. Triethylamine was utilized for extraction of PAH compounds from motor oil...

  2. HETEROGENEOUS PHOTOCATALYTIC DECOMPOSITION OF POLY- AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS OVER TITANIUM DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The photocatalytic degradation of a mixture of 16 polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was investigated in aqueous suspensions of high surface area TiO2 illuminated with 310380 nm ultraviolet light. Triethylamine was utilized for extraction of PAH compounds from motor oil...

  3. Emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from thermal pre-treatment of waste hydrodesulfurization catalysts.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Chieh; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Huang, Hong-Hsin

    2007-09-01

    Despite increasing environmental concerns and stringent limitations on the sulfur content in fuels, many waste hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts containing Co, Mo, Ni and V are generated in the petroleum refining process. To recover valuable metals in the waste HDS catalysts via hydrometallurgy, thermal treatment is usually performed first to remove contaminants (residual oil, carbon and sulfur) present on the surface of catalysts. In this study, the mass partitions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in different media (aqueous, particulate and gaseous) were quantified in order to determine the efficiency of three different air pollution control devices, cooling unit, filter and glass cartridge, on PAH removal. An afterburner and two furnace temperatures were used to observe the effect on the PAH contents of the treated residues. Results show that total-PAH content in treated residues decreased with the pyrolysis temperature of the primary furnace, while those generated in flue gases were destroyed by the afterburner at an efficiency of approximately 95%. In addition, the thermal process converts high molecular weight PAHs to low molecular weight PAHs, and the afterburner temperature involved (1200 degrees C) was high enough to prohibit the generation of high molecular weight PAHs (HM-PAHs), leading to the domination of low molecular weight PAHs (LM-PAHs) in flue gases, while treated residues were dominated by HM-PAHs. Finally, information on metal contents and their concentrations in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure in waste HDS catalyst and thermal treated residues are examined as an index of the potential for metal recovery. PMID:17531290

  4. Effects of climatic modalities on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) availability and attenuation in historically contaminated Technosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagois, Robin; Schwartz, Christophe; Faure, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Since the decline of industrial activities in France, large areas of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs)-contaminated soils have remained derelict. Thus, the fate of PAHs in such soils through natural attenuation process needs to be assessed. On the long-term scale (10-100 years), climate will greatly contribute to the evolution of soil physico-chemical properties and by consequences PAHs availability. In our study, we examined the effect of three contrasted climatic conditions (freeze-thawing, wetting-drying and high temperature) on soil aging processes of 11 historically contaminated soils and consequences on the availability of polycyclic aromatic compounds (including the 16 priority pollutants PAHs). Batch experiments were set-up for each modality; freeze-dried soil underwent variation of humidity and/or temperature. In a first step, PACs availability was roughly evaluated, with a water-extraction method using a H2O2 + CaCl2 solution. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content was measured in these extracts before and after applying the climatic modalities. Difference in DOC indicated an effect of the climatic modality on PACs availability. If an effect was noticed, available PACs was then accurately measured using (i) an hydrogen-peroxide oxidation on the soils followed (ii) a dichloromethane (DCM) extraction and a Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS) quantification of the remaining PACs (i.e. unavailable). Variation of PACs availability will greatly help to understand the mechanisms associated between PACs desorption/sequestration and the abiotic influence of climate. Results of this work will further help understanding and predict the rate of natural attenuation of PACs in contaminated soils for the incoming decades.

  5. The formation and occurrence of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons associated with food.

    PubMed

    Lijinsky, W

    1991-01-01

    Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons are common contaminants of processed food, usually at trace levels. These hydrocarbons are products of combustion and pyrolysis, and are present in petroleum and coal, and in products derived from them. Most polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons are not carcinogenic, but some of them are, and a few are potent inducers of skin and lung tumors in mice. Their carcinogenic properties have not been fully explored, but they seem to be less potent by ingestion or inhalation, and they are known as a group to produce cancer in humans. The most effective carcinogens among them are those with 5 or 6 fused rings, and these tend to be less prevalent in mixtures than the 3- and 4-ring hydrocarbons, most of which are not carcinogenic. Sophisticated analytical methods, using solvent extraction and chromatography have been developed to detect and measure polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons at levels of 1 in 10(9) (1 part per billion) or less, and these have been applied to the measurement of individual compounds in foods, as well as in products of combustion and pyrolysis. Wood smoke and smoked foods contain the carcinogenic benzo[a]pyrene at levels of 1 ppb, and other hydrocarbons; liquid smoke has lower levels. Crude vegetable oils have higher concentrations, but purified 'deodorized' oils have benzo[a]pyrene levels near 1 ppb. Sausages cooked over burning logs had as much as 200 ppb benzo[a]pyrene. Charcoal-broiled steaks and ground meat had benzo[a]pyrene concentrations up to 50 micrograms/kg, while less fatty pork and chicken had lower concentrations (up to 10 micrograms/kg). It was probable that the rendered fat dripped on to the hot charcoal and pyrolyzed to form quantities of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, which rose with the smoke to deposit on the meat. Therefore, oven cooking or cooking with a heat source above the meat, or segregation of the meat from the smoke resulted in food containing negligible amounts of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Modifications of cookings practices accordingly would greatly reduce exposure to this group of carcinogens. PMID:2017211

  6. Fingerprints of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasini, Matteo; Lucotti, Andrea; Alfè, Michela; Ciajolo, Anna; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed a set of 51 PAHs whose structures have been hypothesized from mass spectrometry data collected on samples extracted from carbon particles of combustion origin. We have obtained relationships between infrared absorption signals in the fingerprint region (mid-IR) and the chemical structures of PAHs, thus proving the potential of IR spectroscopy for the characterization of the molecular structure of aromatic combustion products. The results obtained here for the spectroscopic characterization of PAHs can be also of interest in Materials Science and Astrophysics.

  7. Fingerprints of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tommasini, Matteo; Lucotti, Andrea; Alfè, Michela; Ciajolo, Anna; Zerbi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed a set of 51 PAHs whose structures have been hypothesized from mass spectrometry data collected on samples extracted from carbon particles of combustion origin. We have obtained relationships between infrared absorption signals in the fingerprint region (mid-IR) and the chemical structures of PAHs, thus proving the potential of IR spectroscopy for the characterization of the molecular structure of aromatic combustion products. The results obtained here for the spectroscopic characterization of PAHs can be also of interest in Materials Science and Astrophysics. PMID:26208268

  8. Analytical and chromatographic methods for the determination of cyano polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coal-derived materials. [Cyano polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Later, D.W.; Barraclough, S.A.; Lucke, R.B.; Pelroy, R.A.; Stoker, P.; Booth, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    An adsorption chromatographic method has been described for the isolation of cyano-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from the PAH and other N-PAC species found in complex matrices. The utility of these methods has been demonstrated by the separation and detailed characterization of the cyano-PAH in a carbon black extract and a coal-derived gasifier medium oil. Results from microbial mutagenicity and aquatic toxicity assays on four 2- and 3-ring cyano-PAH have also been reported. In general, comparatively low levels of mutagenicity and toxicity were observed for the cyano-PAH isomers tested. 23 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Role of iron catalysts on hydroconversion of aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, E.; Wei, X.Y.; Nishijima, A.

    1995-12-31

    Hydroconversion of aromatics and arylalkanes as a model reaction of coal liquefaction and heavy petroleum residue degradation was carried out in the absence or presence of metallic iron (Fe) and pyrite (FeS{sub 2}). Thermolysis of some diarylalkanes proceeded slowly by the radical chain reaction. The reaction rate was reduced by the addition of hydrogen-donor solvents and was slightly accelerated in the presence of hydrogen molecules. Fe accelerated the hydrogenation of aromatic-rings. FeS{sub 2} promoted the C{sub ar}-C{sub alk} bond cleavage of diarylmethanes only, and promoted the hydrogenation of diarylethanes and diarylpropanes. The C-C bond cleavage of arylalkanes was related to the hydrogen-accepting ability, C-C bond dissociation energy and resonance energy of the species after C-C bond scission. Oxidation of pyrite and its catalysis were also investigated. It was found that the catalytic activity of pyrites on the hydrogenation of 1-methylnaphthalene and hydrocracking of 1-[4-(2-phenylethyl)benzyl]naphthalene decreased with oxidation under air, and the deactivated pyrite was reactivated by addition of sulfur to the reaction system.

  10. Aromatic hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells

    SciTech Connect

    Keeley, D.F.; Meriwether, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    The measurement of the basic physical chemical properties of the components of brine produced in the US DOE geopressured wells is necessary to provide the fundamental data necessary for understanding the mechanisms by which constituents of petroleum migrate and are partitioned into different phases in various geologic strata. The cryocondensate materials, which we sample, are present in the geopressured brines of all the wells observed to date. These materials are a complex mixture of aromatic compounds ranging in complexity from benzene to highly substituted anthracenes. While data is available for room temperature and for solutions of pure water, there is little earlier information on these compounds in solutions of higher salinity and at elevated temperatures. Our work extended the basic solubility data for benzene and toluene (two of the major aromatic constituents of the geopressured brine) to higher sodium chloride concentrations. The techniques we have developed during the course of this work allows us to make solubility measurements with precision and to make major contributions to the basic literature. It is important to realize that reliable data on these fundamental quantities comes only with great attention to detail and an insistence on consistency and reproducibility. To determine the solubility of one compound at one set of conditions requires the manual injection of a minimum of 45 samples into a gas chromatograph and an analysis of each chromatogram. 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Public health impacts of secondary particulate formation from aromatic hydrocarbons in gasoline

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aromatic hydrocarbons emitted from gasoline-powered vehicles contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which increases the atmospheric mass concentration of fine particles (PM2.5). Here we estimate the public health burden associated with exposures to the subset of PM2.5 that originates from vehicle emissions of aromatics under business as usual conditions. Methods The PM2.5 contribution from gasoline aromatics is estimated using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system and the results are compared to ambient measurements from the literature. Marginal PM2.5 annualized concentration changes are used to calculate premature mortalities using concentration-response functions, with a value of mortality reduction approach used to monetize the social cost of mortality impacts. Morbidity impacts are qualitatively discussed. Results Modeled aromatic SOA concentrations from CMAQ fall short of ambient measurements by approximately a factor of two nationwide, with strong regional differences. After accounting for this model bias, the estimated public health impacts from exposure to PM2.5 originating from aromatic hydrocarbons in gasoline lead to a central estimate of approximately 3800 predicted premature mortalities nationwide, with estimates ranging from 1800 to over 4700 depending on the specific concentration-response function used. These impacts are associated with total social costs of $28.2B, and range from $13.6B to $34.9B in 2006$. Conclusions These preliminary quantitative estimates indicate particulates from vehicular emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons demonstrate a nontrivial public health burden. The results provide a baseline from which to evaluate potential public health impacts of changes in gasoline composition. PMID:23425393

  12. Treatability assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contaminated marine sediments using permanganate, persulfate and Fenton oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yu-Jen; Binh, Nguyen Thanh; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Chen, Chih-Feng; Dong, Cheng-Di

    2016-05-01

    Various chemical oxidation techniques, such as potassium permanganate (KMnO4), sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8), Fenton (H2O2/Fe(2+)), and the modified persulfate and Fenton reagents (activated by ferrous complexes), were carried out to treat marine sediments that were contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dredged from Kaohsiung Harbor in Taiwan. Experimental results revealed that KMnO4 was the most effective of the tested oxidants in PAH degradation. Owing to the high organic matter content in the sediment that reduced the efficiencies of Na2S2O8 and regular Fenton reactions, a large excess of oxidant was required. Nevertheless, KH2PO4, Na4P2O7 and four chelating agents (EDTA, sodium citrate, oxalic acid, and sodium oxalate) were utilized to stabilize Fe(II) in activating the Na2S2O8 and Fenton oxidations, while Fe(II)-citrate remarkably promoted the PAH degradation. Increasing the molecular weight and number of rings of PAH did not affect the overall removal efficiencies. The correlation between the effectiveness of the oxidation processes and the physicochemical properties of individual PAH was statistically analyzed. The data implied that the reactivity of PAH (electron affinity and ionization potential) affected its treatability more than did its hydrophobicity (Kow, Koc and Sw), particularly using experimental conditions under which PAHs could be effectively oxidized. PMID:26915591

  13. Spatial Characterization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in 2008 TC3 Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbah, Hassan; Morrow, A.; Zare, R. N.; Jenniskens, P.

    2009-09-01

    Hassan Sabbah1, Amy L. Morrow1, Richard N. Zare1 and Petrus Jenniskens2 1Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, 2 SETI Institute, Carl Sagan Center, 515 North Whisman Road, Mountain View, California 94043, USA. In October 2006 a small asteroid (2-3 meters) was observed in outer space. On October 7, 2008, it entered the Earth's atmosphere creating a fireball over Northern Sudan. Some 280 meteorites were collected by the University of Khartoum. In order to explore the existence of organic materials, specifically polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), we applied two-step laser desorption laser ionization mass spectrometry (L2MS) to some selected fragments. This technique consists of desorbing with a pulsed infrared laser beam the solid materials into a gaseous phase with no fragmentation followed by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization to analyze the PAH content. L2MS was already applied to an array of extraterrestrial objects including interplanetary dust particles IDPs, carbonaceous chondrites and comet coma particles. Moreover, spatial resolution of PAHs in 2008 TC3 samples was achieved to explore the heterogeneity within individual fragments. The results of these studies and their contribution to understanding the formation of this asteroid will be discussed.

