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Sample records for array boundary layer

  1. Optimal Control of Shock Wave Turbulent Boundary Layer Interactions Using Micro-Array Actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Tinapple, Jon; Surber, Lewis

    2006-01-01

    The intent of this study on micro-array flow control is to demonstrate the viability and economy of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to determine optimal designs of micro-array actuation for controlling the shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions within supersonic inlets and compare these concepts to conventional bleed performance. The term micro-array refers to micro-actuator arrays which have heights of 25 to 40 percent of the undisturbed supersonic boundary layer thickness. This study covers optimal control of shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions using standard micro-vane, tapered micro-vane, and standard micro-ramp arrays at a free stream Mach number of 2.0. The effectiveness of the three micro-array devices was tested using a shock pressure rise induced by the 10 shock generator, which was sufficiently strong as to separate the turbulent supersonic boundary layer. The overall design purpose of the micro-arrays was to alter the properties of the supersonic boundary layer by introducing a cascade of counter-rotating micro-vortices in the near wall region. In this manner, the impact of the shock wave boundary layer (SWBL) interaction on the main flow field was minimized without boundary bleed.

  2. Experimental Study of Boundary Layer Flow Control Using an Array of Ramp-Shaped Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirt, Stefanie M.; Zaman, Khairul B.M.Q.; Bencic, Tomothy J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain a database on the flowfield past an array of vortex generators (VGs) in a turbulent boundary layer. All testing was carried out in a low speed wind tunnel with a flow velocity of 29 ft/sec, giving a Reynolds number of 17,500 based on the width of the VG. The flowfield generated by an array of five ramp-shaped vortex generators was examined with hot wire anemometry and smoke flow visualization. The magnitude and extent of the velocity increase near the wall, the penetration of the velocity deficit into the core flow, and the peak streamwise vorticity are examined. Influence of various parameters on the effectiveness of the array is considered on the basis of the ability to pull high momentum fluid into the near wall region.

  3. Boundary Layer Flow Control by an Array of Ramp-Shaped Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Hirt, S. M.; Bencic, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    Flow field survey results for the effect of ramp-shaped vortex generators (VG) on a turbulent boundary layer are presented. The experiments are carried out in a low-speed wind tunnel and the data are acquired primarily by hot-wire anemometry. Distributions of mean velocity and turbulent stresses as well as streamwise vorticity, on cross-sectional planes at various downstream locations, are obtained. These detailed flow field properties, including the boundary layer characteristics, are documented with the primary objective of aiding possible computational investigations. The results show that VG orientation with apex upstream, that produces a downwash directly behind it, yields a stronger pair of streamwise vortices. This is in contrast to the case with apex downstream that produces a pair of vortices of opposite sense. Thus, an array of VG s with the former orientation, usually considered for film-cooling application, may also be superior for mixing enhancement and boundary layer separation control. The data files can be found on a supplemental CD.

  4. Boundary Layer Flow Control by an Array of Ramp-Shaped Vortex Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Hirt, S. M.; Bencic, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    Flow field survey results for the effect of ramp-shaped vortex generators (VG) on a turbulent boundary layer are presented. The experiments are carried out in a low-speed wind tunnel and the data are acquired primarily by hot-wire anemometry. Distributions of mean velocity and turbulent stresses as well as streamwise vorticity, on cross-sectional planes at various downstream locations, are obtained. These detailed flow field properties, including the boundary layer characteristics, are documented with the primary objective of aiding possible computational investigations. The results show that VG orientation with apex upstream, that produces a downwash directly behind it, yields a stronger pair of streamwise vortices. This is in contrast to the case with apex downstream that produces a pair of vortices of opposite sense. Thus, an array of VG s with the former orientation, usually considered for film-cooling application, may also be superior for mixing enhancement and boundary layer separation control. (See CASI ID 20120009374 for Supplemental CD-ROM.)

  5. Solution of the Fokker-Planck equation in a wind turbine array boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melius, Matthew S.; Tutkun, Murat; Cal, Raúl Bayoán

    2014-07-01

    Hot-wire velocity signals from a model wind turbine array boundary layer flow wind tunnel experiment are analyzed. In confirming Markovian properties, a description of the evolution of the probability density function of velocity increments via the Fokker-Planck equation is attained. Solution of the Fokker-Planck equation is possible due to the direct computation of the drift and diffusion coefficients from the experimental measurement data which were acquired within the turbine canopy. A good agreement is observed in the probability density functions between the experimental data and numerical solutions resulting from the Fokker-Planck equation, especially in the far-wake region. The results serve as a tool for improved estimation of wind velocity within the array and provide evidence that the evolution of such a complex and turbulent flow is also governed by a Fokker-Planck equation at certain scales.

  6. The Structure of the Wind Turbine Array/ Atmospheric Boundary Layer Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Luciano; Newman, Jensen

    2013-11-01

    A structure based approach is taken to describe the interface between a scaled wind turbine array in a wind tunnel and the approximate atmospheric boundary layer above it. The principle interest is to identify the various types of structures which exist here and determine 1) the domain of their existence and 2) their role in the process of extracting energy from the mean flow above the wind turbine array. These goals are achieved by computing the proper orthogonal decomposition of particle image velocimetry data collected along the centerline of the scaled wind turbine array and projecting the instantaneous field onto the most energetic modes. The analysis is carried out behind the first four turbines in the array and reveals two distinct regions based on structural differences: The near wake which is dominated by small scale turbulence and the far wake which is dominated by larger scales. It is further shown that the majority of the energy extraction is done by the larger scales in the far wake. Further, it is shown that after the first turbine, the small scale turbulence in the near wake is often less energetic than existing larger scale turbulence in the inflow.

  7. Micromachined microphone array on a chip for turbulent boundary layer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Joshua Steven

    A surface micromachined microphone array on a single chip has been successfully designed, fabricated, characterized, and tested for aeroacoustic purposes. The microphone was designed to have venting through the diaphragm, 64 elements (8x8) on the chip, and used a capacitive transduction scheme. The microphone was fabricated using the MEMSCAP PolyMUMPs process (a foundry polysilicon surface micromachining process) along with facilities at Tufts Micro and Nano Fabrication Facility (TMNF) where a Parylene-C passivation layer deposition and release of the microstructures were performed. The devices are packaged with low profile interconnects, presenting a maximum of 100 mum of surface topology. The design of an individual microphone was completed through the use of a lumped element model (LEM) to determine the theoretical performance of the microphone. Off-chip electronics were created to allow the microphone array outputs to be redirected to one of two channels, allowing dynamic reconfiguration of the effective transducer shape in software and provide 80 dB off isolation. The characterization was completed through the use of laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV), acoustic plane wave tube and free-field calibration, and electrical noise floor testing in a Faraday cage. Measured microphone sensitivity is 0.15 mV/Pa for an individual microphone and 8.7 mV/Pa for the entire array, in close agreement with model predictions. The microphones and electronics operate over the 200--40 000 Hz band. The dynamic range extends from 60 dB SPL in a 1 Hz band to greater than 150 dB SPL. Element variability was +/-0.05 mV/Pa in sensitivity with an array yield of 95%. Wind tunnel testing at flow rates of up to 205.8 m/s indicates that the devices continue to operate in flow without damage, and can be successfully reconfigured on the fly. Care has been taken to systematically remove contaminating signals (acoustic, vibration, and noise floor) from the wind tunnel data to determine actual turbulent pressure fluctuations beneath the turbulent boundary layer to an uncertainty level of 1 dB. Analysis of measured boundary layer pressure spectra at six flow rates from 34.3 m/s to 205.8 m/s indicate single point wall spectral measurements in close agreement to the empirical models of Goody, Chase-Howe, and Efimtsov above Mach 0.4. The MEMS data more closely resembles the magnitude of the Efimtsov model at higher frequencies (25% higher above 3 kHz for the Mach 0.6 case); however, the shape of the spectral model is closer to the model of Goody (50% lower for the Mach 0.6 case for all frequencies). The Chase-Howe model does fall directly on the MEMS data starting at 6 kHz, but has a sharper slope and does not resemble the data at below 6 kHz.

  8. Large eddy simulation of a large wind-turbine array in a conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2015-06-01

    Under conventionally neutral conditions, the boundary layer is frequently capped by an inversion layer, which counteracts vertical entrainment of kinetic energy. Very large wind farms are known to depend on vertical entrainment to transport energy from above the farm towards the turbines. In this study, large eddy simulations of an infinite wind-turbine array in a conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer are performed. By carefully selecting the initial potential-temperature profile, the influence of the height and the strength of a capping inversion on the power output of a wind farm is investigated. Results indicate that both the height and the strength have a significant effect on the boundary layer flow, and that the height of the neutral boundary layer is effectively controlled by the capping inversion. In addition, it is shown that the vertical entrainment rate decreases for increasing inversion strength or height. In our infinite wind-farm simulations, varying the inversion characteristics leads to differences in power extraction on the order of 13% ± 0.2% (for increasing the strength from 2.5 to 10 K), and 31% ± 0.4% (for increasing the height from 500 to 1500 m). A detailed analysis of the mean kinetic-energy equation is included, showing that the variation in power extraction originates from the work done by the driving pressure gradient related to the boundary layer height and the geostrophic angle, while entrainment of kinetic energy from the free atmosphere does not play a significant role. Also, the effect of inversion strength on power extraction is energetically not related to different amounts of energy entrained, but explained by a difference in boundary layer growth, leading to higher boundary layers for lower inversion strengths. We further present a simple analytical model that allows to obtain wind-farm power output and driving power for the fully developed regime as function of Rossby number and boundary layer height.

  9. Streamwise development of the wind turbine boundary layer over a model wind turbine array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Jensen; Lebron, Jose; Meneveau, Charles; Castillo, Luciano

    2013-08-01

    The streamwise development of turbulence statistics and mean kinetic energy in a model wind farm consisting of 3 × 5 wind turbines is studied experimentally in a wind tunnel. The analysis uses planar Particle Image Velocimetry data obtained at the centerline plane of the wind farm, covering the inflow as well as four planes in between five downstream wind turbines. The data analysis is organized by dividing these measurement planes into three regions: the above-rotor, rotor-swept, and below-rotor regions. For each field, flow development is quantified using a properly defined relative difference norm based on an integration over each of the regions. Using this norm, it is found that the mean streamwise velocity approaches a fully developed state most rapidly, whereas the flow development is more gradual for the second-order statistics. The vertical entrainment flux of the mean kinetic energy by the Reynolds shear stress, ?U??u'v'?, is observed to develop at a rate similar to that of the Reynolds shear stress rather than the mean streamwise velocity component. Its development is slowest in the layer nearest to the ground. Analysis of various terms in the mean kinetic energy equation shows that the wind turbine boundary layer has not yet reached fully developed conditions by the fifth turbine but that it is approaching such conditions. By comparing the vertical entrainment flux with the horizontal flux due to the mean flow, it is found that the former increases, whereas the latter decreases, as function of downstream distance, but that the former is already an important contributor in the developing region.

  10. MEMS Pressure Sensor Array for Aeroacoustic Analysis of the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    E-print Network

    White, Robert D.

    using Parylene-C. An acoustic lumped element model was used to model an individual micro- phone Modulus of elasticity of diaphragm 1 Poisson's ratio of diaphragm t2 Thickness of Parylene-C layer 2 Density of Parylene-C layer E2 Modulus of elasticity of Parylene-C layer Research Assistant, Department

  11. MEMS Pressure Sensor Array for Aeroacoustic Analysis of the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    E-print Network

    White, Robert D.

    with an additional fabrication step using Parylene-C. An acoustic lumped element model was used to model Engineering 1 of 15 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics #12;t2 Thickness of Parylene-C layer 2 Density of Parylene-C layer E2 Modulus of elasticity of Parylene-C layer 2 Poisson's ratio of Parylene

  12. The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennekes, Hendrik

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some important parameters of the boundary layer and effects of turbulence on the circulation and energy dissipation of the atmosphere. Indicates that boundary-layer research plays an important role in long-term forecasting and the study of air-pollution meteorology. (CC)

  13. Boundary layer simulator improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, Sarat C.; Schmitz, Craig P.; Nouri, Joseph A.

    1989-01-01

    Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure (BLIMPJ) has been identified by the propulsion community as the rigorous boundary layer program in connection with the existing JANNAF reference programs. The improvements made to BLIMPJ and described herein have potential applications in the design of the future Orbit Transfer Vehicle engines. The turbulence model is validated to include the effects of wall roughness and a way is devised to treat multiple smooth-rough surfaces. A prediction of relaminarization regions is examined as is the combined effects of wall cooling and surface roughness on relaminarization. A turbulence model to represent the effects of constant condensed phase loading is given. A procedure is described for thrust decrement calculation in thick boundary layers by coupling the T-D Kinetics Program and BLIMPJ and a way is provided for thrust loss optimization. Potential experimental studies in rocket nozzles are identified along with the required instrumentation to provide accurate measurements in support of the presented new analytical models.

  14. Boundary layer simulator improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, S. C.; Schmitz, C.; Frost, C.; Engel, C. D.; Fuller, C. E.; Bender, R. L.; Pond, J.

    1984-01-01

    High chamber pressure expander cycles proposed for orbit transfer vehicles depend primarily on the heat energy transmitted from the combustion products through the thrust wall chamber wall. The heat transfer to the nozzle wall is affected by such variables as wall roughness, relamarization, and the presence of particles in the flow. Motor performance loss for these nozzles with thick boundary layers is inaccurate using the existing procedure coded BLIMPJ. Modifications and innovations to the code are examined. Updated routines are listed.

  15. Boundary layer transition studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-01-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated holes in the impervious test plate that used to establish the Blasius base flow. The suction is perturbed harmonically and data are averaged on the basis of the phase of the disturbance, for conditions corresponding to strong suction and without suction. The technique was enhanced by using up to nine multiple probes to reduce the experimental run-time. In both cases, 3D contour surfaces in the vicinity of the hole show highly 3D TS waves which fan out in the spanwise direction forming bow-shaped waves downstream. The case without suction has proved useful for evaluating calculation methods. With suction, the perturbations on the centerline are much stronger and decay less rapidly, while the TS waves in the far field are similar to the case without suction. Downstream, the contour surfaces of the TS waves develop spanwise irregularities which eventually form into clumps. The spanwise clumping is evidence of a secondary instability that could be associated with suction vortices. Designers of porous surfaces use Goldsmith's Criterion to minimize cross-stream interactions. It is shown that partial TS wave cancellation is possible, depending on the hole spacing, disturbance frequency and free-stream velocity. New high-performance Constant Temperature Hot-Wire Anemometers were designed and built, based on a linear system theory analysis that can be extended to arbitrary order. The motivation was to achieve the highest possible frequency reponse while ensuring overall system stability. The performance is equal to or superior to commercially available instruments at about 10% of the cost. Details, such as fabrication drawings and a parts list, have been published to enable the instrument to be construced by others.

  16. The structure and development of streamwise vortex arrays embedded in a turbulent boundary layer. Ph.D. Thesis - Case Western Reserve Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendt, Bruce J.; Greber, Isaac; Hingst, Warren R.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of the structure and development of streamwise vortices embedded in a turbulent boundary layer was conducted. The vortices were generated by a single spanwise row of rectangular vortex generator blades. A single embedded vortex was examined, as well as arrays of embedded counter rotating vortices produced by equally spaced vortex generators. Measurements of the secondary velocity field in the crossplane provided the basis for characterization of vortex structure. Vortex structure was characterized by four descriptors. The center of each vortex core was located at the spanwise and normal position of peak streamwise vorticity. Vortex concentration was characterized by the magnitude of the peak streamwise vorticity, and the vortex strength by its circulation. Measurements of the secondary velocity field were conducted at two crossplane locations to examine the streamwise development of the vortex arrays. Large initial spacings of the vortex generators produced pairs of strong vortices which tended to move away from the wall region while smaller spacings produced tight arrays of weak vortices close to the wall. A model of vortex interaction and development is constructed using the experimental results. The model is based on the structure of the Oseen Vortex. Vortex trajectories are modelled by including the convective effects of neighbors.

  17. Boundary-Layer & health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigliola, V.

    2010-09-01

    It has long been known that specific atmospheric processes, such as weather and longer-term climatic fluctuations, affect human health. The biometeorological literature refers to this relationship as meteorotropism, defined as a change in an organism that is correlated with a change in atmospheric conditions. Plenty of (patho)physiological functions are affected by those conditions - like the respiratory diseases - and currently it is difficult to put any limits for pathologies developed in reply. Nowadays the importance of atmospheric boundary layer and health is increasingly recognised. A number of epidemiologic studies have reported associations between ambient concentrations of air pollution, specifically particulate pollution, and adverse health effects, even at the relatively low concentrations of pollution found. Since 1995 there have been over twenty-one studies from four continents that have explicitly examined the association between ambient air pollutant mixes and daily mortality. Statistically significant and positive associations have been reported in data from various locations around the world, all with varying air pollutant concentrations, weather conditions, population characteristics and public health policies. Particular role has been given to atmospheric boundary layer processes, the impact of which for specific patient-cohort is, however, not well understood till now. Assessing and monitoring air quality are thus fundamental to improve Europe's welfare. One of current projects run by the "European Medical Association" - PASODOBLE will develop and demonstrate user-driven downstream information services for the regional and local air quality sectors by combining space-based and in-situ data with models in 4 thematic service lines: - Health community support for hospitals, pharmacies, doctors and people at risk - Public information for regions, cities, tourist industry and sporting event organizers - Compliance monitoring support on particulate matter for regional environmental agencies - Local forecast model evaluation support for local authorities and city bodies. Giving value to the above listed aspects, PASODOBLE objectives are following: - Evolution of existing and development of new sustainable air quality services for Europe on regional and local scales - Development and testing of a generic service framework for coordinated input data acquisition and customizable user-friendly access to services - Utilization of multiple cycles of delivery, use and assessment versus requirements and market planning in cooperation with users - Promotion and harmonisation of best practise tools for air quality communities. Further European multidisciplinary projects should be created to better understand the most prevalent atmospheric factors to be impacted in predictive, preventive and personalised medicine considered as the central concept for future medicine.

  18. Boundary-layer moisture regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahrt, L.

    1991-01-01

    Boundary-layer moisture fluctuations are estimated by analyzing HAPEX and FIFE data collected on 52 aircraft flight legs. Moisture fluctuations were given considerable attention in the HAPEX flights, which were 120 km long, and flew 150 m over one area of homogeneous terrain. The repetitions permit statistical consideration of motion characteristics on horizontal scales. Two prototypical boundary layer regimes are discovered: the entrainment-drying boundary layer, and the moistening boundary layer. The latter demonstrates positive moisture skewness close to the surface related to high surface evaporation. The former is characterized by boundary-layer instability, weak surface evaporation, and drier air aloft, leading to unexpected negative moisture skewness. It is noted that 10 km moisture variations with horizontal gradients are often found in narrow zones of horizontal convergence, called mesoscale moisture fronts. A negative moisture to temperature correlation, due to surface energy budget inhomogeneity, is shown to incur large mesoscale variations of relative humidity.

  19. Novel parameterisations in the boundary layer

    E-print Network

    Plant, Robert

    in the boundary layer ­ p.3/1 #12;(Carter 2011) Novel parameterisations in the boundary layer ­ p.4/1 #12;Cascade/1 #12;Cascade: rainfall pdf (Holloway 2011) Novel parameterisations in the boundary layer ­ p.6/1 #12 with the boundary layer: perspectives from ensemble forecasting Novel parameterisations in the boundary layer ­ p.1

  20. Vortex boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, P.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with a strong artificially generated longitudinal vortex which may or may not actually enter the boundary layer is studied. The vortices are generated by a delta wing suspended ahead of the test plate, so that the configuration is approximately that of a close coupled carnard with zero main-wing sweep and an invisible body. All necessary configuration and parametric checks are completed, and data acquisition and analysis on the first configuration chosen for detailed study, in which the vortex starts to merge with the boundary layer a short distance downstream of the leading edge of the test plate, are nearly complete.

  1. Boundary Layer Control on Airfoils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhab, George; Eastlake, Charles

    1991-01-01

    A phenomena, boundary layer control (BLC), produced when visualizing the fluidlike flow of air is described. The use of BLC in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, race cars, and boats is discussed. (KR)

  2. Characterization of evening atmospheric boundary layer transitions from a sonic anemometer and an array of microbarometers during the BLLAST field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre, M.; Yagüe, C.; Román-Cascón, C.; Maqueda, G.; Viana, S.

    2012-04-01

    This work focuses on the characterization of the transition which begins in the atmospheric boundary layer before sunset. Data from the BLLAST field campaign are used to analyse different aspects of the atmospheric late afternoon and evening transition in the lower atmosphere. This international campaign took place from 14th June to 8th July 2011 at the Atmospheric Research Center (CRA, for the French name) in Lannemezan, France. This location is quite close to the Pyrenees mountains, so that the influence of nearby complex terrain can be explored. In the present work we will focus on data from a triangular array of high resolution microbarometers (2 Hz) and a sonic anemometer (20 Hz). Turbulent and stability parameters, as well as multiscale methods (Wavelet and MultiResolution Flux Decomposition) are used to study the behaviour of the various transitions observed during the campaign, to analyse the different scales present along the transition and to explore the presence of wave-like disturbances and their interaction to turbulence.

  3. Physics of magnetospheric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1995-01-01

    This final report was concerned with the ideas that: (1) magnetospheric boundary layers link disparate regions of the magnetosphere-solar wind system together; and (2) global behavior of the magnetosphere can be understood only by understanding its internal linking mechanisms and those with the solar wind. The research project involved simultaneous research on the global-, meso-, and micro-scale physics of the magnetosphere and its boundary layers, which included the bow shock, the magnetosheath, the plasma sheet boundary layer, and the ionosphere. Analytic, numerical, and simulation projects were performed on these subjects, as well as comparisons of theoretical results with observational data. Other related activity included in the research included: (1) prediction of geomagnetic activity; (2) global MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) simulations; (3) Alfven resonance heating; and (4) Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) effect. In the appendixes are list of personnel involved, list of papers published; and reprints or photocopies of papers produced for this report.

  4. from Classical Boundary Layer to Interacting Boundary Layer

    E-print Network

    Lagrée, Pierre-Yves

    Pierre-Yves Institut Jean le Rond d'Alembert CNRS UPMC Paris 06 Numerical simulation and fluid mechanics simple set of equations: Integral equations (1D) · cross comparisons in some cases of NS/ RNSP/ Integral /Viscous Inviscid Interactions Le Balleur 78, Carter 79, Cebeci 70s Veldman 81 - Boundary layer Asymptotics

  5. Nonparallel stability of boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, Ali H.

    1987-01-01

    The asymptotic formulations of the nonparallel linear stability of incompressible growing boundary layers are critically reviewed. These formulations can be divided into two approaches. The first approach combines a numerical method with either the method of multiple scales, or the method of averaging, of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) approximation; all these methods yield the same result. The second approach combined a multi-structure theory with the method of multiple scales. The first approach yields results that are in excellent agreement with all available experimental data, including the growth rates as well as the neutral stability curve. The derivation of the linear stability of the incompressible growing boundary layers is explained.

  6. Boundary Layer Transition on X-43A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Wurster, Kathryn; Bittner, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The successful Mach 7 and 10 flights of the first fully integrated scramjet propulsion systems by the Hyper-X (X-43A) program have provided the means with which to verify the original design methodologies and assumptions. As part of Hyper-X s propulsion-airframe integration, the forebody was designed to include a spanwise array of vortex generators to promote boundary layer transition ahead of the engine. Turbulence at the inlet is thought to provide the most reliable engine design and allows direct scaling of flight results to groundbased data. Pre-flight estimations of boundary layer transition, for both Mach 7 and 10 flight conditions, suggested that forebody boundary layer trips were required to ensure fully turbulent conditions upstream of the inlet. This paper presents the results of an analysis of the thermocouple measurements used to infer the dynamics of the transition process during the trajectories for both flights, on both the lower surface (to assess trip performance) and the upper surface (to assess natural transition). The approach used in the analysis of the thermocouple data is outlined, along with a discussion of the calculated local flow properties that correspond to the transition events as identified in the flight data. The present analysis has confirmed that the boundary layer trips performed as expected for both flights, providing turbulent flow ahead of the inlet during critical portions of the trajectory, while the upper surface was laminar as predicted by the pre-flight analysis.

  7. METEOROLOGY 130 Boundary Layer Meteorology

    E-print Network

    Clements, Craig

    on sounding analyses with data. Other specialized topics will be covered including similarity theory, time) Measuring the Boundary Layer · Balloons · Radars · Sodars · Towers (micrometeorology) · Measuring Turbulence · Sonic anemometry · Radiometers 6) Sounding Profile Analysis · Skew-t diagrams · Other profiles 7) Basic

  8. Physics of magnetospheric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    The central ideas of this grant are that the magnetospheric boundary layers link disparate regions of the magnetosphere together, and the global behavior of the magnetosphere can be understood only by understanding the linking mechanisms. Accordingly the present grant includes simultaneous research on the global, meso-, and micro-scale physics of the magnetosphere and its boundary layers. These boundary layers include the bow shock, magnetosheath, the plasma sheet boundary layer, and the ionosphere. Analytic, numerical and simulation projects have been performed on these subjects, as well as comparison of theoretical results with observational data. Very good progress has been made, with four papers published or in press and two additional papers submitted for publication during the six month period 1 June - 30 November 1993. At least two projects are currently being written up. In addition, members of the group have given papers at scientific meetings. The further structure of this report is as follows: section two contains brief accounts of research completed during the last six months, while section three describes the research projects intended for the grant's final period.

  9. THE MARTIAN ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER

    E-print Network

    Spiga, Aymeric

    the atmosphere and the surface. On Mars, this represents the lowest 10 km of the atmosphere during the daytime and variable region of the atmosphere at virtually all locations on Mars, with addi- tional variabilityTHE MARTIAN ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER A. Petrosyan,1 B. Galperin,2 S. E. Larsen,3 S. R. Lewis,4 A

  10. Transition in hypersonic boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanhong; Zhu, Yiding; Chen, Xi; Yuan, Huijing; Wu, Jiezhi; Chen, Shiyi; Lee, Cunbiao; Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    Transition and turbulence production in a hypersonic boundary layer is investigated in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using Rayleigh-scattering visualization, fast-response pressure measurements, and particle image velocimetry. It is found that the second-mode instability is a key modulator of the transition process. Although the second-mode is primarily an acoustic wave, it causes the formation of high-frequency vortical waves, which triggers a fast transition to turbulence.

  11. Jupiter's deep magnetotail boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaou, G.; McComas, D. J.; Bagenal, F.; Elliott, H. A.; Ebert, R. W.

    2015-06-01

    In 2007 the New Horizons (NH) spacecraft flew by Jupiter for a gravity assist en route to Pluto. After closest approach on day of year (DOY) 58, 2007, NH followed a tailward trajectory that provided a unique opportunity to explore the deep jovian magnetotail and the surrounding magnetosheath. After DOY 132, 16 magnetopause crossings were observed between 1654 and 2429 Jupiter radii (Rj) along the dusk flank tailward of the planet. In some cases the crossings were identified as rapid transitions from the magnetotail to the magnetosheath and vice versa. In other cases a boundary layer was observed just inside the magnetopause. Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) is an instrument on board NH that obtained spectra of low energy ions during the flyby period. We use a forward model including the SWAP instrument response to derive plasma parameters (density, temperature and velocity) which best reproduce the observations. We also vary the plasma parameters in our model in order to fit the observations more accurately on occasions where the measurements exhibit significant variability. We compare the properties of the plasma in the boundary layer with those of the magnetosheath plasma derived in our earlier work. We attempt to estimate the magnetic field in the boundary layer assuming pressure balance between it and the magnetosheath. Finally, we investigate several possible scenarios to assess if magnetopause movement and structure could cause the variations seen in the data.

  12. Nonequilibrium chemistry boundary layer integral matrix procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, H.; Buckingham, A. C.; Morse, H. L.

    1973-01-01

    The development of an analytic procedure for the calculation of nonequilibrium boundary layer flows over surfaces of arbitrary catalycities is described. An existing equilibrium boundary layer integral matrix code was extended to include nonequilibrium chemistry while retaining all of the general boundary condition features built into the original code. For particular application to the pitch-plane of shuttle type vehicles, an approximate procedure was developed to estimate the nonequilibrium and nonisentropic state at the edge of the boundary layer.

  13. Boundary Layer Heights from CALIOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, R.; Ackerman, S. A.; Holz, R.; Roubert, L.

    2012-12-01

    This work is focused on the development of a planetary boundary layer (PBL) height retrieval algorithm for CALIOP and validation studies. Our current approach uses a wavelet covariance transform analysis technique to find the top of the boundary layer. We use the methodology similar to that found in Davis et. al. 2000, ours has been developed to work with the lower SNR data provided by CALIOP, and is intended to work autonomously. Concurrently developed with the CALIOP algorithm we will show results from a PBL height retrieval algorithm from profiles of potential temperature, these are derived from Aircraft Meteorological DAta Relay (AMDAR) observations. Results from 5 years of collocated AMDAR - CALIOP retrievals near O'Hare airport demonstrate good agreement between the CALIOP - AMDAR retrievals. In addition, because we are able to make daily retrievals from the AMDAR measurements, we are able to observe the seasonal and annual variation in the PBL height at airports that have sufficient instrumented-aircraft traffic. Also, a comparison has been done between the CALIOP retrievals and the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) PBL height retrievals acquired during the GoMACCS experiment. Results of this comparison, like the AMDAR comparison are favorable. Our current work also involves the analysis and verification of the CALIOP PBL height retrieval from the 6 year CALIOP global data set. Results from this analysis will also be presented.

  14. Microgravity Effects on Plant Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary; Monje, Oscar

    2005-01-01

    The goal of these series of experiment was to determine the effects of microgravity conditions on the developmental boundary layers in roots and leaves and to determine the effects of air flow on boundary layer development. It is hypothesized that microgravity induces larger boundary layers around plant organs because of the absence of buoyancy-driven convection. These larger boundary layers may affect normal metabolic function because they may reduce the fluxes of heat and metabolically active gases (e.g., oxygen, water vapor, and carbon dioxide. These experiments are to test whether there is a change in boundary layer associated with microgravity, quantify the change if it exists, and determine influence of air velocity on boundary layer thickness under different gravity conditions.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic boundary layers in the earth core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starchenko, S. V.

    1993-02-01

    The structure of the self-consistent MHD boundary layers surrounding the liquid inner core of the earth is determined. It is shown that this structure is governed by the latitude and the radial component of the large-scale magnetic field at the boundary. From an analysis of the boundary magnetic field it was found that the core-crust boundary layer is significantly thickened in the narrow near-equator zone. Estimates are made of the scale and the characteristic values of the magnetic fields outside and inside the boundary layers.

  16. Boundary layers of the earth's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetospheric boundary layer and the plasma-sheet boundary layer are the primary boundary layers of the earth's outer magnetosphere. Recent satellite observations indicate that they provide for more than 50 percent of the plasma and energy transport in the outer magnetosphere although they constitute less than 5 percent by volume. Relative to the energy density in the source regions, plasma in the magnetospheric boundary layer is predominantly deenergized whereas plasma in the plasma-sheet boundary layer has been accelerated. The reconnection hypothesis continues to provide a useful framework for comparing data sampled in the highly dynamic magnetospheric environment. Observations of 'flux transfer events' and other detailed features near the boundaries have been recently interpreted in terms of nonsteady-state reconnection. Alternative hypotheses are also being investigated. More work needs to be done, both in theory and observation, to determine whether reconnection actually occurs in the magnetosphere and, if so, whether it is important for overall magnetospheric dynamics.

  17. Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) Spring 2015

    E-print Network

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    week) ATS 101 Instructor: Richard H. Johnson (ATS 305; Phone: 491-8321; E-mail: johnson@atmos.colostate.edu) Course notes: Atmospheric Boundary Layer Notes (2015) by Richard H. Johnson (available online at http Boundary Layer · Hinze (1959) Turbulence · Koschmieder (1993) B´enard Cells and Taylor Vortices · Kundu

  18. Cyclone separator having boundary layer turbulence control

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Coimbatore R. (Mt. Sinai, NY); Milau, Julius S. (Port Jefferson, NY)

    1985-01-01

    A cyclone separator including boundary layer turbulence control that is operable to prevent undue build-up of particulate material at selected critical areas on the separator walls, by selectively varying the fluid pressure at those areas to maintain the momentum of the vortex, thereby preventing particulate material from inducing turbulence in the boundary layer of the vortical fluid flow through the separator.

  19. LDV measurements of turbulent baroclinic boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwald, P.; Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-07-01

    Described here are shock tube experiments of nonsteady, turbulent boundary layers with large density variations. A dense-gas layer was created by injecting Freon through the porous floor of the shock tube. As the shock front propagated along the layer, vorticity was created at the air-Freon interface by an inviscid, baroclinic mechanism. Shadow-schlieren photography was used to visualize the turbulent mixing in this baroclinic boundary layer. Laser-Doppler-Velocimetry (LDV) was used to measure the streamwise velocity histories at 14 heights. After transition, the boundary layer profiles may be approximated by a power-law function u {approximately} u{sup {alpha}} where {alpha} {approx_equal} 3/8. This value lies between the clean flat plate value ({alpha} = 1/7) and the dusty boundary layer value ({alpha} {approx_equal} 0.7), and is controlled by the gas density near the wall.

  20. Propulsion via buoyancy driven boundary layer

    E-print Network

    Doyle, Brian Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Heating a sloped surface generates a well-studied boundary layer flow, but the resulting surface forces have never been studied in propulsion applications. We built a triangular wedge to test this effect by mounting a ...

  1. Interactive boundary layers in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousteix, Jean; Mauss, Jacques

    2007-09-01

    An asymptotic analysis of the structure of the flow at high Reynolds number around a streamlined body is presented. The boundary layer is turbulent. This question is studied with the successive complementary expansion method, SCEM. The starting point is to look for a uniformly valid approximation (UVA) of the velocity field, including the boundary layer and the external flow. Thanks to the use of generalized expansions, SCEM leads to the theory of interactive boundary layer, IBL. For many years, IBL model has been used successfully to calculate aerodynamic flows. Here, the IBL model is fully justified with rational mathematical arguments. The construction of a UVA of the velocity profile in the boundary layer is also studied. To cite this article: J. Cousteix, J. Mauss, C. R. Mecanique 335 (2007).

  2. W.ORKING KNOWLENGE BOUNDARY LAYER

    E-print Network

    Ha, Taekjip

    between the ball and the surrounding air. Indeed, the art of pitching is largely the art of manipulating) is faster than on the left side (above at bot- tom), On the faster side, the boundary layer separates

  3. Boundary-layer control for drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, William D.

    1988-01-01

    Although the number of possible applications of boundary-layer control is large, a discussion is given only of those that have received the most attention recently at NASA Langley Research Center to improve airfoil drag characteristics. This research concerns stabilizing the laminar boundary layer through geometric shaping (natural laminar flow, NLF) and active control involving the removal of a portion of the laminar boundary layer (laminar flow control, LFC) either through discrete slots or a perforated surface. At low Reynolds numbers, a combination of shaping and forced transition has been used to achieve the desired run of laminar flow and control of laminar separation. In the design of both natural laminar flow and laminar flow control airfoils and wings, boundary layer stability codes play an important role. A discussion of some recent stability calculations using both incompressible and compressible codes is given.

  4. Boundary layer flow visualization for flight testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obara, Clifford J.

    1986-01-01

    Flow visualization is used extensively in flight testing to determine aerodynamic characteristics such as surface flow direction and boundary layer state. Several visualization techniques are available to the aerodynamicist. Two of the most popular are oil flows and sublimating chemicals. Oil is used to visualize boundary layer transition, shock wave location, regions of separated flow, and surface flow direction. Boundary layer transition can also be visualized with sublimating chemicals. A summary of these two techniques is discussed, and the use of sublimating chemicals is examined in some detail. The different modes of boundary layer transition are characterized by different patterns in the sublimating chemical coating. The discussion includes interpretation of these chemical patterns and the temperature and velocity operating limitations of the chemical substances. Information for selection of appropriate chemicals for a desired set of flight conditions is provided.

  5. Boundary-layer stability and airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Jeffrey K.

    1986-01-01

    Several different natural laminar flow (NLF) airfoils have been analyzed for stability of the laminar boundary layer using linear stability codes. The NLF airfoils analyzed come from three different design conditions: incompressible; compressible with no sweep; and compressible with sweep. Some of the design problems are discussed, concentrating on those problems associated with keeping the boundary layer laminar. Also, there is a discussion on how a linear stability analysis was effectively used to improve the design for some of the airfoils.

  6. Solute boundary layer on a rotating crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povinelli, Michelle L.; Korpela, Seppo A.; Chait, Arnon

    1994-11-01

    A perturbation analysis has been carried out for the solutal boundary layer next to a rotating crystal. Our aim is to extend the classical results of Burton, Prim and Slicher [1] in order to obtain higher order terms in asymptotic expansions for the concentration field and boundary-layer thickness. Expressions for the effective segregation coefficient are directly obtained from the concentration solution in the two limits that correspond to weak and strong rotation.

  7. Excitation of Crossflow Instabilities in a Swept Wing Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Choudhari, Meelan; Li, Fei; Streett, Craig L.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2010-01-01

    The problem of crossflow receptivity is considered in the context of a canonical 3D boundary layer (viz., the swept Hiemenz boundary layer) and a swept airfoil used recently in the SWIFT flight experiment performed at Texas A&M University. First, Hiemenz flow is used to analyze localized receptivity due to a spanwise periodic array of small amplitude roughness elements, with the goal of quantifying the effects of array size and location. Excitation of crossflow modes via nonlocalized but deterministic distribution of surface nonuniformity is also considered and contrasted with roughness induced acoustic excitation of Tollmien-Schlichting waves. Finally, roughness measurements on the SWIFT model are used to model the effects of random, spatially distributed roughness of sufficiently small amplitude with the eventual goal of enabling predictions of initial crossflow disturbance amplitudes as functions of surface roughness parameters.

  8. Hypersonic boundary layer transition and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, A. A.; Poplavskaya, T.; Bountin, D. A.

    In the present paper an overview of the recent studies of a hypersonic laminar boundary layer and shock layer receptivity and stability are presented. Main attention is paid to investigations of nonlinear wave interaction. New active and passive methods of hypersonic stability control are described too.

  9. Lear jet boundary layer/shear layer laser propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, K.

    1980-01-01

    Optical degradations of aircraft turbulent boundary layers with shear layers generated by aerodynamic fences are analyzed. A collimated 2.5 cm diameter helium-neon laser (0.63 microns) traversed the approximate 5 cm thick natural aircraft boundary layer in double pass via a reflective airfoil. In addition, several flights examined shear layer-induced optical degradation. Flight altitudes ranged from 1.5 to 12 km, while Mach numbers were varied from 0.3 to 0.8. Average line spread function (LSF) and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) data were obtained by averaging a large number of tilt-removed curves. Fourier transforming the resulting average MTF yields an LSF, thus affording a direct comparison of the two optical measurements. Agreement was good for the aerodynamic fence arrangement, but only fair in the case of a turbulent boundary layer. Values of phase variance inferred from the LSF instrument for a single pass through the random flow and corrected for a large aperture ranged from 0.08 to 0.11 waves (lambda = .63 microns) for the boundary layer. Corresponding values for the fence vary from 0.08 to 0.16 waves. Extrapolation of these values to 10.6 microns suggests negligible degradation for a CO2 laser transmitted through a 5 cm thick, subsonic turbulent boundary layer.

  10. High Speed Boundary Layer Stability and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, A. A.

    2011-09-01

    In the present paper an overview of the recent studies of a hypersonic laminar boundary layer and shock layer receptivity and stability are presented. Main attention is paid to investigations of nonlinear wave interaction. It is shown that nonlinear interactions of the second mode play significant role in laminar-turbulent transition and intermode interaction is different for solid and porous walls. The paper deals with two different techniques of transition control. The first one, namely, ultrasonically absorptive coating (UAC) is a passive technique which uses porous materials on the wall to suppress growing acoustic disturbances in the boundary layer. The second one is based on wave interference and intermode interaction and uses blowing-suction method to suppress acoustic in the boundary layer.

  11. Dependence of Boundary Layer Mixing On Lateral Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straub, D.

    Ocean circulation models often show strong mixing in association with lateral bound- ary layers. Such mixing is generally considered to be artifactual rather than real. Fur- thermore, the severity of the problem is boundary condition dependent. For example, an inconsistency between geostrophy and insulating boundary conditions on tempera- ture and salinity cause many modelers to opt for the no slip, rather than slip boundary condtion on the tangential component of momentum. As modellers increasingly move into the eddy revealing regime, biharmonic, rather than harmonic dissipative operators are likely to become more common. Biharmonic operators, however, require specifi- cation of additional boundary conditions. For example, there are several `natural ex- tensions' to each of the slip and no slip conditions. Here, these various possiblities are considered in the context of a simple model. Particular attention is payed to how mixing (and the associated overturning cell) is affected by the choice of boundary condition.

  12. Electrodynamic boundary conditions for planar arrays of thin magnetic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenkov, Ivan; Tyberkevych, Vasyl; Nikitov, Sergei; Slavin, Andrei

    2015-08-01

    Approximate electrodynamic boundary conditions are derived for an array of dipolarly coupled magnetic elements. It is assumed that the elements' thickness is small compared to the wavelength of an electromagnetic wave in a free space. The boundary conditions relate electric and magnetic fields existing at the top and bottom sides of the array through the averaged uniform dynamic magnetization of the array. This dynamic magnetization is determined by the collective dynamic eigen-excitations (spin wave modes) of the array and is found using the external magnetic susceptibility tensor. The problem of oblique scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave on the array is considered to illustrate the use of the derived boundary conditions.

  13. Modelling of unsteady transitional boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addison, J. S.; Hodson, H. P.

    1991-06-01

    In turbomachinery, a considerable proportion of the blade surface area can be covered by transitional boundary layers. This means that accurate prediction of the profile loss and boundary layer behavior in general depends on the accurate modeling of the transitional boundary layers, especially at low Reynolds numbers. This paper presents a model for determining the intermittency resulting from the unsteady transition caused by the passage of wakes over a blade surface. The model is founded on work by Emmons (1951) who showed that the intermittency could be calculated from a knowledge of the behavior of randomly formed turbulent spots. The model is used to calculate the development of the boundary layer on the rotor of a low Reynolds number single-stage turbine. The predictions are compared with experimental results obtained using surface-mounted hot-film anemometers and hot-wire traverses of the rotor mid-span boundary layer at two different rotor-stator gaps. The validity and limitations of the model are discussed.

  14. Boundary Layer Cloudiness Parameterizations Using ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Albrecht

    2004-09-15

    This study used DOE ARM data and facilities to: (1) study macroscopic properties of continental stratus clouds at SGP and the factors controlling these properties, (2) develop a scientific basis for understanding the processes responsible for the formation of boundary layer clouds using ARM observations in conjunction with simple parametric models and LES, and (3) evaluate cumulus cloud characteristics retrieved from the MMCR operating at TWP-Nauru. In addition we have used high resolution 94 GHz observations of boundary layer clouds and precipitation to: (1) develop techniques for using high temporal resolution Doppler velocities to study large-eddy circulations and turbulence in boundary layer clouds and estimate the limitations of using current and past MMCR data for boundary layer cloud studies, (2) evaluate the capability and limitations of the current MMCR data for estimating reflectivity, vertical velocities, and spectral under low- signal-to-noise conditions associated with weak no n-precipitating clouds, (3) develop possible sampling modes for the new MMCR processors to allow for adequate sampling of boundary layer clouds, and (4) retrieve updraft and downdraft structures under precipitating conditions.

  15. The kinematics of turbulent boundary layer structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Stephen Kern

    1991-01-01

    The long history of research into the internal structure of turbulent boundary layers has not provided a unified picture of the physics responsible for turbulence production and dissipation. The goals of the present research are to: (1) define the current state of boundary layer structure knowledge; and (2) utilize direct numerical simulation results to help close the unresolved issues identified in part A and to unify the fragmented knowledge of various coherent motions into a consistent kinematic model of boundary layer structure. The results of the current study show that all classes of coherent motion in the low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer may be related to vortical structures, but that no single form of vortex is representative of the wide variety of vortical structures observed. In particular, ejection and sweep motions, as well as entrainment from the free-streem are shown to have strong spatial and temporal relationships with vortical structures. Disturbances of vortex size, location, and intensity show that quasi-streamwise vortices dominate the buffer region, while transverse vortices and vortical arches dominate the wake region. Both types of vortical structure are common in the log region. The interrelationships between the various structures and the population distributions of vortices are combined into a conceptual kinematic model for the boundary layer. Aspects of vortical structure dynamics are also postulated, based on time-sequence animations of the numerically simulated flow.

  16. Mechanics of Boundary Layer Transition. Part 5: Boundary Layer Stability theory in incompressible and compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    The fundamentals of stability theory, its chief results, and the physical mechanisms at work are presented. The stability theory of the laminar boundary determines whether a small disturbance introduced into the boundary layer will amplify or damp. If the disturbance damps, the boundary layer remains laminar. If the disturbance amplifies, and by a sufficient amount, then transition to turbulence eventually takes place. The stability theory establishes those states of the boundary layer which are most likely to lead to transition, identifys those frequencies which are the most dangerous, and indicates how the external parameters can best be changed to avoid transition.

  17. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers, 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Equations and closure methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers are discussed. Flow phenomena peculiar to calculation of these boundary layers were considered, along with calculations of three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers. Procedures for ascertaining nonsimilar two and three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers were appended, including finite difference, finite element, and mass-weighted residual methods.

  18. Hypersonic Boundary Layer Instability Over a Corner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Zhao, Hong-Wu; McClinton, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A boundary-layer transition study over a compression corner was conducted under a hypersonic flow condition. Due to the discontinuities in boundary layer flow, the full Navier-Stokes equations were solved to simulate the development of disturbance in the boundary layer. A linear stability analysis and PSE method were used to get the initial disturbance for parallel and non-parallel flow respectively. A 2-D code was developed to solve the full Navier-stokes by using WENO(weighted essentially non-oscillating) scheme. The given numerical results show the evolution of the linear disturbance for the most amplified disturbance in supersonic and hypersonic flow over a compression ramp. The nonlinear computations also determined the minimal amplitudes necessary to cause transition at a designed location.

  19. Numerical simulation of supersonic boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Y.; Adams, N. A.; Sandham, N. D.; Kleiser, L.

    1994-01-01

    The present contribution reviews some of the recent progress obtained at our group in the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of compressible boundary layer transition. Elements of the different simulation approaches and numerical techniques employed are surveyed. Temporal and spatial simulations, as well as comparisons with results obtained from Parabolized Stability Equations, are discussed. DNS results are given for flat plate boundary layers in the Mach number range 1.6 to 4.5. A temporal DNS at Mach 4.5 has been continued through breakdown all the way to the turbulent stage. In addition results obtained with a recently developed extended temporal DNS approach are presented, which takes into account some nonparallel effects of a growing boundary layer. Results from this approach are quite close to those of spatial DNS, while preserving the efficiency of the temporal DNS.

  20. Asymptotic modelling for separating boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauss, Jacques

    The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to explain bow the triple deck structure in a boundary layer can be formed. In the context of a laminar steady flow of an incompressible fluid over a flat plate, a theory is developed to explain the separation over significant wall disturbances. In particular, we show that the triple deck structure is the first perturbation that can both displace the classical boundary layer and cause separation of the flow. Above this exist a serie of perturbations, smaller but "stronger", that cause a separation of the boundary layer without displacing it. This serie is limited by the smallest perturbation compatible with the hypothesis of the theory, thus leading to a theory in double deck.

  1. Hair receptor sensitivity to changes in laminar boundary layer shape.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, B T

    2010-03-01

    Biologists have shown that bat wings contain distributed arrays of flow-sensitive hair receptors. The hair receptors are hypothesized to feedback information on airflows over the bat wing for enhanced stability or maneuverability during flight. Here, we study the geometric specialization of hair-like structures for the detection of changes in boundary layer velocity profiles (shapes). A quasi-steady model that relates the flow velocity profile incident on the longitudinal axis of a hair to the resultant moment and shear force at the hair base is developed. The hair length relative to the boundary layer momentum thickness that maximizes the resultant moment and shear-force sensitivity to changes in boundary layer shape is determined. The sensitivity of the resultant moment and shear force is shown to be highly dependent on hair length. Hairs that linearly taper to a point are shown to provide greater output sensitivity than hairs of uniform cross-section. On an order of magnitude basis, the computed optimal hair lengths are in agreement with the range of hair receptor lengths measured on individual bat species. These results support the hypothesis that bats use hair receptors for detecting changes in boundary layer shape and provide geometric guidelines for artificial hair sensor design and application. PMID:20157224

  2. On the Effects of Surface Roughness on Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Edwards, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Surface roughness can influence laminar-turbulent transition in many different ways. This paper outlines selected analyses performed at the NASA Langley Research Center, ranging in speed from subsonic to hypersonic Mach numbers and highlighting the beneficial as well as adverse roles of the surface roughness in technological applications. The first theme pertains to boundary-layer tripping on the forebody of a hypersonic airbreathing configuration via a spanwise periodic array of trip elements, with the goal of understanding the physical mechanisms underlying roughness-induced transition in a high-speed boundary layer. The effect of an isolated, finite amplitude roughness element on a supersonic boundary layer is considered next. The other set of flow configurations examined herein corresponds to roughness based laminar flow control in subsonic and supersonic swept wing boundary layers. A common theme to all of the above configurations is the need to apply higher fidelity, physics based techniques to develop reliable predictions of roughness effects on laminar-turbulent transition.

  3. Separation behavior of boundary layers on three-dimensional wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, H. W.

    1981-01-01

    An inverse boundary layer procedure for calculating separated, turbulent boundary layers at infinitely long, crabbing wing was developed. The procedure was developed for calculating three dimensional, incompressible turbulent boundary layers was expanded to adiabatic, compressible flows. Example calculations with transsonic wings were made including viscose effects. In this case an approximated calculation method described for areas of separated, turbulent boundary layers, permitting calculation of this displacement thickness. The laminar boundary layer development was calculated with inclined ellipsoids.

  4. Provenance of the K/T boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, A. R.; Boynton, W. V.

    1988-01-01

    An array of chemical, physical and isotopic evidence indicates that an impact into oceanic crust terminated the Cretaceous Period. Approximately 1500 cu km of debris, dispersed by the impact fireball, fell out globally in marine and nonmarine environments producing a 2 to 4 mm thick layer (fireball layer). In North American locales, the fireball layer overlies a 15 to 25 mm thick layer of similar but distinct composition. This 15 to 25 mm layer (ejecta layer) may represent approximately 1000 cu km of lower energy ejecta from a nearby impact site. Isotopic and chemical evidence supports a mantle provenance for the bulk of the layers. The extraordinary REE pattern of the boundary clays was modelled as a mixture of oceanic crust, mantle, and approximately 10 percent continental material. The results are presented. If the siderophiles of the ejecta layer were derived solely from the mantle, a test may be available to see if the siderophile element anomaly of the fireball layer had an extraterrestrial origin. Radiogenic Os-187 is depleted in the mantle relative to an undifferentiated chondritic source. Os-187/Os-186 ratios of 1.049 and 1.108 were calculated for the ejecta and fireball layers, respectively.

  5. Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Prediction Tool Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; King, Rudolph A.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Wood, William A.; McGinley, Catherine B.; Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.

    2010-01-01

    Updates to an analytic tool developed for Shuttle support to predict the onset of boundary layer transition resulting from thermal protection system damage or repair are presented. The boundary layer transition tool is part of a suite of tools that analyze the local aerothermodynamic environment to enable informed disposition of damage for making recommendations to fly as is or to repair. Using mission specific trajectory information and details of each d agmea site or repair, the expected time (and thus Mach number) of transition onset is predicted to help define proper environments for use in subsequent thermal and stress analysis of the thermal protection system and structure. The boundary layer transition criteria utilized within the tool were updated based on new local boundary layer properties obtained from high fidelity computational solutions. Also, new ground-based measurements were obtained to allow for a wider parametric variation with both protuberances and cavities and then the resulting correlations were calibrated against updated flight data. The end result is to provide correlations that allow increased confidence with the resulting transition predictions. Recently, a new approach was adopted to remove conservatism in terms of sustained turbulence along the wing leading edge. Finally, some of the newer flight data are also discussed in terms of how these results reflect back on the updated correlations.

  6. Boundary layer control device for duct silencers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Fredric H. (inventor); Soderman, Paul T. (inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A boundary layer control device includes a porous cover plate, an acoustic absorber disposed under the porous cover plate, and a porous flow resistive membrane interposed between the porous cover plate and the acoustic absorber. The porous flow resistive membrane has a flow resistance low enough to permit sound to enter the acoustic absorber and high enough to damp unsteady flow oscillations.

  7. Thick diffusion limit boundary layer test problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T. S.; Warsa, J. S.; Chang, J. H.; Adams, M. L.

    2013-07-01

    We develop two simple test problems that quantify the behavior of computational transport solutions in the presence of boundary layers that are not resolved by the spatial grid. In particular we study the quantitative effects of 'contamination' terms that, according to previous asymptotic analyses, may have a detrimental effect on the solutions obtained by both discontinuous finite element (DFEM) and characteristic-method (CM) spatial discretizations, at least for boundary layers caused by azimuthally asymmetric incident intensities. Few numerical results have illustrated the effects of this contamination, and none have quantified it to our knowledge. Our test problems use leading-order analytic solutions that should be equal to zero in the problem interior, which means the observed interior solution is the error introduced by the contamination terms. Results from DFEM solutions demonstrate that the contamination terms can cause error propagation into the problem interior for both orthogonal and non-orthogonal grids, and that this error is much worse for non-orthogonal grids. This behavior is consistent with the predictions of previous analyses. We conclude that these boundary layer test problems and their variants are useful tools for the study of errors that are introduced by unresolved boundary layers in diffusive transport problems. (authors)

  8. A Vertically Resolved Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    Increase of the vertical resolution of the GLAS Fourth Order General Circulation Model (GCM) near the Earth's surface and installation of a new package of parameterization schemes for subgrid-scale physical processes were sought so that the GLAS Model GCM will predict the resolved vertical structure of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) for all grid points.

  9. Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Virginia

    2014-02-13

    The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, it follows diurnal and seasonal cycles and may vary by hundreds of meters over a 24-hour period. The cap the PBL imposes on low-level aerosol transport makes aerosol concentration an effective proxy for PBL height: the top of the PBL is marked by a rapid transition from polluted, well-mixed boundary-layer air to the cleaner, more stratified free troposphere. Micropulse lidar (MPL) can provide much higher temporal resolution than radiosonde and better vertical resolution than infrared spectrometer (AERI), but PBL heights from all three instruments at the ARM SGP site are compared to one another for validation. If there is agreement among them, the higher-resolution remote sensing-derived PBL heights can accurately fill in the gaps left by the low frequency of radiosonde launches, and thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes.

  10. LAMINAR BOUNDARY-LAYER THEORY: A 20TH CENTURY PARADOX?

    E-print Network

    Cowley, Stephen J.

    of Cambridge, Silver Street, Cambridge CB3 9EW, UK. S.J.Cowley@damtp.cam.ac.uk Keywords: Boundary layer, shear number, Re, is large. In a more general sense we will use `boundary-layer theory' (BLT) to refer to any or not there are boundaries). 20th Century. Prandtl (1904) published his seminal paper on the foundations of boundary-layer

  11. Artificial thickening of transonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otten, L. J.; Van Kuren, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    A wind-tunnel experiment was performed to examine the effect of turbulence enhancers on the growth of a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer. The free-stream Mach number was varied from 0.6 to 0.9 with unit Reynolds numbers of 6.56 million/m and 13.12 million/m. Several configurations of high-drag objects were mounted near the leading edge of a long flat plate to introduce momentum losses. Measurements of both mean and time-variable flow parameters were made at downstream locations to quantify the influence of the turbulence enhancers. A configuration consisting of two rows of alternately spaced, vertical, 0.317-cm-diameter cylinders of 16 and 12 diameters length produced 1/9to 1/7-power velocity profiles. Unsteady total-temperature and static-pressure profiles were found to be similar to natural turbulent boundary-layer profiles. The techniques presented can be useful whenever thick turbulent boundary layers are required, but the natural growth of the layer is limited by the test facility.

  12. Laminar boundary layers in convective heat transport

    E-print Network

    Christian Seis

    2012-12-12

    We study Rayleigh-Benard convection in the high-Rayleigh-number and high-Prandtl-number regime, i.e., we consider a fluid in a container that is exposed to strong heating of the bottom and cooling of the top plate in the absence of inertia effects. While the dynamics in the bulk are characterized by a chaotic convective heat flow, the boundary layers at the horizontal container plates are essentially conducting and thus the fluid is motionless. Consequently, the average temperature exhibits a linear profile in the boundary layers. In this article, we rigorously investigate the average temperature and oscillations in the boundary layer via local bounds on the temperature field. Moreover, we deduce that the temperature profile is indeed essentially linear close to the horizontal container plates. Our results are uniform in the system parameters (e.g. the Rayleigh number) up to logarithmic correction terms. An important tool in our analysis is a new Hardy-type estimate for the convecting velocity field, which can be used to control the fluid motion in the layer. The bounds on the temperature field are derived with the help of local maximal regularity estimates for convection-diffusion equations.

  13. Laboratory Investigation of Boundary Layer Processes*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amatucci, William

    2002-11-01

    Boundary layers are often found in plasmas both in the lab, such as at the edges of laser-produced plasmas, and in natural settings, such as the magnetosphere. These are regions in which plasma characteristics undergo rapid transition and are usually the sites of wave activity. An investigation of boundary layer processes has been conducted in the NRL Space Physics Simulation Chamber (SPSC). A method has been developed to create a boundary layer with controllable density gradients and transverse electric fields with arbitrary amplitude and scale length as small as one-fourth of an ion gyroradius. This method involves interpenetrating plasmas with different diameters, whose plasma potentials can be controlled. Under these conditions, waves in the lower hybrid frequency range have been observed and their characteristics documented. Theoretical work indicates that the observed mode characteristics are similar to those expected for the Electron-Ion Hybrid Instability.^1 As an illustration, we apply our results to space plasmas and the dynamics of the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL). The PSBL is key in the transfer of solar wind mass, energy, and momentum into the magnetosphere and ultimately into the auroral regions. During times of solar activity, the PSBL can become compressed to widths on the order of an ion gyroradius and can contain localized transverse electric fields similar to those generated in the SPSC experiments. At these times, thin layers of energetic electrons and broadband wave activity have been observed in the PSBL. The details of the response of a plasma to such conditions and the observable signatures are the focus of this study. ^1 Ganguli et al., Phys. Fluids, 31, 2753 (1988); Romero et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 17, 2313 (1990).

  14. Bursting frequency prediction in turbulent boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    LIOU,WILLIAM W.; FANG,YICHUNG

    2000-02-01

    The frequencies of the bursting events associated with the streamwise coherent structures of spatially developing incompressible turbulent boundary layers were predicted using global numerical solution of the Orr-Sommerfeld and the vertical vorticity equations of hydrodynamic stability problems. The structures were modeled as wavelike disturbances associated with the turbulent mean flow. The global method developed here involves the use of second and fourth order accurate finite difference formula for the differential equations as well as the boundary conditions. An automated prediction tool, BURFIT, was developed. The predicted resonance frequencies were found to agree very well with previous results using a local shooting technique and measured data.

  15. Boundary Layer Theory. Part 1; Laminar Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichting, H.

    1949-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to give you a survey of a field of aerodynamics which has for a number of years been attracting an ever growing interest. The subject is the theory of flows with friction, and, within that field, particularly the theory of friction layers, or boundary layers. As you know, a great many considerations of aerodynamics are based on the so-called ideal fluid, that is, the frictionless incompressible fluid. By neglect of compressibility and friction the extensive mathematical theory of the ideal fluid (potential theory) has been made possible.

  16. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  17. Sound radiation from a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Morfey, Christopher L.; Sandham, Neil D.

    2006-09-01

    Sound radiation due to fluctuating viscous wall shear stresses in a plane turbulent boundary layer is investigated by a two-stage procedure using direct numerical simulation (DNS) databases for incompressible turbulent Poiseuille flow in a plane channel, at Reynolds numbers up to Re?=1440. The power spectral density of radiated pressure and spectra of sound power per unit wall area are calculated in the low Mach number limit by substituting source terms obtained from DNS into a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings wave equation and using a half-space Green function. The same DNS data are used to predict the spectrum of turbulent boundary layer noise measured in a diffuser downstream of a fully developed channel flow [Greshilov and Mironov, Sov. Phys. Acoust. 29, 275 (1983)]. The measured spectrum is ˜15dB higher at low frequencies, but converges with the prediction at high frequencies.

  18. The role of nonlinear critical layers in boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to describe the nonlinear self-interaction between pairs of oblique instability modes that eventually develops when initially linear spatially growing instability waves evolve downstream in nominally two-dimensional laminar boundary layers. The first nonlinear reaction takes place locally within a so-called 'critical layer', with the flow outside this layer consisting of a locally parallel mean flow plus a pair of oblique instability waves - which may or may not be accompanied by an associated plane wave. The amplitudes of these waves, which are completely determined by nonlinear effects within the critical layer, satisfy either a single integro-differential equation or a pair of integro-differential equations with quadratic to quartic-type nonlinearities. The physical implications of these equations are discussed.

  19. Three dimensional boundary layers in internal flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodonyi, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical study of the effects of viscous-inviscid interactions in three-dimensional duct flows is presented. In particular interacting flows for which the oncoming flow is not fully-developed were considered. In this case there is a thin boundary layer still present upstream of the surface distortion, as opposed to the fully-developed pipe flow situation wherein the flow is viscous across the cross section.

  20. Boundary Layer Transition Results From STS-114

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Cassady, Amy M.; Kirk, Benjamin S.; Wang, K. C.; Hyatt, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    The tool for predicting the onset of boundary layer transition from damage to and/or repair of the thermal protection system developed in support of Shuttle Return to Flight is compared to the STS-114 flight results. The Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Tool is part of a suite of tools that analyze the aerothermodynamic environment of the local thermal protection system to allow informed disposition of damage for making recommendations to fly as is or to repair. Using mission specific trajectory information and details of each damage site or repair, the expected time of transition onset is predicted to help determine the proper aerothermodynamic environment to use in the subsequent thermal and stress analysis of the local structure. The boundary layer transition criteria utilized for the tool was developed from ground-based measurements to account for the effect of both protuberances and cavities and has been calibrated against flight data. Computed local boundary layer edge conditions provided the means to correlate the experimental results and then to extrapolate to flight. During STS-114, the BLT Tool was utilized and was part of the decision making process to perform an extravehicular activity to remove the large gap fillers. The role of the BLT Tool during this mission, along with the supporting information that was acquired for the on-orbit analysis, is reviewed. Once the large gap fillers were removed, all remaining damage sites were cleared for reentry as is. Post-flight analysis of the transition onset time revealed excellent agreement with BLT Tool predictions.

  1. Boundary Layer Control for Hypersonic Airbreathing Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Active and passive methods for tripping hypersonic boundary layers have been examined in NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels using a Hyper-X model. This investigation assessed several concepts for forcing transition, including passive discrete roughness elements and active mass addition (or blowing), in the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air and the 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnels. Heat transfer distributions obtained via phosphor thermography, shock system details, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. The comparisons between the active and passive methods for boundary layer control were conducted at test conditions that nearly match the Hyper-X nominal Mach 7 flight test-point of an angle-of-attack of 2-deg and length Reynolds number of 5.6 million. For passive roughness, the primary parametric variation was a range of trip heights within the calculated boundary layer thickness for several trip concepts. The passive roughness study resulted in a swept ramp configuration, scaled to be roughly 0.6 of the calculated boundary layer thickness, being selected for the Mach 7 flight vehicle. For the active blowing study, the manifold pressure was systematically varied (while monitoring the mass flow) for each configuration to determine the jet penetration height, with schlieren, and transition movement, with the phosphor system, for comparison to the passive results. All the blowing concepts tested, which included various rows of sonic orifices (holes), two- and three-dimensional slots, and random porosity, provided transition onset near the trip location with manifold stagnation pressures on the order of 40 times the model surface static pressure, which is adequate to ensure sonic jets. The present results indicate that the jet penetration height for blowing was roughly half the height required with passive roughness elements for an equivalent amount of transition movement.

  2. Reduction of turbulent drag: Boundary layer manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustols, E.

    1989-03-01

    The drag reduction on airbus profiles is investigated. External and internal boundary layer manipulators are applied. The wind tunnel wall geometry and the model surface geometry are modified, carving riblets in the sense of the main flow. The change induced in the flow are studied using hotwire anemometry and spectral analysis. Direct drag measurements on Airbus profiles indicate a drag reduction of 3.5 percent. Experiments using cylindrical bodies in transonic flow show a drag reduction of 8 percent.

  3. Acoustic Properties of Porous Coatings for Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Control

    E-print Network

    Colonius, Tim

    Acoustic Properties of Porous Coatings for Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Control Guillaume A. Brès.2514/1.40811 Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the interaction of acoustic waves with an array-layer flow. This acoustic scattering problem is important in the design of ultrasonic absorptive coatings

  4. System Identification and Active Control of a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    E-print Network

    Rathnasingham, Ruben

    An experimental investigation is made into the active control of the near-wall region of a turbulent boundary layer using a linear control scheme. System identification in the boundary layer provides optimal transfer ...

  5. Typhoon kinematic and thermodynamic boundary layer structure from dropsonde composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Jie; Zhang, Jun A.; Rogers, Robert F.

    2015-04-01

    The data from 438 Global Positioning System dropsondes in six typhoons are analyzed to investigate the mean atmospheric boundary layer structure in a composite framework. Following a recent study on boundary layer height in Atlantic hurricanes, we aim to quantify characteristics of boundary layer height scales in Western Pacific typhoons including the inflow layer depth (hinflow), height of the maximum tangential wind speed (hvtmax), and thermodynamic mixed layer depth. In addition, the kinematic and thermodynamic boundary layer structures are compared between the dropsonde composites using data in typhoons and hurricanes. Our results show that similar to the hurricane composite, there is a separation between the kinematic and thermodynamic boundary layer heights in typhoons, with the thermodynamic boundary layer depth being much smaller than hinflow and hvtmax in the typhoon boundary layer. All three boundary layer height scales tend to decrease toward the storm center. Our results confirm that the conceptual model of Zhang et al. (2011a) for boundary layer height variation is applicable to typhoon conditions. The kinematic boundary layer structure is generally similar between the typhoon and hurricane composites, but the typhoon composite shows a deeper inflow layer outside the eyewall than the hurricane composite. The thermodynamic structure of the typhoon boundary layer composite is warmer and moister outside the radius of maximum wind speed than the hurricane composite. This difference is attributed to different environmental conditions associated with typhoons compared to the hurricanes studied here.

  6. Shock layers and boundary layers in hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousteix, J.; Arnal, D.; Aupoix, B.; Brazier, J. Ph.; Lafon, A.

    This paper presents an overview of the physical and numerical aspects of flows encountered around a vehicle in hypersonic flight. These problems are typically related to the reentry phase of a space shuttle into the atmosphere. Nonetheless, it is believed that the material given here is a good background for other applications. Compared with the standard aerodynamic problems on an aircraft in transonic or supersonic flight, hypersonic flows are characterized by a much higher level of energy. The high temperature of the flow can lead to thermochemical non-equilibrium, with chemical reactions and vibrational relaxation. These effects are of prime importance in the evaluation of the heating of the body and they may affect general flow features, including the wall pressure. Basic elements are discussed to understand the physics of these phenomena. Applications are given in the framework of boundary layer calculations and of numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. In the front of the vehicle, a strong bow shock wave forms and the boundary layer is fed by a rotational flow. A discussion is given concerning how a boundary layer theory can account for these effects. At lower altitudes, the velocity of the flow remains large, the Reynolds number increases and the flow becomes turbulent. In this context, laminar-turbulent transition and turbulence modelling are discussed.

  7. THEORETICAL SKINFRICTION LAW IN A TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER A. CHESKIDOV

    E-print Network

    Cheskidov, Alexey

    transitional and turbulent boundary layers using a turbulent velocity profile equation recently de­ rived from law, matches experimental data in the turbulent boundary layer for moderately large Reynolds numbers of a turbulent­boundary layer flow, the fil­ ter length scale #11;, which represents the averaged

  8. LAMINAR BOUNDARY-LAYER THEORY: A 20TH CENTURY PARADOX?

    E-print Network

    Cowley, Stephen J.

    to be considered. Such a cascade of scales often limits the quantitative usefulness of solutions, although boundary-layer of Cambridge, Silver Street, Cambridge CB3 9EW, UK. S.J.Cowley@damtp.cam.ac.uk Keywords: Boundary layer, shear onto a consideration of large-Reynolds- number asymptotic instability theory. A key aspect of boundary-layer

  9. Boundary layers in favourable pressure gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piomelli, Ugo

    2012-11-01

    Turbulent boundary layers subjected to freestream acceleration due to a favorable pressure gradient (FPG) are common in many engineering applications. For strong acceleration the flow tends to revert to a laminar state; whether it re-laminarizes fully depends on the strength of the acceleration, and on the distance over which the acceleration is maintained. As the pressure gradient is removed, the flow may then return to a turbulent state; the re-transitioning process is strongly affected by the state of the turbulence at the end of the acceleration region. In this talk we present results of simulations of turbulent flow in flat-plate boundary layers subjected to strong acceleration, exceeding the critical Reynolds number for extended distance. Two Reynolds numbers are considered: a low one is studied by direct simulations, a higher one by large-eddy simulations. As the acceleration increases, the logarithmic layer is initially preserved, albeit with a higher value of the von Kàrmàn constant; in the region of high acceleration, however, the velocity profile becomes laminar-like; in the high- Re case, a new logarithmic layer is established shortly after the end of the acceleration, while in the low- Re case re-transition occurs much later. Good agreement of the high- Re LES with the experimental data is observed. The region of maximum acceleration is characterized by significant reorganization of the wall layer, with streaks that remain stable for very long distances. Frozen turbulence advected from upstream is still present, but it does not adjust to the freestream acceleration (i.e., the freestream velocity increases, but the turbulent kinetic energy maintains its upstream value); the residual turbulent fluctuations are large enough that, once the acceleration ends, a bypass-like transition process is triggered.

  10. Multiscale Structures in Tropical Cyclone Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Ralph

    2015-04-01

    We present recent advances in the development of the resonant triad interaction model of large scale roll vortices in the tropical cyclone boundary layer. The relatively shallow, high shear and strong surface buoyancy flux conditions that characterize the tropical cyclone boundary layer make it an ideal environment for the formation of mixed shear/convection roll vortices. The most commonly documented rolls tend to align close to the mean wind direction and have aspect ratios (wavelength/depth) of near 2.5 to 4. Some observations suggest much smaller scale rolls are nearly ubiquitous in the near surface layer. Recent analyses of synthetic aperture radar images of the sea surface under tropical cyclones find nearly ubiquitous signatures of very large aspect ratio rolls, with wavelengths of order 10 km or greater. These rolls apparently extend from the surface into the lower troposphere. Our studies hypothesize that nonlinear triad wave-wave interactions are a likely candidate to explain the formation and persistence of these large aspect ratio modes, the variability in detectability of "standard roll vortices and a possible reason why such large scale rolls are not formed in mesoscale numerical models.

  11. The role of chemical boundary layers in regulating the thickness of continental and oceanic thermal boundary layers

    E-print Network

    Niu, Fenglin

    The role of chemical boundary layers in regulating the thickness of continental and oceanic thermal the drift of continents and the eventual fate of oceanic thermal boundary layers, e.g., subduction) at the base of the oceanic and continental thermal boundary layers. This manuscript explores the endmember

  12. Flux Avalanches in Multi-layer Superconducting Strip Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, S.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Mine, A.; Pyon, S.; Tamegai, T.; Nagasawa, S.; Hidaka, M.

    We have fabricated three-dimensional double- and triple-layer strip arrays of Nb and observed flux penetration into these strip arrays with an applied field perpendicular to the plane by using the magneto-optical imaging method. In the triple-layer strip arrays with large overlaps between the strips, we observed flux avalanches and one-dimensional penetrations perpendicular to the strip similar to the case of double-layer strip arrays. In thicker triple-layer samples, we also observed flux avalanches parallel to the strip. Enhanced demagnetization effect, thermal conductivity between the neighboring layers, and the driving force parallel to the strip are believed to cause these avalanches.

  13. Performance and boundary-layer evaluation of a sonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. F.; Ruggeri, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the boundary layer characteristics and aerodynamic performance of a radial vane sonic inlet with a length/diameter ratio of 1 for several vane configurations. The sonic inlet was designed with a slight wavy wall type of diffuser geometry, which permits operation at high inlet Mach numbers (sufficiently high for good noise suppression) without boundary layer flow separation and with good total pressure recovery. A new method for evaluating the turbulent boundary layer was developed to separate the boundary layer from the inviscid core flow, which is characterized by a total pressure variation from hub to tip, and to determine the experimental boundary layer parameters.

  14. Studies of the Martian boundary-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davy, Richard A. J.

    2009-12-01

    A coupled boundary layer---aeolian dust model of the Martian atmosphere is presented. This model was developed to determine how radiation scattering, absorption and emission by dust affects the boundary layer and, in turn, how this affects the dust distribution in the atmosphere. This was achieved by coupling a planetary boundary layer (PBL) model with a dynamical dust model. The model is applied to the 1977B dust storm optical data of Viking Lander 1 and our analysis indicates a significant improvement over previous 1D studies of dust storm decay. By calibrating the model to observations of temperature and pressure from the Phoenix lander we have simulated the atmospheric ice formation observed by the Phoenix LIDAR and explored the potential influences of such formations on the atmospheric conditions. By simulating dust settling between multiple LIDAR observations we have estimated the effective radius of suspended dust, which is found to be in the range of estimates made by other methods. Thermocouples at three levels on a 1-m mast on the deck of the Phoenix lander provided temperature data throughout the 151 sol Phoenix mission. Air temperatures showed a large diurnal cycle which showed little sol to sol variation, especially over the first 90 sots of the mission. Daytime temperatures at the top (2 m) level typically rose to about 243 K (-30 C) in early afternoon and had large (10 K) turbulent fluctuations. These are analysed and used to estimate heat fluxes which are found to be in the range 2-10 W m-2 .

  15. Calculation of boundary layers of oscillating airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Carr, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    A two-point finite difference unsteady laminar and turbulent boundary layer computational method was used to investigate the properties of the flow around an airfoil (NACA 0012) oscillating through angles of attack up to 18 degrees, for reduced frequencies of 0.01 and 0.20. The unsteady potential flow was determined using the unsteady potential flow method of Geissler. The influence of transition location on stal behavior was investigated, using both experimentally determined transition information, and transition located at the pressure peak; the results show the need for viscous-inviscid interaction in future computation of such flows.

  16. Boundary-layer Transition at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, George M

    1956-01-01

    Recent results of the effects of Mach number, stream turbulence, leading-edge geometry, leading-edge sweep, surface temperature, surface finish, pressure gradient, and angle of attack on boundary-layer transition are summarized. Factors that delay transition are nose blunting, surface cooling, and favorable pressure gradient. Leading-edge sweep and excessive surface roughness tend to promote early transition. The effects of leading-edge blunting on two-dimensional surfaces and surface cooling can be predicted adequately by existing theories, at least in the moderate Mach number range.

  17. The minisodar and planetary boundary layer studies

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    The minisodar, in addition to being smaller than conventional sodar, operates at higher frequencies, obtains usable signal returns closer to the surface, and can use smaller range gates. Because the max range is generally limited to the lower 200 m above the surface, the minisodar is not able to interrogate the entire daytime atmospheric Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL); however it can be a very useful tool for understanding the PBL. In concert with other instruments, the minisodar can add significant new insights to our understanding of the PBL. This paper gives examples of past and potential uses of minisodars in such situations.

  18. Simulation and optimal control of wind-farm boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Johan; Goit, Jay

    2014-05-01

    In large wind farms, the effect of turbine wakes, and their interaction leads to a reduction in farm efficiency, with power generated by turbines in a farm being lower than that of a lone-standing turbine by up to 50%. In very large wind farms or `deep arrays', this efficiency loss is related to interaction of the wind farms with the planetary boundary layer, leading to lower wind speeds at turbine level. Moreover, for these cases it has been demonstrated both in simulations and wind-tunnel experiments that the wind-farm energy extraction is dominated by the vertical turbulent transport of kinetic energy from higher regions in the boundary layer towards the turbine level. In the current study, we investigate the use of optimal control techniques combined with Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of wind-farm boundary layer interaction for the increase of total energy extraction in very large `infinite' wind farms. We consider the individual wind turbines as flow actuators, whose energy extraction can be dynamically regulated in time so as to optimally influence the turbulent flow field, maximizing the wind farm power. For the simulation of wind-farm boundary layers we use large-eddy simulations in combination with actuator-disk and actuator-line representations of wind turbines. Simulations are performed in our in-house pseudo-spectral code SP-Wind that combines Fourier-spectral discretization in horizontal directions with a fourth-order finite-volume approach in the vertical direction. For the optimal control study, we consider the dynamic control of turbine-thrust coefficients in an actuator-disk model. They represent the effect of turbine blades that can actively pitch in time, changing the lift- and drag coefficients of the turbine blades. Optimal model-predictive control (or optimal receding horizon control) is used, where the model simply consists of the full LES equations, and the time horizon is approximately 280 seconds. The optimization is performed using a nonlinear conjugate gradient method, and the gradients are calculated by solving the adjoint LES equations. We find that the extracted farm power increases by approximately 20% when using optimal model-predictive control. However, the increased power output is also responsible for an increase in turbulent dissipation, and a deceleration of the boundary layer. Further investigating the energy balances in the boundary layer, it is observed that this deceleration is mainly occurring in the outer layer as a result of higher turbulent energy fluxes towards the turbines. In a second optimization case, we penalize boundary-layer deceleration, and find an increase of energy extraction of approximately 10%. In this case, increased energy extraction is balanced by a reduction in of turbulent dissipation in the boundary layer. J.M. acknowledges support from the European Research Council (FP7-Ideas, grant no. 306471). Simulations were performed on the computing infrastructure of the VSC Flemish Supercomputer Center, funded by the Hercules Foundation and the Flemish Government.

  19. Sound Radiation from a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, J.

    1961-01-01

    If the restriction of incompressibility in the turbulence problem is relaxed, the phenomenon of energy radiation in the form of sound from the turbulent zone arises. In order to calculate this radiated energy, it is shown that new statistical quantities, such as time-space correlation tensors, have to be known within the turbulent zone in addition to the conventional quantities. For the particular case of the turbulent boundary layer, indications are that the intensity of radiation becomes significant only in supersonic flows. Under these conditions, the recent work of Phillips is examined together with some experimental findings of the author. It is shown that the qualitative features of the radiation field (intensity, directionality) as predicted by the theory are consistent with the measurements; however, even for the highest Mach number flow, some of the assumptions of the asymptotic theory are not yet satisfied in the experiments. Finally, the question of turbulence damping due to radiation is discussed, with the result that in the Mach number range covered by the experiments, the energy lost from the boundary layer due to radiation is a small percentage of the work done by the wall shearing stresses.

  20. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.; Garske, Michael T.; Saucedo, Luis A.; Kinder, Gerald R.; Micklos, Ann M.

    2011-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLT FE) Project, a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for STS-119, STS-128, STS-131 and STS-133 as well as Space Shuttle Endeavour for STS-134. Additional instrumentation was installed in order to obtain more spatially resolved measurements downstream of the protuberance. This paper provides an overview of the BLT FE Project with emphasis on the STS-131 and STS-133 results. A high-level overview of the in-situ flight data is presented, along with a summary of the comparisons between pre- and post-flight analysis predictions and flight data. Comparisons show that empirically correlated predictions for boundary layer transition onset time closely match the flight data, while predicted surface temperatures were significantly higher than observed flight temperatures. A thermocouple anomaly observed on a number of the missions is discussed as are a number of the mitigation actions that will be taken on the final flight, STS-134, including potential alterations of the flight trajectory and changes to the flight instrumentation.

  1. Kinetic Boundary Layers and FluidKinetic Coupling in Semiconductors

    E-print Network

    Schmeiser, Christian

    Kinetic Boundary Layers and Fluid­Kinetic Coupling in Semiconductors Pierre Degond 1 and Christian, kinetic boundary layers are analyzed and higher order accurate boundary conditions are constructed are derived. As an application, interface conditi­ ons for the fluid­kinetic coupling in a domain

  2. Boundary layer roll circulations during FIRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirer, Hampton N.; Haack, Tracy

    1990-01-01

    The probable mechanism underlying the development of boundary layer roll circulations are studied using wind and temperature profiles measured by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Electra during the stratocumulus phase of the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE). The expected, or preferred, roll orientations, horizontal wavelengths, and propagation periods are determined by finding the minimum values of the dynamic and thermodynamic forcing parameters, which here are the eddy Reynolds number (Re) and moist Rayleigh number (Ra sub m). These minimum values depend on the height z sub T of the capping temperature inversion and on the values of the Fourier coefficients of the background height-dependent vector wind profile. As input to our nonlinear spectral model, descent and ascent runs by the Electra provide for initial estimates of the inversion height and the wind profiles. In the first phase of the investigation presented here, a mechanism is said to be a probable contributor to the development of roll circulations within the stratocumulus-topped boundary layer if the modeled roll orientation and wavelengths agree with their observed values. Preliminary results using the 14-coefficient model of Haack-Hirschberg (1988) are discussed for the 7 July 1987 Electra Mission 188-A (Flight 5). This mission was flown across a sharp cloud boundary that was within a LANDSAT/SPOT scene. The stratocumulus deck was relatively solid in the eastern part of the scene, while there was a rapid decrease in cloud cover to scattered cumulus clouds aligned in streets to the west. These cloud streets were oriented nearly parallel to the mean wind direction in the layer, which was approximately 340 degrees. The hypothesis that roll circulations occurred in both the relatively clear and the cloudy regions is investigated using as model input a descent profile obtained in the relatively clear air and an ascent profile obtained in the cloudy air. Initial results for the clear air case are that the pure inflection point mode is not possible and the pure thermal mode was oriented 35 degrees to the right of the mean wind direction. The origin of this unacceptably large discrepancy between the observed and modeled results will be investigated further and the conclusions reported at the next FIRE workshop.

  3. Ozone Chemistry in the High-Latitude Boundary Layer

    E-print Network

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Ozone Chemistry in the High-Latitude Boundary Layer Linnea Avallone Department of Atmospheric layer ozone loss phenomenon · In situ observations of BrO at Arctic sites · Preliminary results from of boundary layer ozone loss #12;· Tropospheric Ozone has significant climate forcing at poles · ODEs affect

  4. Acoustics of laminar boundary layers breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1994-01-01

    Boundary layer flow transition has long been suggested as a potential noise source in both marine (sonar-dome self noise) and aeronautical (aircraft cabin noise) applications, owing to the highly transient nature of process. The design of effective noise control strategies relies upon a clear understanding of the source mechanisms associated with the unsteady flow dynamics during transition. Due to formidable mathematical difficulties, theoretical predictions either are limited to early linear and weakly nonlinear stages of transition, or employ acoustic analogy theories based on approximate source field data, often in the form of empirical correlation. In the present work, an approach which combines direct numerical simulation of the source field with the Lighthill acoustic analogy is utilized. This approach takes advantage of the recent advancement in computational capabilities to obtain detailed information about the flow-induced acoustic sources. The transitional boundary layer flow is computed by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations without model assumptions, thus allowing a direct evaluation of the pseudosound as well as source functions, including the Lighthill stress tensor and the wall shear stress. The latter are used for calculating the radiated pressure field based on the Curle-Powell solution of the Lighthill equation. This procedure allows a quantitative assessment of noise source mechanisms and the associated radiation characteristics during transition from primary instability up to the laminar breakdown stage. In particular, one is interested in comparing the roles played by the fluctuating volume Reynolds stress and the wall-shear-stresses, and in identifying specific flow processes and structures that are effective noise generators.