  14. Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments of Akaki River, Lake Awassa, and Lake Ziway, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Kebede Nigussie; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh; Redi-Abshiro, Mesfin; Ambushe, Abayneh Ataro; McCrindle, Robert Ian; Moyo, Stanley

    2015-07-01

    The quantification of 14 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was carried out in sediment samples collected from Akaki River, Lake Awassa, and Lake Ziway, Ethiopia. The concentration of PAHs in the samples was determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode, after microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), using acetone/n-hexane (1:1, v/v) mixture. The accuracy of the method was determined by extracting and analyzing New York/New Jersey waterway sediment standard reference material (SRM 1944). The measured concentrations of PAHs in SRM 1944 agreed well with the certified values. In samples from Akaki River, Lake Awassa, and Lake Ziway, the total content of PAHs determined ranged from 0 to 3070ng/g (average 534ng/g), 24.9 to 413ng/g (average 169ng/g), and 15.0 to 305ng/g (average 175ng/g), respectively. Source ratios indicated that the PAHs were mainly from petrogenic origin. Sediments from all sampling sites indicated negligible levels of toxicity with no risk of adverse biological effects. PMID:26122125

  15. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in marine samples by high-performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Obana, H.; Hori, S.; Kashimoto, T.

    1981-05-01

    It has been reported that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widely distributed in the environment, although their concentrations are quite low. Some PAHs, benzo(a)pyrene, dibenz(a,h)anthracene and 3-methycholanthrene, are carcinogenic to mammals after in vivo hydroxylation by mixed function oxidases. PAHs originate largely from smoke, soot, and exhaust gas produced by combustion and from petroleum oil spilled into the sea, so that the quantity of PAHs in the environment is broadly related to the level of contamination in a given region. Although PAHs have been determined by a TLC-fluorescence method, these methods suffer from complex pretreatment. On the other hand, the development of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has made it possible to analyze PAHs with good separation and high sensitivity and to simplify the pretreatment processes. In this study, ten PAHs in sediments, oyster, and wakame seaweed were determined by HPLC with a fluorescence detector (HPLC-FD). The contents and the patterns of PAHs found in sediments and marine samples may be used as an indicator of petroleum contamination in the sea.

  16. Optimization of purification processes to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in polluted raw fish oils.

    PubMed

    Yebra-Pimentel, Iria; Fernndez-Gonzlez, Ricardo; Martnez-Carballo, Elena; Simal-Gndara, Jess

    2014-02-01

    Fish oils are one of the main sources of health promoting nutrients such as n-3 fatty acids in animal and human diet. Nevertheless, they could be an important source of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Different strategies of decontamination processes to reduce polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) levels in fish oils, such as solvent extraction (ethanol) and adsorbent extraction using commercially available (activated carbon) and sustainable adsorbents (mussel shell and wood ashes), were compared. Adsorption conditions were evaluated and optimized by an experimental design and the experimental results were adjusted to response surfaces. In this way, PAH removals increased with increasing of individual PAH molecular weight and they range from 80% to 100% using activated carbon and from 10% to 100% using wood ashes. Pine wood ashes showed similar removal rates to activated carbon (87%-100%) excluding F (51%) and P (42%). No PAH removal was observed using mussel shell ashes. Ethanol extraction was also optimized and showed a good performance in the extraction of PAHs. However, it does affect their ?-3 fatty acid contents. Finally, real oil samples from different fishing areas: Spain, South America, and North Europe were selected for the decontamination experiments under experimental conditions previously optimized. PMID:24231673

  17. Comparison of monolithic capillary electrochromatography and micellar electrokinetic chromatography for the separation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Salwi?ski, Aleksander; Delpe, Raphal

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric pollution of anthropic origin is recognized as a major risk factor for health, in particular for respiratory and cardio-vascular systems. Among these pollutants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are placed on the list of US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as 'priority' pollutants and four of them are assigned as potential carcinogens by The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). In the present work two capillary techniques-micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) and monolithic capillary electrochromatography (CEC)-were compared for the separation of eleven PAHs. Both techniques compared in the present work are fully compatible with every standard apparatus of capillary electrophoresis. For MEKC, enhancement of selectivity and decrease of the separation window of eleven PAHs were obtained with methanol:borate 25 mM (20/80, v/v) running buffer containing 10 mM of hydroxypropylated ?-cyclodextrins with low SDS content (25 mM). In case of CEC, two acrylate-based monolithic stationary phases (MSPs) were evaluated for their application in the separation of eleven PAHs. The best MSP based on butyl acrylate was compared with MEKC in terms of sample capacity, PAHs elution order, LOQ, efficiency and effect of pH. Influence of the hydrophobicity of mobile phase on the PAHs elution order was also studied. PMID:24720981

  18. Historical changes in the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Lake Peipsi sediments.

    PubMed

    Punning, Jaan-Mati; Terasmaa, Jaanus; Vaasma, Tiit; Kapanen, Galina

    2008-09-01

    The distribution of 11 individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was analysed in a (210)Pb dated sediment core from the deepest area of Lake Peipsi and in four surface sediment samples taken from littoral areas. According to the concentrations in the core three groups of PAHs may be distinguished: (1) relatively stable concentrations of PAHs within the whole studied time interval; (2) very low concentrations in sediments accumulated before intensive anthropogenic impact (from 19th century up to the 1920s) following a slight increase and (3) an overall increase in PAH concentrations since the 1920s up to the present. Comprehensive analysis of PAHs in the core and monitoring data obtained in the 1980s together with the lithology of sediments show that an increase of anthropogenically induced PAHs correlates well with the history of fuel consumption in Estonia and speaks about atmospheric long-distance transport of PAHs. The continuous increase of PAH concentrations since the 1920s do not support the earlier hypothesis about the dominating impact of the oil shale fired power plants near the lake, because their emissions decreased significantly in the 1990s. The concentration of PAHs in the deep lake core sample correlates well with the content of organic matter, indicating absorption and co-precipitation with plankton in the sediment. PMID:18270801

  19. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in commonly consumed Nigerian smoked/grilled fish and meat.

    PubMed

    Akpambang, V O E; Purcaro, G; Lajide, L; Amoo, I A; Conte, L S; Moret, S

    2009-07-01

    Smoking and/or grilling, when carried out with traditional methods involving direct contact with wood combustion fumes, is responsible for high contamination levels with carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The aim of this work was to investigate the PAH content of different smoked or grilled meat and fish products commonly consumed in Nigeria. A rapid method involving microwave-assisted saponification and simultaneous extraction followed by solid-phase extraction (SPE), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation and spectrofluorometric detection was employed. Samples that were smoked or grilled using traditional systems, which use a wood fire, were heavily contaminated with benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) at levels ranging from 2.4 to 31.2 microg kg(-1) wet weight. Considerably lower contamination levels were found in samples smoked or grilled in the laboratory using a charcoal fire (BaP from 0.7 to 2.8 microg kg(-1) wet weight). The health risk associated with a daily consumption of 100 g of these products was also evaluated using the margin of exposure (MOE) approach. MOE values lower than 10,000 were obtained for all smoked/grilled commercial samples, indicating a potential concern for consumer health. PMID:19680985

  20. Searching ingredients polluted by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in feeds due to atmospheric or pyrolytic sources.

    PubMed

    Yebra-Pimentel, Iria; Fernndez-Gonzlez, Ricardo; Martnez Carballo, Elena; Simal-Gndara, Jess

    2012-12-01

    The primary aim of the proposed work is to propose the potential sources of pollution by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in feeds and ingredients. To reach this propose the development of a simple, fast, quantitative and economic method for determining PAHs using liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), clean-up and detection by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FD) in polluting feeds and ingredients was developed. The overall method quantification limits range from 0.020 to 4.0?g/kg and analyte recoveries are between 70% and 105% with relative standard deviations (RSD) lower than 20%. Molecular patterns of PAHs were used to study their distribution in the selected samples by cluster analysis, separating them in two groups: contaminated by atmospheric or pyrolytic sources. In order to find a relationship between the nutritional composition (protein, fibre, ash and fat content), and the hypothetical toxicity of selected feeds, a partial least squared (PLS) analysis was used, showing that fibre was a major contributor. Moreover, the complete data set of 27 feed samples and 25 feed ingredients x 13 PAH concentrations were analysed by PCA to find out what ingredients were controlling PAH pollution. PMID:22953956

  1. Sediment-porewater partition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from Lanzhou Reach of Yellow River, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong; Xu, Jian; Wang, Ping; Sun, Hongwen; Dai, Shugui

    2009-06-15

    Pollution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the aquatic environment has drawn much attention around the world. The occurrence of 16 priority PAHs in the sediments and corresponding porewaters in Lanzhou Reach of Yellow River, China, and their partitioning behavior between the two phases were investigated. The results demonstrated that the total PAH levels in the sediments were positively correlated with the sediment clay contents (R(2)=0.756). Concentrations of total PAHs in porewaters ranged from 48.2 to 206 microg/L, and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene (InP) was the most abundant compound measured in the porewater samples with a mean value of 42.9 microg/L. The compositions of PAHs in porewaters were dominated by their compositions in the sediment samples. The in situ organic carbon normalized partition coefficients logK(oc)(') of the PAHs between sediments and porewaters were significantly correlated with their octanol-water partition coefficients (logK(ow)) when logK(ow) values were less than 5.5 (naphthalene (Nap) excluded). logK(oc)(') values of 14 PAHs were lower than those predicted by the Karickhoff relationship. This discrepancy was largest for InP, dibenzo[a,h]anthracene (DBA), and benzo[ghi]perylene (BgP). The results in present study showed the tendency of PAHs release from sediment to porewater, indicating that PAHs sequestered in the sediments may be a pollution source to aquatic ecosystem. PMID:19059717

  2. Degradation and Mineralization of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Anthracene and Naphthalene in Intertidal Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, James E.; Capone, Douglas G.

    1985-01-01

    The degradation of the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) anthracene and naphthalene by the microbiota of intertidal sediments was investigated in laboratory studies. No mineralization of either PAH was observed in the absence of oxygen. Both rates and total amounts of PAH mineralization were strongly controlled by oxygen content and temperature of the incubations. Inorganic nitrogen and glucose amendments had minimal effects on PAH mineralization. The rates and total amounts of PAH mineralized were directly related to compound concentration, pre-exposure time, and concentration. Maximum mineralization was observed at the higher concentrations (5 to 100 ?g/g [ppm]) of both PAHs. Optimal acclimation to anthracene and naphthalene (through pre-exposures to the compounds) occurred at the highest acclimation concentration (1,000 ppm). However, acclimation to a single concentration (100 ppm) resulted in initial relative mineralization rates over a range of re-exposure concentrations (1 to 1,000 ppm) being nearly identical. Maximum mineralization of both PAHs occurred after intermediate periods (1 to 2 weeks) of pre-exposure. The fraction of the total heterotrophic population capable of utilizing anthracene or naphthalene as sole carbon source was also greatest after 2 weeks. PMID:16346843

  3. Degradation and mineralization of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons anthracene and naphthalene in intertidal marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, J.E.; Capone, D.G.

    1985-07-01

    The degradation of the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) anthracene and naphthalene by the microbiota of intertidal sediments was investigated in laboratory studies. No mineralization of either PAH was observed in the absence of oxygen. Both rates and total amounts of PAH mineralization were strongly controlled by oxygen content and temperature of the incubations. Inorganic nitrogen and glucose amendments had minimal effects on PAH mineralization. The rates and total amounts of PAH mineralized were directly related to compound concentration, pre-exposure time, and concentration. Maximum mineralization was observed at the higher concentrations (5 to 100 ..mu..g/g (ppm)) of both PAHs. Optimal acclimation to anthracene and naphthalene (through pre-exposures to the compounds) occurred at the highest acclimation concentration (1,000 ppm). However, acclimation to a single concentration (100 ppm) resulted in initial relative mineralization rates over a range of re-exposure concentrations (1 to 1,000 ppm) being nearly identical. Maximum mineralization of both PAHs occurred after intermediate periods (1 to 2 weeks) of pre-exposure. The fraction of the total heterotrophic population capable of utilizing anthracene or naphthalene as sole carbon source was also greatest after 2 weeks.

  4. Cancer risk assessments of Hong Kong soils contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Man, Yu Bon; Kang, Yuan; Wang, Hong Sheng; Lau, Winifred; Li, Hui; Sun, Xiao Lin; Giesy, John P; Chow, Ka Lai; Wong, Ming Hung

    2013-10-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate soils from 12 different land use types on human cancer risks, with the main focus being on human cancer risks related to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Fifty-five locations were selected to represent 12 different types of land use (electronic waste dismantling workshop (EW (DW)); open burning site (OBS); car dismantling workshop (CDW) etc.). The total concentrations of 16 PAHs in terms of total burden and their bioaccessibility were analysed using GC/MS. The PAHs concentrations were subsequently used to establish cancer risks in humans via three exposure pathways, namely, accident ingestion of soil, dermal contact soil and inhalation of soil particles. When the 95th centile values of total PAH concentrations were used to derive ingestion and dermal cancer risk probabilities on humans, the CDW land use type indicated a moderate potential for cancerous development (244 × 10(-6) and 209 × 10(-6), respectively). Bioaccessible PAHs content in soil samples from CDW (3.60 × 10(-6)) were also classified as low cancer risk. CDW soil possessed a higher carcinogenic risk based on PAH concentrations. Bioremediation is recommended to treat the contaminated soil. PMID:23465409

  5. Bioavailability and biotransformation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the benthos of coastal Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, A.E.; MacGillivray, A.R.; Shiaris, M.P.; Sisson, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    To better understand the environmental factors controlling PAH fate in coastal sediments and to obtain more realistic estimates of biodegradation rates and removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from coastal systems, the authors examined the effect of sediment organic matter concentration and previous contaminant loadings on bioavailability, biotransformation, and biodegradation of two model PAHs: phenanthrene (PHN) and benzanthracene (BA) in benthic microcosms. These processes were assessed in the presence and absence of two representative infaunal organisms, the deposit feeding polychaete Scolecolepides viridis and the suspension feeding bivalve Mya arenaria. Organic carbon content of the sediment does not appear to be the primary controlling factor for PAH accumulation or metabolism by macrofauna or metabolism and degradation by microbes. Susceptibility of an individual PAH to prokaryotic degradation differs from its susceptibility to metabolism by eukaryotes. S. viridis, accumulated more PHN and Ba than M.arenaria. In addition, worms rapidly metabolized PAH, with polar metabolites accounting for more than 50% of the total body burdens of PAH measured. Most, and in some cases almost all, material removed from the sediment reservoir had been transformed into polar metabolites or completely mineralized to CO{sub 2}. Efforts should be made to include metabolism in fate and transport models of PAH in nearshore benthic environments.