  5. Diverging boundary layers with zero streamwise pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauley, Wayne R.; Eaton, John K.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of spanwise divergence on the boundary layer forming between a pair of embedded streamwise vortices with the common flow between them directed toward the wall was studied. Measurements indicate that divergence controls the rate of development of the boundary layer and that large divergence significantly retards boundary layer growth and enhances skin friction. For strongly diverging boundary layers, divergence accounts for nearly all of the local skin friction. Even with divergence, however, the local similarity relationships for two-dimensional boundary layers are satisfactory. Although divergence modifies the mean development of the boundary layer, it does not significantly modify the turbulence structure. In the present experiments with a zero streamwise pressure gradient, it was found that spanwise divergence dit not significantly affect the Reynolds stress and the turbulent triple product distributions.

  6. Development of a laminar boundary layer behind a suction point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuest, Walter

    1952-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is made of the development of a laminar boundary layer behind a suction slot that is assumed to cut off part of the boundary layer without exerting any sink effect. The development, which is approximate, is based on the heat conduction equation. The heat conduction equation enters the analysis through a linearization of the Prandtl-Mises form of the boundary-layer equation.

  7. Methods and results of boundary layer measurements on a glider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nes, W. V.

    1978-01-01

    Boundary layer measurements were carried out on a glider under natural conditions. Two effects are investigated: the effect of inconstancy of the development of static pressure within the boundary layer and the effect of the negative pressure difference in a sublaminar boundary layer. The results obtained by means of an ion probe in parallel connection confirm those results obtained by means of a pressure probe. Additional effects which have occurred during these measurements are briefly dealt with.

  8. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Implementation on OV-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, Theodoros A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the boundary layer transition experiment flown on Discovery. The purpose of the boundary layer transition flight experiment was to obtain hypersonic aero-thermodynamic data for the purpose of better understanding the flow transition from a laminar to turbulent boundary layer using a known height protuberance. The preparation of the shuttle is described, with the various groups responsibilities outlined. Views of the shuttle in flight with the experimental results are shown.

  9. Improved Boundary Layer Depth Retrievals from MPLNET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Jasper R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Molod, Andrea M.; Joseph, Everette

    2013-01-01

    Continuous lidar observations of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) depth have been made at the Micropulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) site in Greenbelt, MD since April 2001. However, because of issues with the operational PBL depth algorithm, the data is not reliable for determining seasonal and diurnal trends. Therefore, an improved PBL depth algorithm has been developed which uses a combination of the wavelet technique and image processing. The new algorithm is less susceptible to contamination by clouds and residual layers, and in general, produces lower PBL depths. A 2010 comparison shows the operational algorithm overestimates the daily mean PBL depth when compared to the improved algorithm (1.85 and 1.07 km, respectively). The improved MPLNET PBL depths are validated using radiosonde comparisons which suggests the algorithm performs well to determine the depth of a fully developed PBL. A comparison with the Goddard Earth Observing System-version 5 (GEOS-5) model suggests that the model may underestimate the maximum daytime PBL depth by 410 m during the spring and summer. The best agreement between MPLNET and GEOS-5 occurred during the fall and they diered the most in the winter.

  10. Acoustic sounding in the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    Three case studies are presented involving data from an acoustic radar. The first two cases examine data collected during the passage of a mesoscale cold-air intrusion, probably thunderstorm outflow, and a synoptic-scale cold front. In these studies the radar data are compared to conventional meteorological data obtained from the WKY tower facility for the purpose of radar data interpretation. It is shown that the acoustic radar echoes reveal the boundary between warm and cold air and other areas of turbulent mixing, regions of strong vertical temperature gradients, and areas of weak or no wind shear. The third case study examines the relationship between the nocturnal radiation inversion and the low-level wind maximum or jet in the light of conclusions presented by Blackadar (1957). The low-level jet is seen forming well above the top of the inversion. Sudden rapid growth of the inversion occurs which brings the top of the inversion to a height equal that of the jet. Coincident with the rapid growth of the inversion is a sudden decrease in the intensity of the acoustic radar echoes in the inversion layer. It is suggested that the decrease in echo intensity reveals a decrease in turbulent mixing in the inversion layer as predicted by Blackadar. It is concluded that the acoustic radar can be a valuable tool for study in the lower atmosphere.

  11. Current isolating epitaxial buffer layers for high voltage photodiode array

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Cooper, Gregory A. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    2002-01-01

    An array of photodiodes in series on a common semi-insulating substrate has a non-conductive buffer layer between the photodiodes and the semi-insulating substrate. The buffer layer reduces current injection leakage between the photodiodes of the array and allows optical energy to be converted to high voltage electrical energy.

  12. Observations of the magnetospheric boundary layers. [International Magnetospheric Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, T. E.

    1984-01-01

    Results on magnetospheric boundary layers are reviewed, emphasizing their dynamical importance based on hot plasma observations, energetic particle signatures, heavy ion contributions and the effects of wave-particle interactions. Satellite plasma observations show that 1% to 2% of the oncoming solar wind plasma enters the magnetosphere and is initially transported within the magnetospheric boundary layer. Some of this boundary layer plasma is entrained within the Earth's magnetotail where it can be accelerated. Tests are needed to determine the relative contributions of the primary acceleration processes whose effects are especially evident in the plasma sheet boundary layer.

  13. Spatially Developing Secondary Instabilities in Compressible Swept Airfoil Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional eigenvalue analysis is used on a massive scale to study spatial instabilities of compressible shear flows with two inhomogeneous directions. The main focus of the study is crossflow dominated swept-wing boundary layers although the methodology can also be applied to study other type of flows, such as the attachment-line flow. Certain unique aspects of formulating a spatial, two-dimensional eigenvalue problem for the secondary instability of finite amplitude crossflow vortices are discussed, namely, fixing the spatial growth direction unambiguously through a non-orthogonal formulation of the linearized disturbance equations. A primary test case used for parameter study corresponds to the low-speed, NLF-0415(b) airfoil configuration as tested in the ASU Unsteady Wind Tunnel, wherein a spanwise periodic array of roughness elements was placed near the leading edge in order to excite stationary crossflow modes with a specified fundamental wavelength. The two classes of flow conditions selected for this analysis include those for which the roughness array spacing corresponds to either the naturally dominant crossflow wavelength, or a subcritical wavelength that serves to reduce the growth of the naturally excited dominant crossflow modes. Numerical predictions are compared with the measured database, both as indirect validation for the spatial instability analysis and to provide a basis for comparison with a higher Reynolds number, supersonic swept-wing configuration. Application of the eigenvalue analysis to the supersonic configuration reveals that a broad spectrum of stationary crossflow modes can sustain sufficiently strong secondary instabilities as to potentially cause transition over this configuration. Implications of this finding for transition control in swept wing boundary layers are examined.

  14. Observations of mesoscale and boundary-layer circulations affecting dust uplift and transport in the Saharan boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsham, J. H.; Parker, D. J.; Grams, C. M.; Grey, W. M. F.; Johnson, B. T.

    2008-05-01

    Observations of the Saharan boundary layer, made during the GERBILS field campaign, show that mesoscale land surface temperature variations (which were related to albedo variations) induced mesoscale circulations, and that mesoscale and boundary-layer circulations affected dust uplift and transport. These processes are unrepresented in many climate models, but may have significant impacts on the vertical transport and uplift of desert dust. Mesoscale effects in particular tend to be difficult to parameterise. With weak winds along the aircraft track, land surface temperature anomalies with scales of greater than 10 km are shown to significantly affect boundary-layer temperatures and winds. Such anomalies are expected to affect the vertical mixing of the dusty and weakly stratified Saharan Air Layer (SAL). Mesoscale variations in winds are also shown to affect dust loadings in the boundary-layer. In a region of local uplift, with strong along-track winds, boundary-layer rolls are shown to lead to warm moist dusty updraughts in the boundary layer. Large eddy model (LEM) simulations suggest that these rolls increased uplift by approximately 30%. The modelled effects of boundary-layer convection on uplift is shown to be larger when the boundary-layer wind is decreased, and most significant when the mean wind is below the threshold for dust uplift and the boundary-layer convection leads to uplift which would not otherwise occur.

  15. Simulating supercell thunderstorms in a convective boundary layer: Effects on storm and boundary layer properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotarski, Christopher J.

    Nearly all previous numerical simulations of supercell thunderstorms have neglected surface uxes of heat, moisture, and momentum as well as horizontal inhomogeneities in the near-storm environment from resulting dry boundary layer convection. This investigation uses coupled radiation and land-surface schemes within an idealized cloud model to identify the effects of organized boundary layer convection in the form of horizontal convective rolls (HCRs) on the strength, structure, and evolution of simulated supercell thunderstorms. The in uence of HCRs and the importance of their orientation relative to storm motion is tested by comparing simulations with a convective boundary layer (CBL) against those with a horizontally homogeneous base state having the same mean environment. The impact of anvil shading on the CBL is tested by comparing simulations with and without the effects of clouds in the radiative transfer scheme. The results of these simulations indicate that HCRs provide a potentially important source of environmental vertical vorticity in the sheared, near-storm boundary layer. These vorticity perturbations are amplified both beneath the main supercell updraft and along the trailing out ow boundary, leading to the formation of occasionally intense misovortices. HCRs perpendicular to storm motion are found to have a detrimental effect on the strength and persistence of the lowlevel mesocyclone, particularly during its initial development. Though the mean environment is less supportive of low-level rotation with a wind profile conducive to HCRs oriented parallel to storm motion, such HCRs are found to often enhance the low-level mesocyclone circulation. When anvil shading is included, stabilization results in generally weaker low-level mesocyclone circulation, regardless of HCR orientation. Moreover, HCRs diminish in the near-storm environment such that the effects of HCRs on the supercell are mitigated. HCRs are also shown to be a necessary condition for the formation of so-called "feeder clouds" and anking line convection in these simulations. These findings suggest potentially important rami fications regarding both non-mesocyclone and mesocyclone tornadoes in supercell thunderstorms in an environment with active boundary layer convection.

  16. Incompressible boundary layer transition flight experiments over a nonaxisymmetric fuselage forebody and comparisons with laminar boundary layer stability theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijgen, Paul M. H. W.

    1990-11-01

    Analyses of previous boundary-layer transition experiments over axisymmetric bodies indicates a potential for achieving substantial amounts of laminar flow over such shapes. Achievement of natural laminar flow over portions of nonlifting aircraft geometries, such as fuselage to forebodies, tip tanks or engine nacelles, could significantly contribute to the reduction of total aircraft viscous drag. A modern surface-panel method, a streamwise boundary-layer analysis method, and streamwise linear stability theory (E(sup n)-method) are used to correlate several previous transition measurements along axisymmetric geometries to study the transition characteristics of a nonaxisymmetric body geometry, a flight investigation was conducted to measure the transition location and analyze the mode of transition over the nonaxisymmetric forebody of an existing light twin-engine propeller-driven airplane. A summary of the inviscid flow field over the forebody of the aircraft at various body angles is presented, indicating the relatively small magnitude of inviscid crossflow along the forebody at typical cruising attitudes. The transition instrumentation installed in the airplane fuselage is described, together with relative surface-waviness measurements along the forebody. The macroscopic location of the transitional front, obtained from arrayed hot-film sensors, is presented for a matrix of flight conditions with various unit-Reynolds numbers, angles of attack and sideslip, and engine power settings.

  17. Boundary layer features observed during NAME 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuckmeyer, Elizabeth A.

    2011-12-01

    S-Pol radar data from the North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) are examined to investigate the characteristics of sea breezes that occurred during the North American Monsoon in the late summer of 2004, as well as their role in modulating monsoon convection. Zero degree plan position indicated (PPI) scans were examined to determine the presence of a sea breeze fine line in the S-Pol radar data. Sea breeze fine lines were typically observed over land very near the coast of the Gulf of California (GoC), and usually moved onshore around 1700--1800 UTC (11:00 AM--12:00 PM local time), and then continued to move slowly inland on the coastal plain. The sea breezes typically moved on land and dissipated before any significant interactions with Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO) convection could occur. Fine lines varied in reflectivity strength, but were typically around 10 to 20 dBZ. Surface winds from the Estacion Obispo (ETO) supersite were analyzed to confirm the presence of a shift in wind direction on days in which a fine line had been identified. Typically winds changed from light and variable to consistently out of the west or southwest. Vertical plots of S-Pol reflectivity were created to examine sea breeze structure in the vertical, but these were not found to be useful as the sea breeze signature was nearly impossible to distinguish from other boundary layer features. Horizontal structure was further investigated using wind profiler relative reflectivity, vertical velocity, and horizontal winds from the profiler located at ETO. Relative reflectivity and vertical velocity fields revealed a complex boundary layer structure on some days of repeating updrafts and downdrafts. Further examination of S-Pol PPI data revealed that these vertical motions are likely due to the presence of horizontal convective rolls. Profiler horizontal winds revealed that the depth and vertical structure of the sea breezes varied significantly from day to day, but that the height of the sea breeze is around 1 km above the ground. Sea breezes observed during NAME almost never initiated convection on their own. It is hypothesized that a weak thermal contrast between the GoC and the land leads to comparatively weak sea breezes, which don't have enough lift to trigger convection.

  18. Effect of sound on boundary layer stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S.; Spencer, Shelly Anne

    1993-01-01

    Experiments are conducted in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel with a zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate model that has a 67:1 elliptical leading edge. Boundary-layer measurements are made of the streamwise fluctuating-velocity component in order to identify the amplified T-S waves that are forced by downstream-traveling sound waves. Measurements are taken with circular 3-D roughness elements placed at the Branch 1 neutral stability point for the frequency under consideration, and then with the roughness element downstream of Branch 1. These roughness elements have a principal chord dimension equal to 2 lambda(sub TS)/pi of the T-S waves under study and are 'stacked' in order to resemble a Gaussian height distribution. Measurements taken just downstream of the roughness (with leading-edge T-S waves, surface roughness T-S waves, instrumentation sting vibrations, and the Stokes wave subtracted) show the generation of 3-D T-S waves, but not in the characteristic heart-shaped disturbance field predicted by 3-D asymptotic theory. Maximum disturbance amplitudes are found on the roughness centerline. However, some near-field characteristics predicted by numerical modeling are observed.

  19. Effect of sound on boundary layer stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S. (Principal Investigator); Spencer, Shelly Anne

    1993-01-01

    Experiments are conducted in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel with a zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate model that has a 67:1 elliptical leading edge. Boundary-layer measurements are made of the streamwise fluctuating-velocity component in order to identify the amplified T-S waves that are forced by downstream-travelling, sound waves. Measurements are taken with circular 3-D roughness elements placed at the Branch 1 neutral stability point for the frequency under consideration, and then with the roughness element downstream of Branch 1. These roughness elements have a principal chord dimension equal to 2(lambda)(sub TS)/pi, of the T-S waves under study and are 'stacked' in order to resemble a Gaussian height distribution. Measurements taken just downstream of the roughness (with leading-edge T-S waves, surface roughness T-S waves, instrumentation sting vibrations and the Stokes wave subtracted) show the generation of 3-D-T-S waves, but not in the characteristic heart-shaped disturbance field predicted by 3-D asymptotic theory. Maximum disturbance amplitudes are found on the roughness centerline. However, some near-field characteristics predicted by numerical modelling are observed.

  20. Helical circulations in the typhoon boundary layer Ryan Ellis1

    E-print Network

    Businger, Steven

    ., 2008]. Numerical studies include two-scale boundary layer models [Ginis et al., 2004] and 3-D idealized observations of Zhang et al. [2008] and the two-scale boundary layer model of Ginis et al. [2004]. Ginis et al. [2008]. This may help explain damage patterns observed by Fujita [1992] in hurricanes Andrew and Iniki

  1. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS OVER ROUGH BEDS

    E-print Network

    Pawlak, Geno

    LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS OVER ROUGH BEDS Krishnakumar Rajagopalan) is then used to simulate the turbulent boundary layer over the rough beds. The LES solver is first validated, pp 75-112. 3. Jiménez J. Turbulent Flows over Rough Walls, Annu. Rev. Fluid mech. 2004. v36. pp173-96

  2. Numerical treatment of singularly perturbed two point boundary value problems exhibiting boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attili, Basem S.

    2011-09-01

    A boundary value method for solving a class of nonlinear singularly perturbed two point boundary value problems with a boundary layer at one end is proposed. Using singular perturbation analysis the method consists of solving two problems; namely, a reduced problem and a boundary layer correction problem. We use Pade' approximation to obtain the solution of the latter problem and to satisfy the condition at infinity. Numerical examples will be given to illustrate the method.

  3. Destiny of earthward streaming plasma in the plasmasheet boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The dynamics of the earth's magnetotail have been investigated, and it has become clear that the plasmasheet boundary layer field lines map into the Region I Field-Aligned Currents (FAC) of the auroral zone. It is pointed out that the role of earthward streaming ions in the plasmasheet boundary layer may be of fundamental importance in the understanding of magnetotail dynamics, auroral zone physics, and especially for ionospheric-magnetospheric interactions. The present paper has the objective to evaluate propagation characteristics for the earthward streaming ions observed in the plasmasheet boundary layer. An investigation is conducted of the propagation characteristics of protons in the plasmasheet boundary layer using independent single particle dynamics, and conclusions are discussed. The density of earthward streaming ions found in the plasmasheet boundary layer should include the ring current as well as the auroral zone precipitaiton and inner plasmasheet regions of the magnetosphere.

  4. Pitot-probe displacement in a supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Eight circular pitot probes ranging in size from 2 to 70 percent of the boundary-layer thickness were tested to provide experimental probe displacement results in a two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer at a nominal free-stream Mach number of 2 and unit Reynolds number of 8 million per meter. The displacement obtained in the study was larger than that reported by previous investigators in either an incompressible turbulent boundary layer or a supersonic laminar boundary layer. The large probes indicated distorted Mach number profiles, probably due to separation. When the probes were small enough to cause no appreciable distortion, the displacement was constant over most of the boundary layer. The displacement in the near-wall region decreased to negative displacement in some cases. This near-wall region was found to extend to about one probe diameter from the test surface.

  5. Lubrication approximation in completed double layer boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseri, S.; Phan-Thien, N.; Fan, X.-J.

    This paper reports on the results of the numerical simulation of the motion of solid spherical particles in shear Stokes flows. Using the completed double layer boundary element method (CDLBEM) via distributed computing under Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM), the effective viscosity of suspension has been calculated for a finite number of spheres in a cubic array, or in a random configuration. In the simulation presented here, the short range interactions via lubrication forces are also taken into account, via the range completer in the formulation, whenever the gap between two neighbouring particles is closer than a critical gap. The results for particles in a simple cubic array agree with the results of Nunan and Keller (1984) and Stoksian Dynamics of Brady etal. (1988). To evaluate the lubrication forces between particles in a random configuration, a critical gap of 0.2 of particle's radius is suggested and the results are tested against the experimental data of Thomas (1965) and empirical equation of Krieger-Dougherty (Krieger, 1972). Finally, the quasi-steady trajectories are obtained for time-varying configuration of 125 particles.

  6. Evaluation of boundary-layer type forecasts 1 Evaluation of boundary-layer type in a weather forecast model

    E-print Network

    Hogan, Robin

    Many studies evaluating model boundary-layer schemes focus either on near-surface parameters for use in model evaluation. In this paper we show how surface and long-term Doppler lidar observations in the UK to evaluate a climatology of boundary layer type forecast by the UK Met Office Unified Model

  7. The wave-induced boundary layer under long internal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuncheng; Redekopp, Larry G.

    2011-08-01

    The boundary layer formed under the footprint of an internal solitary wave is studied by numerical simulation for waves of depression in a two-layer model of the density stratification. The inviscid outer flow, in the perspective of boundary-layer theory, is based on an exact solution for the long wave-phase speed, yielding a family of fully nonlinear solitary wave solutions of the extended Korteweg-de Vries equation. The wave-induced boundary layer corresponding to this outer flow is then studied by means of simulation employing the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation coupled with a turbulence closure model validated for wall-bounded flows. Boundary-layer characteristics are computed for an extensive range of environmental conditions and wave amplitudes. Boundary-layer transition, identified by monitoring the eddy viscosity, is correlated in terms of a boundary-layer Reynolds number. The frictional drag is evaluated for laminar, transitional, and turbulent cases, and correlations are presented for the friction coefficient plus relevant measures of the boundary-layer thickness.

  8. On Reflection of Shock Waves from Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liepmann, H W; Roshko, A; Dhawan, S

    1952-01-01

    Measurements are presented at Mach numbers from about 1.3 to 1.5 of reflection characteristics and the relative upstream influence of shock waves impinging on a flat surface with both laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The difference between impulse and step waves is discussed and their interaction with the boundary layer is compared. General considerations on the experimental production of shock waves from wedges and cones and examples of reflection of shock waves from supersonic shear layers are also presented.

  9. Symmetries in Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberlack, M.

    1996-01-01

    The objective is the development of a new theory which enables the algorithmic computation of all self-similar mean velocity profiles. The theory is based on Liegroup analysis and unifies a large set of self-similar solutions for the mean velocity of stationary parallel turbulent shear flows. The results include the logarithmic law of the wall, an algebraic law, the viscous sublayer, the linear region in the middle of a Couette flow and in the middle of a rotating channel flow, and a new exponential mean velocity profile not previously reported. Experimental results taken in the outer parts of a high Reynolds number flat-plate boundary layer, strongly support the exponential profile. From experimental as well as from DNS data of a turbulent channel flow the algebraic scaling law could be confirmed in both the center region and in the near wall region. In the case of the logarithmic law of the wall, the scaling with the wall distance arises as a result of the analysis and has not been assumed in the derivation. The crucial part of the derivation of all the different mean velocity profiles is to consider the invariance of the equation for the velocity fluctuations at the same time as the invariance of the equation for the velocity product equations. The latter is the dyad product of the velocity fluctuations with the equation for the velocity fluctuations. It has been proven that all the invariant solutions are also consistent with similarity of all velocity moment equations up to any arbitrary order.

  10. Boundary-layer type classification and pollutant mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, N. J.

    For the first time, Doppler lidar and sonic anemometer data are used to objectively classify the observed boundary layer into nine different types based on the Met Office scheme. Examples of these types are decoupled stratocumulus cloud, cumulus capped and stable with no turbulent cloud. This method is applied to three years of data from the Chilbolton Observatory, UK, to create climatology of boundary-layer type. This climatology exhibits clear seasonal and diurnal cycles with the most common type over the three years being a cloud-free stable boundary layer. The decoupled stratocumulus type and the cumulus cloud under a stratocumulus layer type are diagnosed 10.3% and 1.0% of the period respectively. This new observationally based boundary layer classification is used to evaluate the boundary-layer type diagnosed by the 4 km and 12 km resolution versions of the Met Office Unified Model. The model is found to predict too many decoupled stratocumulus boundary layers by a factor of 1.8, in both the stable and unstable regime. Stratocumulus cloud is present in the morning in the model but it is underestimated in the afternoon. The skill of the model in predicting boundary-layer type at the correct time has also been assessed using the symmetric extremal, dependence index measure of skill. This analysis revealed that the skill of predicting the correct boundary-layer cloud type was much lower than the skill of predicting the presence of cloud. The skill of prediction is not affected by model resolution. Finally, a set of idealised single column modelling experiments have been conducted to investigate the impact of boundary-layer type diagnosis on the vertical distribution of pollutants.

  11. Boundary Layer Rolls Observed Above and Below a Jet in a Marine Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, R. C.; Emmitt, G. D.; Godwin, K.; Greco, S.

    2013-12-01

    We have flown a coherent Doppler wind lidar (DWL) on the Cirpas Twin Otter off the California coast near Monterey since 2003. One scientific purpose of these flights is to understand the relationship between the turbulent fluxes measured on the aircraft or on other platforms and the observed structure of the marine boundary layer (MBL). Two common features are found in the MBL flow: (1) a strong jet at approximately 200 m above the sea surface; and (2) organized large eddies (OLE) in the form of roll vortices that are approximately aligned along the mean wind direction. On two flights (April 13, 2007 and September 30, 2012), the DWL data indicated that roll OLE existed simultaneously both above and below the jet. The DWL winds suggest that the OLE in these layers are sometimes independent and sometimes connected. Standard flux data are obtained on the Twin Otter at flight level, which is nominally 300 m. The 10 Hz wind and temperature data exhibit variability at spatial scales corresponding to the OLE wavelength. We have constructed a nonlinear theoretical model that includes triad wave-wave interactions to test the hypothesis that rolls could form both above and below the jet. This model shows that this is possible and that the rolls in the two layers could have unique characteristics compared to standard boundary layer rolls. The model further shows that the rolls above and below the jet are due to separate instabilities that interact. This is consistent with the observations of both connected and independent OLE above and below the jet. Contrast-enhanced DWL line-of-sight winds. Jet maximum 200 m below aircraft. Typical resonant triad solution for rolls above and below a PBL jet.

  12. On the theory of laminar boundary layers involving separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Karman, TH; Millikan, C

    1934-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical discussion of the laminar boundary layer, which was developed with a view of facilitating the investigation of those boundary layers in particular for which the phenomenon of separation occurs. The treatment starts with a slight modification of the form of the boundary layer equation first published by Von Mises. Two approximate solutions of this equation are found, one of which is exact at the outer edge of the boundary layer while the other is exact at the wall. The final solution is obtained by joining these two solutions at the inflection points of the velocity profiles. The final solution is given in terms of a series of universal functions for a fairly broad class of potential velocity distributions outside of the boundary layer. Detailed calculations of the boundary layer characteristics are worked out for the case in which the potential velocity is a linear function of the distance from the upstream stagnation point. Finally, the complete separation point characteristics are determined for the boundary layer associated with a potential velocity distribution made up of two linear functions of the distance from the stagnation point. It appears that extensions of the detailed calculations to more complex potential flows can be fairly easily carried out by using the explicit formulae given in the paper. (author)

  13. A NEW NEURAL RECORDING ELECTRODE ARRAY WITH PARYLENE INSULATING LAYER

    E-print Network

    Nenadic, Zoran

    A NEW NEURAL RECORDING ELECTRODE ARRAY WITH PARYLENE INSULATING LAYER Changlin Pang1 , Jorge G presents a new electrode array applied with parylene technology, used for recording of high-level cognitive and conduction traces are insulated by parylene, which is a polymer material with high electrical resistivity

  14. Boundary layer for the NavierStokesalpha model of fluid turbulence #

    E-print Network

    Cheskidov, Alexey

    as in the turbulent boundary layer for moderately large Reynolds numbers. 1. Introduction 1.1. Boundary layer Boundary­layerBoundary layer for the Navier­Stokes­alpha model of fluid turbulence # A. CHESKIDOV Abstract We study boundary layer turbulence using the Navier­Stokes­alpha model ob­ taining an extension

  15. Boundary layer for the Navier-Stokes-alpha model of fluid turbulence

    E-print Network

    Cheskidov, Alexey

    , and boundary layer equations for the averaged quantities ¯u, ¯v, ¯p and fluctuating parts u , and v can as in the turbulent boundary layer for moderately large Reynolds numbers. 1. Introduction 1.1. Boundary layer Boundary-layerBoundary layer for the Navier-Stokes-alpha model of fluid turbulence A. CHESKIDOV Abstract We study

  16. Boundary-Layer Origin for Jets, and Non-Existence of the Boundary Layer in Young Jet-Producing Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Peter T.

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, Pringle suggested a boundary-layer origin for jets from YSOs. The jets were driven by a toroidal magnetic field generated by strong shear in the accretion boundary layer. Such a mechanism is clearly non-magnetocentrifugal in nature.Nearly fifteen years ago, we suggested a cartoon of the jet-launching mechanism in protostars in which shear, acting upon MHD turbulence generated by the magnetorotational instability (MRI), generated a tangled, toroidal magnetic field capable of driving a jet. This picture, which is also manifestly non-magnetocentrifugal in nature, relied upon a novel model for MRI-driven MHD turbulence based on a viscoelastic, rather than a viscous, prescription for the turbulent stress. Our hypothesis has some clear similarities to Pringle's mechanism, but it relied upon a large envelope surrounding the central star.An accretion boundary layer has long been recognized as a promising source for protostellar jets in good part because in a standard thin disk, matter loses circa half of all its accretion energy in this layer, but it is problematic to drive a well-collimated outflow from a boundary layer in a thin disk. In this presentation, we argue paradoxically that the "boundary layer" can drive jets when a true boundary layer, like the thin disk, does not exist. This changes the inner boundary condition for viscous angular momentum flux in the disk.The standard argument for a thin boundary layer is, we argue, circular. In high accretion-rate systems, or when the gas cannot cool efficiently, there is no reason to suspect the turbulent viscosity in this boundary layer to be small, and therefore neither is the boundary layer. When the boundary layer becomes larger than the central accretor itself, it is arguably no longer a boundary layer, but rather an envelope. It is still, however, a substantial source of power and toroidal MRI-driven magnetic fields.It is, again, only in relatively hot or high-accretion rate systems in which the boundary layer would be expected to inflate and so disappear. Not coincidentally, it is in such systems, such as Class 0 and Class I protostars, in which we have the strongest evidence for powerful, well-collimated jet outflows.

  17. A novel concept for subsonic inlet boundary-layer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    A self-bleeding method for boundary layer control is described and tested for a subsonic inlet designed to operate in the flowfield generated by high angles of attack. Naturally occurring surface static pressure gradients are used to remove the boundary layer from a separation-prone region of the inlet and to reinject it at a less critical location with a net performance gain. The results suggest that this self-bleeding method for boundary-layer control might be successfully applied to other inlets operating at extreme aerodynamic conditions.

  18. Formation of pre-sheath boundary layers in electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    In electronegative plasmas Coulomb scattering between positive and negative ions can lead to the formation of a pre-sheath boundary layer containing the bulk of the negative ions. The negative ion boundary layer forms when momentum transfer from positive to negative ions dominates the negative ion acceleration from the electric field. This condition is met in Inductively Coupled Plasma reactors that operate at low pressure and high plasma density. Simulations of the GEC reactor for Chlorine and Oxygen chemistries using the INDUCT95 2D model are presented showing the pre-sheath boundary layer structure as a function of applied power and neutral pressure.

  19. Structure of turbulence in three-dimensional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, Chelakara S.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the three dimensional turbulent boundary layer concepts and of the currently available experimental information for their turbulence modeling. It is found that more reliable turbulence data, especially of the Reynolds stress transport terms, is needed to improve the existing modeling capabilities. An experiment is proposed to study the three dimensional boundary layer formed by a 'sink flow' in a fully developed two dimensional turbulent boundary layer. Also, the mean and turbulence field measurement procedure using a three component laser Doppler velocimeter is described.

  20. Boundary-Layer Effects on Acoustic Transmission Through Narrow Slit Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, G. P.; Lovelock, R. K.; Murray, A. R. J.; Hibbins, A. P.; Sambles, J. R.; Smith, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    We explore the slit-width dependence of the resonant transmission of sound in air through both a slit array formed of aluminum slats and a single open-ended slit cavity in an aluminum plate. Our experimental results accord well with Lord Rayleigh's theory concerning how thin viscous and thermal boundary layers at a slit's walls affect the acoustic wave across the whole slit cavity. By measuring accurately the frequencies of the Fabry-Perot-like cavity resonances, we find a significant 5% reduction in the effective speed of sound through the slits when an individual viscous boundary layer occupies only 5% of the total slit width. Importantly, this effect is true for any airborne slit cavity, with the reduction being achieved despite the slit width being on a far larger scale than an individual boundary layer's thickness. This work demonstrates that the recent prevalent loss-free treatment of narrow slit cavities within acoustic metamaterials is unrealistic.

  1. Decadal change in the troposphere and atmospheric boundary layer over the South Pole

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, W.D.

    1994-12-31

    During the austral winter of 1993, the Environmental Technology Laboratory carried out a detailed field study of the atmospheric boundary layer at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station to determine the effect of transitory synoptic disturbances on the surface-energy budget. This study used newly developed 915-megahertz radar wind-profiling technology for the first time in the Antarctic in combination with conventional boundary layer instrumentation that included a short tower, sonic anemometer, microbarograph array, and doppler sodar. Recent discussions, however, of interdecadal variability in the circumpolar circulation around Antarctica and of decadal changes in summer cloudiness at the South Pole, motivated our study of the long-term variability in boundary layer characteristics, cloudiness, and tropospheric flow behavior to provide a climatological context for our single year`s observations. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  2. A conditioned volumetric view of ``superstructure'' events in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, Nicholas; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram; Monty, Jason; Marusic, Ivan; Chong, Min

    2008-11-01

    A conditionally averaged view of ``superstructure'' type events is presented for the case of zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers at friction Reynolds number, Re? 14,00. Detailed boundary layer traverses are acquired above a simultaneously sampled spanwise rake of 10 flush-mounted hot-film sensors, affixed to the tunnel wall with a spanwise spacing of approximately 0.08 boundary layer thicknesses (?). The data from the traversing probes are conditioned on the occurrence of superstructure-type footprints sensed by the wall array. The resulting data give a more complete volumetric view of the large-scale meandering log-region features than has previously been afforded by hot-wire rake and PIV measurements. Such detailed views are used to further investigate the existence of an amplitude modulation effect, in which the footprints of large ?- scaled structures (that typify the logarithmic region) have been observed to modulate the viscous-scaled near-wall cycle.

  3. Upstream Boundary Condition Sensitivity of the Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmer, David; Chantrasmi, Tonkid; Elkins, Chris; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Eaton, John

    2009-11-01

    A low aspect ratio Mach 2.1 wind tunnel with a 20 ^o compression wedge is being used to validate uncertainty quantification techniques for CFD. The tunnel is operated continuously, with a mass flow rate of ˜0.7kg/s. The incoming pressure, temperature, and mass flow rate are monitored, and the variation in these boundary conditions is documented to provide bounds for the fluctuation applied in the CFD. The compression wedge causes an oblique shock to form, resulting in flow separation at the base of the wedge. Pressure data are measured using a closely-spaced array of taps near the base of the wedge to map the 2D footprint of the shock. These data show that the flow is only weakly three dimensional. PIV measurements are taken throughout the field, with a focus on the shock-boundary layer interaction at the base of the compression wedge. The field of measurement also includes the location where the shock impinges on the opposite wall, where another separation occurs. Measurements are compared to various CFD simulations to see how different modeling assumptions affect the result and to evaluate the validity of CFD uncertainty quantification techniques.

  4. Examining A Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer at Low Reynolds Number 

    E-print Network

    Semper, Michael Thomas

    2013-05-15

    The purpose of the current study was to answer several questions related to hypersonic, low Reynolds number, turbulent boundary layers, of which available data related to turbulence quantities is scarce. To that end, a ...

  5. Analysis of civil aircraft propulsors with boundary layer ingestion

    E-print Network

    Hall, David Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes (i) guidelines for propulsor sizing, and (ii) strategies for fan turbomachinery conceptual design, for a boundary layer ingesting (BLI) propulsion system for advanced civil transport aircraft. For the ...

  6. Performance of a boundary layer ingesting propulsion system

    E-print Network

    Plas, Angélique (Angélique Pascale)

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents an assessment of the aerodynamic performance of an aircraft propulsion system, with embedded engines, in the presence of aircraft fuselage boundary layer ingestion (BLI). The emphasis is on defining ...

  7. Large Eddy Simulation of Atmospheric Convective Boundary Layer with Realistic

    E-print Network

    Fedorovich, Evgeni

    to evaluate, qualitatively and quantitatively, various physical mechanisms that determine CBL flow structureLarge Eddy Simulation of Atmospheric Convective Boundary Layer with Realistic Environmental in which simulations are run. This study investigates LES initialization options using realistic

  8. Boundary-Layer Meteorology An International Journal of Physical,

    E-print Network

    Lebedev, Vladimir

    1 23 Boundary-Layer Meteorology An International Journal of Physical, Chemical and Biological atmosphere is of great importance for a variety of disciplines, from meteorology and urban planning to botany

  9. Experimental measurements of unsteady turbulent boundary layers near separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations conducted to document the behavior of turbulent boundary layers on flat surfaces that separate due to adverse pressure gradients are reported. Laser and hot wire anemometers measured turbulence and flow structure of a steady free stream separating turbulent boundary layer produced on the flow of a wind tunnel section. The effects of sinusoidal and unsteadiness of the free stream velocity on this separating turbulent boundary layer at a reduced frequency were determined. A friction gage and a thermal tuft were developed and used to measure the surface skin friction and the near wall fraction of time the flow moves downstream for several cases. Abstracts are provided of several articles which discuss the effects of the periodic free stream unsteadiness on the structure or separating turbulent boundary layers.

  10. Energy efficient engine, low-pressure turbine boundary layer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, W. B.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate development of boundary layers under the influence of velocity distributions simulating the suction side of two state-of-the-art turbine airfoils: a forward loaded airfoil (squared-off design) and an aft loaded airfoil (aft-loaded design). These velocity distributions were simulated in a boundary layer wind tunnel. Detailed measurements of boundary layer mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles were obtained for an inlet turbulence level of 2.4 percent and an exit Reynolds number of 800,000. Flush-mounted hot film probes identified the boundary layer transition regimes in the adverse pressure gradient regions for both velocity distributions. Wall intermittency data showed good agreement with the correlations of Dhawan and Narasimha for the intermittency factor distribution in transitional flow regimes.

  11. Interacting turbulent boundary layer over a wavy wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polak, A.; Werle, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    The two dimensional supersonic flow of a thick turbulent boundary layer over a train of relatively small wave-like protuberances is considered. The flow conditions and the geometry are such that there exists a strong interaction between the viscous and inviscid flow. The problem cannot be solved without inclusion of interaction effects due to the occurrence of the separation singularity in classical boundary layer methods. The interacting boundary layer equations are solved numerically using a time-like relaxation method with turbulence effects represented by the inclusion of the eddy viscosity model. Results are presented for flow over a train of up to six waves for Mach numbers of 10 and 32 million/meter, and wall temperature rations (T sub w/T sub 0) of 0.4 and 0.8. Limited comparisons with independent experimental and analytical results are also given. Detailed results on the influence of small protuberances on surface heating by boundary layers are presented.

  12. Multidimensional Longwave Forcing of Boundary Layer Cloud Systems

    E-print Network

    Mechem, David B.; Kogan, Yefim L.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Davis, Anthony B.; Evans, K. Franklin; Ellingson, Robert G.

    2008-12-01

    radiative transfer, however, differ little. For the solid cloud case, relative to using IPA, the MD simulation exhibits a slight reduction in entrainment rate and boundary layer total kinetic energy (TKE) relative to the IPA simulation. This reduction...

  13. Distributed Roughness Receptivity in a Flat Plate Boundary Layer 

    E-print Network

    Kuester, Matthew Scott

    2014-04-18

    Surface roughness can affect boundary layer transition by acting as a receptivity mechanism for transient growth. Several experiments have investigated transient growth created by discrete roughness elements; however, very few experiments have...

  14. Report of secondary flows, boundary layers, turbulence and wave team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doviak, R.

    1980-01-01

    Correspondence concerning the comparison of horizontal wind fields, two dimensional spectra, heat flux, mesoscale divergence and deformation in the prestorm environment, and thunderstorm gust front winds is presented. Other subjects include the use of radar to determine heating rate and evaporation near the Earth's surface for an unstable boundary layer and statistical considerations in the estimation of wind fields from single Doppler radar and application to prestorm boundary layer observations.

  15. Approximation theory for boundary layer suction through individual slits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walz, A.

    1979-01-01

    The basic concepts of influencing boundary layers are summarized, especially the prevention of flow detachment and the reduction of frictional resistance. A mathematical analysis of suction through a slit is presented with two parameters, for thickness and for shape of the boundary layer, being introduced to specify the flow's velocity profile behind the slit. An approximation of the shape parameter produces a useful formula, which can be used to determine the most favorable position of the slit. An aerodynamic example is given.

  16. Shock wave oscillation driven by turbulent boundary layer fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotkin, K. J.

    1972-01-01

    Pressure fluctuations due to the interaction of a shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer were investigated. A simple model is proposed in which the shock wave is convected from its mean position by velocity fluctuations in the turbulent boundary layer. Displacement of the shock is assumed limited by a linear restoring mechanism. Predictions of peak root mean square pressure fluctuation and spectral density are in excellent agreement with available experimental data.

  17. Tropical boundary layer equilibrium in the last ice age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Alan K.; Ridgway, W.

    1992-01-01

    A radiative-convective boundary layer model is used to assess the effect of changing sea surface temperature, pressure, wind speed, and the energy export from the tropics on the boundary layer equilibrium equivalent potential temperature. It remains difficult to reconcile the observations that during the last glacial maximum (18,000 yr BP) the snowline on the tropical mountains fell 950 m, while the tropical sea surface temperatures fell only 1-2 K.

  18. Classification of structures in the stable boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belusic, Danijel

    2015-04-01

    Ubiquitous but generally unknown flow structures populate the stable boundary layer at scales larger than turbulence. They introduce nonstationarity, affect the generation of turbulence and induce fluxes. Classification of the structures into clusters based on a similarity measure could reduce their apparent complexity and lead to better understanding of their characteristics and mechanisms. Here we explore different approaches to detect and classify structures, the usefulness of those approaches, and their potential to provide better understanding of the stable boundary layer.