  6. Rinodina sophodes (Ach.) Massal.: a bioaccumulator of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Kanpur City, India.

    PubMed

    Satya; Upreti, Dalip K; Patel, D K

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the possibility of using Rinodina sophodes (Ach.) Massal., a crustose lichen as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) bioaccumulator for evaluation of atmospheric pollution in tropical areas of India, where few species of lichens are able to grow. PAHs were identified, quantified and compared to evaluate the potential utility of R. sophodes. The limit of detection for different PAHs was found to be 0.008-0.050?gg(?-?1). The total PAHs in different sites were ranged between 0.189 0.029 and 0.494 0.105?gg(?-?1). The major sources of PAHs were combustion of organic materials, traffic and vehicular exhaust (diesel and gasoline engine). Significantly higher concentration of acenaphthylene and phenanthrene indicates road traffic as major source of PAH pollution in the city. Two-way ANOVA also confirms that all PAHs content showed significant differences between all sampling sites (P 1%). This study establishes the utility of R. sophodes in monitoring the PAHs accumulation potentiality for development of effective tool and explores the most potential traits resistant to the hazardous environmental conditions in the tropical regions of north India, where no such other effective way of biomonitoring is known so far. PMID:21465135

  7. A comparison of the biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in three different systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kagi, R.I.; Fisher, S.J.; Alexander, R.

    1996-10-01

    In three case studies, the circumstances in which petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation took place were markedly different. (1) Two reservoir-biodegraded oils from the Barrow Sub-basin. (2) Petroleum hydrocarbons from a condensate which had seeped into a mangrove creek bed. (3) Hydrocarbons in sediments exposed to drilling discharges from an off-shore petroleum platform. For each case, the progress of biodegradation of the aromatic hydrocarbons was studied in detail using GC-MS and GC-FTIR, so that the susceptibility to biodegradation of individual methylated naphthalenes and alkylphenanthrenes could be established. Striking similarities were observed in the progress of biodegradation in the three different environments, especially with the alkylnaphthalenes. One particularly prominent feature of all three systems was that 1,6 dimethyl substituted naphthalenes are more susceptible than other isomers. These similarities raise interesting questions about the mechanisms of biodegradation in these three systems.

  8. Detection of aromatic hydrocarbons in the atmosphere at ppt levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, M.; Driscoll, J. N.; Wood, C. D.

    A new method has been described and evaluated which will detect ppt levels of hydrocarbons in the atmosphere. An automatic GC was used with a concentrator and a photoionization detector to measure benzene, toluene and xylene. The values obtained in the Boston, MA area were in good agreement with the literature value. The BTX data were compared with simultaneous CO 2 data and some interesting features were observed. Good correlation was obtained with simultaneous CO 2 data during rush hour traffic and no correlation during the early morning hours when the BTX values would rise while the CO 2 values decreased to their ambient levels of 350 ppm.

  9. Blockade of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor pathway triggered by dioxin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and cigarette smoke by Phellinus linteus.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Mai; Kasai, Ayumi; Hiramatsu, Nobuhiko; Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Okamura, Maro; Tagawa, Yasuhiro; Yao, Jian; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Kitamura, Masanori

    2008-10-01

    Environmental pollutants including halogenated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and thereby cause a wide range of pathological changes. Development of AhR antagonists will be useful for prevention and treatment of diseases related to AhR activation. Towards this end, we aimed in the present study at seeking for potential inhibitors of the AhR pathway in mycelial extracts using the dioxin responsive element-based sensing via secreted alkaline phosphatase (DRESSA). Through the screening of 13 mycelia, extracts prepared from Phellinus linteus, Cordyceps militaris and Hericium erinaceum inhibited activation of AhR by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, benzo[a]pyrene or 3-methylcholanthrene. Subsequent studies revealed that only Phellinus linteus suppressed activation of AhR and AhR-dependent gene expression triggered by all of these agonists. Cigarette smoke is known to contain a number of halogenated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We found that Phellinus linteus has the potential to block activation of AhR and AhR-dependent gene expression triggered by cigarette smoke. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of Phellinus linteus on the AhR pathway was independent of; 1) depression of AhR or AhR nuclear translocator, and 2) induction of AhR repressor. We conclude that Phellinus linteus contains potent inhibitor(s) of AhR activation and may be useful for prevention of pathologies associated with aberrant activation of AhR. PMID:18827349

  10. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degradation of Phytoplankton-Associated Arenibacter spp. and Description of Arenibacter algicola sp. nov., an Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Glenn; Mishamandani, Sara; Berry, David; Whitman, William B.; Nichols, Peter D.; Semple, Kirk T.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrosequencing of the bacterial community associated with a cosmopolitan marine diatom during enrichment with crude oil revealed several Arenibacter phylotypes, of which one (OTU-202) had become significantly enriched by the oil. Since members of the genus Arenibacter have not been previously shown to degrade hydrocarbons, we attempted to isolate a representative strain of this genus in order to directly investigate its hydrocarbon-degrading potential. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, one isolate (designated strain TG409T) exhibited >99% sequence identity to three type strains of this genus. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain TG409T represents a novel species in the genus Arenibacter, for which the name Arenibacter algicola sp. nov. is proposed. We reveal for the first time that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation is a shared phenotype among members of this genus, indicating that it could be used as a taxonomic marker for this genus. Kinetic data for PAH mineralization rates showed that naphthalene was preferred to phenanthrene, and its mineralization was significantly enhanced in the presence of glass wool (a surrogate for diatom cell surfaces). During enrichment on hydrocarbons, strain TG409T emulsified n-tetradecane and crude oil, and cells were found to be preferentially attached to oil droplets, indicating an ability by the strain to express cell surface amphiphilic substances (biosurfactants or bioemulsifiers) as a possible strategy to increase the bioavailability of hydrocarbons. This work adds to our growing knowledge on the diversity of bacterial genera in the ocean contributing to the degradation of oil contaminants and of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria found living in association with marine eukaryotic phytoplankton. PMID:24212584

  11. Size- and density-distributions and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban road dust.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Michio; Nakajima, Fumiyuki; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2005-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in size- and density-fractionated road dust were measured to identify the important fractions in urban runoff and to analyse their sources. Road dust was collected from a residential area (Shakujii) and a heavy traffic area (Hongo Street). The sampling of road dust from the residential area was conducted twice in different seasons (autumn and winter). The collected road dust was separated into three or four size-fractions and further fractionated into light (<1.7 g/cm3) and heavy (>1.7 g/cm3) fractions by using cesium chloride solution. Light particles constituted only 4.0+/-1.4%, 0.69+/-0.03% and 3.4+/-1.0% of the road dust by weight for Shakujii (November), Shakujii (February) and Hongo Street, respectively but contained 28+/-10%, 33+/-3% and 44+/-8% of the total PAHs, respectively. The PAH contents in the light fractions were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than those in the heavy fractions. In the light fractions, the 12PAH contents in February were significantly higher than the 12PAH contents in November (P<0.01), whereas in the heavy fractions, no significant difference was found (P>0.05). Cluster analysis revealed that there was a significant difference in the PAH profiles between locations rather than between size-fractions, density-fractions and sampling times. Multiple regression analysis indicated that asphalt/pavement was the major source of Shakujii road dust, and that tyre and diesel vehicle exhaust were the major sources of finer and coarser fractions collected from Hongo Street road dust, respectively. PMID:15893791

  12. Atmospheric chemistry of gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: formation of atmospheric mutagens.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, R; Arey, J

    1994-01-01

    The atmospheric chemistry of the 2- to 4-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which exist mainly in the gas phase in the atmosphere, is discussed. The dominant loss process for the gas-phase PAH is by reaction with the hydroxyl radical, resulting in calculated lifetimes in the atmosphere of generally less than one day. The hydroxyl (OH) radical-initiated reactions and nitrate (NO3) radical-initiated reactions often lead to the formation of mutagenic nitro-PAH and other nitropolycyclic aromatic compounds, including nitrodibenzopyranones. These atmospheric reactions have a significant effect on ambient mutagenic activity, indicating that health risk assessments of combustion emissions should include atmospheric transformation products. PMID:7821285

  13. Low temperature deep oxidation of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, M.T.; Maroldo, S.G.; Brendley, W.H. Jr.; Jurczyk, K.; Drago, R.S.

    1993-12-31

    Despite the fact that adsorption on activated carbon and thermal oxidation are well established methods for VOC emissions control, there are serious deficiencies with each. For the case of adsorption on activated carbon, these include the generation of large volumes of spent adsorbent that must be transported for regeneration or disposal and for the case of thermal oxidation, these include high energy and operating costs due to the high temperatures required. A new series of low temperature catalysts have been developed that comprise transition metal oxides dispersed on a new class of synthetic carbonaceous supports, the Ambersorb{reg_sign} adsorbents. Data are reported here demonstrating high conversion using these catalysts for the deep oxidation of aliphatic and aromatic compounds to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The process temperatures required are only 175-250{degrees}C which is substantional reduction over conventional thermal oxidation systems.

  14. Monitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in seafoods from Lake Timsah.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Gamal A

    2002-03-01

    Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrpcarvons (PAHs) in some seafoods caught from Lake Timsah were determined. The tested samples were tilapia fish (Oreochromis aureus), crabs (Portuns pelagicus), bivalves (Venerupis decussata), clams (Strombus tricornis) and gastropods (Munes Sp.). Where these seafoods are locally and favorite consumed foods in the area around the lake (Ismailia governorate). Results showed that crabs contained significantly higher concentrations of both total and carcinogenic PAHs ranging from 1318.6 to 3767.4 and 1230.3 to 3442.2 microg kg(-1), respectively. Meanwhile, clams contained significantly lower levels with mean value of 28.4 microg kg(-1) for total and 24.4 microg kg(-1) for carcinogenic PAHs. The most frequently detected PAHs in the tested samples were indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene followed by benzo(a)pyrene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, and benzo(b)fluoranthene which are characterized as carcinogenic compounds. PMID:11970818

  15. Aromatic hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells

    SciTech Connect

    Keeley, D.F.; Meriwether, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The measurement of basic physical chemical properties of the brine components produced in the US DOE geopressured wells it necessary to provide the fundamental data necessary for an understanding of the mechanisms by which constituents of petroleum migrate and are partitioned into different phases in various geologic strata. The cryocondensate materials, which we sample, are present in the geopressured brines of all the wells observed to date. These materials are a complex mixture of aromatic compounds ranging in complexity from benzene to alkyl substituted anthracenes. This progress report includes articles published in the open literature from the data and findings of this project. Topics include the solubility and thermodynamic distribution coefficients. To accomplish these measurements of solubility and distribution coefficients, new techniques and new equipment were developed and were also published as journal articles.

  16. Quenching of aromatic hydrocarbon triplet states by stable carbon free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, A. R.

    1980-10-01

    Quenching of the triplet states of a series of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in solution by three members of the bis-biphenylene allyl radical family has been studied. Bimolecular rate constants for the quenching process have values corresponding to a diffusion controlled process; in contrast to quenching by nitroxide radicals, there is no clear dependence of quenching rate constant on the triplet energy of the hydrocarbon being quenched. It is proposed that the mechanism leading to quenching is based on an exchange interaction between the tree radical and the triplet state.

  17. Hydrocarbon content of geopressured brines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Osif, T.L.

    1985-08-01

    Design Well data (bottomhole pressure minus wellhead pressure, GWR, and hydrocarbon composition) is presented as a function of producing conditions. These are examined in conjunction with the following models to attempt to deduce the reservoir brine saturation level: (1) reservoir contains gas dispersed in the pores and the gas saturation is greater than critical; (2) reservoir brine is gas-saturated; (3) bubble point below hydrostatic pressure; and (4) bubble point between hydrostatic pressure and reservoir pressure. 24 figs., 10 tabs. (ACR)

  18. Biogeochemistry of aromatic and saturated hydrocarbons in a rocky intertidal marine community in the Strait of Juan de Fuca

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Seasonal distributions of aromatic and saturated hydrocarbons were determined in important members of a rocky intertidal marine community remote from known sources of petroleum input. Nine major species were sampled quarterly for four years at Freshwater Bay, west of Port Angeles on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. More than seventy physical and chemical parameters were obtained for use in evaluating seasonal, annual, and interspecies trends. A simplified food chain study using /sup 3/H-naphthalane added to a seawater-phytoplankton-herbivore-carnivore system demonstrated the transfer of an aromatic petroleum-type hydrocarbon from seawater to organisms typically found in a stable rocky intertidal community. The phytoplankton and herbivore showed a biomagnification of /sup 3/H-naphthalene in the food chain, but the carnivore did not, possibly due to metabolism of the labelled aromatic hydrocarbon and subsequent discharge of water-soluble radioactive products. These studies suggest that aromatic hydrocarbons may be good indicators of short-term petroleum contamination only in species without enzymatic detoxification pathways. Saturated hydrocarbons tend to be better longer-term indicators. Saturated hydrocarbons do not show statistically significant seasonal variations. While organisms displayed some seasonal variations in aromatic hydrocarbons, no universally consistent relationship between seasonal patterns in different organisms was observed. When exposed to spilled oil, organisms similar to Freshwater Bay populations took up different amounts of petroleum hydrocarbons according to type of oil, spill location, duration, and intensity of exposure.