  19. Flow visualization of shock-boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hingst, W. R.; Jurkovich, M.

    1982-01-01

    Two and three-dimensional shock-boundary layer interaction data were obtained from supersonic wind tunnel tests. These interactions are studied both with and without boundary layer bleed. The data verify computational fluid dynamic codes. Surface static pressure, pitot pressure, flow angularity, and bleed rates, are studied by flow visualization techniques. Surface oil flow using fluorescent dye and laser sheet using water droplets as the scattering material are used for flow visualization.

  20. On stability of free laminar boundary layer between parallel streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessen, Martin

    1950-01-01

    An analysis and calculations on the stability of the free laminar boundary layer between parallel streams were made for an incompressible fluid using the Tollmien-Schlichting theory of small disturbances. Because the boundary conditions are at infinity, two solutions of the Orr-Sommerfeld stability equations need not be considered, and the remaining two solutions are exponential in character at the infinite boundaries. The calculations show that the flow is unstable except for very low Reynolds numbers.

  1. Dense gas boundary layer experiments: Visualization, pressure measurements, concentration evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Neuwald, P.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1992-11-01

    This technical report describes methods that were applied to investigate turbulent boundary layers generated by inviscid, baroclinic effects. The Cranz-Schardin 24-sparks camera was used to visualize the interactions of a planar shock wave with a Freon R12-layer. The shock propagates more slowly in the Freon layer than in air because of its smaller sound speed. This causes the shock front to be curved and to be reflected between the wall and the layer interface. As a consequence of the reflection process, a series of compression and expansion waves radiate from the layer. Large fluctuations in the streamwise velocity and in pressure develop for about 1 ms. These waves strongly perturb the interface shear layer, which rapidly transitions to a turbulent boundary flow. Pressure measurements showed that the fluctuations in the Freon layer reach a peak pressure 4 times higher than in the turbulent boundary flow. To characterize the preshock Freon boundary layer, concentration measurements were performed with a differential interferometry technique. The refraction index of Freon R12 is so high that Mach-Zehnder interferometry was not successful in these experiments. The evaluation of the concentration profile is described here in detail. Method and results of corresponding LDV measurements under the same conditions are presented in a different report, EMI Report T 9/92. The authors plan to continue the dense gas layer investigations with the gas combination helium/Freon.

  2. Development of instrumentation for boundary layer transition detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Steven B.

    A steady state heat transfer technique is developed and evaluated for detecting boundary layer transition on a flat plate in incompressible flow. The method involves adhering encapsulated temperature sensitive liquid crystals to a constant heat flux surface. A heater composed of unidirectional carbon fibers is developed and tested with the aim of in-flight boundary layer transition detection on a natural laminar flow nacelle. The individual and combined influences of surface heating and favorable pressure gradient on boundary layer transition are considered. Heating is found to be a destabilizing influence on the boundary layer, while a favorable pressure gradient is a stabilizing influence. A Stanton number correlates the movement of transition with heating for zero pressure gradient flat plate boundary layers. No similar correlation is found when a favorable pressure gradient accompanies the heating. Heating is more destabilizing in a favorable pressure gradient than in zero pressure gradient. Shear sensitive liquid crystal is used to detect transition and to obtain, for the first time, quantitative measurements of surface shear stress in a transitional boundary layer. This involves calibrating the time required for the liquid crystal film to experience a texture change when subjected to a shearing force. Using this technique, shear sensitive liquid crystal shows promise for full coverage measurement of surface shear stress in low speed flows.

  3. Large eddy simulation of boundary layer flow under cnoidal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yin-Jun; Chen, Jiang-Bo; Zhou, Ji-Fu; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-09-01

    Water waves in coastal areas are generally nonlinear, exhibiting asymmetric velocity profiles with different amplitudes of crest and trough. The behaviors of the boundary layer under asymmetric waves are of great significance for sediment transport in natural circumstances. While previous studies have mainly focused on linear or symmetric waves, asymmetric wave-induced flows remain unclear, particularly in the flow regime with high Reynolds numbers. Taking cnoidal wave as a typical example of asymmetric waves, we propose to use an infinite immersed plate oscillating cnoidally in its own plane in quiescent water to simulate asymmetric wave boundary layer. A large eddy simulation approach with Smagorinsky subgrid model is adopted to investigate the flow characteristics of the boundary layer. It is verified that the model well reproduces experimental and theoretical results. Then a series of numerical experiments are carried out to study the boundary layer beneath cnoidal waves from laminar to fully developed turbulent regimes at high Reynolds numbers, larger than ever studied before. Results of velocity profile, wall shear stress, friction coefficient, phase lead between velocity and wall shear stress, and the boundary layer thickness are obtained. The dependencies of these boundary layer properties on the asymmetric degree and Reynolds number are discussed in detail.

  4. Experimental studies on two dimensional shock boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skebe, S. A.; Greber, I.; Hingst, W. R.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments have been performed on the interaction of oblique shock waves with flat plate boundary layers in the 30.48 cm x 30.48 cm (1 ft. x 1 ft.) supersonic wind tunnel at NASA Lewis Research Center. High accuracy measurements of the plate surface static pressure and shear stress distributions as well as boundary layer velocity profiles were obtained through the interaction region. Documentation was also performed of the tunnel test section flow field and of the two-dimensionality of the interaction regions. The findings provide detailed description of two-dimensional interaction with initially laminar boundary layers over the Mach number range 2.0 to 4.0. Additional information with regard to interactions involving initially transitional boundary layers is presented over the Mach number range 2.0 to 3.0 and those for initially turbulent boundary layers at Mach 2.0. These experiments were directed toward providing well documented information of high accuracy useful as test cases for analytic and numerical calculations. Flow conditions encompassed a Reynolds number range of 4.72E6 to 2.95E7 per meter. The shock boundary layer interaction results were found to be generally in good agreement with the experimental work of previous authors both in terms of direct numerical comparison and in support of correlations establishing laminar separation characteristics.

  5. Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Stability Modeling at Flight Entry Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartkowicz, Matt; Johnson, Heath; Candler, Graham; Campbell, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    State of the art boundary layer stability modeling capabilities are increasingly seeing application to entry flight vehicles. With the advent of user friendly and robust implementations of two-dimensional chemical nonequilibrium stability modeling with the STABL/PSE-CHEM software, the need for flight data to calibrate such analyses capabilities becomes more critical. Recent efforts to perform entry flight testing with the Orbiter geometry related to entry aerothermodynamics and boundary layer transition is allowing for a heightened focus on the Orbiter configuration. A significant advancement in the state of the art can likely be achieved by establishing a basis of understanding for the occurrence of boundary layer transition on the Orbiter due to discrete protruding gap fillers and the nominal distributed roughness of the actual thermal protection system. Recent success in demonstrating centerline two-dimensional stability modeling on the centerline of the Orbiter at flight entry conditions provides a starting point for additional investigations. The more detailed paper will include smooth Orbiter configuration boundary layer stability results for several typical orbiter entry conditions. In addition, the numerical modeling approach for establishing the mean laminar flow will be reviewed and the method for determining boundary layer disturbance growth will be overviewed. In addition, if actual Orbiter TPS surface data obtained via digital surface scans become available, it may be possible to investigate the effects of an as-flown flight configuration on boundary layer transition compared to a smooth CAD reference.

  6. Grain-boundary motion in layered phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Denis; Viñals, Jorge

    2001-06-01

    We study the motion of a grain boundary that separates two sets of mutually perpendicular rolls in Rayleigh-Bénard convection above onset. The problem is treated either analytically from the corresponding amplitude equations, or numerically by solving the Swift-Hohenberg equation. We find that if the rolls are curved by a slow transversal modulation, a net translation of the boundary follows. We show analytically that although this motion is a nonlinear effect, it occurs in a time scale much shorter than that of the linear relaxation of the curved rolls. The total distance traveled by the boundary scales as ?-1/2, where ? is the reduced Rayleigh number. We obtain analytical expressions for the relaxation rate of the modulation and for the time-dependent traveling velocity of the boundary, and especially their dependence on wave number. The results agree well with direct numerical solutions of the Swift-Hohenberg equation. We finally discuss the implications of our results on the coarsening rate of an ensemble of differently oriented domains in which grain-boundary motion through curved rolls is the dominant coarsening mechanism.

  7. Application of a Reynolds stress model to separating boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Sung HO

    1993-01-01

    Separating turbulent boundary layers occur in many practical engineering applications. Nonetheless, the physics of separation/reattachment of flows is poorly understood. During the past decade, various turbulence models were proposed and their ability to successfully predict some types of flows was shown. However. prediction of separating/reattaching flows is still a formidable task for model developers. The present study is concerned with the process of separation from a smooth surface. Features of turbulent separating boundary layers that are relevant to modeling include the following: the occurrence of zero wall shear stress, which causes breakdown of the boundary layer approximation; the law of the wall not being satisfied in the mean back flow region; high turbulence levels in the separated region; a significant low-frequency motion in the separation bubble; and the turbulence structure of the separated shear layer being quite different from that of either the mixing layers or the boundary layers. These special characteristics of separating boundary layers make it difficult for simple turbulence models to correctly predict their behavior.

  8. Boundary Layer Separation Control via Spanwise Lorentz Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattarajan, Srinivasan; Johari, Hamid

    2006-11-01

    The ability of a Lorentz force actuator to suppress boundary layer separation in a weakly conductive fluid was examined experimentally. The actuator comprising of an array of alternately arranged electrodes and magnets was flush mounted on the surface of a two dimensional hydrofoil model with a trailing flap inclined at 20 to the freestream flow in a water tunnel. The actuator was powered with a unipolar square wave at various frequencies and amplitudes in order to generate time-periodic, spanwise Lorentz forces. Velocity fields measured using PIV indicated complete flow reattachment on the inclined flap as a result of the application of Lorentz forces above a certain forcing amplitude. Performance of the actuator was weakly dependent on the forcing frequency, with improved performance found at a non-dimensional frequency of unity. The effectiveness of forcing varied with the Reynolds number, with better control achieved at higher Reynolds number for the same forcing amplitude and frequency. The ability of the actuator in suppressing separation appeared to be related to the appearance of distinct streamwise vortices as a result of Lorentz forcing.

  9. Bottom boundary layer measurements in OMP. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, T.F.; Williams, A.J.

    1998-11-01

    The main role of the Benthic Acoustic Stress Sensor (BASS) tripods within the Ocean Margins Program experiments was to detect and quantify organic carbon rich particle transport off the shelf. This requires measures of the turbulent boundary layer flow and bed stress, the physical forcing of the particle transport, as well as the concentration and type of particles which are being transported. The BASS tripods were deployed at sites 17 and 26. Data from site 26 were recovered spanning three periods: Feb. 2--April 6, May 13--June 27, June 28--Aug. 18. Site 17 was occupied Feb. 12--april 11. The BASS tripods were arrayed with five BASS sensors measuring detailed velocity parameters within four meters of the seabed. Velocity time series indicate a usually weak tidal flow which produces small bed stress by itself. On the occasions when a strong flow, probably the Gulf Stream, crosses the area, the bed shear stress increases dramatically to as much as 10 dyne cm{sup {minus}2}. This is competent to move unconsolidated sediments in the area. Other instruments from the tripods include: two conductivity/temperature sensor pairs, five WetStar fluorometers, thermistors, transmissometer, optical backscatterence sensors and a pressure sensor.

  10. Validation of High-Speed Turbulent Boundary Layer and Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction Computations with the OVERFLOW Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, A. B.; Lillard, R. P.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Lyrintizis, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The capability of the OVERFLOW code to accurately compute high-speed turbulent boundary layers and turbulent shock-boundary layer interactions is being evaluated. Configurations being investigated include a Mach 2.87 flat plate to compare experimental velocity profiles and boundary layer growth, a Mach 6 flat plate to compare experimental surface heat transfer,a direct numerical simulation (DNS) at Mach 2.25 for turbulent quantities, and several Mach 3 compression ramps to compare computations of shock-boundary layer interactions to experimental laser doppler velocimetry (LDV) data and hot-wire data. The present paper describes outlines the study and presents preliminary results for two of the flat plate cases and two small-angle compression corner test cases.

  11. ON AERODYNAMIC AND BOUNDARY LAYER RESISTANCES WITHIN DRY DEPOSITION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There have been many empirical parameterizations for the aerodynamic and boundary layer resistances proposed in the literature, e.g. those of the Meyers Multi-Layer Deposition Model (MLM) used with the nation-wide dry deposition network. Many include arbitrary constants or par...

  12. A numerical investigation of boundary layer quasi-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer-Calder, K.; Randall, David

    2015-01-01

    Despite the large energy input from surface evaporation, the moist static energy (MSE) of the tropical boundary layer remains relatively constant on large spatial and temporal scales due to lifting of vapor by cloudy updrafts and the addition of dry air from the layers above. Arakawa and Schubert (1974) suggested that drying is due mainly to clear-air turbulent entrainment between cloudy updrafts, while Raymond (1995) described drying due mainly to convective downdrafts. We used cloud-resolving numerical simulations to investigate the transport of MSE into the boundary layer and found turbulent entrainment between clouds to be the dominant process.

  13. Feasibility study of optical boundary layer transition detection method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azzazy, M.; Modarress, D.; Trolinger, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    A high sensitivity differential interferometer was developed to locate the region where the boundary layer flow undergoes transition from laminar to turbulent. Two laboratory experimental configurations were used to evaluate the performance of the interferometer: open shear layer, and low speed wind tunnel turbulent spot configuration. In each experiment, small temperature fluctuations were introduced as the signal source. Simultaneous cold wire measurements were compared with the interferometer data. The comparison shows that the interferometer is sensitive to very weak phase variations in the order of 0.001 the laser wavelength. An attempt to detect boundary layer transition over a flat plate at NASA-Langley Unitary Supersonic Wind Tunnel using the interferometer system was performed. The phase variations during boundary layer transition in the supersonic wind tunnel were beyond the minimum signal-to-noise level of the instrument.

  14. Shock-like structures in the tropical cyclone boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gabriel J.; Taft, Richard K.; McNoldy, Brian D.; Schubert, Wayne H.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents high horizontal resolution solutions of an axisymmetric, constant depth, slab boundary layer model designed to simulate the radial inflow and boundary layer pumping of a hurricane. Shock-like structures of increasing intensity appear for category 1-5 hurricanes. For example, in the category 3 case, the u>(?u/?r>) term in the radial equation of motion produces a shock-like structure in the radial wind, i.e., near the radius of maximum tangential wind the boundary layer radial inflow decreases from approximately 22 m s-1 to zero over a radial distance of a few kilometers. Associated with this large convergence is a spike in the radial distribution of boundary layer pumping, with updrafts larger than 22 m s-1 at a height of 1000 m. Based on these model results, it is argued that observed hurricane updrafts of this magnitude so close to the ocean surface are attributable to the dry dynamics of the frictional boundary layer rather than moist convective dynamics. The shock-like structure in the boundary layer radial wind also has important consequences for the evolution of the tangential wind and the vertical component of vorticity. On the inner side of the shock the tangential wind tendency is essentially zero, while on the outer side of the shock the tangential wind tendency is large due to the large radial inflow there. The result is the development of a U-shaped tangential wind profile and the development of a thin region of large vorticity. In many respects, the model solutions resemble the remarkable structures observed in the boundary layer of Hurricane Hugo (1989).

  15. Aeroelastically deflecting flaps for shock/boundary-layer interaction control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gefroh, D.; Loth, E.; Dutton, C.; Hafenrichter, E.

    2003-06-01

    An aeroelastic mesoflap system has been developed to improve the downstream flow properties of an oblique shock/boundary-layer interaction. The mesoflap system employs a set of small flaps over a cavity, whereby the flaps downstream of the interaction bend downward aeroelastically to bleed the flow and the upstream flaps bend upward to re-inject this same mass flow upstream. This recirculating system requires no net mass bleed and therefore has advantages for boundary layer control in external or mixed-compression supersonic aircraft inlets. In addition, the system may be applicable in other aerospace applications where boundary-layer control can help remedy the adverse effects of shock interactions. Several mesoflap systems have been fabricated and examined experimentally to investigate their aerodynamic and structural performance. Each mesoflap is rigidly attached to a spar on its upstream end while the remainder of the flap is free to deflect aeroelastically. The flap length is nominally a few boundary-layer thicknesses in dimension, while the flap thickness is small enough to allow tip deflections that are of the order of the boundary-layer momentum thickness. Experiments were conducted for a Mach 2.41 impinging oblique shock wave interaction with a turbulent boundary layer. Spanwise-centered laser Doppler velocimeter measurements indicate that certain mesoflap designs can show significant flow improvement as compared to the solid-wall case, including increased stagnation pressure recovery and a 7% reduction in boundary layer thickness and sonic thickness. However, one drawback of the mesoflap system is the potential for fatigue, which in some cases led to microcracking followed by flap failure. Structural design improvements to alleviate and avoid this problem included a lower profile spar design, substitution of Nitinol for aluminum as the flap material, and use of stress-relieving holes at the ends of the flap cut-outs.

  16. Summary of experimentally determined facts concerning the behavior of the boundary layer and performance of boundary layer measurements. [considering sailing flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanness, W.

    1978-01-01

    A summary report of boundary layer studies is presented. Preliminary results of experimental measurements show that: (1) A very thin layer (approximately 0.4 mm) of the boundary layer seems to be accelerated; (2) the static pressure of the outer flow does not remain exactly constant through the boundary layer; and (3) an oncoming boundary layer which is already turbulent at the suction point can again become laminar behind this point without being completely sucked off.

  17. The Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lothon, Marie; Lohou, Fabienne; Darbieu, Clara; Couvreux, Fleur; Pino, David; Blay, Estel; Vila-Guerau de Arellano, Jordi; Pietersen, Henk; Hartogensis, Oscar; Pardyjak, Eric; Alexander, Daniel; Reuder, Joachim; Baaserud, Line; Nilsson, Erik; Jimenez, Maria Antonia; Faloona, Ian; Sastre-Marugan, Mariano; Angevine, Wayne M.; Canut, Guylaine; Bazile, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The BLLAST (Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence) project aims at better understanding the turbulence processes which occur during the transition from a well-mixed convective boundary layer to a residual layer overlying a stabilized nocturnal layer. This phase of the diurnal cycle is challenging from both modeling and observational perspectives: it is transitory, most of the forcings are small or null during the transition and the turbulence regime changes from the fully convective regime of turbulence, close to homogeneous and isotropic, toward more heterogeneous and intermittent turbulence during its decay. Those issues motivated a field campaign that was conducted from 14 June to 8 July 2011 in southern France in complex terrain and consisted of a range of integrated instrument platforms including: full-size aircraft, Remotely Piloted Airplane Systems (RPAS), remote sensing instruments, radiosoundings, tethered balloons, surface flux stations, and various meteorological towers deployed over different surface covers. The boundary layer, from the earth's surface to free troposphere was densely probed during the entire day, with a focus and intense observations from midday until sunset. The field dataset now forms the base of a set of studies utilizing the observations and several types of models including: Large Eddy Simulation, Mesoscale models, forecast models. The presentation will expose an overview of this experiment and of the current observational and modeling studies, with the focus on: the turbulence decay process within the entire boundary layer from surface to the top, the mesoscale forcings of importance during BLLAST, the ability of the forecast models to represent the diurnal cycle, the relevance of the Monin Obukhov similarity theory, and shallow drainage flows. Reference: Lothon M. et al., 2012. The Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence field experiment, Proc. of the 20th Symposium on Boundary-Layers and Turbulence, 7-13 July, Boston, MA, USA.

  18. Synoptically Driven Boundary Layer Behavior over Summit Station Greenland during the Unusual Melt Season of 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, William; Shupe, Mathew; Miller, Nathaniel

    2013-04-01

    The summer of 2012 saw two periods of extensive melting of the ice surface over Greenland, the first since 1889 over the highest regions of the ice sheet. Fortunately a rather complete set of observations of the boundary layer evolution was provided by an acoustic minisounder and supported by an extensive array of cloud and radiation measurements. During the summer, three were a total of three multi-day warming periods in response, each time, to negative excursions of the Arctic Oscillation. During two of these, corresponding to periods of extensive melt, a ridge-trough pattern set up to transport warm, moist air from the south over Greenland: over the ocean this transport appeared as Atmospheric Rivers. In this paper, we describe the boundary layer over the period of June-August and its response to this synoptic forcing, in particular the rapidity of boundary response to changing radiative forcing.

  19. Nature, theory and modelling of geophysical convective planetary boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical convective planetary boundary layers (CPBLs) are still poorly reproduced in oceanographic, hydrological and meteorological models. Besides the mean flow and usual shear-generated turbulence, CPBLs involve two types of motion disregarded in conventional theories: 'anarchy turbulence' comprised of the buoyancy-driven plumes, merging to form larger plumes instead of breaking down, as postulated in conventional theory (Zilitinkevich, 1973), large-scale organised structures fed by the potential energy of unstable stratification through inverse energy transfer in convective turbulence (and performing non-local transports irrespective of mean gradients of transporting properties). C-PBLs are strongly mixed and go on growing as long as the boundary layer remains unstable. Penetration of the mixed layer into the weakly turbulent, stably stratified free flow causes turbulent transports through the CPBL outer boundary. The proposed theory, taking into account the above listed features of CPBL, is based on the following recent developments: prognostic CPBL-depth equation in combination with diagnostic algorithm for turbulence fluxes at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries (Zilitinkevich, 1991, 2012, 2013; Zilitinkevich et al., 2006, 2012), deterministic model of self-organised convective structures combined with statistical turbulence-closure model of turbulence in the CPBL core (Zilitinkevich, 2013). It is demonstrated that the overall vertical transports are performed mostly by turbulence in the surface layer and entrainment layer (at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries) and mostly by organised structures in the CPBL core (Hellsten and Zilitinkevich, 2013). Principal difference between structural and turbulent mixing plays an important role in a number of practical problems: transport and dispersion of admixtures, microphysics of fogs and clouds, etc. The surface-layer turbulence in atmospheric and marine CPBLs is strongly enhanced by the velocity shears in horizontal branches of organised structures. This mechanism (Zilitinkevich et al., 2006), was overlooked in conventional local theories, such as the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, and convective heat/mass transfer law: Nu~Ra1/3, where Nu and Ra are the Nusselt number and Raleigh numbers. References Hellsten A., Zilitinkevich S., 2013: Role of convective structures and background turbulence in the dry convective boundary layer. Boundary-Layer Meteorol. 149, 323-353. Zilitinkevich, S.S., 1973: Shear convection. Boundary-Layer Meteorol. 3, 416-423. Zilitinkevich, S.S., 1991: Turbulent Penetrative Convection, Avebury Technical, Aldershot, 180 pp. Zilitinkevich S.S., 2012: The Height of the Atmospheric Planetary Boundary layer: State of the Art and New Development - Chapter 13 in 'National Security and Human Health Implications of Climate Change', edited by H.J.S. Fernando, Z. Klai?, J.L. McKulley, NATO Science for Peace and Security Series - C: Environmental Security (ISBN 978-94-007-2429-7), Springer, 147-161. Zilitinkevich S.S., 2013: Atmospheric Turbulence and Planetary Boundary Layers. Fizmatlit, Moscow, 248 pp. Zilitinkevich, S.S., Hunt, J.C.R., Grachev, A.A., Esau, I.N., Lalas, D.P., Akylas, E., Tombrou, M., Fairall, C.W., Fernando, H.J.S., Baklanov, and A., Joffre, S.M., 2006: The influence of large convective eddies on the surface layer turbulence. Quart. J. Roy. Met. Soc. 132, 1423-1456. Zilitinkevich S.S., Tyuryakov S.A., Troitskaya Yu. I., Mareev E., 2012: Theoretical models of the height of the atmospheric planetary boundary layer and turbulent entrainment at its upper boundary. Izvestija RAN, FAO, 48, No.1, 150-160 Zilitinkevich, S.S., Elperin, T., Kleeorin, N., Rogachevskii, I., Esau, I.N., 2013: A hierarchy of energy- and flux-budget (EFB) turbulence closure models for stably stratified geophysical flows. Boundary-Layer Meteorol. 146, 341-373.

  20. Diamagnetic boundary layers - A kinetic theory. [for collisionless magnetized plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemaire, J.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1976-01-01

    A kinetic theory is presented for boundary layers associated with MHD tangential 'discontinuities' in a collisionless magnetized plasma, such as those observed in the solar wind. The theory consists of finding self-consistent solutions of Vlasov's equation and Maxwell's equation for stationary one-dimensional boundary layers separating two Maxwellian plasma states. Layers in which the current is carried by electrons are found to have a thickness of the order of a few electron gyroradii, but the drift speed of the current-carrying electrons is found to exceed the Alfven speed, and accordingly such layers are not stable. Several types of layers in which the current is carried by protons are discussed; in particular, cases are considered in which the magnetic-field intensity, direction, or both, changed across the layer. In every case, the thickness was of the order of a few proton gyroradii, and the field changed smoothly, although the characteristics depended somewhat on the boundary conditions. The drift speed was always less than the Alfven speed, consistent with stability of such structures. These results are consistent with observations of boundary layers in the solar wind near 1 AU.

  1. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    An analytical, parametric study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers or edge effects in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated thin cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize and quantify the effects of laminate orthotropy and laminate anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general and encompassing manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all the laminate constructions considered, the results show that the differences between results that were obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that in some cases neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and in other cases it results in an overestimation.

  2. Turbulent boundary-layer structure of flows over freshwater biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, J. M.; Sargison, J. E.; Henderson, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    The structure of the turbulent boundary-layer for flows over freshwater biofilms dominated by the diatom Tabellaria flocculosa was investigated. Biofilms were grown on large test plates under flow conditions in an Australian hydropower canal for periods up to 12 months. Velocity-profile measurements were obtained using LDV in a recirculating water tunnel for biofouled, smooth and artificially sandgrain roughened surfaces over a momentum thickness Reynolds number range of 3,000-8,000. Significant increases in skin friction coefficient of up to 160 % were measured over smooth-wall values. The effective roughnesses of the biofilms, k s, were significantly higher than their physical roughness measured using novel photogrammetry techniques and consisted of the physical roughness and a component due to the vibration of the biofilm mat. The biofilms displayed a k-type roughness function, and a logarithmic relationship was found between the roughness function and roughness Reynolds number based on the maximum peak-to-valley height of the biofilm, R t. The structure of the boundary layer adhered to Townsend's wall-similarity hypothesis even though the scale separation between the effective roughness height and the boundary-layer thickness was small. The biofouled velocity-defect profiles collapsed with smooth and sandgrain profiles in the outer region of the boundary layer. The Reynolds stresses and quadrant analysis also collapsed in the outer region of the boundary layer.

  3. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    A study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize the effects of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all laminates considered, the results show that the differences between results obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that, in some cases, neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and, in other cases, results in an overestimation.

  4. Particle motion in atmospheric boundary layers of Mars and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. R.; Iversen, J. D.; Greeley, R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    To study the eolian mechanics of saltating particles, both an experimental investigation of the flow field around a model crater in an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel and numerical solutions of the two- and three-dimensional equations of motion of a single particle under the influence of a turbulent boundary layer were conducted. Two-dimensional particle motion was calculated for flow near the surfaces of both Earth and Mars. For the case of Earth both a turbulent boundary layer with a viscous sublayer and one without were calculated. For the case of Mars it was only necessary to calculate turbulent boundary layer flow with a laminar sublayer because of the low values of friction Reynolds number; however, it was necessary to include the effects of slip flow on a particle caused by the rarefied Martian atmosphere. In the equations of motion the lift force functions were developed to act on a single particle only in the laminar sublayer or a corresponding small region of high shear near the surface for a fully turbulent boundary layer. The lift force functions were developed from the analytical work by Saffman concerning the lift force acting on a particle in simple shear flow.

  5. Interferometric data for a shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.; Brown, James L.; Miles, John B.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study of the axisymmetric shock-wave / boundary-layer strong interaction flow generated in the vicinity of a cylinder-cone intersection was conducted. The study data are useful in the documentation and understanding of compressible turbulent strong interaction flows, and are part of a more general effort to improve turbulence modeling for compressible two- and three-dimensional strong viscous/inviscid interactions. The nominal free stream Mach number was 2.85. Tunnel total pressures of 1.7 and 3.4 atm provided Reynolds number values of 18 x 10(6) and 36 x 10(6) based on model length. Three cone angles were studied giving negligible, incipient, and large scale flow separation. The initial cylinder boundary layer upstream of the interaction had a thickness of 1.0 cm. The subsonic layer of the cylinder boundary layer was quite thin, and in all cases, the shock wave penetrated a significant portion of the boundary layer. Owing to the thickness of the cylinder boundary layer, considerable structural detail was resolved for the three shock-wave / boundary-layer interaction cases considered. The primary emphasis was on the application of the holographic interferometry technique. The density field was deduced from an interferometric analysis based on the Able transform. Supporting data were obtained using a 2-D laser velocimeter, as well as mean wall pressure and oil flow measurements. The attached flow case was observed to be steady, while the separated cases exhibited shock unsteadiness. Comparisons with Navier-Stokes computations using a two-equation turbulence model are presented.

  6. Synthetic Jet Interaction With A Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Douglas R.

    2002-01-01

    Perhaps one of the more notable advances to have occurred in flow control technology in the last fifteen years is the application of surface-issuing jets for separation control on aerodynamic surfaces. The concept was introduced by Johnston and Night (1990) who proposed using circular jets, skewed and inclined to the wall, to generate streamwise vortices for the purpose of mitigating boundary layer separation. The skew and inclination angles have subsequently been shown to affect the strength and sign of the ensuing vortices. With a non-circular orifice, in addition to skew and inclination, the yaw angle of the major axis of the orifice can influence the flow control effectiveness of the jet. In particular, a study by Chang arid Collins (1997) revealed that a non-circular orifice, yawed relative to the freestream, can be used to control the size and strength of the vortices produced by the control jet. This early work used jets with only a steady injection of mass. Seifert et al. revealed that an unsteady blowing jet, could be as effective at separation control as a steady jet but with less mass flow. Seifert et al. showed that small amplitude blowing oscillations superimposed on a low momentum steady jet Was the most effective approach to delaying separation on a NACA 0015 airfoil at post-stall angles of attack. More recent work suggests that perhaps the most efficient jet control effect comes from a synthetic (oscillatory) jet where the time-averaged mass flux through the orifice is zero, but the net wall normal momentum is non-zero. The control effectiveness of synthetic jets has been demonstrated for several internal and external flow fields used synthetic jet control on a thick, blunt-nosed airfoil to delay stall well beyond the stall angles for the uncontrolled airfoil and with a dramatic increase in the lift-to-drag performance. Amitay et al. used an array of synthetic jets to mitigate flow separation in curved and diffusing ducts. While the control effectiveness of synthetic jet actuators in an application setting has been confirmed through a number of studies, the fluid dynamic mechanism by which control is effected is not well understood. Issues like yaw angle arid velocity ratio that have been studied for steady control jets have not been investigated for synthetic jets. Moreover, the role played by the inherently unsteady nature of a synthetic jet in the interaction with the controlled flow is not known. Some recent work by Rinehart and Glazer and Smith suggests that away from tile immediate vicinity of the jet orifice the flow field is steady in the mean, and that the interaction of a synthetic jet and a boundary layer creates a secondary flow in the boundary layer consisting primarily of streamwise vortices.

  7. Incompressible Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiments Over a Nonaxisymmetric Fuselage Forebody and Comparisons with Laminar Boundary Layer Stability Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijgen, Paul M. H. W.

    Analyses of previous boundary-layer transition experiments over axisymmetric bodies indicates a potential for achieving substantial amounts of laminar flow over such shapes. Achievement of natural laminar flow over portions of nonlifting aircraft geometries, such as fuselage forebodies, tip tanks or engine nacelles, could significantly contribute to the reduction of total aircraft viscous drag. A modern surface-panel method, a streamwise boundary-layer analysis method and streamwise linear stability theory (e^{rm n}-method) are used to correlate several previous transition measurements along axisymmetric geometries. To study the transition characteristics of a nonaxisymmetric body geometry, a flight investigation was conducted to measure the transition location and analyze the mode of transition over the nonaxisymmetric forebody of an existing light twin-engine propeller-driven airplane. A summary of the inviscid flow field over the forebody of the aircraft at various body angles is presented, indicating the relatively small magnitude of inviscid crossflow along the forebody at typical cruising attitudes. The transition instrumentation installed in the airplane fuselage is described, together with relative surface-waviness measurements along the forebody. Comparison of predicted and measured longitudinal and circumferential surface-pressure distributions along the forebody show good agreement in regions not affected by surface waviness and the propeller flow field. The macroscopic location of the transition front, obtained from arrayed hot-film sensors, is presented for a matrix of flight conditions with various unit-Reynolds numbers, angles of attack and sideslip, and engine power settings. The measured axial extent of laminar flow (maximum of 4.9 ft along the side) demonstrates the achievability of laminar flow on the smoothed nonaxisymmetric fuselage forebody of a typical twin-engine light airplane in the presence of engine acoustic disturbances and surface waviness. Spectral analysis of measured hot-film signals revealed amplified disturbances in the range of predicted Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) instabilities. The computed logarithmic T-S amplitude ratios ("n-factors") using the axisymmetric-analogue e^{rm n }-method are found to be generally lower than from the axisymmetric transition correlations. The relatively low "n-factors" on both the side and the top of the forebody may result from the waviness of the test surface. The proximity of the propeller-propulsion system appears to have affected the location of transition onset along the side of the fuselage forebody in some flight conditions. The flow visualization did not reveal evidence of transition caused by crossflow-vorticity instability on the forebody side; however, neither the axisymmetric-analogue method predicts possible crossflow-instability growth along the forebody.

  8. Vortex Generators to Control Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babinsky, Holger (Inventor); Loth, Eric (Inventor); Lee, Sang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Devices for generating streamwise vorticity in a boundary includes various forms of vortex generators. One form of a split-ramp vortex generator includes a first ramp element and a second ramp element with front ends and back ends, ramp surfaces extending between the front ends and the back ends, and vertical surfaces extending between the front ends and the back ends adjacent the ramp surfaces. A flow channel is between the first ramp element and the second ramp element. The back ends of the ramp elements have a height greater than a height of the front ends, and the front ends of the ramp elements have a width greater than a width of the back ends.

  9. Atmospheric boundary layer processes during a total solar eclipse

    SciTech Connect

    SethuRaman, S.; Prabhu, A.; Narahari Rao, K.; Narasimha, R.

    1980-01-01

    The total solar eclipse that occurred over the southern part of India on February 16, 1980, gave a unique opportunity to study the earth's atmospheric boundary layer. The meteorological experiments during the 1980 solar eclipse were conducted at Raichur, India (16/sup 0/12'N, 77/sup 0/21'E) located in the state of Karnataka, approximately 400-m above sea level. The main objective was to determine the changes in the earth's atmosphere during and immediately after the eclipse. The goal was to study the changes in the momentum and heat fluxes in the boundary layer due to the eclipse. Measurements were made for 2 days prior to and 1 day after the day of the eclipse to determine background characteristics of the boundary layer which might be site-dependent.

  10. Roughness Induced Transition in a Supersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Kergerise, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used to investigate the transition induced by threedimensional isolated roughness elements in a supersonic boundary layer at a free stream Mach number of 3.5. Simulations are performed for two different configurations: one is a square planform roughness and the other is a diamond planform roughness. The mean-flow calculations show that the roughness induces counter rotating streamwise vortices downstream of the roughness. These vortices persist for a long distance downstream and lift the low momentum fluid from the near wall region and place it near the outer part of the boundary layer. This forms highly inflectional boundary layer profiles. These observations agree with recent experimental observations. The receptivity calculations showed that the amplitudes of the mass-flux fluctuations near the neutral point for the diamond shape roughness are the same as the amplitude of the acoustic disturbances. They are three times smaller for the square shape roughness.

  11. An investigation of shock/turbulent boundary layer bleed interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.; Shih, S. H.; Yeuan, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical investigation was conducted to determine the effect of bleed on oblique shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions. The numerical solution to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations reveal the flow details throughout the interaction zone and inside the normal bleed slot. Results are presented for an incident oblique shock of sufficient strength to cause boundary layer separation in the absence of bleed. Bleed is applied across the shock impingement location over a range of bleed mass flow rates corresponding to different values of plenum pressures. The results indicate a complex flow structure with large variations in both normal and tangential flow velocities across the bleed slot. The flow entrainment into the slot is accompanied by an expansion-compression wave system with a bow shock originating inside the bleed slot. Increasing the bleed mass flow by decreasing the plenum pressure caused an initial decrease then a later increase in the boundary layer momentum and displacement thickness downstream of the interaction.

  12. Defects and boundary layers in non-Euclidean plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmer, J. A.; Venkataramani, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the behaviour of non-Euclidean plates with constant negative Gaussian curvature using the Föppl-von Kármán reduced theory of elasticity. Motivated by recent experimental results, we focus on annuli with a periodic profile. We prove rigorous upper and lower bounds for the elastic energy that scales like the thickness squared. In particular we show that are only two types of global minimizers—deformations that remain flat and saddle shaped deformations with isolated regions of stretching near the edge of the annulus. We also show that there exist local minimizers with a periodic profile that have additional boundary layers near their lines of inflection. These additional boundary layers are a new phenomenon in thin elastic sheets and are necessary to regularize jump discontinuities in the azimuthal curvature across lines of inflection. We rigorously derive scaling laws for the width of these boundary layers as a function of the thickness of the sheet.

  13. Finite volume solution of the compressible boundary-layer equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyd, B.; Murman, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    A box-type finite volume discretization is applied to the integral form of the compressible boundary layer equations. Boundary layer scaling is introduced through the grid construction: streamwise grid lines follow eta = y/h = const., where y is the normal coordinate and h(x) is a scale factor proportional to the boundary layer thickness. With this grid, similarity can be applied explicity to calculate initial conditions. The finite volume method preserves the physical transparency of the integral equations in the discrete approximation. The resulting scheme is accurate, efficient, and conceptually simple. Computations for similar and non-similar flows show excellent agreement with tabulated results, solutions computed with Keller's Box scheme, and experimental data.

  14. Hypersonic flow separation in shock wave boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.; Kumar, Ajay

    1992-01-01

    An assessment is presented for the experimental data on separated flow in shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions at hypersonic and supersonic speeds. The data base consists mainly of two dimensional and axisymmetric interactions in compression corners or cylinder-flares, and externally generated oblique shock interactions with boundary layers over flat plates or cylindrical surfaces. The conditions leading to flow separation and the subsequent changes in the flow empirical correlations for incipient separation are reviewed. The effects of the Mach number, Reynolds number, surface cooling and the methods of detecting separation are discussed. The pertinent experimental data for the separated flow characteristics in separated turbulent boundary layer shock interaction are also presented and discussed.

  15. Boundary layer effects on particle impaction and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Fernandez De La Mora, J.

    1984-01-01

    The inertial impaction and deposition of small particles on larger bodies with viscous boundary layers are considered theoretically, in a detailed comment on a paper by Menguturk et al. (1983). Topics addressed include cushion effects, the dimensionless groups corresponding to the diameter range (3-6 microns) examined by Menguturk et al. in a numerical example, analogous effects of particle-gas energy and mass exchange in boundary layers, and the combined effects of particle inertia and diffusion. It is argued that the inertial effects can be characterized in terms of a body, boundary-layer, or sublayer Stokes number. In a reply by Menguturk et al., the focus is on the application of the theoretical model to the erosion of blade surfaces in large gas turbines; the Stokes number is found to be of limited practical value in these cases, because the particle motion is not primarily normal to the blade surfaces.

  16. Numerical Simulations of Wake/Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Ovchinnikov, Victor; Balaras, Elias

    2003-01-01

    Direct and large-eddy simulations of the interaction between the wake of a circular cylinder and a flat-plate boundary layer are conducted. Two Reynolds numbers are examined. The simulations indicate that at the lower Reynolds number the boundary layer is buffeted by the unsteady Karman vortex street shed by the cylinder. The fluctuations, however, cannot be self-sustained due to the low Reynolds-number, and the flow does not reach a turbulent state within the computational domain. In contrast, in the higher Reynolds-number case, boundary-layer fluctuations persist after the wake has decayed (due, in part, to the higher values of the local Reynolds number Re(sub theta) achieved in this case); some evidence could be observed that a self-sustaining turbulence generation cycle was beginning to be established.

  17. Inverse boundary-layer theory and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    Inverse boundary layer computational procedures, which permit nonsingular solutions at separation and reattachment, are presented. In the first technique, which is for incompressible flow, the displacement thickness is prescribed; in the second technique, for compressible flow, a perturbation mass flow is the prescribed condition. The pressure is deduced implicitly along with the solution in each of these techniques. Laminar and turbulent computations, which are typical of separated flow, are presented and comparisons are made with experimental data. In both inverse procedures, finite difference techniques are used along with Newton iteration. The resulting procedure is no more complicated than conventional boundary layer computations. These separated boundary layer techniques appear to be well suited for complete viscous-inviscid interaction computations.

  18. A compilation of unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    An extensive literature search was conducted and those experiments related to unsteady boundary layer behavior were cataloged. In addition, an international survey of industrial, university, and governmental research laboratories was made in which new and ongoing experimental programs associated with unsteady turbulent boundary layer research were identified. Pertinent references were reviewed and classified based on the technical emphasis of the various experiments. Experiments that include instantaneous or ensemble averaged profiles of boundary layer variables are stressed. The experimental apparatus and flow conditions are described and summaries of acquired data and significant conclusions are summarized. Measurements obtained from the experiments which exist in digital form were stored on magnetic tape. Instructions are given for accessing these data sets for further analysis.