  19. Renal cancer risk and occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and plastics

    PubMed Central

    Karami, Sara; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Stewart, Patricia A.; Zaridze, David; Matveev, Vsevolod; Janout, Vladimir; Kollarova, Helena; Bencko, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Mates, Dana; Gromiec, Jan P.; Sobotka, Roman; Chow, Wong-Ho; Rothman, Nathaniel; Moore, Lee E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and certain plastic monomers increased renal cell carcinomas (RCC) risk. Methods Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate RCC risk in relation to exposure. Results No association between RCC risk and having ever been occupationally exposed to any polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or plastics was observed. Duration of exposure and average exposure also showed no association with risk. Suggestive positive associations between RCC risk and cumulative exposure to styrene (P-trend = 0.02) and acrylonitrile (P-trend = 0.06) were found. Cumulative exposure to petroleum/gasoline engine emissions was inversely associated with risk (P-trend = 0.02). Conclusions Results indicate a possible association between occupational styrene and acrylonitrile exposure and RCC risk. Additional studies are needed to replicate findings, as this is the first time these associations have been reported and they may be due to chance. PMID:21270648

  20. Air monitoring of aromatic hydrocarbons during automobile spray painting for developing change schedule of respirator cartridges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of End of Service Life Indicator (ESLI), a cartridge change schedule should be established for ensuring that cartridges are changed before their end of service life. Factors effecting service life of cartridges were evaluated, including the amount of atmospheric contamination with aromatic hydrocarbon vapors in the workplace, temperature, and relative humidity of the air. A new change schedule was established based on comparing the results of air monitoring and workplace conditions, laboratory experiment, and the NIOSH MultiVapor software. Spray painters were being exposed to aromatic hydrocarbons in a range exceeding occupational exposure limits. The cartridge change schedule was not effective and could no longer provide adequate protection against organic contaminants for sprayers. Change schedules for respirator cartridges should be reduced from 16–24 hours to 4 hours. NIOSH’s service life software program could be applied to developing cartridge change schedules. PMID:24468234

  1. Aqueous solubilities and infinite dilution activity coefficients of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, R.I.S.; Sandler, S.I.

    1995-07-01

    Determining the aqueous solubilities and infinite dilution activity coefficients of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is important for environmental reasons. However, common methods for the measurement of infinite dilution activity coefficients, such as ebulliometry or gas chromatography, cannot be used for solutes that are only very slightly soluble in water and have very low vapor pressures, such as the PAHs. Here the authors report values of the aqueous infinite dilution activity coefficients of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons obtained by measuring their very low aqueous solubilities and their enthalpies of fusion. The values of the infinite dilution activity coefficients they obtain range from 4.2 {times} 10{sup 5} for acenaphthene to 3.7 {times} 10{sup 8} for benzo[a]pyrene, with an average error of {+-}12.5%. The other two PAH used were anthracene and benz[a]anthracene.

  2. Characterization of subsurface polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at the Deepwater Horizon site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diercks, Arne-R.; Highsmith, Raymond C.; Asper, Vernon L.; Joung, DongJoo; Zhou, Zhengzhen; Guo, Laodong; Shiller, Alan M.; Joye, Samantha B.; Teske, Andreas P.; Guinasso, Norman; Wade, Terry L.; Lohrenz, Steven E.

    2010-10-01

    Here, we report the initial observations of distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in subsurface waters near the Deepwater Horizon oil well site (also referred to as the Macondo, Mississippi Canyon Block 252 or MC252 well). Profiles of in situ fluorescence and beam attenuation conducted during 9-16 May 2010 were characterized by distinct peaks at depths greater than 1000 m, with highest intensities close to the wellhead and decreasing intensities with increasing distance from the wellhead. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analyses of water samples coinciding with the deep fluorescence and beam attenuation anomalies confirmed the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) at concentrations reaching 189 ?g L-1 (ppb). Subsurface exposure to PAH at levels considered to be toxic to marine organisms would have occurred in discrete depth layers between 1000 and 1400 m in the region southwest of the wellhead site and extending at least as far as 13 km.

  3. Secondary Aerosol Formation from Oxidation of Aromatics Hydrocarbons by Cl atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, X.; Griffin, R.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol Formation From the Oxidation of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Chlorine Atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) affects regional and global air quality. The formation mechanisms of SOA via the oxidation of volatile organic compounds by hydroxyl radicals, ozone, and nitrate radicals have been studied intensively during the last decade. Chlorine atoms (Cl) also have been hypothesized to be effective oxidants in marine and industrially influenced areas. Recent work by the authors has indicated that significant amounts of SOA are formed from the oxidation of monoterpenes by Cl. Aromatic hydrocarbons are important for generation of both SOA and ozone in urban areas because of their large emission rates and high reactivity. The goal of this work was to quantify the SOA formation potentials of two representative aromatic hydrocarbons through laboratory chamber experiments in which oxidation was initiated by Cl. The system constructed for this study includes an experimental chamber, a gas chromatograph for quantification of aromatic mixing ratios, a Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer to measure SOA size distributions, a zero air generator, and an illuminating system. The model aromatic hydrocarbons chosen for this study are toluene and m-xylene. Aerosol yields are estimated based on measured aerosol volume concentration, the concentration of consumed hydrocarbon, and estimation of wall loss of the newly formed aerosol. Toluene and m-xylene exhibit similar SOA yields from the oxidation initiated by Cl. The toluene SOA yield from Cl-initiated oxidation, however, depends on the ratio between the mixing ratios of the initial chlorine source and toluene in the chamber. For toluene experiments with higher such ratios, SOA yields vary from 0.05 to 0.079 for generated aerosol ranging from 4.2 to12.0 micrograms per cubic meter. In the lower ratio experiments, SOA yields are from 0.033 to 0.064, corresponding to generated aerosol from 3.0 to 11.0 micrograms per cubic meter. The m-xylene SOA yield ranges from 0.04 to 0.08 for aerosol in the range of 4.0 to 12.0 micrograms per cubic meter. These yields are generally comparable to those from photooxidation. In marine and industrial areas, SOA formation from the Cl- initiated oxidation of the studied common aromatics is likely to be most important in the early morning.

  4. COMPARISON OF IMMUNOASSAY AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR MEASUREMENT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are frequently encountered in the environment and may pose health concerns due to their carcinogenicity. A commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), was evaluated as a screening method for monitoring PAHs at contaminated site...

  5. IMPORTANCE OF BLACK CARBON IN DISTRIBUTION AND BIOACCUMULATION MODELS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CONTAMINATED MARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The roles and relative importance of nonpyrogenic organic carbon (NPOC) and black carbon (BC) as binding phases of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were assessed by their ability to estimate pore water concentrations and biological uptake in various marine sediments. Sedim...

  6. PHOTOACTIVATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON TOXICITY IN MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES) EMBRYOS: RELEVANCE TO ENVIRONMENTAL RISK IN CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hazard for photoactivated toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been clearly demonstrated; however, to our knowledge, the risk in contaminated systems has not been characterized. To address this question, a median lethal dose (LD50) for fluoranthene photoa...

  7. CROSS-INDUCTION OF PYRENE AND PHENANTHRENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM SP. ISOLATED FROM POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CONTAMINATED RIVER SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading culture enriched from contaminated river sediments and a Mycobacterium sp. isolated from the enrichment were tested to investigate the possible synergistic and antagonistic interactions affecting the degradation of pyrene in the p...

  8. FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND THEIR GROWTH TO SOOT -A REVIEW OF CHEMICAL REACTION PATHWAYS. (R824970)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The generation by combustion processes of airborne species of current health concern such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot particles necessitates a detailed understanding of chemical reaction pathways responsible for their formation. The present review discus...

  9. SYMPOSIUM: CARCINOGENIC POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT HELD AT PENSOCALA BEACH, FLORIDA ON 14-18 AUGUST 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication is a compilation of papers contributed by scientists who participated in the 'Symposium on Carcinogenic Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Marine Environment' sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Energy, Minerals, and Industry an...

  10. AVAILABILITY OF PCBS (POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS) AND PAHS (POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS) TO 'MYTILUJ EDULIS' FROM ARTIFICIALLY RESUSPENDED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuarine sediment containing high levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was resuspended into a flowing seawater system. Analysis of the dissolved and particulate phases in the exposure tank indicated a release of some low molecula...

  11. IMPORTANCE OF MATERNAL TRANSFER OF THE PHOTOREACTIVE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FLUORANTHENE FROM BENTHIC ADULT BIVALVES TO THEIR PELAGIC LARVAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine if maternal transfer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from benthic adult bivalves could result in phototoxicity to their pelagic larvae when exposed to ultraviolet light (UV). In these experiments, adult bivalves were e...

  12. Observational aspects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon charging in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakes, E. L. O.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the charging processes which affect small carbonaceous dust grains and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's). Because of their high abundance, interstellar PAH molecules can dominate the charge balance of the interstellar medium (ISM), which controls the heating and cooling interstellar gas and interstellar chemistry. We present the results of our model, which compare well with observations and suggest further applications to both laboratory measurements and data obtainable from the KAO.

  13. Phototoxicity of non-carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aquatic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, J.; Kagan, E.D.; Kagan, I.A.; Kagan, P.A.; Quigley, S.

    1985-01-01

    Anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene are phototoxic in Daphnia magna, Artemia salina, first instar larvae of Aedes aegypti, late embryonic forms of Rana pipiens, and fish (Pimephales promelas). Since polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are generated in the combustion processes held responsible for the damages of acid rain, and they are introduced into the environment through other means as well, the high phototoxicity of the major pollutants, which are not carcinogenic, suggests that greater attention must be given to their environmental significance.

  14. A method of calculating the thermophysical parameters of liquid aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafeev, R.A.; Gabulov, D.M.; Musaev, T.P.; Tagiev, S.I.

    1986-05-01

    Wide use is made of heat-transfer processes in advanced technology and in the chemical industry involving substances with largely unexamined thermophysical parameters. This paper proposes general formulas for the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, surface tension, and latent heat of evaporation for certain aromatic hydrocarbons at atmospheric pressure. Results are presented for toluene, p-Xylene, m-Xylene, o-Xylene, ethylbenzene, and benzene.

  15. Removal of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons from primary aluminum air pollution control scrubber wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, C.R.; Dostal, K.A.; Osantowski, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    A pilot-scale study was conducted at a primary aluminum plant to evaluate the removal of benzo(a)pyrene and other polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) from potline scrubber wastewater. Specific objectives included determining the need for granular activated carbon to remove the PAH's to 10 micrograms/l and evaluating the use of benzo(a)pyrene as an indicator for the removal of all PAH's.

  16. Efficient detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated biphenyls via three-component energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Serio, Nicole; Miller, Kayla; Levine, Mindy

    2013-05-25

    Reported herein is the detection of highly toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) via proximity-induced non-covalent energy transfer. This energy transfer occurs in the cavity of ?-cyclodextrin, and is efficient even with the most toxic PAHs and least fluorescent PCBs. The low limits of detection and potential for selective detection using array-based systems, combined with the straightforward experimental setup, make this new detection method particularly promising. PMID:23595226

  17. Toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the toxicity and biochemical effects of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons. Topics include effects on metabolism and liver activity, cellular responses, binding characteristics, and the occurrence and path of the compounds in food chains. Bioaccumulation studies in specific areas, and isolation and detection techniques are also considered. (Contains a minimum of 242 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Metabolic Network in Mycobacterium vanbaaleniiPYR-1 ?

    PubMed Central

    Kweon, Ohgew; Kim, Seong-Jae; Holland, Ricky D.; Chen, Hongyan; Kim, Dae-Wi; Gao, Yuan; Yu, Li-Rong; Baek, Songjoon; Baek, Dong-Heon; Ahn, Hongsik; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated a metabolic network (MN) from Mycobacterium vanbaaleniiPYR-1 for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the perspective of structure, behavior, and evolution, in which multilayer omics data are integrated. Initially, we utilized a high-throughput proteomic analysis to assess the protein expression response of M. vanbaaleniiPYR-1 to seven different aromatic compounds. A total of 3,431 proteins (57.38% of the genome-predicted proteins) were identified, which included 160 proteins that seemed to be involved in the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Based on the proteomic data and the previous metabolic, biochemical, physiological, and genomic information, we reconstructed an experiment-based system-level PAH-MN. The structure of PAH-MN, with 183 metabolic compounds and 224 chemical reactions, has a typical scale-free nature. The behavior and evolution of the PAH-MN reveals a hierarchical modularity with funnel effects in structure/function and intimate association with evolutionary modules of the functional modules, which are the ring cleavage process (RCP), side chain process (SCP), and central aromatic process (CAP). The 189 commonly upregulated proteins in all aromatic hydrocarbon treatments provide insights into the global adaptation to facilitate the PAH metabolism. Taken together, the findings of our study provide the hierarchical viewpoint from genes/proteins/metabolites to the network via functional modules of the PAH-MN equipped with the engineering-driven approaches of modularization and rationalization, which may expand our understanding of the metabolic potential of M. vanbaaleniiPYR-1 for bioremediation applications. PMID:21725022

  19. Evaluating the Effects of Aromatics Content in Gasoline on Gaseous and Particulate Matter Emissions from SI-PFI and SIDI Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Karavalakis, Georgios; Short, Daniel; Vu, Diep; Russell, Robert; Hajbabaei, Maryam; Asa-Awuku, Akua; Durbin, Thomas D

    2015-06-01

    We assessed the emissions response of a fleet of seven light-duty gasoline vehicles for gasoline fuel aromatic content while operating over the LA92 driving cycle. The test fleet consisted of model year 2012 vehicles equipped with spark-ignition (SI) and either port fuel injection (PFI) or direct injection (DI) technology. Three gasoline fuels were blended to meet a range of total aromatics targets (15%, 25%, and 35% by volume) while holding other fuel properties relatively constant within specified ranges, and a fourth fuel was formulated to meet a 35% by volume total aromatics target but with a higher octane number. Our results showed statistically significant increases in carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbon, particulate matter (PM) mass, particle number, and black carbon emissions with increasing aromatics content for all seven vehicles tested. Only one vehicle showed a statistically significant increase in total hydrocarbon emissions. The monoaromatic hydrocarbon species that were evaluated showed increases with increasing aromatic content in the fuel. Changes in fuel composition had no statistically significant effect on the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), formaldehyde, or acetaldehyde. A good correlation was also found between the PM index and PM mass and number emissions for all vehicle/fuel combinations with the total aromatics group being a significant contributor to the total PM index followed by naphthalenes and indenes. PMID:25938171

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingobium sp. Strain C100, a Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium from the Deep-Sea Sediment of the Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chunming; Bai, Xiuhua; Lai, Qiliang; Xie, Yanrong; Chen, Xin; Shao, Zongze

    2014-01-01

    Sphingobium sp. strain C100 was isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading consortium from the deep-sea sediment of the Arctic Ocean. It can degrade two- to four-ring PAHs at 25C. Here we present the draft genome sequence of this strain, which is 4,776,810bp with a G+C content of 63.9%. PMID:24482512

  1. Genome Sequence of Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus Strain MCTG13d, an Obligate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Associated with Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Whitman, William B; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus strain MCTG13d is a recently discovered bacterium that is associated with marine eukaryotic phytoplankton and that almost exclusively utilizes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole source of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 2,474,654bp with 2,385 genes and has an average G+C content of 53.1%. PMID:26089431

  2. [Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water and sediment from Zhoushan coastal area, China].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Min; Tuan, Le Huy; Mei, Wei-Ping; Ruan, Hui-Hui; Wu, Hao

    2014-07-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been investigated in water and sediments of Zhoushan coastal area every two months in 2012. The concentrations of total PAHs ranged from 382.3 to 816.9 ng x L(-1), with the mean value of 552.5 ng x L(-1) in water; whereas it ranged from 1017.9 to 3047.1 ng x g(-1), with the mean value of 2 022.4 ng x g(-1) in sediment. Spatial distribution showed that Yangshan and Yanwoshan offshore area had the maximum and minimum of total PAHs contents in water, while the maximum and minimum occurred at Yangshan and Zhujiajian Nansha offshore area in sediment. Temporal distribution revealed that total PAHs contents in water reached the maximum and minimum values in October and June, however in sediments these values were found in August and June, respectively. The PAHs pollution was affected by oil emission, charcoal and coal combustion. Using the biological threshold and exceeded coefficient method to assess the ecological risk of PAHs in Zhoushan coastal area, the result showed that sigma PAHs had a lower probability of potential risk, while there was a higher probability of potential risk for acenaphthylene monomer, and there might be ecological risk for acenaphthene and fluorene. Distribution of PAHs between sediment and water showed that Zhoushan coastal sediment enriched a lot of PAHs, meanwhile the enrichment coefficient (K(d) value) of sediment in Daishan island was larger than that in Zhoushan main island. PMID:25244854

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the surface sediments from Yellow River, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Yu, Yong; Wang, Ping; Guo, Weifeng; Dai, Shugui; Sun, Hongwen

    2007-04-01

    Fourteen surface sediment samples were collected from Lanzhou Reach of Yellow River, China in July 2005. The concentrations of 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined by gas chromatography equipped with a mass spectrometry detector (GC-MS). Total concentrations of the PAHs ranged from 464 to 2621 ng/g dry weight. Sediment samples with the highest PAH concentrations appeared at the downstream of Lanzhou City, where there was the biggest wastewater discharge pipeline from Lanzhou Oil Refinery Factory and Lanzhou Chemical Industry Company. Municipal sewage also contributed to the PAH contamination in the sediments. A correlation existed between the sediment organic carbon content (f(oc)) and the total PAH concentrations (r(2)=0.57), suggesting that sediment organic carbon content played an important role in controlling the PAHs levels in the sediments. According to the observed molecular indices, PAHs contamination in Lanzhou Reach of Yellow River originated both from the high-temperature pyrolytic processes and from the petrogenic source, showing a mixed PAH input pattern, which was also confirmed by the results of a principal component analysis (PCA). According to the numerical effect-based sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) of the United States, the levels of PAHs at most studied sites in Lanzhou Reach of Yellow River should not exert adverse biological effects. Although at some sites (such as S10, S12, etc.) one PAH may exceed the effects range low (ERL), individual PAH did not exceed the effects range median (ERM). The results indicated that sediments in all sites should have potential biological impact, but should have no impairment. PMID:17217985

  4. Deuterium enrichment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by photochemically induced exchange with deuterium-rich cosmic ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, S. A.; Bernstein, M. P.; Allamandola, L. J.; Gillette, J. S.; Zare, R. N.

    2000-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) coronene (C24H12) frozen in D2O ice in a ratio of less than 1 part in 500 rapidly exchanges its hydrogen atoms with the deuterium in the ice at interstellar temperatures and pressures when exposed to ultraviolet radiation. Exchange occurs via three different chemical processes: D atom addition, D atom exchange at oxidized edge sites, and D atom exchange at aromatic edge sites. Observed exchange rates for coronene (C24H12)-D2O and d12-coronene (C24D12)-H2O isotopic substitution experiments show that PAHs in interstellar ices could easily attain the D/H levels observed in meteorites. These results may have important consequences for the abundance of deuterium observed in aromatic materials in the interstellar medium and in meteorites. These exchange mechanisms produce deuteration in characteristic molecular locations on the PAHs that may distinguish them from previously postulated processes for D enrichment of PAHs.

  5. Source identification of aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments using GC/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Sporstoel, S.; Gjos, N.; Lichtenthaler, R.G.; Gustavsen, K.O.; Urdal, K.; Oreld, F.; Skel, J.

    1983-01-01

    A method that may distinguish between input of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from petroleum and combustion sources is demonstrated on sediment samples. Selected series of aromatics (unsubstituted compounds and their C/sub 1/-C/sub 3/ alkyl homologues) are quantified by computerized GC/MS. The alkyl homologue distribution (AHD) within each series and the sum of components in each series relative to the sum of all components measured (relative amount of each aromatic series (RAA)) are graphically visualized. In combination these parameters give a first-order indication of the PAH source. Pyrene/fluoranthene AHD series appear to be especially sensitive as an indicator for detecting PAH from combustion sources. Interestingly the dibenzothiophene AHD series does not discriminate between crude oil and soot samples. The method is demonstrated on sediments from the North Sea and from Norwegian and Swedish fjords.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts in coke-oven workers.

    PubMed

    Ovreb, S; Hewer, A; Phillips, D H; Haugen, A

    1990-01-01

    Different approaches for measuring occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are presented, (i) determination of PAHs in the workplace by personal sampling, (ii) determination of urinary PAHs and PAH metabolites, and (iii) measurements of aromatic DNA adducts in white blood cells by ultra-sensitive enzyme radioimmunoassay (USERIA) and 32P-postlabelling. Large amounts of PAHs, including benzo[a]pyrene (BP), are released from the coke ovens. Mean PAH exposure levels were reduced by 60% when the workers used masks during work. However, low PAH concentrations were found in the urine of the exposed workers. Approximately 40% of the coke-oven workers had detectable levels of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE)-DNA adducts in the white blood cells measured by USERIA and 90% had levels of aromatic adducts detectable by the 32P-postlabelling assay. In this study there was a correlation between DNA adduct levels and estimated exposure. PMID:2228116

  7. [Halogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments of Maozhou River, Shenzhen].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian-Lin; Ni, Hong-Gang; Ding, Chao; Zeng, Hui

    2012-09-01

    Surface sediments collected from the Maozhou River watershed in Shenzhen were analyzed for the concentration levels and spatial distribution characteristics of halogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HPAHs) using GC-MS. Total concentrations of three chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (ClPAHs) and six brominated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (BrPAHs) of concern ranged from 3.00 to 301 ng x g(-1) and 7.52 to 285 ng x g(-1), respectively. Source appointments indicated that the HPAHs in these surface sediments were mainly derived from waste incineration, fossil fuel combustion, vehicle emission, and burning of crop straw, accounting for 40%, 20.5% 11.9%, and 11.7% of the total loading, respectively. Additionally, the toxic equivalency quotients (TEQ) of total ClPAHs and BrPAHs ranged from 7.95 to 38.1 pg x g(-1) and 38.1 to 105 pg x g(-1) respectively. Finally, the relationships between the HPAHs levels and different land use types were examined. Results indicated that the levels of HPAHs in surface sediments showed a decreasing trend after the first increase to the peak with the density of industrial land, but inversely proportional to the density of agricultural land. PMID:23243864

  8. Optimizing catalysis conditions to decrease aromatic hydrocarbons and increase alkanes for improving jet biofuel quality.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Li, Tao; Huang, Rui; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2014-04-01

    To produce quality jet biofuel with high amount of alkanes and low amount of aromatic hydrocarbons, two zeolites of HY and HZSM-5 supporting Ni and Mo were used as catalysts to convert soybean oil into jet fuel. Zeolite HY exhibited higher jet range alkane selectivity (40.3%) and lower jet range aromatic hydrocarbon selectivity (23.8%) than zeolite HZSM-5 (13.8% and 58.9%). When reaction temperature increased from 330 to 390C, yield of jet fuel over Ni-Mo/HY catalyst at 4 MPa hydrogen pressure increased from 0% to 49.1% due to the shift of reaction pathway from oligomerization to cracking reaction. Further increase of reaction temperature from 390 to 410C resulted in increased yield of jet range aromatic hydrocarbons from 18.7% to 30%, which decreased jet fuel quality. A high yield of jet fuel (48.2%) was obtained at 1 MPa low hydrogen pressure over Ni (8 wt.%)-Mo (12 wt.%)/HY catalyst. PMID:24656484

  9. Assessment of the bioavailability and phytotoxicity of sediment spiked with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ron?evi?, Sr?an; Spasojevi?, Jelena; Maleti?, Sneana; Jazi?, Jelena Molnar; Isakovski, Marijana Kragulj; Agbaba, Jasmina; Grgi?, Marko; Dalmacija, Boo

    2016-02-01

    Large amounts of sediment are dredged globally every year. This sediment is often contaminated with low concentrations of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides and other organic pollutants. Some of this sediment is disposed of on land, creating a need for risk assessment of the sediment disposal method, to minimize the degradation of environmental quality and prevent risks to human health. Evaluating the available fractions of certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is very important, as in the presence of various organisms, they are believed to be easily subject to the processes of bioaccumulation, biosorption and transformation. In order to determine the applicability of applying these methods for the evaluation of pollutant bioavailability in sediments, the desorption kinetics from the sediment of various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the presence of Tenax and XAD4 were examined over the course of 216h. Changes in the PAH concentrations in dredged sediments using five different seed plants during a short time of period (10days) were also followed. Using chemical extraction techniques with Tenax and XAD4, a time of around 24h is enough to achieve equilibrium for all four PAHs. Results showed good agreement between the seed accumulation and PAH extraction methods with both agents. If we compare the two extraction techniques, XAD4 gave better results for phenanthrene, pyrene and benzo(a)pyrene, and Tenax gave better results for chrysene. PMID:26490893

  10. Speciation of atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present during fog time collected submicron particles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Sharma, Swati; Habib, Gazala; Gupta, Tarun

    2015-08-01

    Airborne submicron particles (PM1) were collected using PM1 sampler during the fog-dominated days (December 2013-January 2014). PM1 values varied between 58.12 ?g/m(3) and 198.75 ?g/m(3), and average mass concentration was 162.33??38.25 ?g/m(3) while total average concentration of particle-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) determined was 616.31??30.31 ng/m(3). This is a signal for an alarming high pollution level at this site situated in the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). PAHs were extracted from filters using toluene and acetonitrile. Quantitative measurements of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were carried out using the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique. The extracts were analyzed for 16 target polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) including carcinogenic compound benzo(a)pyrene (19.86??38.98 ng/m(3)). Fluoranthene, benzo(a)anthracene, anthracene, and fluorene were the predominant compounds found in the samples collected during foggy days. Based on number of rings, four-ring PAH compounds had maximum contribution (43%) in this fog time collected submicron particles followed by three-ring (21%), five-ring (20%), six-ring (13%), and two-ring (3%), respectively. In winter and foggy days, wood and coal combustion and biomass burning also significantly contribute to the PAH levels. However, diagnostic ratio suggests diesel emissions as the prime source of PAHs at this sampling site. PMID:25903173

  11. Aromatic hydrocarbon emissions in the United States deduced from tall tower measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, L.; Millet, D. B.; Griffis, T. J.; Tessum, C.; Travis, K.