  19. Unsteady turbulent boundary layers in swimming rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Yanase, Kazutaka; Saarenrinne, Pentti

    2015-05-01

    The boundary layers of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, swimming at 1.02±0.09?L?s(-1) (mean±s.d., N=4), were measured by the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique at a Reynolds number of 4×10(5). The boundary layer profile showed unsteadiness, oscillating above and beneath the classical logarithmic law of the wall with body motion. Across the entire surface regions that were measured, local Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness, which is the distance that is perpendicular to the fish surface through which the boundary layer momentum flows at free-stream velocity, were greater than the critical value of 320 for the laminar-to-turbulent transition. The skin friction was dampened on the convex surface while the surface was moving towards a free-stream flow and increased on the concave surface while retreating. These observations contradict the result of a previous study using different species swimming by different methods. Boundary layer compression accompanied by an increase in local skin friction was not observed. Thus, the overall results may not support absolutely the Bone-Lighthill boundary layer thinning hypothesis that the undulatory motions of swimming fish cause a large increase in their friction drag because of the compression of the boundary layer. In some cases, marginal flow separation occurred on the convex surface in the relatively anterior surface region, but the separated flow reattached to the fish surface immediately downstream. Therefore, we believe that a severe impact due to induced drag components (i.e. pressure drag) on the swimming performance, an inevitable consequence of flow separation, was avoided. PMID:25750412

  20. Additive thermochemical effects in turbulent erosive boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.; Levatin, J.L.

    1983-01-18

    Previously obtained interior ballistics and wall boundary layer modeling results indicate that significant reduction in erosive heating can be expected when finely divided particles are dispersed through the propellant combustion flow field. Attention was first placed on the particle size influences, together with particle dispersal dynamics in both turbulent combustion core flow and the erosive wall boundary layer region. Submicron thermochemically inert particles were predicted to disperse readily to the near wall region where they were then entrained in the boundary layer. This was estimated to substantially reduce the predicted erosive heat and mass transfer and experimentally confirmed. Examination of the time-averaged turbulent boundary layer macrostructure changes indicated that inertial influences were primarily responsible for this reduction in erosive heating to gun barrel walls. The boundary layers were thickened by the additives and erosive diffusion gradients were correspondingly reduced. The isolated inertial mechanisms are now understood but are difficult to apply in general dimensional analysis scaling or in analytical heat transfer correlation predictions. Three major factors which contribute to these difficulties are: time dependence of both developing mean flow and particle field; turbulence-particle interactions; and thermochemical heat release and exchange between reactive gas components and particles, particles and wall surface, and reactive gas and wall surface. To help illustrate the influence of thes mechanisms and provide a basis for prediction, the influence of submicron additives in unsteady turbulent boundary layer growth and interaction regions adjacent to a model of a chemically active metallic (steel) surface are examined. Equilibrium chemistry is assumed for all phases.

  1. Optical transmission through double-layer metallic subwavelength slit arrays

    E-print Network

    Tanner, David B.

    structures have been shown to ex- hibit intriguing optical properties.2 For instance, Ebbesen and co-workers3Optical transmission through double-layer metallic subwavelength slit arrays H. B. Chan, Z. Marcet. Ferry, F. Klemens, J. Miner, C. S. Pai, and J. A. Taylor Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, Murray

  2. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers over Straight and Flared Cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of adverse pressure gradients on the receptivity and stability of hypersonic boundary layers were numerically investigated. Simulations were performed for boundary layer flows over a straight cone and two flared cones. The steady and the unsteady flow fields were obtained by solving the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in axi-symmetric coordinates using the 5th order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. The mean boundary layer profiles were analyzed using local stability and non-local parabolized stability equations (PSE) methods. After the most amplified disturbances were identified, two-dimensional plane acoustic waves were introduced at the outer boundary of the computational domain and time accurate simulations were performed. The adverse pressure gradient was found to affect the boundary layer stability in two important ways. Firstly, the frequency of the most amplified second-mode disturbance was increased relative to the zero pressure gradient case. Secondly, the amplification of first- and second-mode disturbances was increased. Although an adverse pressure gradient enhances instability wave growth rates, small nose-tip bluntness was found to delay transition due to the low receptivity coefficient and the resulting weak initial amplitude of the instability waves. The computed and measured amplitude-frequency spectrums in all three cases agree very well in terms of frequency and the shape except for the amplitude.

  3. Numerical Study of Boundary-Layer in Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tom I-P.

    1997-01-01

    The accomplishments made in the following three tasks are described: (1) The first task was to study shock-wave boundary-layer interactions with bleed - this study is relevant to boundary-layer control in external and mixed-compression inlets of supersonic aircraft; (2) The second task was to test RAAKE, a code developed for computing turbulence quantities; and (3) The third task was to compute flow around the Ames ER-2 aircraft that has been retrofitted with containers over its wings and fuselage. The appendices include two reports submitted to AIAA for publication.

  4. Simulation of glancing shock wave and boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Mao

    1989-01-01

    Shock waves generated by sharp fins, glancing across a laminar boundary layer growing over a flat plate, are simulated numerically. Several basic issues concerning the resultant three-dimensional flow separation are studied. Using the same number of grid points, different grid spacings are employed to investigate the effects of grid resolution on the origin of the line of separation. Various shock strengths (generated by different fin angles) are used to study the so-called separated and unseparated boundary layer and to establish the existence or absence of the secondary separation. The usual interpretations of the flow field from previous studies and new interpretations arising from the present simulation are discussed.

  5. Axisymmetric fundamental solutions for a finite layer with impeded boundaries.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ze-Hai; Chen, Yun-Min; Ling, Dao-Sheng; Tang, Xiao-Wu

    2003-01-01

    Axisymmetric fundamental solutions that are applied in the consolidation calculations of a finite clay layer with impeded boundaries were derived. Laplace and Hankel integral transforms were utilized with respect to time and radial coordinates, respectively in the analysis. The derivation of fundamental solutions considers two-boundary value problems involving unit point loading and ring loading in the vertical. The solutions are extended to circular distributed and strip distributed normal load. The computation and analysis of settlements, vertical total stress and excess pore pressure in the consolidation layer subject to circular loading are presented. PMID:12861613

  6. A fast method to solve incompressible boundary layer interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldman, A. E. P.; Dijkstra, D.

    1981-06-01

    The mutual influence of pressure and displacement thickness is recognized by simultaneously updating both these quantities as the boundary layer is marched. A survey of hierarchical and nonhierarchical solutions is presented. The iteration technique was implemented in a full boundary layer approach and a triple-deck formulation. Results were calculated for the flat plate trailing edge interaction problem, for backward and forward facing steps and for the Carter/Wornom trough. In all cases fast convergence is obtained. Separation, reattachment, dividing streamline and skin friction are found to be virtually identical.

  7. Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, P; Bonin, TA; Newman, JF; Turner, DD; Chilson, P; Blumberg, WG; Mishra, S; Wainwright, CE; Carney, M; Jacobsen, EP; Wharton, S

    2015-11-01

    The Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) included two measurement campaigns conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma during 2012 and 2013. LABLE was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost collaboration among the University of Oklahoma, the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the ARM program. A unique aspect was the role of graduate students in LABLE. They served as principal investigators and took the lead in designing and conducting experiments using different sampling strategies to best resolve boundary-layer phenomena.

  8. Carbon vaporization into a nonequilibrium, stagnation-point boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, T.

    1978-01-01

    The heat transfer to the stagnation point of an ablating carbonaceous heat shield, where both the gas-phase boundary layer and the heterogeneous surface reactions are not in chemical equilibrium, is examined. Specifically, the nonequilibrium changes in the mass fraction profiles of carbon species calculated for frozen flow are studied. A set of equations describing the steady-state, nonequilibrium laminar boundary layer in the axisymmetric stagnation region, over an ablating graphite surface, is solved, with allowance for the effects of finite rate of carbon vaporization.

  9. Second mode interactions in supersonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erlebacher, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1990-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of a two-dimensional second mode unstable wave in a Mach 4.5 wall-bounded flow is computed by solving the full time-dependent compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A highly accurate solution is obtained using spectral collocation methods. It is shown that departure from linearity first occurs in the critical layer due to the cubic nonlinearities in the momentum equation. This is a direct result of the large density perturbations in this regime. Time evolution studies of the growth rate as a function of normal distance from the plate suggests that the mode is evolving toward a nonlinear saturated state, and that this problem is possibly amenable to standard weakly nonlinear perturbation methods.

  10. Lagranian measurements of inertial particle trajectories in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerashchenko, Sergiy; Sharp, Nicole; Neuscamman, Stephanie; Ayyalasomayajula, Sathyanarayana; Warhaft, Zellman

    2007-11-01

    We describe Lagrangian measurements of water droplets in a boundary layer with high Reynolds number free stream turbulence. The high Reynolds number turbulence is produced using a active grid in a wind tunnel. Water droplets are introduced into the flow using an array of nozzles attached down stream of the active grid. A boundary layer is formed above a glass plate and the particle trajectories are tracked by a high speed camera moving along side of the tunnel [Ayyalasomayajula et al Phys. Rev. Lett., 97, 2006). We show that the probability density function of the acceleration of the particles in the boundary layer has stretched exponential tails that have pronounced asymmetry, reflecting the deceleration events as the particles approach the wall.The pdf's are measured as a function of distance from the wall and the free stream turbulence level is is also varied in order to change the turbulence characteristics in the boundary layer. The Stokes number of the particles is varied up to a value of approximately 0.2.

  11. Laminar-Turbulent Transition Behind Discrete Roughness Elements in a High-Speed Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Wu, Minwei; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Edwards, Jack R., Jr.; Kegerise, Michael; King, Rudolph

    2010-01-01

    Computations are performed to study the flow past an isolated roughness element in a Mach 3.5, laminar, flat plate boundary layer. To determine the effects of the roughness element on the location of laminar-turbulent transition inside the boundary layer, the instability characteristics of the stationary wake behind the roughness element are investigated over a range of roughness heights. The wake flow adjacent to the spanwise plane of symmetry is characterized by a narrow region of increased boundary layer thickness. Beyond the near wake region, the centerline streak is surrounded by a pair of high-speed streaks with reduced boundary layer thickness and a secondary, outer pair of lower-speed streaks. Similar to the spanwise periodic pattern of streaks behind an array of regularly spaced roughness elements, the above wake structure persists over large distances and can sustain strong enough convective instabilities to cause an earlier onset of transition when the roughness height is sufficiently large. Time accurate computations are performed to clarify additional issues such as the role of the nearfield of the roughness element during the generation of streak instabilities, as well as to reveal selected details of their nonlinear evolution. Effects of roughness element shape on the streak amplitudes and the interactions between multiple roughness elements aligned along the flow direction are also investigated.

  12. Magnetic field maxima in the low latitude boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnerup, B.; Paschmann, G.; Phan, T.-D.; Luehr, H.

    1992-01-01

    The magnetic field often exhibits a maximum in the earth's low-latitude boundary layer. Examples of this behavior are shown using data from the AMPTE/IRM spacecraft, and it is argued that two fundamentally distinct causes exist for the excess field: (1) a depression, within the layer, of the population of medium-energy ions of magnetospheric origin and (2) field curvature effects associated with undulations of the magnetopause itself.

  13. Magnetic field maxima in the low latitude boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnerup, B. ); Paschmann, G.; Phan, T.D. ); Luehr, H. )

    1992-09-04

    The magnetic field often exhibits a maximum in the Earth's low-latitude boundary layer. The authors show examples of this behavior, using data from the AMPTE/IRM spacecraft, and argue that two fundamentally distinct causes exist for the excess field: (1) a depression, within the layer, of the population of medium-energy ions of magnetospheric origin; (2) field curvature effects associated with undulations of the magnetopause itself.

  14. Strained layer superlattice focal plane array having a planar structure

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jin K; Carroll, Malcolm S; Gin, Aaron; Marsh, Phillip F; Young, Erik W; Cich, Michael J

    2012-10-23

    An infrared focal plane array (FPA) is disclosed which utilizes a strained-layer superlattice (SLS) formed of alternating layers of InAs and In.sub.xGa.sub.1-xSb with 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5 epitaxially grown on a GaSb substrate. The FPA avoids the use of a mesa structure to isolate each photodetector element and instead uses impurity-doped regions formed in or about each photodetector for electrical isolation. This results in a substantially-planar structure in which the SLS is unbroken across the entire width of a 2-D array of the photodetector elements which are capped with an epitaxially-grown passivation layer to reduce or eliminate surface recombination. The FPA has applications for use in the wavelength range of 3-25 .mu.m.

  15. AIRCRAFT OBSERVATIONS OF THE MEAN AND TURBULENT STRUCTURE OF A SHALLOW BOUNDARY LAYER OVER THE

    E-print Network

    Brooks, Ian M.

    -layer evolution made by the U.K. Meteorological Office's C-130 Hercules research aircraft over the Persian Gulf in the lower 30­50% of the boundary layer. Scaling of boundary-layer turbulence statistics using local

  16. Existence results for nano boundary layer flows with nonlinear Navier boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivanian, Elyas

    2013-12-01

    The standard no slip boundary condition of classical fluid mechanics is no longer valid at the micro- and nano-scale and should be replaced by a boundary condition that allows some degree of tangential slip. In the present work, the classical laminar boundary layer equation of the flow away from the origin past a wedge with the no-slip boundary condition replaced by a nonlinear Navier boundary condition is revisited. This boundary condition includes an arbitrary index parameter, denoted by n>0, which appears in the coefficients of the differential equation to be solved. It is proved corresponding to the value n=1/3, there are exactly three situations for the problem: (i) there is no solution; (ii) there exist two solutions; (iii) there exist four solutions. Furthermore, the exact analytical solution of the problem is given in terms of parabolic cylinder functions for further physical interpretations.

  17. Investigations on entropy layer along hypersonic hyperboloids using a defect boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazier, J. P.; Aupoix, B.; Cousteix, J.

    1992-01-01

    A defect approach coupled with matched asymptotic expansions is used to derive a new set of boundary layer equations. This method ensures a smooth matching of the boundary layer with the inviscid solution. These equations are solved to calculate boundary layers over hypersonic blunt bodies involving the entropy gradient effect. Systematic comparisons are made for both axisymmetric and plane flows in several cases with different Mach and Reynolds numbers. After a brief survey of the entropy layer characteristics, the defect boundary layer results are compared with standard boundary layer and full Navier-Stokes solutions. The entropy gradient effects are found to be more important in the axisymmetric case than in the plane one. The wall temperature has a great influence on the results through the displacement effect. Good predictions can be obtained with the defect approach over a cold wall in the nose region, with a first order solution. However, the defect approach gives less accurate results far from the nose on axisymmetric bodies because of the thinning of the entropy layer.

  18. Fifty Years of Boundary-Layer Theory and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryden, Hugh L.

    1955-01-01

    The year 1954 marked the 50th anniversary of the Prandtl boundary-layer theory from which we may date the beginning of man's understanding of the dynamics of real fluids. A backward look at this aspect of the history of the last 50 years may be instructive. This paper (1) attempts to compress the events of those 50 years into a few thousand words, to tell in this brief space the interesting story of the development of a new concept, its slow acceptance and growth, its spread from group to group within its country of origin, and its diffusion to other countries of the world. The original brief paper of Prandtl (2) was presented at the Third International Mathematical Congress at Heidelberg in 1904 and published in the following year. It was an attempt to explain the d'Alembert paradox, namely, that the neglect of the small friction of air in the theory resulted in the prediction of zero resistance to motion. Prandtl set himself the task of computing the motion of a fluid of small friction, so small that its effect could be neglected everywhere except where large velocity differences were present or a cumulative effect of friction occurred This led to the concept of boundary layer, or transition layer, near the wall of a body immersed in a fluid stream in which the velocity rises from zero to the free-stream value. It is interesting that Prandtl used the term Grenzsehicht (boundary layer) only once and the term Ubergangsschicht (transition layer) seven times in the brief article. Later writers also used Reibungsschicht (friction layer), but most writers today use Grenzschicht (boundary layer).

  19. Determination of Stability and Translation in a Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crepeau, John; Tobak, Murray

    1996-01-01

    Reducing the infinite degrees of freedom inherent in fluid motion into a manageable number of modes to analyze fluid motion is presented. The concepts behind the center manifold technique are used. Study of the Blasius boundary layer and a precise description of stability within the flow field are discussed.

  20. ON HYDROMAGNETIC STRESSES IN ACCRETION DISK BOUNDARY LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Pessah, Martin E.; Chan, Chi-kwan E-mail: ckch@nordita.org

    2012-05-20

    Detailed calculations of the physical structure of accretion disk boundary layers, and thus their inferred observational properties, rely on the assumption that angular momentum transport is opposite to the radial angular frequency gradient of the disk. The standard model for turbulent shear viscosity satisfies this assumption by construction. However, this behavior is not supported by numerical simulations of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accretion disks, which show that angular momentum transport driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is inefficient in disk regions where, as expected in boundary layers, the angular frequency increases with radius. In order to shed light on physically viable mechanisms for angular momentum transport in this inner disk region, we examine the generation of hydromagnetic stresses and energy density in differentially rotating backgrounds with angular frequencies that increase outward in the shearing-sheet framework. We isolate the modes that are unrelated to the standard MRI and provide analytic solutions for the long-term evolution of the resulting shearing MHD waves. We show that, although the energy density of these waves can be amplified significantly, their associated stresses oscillate around zero, rendering them an inefficient mechanism to transport significant angular momentum (inward). These findings are consistent with the results obtained in numerical simulations of MHD accretion disk boundary layers and challenge the standard assumption of efficient angular momentum transport in the inner disk regions. This suggests that the detailed structure of turbulent MHD accretion disk boundary layers could differ appreciably from those derived within the standard framework of turbulent shear viscosity.

  1. Measurements Of Shock-Separated Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. D.; Brown, J. L.; Kussoy, M. I.

    1990-01-01

    Report documents surface and flow-field measurements of two- and three-dimensional, shock-separated, turbulent boundary layers. Data tabulated to facilitate comparison with other measurements and computations. Shows shock-interaction shadowgraph and oil-flow pattern for each angle. Plotted profiles given for pressures, velocities, Reynolds stresses, and turbulent kinetic energies.

  2. Iodine monoxide in the Western Pacific marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Großmann, K.; Frieß, U.; Peters, E.; Wittrock, F.; Lampel, J.; Yilmaz, S.; Tschritter, J.; Sommariva, R.; von Glasow, R.; Quack, B.; Krüger, K.; Pfeilsticker, K.; Platt, U.

    2013-03-01

    A latitudinal cross-section and vertical profiles of iodine monoxide (IO) are reported from the marine boundary layer of the Western Pacific. The measurements were taken using Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) during the TransBrom cruise of the German research vessel Sonne, which led from Tomakomai, Japan (42° N, 141° E) through the Western Pacific to Townsville, Australia (19° S, 146° E) in October 2009. In the marine boundary layer within the tropics (between 20° N and 5° S), IO mixing ratios ranged between 1 and 2.2 ppt, whereas in the subtropics and at mid-latitudes typical IO mixing ratios were around 1 ppt in the daytime. The profile retrieval reveals that the bulk of the IO was located in the lower part of the marine boundary layer. Photochemical simulations indicate that the organic iodine precursors observed during the cruise (CH3I, CH2I2, CH2ClI, CH2BrI) are not sufficient to explain the measured IO mixing ratios. Reasonable agreement between measured and modelled IO can only be achieved if an additional sea-air flux of inorganic iodine (e.g., I2) is assumed in the model. Our observations add further evidence to previous studies that reactive iodine is an important oxidant in the marine boundary layer.

  3. Boundary layer control of rotating convection Eric M. King1

    E-print Network

    weakens, and three-dimensional, turbulent convection can occur (Fig. 1b). It is commonly assumed is the fluid's viscous diffusivity and k is the fluid's thermal diffusivity. Many non-rotating convection be explained in terms of boundary layer dynamics. A convecting fluid volume consists of two distinct dynamical

  4. Stratified Flow over Topography: Wave Generation and Boundary Layer Separation

    E-print Network

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Stratified Flow over Topography: Wave Generation and Boundary Layer Separation B. R. Sutherland topography. We have chosen to use periodic, finite­amplitude hills which are representative of the Earth upon internal waves generated by flow over rough topography. 1 Introduction Internal waves propagate

  5. Stratified Flow over Topography: Wave Generation and Boundary Layer Separation

    E-print Network

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Stratified Flow over Topography: Wave Generation and Boundary Layer Separation B. R. Sutherland topography. We have chosen to use periodic, finite-amplitude hills which are representative of the Earth upon internal waves generated by flow over rough topography. 1 Introduction Internal waves propagate

  6. Numerical Study of Flat-Plate Boundary Layer Bypass Transition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Victor; Piomelli, Ugo; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2004-11-01

    Previous numerical simulations of boundary-layer bypass transition due to free-stream-turbulence (FST) have focused primarily on the transition region itself, using an ad hoc inflow condition downstream of the plate leading edge. This approach involves significant assumptions regarding the spatial evolution of FST and its penetration into the boundary layer. Additionally, the effects of FST length-scale have largely been ignored, which can lead to incorrect decay rates over the boundary layer, making a quantitative comparison with experiments difficult. We present DNS of boundary-layer bypass transition, which addresses some of the above limitations by including the super-elliptic leading edge of the flat-plate model inside the computational domain. The FST is generated upstream of the plate, enabling the leading-edge/FST interaction region to be fully captured in the simulations. The FST also has the same decay rate as in the experiments of Roach and Brierlay (1992), facilitating a direct comparison with the experimental data.

  7. Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Y.C.

    1998-10-05

    This report summarizes the activities and findings from a field experiment devised to estimate the rates and mechanisms of transport of carbon across the continental shelves. The specific site chosen for the experiment was the mid-Atlantic Bight, a region off the North Carolina coast. The experiment involved a large contingent of scientists from many institutions. The specific component of the program was the transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer. The postulate mechanisms of transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer are: resuspension and advection, downward deposition, and accumulation. The high turbulence levels in the bottom boundary layer require the understanding of the coupling between turbulence and bottom sediments. The specific issues addressed in the work reported here were: (a) What is the sediment response to forcing by currents and waves? (b) What is the turbulence climate in the bottom boundary layer at this site? and (c) What is the rate at which settling leads to carbon sequestering in bottom sediments at offshore sites?

  8. Stability of Supersonic Boundary Layers Over Blunt Wedges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam

    2006-01-01

    Receptivity and stability of supersonic boundary layers over blunt flat plates and wedges are numerically investigated at a free stream Mach number of 3.5 and at a high Reynolds number of 10(exp 6)/inch. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using the 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. Computations are performed for a flat plate with leading edge thicknesses of 0.0001, 0.001, 0.005 and 0.01 inches that give Reynolds numbers based on the leading edge thickness ranging from 1000 to 10000. Calculations are also performed for a wedge of 10 degrees half angle with different leading edge radii 0.001 and 0.01 inches. The linear stability results showed that the bluntness has a strong stabilizing effect on the stability of two-dimensional boundary layers. The transition Reynolds number for a flat plate with a leading edge thickness of 0.01 inches is about 3.5 times larger than it is for the Blasius boundary layer. It was also revealed that boundary layers on blunt wedges are far more stable than on blunt flat plates.

  9. Large-Scale Streamwise Turbulent Structures in Hypersonic Boundary Layers 

    E-print Network

    English, Benjamin L.

    2013-04-22

    Prior research in the field of boundary layer turbulence has identified streamwise-elongated large-scale turbulence structures in both low speed compressible and high speed (M=2.0) flow. No experimental work has been done in any flow of M> or =3...

  10. FLUID MODELING OF ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION IN THE CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY LAYER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Study of convective boundary layer (CBL) processes has depended largely upon laboratory analogs for many years. The pioneering work of Willis and Deardorff (1974) and some 35 subsequent papers by the same authors showed that much useful research could be accomplished with a re...

  11. Boundary-Layer Receptivity and Integrated Transition Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan

    2005-01-01

    The adjoint parabold stability equations (PSE) formulation is used to calculate the boundary layer receptivity to localized surface roughness and suction for compressible boundary layers. Receptivity efficiency functions predicted by the adjoint PSE approach agree well with results based on other nonparallel methods including linearized Navier-Stokes equations for both Tollmien-Schlichting waves and crossflow instability in swept wing boundary layers. The receptivity efficiency function can be regarded as the Green's function to the disturbance amplitude evolution in a nonparallel (growing) boundary layer. Given the Fourier transformed geometry factor distribution along the chordwise direction, the linear disturbance amplitude evolution for a finite size, distributed nonuniformity can be computed by evaluating the integral effects of both disturbance generation and linear amplification. The synergistic approach via the linear adjoint PSE for receptivity and nonlinear PSE for disturbance evolution downstream of the leading edge forms the basis for an integrated transition prediction tool. Eventually, such physics-based, high fidelity prediction methods could simulate the transition process from the disturbance generation through the nonlinear breakdown in a holistic manner.

  12. Secondary three-dimensional instability in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, Nabil M.

    1989-01-01

    Three dimensional linear secondary instability theory is extended for compressible boundary layers on a flat plate in the presence of finite amplitude Tollmien-Schlichting waves. The focus is on principal parametric resonance responsible for strong growth of subharmonics in low disturbance environment.

  13. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION IN THE ARCTIC: WINTERTIME BOUNDARY-LAYER MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The wintertime arctic atmospheric boundary layer was investigated with micro-meteorological and SF6 tracer measurements collected in Prudhoe Bay, AK. he flat, snow-covered tundra surface at this site generates a very small (0.03 cm) surface roughness. he relatively warm maritime ...

  14. IMPACT OF BOUNDARY-LAYER CUTTING ON FREE-SURFACE

    E-print Network

    Collection · Cuvette opening = 1 cm × 1 cm w/ 1 mm walls · 5 cuvettes placed side by side Cuvette #3 centered / (m2·s)] Equivalent number density, N [m-3] zs x Cuvettes y z 54 3 2 1 #12;13 Boundary-Layer Cutter

  15. Numerical Calculations of Shock-Wave/Boundary-Layer Flow Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.; Liou, W. W.

    1994-01-01

    The paper presents results of calculations for 2-D supersonic turbulent compression corner flows. The results seem to indicate that the newer, improved kappa-epsilon models offer limited advantages over the standard kappa-epsilon model in predicting the shock-wave/boundary-layer flows in the 2-D compression corner over a wide range of corner angles and flow conditions.

  16. Radiation-dominated, relativistic jets and their boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Eric Robert; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2015-01-01

    The energetics of certain astrophysical jets, such as those launched from the progenitors of long gamma-ray bursts and super-Eddington tidal disruption events, are likely dominated by radiation. In the limit that the outflow is optically thick, the shear boundary layer that develops between the jet and the ambient medium is mediated by radiation viscosity. We use the relativistic equations of radiation hydrodynamics in the viscous limit, accurate to first order in the mean-free path of a photon, to describe the dynamics of the boundary layer. A set of boundary layer equations is derived and we solve them in a self-similar manner, demonstrating in the process how the compressibility of the fluid, the variation of the viscosity coefficient, and the relativistic nature of the velocity affect the structure and dynamics of the boundary layer. We apply the model to the case of Swift J1644+57, the recently-observed, jetted, super-Eddington tidal distruption event, in an attempt to place tighter constraints on the physical characteristics of the jet.

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Mechanical filtering by the boundary layer and fluidstructure

    E-print Network

    McHenry, Matt

    in larval zebrafish (Danio rerio). The model predicts that the boundary layer of flow over the body filters flow signals. Keywords Fish Á Mechanosensation Á Hair cells Á Biomechanics Á Zebrafish List cupula deflection ms cupula deflection by vibrating sphere qm density of cupular material qw density

  18. Retinal layer segmentation of macular OCT images using boundary classification.

    PubMed

    Lang, Andrew; Carass, Aaron; Hauser, Matthew; Sotirchos, Elias S; Calabresi, Peter A; Ying, Howard S; Prince, Jerry L

    2013-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be an essential imaging modality for ophthalmology and is proving to be very important in neurology. OCT enables high resolution imaging of the retina, both at the optic nerve head and the macula. Macular retinal layer thicknesses provide useful diagnostic information and have been shown to correlate well with measures of disease severity in several diseases. Since manual segmentation of these layers is time consuming and prone to bias, automatic segmentation methods are critical for full utilization of this technology. In this work, we build a random forest classifier to segment eight retinal layers in macular cube images acquired by OCT. The random forest classifier learns the boundary pixels between layers, producing an accurate probability map for each boundary, which is then processed to finalize the boundaries. Using this algorithm, we can accurately segment the entire retina contained in the macular cube to an accuracy of at least 4.3 microns for any of the nine boundaries. Experiments were carried out on both healthy and multiple sclerosis subjects, with no difference in the accuracy of our algorithm found between the groups. PMID:23847738

  19. Modeling Disturbance Dynamics in Transitional and Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.; Gatski, T. B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of an ensemble of linear disturbances in boundary-layer flows at various Reynolds numbers is studied through an analysis of the transport equations for the mean disturbance kinetic energy and energy dissipation rate. Effects of adverse and favorable pressure-gradients on the disturbance dynamics are also included in the analysis. Unlike the fully turbulent regime where nonlinear phase scrambling of the fluctuations affects the flow field even in proximity to the wall, the early stage transition regime fluctuations studied here are influenced across the boundary layer by the solid boundary. In addition, the dominating dynamics in the disturbance kinetic energy equation is governed by the energy production, pressure-transport and viscous diffusion - also in contrast to the fully turbulent regime. For the disturbance dissipation rate, a dynamic balance exists between the destruction and diffusion of dissipation.

  20. Effects of mesoscale surface inhomogeneities on atmospheric boundary layer transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.J.; Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.

    1992-09-01

    Defining the nature of turbulent transfer over horizontally inhomogeneous surfaces remains one of the challenges in meteorology. Because the transfer of energy and momentum through the atmospheric boundary layer forms part of the lower boundary condition for global climate models (GCMs), the problem is important. Over the last two decades, advances in sensor and computer technology wave made good point measurements of turbulent fluxes fairly routine. A fundamental question with respect to climate models, however, is how such point measurements are related to average fluxes over the area of a GCM grid box. In this paper we will use data from the field program to depict the evolution of the boundary layer over adjacent, sharply contrasting surface types on two separate occasions. We will then use simple scaling based on the observations to argue that sub-gridscale motions would often be likely to significantly alter the estimates and resulting parameterizations of GCM-scale surface fluxes in the region.

  1. On Supersonic-Inlet Boundary-Layer Bleed Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harloff, Gary J.; Smith, Gregory E.

    1995-01-01

    Boundary-layer bleed in supersonic inlets is typically used to avoid separation from adverse shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions and subsequent total pressure losses in the subsonic diffuser and to improve normal shock stability. Methodologies used to determine bleed requirements are reviewed. Empirical sonic flow coefficients are currently used to determine the bleed hole pattern. These coefficients depend on local Mach number, pressure ratio, hole geometry, etc. A new analytical bleed method is presented to compute sonic flow coefficients for holes and narrow slots and predictions are compared with published data to illustrate the accuracy of the model. The model can be used by inlet designers and as a bleed boundary condition for computational fluid dynamic studies.

  2. Anomalous plasma diffusion and the magnetopause boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treumann, Rudolf A.; Labelle, James; Haerendel, Gerhard; Pottelette, Raymond

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the current state of anomalous diffusion research at the magnetopause and its role in the formation of the magnetopause boundary layer is presented. Plasma wave measurements in the boundary layer indicate that most of the relevant unstable wave modes contribute negligibly to the diffusion process at the magnetopause under magnetically undisturbed northward IMF conditions. The most promising instability is the lower hybrid drift instability, which may yield diffusion coefficients of the right order if the highest measured wave intensities are assumed. It is concluded that global stationary diffusion due to wave-particle interactions does not take place at the magnetopause. Microscopic wave-particle interaction and anomalous diffusion may contribute to locally break the MD frozen-in conditions and help in transporting large amounts of magnetosheath plasma across the magnetospheric boundary.

  3. A general integral form of the boundary-layer equation for incompressible flow with an application to the calculation of the separation point of turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tetervin, Neal; Lin, Chia Chiao

    1951-01-01

    A general integral form of the boundary-layer equation, valid for either laminar or turbulent incompressible boundary-layer flow, is derived. By using the experimental finding that all velocity profiles of the turbulent boundary layer form essentially a single-parameter family, the general equation is changed to an equation for the space rate of change of the velocity-profile shape parameter. The lack of precise knowledge concerning the surface shear and the distribution of the shearing stress across turbulent boundary layers prevented the attainment of a reliable method for calculating the behavior of turbulent boundary layers.

  4. Some Basic Aspects of Magnetohydrodynamic Boundary-Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Robert V.

    1959-01-01

    An appraisal is made of existing solutions of magnetohydrodynamic boundary-layer equations for stagnation flow and flat-plate flow, and some new solutions are given. Since an exact solution of the equations of magnetohydrodynamics requires complicated simultaneous treatment of the equations of fluid flow and of electromagnetism, certain simplifying assumptions are generally introduced. The full implications of these assumptions have not been brought out properly in several recent papers. It is shown in the present report that for the particular law of deformation which the magnetic lines are assumed to follow in these papers a magnet situated inside the missile nose would not be able to take up any drag forces; to do so it would have to be placed in the flow away from the nose. It is also shown that for the assumption that potential flow is maintained outside the boundary layer, the deformation of the magnetic lines is restricted to small values. The literature contains serious disagreements with regard to reductions in heat-transfer rates due to magnetic action at the nose of a missile, and these disagreements are shown to be mainly due to different interpretations of reentry conditions rather than more complicated effects. In the present paper the magnetohydrodynamic boundary-layer equation is also expressed in a simple form that is especially convenient for physical interpretation. This is done by adapting methods to magnetic forces which in the past have been used for forces due to gravitational or centrifugal action. The simplified approach is used to develop some new solutions of boundary-layer flow and to reinterpret certain solutions existing in the literature. An asymptotic boundary-layer solution representing a fixed velocity profile and shear is found. Special emphasis is put on estimating skin friction and heat-transfer rates.

  5. Turbulent boundary layer on a convex, curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. C.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of strong convex curvature on boundary layer turbulence were investigated. The data gathered on the behavior of Reynolds stress suggested the formulation of a simple turbulence model. Three sets of data were taken on two separate facilities. Both rigs had flow from a flat surface, over a convex surface with 90 deg of turning, and then onto a flat recovery surface. The geometry was adjusted so that, for both rigs, the pressure gradient along the test surface was zero - thus avoiding any effects of streamwise acceleration on the wall layers. Results show that after a sudden introduction of curvature, the shear stress in the outer part of the boundary layer is sharply diminished and is even slightly negative near the edge. The wall shear also drops off quickly downstream. In contrast, when the surface suddenly becomes flat again, the wall shear and shear stress profiles recover very slowly towards flat wall conditions.

  6. Lidar boundary layer observations and ozone measurements in Sofia, Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorieva, V.; Kolev, N.; Donev, E.; Ivanov, D.; Kaprielov, B.; Kolev, I.

    2008-12-01

    Remote-sensing technique (aerosol LIDAR), that provides a opportunity to investigate atmospheric boundary layer structure and determine the height of the mixing layer, was used. Simultaneous observations of the convective boundary layer development and surface ozone concentration dynamics between early morning and afternoon are presented. Contribution of the two processes (photochemical ozone formation and vertical advection) driven by increasing solar radiation to ozone content is analysed on the base of experimental data received during summer campaign of 2005 in Sofia, Bulgaria. Also, simultaneous diurnal surface ozone and meteorological parameters (temperature, solar radiation, wind speed and direction, relative humidity) measurements carried out during summer - spring time of 2006 are presented. An examination of the relationships between ozone and meteorological factors provided evidence for the processes defining observed ozone pollution.

  7. Lateral straining of turbulent boundary layers. I - Streamline divergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saddoughi, Seyed G.; Joubert, Peter N.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of prolonged streamline divergence on developing turbulent boundary layers is investigated using an experimental approximation of the source flow over a flat plate to achieve a simple divergence. Results are presented of hot-wire measurements for the planes of symmetry of two layers which had the same (low) Reynolds number and were developed in the presence of the same amount of simple divergence with a maximum divergence parameter of about 0.075 but with different (by a factor of 2) pressure-gradient parameters. It was found that there were two overlapping stages of development. In the initial stage, which covered a distance of about 20 initial boundary-layer thicknesses from the start of divergence, the coupled effects of both the pressure gradient and divergence were present. In the second region, which lasts nearly to the end of the diverging section, the pressure-gradient effects were negligible.

  8. Photoacoustic emission from Au nanoparticles arrayed on thermal insulation layer.

    PubMed

    Namura, Kyoko; Suzuki, Motofumi; Nakajima, Kaoru; Kimura, Kenji

    2013-04-01

    Efficient photoacoustic emission from Au nanoparticles on a porous SiO(2) layer was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The Au nanoparticle arrays/porous SiO(2)/SiO(2)/Ag mirror sandwiches, namely, local plasmon resonators, were prepared by dynamic oblique deposition (DOD). Photoacoustic measurements were performed on the local plasmon resonators, whose optical absorption was varied from 0.03 (3%) to 0.95 by varying the thickness of the dielectric SiO(2) layer. The sample with high absorption (0.95) emitted a sound that was eight times stronger than that emitted by graphite (0.94) and three times stronger than that emitted by the sample without the porous SiO(2) layer (0.93). The contribution of the porous SiO(2) layer to the efficient photoacoustic emission was analyzed by means of a numerical method based on a one-dimensional heat transfer model. The result suggested that the low thermal conductivity of the underlying porous layer reduces the amount of heat escaping from the substrate and contributes to the efficient photoacoustic emission from Au nanoparticle arrays. Because both the thermal conductivity and the spatial distribution of the heat generation can be controlled by DOD, the local plasmon resonators produced by DOD are suitable for the spatio-temporal modulation of the local temperature. PMID:23571958

  9. BLSTA: A boundary layer code for stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Yong-Sun

    1992-01-01

    A computer program is developed to solve the compressible, laminar boundary-layer equations for two-dimensional flow, axisymmetric flow, and quasi-three-dimensional flows including the flow along the plane of symmetry, flow along the leading-edge attachment line, and swept-wing flows with a conical flow approximation. The finite-difference numerical procedure used to solve the governing equations is second-order accurate. The flow over a wide range of speed, from subsonic to hypersonic speed with perfect gas assumption, can be calculated. Various wall boundary conditions, such as wall suction or blowing and hot or cold walls, can be applied. The results indicate that this boundary-layer code gives velocity and temperature profiles which are accurate, smooth, and continuous through the first and second normal derivatives. The code presented herein can be coupled with a stability analysis code and used to predict the onset of the boundary-layer transition which enables the assessment of the laminar flow control techniques. A user's manual is also included.

  10. Investigation Of Boundary Layers Fine Structure In Arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golitsyn, G. S.; Granberg, I. G.; Andronova, A. V.; Zilitinkevich, S. S.; Smirnov, V. V.; Ponomarev, V. M.

    In connection with insufficiency of the quantitative items of information about the structure of surface and boundary layers structure of the atmosphere in the periods previous dusty ejection, and also absence of the description of an arid atmospheres micrometeorological mode, when the dry spreading surface thermally is non-uniform, that is characteristic for midday hours, the forwarding researches of fine structure of boundary layers in deserted regions of Kalmykia (1995-1997) and on dried bottom of the Aral sea (1991-1992 and in 1998) were carried out. Is was established that in dry hot weather above sandy "saucers" at heights of 1-2 meters there are micro- inversions of temperature and humidity. On our supervisions, this process occurs at temperatures of air above 25 deg.C and relative humidity less than 40%. Thus the gra- dient of temperature in bottom (5 cm) layer in absence of an external wind reaches 200-500 , i.e., arises strongly unstable subsurface boundary layer. Thus during dehydration of aggregate particles consisting, as has shown the soil anal- ysis, from particles of size 80-150 microns, the organic-mineral compositions (OMC) are allocated, and the thin-dispersion aerosol is formed. These thin-dispersion par- ticles (0.01-0.1 microns) first accumulate in this layer, and then at the expense of strong temperature (vertical and horizontal) gradient pass through viscous sub-layer and rise above, as whirlwinds - standing motionless thermics, or dust-devils, or as sim- ple convective of flows. During investigations, is was established, that in a hot season in absence of dusty storms convective processes lift into air from sandy landscapes of Kalmykia and Sub-Aral regions, consisting from aggregate particles, significant amounts of long-living aerosol of size less than 5 microns (including thin-dispersion (0.01-0.1 microns) aerosol), which renders essential influence on formation of aerosol pollution of an atmosphere and, thus, on a climate. Is was established, that the in- termediate condition between unstable and homogeneous atmosphere is characteristic for a structure of a boundary layer during dusty ejection. The analysis of the basic characteristics of boundary layers fine structure in deserted regions was carried out.

  11. A modeling study of marine boundary layer clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Shouping; Fitzjarrald, Daniel E.

    1993-01-01

    Marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds are important components of the earth's climate system. These clouds drastically reduce the amount of solar radiation absorbed by the earth, but have little effect on the emitted infrared radiation on top of the atmosphere. In addition, these clouds are intimately involved in regulating boundary layer turbulent fluxes. For these reasons, it is important that general circulation models used for climate studies must realistically simulate the global distribution of the MBL. While the importance of these cloud systems is well recognized, many physical processes involved in these clouds are poorly understood and their representation in large-scale models remains an unresolved problem. The present research aims at the development and improvement of the parameterization of these cloud systems and an understanding of physical processes involved. This goal is addressed in two ways. One is to use regional modeling approach to validate and evaluate two-layer marine boundary layer models using satellite and ground-truth observations; the other is to combine this simple model with a high-order turbulence closure model to study the transition processes from stratocumulus to shallow cumulus clouds. Progress made in this effort is presented.

  12. The Role of Lateral Boundary Conditions and Boundary Layer in air Quality Modelling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piot, M.; Jorba, O.; Jimenez, P.; Baldasano, J.