    2013-12-01

    Aromatic compounds including benzene (C6H6), toluene (C7H8), and xylenes (C8H10) are important anthropogenic precursors of secondary organic aerosol and ground-level ozone. In addition, benzene has been classified as a Group 1 carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). However, their emissions remain poorly constrained. Here we present a full year (2011) of continuous aromatic hydrocarbon measurements by PTR-MS at the University of Minnesota tall tower Tracer Gas Observatory (KCMP tall tower, 244 m a.g.l, 44.689N, 93.073W). We interpret the tall tower data with a 0.5 0.667 GEOS-Chem nested grid simulation to constrain US sources of benzene, toluene, and xylenes. The tall tower observations reveal a clear high bias in the model, with model: measurement slopes of 1.8, 5.3, and 2.9 for benzene, toluene, and xylenes, respectively. The high bias reflects an overestimate of aromatic hydrocarbon emissions in the model, which are based on the RETRO emission Inventory. In this work, we employ a Bayesian inversion to interpret the KCMP tall tower measurements in terms of quantitative constraints on US aromatic sources and the importance of sectors such as on-road transportation, waste treatment and disposal, solvent use, etc. We discuss our findings relative to other emission estimates (e.g., the EPA NEI) and in terms of their implications for air quality modeling.

  12. Remediation of a chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbon in water by photoelectrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Silke; Alexander, Bruce D; Dawood, Ilyas; Tillotson, Martin; Wells, Richard P K; Macphee, Donald E; Killham, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Photoelectrocatalysis driven by visible light offers a new and potentially powerful technology for the remediation of water contaminated by organo-xenobiotics. In this study, the performance of a visible light-driven photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) batch reactor, applying a tungsten trioxide (WO(3)) photoelectrode, to degrade the model pollutant 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) was monitored both by toxicological assessment (biosensing) and chemical analysis. The bacterial biosensor used to assess the presence of toxicity of the parent molecule and its breakdown products was a multicopy plasmid lux-marked E. coli HB101 pUCD607. The bacterial biosensor traced the removal of 2,4-DCP, and in some case, its toxicity response suggests the identification of transient toxic intermediates. The loss of the parent molecule, 2,4-DCP determined by HPLC, corresponded to the recorded photocurrents. Photoelectrocatalysis offers considerable potential for the remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons, and that the biosensor based toxicity results identified likely compatibility of this technology with conventional, biological wastewater treatment. PMID:18789564

  13. THE EFFECTS OF EQUIVALENCE RATIO ON THE FORMATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND SOOT IN PREMIXED ETHANE FLAMES. (R825412)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot has been investigated in atmospheric-pressure, laminar, ethane/oxygen/argon premixed flames as a function of mixture equivalence ratio. Mole fraction profiles of major products, trace aromatics, ...

  14. Isolation and gas-chromatographic determination of saturated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in mussels

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, A.C.; Sibbald, R.R.

    1986-10-01

    The method here presented is intended for application in the analysis of trace quantities of petroleum hydrocarbons in oil-polluted mussels. It is a technique incorporating saponification, pentane extraction and silica gel cleanup, and represents a modification and ad hoc synthesis of other procedures. Recovery efficiencies of the method are 80% or greater for C/sub 15/ to C/sub 38/ n-alkanes, and vary between 0% for naphthalene and 84% for pyrene. Isolation and quantification of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fraction are of importance in environmental monitoring; some compounds in this group are either known or suspected to be carcinogenic agents. Concomitant analysis for the saturated hydrocarbons fraction can provide essential clues to the petrogenic or pyrolytic origin of the PAHs.

  15. Isolation and gas-chromatographic determinations of saturated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in mussels

    SciTech Connect

    Bulter, A.C.; Sibbald, R.R.

    1986-10-01

    The method here presented is intended for application in the analysis of trace quantities of petroleum hydrocarbons in oil-polluted mussels. It is a technique incorporating saponification, pentane extraction and silica gel cleanup, and represents a modification and ad hoc synthesis of other procedures. Recovery efficiencies of the method are 80% or greater for C/sub 15/ to C/sub 38/ n-alkanes, and vary between 0% for naphthalene and 84% for pyrene. Isolation and quantification of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fraction are of importance in environmental monitoring; some compounds in this group are either known or suspected to be carcinogenic agents. Concomitant analysis for the saturated hydrocarbons fraction can provide essential clues to the petrogenic or pyrolytic origin of the PAHs.

  16. Environmental degradation of polluting aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons: a case study.

    PubMed

    Osuji, Leo C; Ozioma, Achugasim

    2007-03-01

    Oil extracts of Ukpeliede spill samples from Niger Delta (Nigeria) were analyzed by gas chromatography. The amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), especially the lower-molecular-weight naphthene, fluorine, phenathrene, pyrene, and benzo[a]anthracene, decreased within the sampling intervals of 2 months and 5 months. There was a predominance of three-to-six-ring PAHs over the two-ring PAHs. There was marked disappearance of n-C8 to n-C11 hydrocarbon fractions and the acyclic isoprenoids (pristane and phytane). The depletion of these molecules within the two sampling intervals suggests the possible attenuation of hydrocarbons as a result of the environmental modification within the set interval. PMID:17372944

  17. [Qualitative and quantitative changes in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in cutting oils after their use].

    PubMed

    Apostoli, P; Crippa, M; Cottica, D; Pozzoli, L; Alessio, L

    1989-11-01

    The quantitative and qualitative variations in the mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) present in different samples of a cutting oil, unused and after 3,6 and 9 months of use, were evaluated by means of gas-chromatography mass spectrometry. Nine of the identified hydrocarbons (phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo-a-anthracene, chrysene, triphenylene, benzo-a-pyrene, benzo-e-pyrene and perylene) were studied. The total PAH concentration increased from 45 (first sample) to 915 ng/gr of oil, even if a different behaviour for various hydrocarbons was shown. In fact some of them, such as phenanthrene and anthracene increased with use, some, such as fluoranthene and pyrene decreased and the other did not exhibit a regular trend. In the light of results, the influence of variations of the PAH mixture in oil on the PAH air concentration and on the preventive measures to be adopted, is discussed. PMID:2562746

  18. Potential of non-ligninolytic fungi in bioremediation of chlorinated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Marco-Urrea, Ernest; García-Romera, Inmaculada; Aranda, Elisabet

    2015-12-25

    In previous decades, white-rot fungi as bioremediation agents have been the subjects of scientific research due to the potential use of their unspecific oxidative enzymes. However, some non-white-rot fungi, mainly belonging to the Ascomycota and Zygomycota phylum, have demonstrated their potential in the enzymatic transformation of environmental pollutants, thus overcoming some of the limitations observed in white-rot fungi with respect to growth in neutral pH, resistance to adverse conditions and the capacity to surpass autochthonous microorganisms. Despite their presence in so many soil and water environments, little information exists on the enzymatic mechanisms and degradation pathways involved in the transformation of hydrocarbons by these fungi. This review describes the bioremediation potential of non-ligninolytic fungi with respect to chlorinated hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and also shows known conversion pathways and the prospects for future research. PMID:25681797

  19. Release of bound aromatic hydrocarbons from late Archean and Mesoproterozoic kerogens via hydropyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocks, Jochen J.; Love, Gordon D.; Snape, Colin E.; Logan, Graham A.; Summons, Roger E.; Buick, Roger

    2003-04-01

    Hydrogen-lean kerogens (atomic H/C<0.4) isolated from the 2.5-billion-year-old (Ga) Mt. McRae Shale, Hamersley Group, at Tom Price, Western Australia, were studied via hydropyrolysis, a continuous-flow technique that degrades organic matter in a stream of high-pressure hydrogen assisted by a dispersed Mo catalyst. The hydropyrolysates yielded predominantly phenanthrene and pyrene, and higher polyaromatic hydrocarbons and alkylated homologues were generated in low relative concentrations. Saturated hydrocarbons were not detected. The molecular and carbon isotopic compositions of the hydropyrolysates are very similar to aromatic hydrocarbons obtained by solvent extraction of the host rocks. Because molecular structures covalently attached to kerogen are unaffected by contamination, this indicates that both the bound and extractable aromatic fractions are syngenetic with the host rocks. Therefore, the results of the hydropyrolysis experiments provide compelling evidence for preserved bitumen of Archean age. The very high proportion of nonalkylated polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the hydropyrolysates is consistent with hydrothermal dehydrogenation of the kerogen, and a marked concentration difference of pyrene in rock extracts and hydropyrolysates might be explained by hydrothermal redistribution of the bitumen. The kerogen and bitumen composition is therefore consistent with models suggesting a hydrothermal origin for the giant iron ore deposits at Mt. Tom Price. Comparison of the Archean samples with hydropyrolysates from immature Mesoproterozoic kerogens from the Roper Group, McArthur Basin, Northern Territory, and with pyrolysis experiments on Proterozoic kerogens in the literature suggests that Precambrian kerogens are frequently highly aromatic and lipid-poor regardless of their degree of thermal preservation.

  20. Polycyclic Aromatic HydrocarbonsAromatic DNA Adducts in Cord Blood and Behavior Scores in New York City Children

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuang; Vishnevetsky, Julia; Zhang, Bingzhi; Cole, Kathleen J.; Tang, Deliang; Rauh, Virginia; Phillips, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are widespread urban pollutants that can bind to DNA to form PAHDNA adducts. Prenatal PAH exposure measured by personal monitoring has been linked to cognitive deficits in childhood in a prospective study conducted by the Columbia Center for Childrens Environmental Health. Objectives: We measured PAHDNA and other bulky aromatic adducts in umbilical cord white blood cells using the 32P-postlabeling assay to determine the association between this molecular dosimeter and behavioral/attention problems in childhood. Methods: Children born to nonsmoking African-American and Dominican women residing in New York City (NYC) were followed from in utero to 78 years of age. At two time points before 8 years of age (mean ages, 4.8 years and 7 years), child behavior was assessed using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). To estimate and test the association between adducts and behavioral outcomes, both CBCL continuous raw scores and dichotomized T-scores were analyzed. Results: Higher cord adducts were associated with higher symptom scores of Anxious/Depressed at 4.8 years and Attention Problems at 4.8 and 7 years, and with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th editionoriented Anxiety Problems at 4.8 years. Conclusions: These results suggest that PAH exposure, measured by DNA adducts, may adversely affect child behavior, potentially affecting school performance. PMID:21486719

  1. Current-density maps as probes of aromaticity: global and Clar pi ring currents in totally resonant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Erich; Fowler, Patrick W; Soncini, Alessandro; Jenneskens, Leonardus W

    2007-01-01

    Calculation and visualisation of induced current density are important aids to the study of both aromaticity and observable molecular magnetic response properties. The ipsocentric method offers an accurate and economical approach to calculation of induced current density, and a physical interpretation in terms of occupied-orbital contributions. In monocyclic systems, these contributions allow rationalisation of the existence, sense, and strength of ring current using simple symmetry and node-counting arguments. Here we show maps computed with the model pseudo-pi version of the ipsocentric theory for large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) of the Clar type. Maps are presented for D(6h)-symmetric systems with up to 438 carbon centres; a full ab initio calculation for an isomer of C114H30 confirms that the success of the pseudo-pi method for small PAH carries over to these larger systems. The computed maps follow a generic overall pattern that can be understood with a natural extension of the orbital arguments to a 'band theory' of totally resonant PAH. All show pi current densities that combine a Clar-sextet structure of localised benzenoid diatropic ring currents (contributed by just four HOMO electrons) with a global perimeter diatropic ring current contributed by the remaining pi electrons. Both currents are explained in the ipsocentric model: the localised currents arise from excitations from the HOMO; the perimeter current from excitations from the rest of the HOMO-band. PMID:17328436

  2. The phn Island: A New Genomic Island Encoding Catabolism of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, William J.; Chen, Shicheng; Zhao, Jiangchao

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria are key in the biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which are widespread environmental pollutants. At least six genotypes of PAH degraders are distinguishable via phylogenies of the ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase (RHD) that initiates bacterial PAH metabolism. A given RHD genotype can be possessed by a variety of bacterial genera, suggesting horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is an important process for dissemination of PAH-degrading genes. But, mechanisms of HGT for most RHD genotypes are unknown. Here, we report in silico and functional analyses of the phenanthrene-degrading bacterium Delftia sp. Cs1-4, a representative of the phnAFK2 RHD group. The phnAFK2 genotype predominates PAH degrader communities in some soils and sediments, but, until now, their genomic biology has not been explored. In the present study, genes for the entire phenanthrene catabolic pathway were discovered on a novel ca. 232 kb genomic island (GEI), now termed the phn island. This GEI had characteristics of an integrative and conjugative element with a mobilization/stabilization system similar to that of SXT/R391-type GEI. But, it could not be grouped with any known GEI, and was the first member of a new GEI class. The island also carried genes predicted to encode: synthesis of quorum sensing signal molecules, fatty acid/polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis, a type IV secretory system, a PRTRC system, DNA mobilization functions and >50 hypothetical proteins. The 50% G + C content of the phn gene cluster differed significantly from the 66.7% G + C level of the island as a whole and the strain Cs1-4 chromosome, indicating a divergent phylogenetic origin for the phn genes. Collectively, these studies added new insights into the genetic elements affecting the PAH biodegradation capacity of microbial communities specifically, and the potential vehicles of HGT in general. PMID:22493593

  3. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in alcoholic drinks and the identification of their potential sources.

    PubMed

    García-Falcón, M S; Simal-Gándara, J

    2005-09-01

    Some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), particularly those with a high molecular mass, have been classified as probably being carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The significance of the determination of PAHs is reflected by the special attention the European Union is paying to regulating their maximum allowed levels in various types of foodstuffs. Like tobacco and smoked meats, alcoholic drinks can also contain these carcinogenic chemicals, as the latter have been detected in the charred insides of barrels, some ingredients such as caramel or the smoke released during the drying of germinated barley in beer or whisky. This paper determined the contents of seven PAHs in alcoholic beverages of variable alcoholic strength that had been aged in charred barrels for different times (months, years). The aim was to elucidate the dependence of the formation of seven PAHs on the type of charring (traditional or convective) used and the charring intensity (light, medium or heavy). Based on the results, the way the tree raw material is toasted strongly influences PAH levels in alcoholic drinks; thus, traditional charring produces increased amounts of PAHs from the wood relative to convective toasting. The sum of the analysed PAH concentrations in the aged alcoholic beverages studied ranged from zero for a white wine to 172 ng l(-1) for a 'brandy de jerez solera'. The carcinogenic indicator benzo[a]pyrene was found at concentrations below 10 ng l(-1). These PAH concentrations in alcoholic beverages are very low relative to those in smoked and char-broiled foodstuffs. Any health hazards, however, can be minimized by using convective toasting to manufacture the barrels where the drinks are to be aged. PMID:16192065

  4. Partitioning of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols, bisphenol A and phthalates in landfill leachates and stormwater.

    PubMed

    Kalmykova, Yuliya; Bjrklund, Karin; Strmvall, Ann-Margret; Blom, Lena

    2013-03-01

    Partitioning of organic pollutants is essential to their fate, mobility and removal from water and soil. To study the partitioning behavior of selected alkylphenols, bisphenol A, phthalates and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a method for separating the truly dissolved and colloidal phase of organic pollutants was developed, verified and applied to samples of landfill leachate and stormwater from urban areas and waste-sorting sites. Alkylphenols, bisphenol A, phthalates and PAHs were detected in all the untreated samples (total concentrations), most of the filtered samples and frequently in the colloid-bound phase. Concentrations of alkylphenols and PAHs in urban stormwater were one order of magnitude lower than in the landfill leachates and stormwater from waste-sorting sites. The difference between total, dissolved and colloid-bound concentrations in the water samples was not statistically significant for any phenols or phthalates, but for three of the PAHs; naphthalene (mostly dissolved), phenanthrene and fluoranthene (mostly particulate). These results indicate that in landfill leachates and stormwaters, organic pollutants are predominantly attached to colloids and/or truly dissolved in contrast to their expected strong sorption to particulate matter. Occurrence and concentrations of pollutants in dissolved and colloid-bound phases correlated negatively with the K(OW). However, even highly hydrophobic compounds were frequently detected in filtered samples, i.e. the dissolved phases, and it is suggested that the organic content in the colloids decreases the compounds' partition to particles. The results confirm that the K(OW) values of specific organic pollutants well describe the compounds partition-binding process to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) colloids. Our findings call for a re-assessment of the organic pollutants' mobility and associated risks. This knowledge can also serve as a base for selecting efficient treatment methods for stormwater and landfill leachates. PMID:23295068

  5. Excretion Profiles and Half-Lives of Ten Urinary Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Metabolites after Dietary Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Romanoff, Lovisa; Bartell, Scott; Pittman, Erin N.; Trinidad, Debra A.; McClean, Michael; Webster, Thomas F.; Sjdin, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be assessed by biomonitoring of their urinary mono-hydroxylated metabolites (OH-PAHs). Limited information exists on the human pharmacokinetics of OH-PAHs. This study aimed to investigate the excretion half-life of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-PYR), the most used biomarker for PAH exposure, and 9 other OH-PAHs following a dietary exposure in 9 non-smoking volunteers with no occupational exposure to PAHs. Each person avoided food with known high PAH-content during the study period, except for a high PAH-containing lunch (barbecued chicken) on the first day. Individual urine samples (n = 217) were collected from 15 hours before to 60 hours following the dietary exposure. Levels of all OH-PAHs in all subjects increased rapidly by 9141 fold after the exposure, followed by a decrease consistent with first order kinetics, and returned to background levels 2448 hours after the exposure. The average time to reach maximal concentration ranged from 3.1 h (1-naphthol) to 5.5 h (1-PYR). Creatinine-adjusted urine concentrations for each metabolite were analyzed using a non-linear mixed effects model including a term to estimate background exposure. The background-adjusted half-life estimate was 3.9 h for 1-PYR and ranged 2.56.1 h for the other 9 OH-PAHs, which in general, were shorter than those previously reported. The maximum concentrations after the barbecued chicken consumption were comparable to the levels found in reported occupational settings with known high PAH exposures. It is essential to consider the relatively short half-life, the timing of samples relative to exposures, and the effect of diet when conducting PAH exposure biomonitoring studies. PMID:22663094

  6. Increasing the bioaccessibility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediment using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Pee, Gim-Yang; Na, Seungmin; Wei, Zongsu; Weavers, Linda K

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the effect of sonication on the distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the bioaccessible and less bioaccessible fractions of three contaminated sediments (Little Scioto River, OH-LS; Gary, IN-GI; Eagle Harbor, WA-EH) was examined. After 60min sonication, the fractions of naphthalene, phenanthrene and pyrene remaining in the LS sediment were 0.760.18, 0.830.04 and 0.760.05, respectively, indicating ultrasonic degradation of PAHs in the sediment. In addition, there was a significant decrease in PAH concentration (i.e., up to 91.4%) in the less bioaccessible fractions for all three sediments with sonication. The bioaccessible fraction of phenanthrene and pyrene in LS and pyrene in EH increased by 12.9%, 48.3% and 27.8%, respectively, followed by a slight decrease due to degradation. The initial increase suggests that ultrasonic irradiation of sediment either transfers the PAHs from the less bioaccessible sites to the bioaccessible sites for treatment or transforms less bioaccessible sites into bioaccessible sites. A comparatively smaller reduction (i.e., 20.2%) in the less bioaccessible fraction in GI sediment is attributed to the larger fraction of black carbon in the organic carbon content of the sediment hindering the ability of ultrasound to switch the PAHs from the less to the more bioaccessible sites. Overall ultrasonic irradiation of contaminated sediments is a technique to enhance contaminant remediation by reducing the fraction of contaminants in less bioaccessible sites. PMID:25532768

  7. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Biota from the Brisbane River Estuary, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayal, S.; Connell, D. W.

    1995-05-01

    Six species of aquatic organisms from the Brisbane River estuarine system were sampled and their tissues analysed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These were the sea mullet, Mugil cephalus, bony bream, Nematolosa come, blue catfish, Arius graffei, mud crab, Scylla serrata, pelican, Pelecanus conspicillatus, and silver gull, Larus novaehollandiae. PAHs in the muscle (fish and birds) and soft (crab) tissue samples were isolated by first hydrolysing these samples and then solvent extraction followed by column chromatography. The compounds were then identified and quantified by gas chromatography and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The samples contained low levels of PAHs that ranged in molecular weight from 128 (naphthalene) to 252 (benzo[k]fluoranthene). The highest total PAH level of 195 ng g -1, wet weight, was recorded in mullet samples whereas the blue catfish samples yielded the lowest level of 43 ng g -1. Relative ratios of low molecular weight (≤3-rings) compounds to those with high molecular weights (≤4-rings) suggested a petroleum related origin for the PAHs detected in the organisms. Results indicated that significant biomagnification of PAHs in the estuarine ecosystem sampled is highly unlikely. Characteristics such as the trophic level and size/age were not significant factors in determining the corresponding tissue PAH levels in the fish and crab species. Tissue lipid content, however, was found to be a primary factor in determining the PAH concentrations in fish species. PAH levels recorded in the samples are comparable to those levels reported from similarly urbanized areas in other geographical locations.

  8. Sorption coefficients of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for two lake sediments: Influence of the bactericide sodium azide

    SciTech Connect

    Maagd, P.G.J. de; Sinnige, T.L.; Schrap, S.M.; Opperhuizen, A.; Sijm, D.T.H.M.

    1998-10-01

    Sorption coefficient s (K{sub p}s) of a series of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in two Dutch freshwater lake sediments to improve the insight into sorption in the aquatic environment. The influence of experimental factors, such as compound concentration, equilibration time, and influence of a bactericide on K{sub p}, was studied. No significant influence of compound concentration on K{sub p} was found. A contact time of 48 h was sufficient to reach equilibrium between PAHs in the sediment and water phase. In the absence of the bactericide, sodium azide, incomplete mass balances, and high K{sub p} of low molecular weight PAHs were found that were not caused by volatilization from, photodegradation in, or sorption by the test system. In the presence of sodium azide, however, high mass balances and lower K{sub p} were found for these compounds. This suggested that significant biodegradation of these compounds occurred in the water phase in the absence of sodium azide. The organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficients (K{sub oc}) of the PAHs in Lake Oostvaardersplassen were two to three times higher than those in Lake Ketelmeer sediment. Although K{sub oc} of the PAHs differed for the two sediments, a clear relationship was found between K{sub oc} and the octanol/water partition coefficient for both sediments and between the K{sub oc} of both sediments. In conclusion, the methodology to determine K{sub p} of biodegradable compounds should include the prevention of bacterial activity, e.g., by addition of sodium azide. Sorption of PAHs in the Dutch lake sediments is determined by the hydrophobicity of the PAH, the organic carbon content of the sediment, and one or more unspecified sediment-specific characteristics.

  9. Characterization of elemental and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compositions of urban air in Brisbane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, McKenzie C. H.; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Morawska, Lidia

    Characterization of the elemental and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) compositions of urban air was undertaken at three major sites in Brisbane, Australia. 17 elements and 16 US EPA priority PAHs were quantified at the sites. The most commonly detected elements in the TSP and PM 2.5 fractions were Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Si, Sn, Sr and Zn. Compared to the two other sites, PM 2.5 was found to contain higher concentrations of Zr, Mo, V, Al, Mn and Sr at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) site. In contrast, the Woolloongabba sampling site, which was highly influenced by the vehicular emission and local industrial activities, has higher concentrations of Co, Sn, Cu, Zn and Mg while ANZ site has significantly lower concentration levels of most elements than the other sites; possibly due to the shielding effect of the nearby bush and forest. NAP, PHE, ANT, FLT, PYR and CRY were the most widespread PAHs found in all sites. But only QUT and Woolloongabba bus platform sites had detectable levels of the most carcinogenic US EPA PAH, BAP. The multi-criteria decision making procedures, Preference Ranking Organisation Method for Enrichment Evaluation (PROMETHEE) and Geometrical Analysis for Interactive Aid (GAIA) were used to rank the air samples and to identify the sources of the pollutants. Thus Woolloongabba bus platform was ranked as the most polluted site on the basis of the elemental and PAH compositions of its air samples while Woolloongabba bus platform and QUT sites were ranked as the worst polluted sites in terms of PAHs and PM 2.5 elemental contents, respectively.

  10. Sources and fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Antarctic and Southern Ocean atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrerizo, Ana; Galbn-Malagn, Cristbal; Del Vento, Sabino; Dachs, Jordi

    2014-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a geochemically relevant family of semivolatile compounds originating from fossil fuels, biomass burning, and their incomplete combustion, as well as biogenic sources. Even though PAHs are ubiquitous in the environment, there are no previous studies of their occurrence in the Southern Ocean and Antarctic atmosphere. Here we show the gas and aerosol phase PAHs concentrations obtained from three sampling cruises in the Southern Ocean (Weddell, Bellingshausen, and South Scotia Seas), and two sampling campaigns at Livingston Island (Southern Shetlands). This study shows an important variability of the atmospheric concentrations with higher concentrations in the South Scotia and northern Weddell Seas than in the Bellingshausen Sea. The assessment of the gas-particle partitioning of PAHs suggests that aerosol elemental carbon contribution is modest due to its low concentrations. Over the ocean, the atmospheric concentrations do not show a temperature dependence, which is consistent with an important role of long-range atmospheric transport of PAHs. Conversely, over land at Livingston Island, the PAHs gas phase concentrations increase when the temperature increases, consistently with the presence of local diffusive sources. The use of fugacity samplers allowed the determination of the air-soil and air-snow fugacity ratios of PAHs showing that there is a significant volatilization of lighter molecular weight PAHs from soil and snow during the austral summer. The higher volatilization, observed in correspondence of sites where the organic matter content in soil is higher, suggests that there may be a biogenic source of some PAHs. The volatilization of PAHs from soil and snow is sufficient to support the atmospheric occurrence of PAHs over land but may have a modest regional influence on the atmospheric occurrence of PAHs over the Southern Ocean.

  11. Excretion profiles and half-lives of ten urinary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites after dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Romanoff, Lovisa; Bartell, Scott; Pittman, Erin N; Trinidad, Debra A; McClean, Michael; Webster, Thomas F; Sjödin, Andreas

    2012-07-16

    Human exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be assessed by biomonitoring of their urinary monohydroxylated metabolites (OH-PAHs). Limited information exists on the human pharmacokinetics of OH-PAHs. This study aimed to investigate the excretion half-life of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-PYR), the most used biomarker for PAH exposure, and 9 other OH-PAHs following a dietary exposure in 9 nonsmoking volunteers with no occupational exposure to PAHs. Each person avoided food with known high PAH-content during the study period, except for a high PAH-containing lunch (barbecued chicken) on the first day. Individual urine samples (n = 217) were collected from 15 h before to 60 h following the dietary exposure. Levels of all OH-PAHs in all subjects increased rapidly by 9-141-fold after the exposure, followed by a decrease consistent with first-order kinetics, and returned to background levels 24-48 h after the exposure. The average time to reach maximal concentration ranged from 3.1 h (1-naphthol) to 5.5 h (1-PYR). Creatinine-adjusted urine concentrations for each metabolite were analyzed using a nonlinear mixed effects model including a term to estimate background exposure. The background-adjusted half-life estimate was 3.9 h for 1-PYR and ranged 2.5-6.1 h for the other 9 OH-PAHs, which in general, were shorter than those previously reported. The maximum concentrations after barbecued chicken consumption were comparable to the levels found in reported occupational settings with known high PAH exposures. It is essential to consider the relatively short half-life, the timing of samples relative to exposures, and the effect of diet when conducting PAH exposure biomonitoring studies. PMID:22663094

  12. The 4S polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-binding protein: immunohistochemical localization in mice.