    2008-12-01

    Often in Europe, high concentrations of O3 and NOx exceed the allowed maximum levels defined by the European Commission. The model system WRF-CMAQ is a regional air quality modelling system, which we applied to the European continent with a horizontal resolution of 12km × 12km and 8 vertical layers for CMAQ. The EMEP emission inventory was compiled and applied to the model domain. Due to uncertain external influence, the definition of adequate lateral boundary conditions for gas phase chemistry in a regional model is a complex issue and an important source of errors. Sensitivity studies were performed for a tested month (May 2004) to assess the impact of boundary conditions and boundary layer on the quality of the simulations. In order to evaluate the performances of the model, model simulations were compared to 70 and 21 stations from the EMEP network for O3 and NO2, respectively, throughout Europe. Basically, synthetic boundary conditions over 6 vertical layers were used in preliminary simulations. Then, climatological data provided by the global climate-chemistry model LMDz-INCA2 were used to define consistent lateral conditions and simulations were also performed using the May-2004 data from this model (both over 6 or 15 layers). Climatological data provided reliable conditions for the model boundaries but did not improve the quality of simulated O3 in the model domain (mean normalized gross error (MNGE) of 23% compared to 20% for synthetic profiles). Besides, the use of higher vertical resolution notably improved the trend and daily variations of O3 and hindered unrealistic subsidence of O3-enriched air from aloft, reducing the MNGE from 23% to 18%. The chemistry of NO2 was found to be mostly governed by local emissions, with little influence of the boundary conditions. A best-fitting configuration of boundary conditions will be discussed. Also, this work analyzes the influence of two different planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterization schemes: the YSU PBL scheme based on Hong. et al (1996) and a new stable boundary layer scheme allowing the computation of vertical diffusion coefficients at all timesteps. The two schemes do not differ sufficiently from one another to lead to a significant improvement in the simulation of the chemistry. In the view of excessive NO2 simulated at night, other PBL parameterizations will be discussed.

  13. Numerical Simulation of a Spatially Evolving Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, T. B.; Erlebacher, G.

    2002-01-01

    The results from direct numerical simulations of a spatially evolving, supersonic, flat-plate turbulent boundary-layer flow, with free-stream Mach number of 2.25 are presented. The simulated flow field extends from a transition region, initiated by wall suction and blowing near the inflow boundary, into the fully turbulent regime. Distributions of mean and turbulent flow quantities are obtained and an analysis of these quantities is performed at a downstream station corresponding to Re(sub x)= 5.548 x10(exp 6) based on distance from the leading edge.

  14. Polymer Effects on Heat Transport in Laminar Boundary Layer Flow

    E-print Network

    Roberto Benzi; Emily S. C. Ching; Vivien W. S. Chu

    2011-04-27

    We consider a laminar Blasius boundary-layer flow above a slightly heated horizontal plate and study the effect of polymer additives on the heat transport. We show that the action of the polymers can be understood as a space-dependent effective viscosity that first increases from the zero-shear value then decreases exponentially back to the zero-shear value as one moves away from the boundary. We find that with such an effective viscosity, both the horizontal and vertical velocities near the plate are decreased thus leading to an increase in the friction drag and a decrease in the heat transport in the flow.

  15. Edge Plasma Boundary Layer Generated By Kink Modes in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Zakharov

    2010-11-22

    This paper describes the structure of the electric current generated by external kink modes at the plasma edge using the ideally conducting plasma model. It is found that the edge current layer is created by both wall touching and free boundary kink modes. Near marginal stability, the total edge current has a universal expression as a result of partial compensation of the ?-functional surface current by the bulk current at the edge. The resolution of an apparent paradox with the pressure balance across the plasma boundary in the presence of the surface currents is provided.

  16. Fullerenes in the cretaceous-tertiary boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Heymann, D; Chibante, L P; Brooks, R R; Wolbach, W S; Smalley, R E

    1994-07-29

    High-pressure liquid chromatography with ultraviolet-visible spectral analysis of toluene extracts of samples from two Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary sites in New Zealand has revealed the presence of C(60) at concentrations of 0.1 to 0.2 parts per million of the associated soot. This technique verified also that fullerenes are produced in similar amounts in the soots of common flames under ambient atmospheric conditions. Therefore, the C(60) in the K-T boundary layer may have originated in the extensive wildfires that were associated with the cataclysmic impact event that terminated the Mezozoic era about 65 million years ago. PMID:17752762

  17. Structure measurements in a synthetic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    1987-09-01

    Extensive hot-wire measurements have been made to determine the structure of the large eddy in a synthejc turbulent boundary layer on a flat-plate model. The experiments were carried out in a wind tunnel at a nominal free-stream velocity of 12 m/s. The synthetic turbulent boundary layer had a hexagonal pattern of eddies and a ratio of streamwise scale to spanwise scale of 3.2:1. The measured celerity of the large eddy was 84.2 percent of the free-stream velocity. There was some loss of coherence, but very little distortion, as the eddies moved downstream. Several mean properties of the synthetic boundary layer were found to agree quite well with the mean properties of a natural turbulent boundary layer at the same Reynolds number. The large eddy is composed of a pair of primary counter-rotating vortices about five [...] long in the streamwise direction and about one [...] apart in the spanwise direction, where [...] is the mean boundary-layer thickness. The sense of the primary pair is such as to pump fluid away from the wall in the region between the vortices. A secondary pair of counter-rotating streamwise vortices, having a sense opposite to that of the primary pair, is observed outside of and slightly downstream from the primary vortices. Both pairs of vortices extend across the full thickness of the boundary layer and are inclined at a shallow angle to the surface of the flat plate. The data show that the mean vorticity vectors are not tangential to the large-eddy vortices. In fact, the streamwise and normal vorticity components that signal the presence of the eddy are of the same order of magnitude. Definite signatures are obtained in terms of the mean skin-friction coefficient and the mean wake parameter averaged at constant phase. Velocities induced by the vortices are partly responsible for entrainment of irrotational fluid, for transport of momentum, for generation of Reynolds stresses, and for maintenance of streamwise and normal vorticity in the outer flow. A stretching mechanism is important in matching spanwise vorticity close to the wall to variations in turbulent shearing stress. Regions where the stretching term is large coincide with regions of large wall shearing stress and large turbulence production.

  18. Boundary layer ozone - An airborne survey above the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Browell, Edward V.; Warren, Linda S.

    1988-01-01

    Ozone data obtained over the forest canopy of the Amazon Basin during July and August 1985 in the course of NASA's Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment 2A are discussed, and ozone profiles obtained during flights from Belem to Tabatinga, Brazil, are analyzed to determine any cross-basin effects. The analyses of ozone data indicate that the mixed layer of the Amazon Basin, for the conditions of undisturbed meteorology and in the absence of biomass burning, is a significant sink for tropospheric ozone. As the coast is approached, marine influences are noted at about 300 km inland, and a transition from a forest-controlled mixed layer to a marine-controlled mixed layer is noted.

  19. Use of multiple discrete wall jets for delaying boundary layer separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, J. D.; Herring, H. J.

    1974-01-01

    The effectiveness of a spanwise array of small discrete blowing nozzles in preventing separation of a turbulent boundary layer was investigated experimentally. The spacing, axial location, and momentum flux of the nozzles were varied in a systematic way, and overall performance was measured for each combination. Extensive mean velocity profiles were measured for one selected combination. Overall diffusion achieved before separation was correlated successfully with a momentum flux excess parameter, and in terms of this parameter discrete nozzles, when advantageously placed, were found to perform somewhat better than an optimally placed two-dimensional jet slot.

  20. Transport of contaminants in the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, I. Y.; Swan, P. R.

    1978-01-01

    A planetary boundary layer model is described and used to simulate PBL phenomena including cloud formation and pollution transport in the San Francisco Bay Area. The effect of events in the PBL on air pollution is considered, and governing equations for the average momentum, potential temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and air contaminants are presented. These equations are derived by integrating the basic equations vertically through the mixed layer. Characteristics of the day selected for simulation are reported, and the results suggest that the diurnally cyclic features of the mesoscale motion, including clouds and air pollution, can be simulated in a readily interpretable way with the model.

  1. Atmospheric surface and boundary layers of the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garstang, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Three phases of work were performed: design of and preparation for the Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE 2-A); execution of the ABLE 2-A field program; and analysis of the ABLE 2-A data. Three areas of experiment design were dealt with: surface based meteorological measurements; aircraft missions; and project meteorological support. The primary goal was to obtain a good description of the structure of the atmosphere immediately above the rain forest canopy (top of canopy to a few thousand meters), to describe this region during the growing daytime phase of the boundary layer; and to examine the nighttime stratified state. A secondary objective was to examine the role that deep convective storms play in the vertical transport of heat, water vapor, and other trace gases. While significant progress was made, much of the analysis remains to be done.

  2. Works on theory of flapping wing. [considering boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubev, V. V.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown mathematically that taking account of the boundary layer is the only way to develop a theory of flapping wings without violating the basic observations and mathematics of hydromechanics. A theory of thrust generation by flapping wings can be developed if the conventional downstream velocity discontinuity surface is replaced with the observed Karman type vortex streets behind a flapping wing. Experiments show that the direction of such vortices is the reverse of that of conventional Karman streets. The streets form by breakdown of the boundary layer. Detailed analysis of the movements of certain birds and insects during flight 'in place' is fully consistent with this theory of the lift, thrust and drag of flapping wings. Further directions for research into flight with flapping wings are indicated.

  3. Boundary layer development on turbine airfoil suction surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, O. P.; Wells, R. A.; Schlinker, R. H.; Bailey, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a study supported by NASA under the Energy Efficient Engine Program, conducted to investigate the development of boundary layers under the influence of velocity distributions that simulate the suction sides of two state-of-the-art turbine airfoils, are presented. One velocity distribution represented a forward loaded airfoil ('squared-off' design), while the other represented an aft loaded airfoil ('aft loaded' design). These velocity distributions were simulated in a low-speed, high-aspect-ratio wind tunnel specifically designed for boundary layer investigations. It is intended that the detailed data presented in this paper be used to develop improved turbulence model suitable for application to turbine airfoil design.

  4. Crossing shock wave-turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanswami, N.; Knight, D. D.; Bogdonoff, S. M.; Horstman, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional interactions between crossing shock waves generated by symmetric sharp fins and a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate are investigated experimentally and theoretically at Mach number 2.95 and freestream unit Reynolds number 1.96 x 10 to the 7th/ft. The incoming boundary layer has a thickness of 4 mm at the location of the fin leading edges. A comparison of experimental and computational results for two sets of fin angles (11 x 11 and 9 x 9 deg) shows general agreement with regard to surface pressure measurements and surface streamline patterns. The principal feature of the streamline structure is a collision of counterrotating vortical structures emanating from near the fin leading edges and meeting at the geometric centerline of the interaction.

  5. Benthic boundary layer processes in the Lower Florida Keys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lavoie, D.L.; Richardson, M.D.; Holmes, C.

    1997-01-01

    This special issue of Geo-Marine Letters, "Benthic Boundary Layer Processes in the Lower Florida Keys," includes 12 papers that present preliminary results from the Key West Campaign. The Dry Tortugas and Marquesas Keys test sites were selected by a group of 115 scientists and technicians to study benthic boundary layer processes in a carbonate environment controlled by bioturbation and biogeochemical processes. Major activities included remote sediment classification; high-frequency acoustic scattering experiments; sediment sampling for radiological, geotechnical, biological, biogeochemical, physical, and geoacoustic studies; and hydrodynamic studies using an instrumented tetrapod. All these data are being used to improve our understanding of the effects of environmental processes on sediment structure and behavior.

  6. Clues and modelling for missing boundary layer in cataclysmic variables

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, M.; Sion, E.M.; Sparks, W.M.

    1996-12-31

    Recently, it has become observationally evident that during a dwarf nova (DN) outburst, a significant portion of the gravitational energy accreted onto the white dwarf (WD) may not be radiated away instantly from a narrow boundary layer as predicted by the standard disk theory. Instead, it may be stored in the WD through various mechanisms and the radiative area may be much larger; thus the long-puzzling {ital missing boundary layer} may be accounted for when the response of the WD to the accretion is considered. The results from our group and collaborators on this aspect are outlined in the first part. A progress report on the development, of a new numerical model forms the second.

  7. Fluctuating pressure loads under high speed boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, William E.

    1987-01-01

    Aeroacoustic fatigue is anticipated to control the design of significant portions of the structures of high-speed vehicles. This is due to contemplated long-duration flights at high dynamic pressures and Mach numbers with related high skin temperatures. Fluctuating pressure loads are comparatively small beneath attached turbulent boundary layers, but become important in regions of flow separation such as compression and expansion corners on elevons and rudders. The most intense loads are due to shock/boundary-layer interaction. These flows may occur in the engine-exhaust wall jet and in flows over control surfaces. A brief review is given of available research in these areas with a description of work under way at Langley Research Center.

  8. A review of unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    The essential results of a comprehensive review of existing unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments are presented. Different types of unsteady flow facilities are described, and the related unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments are cataloged and discussed. The measurements that were obtained in the various experiments are described, and a complete list of experimental results is presented. All the experiments that measured instantaneous values of velocity, turbulence intensity, or turbulent shear stress are identified, and the availability of digital data is indicated. The results of the experiments are analyzed, and several significant trends are identified. An assessment of the available data is presented, delineating gaps in the existing data, and indicating where new or extended information is needed. Guidelines for future experiments are included.

  9. Investigation of Turbulent Boundary-Layer Separation Using Laser Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modarress, D.; Johnson, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Boundary-layer measurements realized by laser velocimetry are presented for a Much 2.9, two-dimensional, shock-wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction containing an extensive region of separated flow. Mean velocity and turbulent intensity profiles were obtained from upstream of the interaction zone to downstream of the mean reattachment point. The superiority of the laser velocimeter technique over pressure sensors in turbulent separated flows is demonstrated by a comparison of the laser velocimeter data with results obtained from local pilot and static pressure measurements for the same flow conditions. The locations of the mean separation and reattachment points as deduced from the mean velocity measurements are compared to oil-now visualization results. Representative velocity probability density functions obtained in the separated now region are also presented. Critical to the success of this investigation were: the use of Bragg cell frequency shifting and artificial seeding of the now with submicron light-scattering particles.

  10. Additive erosion reduction influences in the turbulent boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1981-05-06

    Results of a sequence of flow, heat and mass transfer calculations are presented which theoretically characterize the erosive environment at the wall surface of refractory metal coated and uncoated gun barrels. The theoretical results include analysis of the wall surface temperature, heat flux, and shear stress time histories on thin (10 mil. or 0.254 mm) Cr, Mo, Nb, and Ta plated steel barrel walls as uncoated steel walls. The calculations combine effects of a number of separate processes which have been previously (and purposely) studied individually. These include solid particle additive concentrations, gas-wall thermo-chemical influences, and transient turbulent wall boundary layer flow with multi-component molecular diffusion and reactions from interaction of propellant combustion and the eroding surface. The boundary layer model includes particulate additive concentrations as well as propellant combustion products, considered for the present to be in the local thermochemical equilibrium.

  11. Additive erosion reduction influences in the turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, A. C.

    1981-05-01

    Results of a sequence of flow, heat and mass transfer calculations are presented which theoretically characterize the erosive environment at the wall surface of refractory metal coated and uncoated gun barrels. The theoretical results include analysis of the wall surface temperature, heat flux, and shear stress time histories on thin (10 mil.) Cr, Mo, Nb, and Ta plated steel barrel walls as uncoated steel walls. The calculations combine effects of a number of separate processes which were previously (and purposely) studied individually. These include solid particle additive concentrations, gas wall thermochemical influences, and transient turbulent wall boundary layer flow with multicomponent molecular diffusion and reactions from interaction of propellant combustion and the eroding surface. The boundary layer model includes particulate additive concentrations as well as propellant combustion products, considered for the present to be in the local thermochemical equilibrium.

  12. Boundary-layer turbulence as a kangaroo process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Maassen van den Brink, A.

    1995-09-01

    A nonlocal mixing-length theory of turbulence transport by finite size eddies is developed by means of a novel evaluation of the Reynolds stress. The analysis involves the contruct of a sample path space and a stochastic closure hypothesis. The simplifying property of exhange (strong eddies) is satisfied by an analytical sampling rate model. A nonlinear scaling relation maps the path space onto the semi-infinite boundary layer. The underlying near-wall behavior of fluctuating velocities perfectly agrees with recent direct numerical simulations. The resulting integro-differential equation for the mixing of scalar densities represents fully developed boundary-layer turbulence as a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type of stochastic process. The model involves a scaling exponent ? (with ?-->? in the diffusion limit). For the (partly analytical) solution for the mean velocity profile, excellent agreement with the experimental data yields ?~=0.58.

  13. Boundary layer integral matrix procedure code modifications and verifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. M.; Morse, H. L.

    1974-01-01

    A summary of modifications to Aerotherm's Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure (BLIMP) code is presented. These modifications represent a preliminary effort to make BLIMP compatible with other JANNAF codes and to adjust the code for specific application to rocket nozzle flows. Results of the initial verification of the code for prediction of rocket nozzle type flows are discussed. For those cases in which measured free stream flow conditions were used as input to the code, the boundary layer predictions and measurements are in excellent agreement. In two cases, with free stream flow conditions calculated by another JANNAF code (TDK) for use as input to BLIMP, the predictions and the data were in fair agreement for one case and in poor agreement for the other case. The poor agreement is believed to result from failure of the turbulent model in BLIMP to account for laminarization of a turbulent flow. Recommendations for further code modifications and improvements are also presented.

  14. Asymptotically optimal unsaturated lattice cubature formulae with bounded boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, M D

    2013-07-31

    This paper describes a new algorithm for constructing lattice cubature formulae with bounded boundary layer. These formulae are unsaturated (in the sense of Babenko) both with respect to the order and in regard to the property of asymptotic optimality on W{sub 2}{sup m}-spaces, m element of (n/2,?). Most of the results obtained apply also to W{sub 2}{sup ?}(R{sup n})-spaces with a hypoelliptic multiplier of smoothness ?. Bibliography: 6 titles.

  15. Boundary Layer Transition Experiments in Support of the Hypersonics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Chen, Fang-Jenq; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.

    2007-01-01

    Two experimental boundary layer transition studies in support of fundamental hypersonics research are reviewed. The two studies are the HyBoLT flight experiment and a new ballistic range effort. Details are provided of the objectives and approach associated with each experimental program. The establishment of experimental databases from ground and flight are to provide better understanding of high-speed flows and data to validate and guide the development of simulation tools.

  16. Defects and boundary layers in non-Euclidean plates

    E-print Network

    Gemmer, John

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the behaviour of non-Euclidean plates with constant negative Gaussian curvature using the F\\"oppl-von K\\'arm\\'an reduced theory of elasticity. Motivated by recent experimental results, we focus on annuli with a periodic profile. We prove rigorous upper and lower bounds for the elastic energy that scales like the thickness squared. We also investigate the scaling with thickness of boundary layers where the stretching energy is concentrated with decreasing thickness.

  17. Topographically generated internal waves and boundary layer instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soontiens, Nancy; Stastna, Marek; Waite, Michael L.

    2015-08-01

    Flow over topography has been shown to generate finite amplitude internal waves upstream, over the topography and downstream. Such waves can interact with the viscous bottom boundary layer to produce vigorous instabilities. However, the strength and size of such instabilities depends on whether viscosity significantly modifies the wave generation process, which is usually treated using inviscid theory in the literature. In this work, we contrast cases in which boundary layer separation profoundly alters the wave generation process and cases for which the generated internal waves largely match inviscid theory. All results are generated using a numerical model that simulates stratified flow over topography. Several issues with using a wave-based Reynolds number to describe boundary layer properties are discussed by comparing simulations with modifications to the domain depth, background velocity, and viscosity. For hill-like topography, three-dimensional aspects of the instabilities are also discussed. Decreasing the Reynolds number by a factor of four (by increasing the viscosity), while leaving the primary two-dimensional instabilities largely unchanged, drastically affects their three-dimensionalization. Several cases at the laboratory scale with a depth of 1 m are examined in both two and three dimensions and a subset of the cases is scaled up to a field scale 10-m deep fluid while maintaining similar values for the background current and viscosity. At this scale, increasing the viscosity by an order of magnitude does not significantly change the wave properties but does alter the wave's interaction with the bottom boundary layer through the bottom shear stress. Finally, two subcritical cases for which disturbances are able to propagate upstream showcase a set of instabilities forming on the upstream slope of the elevated topography. The time scale over which these instabilities develop is related to but distinct from the advective time scale of the waves. At a non-dimensional time when instabilities have formed in the field scale case, no instabilities have yet formed in the lab scale case.

  18. Linear stability theory and three-dimensional boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, Robert E.; Malik, Mujeeb R.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of linear stability theory and three dimensional boundary layer transition are provided. The ability to predict, using analytical tools, the location of boundary layer transition over aircraft-type configurations is of great importance to designers interested in laminar flow control (LFC). The e(sup N) method has proven to be fairly effective in predicting, in a consistent manner, the location of the onset of transition for simple geometries in low disturbance environments. This method provides a correlation between the most amplified single normal mode and the experimental location of the onset of transition. Studies indicate that values of N between 8 and 10 correlate well with the onset of transition. For most previous calculations, the mean flows were restricted to two-dimensional or axisymmetric cases, or have employed simple three-dimensional mean flows (e.g., rotating disk, infinite swept wing, or tapered swept wing with straight isobars). Unfortunately, for flows over general wing configurations, and for nearly all flows over fuselage-type bodies at incidence, the analysis of fully three-dimensional flow fields is required. Results obtained for the linear stability of fully three-dimensional boundary layers formed over both wing and fuselage-type geometries, and for both high and low speed flows are discussed. When possible, transition estimates form the e(sup N) method are compared to experimentally determined locations. The stability calculations are made using a modified version of the linear stability code COSAL. Mean flows were computed using both Navier Stokes and boundary-layer codes.

  19. Vortex/boundary-layer interactions: Data report, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Bradshaw, P.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done under NASA Grant NAGw-581, Vortex/Boundary Layer Interactions. The experimental methods are discussed in detail and numerical results are presented, but are not fully interpreted. This report should be useful to anyone who wishes to make further use of the data (available on floppy disc or magnetic tape) for the development of turbulence models or the validation of predictive methods. Journal papers are in course of preparation.

  20. Stability of High-Speed, Three-Dimensional Boundary Layers 

    E-print Network

    Craig, Stuart A

    2015-04-02

    -developing inflection points lead to secondary inviscid instability (Kohama et al., 1991; Malik et al., 1994; Wassermann & Kloker, 2002; White & Saric, 2005; Bonfigli & Kloker, 2007). It is these secondary instabilities rather than the primary wave that eventually cause... the breakdown to transition. It was predicted by Malik et al. (1996) and confirmed experimentally by White & Saric (2005) that two classes of secondary instability exist in the crossflow boundary layer. Type-I modes are dominated by the ?U/?z extrema, and type...

  1. SCALING OF THE ANOMALOUS BOOST IN RELATIVISTIC JET BOUNDARY LAYER

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the one-dimensional interaction of a relativistic jet and an external medium. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations show an anomalous boost of the jet fluid in the boundary layer, as previously reported. We describe the boost mechanism using an ideal relativistic fluid and magnetohydrodynamic theory. The kinetic model is also examined for further understanding. Simple scaling laws for the maximum Lorentz factor are derived, and verified by the simulations.

  2. Kubo-Anderson Mixing in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Brink, A. Maassen Van Den

    A novel ab initio analysis of the Reynolds stress is presented in order to model non-local turbulence transport. The theory involves a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. A scaling relation maps the path space onto the boundary layer. Analytical sampling rates are shown to model mixing by exchange. Nonlocal mixing involves a scaling exponent ??0.58 (??? in the diffusion limit). The resulting transport equation represents a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process.

  3. Vortex studies relating to boundary layer turbulence and noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, J. L.; Hardin, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    The present study considers the two-dimensional case of an array of N rectilinear, like-sign vortices above an infinite flat boundary. The method of images can be employed with this configuration to reduce the problem to that of 2N vortices in free space, constrained by 2N symmetry relations. This system is Hamiltonian and therefore certain invariants of the motion are known. Futher, from the Hamiltonian constant, the equations of motion are readily derived and may be integrated numerically to determine the vortex trajectories. This knowledge of the time-dependent vortex motion then allows the resulting noise radiation to be computed by standard aeroacoustic techniques.

  4. The nonlinear development of Goertler vortices in growing boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Philip

    1988-01-01

    The development of Goertler vortices in boundary layers over curved walls in the nonlinear regime is investigated. The growth of the boundary layer makes a parallel flow analysis impossible except in the high wavenumber regime so in general the instability equations must be integrated numerically. Here the spanwise dependence of the basic flow is described using Fourier series expansion while the normal and streamwise variations are taken into account using finite differences. The calculations suggest that a given disturbance imposed at some position along the wall will eventually reach a local equilibrium state essentially independent of the initial conditions. In fact, the equilibrium state reached is qualitatively similar to the large amplitude high wave-number solution described asymptotically by Hall (1982). In general, it is found that the nonlinear interactions are dominated by a mean field type of interaction between the mean flow and the fundamental. Thus, even though higher harmonics of the fundamental are necessarily generated, most of the disturbance energy is confined to the mean flow correction and the fundamental. A major result of the calculations is finding that the downstream velocity field develops a strongly inflectional character as the flow moves downstream. The latter result suggests that the major effect of Goertler vortices on boundary layers of practical importance might be to make them highly receptive to rapidly growing Rayleigh modes of instability.

  5. The nonlinear development of Gortler vortices in growing boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Philip

    1986-01-01

    The development of Gortler vortices in boundary layers over curved walls in the nonlinear regime is investigated. The growth of the boundary layer makes a parallel flow analysis impossible except in the high wavenumber regime so in general the instability equations must be integrated numerically. Here the spanwise dependence of the basic flow is described using Fourier series expansion whilst the normal and streamwise variations are taken into account using finite differences. The calculations suggest that a given disturbance imposed at some position along the wall will eventually reach a local equilibrium state essentially independent of the initial conditions. In fact, the equilibrium state reached is qualitatively similar to the large amplitude high wave-number solution described asymptotically by Hall (1982). In general, it is found that the nonlinear interactions are dominated by a mean field type of interaction between the mean flow and the fundamental. Thus, even though higher harmonics of the fundamental are necessarily generated, most of the disturbance energy is confined to the mean flow correction and the fundamental. A major result of the calculations is finding that the downstream velocity field develops a strongly inflection character as the flow moves downstream. The latter result suggests that the major effect of Gortler vortices on boundary layers of practical importance might be to make them highly receptive to rapidly growing Rayleigh modes of instability.

  6. Review of Orbiter Flight Boundary Layer Transition Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcginley, Catherine B.; Berry, Scott A.; Kinder, Gerald R.; Barnell, maria; Wang, Kuo C.; Kirk, Benjamin S.

    2006-01-01

    In support of the Shuttle Return to Flight program, a tool was developed to predict when boundary layer transition would occur on the lower surface of the orbiter during reentry due to the presence of protuberances and cavities in the thermal protection system. This predictive tool was developed based on extensive wind tunnel tests conducted after the loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia. Recognizing that wind tunnels cannot simulate the exact conditions an orbiter encounters as it re-enters the atmosphere, a preliminary attempt was made to use the documented flight related damage and the orbiter transition times, as deduced from flight instrumentation, to calibrate the predictive tool. After flight STS-114, the Boundary Layer Transition Team decided that a more in-depth analysis of the historical flight data was needed to better determine the root causes of the occasional early transition times of some of the past shuttle flights. In this paper we discuss our methodology for the analysis, the various sources of shuttle damage information, the analysis of the flight thermocouple data, and how the results compare to the Boundary Layer Transition prediction tool designed for Return to Flight.

  7. Turbulent thermal boundary layers subjected to severe acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araya, Guillermo; Castillo, Luciano

    2013-11-01

    Favorable turbulent boundary layers are flows of great importance in industry. Particularly, understanding the mechanisms of quasi-laminarization by means of a very strong favorable streamwise pressure gradient is indeed crucial in drag reduction and energy management applications. Furthermore, due to the low Reynolds numbers involved in the quasi-laminarization process, abundant experimental investigation can be found in the literature for the past few decades. However, several grey zones still remain unsolved, principally associated with the difficulties that experiments encounter as the boundary layer becomes smaller. In addition, little attention has been paid to the heat transfer in a quasi-laminarization process. In this investigation, DNS of spatially-developing turbulent thermal boundary layers with prescribed very strong favorable pressure gradients (K = 4 × 10-6) are performed. Realistic inflow conditions are prescribed based on the Dynamic Multi-scale Approach (DMA) [Araya et al. JFM, Vol. 670, pp. 581-605, 2011]. In this sense the flow carries the footprint of turbulence, particularly in the streamwise component of the Reynolds stresses.

  8. Boundary layer control by means of wall parallel Lorentz forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weier, T.; Fey, U.; Gerbeth, G.; Mutschke, G.; Lielausis, O.; Platacis, E.

    2001-06-01

    Lorentz forces can be used to control the near wall flow of low conducting liquids like sea-water. To achieve force densities strong enough to modify the flow, both magnetic and electric fields have to be applied to the fluid. Here, wall parallel Lorentz forces in the streamwise direction were used to influence the velocity profile of a flat plate boundary layer as well as the flow around a symmetric hydrofoil. Velocity measurements inside the boundary layer and direct force measurements are given for the flat plate. At moderate force strength, the mean velocity profile is characterized by a momentum thickness smaller than in the unforced case, whereas at high enough Hartmann numbers a wall jet develops. Additionally, a turbulent, but approximately non-growing boundary layer has been observed. The effect of a suction-side, streamwise Lorentz force on a NACA-0017-like hydrofoil is quantified by means of force balance measurements. Depending on the angle of attack, two different effects are observed. (1) At small angles of incidence, a moderate increase in lift due to additional circulation is observed. Simultaneously, a decrease in drag of the hydrofoil is caused by the momentum added. (2) At higher angles of attack, where the unforced hydrofoil would normally stall, a more pronounced lift increase and a corresponding drag reduction are observed due to separation prevention. Figs 8, Refs 15.

  9. Numerical simulation of shock/turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, Sedat; Hatay, Ferhat F.

    1993-01-01

    Most flows of aerodynamic interest are compressible and turbulent. However, our present knowledge on the structures and mechanisms of turbulence is mostly based on incompressible flows. In the present work, compressibility effects in turbulent, high-speed, boundary layer flows are systematically investigated using the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) approach. Three-dimensional, time-dependent, fully nonlinear, compressible Navier-Stokes equations were numerically integrated by high-order finite-difference methods; no modeling for turbulence is used during the solution because the available resolution is sufficient to capture the relevant scales. The boundary layer problem deals with fully-turbulent compressible flows over flat geometries. Apart from its practical relevance to technological flows, turbulent compressible boundary layer flow is the simplest experimentally realizable turbulent compressible flow. Still, measuring difficulties prohibit a detailed experimental description of the flow, especially in the near-wall region. DNS studies provide a viable means to probe the physics of compressible turbulence in this region. The focus of this work is to explore the paths of energy transfer through which compressible turbulence is sustained. The structural similarities and differences between the incompressible and compressible turbulence are also investigated. The energy flow patterns or energy cascades are found to be directly related to the evolution of vortical structures which are generated in the near-wall region. Near-wall structures, and mechanisms which are not readily accessible through physical experiments are analyzed and their critical role on the evolution and the behavior of the flow is documented extensively.

  10. Viscous Forces in Velocity Boundary Layers around Planetary Ionospheres.

    PubMed

    Pérez-De-Tejada

    1999-11-01

    A discussion is presented to examine the role of viscous forces in the transport of solar wind momentum to the ionospheric plasma of weakly magnetized planets (Venus and Mars). Observational data are used to make a comparison of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses that are operative in the interaction of the solar wind with local plasma (planetary ionospheres). Measurements show the presence of a velocity boundary layer formed around the flanks of the ionosphere where the shocked solar wind has reached super-Alfvénic speeds. It is found that the Reynolds stresses in the solar wind at that region can be larger than the Maxwell stresses and thus are necessary in the local acceleration of the ionospheric plasma. From an order-of-magnitude calculation of the Reynolds stresses, it is possible to derive values of the kinematic viscosity and the Reynolds number that are suitable to the gyrotropic motion of the solar wind particles across the boundary layer. The value of the kinematic viscosity is comparable to those inferred from studies of the transport of solar wind momentum to the earth's magnetosphere and thus suggest a common property of the solar wind around planetary obstacles. Similar conditions could also be applicable to velocity boundary layers formed in other plasma interaction problems in astrophysics. PMID:10511515

  11. Cloud-Scale Numerical Modeling of the Arctic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Steven K.

    1998-01-01

    The interactions between sea ice, open ocean, atmospheric radiation, and clouds over the Arctic Ocean exert a strong influence on global climate. Uncertainties in the formulation of interactive air-sea-ice processes in global climate models (GCMs) result in large differences between the Arctic, and global, climates simulated by different models. Arctic stratus clouds are not well-simulated by GCMs, yet exert a strong influence on the surface energy budget of the Arctic. Leads (channels of open water in sea ice) have significant impacts on the large-scale budgets during the Arctic winter, when they contribute about 50 percent of the surface fluxes over the Arctic Ocean, but cover only 1 to 2 percent of its area. Convective plumes generated by wide leads may penetrate the surface inversion and produce condensate that spreads up to 250 km downwind of the lead, and may significantly affect the longwave radiative fluxes at the surface and thereby the sea ice thickness. The effects of leads and boundary layer clouds must be accurately represented in climate models to allow possible feedbacks between them and the sea ice thickness. The FIRE III Arctic boundary layer clouds field program, in conjunction with the SHEBA ice camp and the ARM North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean site, will offer an unprecedented opportunity to greatly improve our ability to parameterize the important effects of leads and boundary layer clouds in GCMs.

  12. Boundary layer structure during sea breeze conditions at Ahtopol, Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barantiev, D.; Batchvarova, E.; Novitzky, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    Continuous sodar (Scintec MFAS) and ultrasonic anemometer (Typhoon - Obninsk make) measurements were initiated in summer 2008 at the meteorological observatory of Ahtopol at the Black Sea coast (south-east Bulgaria) under a Bulgarian-Russian collaborative programme. These observations of high resolution form the basis for studies of the atmospheric boundary layer turbulence and vertical structure at a coastal site. This sodar is unique in Bulgaria and provides the first continuous high resolution data on the wind profile up to 400 - 500 m above the ground. In addition, the continuous turbulence parameters monitoring allows atmospheric boundary studies needed for different applications. The meteorological observatory at Ahtopol is under development as a background atmospheric composition station in coastal area and the wind data are essential for the studies of gases exchange under breeze conditions. The measurements revealed quite different sea breeze seasons during the years 2008 to 2011 and within the individual seasons, a number of different sea breeze types were identified depending on the interaction of local and larger-scale forcing. In this study we investigate the turbulence parameters and the vertical structure of the boundary layer related to only to sea breeze conditions. We also study the wind profile within the first 400 - 500 m above the ground. For the surface layer, we test the free convection theory against the sodar observations.

  13. Improved Inlet Noise Attenuation by Alteration of Boundary Layer Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mani, Ramani; Luedke, Jon; Jones, Michael G.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic liners are an essential component of technology used to reduce aircraft engine noise. Flow affects attenuation due to the liner in several ways, one of which is that boundary layers adjacent to the liner refract the sound. In the case of inlet noise, the boundary layer causes sound to be refracted away from the liner, thus degrading attenuation. A concept to improve attenuation by the liner by alteration of inlet boundary layer profiles is presented. The alteration of profiles is achieved by inlet blowing. Computational fluid dynamics and duct mode propagation theory for ducts carrying a parallel sheared flow have been used to design experiments to explore such a possibility in the NASA Langley Research Center Grazing Incidence Tube using an inlet blowing scheme developed at General Electric Global Research. The effects of inlet blowing on two liner configurations were evaluated. Calculated results will be shown for blowing ratios (injected flow/duct flow) of approximately 12% and frequencies up to 3 kHz. These results emphasize changes of attenuation achieved by blowing for the two liners. Experimental results of measured flow profiles (with and without blowing) in the Grazing Incidence Tube, and of corresponding changes in attenuation by the liner due to blowing will be presented.

  14. A planetary boundary layer observational capability in Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Wesely, M.L.; Coulter, R.L.; Klazura, G.E.

    1997-03-01

    An initiative is underway to establish the Argonne Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility to provide continuous, long-term observations of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) with state-of-the-art instruments. Planning for ABLE began during 1995, and implementation is expected to be mostly complete by 1998. ABLE will be located within the area now occupied by the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site of DOE`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The Argonne facility will concentrate on measuring at spatial scales considerably smaller than addressed with CART. When it is fully functional, ABLE will offer atmospheric scientists the opportunity to remotely {open_quote}collect{close_quote} data in real time without necessarily leaving their home offices. Specialized computer analysis and visualization software will be developed and provided by ABLE to facilitate analysis by remote users. ABLE will host specialized field campaigns for which it can provide supplementary measurements and the required facilities for shorter-term instrument deployments. In addition, ABLE will function as the proving ground for new technologies for atmospheric boundary layer research. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  15. Improving Subtropical Boundary Layer Cloudiness in the 2011 NCEP GFS

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J. K.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Xiao, Heng; Sun, Ruiyu N.; Han, J.

    2014-09-23

    The current operational version of National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Global Forecasting System (GFS) shows significant low cloud bias. These biases also appear in the Coupled Forecast System (CFS), which is developed from the GFS. These low cloud biases degrade seasonal and longer climate forecasts, particularly of short-wave cloud radiative forcing, and affect predicted sea surface temperature. Reducing this bias in the GFS will aid the development of future CFS versions and contributes to NCEP's goal of unified weather and climate modelling. Changes are made to the shallow convection and planetary boundary layer parameterisations to make them more consistent with current knowledge of these processes and to reduce the low cloud bias. These changes are tested in a single-column version of GFS and in global simulations with GFS coupled to a dynamical ocean model. In the single-column model, we focus on changing parameters that set the following: the strength of shallow cumulus lateral entrainment, the conversion of updraught liquid water to precipitation and grid-scale condensate, shallow cumulus cloud top, and the effect of shallow convection in stratocumulus environments. Results show that these changes improve the single-column simulations when compared to large eddy simulations, in particular through decreasing the precipitation efficiency of boundary layer clouds. These changes, combined with a few other model improvements, also reduce boundary layer cloud and albedo biases in global coupled simulations.

  16. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers to Acoustic and Vortical Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakamar, P.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Boundary layer receptivity to two-dimensional acoustic disturbances at different incidence angles and to vortical disturbances is investigated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for Mach 6 flow over a 7deg half-angle sharp-tipped wedge and a cone. Higher order spatial and temporal schemes are employed to obtain the solution. The results show that the instability waves are generated in the leading edge region and that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves as compared to the fast waves. It is found that the receptivity of the boundary layer on the windward side (with respect to the acoustic forcing) decreases when the incidence angle is increased from 0 to 30 degrees. However, the receptivity coefficient for the leeward side is found to vary relatively weakly with the incidence angle. The maximum receptivity is obtained when the wave incident angle is about 20 degrees. Vortical disturbances also generate unstable second modes, however the receptivity coefficients are smaller than that for the acoustic waves. Vortical disturbances first generate the fast acoustic modes and they switch to the slow mode near the continuous spectrum.

  17. Thermocapillary Bubble Migration: Thermal Boundary Layers for Large Marangoni Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1996-01-01

    The migration of an isolated gas bubble in an immiscible liquid possessing a temperature gradient is analyzed in the absence of gravity. The driving force for the bubble motion is the shear stress at the interface which is a consequence of the temperature dependence of the surface tension. The analysis is performed under conditions for which the Marangoni number is large, i.e. energy is transferred predominantly by convection. Velocity fields in the limit of both small and large Reynolds numbers are used. The thermal problem is treated by standard boundary layer theory. The outer temperature field is obtained in the vicinity of the bubble. A similarity solution is obtained for the inner temperature field. For both small and large Reynolds numbers, the asymptotic values of the scaled migration velocity of the bubble in the limit of large Marangoni numbers are calculated. The results show that the migration velocity has the same scaling for both low and large Reynolds numbers, but with a different coefficient. Higher order thermal boundary layers are analyzed for the large Reynolds number flow field and the higher order corrections to the migration velocity are obtained. Results are also presented for the momentum boundary layer and the thermal wake behind the bubble, for large Reynolds number conditions.

  18. Minnowbrook II 1997 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition in Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff John E. (Editor); Ashpis, David E. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The volume contains materials presented at the Minnowbrook II - 1997 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition in Turbomachines, held at Syracuse University Minnowbrook Conference Center, New York, on September 7-10, 1997. The workshop followed the informal format at the 1993 Minnowbrook I workshop, focusing on improving the understanding of late stage (final breakdown) boundary layer transition, with the engineering application of improving design codes for turbomachinery in mind. Among the physical mechanisms discussed were hydrodynamic instabilities, laminar to turbulent transition, bypass transition, turbulent spots, wake interaction with boundary layers, calmed regions, and separation, all in the context of flow in turbomachinery, particularly in compressors and high and low pressure turbines. Results from experiments, DNS, computation, modeling and theoretical analysis were presented. Abstracts and copies of viewgraphs, a specifically commissioned summation paper prepared after the workshop, and a transcript of the extensive working group reports and discussions are included in this volume. They provide recommendations for future research and clearly highlight the need for continued vigorous research in the technologically important area of transition in turbomachines.

  19. Coupling of magnetopause-boundary layer to the polar ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, C.Q.; Lee, L.C. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors develop a model which seeks to explain ultraviolet auroral images from the Viking satellite which show periodic bright regions which resemble [open quotes]beads[close quotes] or [open quotes]pearls[close quotes] aligned along the postnoon auroral oval. ULF geomagnetic pulsations observed in the cusp region are also addressed by this model. The model addresses plasma dynamics in the low-latitude boundary layer and interactions with the polar ionosphere by means of field-aligned current. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can develop in the presence of driven plasma flow, which can lead to the formation and growth of plasma vortices in the boundary layer. The finite conductivity of the earth ionosphere causes these vortices to decay. However regions of enhanced field-aligned power density in the postnoon auroral oval can be associated with field-aligned current filaments and boundary layer vortices. These structures may explain the observed bright spots. The authors also discuss the frequency spectrum and the polarization state of the pulsations.