    PubMed

    Forkert, P G; Barton, H A; Costantini, M G; Marletta, M A

    1990-10-01

    The 4S polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-binding protein (PBP) is a cytoplasmic protein that binds PAHs with specificity and high affinity. We have used antisera for the PBP and unlabeled peroxidase anti-peroxidase immunohistochemistry to demonstrate its possible localization in cell types known to have xenobiotic metabolizing capabilities. Cellular sites of the PBP in liver, lung and kidney of C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice were probed. The PBP was visualized in hepatocytes throughout the liver lobule and was not preferentially located in either centrilobular or periportal areas. However, cellular heterogeneity with respect to PBP content was clearly evident in the hepatocyte population. The positive reactivity correlated with substantial levels of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) binding in liver cytosol. In the lung, the PBP was found in the bronchiolar epithelium and the alveolar septa, and was localized in ciliated and non-ciliated Clara and alveolar type II cells as well as in alveolar macrophages. In the kidney, the glomeruli and epithelia of proximal and distal convoluted tubules and collecting ducts were labeled. Staining for the PBP was greatest in the apical region of the pyramid and was localized in the epithelial lining of the collecting ducts. Relatively lower levels of the PBP were detected in the lung and kidney than in the liver. Staining was localized in the cytoplasmic compartment of cells in all tissues examined. Similar immunoreactivities were exhibited in the tissues of both C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice. Treatment with beta-naphthoflavone (beta NF) altered neither the intensity nor pattern of immunostaining. Furthermore, treatment with beta NF or isosafrole has no effect on the Kd and Bmax of B[a]P binding to liver cytosolic PBP. The results of our experiments demonstrate localization of the PBP to sites of active physiological response to PAH exposure. PMID:2208597

  13. Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of polychlorinated biphenyls, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heteroatom-containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and n-alkanes from polyurethane foam sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, S.B.; Krieger, M.S.; Miller, D.J.

    1989-04-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with CO/sub 2/ is a rapid alternative to liquid solvent extraction for the recovery of organic air pollutants collected on polyurethane foam (PUF) sorbent plugs. Quantitative recovery (> 95%) of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranging from naphthalene to perylene, several heteroatom-containing PAHs, and n-alkanes ranging from C/sub 12/ to C/sub 24/ was achieved with 10-20 min extractions. Class-selective extraction of n-alkanes versus PAHs resulted from the sequential extraction of the same PUF plug at 80 and 380 atm. Directly coupled SFE with gas chromatography (SFE-GC) allowed a PUF sample to be analyzed in < 1 hr including sample collection, extraction, analyte concentration, and GC separation. The application of SFE and coupled SFE-GC for the extraction and analysis of organic air pollutants that have been collected on PUF is demonstrated for cigarette smoke, diesel exhaust, and roofing tar volatiles.

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban air particulates and their relationship to emission sources in the Pan-Japan Sea countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Ning; Hattori, Tetsuyuki; Taga, Rina; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Yang, Xiaoyang; Tamura, Kenji; Kakimoto, Hitoshi; Mishukov, Vasiliy F.; Toriba, Akira; Kizu, Ryoichi; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    Airborne particulates were collected in seven cities in the Pan-Japan Sea countries, Shenyang (China), Vladivostok (Russia), Seoul (South Korea), Kitakyushu, Kanazawa, Tokyo and Sapporo (Japan), in winter and summer from 1997 to 2002. In addition, particulates from domestic coal-burning heaters and diesel engine automobiles were collected in Shenyang and Kanazawa, respectively. Nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and four nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) in the extracts from the particulates were analysed by HPLC with fluorescence and chemiluminescence detections, respectively. The PAHs were fluoranthene, pyrene (Pyr), benz[ a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[ b]fluoranthene, benzo[ k]fluoranthene, benzo[ a]pyrene, benzo[ ghi]perylene and indeno[1,2,3- cd]pyrene, and NPAHs were 1,3-, 1,6-, 1,8-dinitropyrenes, and 1-nitropyrene (1-NP). Mean atmospheric concentrations of PAHs in Shenyang and Vladivostok were substantially higher than those in Seoul, Tokyo, Sapporo, Kitakyushu and Kanazawa. However, the mean atmospheric concentrations of NPAHs were at the same levels in all cities except Kitakyushu. The expected seasonal variations (greater PAH and NPAH concentrations in winter than in summer) were observed in all cities. In order to study the major contributors of atmospheric PAHs and NPAHs, both cluster analysis and factor analysis were used and three large clusters were identified. Furthermore, the concentration ratios of 1-NP to Pyr were significantly smaller in Shenyang, Vladivostok and Kitakyushu and the values were close to those observed in particulates from coal stove exhaust. By contrast, in Seoul, Kanazawa, Tokyo and Sapporo the [1-NP]/[Pyr] ratio reached values similar to those of particulates released from diesel-engine automobiles. The [1-NP]/[Pyr] concentration ratio seemed to be a suitable indicator of the contribution made by diesel-engine vehicles and coal combustion to urban air particulates.

  15. Study of fuel cetane number and aromatic-content effects on regulated emissions from a heavy-duty diesel engine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ullman, T.L.; Mason, R.L.; Montalvo, D.A.

    1990-09-01

    As heavy-duty diesel engine manufacturers strive to meet stringent emission requirements, the relationship between regulated emissions and fuel properties has become increasingly important. Emissions of particulate and NOx are of special interest because control of these pollutants represents a major problem for the diesel engine. Earlier study VE-1 study results indicated that fuel aromatic content was correlated with cetane number. To determine the effects of cetane number, cetane improver, and fuel aromatics on exhaust emissions (NOx, particulate, HC, and CO), a follow-on study was developed by the VE-1 Group and is reported herein as Phase II of the VE-1 project. The study determined cetane number is the fuel property affecting hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions. Both cetane number and aromatic content affect NOx emissions and cetane number and possibly aromatic content affect particulate emissions.

  16. Evaluation of environmental levels of aromatic hydrocarbons in gasoline service stations by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Periago, J F; Zambudio, A; Prado, C

    1997-08-22

    The volume of gasoline sold in refuelling operations and the ambient temperature, can increase significantly the environmental levels of aromatic hydrocarbon vapours and subsequently, the occupational risk of gasoline service station attendants, specially in the case of benzene. We have evaluated the occupational exposure to aromatic hydrocarbons by means of personal-breathing-zone samples of gasoline vapours in a service station attendant population. This evaluation was carried out using diffusive samplers, in two periods at quite different temperatures (March and July). A significant relationship between the volume of gasoline sold during the shift and the ambient concentration of benzene, toluene, and xylenes was found for each worker sampled. Furthermore a significant difference was found between the time-weighted average concentration of aromatic compounds measured in March, with ambient temperatures of 14-15 degrees C and July, with temperatures of 28-30 degrees C. In addition, 20% of the population sampled in the last period were exposed to a time-weighted average concentration of benzene above the proposed Threshold Limit Value of 960 micrograms/m(3) of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). PMID:9299740

  17. Spatial and temporal distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments from the Songhua River, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, D.; Guo, Z.; Liu, X.; Hua, X.; Liang, D.

    2013-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a class of typical persistent organic pollutants, widely exist in the environment and are potentially harmful to human health. They can enter the waters through atmospheric deposition, soil leaching, shipping, sewage discharges and surface runoff. In recent years, many studies on the distributions of PAHs in major rivers, lakes and bays around the world have been carried out. In this study, 9 surface sediments (0-10cm) were sampled from the Songhua River in Jilin and Heilongjiang provinces. The contents of 16 PAHs in the US Environmental Protection Agency list of priority pollutants were determined and their spatial distributions were discussed. Sediment cores (50cm length) in three oxbow lakes in this area were also collected and cut into 2 cm thickness sub-samples. PAHs concentrations in these samples were determined and the cores were dated using a 210Pb geochronology technique. Finally, the sedimentary history of PAHs in the Songhua River since the 1920s was revealed. Results indicated that total concentration of the 16 PAHs analyzed in the surface sediments was 187-2079 ng/g (dry weight), and the mean was 1029 ng/g. Sediments collected from near urban areas (Jilin and Harbin City) contained higher PAHs content. Compared with the domestic and international rivers, the PAHs content in this river sediments is at a medium level. The PAHs profiles showed that 2-3 ring PAHs, especially naphthalene, were dominant in all of the samples. Sedimentary flux can reflect the accumulating history of pollutants better. The PAHs fluxes were low and varied little from the 1920s to 1970s, but higher PAH fluxes were found since the 1980s in each core (Fig. 1). The PAHs sedimentary flux near Harbin City (Shuangcheng) was found changed remarkably. We inferred that the PAHs might be influenced by hydrological conditions, population mobility and economic activity in this area. PAHs sedimentary record in the Songhua River revealed that the economic development in large cities in this area lagged behind the environmental protection. Acknowledgments: This work was supported by Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education (No. 20100061110041), and the Major Science and Technology Program for Water Pollution Control and Treatment, China (No. 2009ZX0707-001-03). Fig. 1 PAHs fluxes vs. year in sediment cores from Songyuan, Shuangcheng (Harbin) and Mulan

  18. Reaction Dynamics in Astrochemistry: Low-Temperature Pathways to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Ralf I.; Parker, Dorian S. N.; Mebel, Alexander M.

    2015-04-01

    Bimolecular reactions of phenyl-type radicals with the C4 and C5 hydrocarbons vinylacetylene and (methyl-substituted) 1,3-butadiene have been found to synthesize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with naphthalene and 1,4-dihydronaphthalene cores in exoergic and entrance barrierless reactions under single-collision conditions. The reaction mechanism involves the initial formation of a van der Waals complex and addition of a phenyl-type radical to the C1 position of a vinyl-type group through a submerged barrier. Investigations suggest that in the hydrocarbon reactant, the vinyl-type group must be in conjugation with a -C≡CH or -HC=CH2 group to form a resonantly stabilized free radical intermediate, which eventually isomerizes to a cyclic intermediate followed by hydrogen loss and aromatization (PAH formation). The vinylacetylene-mediated formation of PAHs might be expanded to more complex PAHs, such as anthracene and phenanthrene, in cold molecular clouds via barrierless reactions involving phenyl-type radicals, such as naphthyl, which cannot be accounted for by the classical hydrogen abstraction-acetylene addition mechanism.

  19. Reaction dynamics in astrochemistry: low-temperature pathways to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Ralf I; Parker, Dorian S N; Mebel, Alexander M

    2015-04-01

    Bimolecular reactions of phenyl-type radicals with the C4 and C5 hydrocarbons vinylacetylene and (methyl-substituted) 1,3-butadiene have been found to synthesize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with naphthalene and 1,4-dihydronaphthalene cores in exoergic and entrance barrierless reactions under single-collision conditions. The reaction mechanism involves the initial formation of a van der Waals complex and addition of a phenyl-type radical to the C1 position of a vinyl-type group through a submerged barrier. Investigations suggest that in the hydrocarbon reactant, the vinyl-type group must be in conjugation with a -C≡CH or -HC=CH2 group to form a resonantly stabilized free radical intermediate, which eventually isomerizes to a cyclic intermediate followed by hydrogen loss and aromatization (PAH formation). The vinylacetylene-mediated formation of PAHs might be expanded to more complex PAHs, such as anthracene and phenanthrene, in cold molecular clouds via barrierless reactions involving phenyl-type radicals, such as naphthyl, which cannot be accounted for by the classical hydrogen abstraction-acetylene addition mechanism. PMID:25422849

  20. Docosahexaenoic acid regulates gene expression in HUVEC cells treated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Gdula-Argasi?ska, Joanna; Czepiel, Jacek; Toto?-?ura?ska, Justyna; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Perucki, William; Wo?kow, Pawe?

    2015-07-16

    The molecular mechanism of inflammation and carcinogenesis induced by exposure of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is not clearly understood. Our study was undertaken due to the strong pro-carcinogenic potential and reactivity of PAH-metabolites, as well as the susceptibility of polyunsaturated fatty acids to oxidation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pro- or anti-inflammatory impact of n-3 docosahexaenoic acid on human primary umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. We analysed the influence of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and/or PAHs supplementation on the fatty acid profile of cell membranes, on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and glutathione S transferase Mu1 (GSTM1) protein expression as well as on the prostaglandin synthase 2 (PTGS2), AHR, GSTM1, PLA2G4A, and cytochrome P450 CYP1A1 gene expression. We observed that COX-2 and AHR protein expression was increased while GSTM1 expression was decreased in cells exposed to DHA and PAHs. Docosahexaenoic acid down-regulated CYP1A1 and up-regulated the AHR and PTGS2 genes. Our findings suggested that DHA contributes significantly to alleviate the harmful effects caused by PAHs in endothelial cells. Moreover, these results suggest that a diet rich in n-3 fatty acids is helpful to reduce the harmful effects of PAHs exposure on human living in heavily polluted areas. PMID:25956473