  20. Hot-Film and Hot-Wire Anemometry for a Boundary Layer Active Flow Control Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenahan, Keven C.; Schatzman, David M.; Wilson, Jacob Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Unsteady active flow control (AFC) has been used experimentally for many years to minimize bluff-body drag. This technology could significantly improve performance of rotorcraft by cleaning up flow separation. It is important, then, that new actuator technologies be studied for application to future vehicles. A boundary layer wind tunnel was constructed with a 1ft-x-3ft test section and unsteady measurement instrumentation to study how AFC manipulates the boundary layer to overcome adverse pressure gradients and flow separation. This unsteady flow control research requires unsteady measurement methods. In order to measure the boundary layer characteristics, both hot-wire and hot-film Constant Temperature Anemometry is used. A hot-wire probe is mounted in the flow to measure velocity while a hot-film array lays on the test surface to measure skin friction. Hot-film sensors are connected to an anemometer, a Wheatstone bridge circuit with an output that corresponds to the dynamic flow response. From this output, the time varying flow field, turbulence, and flow reversal can be characterized. Tuning the anemometers requires a fan test on the hot-film sensors to adjust each output. This is a delicate process as several variables drastically affect the data, including control resistance, signal input, trim, and gain settings.

  1. Influence of a Two-scale Surface Roughness on a Neutral Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salizzoni, Pietro; Soulhac, Lionel; Mejean, Patrick; Perkins, Richard J.

    2008-04-01

    Flow in the urban boundary layer is strongly influenced by the surface roughness, which is composed principally of isolated buildings or groups of buildings. Previous research has shown that the flow regime depends on the characteristic height of these obstacles ( H), and the spacing between them ( W). In reality, the urban boundary layer contains roughness elements with a wide range of length scales; in many practical situations these can be classified into large-scale roughness—buildings, or groups of buildings—and small-scale roughness, such as street furniture and elements on the façades and roofs. It is important to understand how the small-scale roughness might modify mass and momentum transfer in the urban boundary layer, but relatively little information is available concerning the potential interaction between large- and small-scale roughness elements in the different flow regimes. This problem has been studied using wind-tunnel experiments, by measuring vertical velocity profiles over a two-dimensional obstacle array, adding small-scale roughness elements to the top of larger parallel square bars. The experiments were performed for different cavity aspect ratios: the results show that the small-scale roughness increases the turbulence intensities and the momentum transfer when the large-scale obstacles are closely packed ( H/ W > 1) but it has very little effect for more widely-spaced obstacles ( H/ W < 1).

  2. Acoustic emissions from unsteady transitional boundary layer flow structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marboe, Richard Chostner

    The acoustic radiation contribution of boundary layer flow structures has long been the subject of debate. The research described critically examines the popular approaches to modeling the radiation mechanisms and attempts to bring some degree of closure to the physical and practical significance of noise and pseudo-noise originating in the laminar-to-turbulent transition zone within a natural boundary layer. This includes improving models to include recent computational and experimental statistics, evaluation of model sensitivities to input parameters, and applicability to situations of engineering relevance. Prior efforts to model wall pressure fluctuation statistics resulting from boundary layer transition zone flow structures allow further development of direct radiation prediction codes. Several refinements were made to theoretical models for directly radiated noise based upon the Liepmann analogy for fluctuating displacement thickness including the incorporation of a semi- empirically derived space-time correlation function for the intermittency indicator. A similar two-fluids model uses a Lighthill acoustic analogy. Radiation by vortex structures and direct numerical simulation methods are reviewed to help define their useful role in predicting sound radiation from transition. The role of pressure gradient in axisymmetric body flows, flat plate flows, and over hydrofoils is investigated. A quiet airflow facility was developed to measure the direct acoustic radiation from a naturally transitioning boundary layer. Real-time acoustic intensity measurement instrumentation was developed if measurements of isolated spots in otherwise laminar flow had been necessary. This technique uses a hot film signal from the transition structure to obtain the coherent output intensity (COI). Model predictions are compared to the measured acoustic radiation from a naturally transitioning boundary layer. Radiated noise measurements isolating the direct transition zone radiation demonstrated similar dependence with axial location within the transition zone as previous wall pressure measurements. The measurements suggest that radiation from transition flow structures is multipolar and has low radiation efficiency. Transition noise per unit area is greater than TBL noise per unit area. Thus, the contribution to overall directly radiated flow noise from the transition zone in typical engineering applications is negligible compared to the radiation from the much larger area of fully turbulent flow.

  3. Atmospheric Boundary Layer of a pasture site in Amazônia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trindade de Araújo Tiburtino Neves, Theomar; Fisch, Gilberto; Raasch, Siegfried

    2013-04-01

    A great effort has been made by the community of micrometeorology and planetary boundary layer for a better description of the properties of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL), such as its height, thermodynamics characteristics and its time evolution. This work aims to give a review of the main characteristics of Atmospheric Boundary Layer over a pasture site in Amazonia. The measurements dataset was carried out from 3 different LBA field campaigns: RBLE 3 (during the dry season from 1993), RaCCI (during the dry-to-wet transition season from 2002) and WetAMC (during the wet season from 1999), collected with tethered balloon, radiosondes and eddy correlation method in a pasture site in the southwestern Amazonia. Different techniques and instruments were used to estimate the AB?s properties. During the daytime, it was possible to observe that there is an abrupt growth of the Convective Boundary Layer (CBL) between 08 and 11 LT, with a stationary pattern between 14 and 17 LT. The maximum heights at late afternoon were around 1600 m during the dry season, whilst the wet season it only reached 1000 m. This is due to the lower surface turbulent sensible heat flux as the soil is wetter and the partition of energy is completely different between wet to the dry season. For the transition period (RaCCI 2002), it was possible to analyze and compare several estimates from different instruments and methods. It showed that the parcel method overestimates the heights of all measurements (mainly at 14 LT) due to the high incidence of solar radiation and superadiabatic gradients. The profile and Richardson number methods gave results very similar to estimate the height of the CBL. The onset of the Nocturnal Boundary Layer (NBL) occurs before the sunset (18 LT) and its height is reasonable stable during the night (typical values around 180-250 m). An alternative method (Vmax) which used the height of the maximum windspeed derived from a SODAR instrument during RaCCI 2002 was proposed and it showed to be satisfactory comparing with the others methods. Besides that, it has the advantage to have measurements each 30 min.

  4. Boundary-layer turbulence modeling and vorticity dynamics: I. A kangaroo-process mixing model of boundary-layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; van den Brink, A. Maassen

    A nonlocal turbulence transport theory is presented by means of a novel analysis of the Reynolds stress, inter alia involving the construct of a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. An analytical sampling rate model (satisfying exchange) and a nonlinear scaling relation (mapping the path space onto the boundary layer) lead to an integro-differential equation for the mixing of scalar densities, which represents fully-developed boundary-layer turbulence as a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process. The underlying near-wall behavior (i.e. for y +?0) of fluctuating velocities fully agrees with recent direct numerical simulations. The model involves a scaling exponent ?, with ??? in the diffusion limit. For the (partly analytical) solution for the mean velocity profile, excellent agreement with the experimental data yields ??0.58. The significance of ? as a turbulence Cantor set dimension (in the logarithmic profile region, i.e. for y +??) is discussed.

  5. The influence of surface forces on the formation of structural peculiarities in the boundary layers of liquids and boundary phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derjaguin, B. V.

    1992-05-01

    This article, mentioning the influence of surface forces on the formation and the properties of diffuse adsorption layers on the boundary of solution-substrate, is mainly about the influence of surface forces on the structure and properties of boundary layers of the liquid. It deals with the phenomena of formation of homogeneous liquid crystalline layers of nonmesogenic liquids, boundary phases and the properties of boundary nonhomogeneous layers of water and alcohols. In the conclusion the data on surface forces are given with the radius of action up to 100 ?m, which are generated by leucocytes of blood plasma with the addition of a concentrated salt solution.

  6. The Jovian boundary layer as formed by magnetic-anomaly effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessler, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    A model is presented in which a plasma boundary layer of Jupiter is formed from plasma of internal origin. It is proposed that, unlike the Earth's boundary layer, which is thought to consist principally of solar wind plasma, Jupiter's boundary layer consists principally of sulphur and oxygen from the Io plasma torus, plus a small component of hydrogen from Jupiter's ionosphere. Fresh plasma is supplied to the boundary layer once each planetary rotation period by a convection pattern that rotates with Jupiter.

  7. The simulation of coherent structures in a laminar boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breuer, Kenny; Landahl, Marten T.; Spalart, Philippe R.

    1987-01-01

    Coherent structures in turbulent shear flows were studied extensively by several techniques, including the VITA technique which selects rapidly accelerating or decelerating regions in the flow. The evolution of a localized disturbance in a laminar boundary layer shows strong similarity to the evolution of coherent structures in a turbulent-wall bounded flow. Starting from a liftup-sweep motion, a strong shear layer develops which shares many of the features seen in conditionally-sampled turbulent velocity fields. The structure of the shear layer, Reynolds stress distribution, and wall pressure footprint are qualitatively the same, indicating that the dynamics responsible for the structure's evolution are simple mechanisms dependent only on the presence of a high mean shear and a wall and independent of the effects of local random fluctuations and outer flow effects. As the disturbance progressed, the development of streak-like-high- and low-speed regions associated with the three-dimensionality.

  8. Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant-temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spina, Eric F.

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective in the two research investigations performed under NASA Langley sponsorship (Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers) has been to increase the understanding of the physics of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. The study began with an extension of constant-temperature thermal anemometry techniques to a Mach 11 helium flow, including careful examinations of hot-wire construction techniques, system response, and system calibration. This was followed by the application of these techniques to the exploration of a Mach 11 helium turbulent boundary layer (To approximately 290 K). The data that was acquired over the course of more than two years consists of instantaneous streamwise mass flux measurements at a frequency response of about 500 kHz. The data are of exceptional quality in both the time and frequency domain and possess a high degree of repeatability. The data analysis that has been performed to date has added significantly to the body of knowledge on hypersonic turbulence, and the data reduction is continuing. An attempt was then made to extend these thermal anemometry techniques to higher enthalpy flows, starting with a Mach 6 air flow with a stagnation temperature just above that needed to prevent liquefaction (To approximately 475 F). Conventional hot-wire anemometry proved to be inadequate for the selected high-temperature, high dynamic pressure flow, with frequent wire breakage and poor system frequency response. The use of hot-film anemometry has since been investigated for these higher-enthalpy, severe environment flows. The difficulty with using hot-film probes for dynamic (turbulence) measurements is associated with construction limitations and conduction of heat into the film substrate. Work continues under a NASA GSRP grant on the development of a hot film probe that overcomes these shortcomings for hypersonic flows. Each of the research tasks performed during the NASA Langley research grants is discussed separately below.

  9. Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 82758287 Boundary layer photochemistry simulated with a two-stream

    E-print Network

    Menut, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    homogeneous concentrations in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Ozone concentrations are also more Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Photochemical smog; Boundary layer; Mixing; Turbulence; OzoneAtmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 8275­8287 Boundary layer photochemistry simulated with a two

  10. Boundary-Layer Meteorol DOI 10.1007/s10546-012-9768-8

    E-print Network

    Brandenburg, Axel

    between the two principally different regimes: "strong turbulence" at Ri 1 typical of boundary-layer flows including turbulent fluxes. Keywords Boundary layers · Critical Richardson number · Eddy viscosityBoundary-Layer Meteorol DOI 10.1007/s10546-012-9768-8 ARTICLE A Hierarchy of Energy- and Flux

  11. LMS/Leicester Workshop on Stability and Transition of Rotating Boundary-Layer Flows

    E-print Network

    profiles scale linearly with radius. The similarity variables are given by: U(z) = U*/(r**) V(z) = V*/(r) location. · The nonlinearity further destabilizes the boundary layer and leads to the onset of laminar-turbulentLMS/Leicester Workshop on Stability and Transition of Rotating Boundary-Layer Flows Boundary-Layer

  12. A parametric study of adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers J.P. Monty

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    A parametric study of adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers J.P. Monty , Z. Harun, I Accepted 22 March 2011 Keywords: Adverse pressure gradient Boundary layer Wall-turbulence a b s t r a c t There are many open questions regarding the behaviour of turbulent boundary layers subjected to pressure

  13. Direct Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer over a Compression Ramp

    E-print Network

    Martín, Pino

    Direct Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer over a Compression Ramp M. Wu numerical simulation of shock wave and turbulent boundary layer interaction for a 24 deg compression ramp boundary layer, the mean wall-pressure distribution, the size of the separation bubble, and the velocity

  14. Large-Eddy Simulations of Longitudinal Vortices Embedded in a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    E-print Network

    Mittal, Rajat

    Large-Eddy Simulations of Longitudinal Vortices Embedded in a Turbulent Boundary Layer Donghyun You in a turbulent boundary layer upstream of the tip-leakage flow in a linear cascade. Early studies of longitudinal embedded in a two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer are performed to study the dynamics of the vortical

  15. The continuous spectrum for a boundary layer in a streamwise pressure gradient

    E-print Network

    Spiteri, Raymond J.

    The continuous spectrum for a boundary layer in a streamwise pressure gradient S. A. Maslowe spectrum are presented for boundary layers developing in the presence of a streamwise pressure gradient of the boundary layer can be much larger than it is for Blasius flow. This is particularly true when the pressure

  16. Low heat conduction in white dwarf boundary layers?

    E-print Network

    F. K. Liu; F. Meyer; E. Meyer-Hofmeister; V. Burwitz

    2008-03-13

    X-ray spectra of dwarf novae in quiescence observed by Chandra and XMM-Newton provide new information on the boundary layers of their accreting white dwarfs. Comparison of observations and models allows us to extract estimates for the thermal conductivity in the accretion layer and reach conclusions on the relevant physical processes. We calculate the structure of the dense thermal boundary layer that forms under gravity and cooling at the white dwarf surface on accretion of gas from a hot tenuous ADAF-type coronal inflow. The distribution of density and temperature obtained allows us to calculate the strength and spectrum of the emitted X-ray radiation. They depend strongly on the values of thermal conductivity and mass accretion rate. We apply our model to the dwarf nova system VW Hyi and compare the spectra predicted for different values of the thermal conductivity with the observed spectrum. We find a significant deviation for all values of thermal conductivity that are a sizable fraction of the Spitzer conductivity. A good fit arises however for a conductivity of about 1% of the Spitzer value. This also seems to hold for other dwarf nova systems in quiescence. We compare this result with thermal conduction in other astrophysical situations. The highly reduced thermal conductivity in the boundary layer requires magnetic fields perpendicular to the temperature gradient. Locating their origin in the accretion of magnetic fields from the hot ADAF-type coronal flow we find that dynamical effects of these fields will lead to a spatially intermittent, localized accretion geometry at the white dwarf surface.

  17. Orbiter Entry Aeroheating Working Group Viscous CFD Boundary Layer Transition Trailblazer Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Erickson, David W.; Greene, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    Boundary layer transition correlations for the Shuttle Orbiter have been previously developed utilizing a two-layer boundary layer prediction technique. The particular two-layer technique that was used is limited to Mach numbers less than 20. To allow assessments at Mach numbers greater than 20, it is proposed to use viscous CFD to the predict boundary layer properties. This report addresses if the existing Orbiter entry aeroheating viscous CFD solutions, which were originally intended to be used for heat transfer rate predictions, adequately resolve boundary layer edge properties and if the existing two-layer results could be leveraged to reduce the number of needed CFD solutions. The boundary layer edge parameters from viscous CFD solutions are extracted along the wind side centerline of the Space Shuttle Orbiter at reentry conditions, and are compared with results from the two-layer boundary layer prediction technique. The differences between the viscous CFD and two-layer prediction techniques vary between Mach 6 and 18 flight conditions and Mach 6 wind tunnel conditions, and there is not a straightforward scaling between the viscous CFD and two-layer values. Therefore: it is not possible to leverage the existing two-layer Orbiter flight boundary layer data set as a substitute for a viscous CFD data set; but viscous CFD solutions at the current grid resolution are sufficient to produce a boundary layer data set suitable for applying edge-based boundary layer transition correlations.

  18. Discussion of boundary-layer characteristics near the casing of an axial-flow compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mager, Artur; Mahoney, John J; Budinger, Ray E

    1951-01-01

    Boundary-layer velocity profiles on the casing of an axial-flow compressor behind the guide vanes and rotor were measured and resolved into two components: along the streamline of the flow and perpendicular to it. Boundary-layer thickness and the deflection of the boundary layer at the wall were the generalizing parameters. By use of these results and the momentum-integral equations, the characteristics of boundary on the walls of axial-flow compressor are qualitatively discussed. Important parameters concerning secondary flow in the boundary layer appear to be turning of the flow and the product of boundary-layer thickness and streamline curvature outside the boundary layer. Two types of separation are shown to be possible in three dimensional boundary layer.

  19. Characteristics of convective boundary layer over the Arabian sea region

    SciTech Connect

    Parasnis, S.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Convective Boundary Layer (CBL) over the oceanic regions plays an important role in regulating the transport of energy and moisture upward into the atmosphere from the surface. CBL structure over the Arabian sea region has been explored using the aerological soundings at two ships viz. SHIRSHOV (12.5{degrees}N, 68{degrees}E ) and OKEAN (14.5{degrees} N, 66{degrees} E) during MONSOON-77. Conserved variable analysis of the mean data sets obtained during the period of 29 June - 16 July, 1977 revealed salient features of the CBL over these regions. The vertical gradients of saturation point parameters viz. virtual potential temperature ({Theta}{sub v}), equivalent potential temperature ({Theta}{sub e}), saturated equivalent potential temperature ({Theta}{sub es}), saturation pressure deficit (P*) and the mixing ratio (q) were used to characterize the different sublayers such as subcloud layer, cloud layer and inversion/stable layer. The mean cloud base was around 950 hPa and the subcloud layer has nearly constant {Theta}{sub v}. The moist layer was associated with unstable {Theta}{sub es} with nearly constant value of P* ({approximately} -40 hPa). This cloud layer was capped by the stable (over OKEAN). The {Theta}{sub e} minimum over OKEAN was observed at 650 hPa (50 hPa above the CBL top) indicating that at some time the convection had reached deeper levels. The {Theta}{sub e} -q diagrams showed a characteristic mixing line up through the cloud and stable layer to the top of CBL. The low level stability analysis using the {Theta}{sub e} and {Theta}{sub es} profiles indicated conditions favorable for shallow convection over OKEAN and for deep convection over SHIRSHOV. The above characteristic features could be attributed to the prevailing weather conditions at OKEAN and SHIRSHOV. The results are discussed.

  20. Boundary layer receptivity to free-stream vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buter, T. A.; Reed, H. L.

    1994-10-01

    The receptivity to free-stream vorticity of the boundary layer over a flat plate with an elliptic leading edge is investigated numerically by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes system in general curvilinear coordinates with the vorticity and streamfunction as dependent variables. A small-amplitude vortical disturbance is introduced at the upstream boundary and the governing equations solved time accurately to evaluate the spatial and temporal growth of the perturbations leading to instability waves [Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves] in the boundary layer. The effect of disturbance amplitude, orientation, and the effect of the leading edge and of surface curvature are investigated for the case of spanwise vorticity. Simulations reveal, for the conditions considered, a linear variation in the TS response with forcing amplitude for perturbations of free-stream velocity that are either symmetrical or asymmetrical with respect to the basic-state stagnation streamline. The presence near the leading edge of a large, oscillating component of velocity normal to the airfoil axis for the case of asymmetrical forcing results, for the same strength of input disturbance, in an increase in the TS response aft of the juncture and in the appearance of a superharmonic component of the disturbance motion near the tip of the nose. This superharmonic decays rapidly in the streamwise direction. In all cases considered, the first clear appearance of the TS mode occurs aft of the surface pressure-gradient maximum. Changes to the geometry that increase the maximum in steady surface pressure gradient are found to increase receptivity.

  1. Three-dimensional boundary layer calculation by a characteristic method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houdeville, R.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical method for solving the three-dimensional boundary layer equations for bodies of arbitrary shape is presented. In laminar flows, the application domain extends from incompressible to hypersonic flows with the assumption of chemical equilibrium. For turbulent boundary layers, the application domain is limited by the validity of the mixing length model used. In order to respect the hyperbolic nature of the equations reduced to first order partial derivative terms, the momentum equations are discretized along the local streamlines using of the osculator tangent plane at each node of the body fitted coordinate system. With this original approach, it is possible to overcome the use of the generalized coordinates, and therefore, it is not necessary to impose an extra hypothesis about the regularity of the mesh in which the boundary conditions are given. By doing so, it is possible to limit, and sometimes to suppress, the pre-treatment of the data coming from an inviscid calculation. Although the proposed scheme is only semi-implicit, the method remains numerically very efficient.

  2. Coastal boundary layer transition within tropical cyclones at landfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, James Robert

    Hurricanes pose a great risk to life and property with their high winds, excessive rainfall, wave action, and storm surge. Predicting changes within hurricanes at and near the time of landfall requires an understanding of the dynamics that drive the boundary layer flow. Forecasters predict the timing, duration, and effects of the intense winds associated with a hurricane when it comes ashore, while emergency management officials call for public evacuations based upon these forecasts. One region where understanding the magnitude and structure of the wind is critical is within the surface layer just downstream of the coastline in the onshore flow. Within this region the flow begins to adjust to changes in surface triggered by its passage from the shallow coastal waters to the less homogeneous and rougher land. This adjustment may include a slowing of the mean wind with an increase in turbulence, both resulting from the increased friction of the man-made and natural terrain. Hurricane observing programs consisting of portable and mobile equipment and regional coastal mesoscale observing networks are leading to a better understanding of the processes involved with these flow modifications. The Texas Tech University Wind Engineering Mobile Instrumented Tower Experiment (WEMITE) continues to play a leading role in the observation and analysis of the boundary layer of tropical cyclones at landfall. In order to gain further insight into the characteristics of this coastal transition zone, experiments were planned utilizing portable in-situ and remote measuring devices to be placed within the onshore flow at landfall. Experiment plan designs along with results from these experiments are discussed, including the analysis of a dataset collected by multiple institutions during the landfall of Hurricane Lili (2002) along the south-central Louisiana coast. Investigation reveals the existence of frictionally-induced changes in the boundary layer downwind of the coastline within the right semicircle with respect to Lili's forward motion. In the outer reaches of Lili, these transitions appear similar to internal boundary layers produced by flow moving over an abrupt change in surface. The impact on the magnitude of the wind within this near-shore region is a reduction of 4--10% per 10 km distance from the coast up to 50 km inland for open terrain. Results of the study show this reduction to be an exponential function of distance from the coast, which is dependent upon surface roughness. This rate of wind decay slows with farther progression inland and appears to be much faster than the rate found in some modeling studies. In contrast, near Lili's circulation center, little or no decrease in the magnitude of the mean wind was found for distances of up to 20 km inland.

  3. Nonlinear spatial evolution of inviscid instabilities on hypersonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wundrow, David W.

    1996-01-01

    The spatial development of an initially linear vorticity-mode instability on a compressible flat-plate boundary layer is considered. The analysis is done in the framework of the hypersonic limit where the free-stream Mach number M approaches infinity. Nonlinearity is shown to become important locally, in a thin critical layer, when sigma, the deviation of the phase speed from unity, becomes o(M(exp -8/7)) and the magnitude of the pressure fluctuations becomes 0(sigma(exp 5/2)M(exp 2)). The unsteady flow outside the critical layer takes the form of a linear instability wave but with its amplitude completely determined by the nonlinear flow within the critical layer. The coupled set of equations which govern the critical-layer dynamics reflect a balance between spatial-evolution, (linear and nonlinear) convection and nonlinear vorticity-generation terms. The numerical solution to these equations shows that nonlinear effects produce a dramatic reduction in the instability-wave amplitude.

  4. Thermographic analysis of turbulent non-isothermal water boundary layer

    E-print Network

    Znamenskaya, Irina A

    2015-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the investigation of the turbulent water boundary layer in the jet mixing flows using high-speed infrared (IR) thermography. Two turbulent mixing processes were studied: a submerged water jet impinging on a flat surface and two intersecting jets in a round disc-shaped vessel. An infrared camera (FLIR Systems SC7700) was focused on the window transparent for IR radiation; it provided high-speed recordings of heat fluxes from a thin water layer close to the window. Temperature versus time curves at different points of water boundary layer near the wall surface were acquired using the IR camera with the recording frequency of 100 Hz. The time of recording varied from 3 till 20 min. The power spectra for the temperature fluctuations at different points on the hot-cold water mixing zone were calculated using the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. The obtained spectral behavior was compared to the Kolmogorov "-5/3 spectrum" (a direct energy cascade) and the dual-cascade scenario predicted for...

  5. Closed-Loop Control of Unsteady Transient Growth Disturbances in a Blasius Boundary Layer using DBD Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Philippe; Hanson, Ronald; Bade, Kyle; Naguib, Ahmed; Belson, Brandt; Rowley, Clarence

    2012-11-01

    Plasma actuators have recently been shown to negate the effect of the transient growth instability occurring in a Blasius boundary layer for the purpose of delaying bypass transition. Specifically, during steady operation, the energy of a disturbance introduced via an array of static cylindrical roughness elements was reduced by up to 68%, as shown by Hanson et al. (Exp. Fluids, 2010). In the present work, the actuators used in the aforementioned study were integrated into a complete closed-loop control system capable of negating unsteady transient growth disturbances induced in a Blasius boundary layer established in a wind tunnel. Shear stress measurements from an array of hot-wires mounted just above the surface of the boundary-layer plate downstream of the actuators are used to provide feedback information about the state of the boundary layer. The effectiveness and robustness of the closed-loop controller are rigorously established based on both control-model simulations and experiments. NSERC and NSF grant number: CMMI 0932546.

  6. Fullerenes in the cretaceous-tertiary boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Heymann, D.; Chibante, L.P.F.; Smalley, R.E. ); Brooks, R.R. ); Wolbach, W.S. )

    1994-07-29

    High-pressure liquid chromatography with ultraviolet-visible spectral analysis of toluene extracts of samples from two Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary sites in New Zealand has revealed the presence of C[sub 60] at concentrations of 0.1 to 0.2 parts per million of the associated soot. This technique verified also that fullerenes are produced in similar amounts in the soots of common flames under ambient atmospheric conditions. Therefore, the C[sub 60] in the K-T boundary layer may have originated in the extensive wildfires that were associated with the cataclysmic impact event that terminated the Mezozoic era about 65 million years ago.

  7. An approximate analytical solution of the laminar boundary layer equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yi-Wu

    1993-01-01

    Using the pressure gradient as the new variable instead of the ordinary longitudinal coordinate x, Liu (1981) transformed the ordinary laminar boundary equations into a new form. On this basis, Liu obtained the frictional stress factor by using the graphical method. In this paper the same variable replacement is used, and an approximate analytical solution of the laminar boundary layer equations is obtained by the series method. Also obtained is a formula for the frictional stress factor. For the case of the main function without the term of the constant, a further simplification is made. The error of the frictional stress factor obtained is still less than 10 percent, compared with that of Liu.

  8. Interaction of a Boundary Layer with a Turbulent Wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this grant was to study the transition mechanisms on a flat-plate boundary layer interacting with the wake of a bluff body. This is a simplified configuration presented and designed to exemplify the phenomena that occur in multi-element airfoils, in which the wake of an upstream element impinges on a downstream one. Some experimental data is available for this configuration at various Reynolds numbers. The first task carried out was the implementation and validation of the immersed-boundary method. This was achieved by performing calculations of the flow over a cylinder at low and moderate Reynolds numbers. The low-Reynolds number results are discussed, which is enclosed as Appendix A. The high-Reynolds number results are presented in a paper in preparation for the Journal of Fluid Mechanics. We performed calculations of the wake-boundary-layer interaction at two Reynolds numbers, Re approximately equal to 385 and 1155. The first case is discussed and a comparison of the two calculations is reported. The simulations indicate that at the lower Reynolds number the boundary layer is buffeted by the unsteady Karman vortex street shed by the cylinder. This is shown: long streaky structures appear in the boundary layer in correspondence of the three-dimensionalities in the rollers. The fluctuations, however, cannot be self-sustained due to the low Reynolds-number, and the flow does not reach a turbulent state within the computational domain. In contrast, in the higher Reynolds-number case, boundary-layer fluctuations persist after the wake has decayed (due, in part, to the higher values of the local Reynolds number Re achieved in this case); some evidence could be observed that a self-sustaining turbulence generation cycle was beginning to be established. A third simulation was subsequently carried out at a higher Reynolds number, Re=3900. This calculation gave results similar to those of the Re=l155 case. Turbulence was established at fairly low Reynolds number, as a consequence of the high level of the free-stream perturbation. An instantaneous flow visualization for that case is shown. A detailed examination of flow statistics in the transitional and turbulent regions, including the evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget and frequency spectra showed the formation and evolution of turbulent spots characteristic of the bypass transition mechanism. It was also observed that the turbulent eddies achieved an equilibrium, fully developed turbulent states first, as evidenced by the early agreement achieved by the terms in the TKE budget with those observed in turbulent flows. Once a turbulent Reynolds stress profile had been established, the velocity profile began to resemble a turbulent one, first in the inner region and later in the outer region of the wall layer. An extensive comparison of the three cases, including budgets, mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles and flow visualization, is included. The results obtained are also presented.

  9. Impact of the vertical mixing induced by low-level jets on boundary layer ozone concentration

    E-print Network

    Xue, Ming

    Impact of the vertical mixing induced by low-level jets on boundary layer ozone concentration Xiao: Ozonesonde Low-level jet Atmospheric boundary layer Ozone WRF/Chem Residual layer a b s t r a c t After at multiple sites along the corridor. layer (RL) is leaky in the presence of a strong low

  10. Free-stream disturbances, continuous eigenfunctions, boundary-layer instability and transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salwen, H.

    1980-01-01

    A rational foundation is provided for the application of the linear stability theory of parallel shear flows to transition prediction. An explicit method is given for carrying out the necessary calculations. The expansions are shown to be complete. Sample calculations show that a typical boundary layer is very sensitive to vorticity disturbance in the inner boundary layer near the critical layer. Vorticity disturbances three or four boundary layer thicknesses above the boundary are nearly uncoupled from the boundary layer, in that the amplitudes of the discrete Tollmein-Schlichting waves are an extremely small fraction of the amplitude of the disturbance.

  11. Computation of unsteady turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal and evaluation of two separate turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure which solves the governing boundary layer equations within Keller's box method was developed for calculating unsteady laminar flows with flow reversal. This method is extended to turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal. Test cases are used to investigate the proposition that unsteady turbulent boundary layers also remain free of singularities. Turbulent flow calculations are performed. The governing equations for both models are solved. As in laminar flows, the unsteady turbulent boundary layers are free from singularities, but there is a clear indication of rapid thickening of the boundary layer with increasing flow reversal. Predictions of both turbulence models are the same for all practical purposes.

  12. Infrared Imaging of Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J., Jr.; Schwartz, Richard; Ross, Martin; Anderson, Brian; Campbell, Charles H.

    2008-01-01

    The Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurement (HYTHIRM) project is presently focused on near term support to the Shuttle program through the development of an infrared imaging capability of sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to augment existing on-board Orbiter instrumentation. Significant progress has been made with the identification and inventory of relevant existing optical imaging assets and the development, maturation, and validation of simulation and modeling tools for assessment and mission planning purposes, which were intended to lead to the best strategies and assets for successful acquisition of quantitative global surface temperature data on the Shuttle during entry. However, there are longer-term goals of providing global infrared imaging support to other flight projects as well. A status of HYTHIRM from the perspective of how two NASA-sponsored boundary layer transition flight experiments could benefit by infrared measurements is provided. Those two flight projects are the Hypersonic Boundary layer Transition (HyBoLT) flight experiment and the Shuttle Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLT FE), which are both intended for reducing uncertainties associated with the extrapolation of wind tunnel derived transition correlations for flight application. Thus, the criticality of obtaining high quality flight data along with the impact it would provide to the Shuttle program damage assessment process are discussed. Two recent wind tunnel efforts that were intended as risk mitigation in terms of quantifying the transition process and resulting turbulent wedge locations are briefly reviewed. Progress is being made towards finalizing an imaging strategy in support of the Shuttle BLT FE, however there are no plans currently to image HyBoLT.

  13. Planetary Boundary Layer Dynamics over Reno, Nevada in Summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liming, A.; Sumlin, B.; Loria Salazar, S. M.; Holmes, H.; Arnott, W. P.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is important to understand the transport behavior, mixing, and surface concentrations of air pollutants. In Reno, NV, located in complex, mountainous terrain with high desert climate, the daytime boundary layer can rise to an estimated 3km or more on a summer day due to surface heating and convection. The nocturnal boundary layer, conversely, tends to be much lower and highly stable due to radiative cooling from the surface at night and downslope flow of cool air from nearby mountains. With limited availability of radiosonde data, current estimates of the PBL height at any given time or location are potentially over or underestimated. To better quantify the height and characterize the PBL physics, we developed portable, lightweight sensors that measure CO2 concentrations, temperature, pressure, and humidity every 5 seconds. Four of these sensors are used on a tethered balloon system to monitor CO2 concentrations from the surface up to 300m. We will combine this data with Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) data that measures vertical profiles of wind speed, temperature, and humidity from 40m to 400m. This experiment will characterize the diurnal evolution of CO2 concentrations at multiple heights in the PBL, provide insight into PBL physics during stability transition periods at sunrise and sunset, and estimate the nighttime PBL depth during August in Reno. Further, we expect to gain a better understanding of the impact of mixing volume changes (i.e., PBL height) on air quality and pollution concentrations in Reno. The custom portable sensor design will also be presented. It is expected that these instruments can be used for indoor or outdoor air quality studies, where lightness, small size, and battery operation can be of benefit.

  14. A finite element-boundary integral method for conformal antenna arrays on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Woo, Alex C.; Yu, C. Long

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. In the past, antenna designers have had to resort to expensive measurements in order to develop a conformal array design. This is due to the lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays, and as a result the design of conformal arrays is primarily based on planar antenna design concepts. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. Herewith we shall extend this formulation for conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In this we develop the mathematical formulation. In particular we discuss the finite element equations, the shape elements, and the boundary integral evaluation, and it is shown how this formulation can be applied with minimal computation and memory requirements. The implementation shall be discussed in a later report.

  15. A finite element-boundary integral method for conformal antenna arrays on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. In the past, antenna designers have had to resort to expensive measurements in order to develop a conformal array design. This was due to the lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays. As a result, the design of conformal arrays was primarily based on planar antenna design concepts. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. We are extending this formulation to conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In doing so, we will develop a mathematical formulation. In particular, we discuss the finite element equations, the shape elements, and the boundary integral evaluation. It is shown how this formulation can be applied with minimal computation and memory requirements.

  16. Transition in Hypersonic Boundary Layers: Role of Dilatational Waves

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Yiding; Yuan, Huijing; Wu, Jiezhi; Chen, Shiyi; Lee, Cunbiao; Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Transition and turbulence production in a hypersonic boundary layer is investigated in a Mach 6 quiet wind tunnel using Rayleigh-scattering visualization, fast-response pressure measurements, and particle image velocimetry. It is found that the second instability acoustic mode is the key modulator of the transition process. The second mode experiences a rapid growth and a very fast annihilation due to the effect of bulk viscosity. The second mode interacts strongly with the first vorticity mode to directly promote a fast growth of the latter and leads to immediate transition to turbulence.

  17. Some theoretical aspects of boundary layer stability theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Philip

    1990-01-01

    Increased understanding in recent years of boundary layer transition has been made possible by the development of strongly nonlinear stability theories. After some twenty or so years when nonlinear stability theory was restricted to the application of the Stuart-Watson method (or less formal amplitude expansion procedures), there now exist strongly nonlinear theories which can describe processes which have an 0(1) effect on the basic state. These strongly nonlinear theories and their possible role in pushing theoretical understanding of transition ever further into the nonlinear regime are discussed.

  18. A numerical model for dispersion in a convective boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, N.U.; Chai, S.K.; Telford, J.W. )

    1993-11-15

    A numerical model based on the convective plumes observed in the convecting planetary boundary layer has been developed for material dispersion from both elevated and ground source releases. Mechanistic formulation, rather than parameterization, or statistical behavior of PBL phenomenon, has been used as a basis. This model uses two universal constants, the turbulent entrainment constant, a, and decay constant, A. The model results have physical significance with regard to the observed plume behavior in a convective field. An observed case of diffusion has been simulated. The model results are in reasonable agreement with the observation without introducing any adjustable parameters to improve the fit. 37 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  19. A numerical model for dipsersion in a convective boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, N.U.; Chai, S.K.; Telford, J.W.

    1993-11-01

    A numerical model based on the convective plumes observed in the convecting planetary boundary layers (PBL) has been developed for material dispersion from both elevated and ground source releases. Mechanistic formulation, rather than parameterization, or statistical behavior of PBL phenomenon, has been use as basis. This model uses two universal constants, the turbulent entrainment constant, a, and decay constant, A. The model results have physical significance with regard to the observed plume behavior in a convective field. An observed case of diffusion has been simulated. The model results are in reasonable agreement with the observation without introducing any adjustable parameters to improve fit.

  20. Streaming effect of wall oscillation to boundary layer separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, X. H.; Wu, J. Z.; Wu, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary theoretical result on the time averaged streaming effect of local forcing excitation to the boundary layer separation from smooth surface. The problem is formulated as a periodic disturbance to a basic steady breakaway separating flow, for which the data are taken from a numerical triple-deck solution. The ratio of Strouhal number St and Reynolds number Re plays an important role, both being assumed sufficiently high. The analytical and numerical results show that this streaming effect is quite strong at proper values of St/Re exp 1/4, which may delay or even suppress the separation.

  1. Regional scale evaporation and the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlange, Marc B.; Eichinger, William E.; Albertson, John D.

    1995-01-01

    In this review we briefly summarize some current models of evaporation and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and discuss new experimental and computational oppurtunities that may aid our understanding of evaporation at these larger scales. In particular, consideration is given to remote sensing of the atmosphere, computational fluid dynamics and the role numerical models can play in understanding land-atmosphere interactions. These powerful modeling and measurement tools are allowing us to visualize and study spatial and temporal scales previously untouched, thereby increasing the oppurtunities to improve our understanding of land-atmosphere interaction.

  2. Total temperature-velocity relation in turbulent compressible boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laderman, A. J.

    1981-12-01

    It is noted that Whitfield and High (1977) introduced an approximate model for the turbulent shear stress distribution into the energy-momentum equation and derived an analytical solution which provides reasonable agreement with experimental observations. In studies by Laderman (1978, 1980) of the effects on an adverse present gradient on a supersonic turbulent boundary layer, it was found that the T bar vs U bar relation is insensitive to the pressure gradient although the shear stress distribution is apparently strongly dependent on beta sub k0. The implications of the Whitfield and High solution are therefore considered to merit further examination.

  3. Wake characteristics of buildings in disturbed boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, E., Jr.; Chang, J.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements relevant to the effect of buildings on the low level atmospheric boundary layer are presented. Field measurements of velocity and turbulence in the wake of a block building 3.2 m high and 26.8 m long are presented which show an apparent increase in momentum flow above the upwind value. Velocity-deficit and turbulence-excess decay characteristics of the disturbed or nonequilibrium layer are correlated with power law exponents and apparent roughness length at various distances downstream of the disturbance. Model wake profiles from the simulated building are compared at various stations for equilibrium and nonequilibrium upstream profiles. Empirical correlations relating building wake profiles to upstream nonequilibrium parameters are presented. The relationship of the data to the smooth-rough transition is discussed, and a flow model is presented.

  4. Aerodynamic Models for Hurricanes III. Modeling hurricane boundary layer

    E-print Network

    Leonov, Arkady I

    2008-01-01

    The third paper of the series (see previous ones in Refs.[1-2]) discusses basic physicalprocesses in the (quasi-) steady hurricane boundary layer (HBL), develops an approximate airflow model, establishes the HBL structure, and presents integral balance relations for dynamic and thermodynamic variables in HBL. Models of evaporation and condensation are developed, where the condensation is treated similarly to the slow combustion theory. A turbulent approximation for the lower sub-layer of HBL is applied to the sea-air interaction to establish the observed increase in angular momentum in the outer region of HBL.A closed set of balance relations has been obtained. Simple analytical solution of the set yields expressions for the basic dynamic variables - maximal tangential and radial velocities in hurricane, maximal vertical speed in eye wall, the affinity speed of hurricane travel, and the maximal temperature increase after condensation. Estimated values of the variables seem to be realistic. An attempt is also ...

  5. Nanodiamonds in the Younger Dryas boundary sediment layer.

    PubMed

    Kennett, D J; Kennett, J P; West, A; Mercer, C; Hee, S S Que; Bement, L; Bunch, T E; Sellers, M; Wolbach, W S

    2009-01-01

    We report abundant nanodiamonds in sediments dating to 12.9 +/- 0.1 thousand calendar years before the present at multiple locations across North America. Selected area electron diffraction patterns reveal two diamond allotropes in this boundary layer but not above or below that interval. Cubic diamonds form under high temperature-pressure regimes, and n-diamonds also require extraordinary conditions, well outside the range of Earth's typical surficial processes but common to cosmic impacts. N-diamond concentrations range from approximately 10 to 3700 parts per billion by weight, comparable to amounts found in known impact layers. These diamonds provide strong evidence for Earth's collision with a rare swarm of carbonaceous chondrites or comets at the onset of the Younger Dryas cool interval, producing multiple airbursts and possible surface impacts, with severe repercussions for plants, animals, and humans in North America. PMID:19119227

  6. Prandtl boundary layers for the Phan-Thien Tanner and Giesekus fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renardy, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The Prandtl equations, arising naturally in the description of high Reynolds number boundary layers, have turned out to be quite difficult from the point of view of mathematical analysis. Recent work by the author has shown that the analogous problem for the upper-convected Maxwell fluid is actually better behaved, and the well-posedness of the boundary layer equations has been established. In this paper, boundary layers for the Phan-Thien-Tanner and Giesekus fluid are considered. It turns out that there are two fundamentally different types of boundary layers, which we shall call elastic and viscometric boundary layers. The elastic boundary layers will be analyzed in an analogous fashion as those for the upper-convected Maxwell fluid. On the other hand, for viscometric boundary layers, which occur only for the PTT fluid, the equations are equivalent to those for a power law fluid.

  7. Lidar Applications in Atmospheric Dynamics: Measurements of Wind, Moisture and Boundary Layer Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoz, Belay; Whiteman, David; Gentry, Bruce; Schwemmer, Geary; Evans, Keith; DiGirolamo, Paolo; Comer, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    A large array of state-of-the-art ground-based and airborne remote and in-situ sensors were deployed during the International H2O Project (THOP), a field experiment that took place over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) of the United States from 13 May to 30 June 2002. These instruments provided extensive measurements of water vapor mixing ratio in order to better understand the influence of its variability on convection and on the skill of quantitative precipitation prediction (Weckwerth et all, 2004). Among the instrument deployed were ground based lidars from NASA/GSFC that included the Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL), the Goddard Laboratory for Observing Winds (GLOW), and the Holographic Airborne Rotating Lidar Instrument Experiment (HARLIE). A brief description of the three lidars is given below. This study presents ground-based measurements of wind, boundary layer structure and water vapor mixing ratio measurements observed by three co-located lidars during MOP at the MOP ground profiling site in the Oklahoma Panhandle (hereafter referred as Homestead). This presentation will focus on the evolution and variability of moisture and wind in the boundary layer when frontal and/or convergence boundaries (e.g. bores, dry lines, thunderstorm outflows etc) were observed.

  8. Unsteady transonic viscous-inviscid interaction using Euler and boundary-layer equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar; Whitfield, Dave

    1989-01-01

    The Euler code is used extensively for computation of transonic unsteady aerodynamics. The boundary layer code solves the 3-D, compressible, unsteady, mean flow kinetic energy integral boundary layer equations in the direct mode. Inviscid-viscous coupling is handled using porosity boundary conditions. Some of the advantages and disadvantages of using the Euler and boundary layer equations for investigating unsteady viscous-inviscid interaction is examined.

  9. Surface boundary layer turbulence in the Southern ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrifield, Sophia; St. Laurent, Louis; Owens, Breck; Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Due to the remote location and harsh conditions, few direct measurements of turbulence have been collected in the Southern Ocean. This region experiences some of the strongest wind forcing of the global ocean, leading to large inertial energy input. While mixed layers are known to have a strong seasonality and reach 500m depth, the depth structure of near-surface turbulent dissipation and diffusivity have not been examined using direct measurements. We present data collected during the Diapycnal and Isopycnal Mixing Experiment in the Southern Ocean (DIMES) field program. In a range of wind conditions, the wave affected surface layer (WASL), where surface wave physics are actively forcing turbulence, is contained to the upper 15-20m. The lag-correlation between wind stress and turbulence shows a strong relationship up to 6 hours (˜1/2 inertial period), with the winds leading the oceanic turbulent response, in the depth range between 20-50m. We find the following characterize the data: i) Profiles that have a well-defined hydrographic mixed layer show that dissipation decays in the mixed layer inversely with depth, ii) WASLs are typically 15 meters deep and 30% of mixed layer depth, iii) Subject to strong winds, the value of dissipation as a function of depth is significantly lower than predicted by theory. Many dynamical processes are known to be missing from upper-ocean parameterizations of mixing in global models. These include surface-wave driven processes such as Langmuir turbulence, submesocale frontal processes, and nonlocal representations of mixing. Using velocity, hydrographic, and turbulence measurements, the existence of coherent structures in the boundary layer are investigated.

  10. Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrenz, S.E.; Asper, V.L.

    1997-09-01

    The authors objective was to characterize distributions of chloropigment fluorescence in relation to physical processes in the benthic boundary layer in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Ocean Margins Program`s (OMP) goal of quantifying carbon transport across the continental shelf. Their approach involved participation in the Ocean Margins Program (OMP) field experiment on the continental shelf off Cape Hatteras by conducting multi-sensor fluorescence measurements of photosynthetic pigments. Specific tasks included (1) pre- and post-deployment calibration of multiple fluorescence sensors in conjunction with Woods Hole personnel; (2) collection and analysis of photosynthetic pigment concentrations and total particulate carbon in water column samples to aid in interpretation of the fluorescence time-series during the field experiment; (3) collaboration in the analysis and interpretation of 1994 and 1996 time-series data in support of efforts to quantify pigment and particulate organic carbon transport on the continental shelf off Cape Hatteras. This third component included analysis of data obtained with a multi-sensor fiber-optic fluorometer in the benthic boundary layer of the inner shelf off Cape Hatteras during summer 1994.

  11. Boundary layer structure over areas of heterogeneous heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, J.C.; Barnes, F.J.; Coulter, R.L.; Crawford, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    In general circulation models (GCMs), some properties of a grid element are necessarily considered homogeneous. That is, for each grid volume there is associated a particular combination of boundary layer depth, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, etc. In reality, all of these quantities may exhibit significant spatial variations the grid area, and the larger the area the greater the likely variations. In balancing the benefits of higher resolution against increased computational time and expense, it is useful to consider what the consequences of such subgrid-scale variability may be. Moreover, in interpreting the results of a simulation, one must be able to define an appropriate average value over a grid. There are two aspects of this latter problem: (1) in observations, how does one take a set of discrete or volume-averaged measurements and relate these to properties of the entire domain, and (2) in computations, how can subgrid-scale features be accounted for in the model parameterizations? To address these and related issues, two field campaigns were carried out near Boardman, Oregon, in June 1991 and 1992. These campaigns were designed to measure the surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over adjacent areas with strongly contrasting surface types and to measure the response of the boundary layer to those fluxes. This paper discusses some initial findings from those campaigns.

  12. Boundary layer structure over areas of heterogeneous heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, J.C. ); Barnes, F.J. ); Coulter, R.L. ); Crawford, T.L. . Air Resources Lab. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Div.)

    1993-01-01

    In general circulation models (GCMs), some properties of a grid element are necessarily considered homogeneous. That is, for each grid volume there is associated a particular combination of boundary layer depth, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, etc. In reality, all of these quantities may exhibit significant spatial variations the grid area, and the larger the area the greater the likely variations. In balancing the benefits of higher resolution against increased computational time and expense, it is useful to consider what the consequences of such subgrid-scale variability may be. Moreover, in interpreting the results of a simulation, one must be able to define an appropriate average value over a grid. There are two aspects of this latter problem: (1) in observations, how does one take a set of discrete or volume-averaged measurements and relate these to properties of the entire domain, and (2) in computations, how can subgrid-scale features be accounted for in the model parameterizations To address these and related issues, two field campaigns were carried out near Boardman, Oregon, in June 1991 and 1992. These campaigns were designed to measure the surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over adjacent areas with strongly contrasting surface types and to measure the response of the boundary layer to those fluxes. This paper discusses some initial findings from those campaigns.

  13. Boundary layer structure over areas of heterogeneous heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, J.C.; Barnes, F.J.; Coulter, R.L.; Crawford, T.L.

    1993-04-01

    In general circulation models (GCMs), some properties of a grid element are necessarily considered homogeneous. That is, for each grid volume there is associated a particular combination of boundary layer depth, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, etc. In reality, all of these quantities may exhibit significant spatial variations within the grid area, and the larger the area the greater the likely variations. In balancing the benefits of higher resolution against increased computational time and expense, it is useful to consider what the consequences of such subgrid-scale variability may be. Moveover, in interpreting the results of a simulation, one must be able to define an appropriate average value over a grid. There are two aspects of this latter problem: (1) in observations, how does one take a set of discrete or volume-averaged measurements and relate these to properties of the entire domain, and (2) in computations, how can subgrid-scale features be accounted for in the model parameterizations? To address these and related issues, two field campaigns were carried out near Boardman, Oregon, in June 1991 and 1992. These campaigns were designed to measure the surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over adjacent areas with strongly contrasting surface types and to measure the response of the boundary layer to those fluxes. This paper discuses some initial findings from those campaigns.

  14. Boundary layer structure over areas of heterogeneous heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, J.C. ); Barnes, F.J. ); Coulter, R.L. ); Crawford, T.L. . Air Resources Lab. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Div.)

    1993-01-01

    In general circulation models (GCMs), some properties of a grid element are necessarily considered homogeneous. That is, for each grid volume there is associated a particular combination of boundary layer depth, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, etc. In reality, all of these quantities may exhibit significant spatial variations within the grid area, and the larger the area the greater the likely variations. In balancing the benefits of higher resolution against increased computational time and expense, it is useful to consider what the consequences of such subgrid-scale variability may be. Moveover, in interpreting the results of a simulation, one must be able to define an appropriate average value over a grid. There are two aspects of this latter problem: (1) in observations, how does one take a set of discrete or volume-averaged measurements and relate these to properties of the entire domain, and (2) in computations, how can subgrid-scale features be accounted for in the model parameterizations To address these and related issues, two field campaigns were carried out near Boardman, Oregon, in June 1991 and 1992. These campaigns were designed to measure the surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over adjacent areas with strongly contrasting surface types and to measure the response of the boundary layer to those fluxes. This paper discuses some initial findings from those campaigns.

  15. Turbulent Boundary Layer Separation at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgoyne, Dwayne; Ceccio, Steven; Dowling, David

    1999-11-01

    One of the main hydroacoustic noise sources from fully submerged lifting surfaces is the unsteady separated turbulent flow near the surface's trailing edge that produces pressure fluctuations on the surface and oscillatory flow behavior in the near wake. However, the turbulent flow characteristics near boundary layer separation are largely undocumented at the high Reynolds numbers typical of many hydrodynamic applications. This talk describes a new experimental effort to identify and measure the dominant flow features near the trailing edge of a hydrofoil at chord-based Reynolds numbers up to 40 million. The experiments are conducted at the US Navy's Large Cavitation Channel with a two-dimensional test-section-spanning hydrofoil (2.1 m chord, 3.0 m span) at flow speeds from 1 to 18 m/s. The foil section is a modified NACA 66 with a flat pressure side. At a zero angle of attack, the lift load on the foil approaches 700 kN. The results presented here cover the first phase of experiments and emphasize LDV surveys of the separating boundary layer flow on the suction side of the hydrofoil at Reynolds numbers between 2 and 40 million. Additional experimental results covering foil flutter, wake shedding frequencies, and hydroacoustic measurements may also be presented. [Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, Code 333.

  16. Experimental investigation of boundary-layer flashback in swirl flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebi, Dominik; Clemens, Noel

    2013-11-01

    Swirling flows are widely employed for flame stabilization purposes in gas turbine combustors. However, flames in swirling flows are more prone to flashback, a potentially catastrophic phenomenon leading to thermal damage of the burner. The physical mechanism driving flashback in a swirling flow is not yet fully understood. The mechanism is particularly complex if the upstream flame propagation interacts with a boundary layer. In a previous study we showed that the flame/boundary-layer interaction is important for burners, which include an axial swirler and a central body attached to the swirler hub. We are investigating the mechanism of flashback in atmospheric pressure lean-premixed methane/hydrogen-air flames inside the mixing tube of our confined model swirl combustor. Flashback occurs at an equivalence ratio of approximately 0.7. The effect of hydrogen is investigated by testing different methane-to-hydrogen ratios. The duration of a single flashback event is on the order of 100 ms, requiring high-speed diagnostic techniques. We are applying simultaneous stereoscopic PIV, flame front detection based on Mie scattering, and chemiluminescence imaging to investigate the flame/flow interaction during flashback events.

  17. Flowfield Measurements Inside a Boundary-Layer Bleed Slot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. O.; Willis, B. P.; Hingst, W. R.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the flowfield inside a bleed slot used to control an oblique shock-wave and turbulent boundary-layer interaction. The slot was oriented normal to the primary flow direction and had a width of 1.0 cm (primary flow direction) and a length of 2.54 cm and spanned 16.5 cm. The approach boundary layer upstream of the interaction was nominally 3.0 cm thick. Two operating conditions were studied: M = 1.98 with a shock generator deflection angle of 6 deg and M = 2.46 with a shock generator deflection angle of 8 deg. Measurements include surface and flowfield static pressure, pitot pressure, and total mass flow through the slot. The results show that despite an initially two-dimensional interaction for the zero-bleed-flow case, the slot does not remove mass uniformly in the spanwise direction. Inside the slot, the flow is characterized bv two separation regions, which significantly reduce the effective flow area. The upper separation region acts as an aerodynamic throat, resulting in supersonic flow through much of the slot.

  18. Transition in a Supersonic Boundary Layer due to Acoustic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam

    2004-01-01

    The boundary layer receptivity process due to the interaction of three-dimensional slow and fast acoustic disturbances with a blunted flat plate is numerically investigated at a free stream Mach number of 3.5 and at a high Reynolds number of 106/inch. The computations are performed with and without two-dimensional isolated roughness element located near the leading edge. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using the 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. The simulations showed that the linear instability waves are generated very close to the leading edge. The wavelength of the disturbances inside the boundary layer first increases gradually and becomes longer than the wavelength for the instability waves within a short distance from the leading edge. The wavelength then decreases gradually and merges with the wavelength for the Tollmien_Schlichting wave. The initial amplitudes of the instability waves near the neutral points, the receptivity coefficients, are about 1.20 and 0.07 times the amplitude of the free-stream disturbances for the slow and the fast waves respectively. It was also revealed that small isolated roughness element does not enhance the receptivity process for the given nose bluntness.

  19. Transition in a Supersonic Boundary Layer Due to Acoustic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2005-01-01

    The boundary layer receptivity process due to the interaction of three-dimensional slow and fast acoustic disturbances with a blunted flat plate is numerically investigated at a free stream Mach number of 3.5 and at a high Reynolds number of 10(exp 6)/inch. The computations are performed with and without two-dimensional isolated roughness element located near the leading edge. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using the fifth-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. The simulations showed that the linear instability waves are generated very close to the leading edge. The wavelength of the disturbances inside the boundary layer first increases gradually and becomes longer than the wavelength for the instability waves within a short distance from the leading edge. The wavelength then decreases gradually and merges with the wavelength for the Tollmien-Schlichting wave. The initial amplitudes of the instability waves near the neutral points, the receptivity coefficients, are about 1.20 and 0.07 times the amplitude of the free-stream disturbances for the slow and the fast waves respectively. It was also revealed that small isolated roughness element does not enhance the receptivity process for the given nose bluntness.

  20. Acoustic sounding study of the atmospheric boundary layer in Moscow

    SciTech Connect

    Pekour, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    Since 1989, the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP) carries out long term acoustic sounding investigation to the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over Moscow. This paper presents a review of the main results of this study. Three-year long continues acoustic sounder (SODAR) measurements at one point has provided data for estimation of thermal stratification and mixing height statistics. The horizontal variability of the ABL structure has been estimated on the basis of 4 one-month campaigns of simultaneous SODAR measurements at 3 sites (the first in the center of Moscow, the second - 7 km from the center and the third - 45 km west at rural locality). The wind field measurements over the center of Moscow have been performed during 3 of the above mentioned campaigns with the help of tree-axis Doppler acoustic sounder. The experience in investigation with the acoustic sounders in Moscow, that was gained in the IAP, reveals very high potentials of the remote acoustic technique to ecological study of the urban boundary layer.

  1. The turning of the wind in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier

    2014-06-01

    Here we use accurate observations of the wind speed vector to analyze the behavior with height of the wind direction. The observations are a combination of tall meteorological mast and long-range wind lidar measurements covering the entire atmospheric boundary layer. The observations were performed at the Høvsøre site in Denmark, which is a flat farmland area with a nearly homogeneous easterly upstream sector. Therefore, within that sector, the turning of the wind is caused by a combination of atmospheric stability, Coriolis, roughness, horizontal pressure gradient and baroclinity effects. Atmospheric stability was measured using sonic anemometers placed at different heights on the mast. Horizontal pressure gradients and baroclinity are derived from outputs of a numerical weather prediction model and are used to estimate the geostrophic wind. It is found, for these specific and relatively short periods of analysis, that under both barotropic and baroclinic conditions, the model predicts the gradient and geostrophic wind well, explaining for a particular case an 'unusual' backing of the wind. The observed conditions at the surface, on the other hand, explain the differences in wind veering. The simulated winds underpredict the turning of the wind and the boundary-layer winds in general.

  2. Space Shuttle Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Ground Testing Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Flight Experiment (FE) Project in which a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for STS-119, STS- 128, STS-131 and STS-133 as well as Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour for STS-134, a significant ground test campaign was completed. The primary goals of the test campaign were to provide ground test data to support the planning and safety certification efforts required to fly the flight experiment as well as validation for the collected flight data. These test included Arcjet testing of the tile protuberance, aerothermal testing to determine the boundary layer transition behavior and resultant surface heating and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) testing in order to gain a better understanding of the flow field characteristics associated with the flight experiment. This paper provides an overview of the BLT FE Project ground testing. High-level overviews of the facilities, models, test techniques and data are presented, along with a summary of the insights gained from each test.

  3. Scaling of pressure spectrum in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Saurabh S.; Ramesh, O. N.

    2014-04-01

    Scaling of pressure spectrum in zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layers is discussed. Spatial DNS data of boundary layer at one time instant (Re? = 4500) are used for the analysis. It is observed that in the outer regions the pressure spectra tends towards the -7/3 law predicted by Kolmogorov's theory of small-scale turbulence. The slope in the pressure spectra varies from -1 close to the wall to a value close to -7/3 in the outer region. The streamwise velocity spectra also show a -5/3 trend in the outer region of the flow. The exercise carried out to study the amplitude modulation effect of the large scales on the smaller ones in the near-wall region reveals a strong modulation effect for the streamwise velocity, but not for the pressure fluctuations. The skewness of the pressure follows the same trend as the amplitude modulation coefficient, as is the case for the velocity. In the inner region, pressure spectra were seen to collapse better when normalized with the local Reynolds stress than when scaled with the local turbulent kinetic energy

  4. Phase-averaged measurements of perturbations introduced into boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1991-01-01

    Large-scale structures in turbulent and transitional wall-bounded flows make a significant contribution to the Reynolds stress and turbulent energy. The behavior of these structures is examined. Small perturbations are introduced into a laminar and a turbulent boundary layer to trigger the formation of large-scale features. Both flows use the same inlet unit Reynolds number, and they experience the same pressure gradient history, i.e. a favorable pressure gradient (FPG) followed by an adverse pressure gradient (APG). The perturbation consists of a small short duration flow repetitively introduced through a hole in the wall located at the C(sub p) minimum. Hot-wire data are averaged on the basis of the phase of the disturbance, and automation of the experiment was used to obtain measurements on large spatially dense grids. In the turbulent boundary, the perturbation evolves into a vortex loop which retains its identity for a considerable streamwise distance. In the laminar layer, the perturbation decays to a very small magnitude before growing rapidly and triggering the transition process in the APG. The 'time-like' animations of the phase-averaged data are used to gain insight into the naturally occurring physical mechanisms in each flow.

  5. Generation of 'artificial' bursts in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gad-El-hak, M.; Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1986-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the physics and structure of coherent events in a turbulent boundary layer, an attempt is made to produce 'artificial' bursts. These are generated in a unique turbulent boundary layer, developed on a flat plate towed in an 18-m water channel, and thus with negligible freestream turbulence. The burst-like events are produced by either withdrawing near-water fluid from two minute holes separated in the spanwise direction, or by pitching a miniature delta wing that is flush-mounted to the wall. Either of these two actions generates a hairpin-like vortex and low-speed streak that resemble naturally occurring structures. The resulting sequence of events that occur at a given location can be controlled at will, thus allowing detailed examination via phase-locked measurements and flow visualization. In this paper, the artificial bursts are compared with natural, random bursts, using flow visualization and hot-film signals. Detailed quantitative data on topographical details and dynamical significance of the bursting structure will be addressed in a forthcoming article.

  6. Analytical Studies of Boundary Layer Generated Aircraft Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, M. S.; Shah, P. L.

    1997-01-01

    An analysis is made of the "interior noise" produced by high, subsonic turbulent flow over a thin elastic plate partitioned into "panels" by straight edges transverse to the mean flow direction. This configuration models a section of an aircraft fuselage that may be regarded as locally flat. The analytical problem can be solved in closed form to represent the acoustic radiation in terms of prescribed turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations. Two cases are considered: (i) the production of sound at an isolated panel edge (i.e., in the approximation in which the correlation between sound and vibrations generated at neighboring edges is neglected), and (ii) the sound generated by a periodic arrangement of identical panels. The latter problem is amenable to exact analytical treatment provided the panel edge conditions are the same for all panels. Detailed predictions of the interior noise depend on a knowledge of the turbulent boundary layer wall pressure spectrum, and are given here in terms of an empirical spectrum proposed by Laganelli and Wolfe. It is expected that these analytical representations of the sound generated by simplified models of fluid-structure interactions can used to validate more general numerical schemes.

  7. Boundary-Layer-Transition Measurements in Full-Scale Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banner, Richard D.; McTigue, John G.; Petty, Gilbert, Jr.

    1958-01-01

    Chemical sublimation has been employed for boundary-layer-flow visualization on the wings of a supersonic fighter airplane in level flight at speeds near a Mach number of 2.0. The tests have shown that laminar flow can be obtained over extensive areas of the wing with practical wing-surface conditions. In addition to the flow visualization tests, a method of continuously monitoring the conditions of the boundary layer has been applied to flight testing, using heated temperature resistance gages installed in a Fiberglas "glove" installation on one wing. Tests were conducted at speeds from a Mach number of 1.2 to a Mach number of 2.0, at altitudes from 35,000 feet to 56,000 feet. Data obtained at all angles of attack, from near 0 deg to near 10 deg, have shown that the maximum transition Reynolds number on the upper surface of the wing varies from about 2.5 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 1.2 to about 4 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 2.0. On the lower surface, the maximum transition Reynolds number varies from about 2 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 1.2 to about 8 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 2.0.

  8. MAGIC Assessment of a Stochastic Edmf Boundary Layer Parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmus, P.; Suselj, K.; Lebsock, M. D.; Teixeira, J.

    2014-12-01

    The northeast Pacific is representative of subtropical ocean basins with high-albedo regions of persistent stratocumulus clouds that transition to low-albedo regions of shallow convection. The accurate modeling of this system is a longstanding and critical problem in climate science. We use data from the recent ship-based Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) campaign in the northeast Pacific to evaluate the skill of a unified stochastic Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass Flux (EDMF) boundary layer model. The MAGIC campaign data provides a nearly ideal validation framework, as it samples marine stratocumulus and cumulus regimes and the transition between them. We classify MAGIC scenes by cloud type, and produce probability distributions for the key EDMF forcing/initialization and output variables by cloud type. We initialize the EDMF model with the MAGIC input distributions and compare the output to the MAGIC data. Through this assessment we demonstrate improvements in the unified model's ability to handle a variety of boundary layer regimes.

  9. The Parametrisation of The Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodemann, H.; Foken, T.

    The stratification of the atmospheric boundary layer strongly influences fluxes of mass and energy between earth surface and atmosphere. Modelling these fluxes, e.g. in Gen- eral Circulation Models, is performed using parametrisations based on a range of sim- plifying assumptions. For neutral and unstable stratification, these parametrisations perform reasonably well. Under stable stratification however, the current parametri- sations lack theoretical consistency and contradict evidence from new experimental findings (Zilitinkevich et al. 2001). This poster presents an approach aiming to iden- tify the influences of different turbulence regimes and other parameters on mass and energy fluxes in the stably stratified boundary layer, using data from the 1994 FIN- TUREX experiment in Antarctica. Quantifying the different influencing parameters leads towards deriving a new parametrisation scheme for turbulent mass and energy exchange under stable conditions. The results yield the potential for improving a range of modelling applications, such as footprint models or flux modelling. Zilitinkevich, S., Perov, V. and King, J., 2001, Near-Surface Turbulent Fluxes in the Stable Stratification: Calculation Techniques for use in General Circulation Models, Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, submitted.

  10. Low Cost Geothermal Separators BLISS Boundary Layer Inline Separator Scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Douglas; Wai, King

    2000-05-26

    A new compact, low cost, and high performance separator is being developed to help reduce the installed and O and M cost of geothermal power generation. This device has been given the acronym ''BLISS'' that stands for ''Boundary Layer Inline Separator Scrubber''. The device is the first of a series of separators, and in the case of injectates, scrubbers to address the cost-reduction needs of the industry. The BLISS is a multi-positional centrifugal separator primarily designed to be simply installed between pipe supports, in a horizontal position. This lower profile reduces the height safety concern for workers, and significantly reduces the total installation cost. The vessel can demand as little as one-quarter (25%) the amount of steel traditionally required to fabricate many large vertical separators. The compact nature and high separating efficiency of this device are directly attributable to a high centrifugal force coupled with boundary layer control. The pseudo isokinetic flow design imparts a self-cleaning and scale resistant feature. This polishing separator is designed to remove moderate amounts of liquid and entrained solids.

  11. Aeromechanics Analysis of a Boundary Layer Ingesting Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Reddy, T. S. R.; Herrick, Gregory P.; Shabbir, Aamir; Florea, Razvan V.

    2013-01-01

    Boundary layer ingesting propulsion systems have the potential to significantly reduce fuel burn but these systems must overcome the challe nges related to aeromechanics-fan flutter stability and forced response dynamic stresses. High-fidelity computational analysis of the fan a eromechanics is integral to the ongoing effort to design a boundary layer ingesting inlet and fan for fabrication and wind-tunnel test. A t hree-dimensional, time-accurate, Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes computational fluid dynamics code is used to study aerothermodynamic and a eromechanical behavior of the fan in response to both clean and distorted inflows. The computational aeromechanics analyses performed in th is study show an intermediate design iteration of the fan to be flutter-free at the design conditions analyzed with both clean and distorte d in-flows. Dynamic stresses from forced response have been calculated for the design rotational speed. Additional work is ongoing to expan d the analyses to off-design conditions, and for on-resonance conditions.

  12. Investigation of Boundary Layer Development in Multi-Stage Low Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A review of recent literature has been made in the areas of unsteady measurement in turbomachinery and LP turbine design. This has included a detailed review of methods for extracting quantitative shear stress data from surface mounted hot-film arrays. Research goals were identified on the basis of the literature survey and following interaction with the GE and NASA contracts. Progress has also been made in the detailed planning of the research program. An array of hot-film sensors has been mounted at mid-span on a second stage nozzle blade ready for installation in the current turbine buildup. A new technique of applying the hot-film array using double sided adhesive is being tested. The temperature in the vicinity of the hot-films will be monitored using a thermocouple attached to the blade pressure surface. This will increase the accuracy of the data reduction process compared with the methods applied by Halstead et at. (1995) and others. Data obtained from this first set of sensors, along with data from the hot-wire investigation will help to determine the best locations for surface hot-film instrumentation for subsequent builds of the turbine. Other LSRT instrumentation issues which have been addressed include calibration of the torque measurement system and procurement of custom design hot-wire sensors required to compensate for the slope flow path. Preliminary attempts at modeling the boundary layer transition process have been completed. A steady, coupled viscous-inviscid flow solver (the MISES code of Drela and Youngren) was used to calculate the steady-flow boundary layer transition location.

  13. Problems in the simulation of atmospheric boundary layer flows. [natural wind environment in atmospheric boundary layer for aerospace and aeronautical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    The realistic simulation of flow in the atmospheric boundary layers at heights greater than two kilometers is discussed. Information concerning horizontally homogeneous and statistically stationary atmospheric boundary layer flows is presented. The problems related to the incorporation of the information into atmospheric wind simulation programs are analyzed. The information which the meteorologist must acquire in order to provide a basis for improving the simulation of atmospheric boundary flows is explained.

  14. Thermoacoustic boundary layers near the liquid-vapor critical point.

    PubMed

    Gillis, K A; Shinder, I I; Moldover, M R

    2004-08-01

    We measure and calculate the sound attenuation within thermoacoustic boundary layers between solid surfaces and xenon at its critical density rhoc as the reduced temperature tau identical with (T- Tc)/Tc approaches zero. (Tc is the critical temperature.) Using the known thermophysical properties of xenon, we predict that the attenuation at the boundary first increases approximately as tau(-0.6) and then saturates when the effusivity of the xenon exceeds that of the solid. [The effusivity is epsilon identical with (rhoCPlambdaT)(1/2), where CP is the isobaric specific heat and lambdaT is the thermal conductivity.] The model correctly predicts (+/-1.0%) the quality factors Q of resonances measured in a stainless steel resonator (epsilon(ss) =6400 kg K(-1) s(-5/2)); it also predicts the observed increase of the Q, by up to a factor of 8, when the resonator is coated with a polymer (epsilon(pr) =370 kg K(-1) s(-5/2)). The test data span the frequency range 0.1boundary layer in the xenon decreases approximately as tau(0.4) until 2pifgammazeta/(rhoc2) approximately 0.5. (zeta is the bulk viscosity, gamma is the heat capacity ratio, and c is the speed of sound.) Still closer to Tc, deltaT becomes complex and its magnitude increases. These predictions concerning deltaT have not yet been tested. We deduce accurate values for the heat capacity CV and thermal conductivity lambdaT for xenon in the range 10(-3)

  15. A stable boundary layer perspective on global temperature trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNider, R. T.; Christy, J. R.; Biazar, A.

    2010-08-01

    One of the most significant signals in the thermometer-observed temperature record since 1900 is the decrease in the diurnal temperature range over land, largely due to warming of the minimum temperatures. While some data sets have indicated this asymmetrical warming has been reduced since 1979, regional analyses (e.g. East Africa) indicate that the nocturnal warming continues at a pace greater than daytime temperatures. The cause for this night time warming in the observed temperatures has been attributed to a variety of causes. Climate models have in general not replicated the change in diurnal temperature range well. Here we would like to try to distinguish between warming in the nocturnal boundary layer due to a redistribution of heat and warming due to the accumulation of heat. The temperature at night at shelter height is a result of competition between thermal stability and mechanical shear. If stability wins then turbulence is suppressed and the cooling surface becomes cut-off from the warmer air aloft, which leads to sharp decay in surface air temperature. If shear wins, then turbulence is maintained and warmer air from aloft is continually mixed to the surface, which leads to significantly lower cooling rates and warmer temperatures. This warming occurs due to a redistribution of heat. As will be shown by techniques of nonlinear analysis the winner of the stability and shear contest can be very sensitive to changes in greenhouse gas forcing, surface roughness, cloudiness, and surface heat capacity (including soil moisture). Further, the minimum temperatures measured in the nocturnal boundary layer represent only a very shallow layer of the atmosphere which is usually only a few hundred meters thick. It is likely that the observed warming in minimum temperature, whether caused by additional greenhouse forcing or land use changes or other land surface dynamics, is reflecting a redistribution of heat by turbulence-not an accumulation of heat. Because minimum temperatures in the stable boundary layer are not very robust measures of the heat content in the deep atmosphere and climate models do not predict minimum temperatures well, minimum temperatures should not be used as a surrogate for measures of deep atmosphere global warming.

  16. Cloud Shading Effects on Characteristic Boundary-Layer Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, G. L.; Ouwersloot, H. G.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Sikma, M.

    2015-11-01

    We studied the effects of shading by shallow cumulus (shallow Cu) and the subsequent effect of inducing heterogeneous conditions at the surface on boundary-layer characteristics. We placed special emphasis on quantifying the changes in the characteristic length and time scales associated with thermals, shallow Cu and induced thermal circulation structures. A series of systematic numerical experiments, inspired by Amazonian thermodynamic conditions, was performed using a large-eddy simulation model coupled to a land-surface model. We used four different experiments to disentangle the effects of shallow Cu on the surface and the response of clouds to these surface changes. The experiments include a `clear case', `transparent clouds', `shading clouds' and a case with a prescribed uniform domain and reduced surface heat flux. We also performed a sensitivity study on the effect of introducing a weak background flow. Length and time scales were calculated using autocorrelation and two-dimensional spectral analysis, and we found that shading controlled by shallow Cu locally lowers surface temperatures and consequently reduces the sensible and latent heat fluxes, thus inducing spatial and temporal variability in these fluxes. The length scale of this surface heterogeneity is not sufficiently large to generate circulations that are superimposed on the boundary-layer scale, but the heterogeneity does disturb boundary-layer dynamics and generates a flow opposite to the normal thermal circulation. Besides this effect, shallow Cu shading reduces turbulent kinetic energy and lowers the convective velocity scale, thus reducing the mass flux. This hampers the thermal lifetime, resulting in a decrease in the shallow Cu residence time (from 11 to 7 min). This reduction in lifetime, combined with a decrease in mass flux, leads to smaller clouds. This is partially compensated for by a decrease in thermal cell size due to a reduction in turbulent kinetic energy. As a result, inter-cloud distance is reduced, leading to a larger population of smaller clouds, while maintaining cloud cover similar to the non-shading clouds experiment. Introducing a 1 m s^{-1} background wind speed increases the thermal size in the sub-cloud layer, but the diagnosed surface-cloud coupling, quantified by characteristic time and length scales, remains.

  17. An approach for configuring space photovoltaic tandem arrays based on cell layer performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flora, C. S.; Dillard, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    Meeting solar array performance goals of 300 W/Kg requires use of solar cells with orbital efficiencies greater than 20 percent. Only multijunction cells and cell layers operating in tandem produce this required efficiency. An approach for defining solar array design concepts that use tandem cell layers involve the following: transforming cell layer performance at standard test conditions to on-orbit performance; optimizing circuit configuration with tandem cell layers; evaluating circuit sensitivity to cell current mismatch; developing array electrical design around selected circuit; and predicting array orbital performance including seasonal variations.

  18. The Physics of Turbulence in the Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline, Stephen; Cantwell, Brian

    1995-01-01

    The geometry of the velocity field in a numerically simulated incompressible turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate at Re theta=670 has been studied using the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor. These invariants are computed at every grid point in the flow and used to form the discriminant. Of primary interest are those regions in the flow where the discriminant is positive; regions where, according to the characteristic equation, the eigenvalues of the velocity gradient tensor are complex. An observer moving with a frame of reference which is attached to a fluid particle lying within such a region would see a local flow pattern of the type stable-focus-stretching or unstable-focus-compressing. When the flow is visualized this way, continuous, connected, large-scale structures are revealed that extend from the point just below the buffer layer out to the beginning of the wake region. These structures are aligned with the mean shear close to the wall and arch in the cross-stream direction away from the wall. In some cases the structures observed are very similar to to the hairpin eddy vision of boundary layer structure proposed by Theodorsen. That the structure of the flow is revealed more effectively by the discriminant rather than by the vorticity is important and adds support to recent observations of the discriminant in a channel flow simulation. Of particular importance is the fact that the procedure does not require the use of an arbitrary threshold in the discriminant. Further analysis using computer flow visualization shows a high degree of spatial correlation between regions of positive discriminant, extreme negative pressure fluctuations and large instantaneous values of Reynolds shear stress.

  19. Seasonal Characteristics of Planetary Boundary Layer in Qatar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, Luis; Ayoub, Mohammed A.; Astudillo, Daniel P.; Bachour, Dunia A.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms driving the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) development as well as its seasonal characteristics is essential for predicting meteorological and air quality phenomena. Using data from the vertical backscatter profile of the atmosphere above Qatar from a ceilometer, coupled with a novel Layer Identification Algorithm (LIA) developed by QEERI, a continuous time series of the PBL has been attained. This data has been carefully validated against in-situ measurements via coinciding radiosonde launches. These launches were performed weekly at 13:00 local time during 2014; with occasional launches at 07:00. The detected PBL depth from the sondes show good correlation with LIA. This algorithm uses image recognition methods to identify boundary layers not only by their vertical characteristics; but also by their temporal and spatial signatures. This algorithm was written in Python and is designed to process the ceilometer's output data in real time or as a post-process. The behavior of the PBL depth diurnal variation in Qatar was observed to vary in correlation with the change in seasons. During the winter months the mean PBL depth was higher compared to the summer months; in addition, the diurnal amplitude was higher during winter. Apart from seasonal variations in the PBL depth behavior, short term fluctuations in the daily signature of the PBL structure were observed; with some days exhibiting a well-developed PBL followed by a day with no significant PBL variation. This behavior of the summer PBL (lower daily mean depth and lower diurnal amplitude relative to winter) was explained after looking at diurnal humidity and temperature variations. During these months, the intense temperature and humidity enhances the energy flux towards latent heat, actually diminishing the effect of the high insolation towards the development of the PBL. Lower mean PBL depths during the months of higher photochemical activity affect surface concentrations of secondary pollutants and particle matter.

  20. Interface Modes and Their Instabilities in Accretion Disc Boundary Layers

    E-print Network

    David Tsang; Dong Lai

    2008-12-20

    We study global non-axisymmetric oscillation modes trapped near the inner boundary of an accretion disc. Observations indicate that some of the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in the luminosities of accreting compact objects (neutron stars, black holes and white dwarfs) are produced in the inner-most regions of accretion discs or boundary layers. Two simple models are considered in this paper: The magnetosphere-disc model consists of a thin Keplerian disc in contact with a uniformly rotating magnetosphere with and low plasma density, while the star-disc model involves a Keplerian disc terminated at the stellar atomosphere with high density and small density scale height. We find that the interface modes at the magnetosphere-disc boundary are generally unstable due to Rayleigh-Taylor and/or Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. However, differential rotation of the disc tends to suppress Rayleigh-Taylor instability and a sufficiently high disc sound speed (or temperature) is needed to overcome this suppression and to attain net mode growth. On the other hand, Kelvin-Helmholtz instability may be active at low disc sound speeds. We also find that the interface modes trapped at the boundary between a thin disc and an unmagnetized star do not suffer Rayleigh-Taylor or Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, but can become unstable due to wave leakage to large disc radii and, for sufficiently steep disc density distributions, due to wave absorption at the corotation resonance in the disc. The non-axisymmetric interface modes studied in this paper may be relevant to the high-frequency QPOs observed in some X-ray binaries and in cataclysmic variables.

  1. Turbulence Spectra and Local Similarity Scaling in a Strongly Stratified Oceanic Bottom Boundary Layer

    E-print Network

    Lien, Ren-Chieh

    Turbulence Spectra and Local Similarity Scaling in a Strongly Stratified Oceanic Bottom Boundary, there is no effective way to separate internal waves and turbulence in the stratified boundary layer. We propose that the energy containing eddies in the stratified boundary layer have a scale close to the Ozmidov scale, 1/2 N

  2. AN ODE FOR BOUNDARY LAYER SEPARATION ON A SPHERE AND A HYPERBOLIC SPACE

    E-print Network

    Ikegami, Takashi

    point) of u. Theorem 1.1. [8] Let K be a compact domain in R2 with Cr+1 boundary, K, for r 2. Let p0 KAN ODE FOR BOUNDARY LAYER SEPARATION ON A SPHERE AND A HYPERBOLIC SPACE CHI HIN CHAN, MAGDALENA and times for the boundary layer separation of incompressible fluid flows. The equation gave a necessary

  3. On the computation of planetary boundary-layer height using the bulk Richardson number method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Gao, Z.; Li, D.; Li, Y.; Zhang, N.; Zhao, X.; Chen, J.

    2014-11-01

    Experimental data from four field campaigns are used to explore the variability of the bulk Richardson number of the entire planetary boundary layer (PBL), Ribc, which is a key parameter for calculating the PBL height (PBLH) in numerical weather and climate models with the bulk Richardson number method. First, the PBLHs of three different thermally stratified boundary layers (i.e., strongly stable boundary layers, weakly stable boundary layers, and unstable boundary layers) from the four field campaigns are determined using the turbulence method, the potential temperature gradient method, the low-level jet method, and the modified parcel method. Then for each type of boundary layer, an optimal Ribc is obtained through linear fitting and statistical error minimization methods so that the bulk Richardson method with this optimal Ribc yields similar estimates of PBLHs as the methods mentioned above. We find that the optimal Ribc increases as the PBL becomes more unstable: 0.24 for strongly stable boundary layers, 0.31 for weakly stable boundary layers, and 0.39 for unstable boundary layers. Compared with previous schemes that use a single value of Ribc in calculating the PBLH for all types of boundary layers, the new values of Ribc proposed by this study yield more accurate estimates of PBLHs.

  4. Thermal Boundary Layer Dynamics in Multiple Droplet Impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Mario F.; Lewis, Steven; Gehring, Eelco

    2010-11-01

    The impingement of a stream of HFE-7100 droplets striking a pre-wetted and heated surface is studied for droplet Weber and Reynolds numbers ranging from 285 to 427 and 1250 to 4850, respectively, and for a film depth to droplet diameter ratio varying from 0.4 to 1.5. After a short period, a quasi-steady state is achieved; in which the liquid crown formed during continuous droplet impact remains nearly stationary. Temporal averages of the velocity, temperature, and liquid fraction fields suggest that the boundary layer can be categorized as consisting of a stagnation point flow region, a linear growth section, and a jump region, similar to a hydraulic jump, near the liquid crown. Results of the average radial temperatures are compared to experiments for various heat fluxes yielding good agreement. Additionally, it is shown that a sub-layer is present in all cases considered, which is categorized by low values of the local Peclet and Reynolds numbers. The heat transfer mode in this sub-layer domain is governed to a great degree by conduction, and experiences a delayed cooling effect.

  5. Large eddy simultations of the atmospheric boundary layer east of the Colorado Rockies

    SciTech Connect

    Costigan, K.R.; Cotton, W.R.

    1992-10-22

    Large eddy simulation, LES, has often been carried out for the idealized situation of a simple convective boundary layer. Studies of dual Doppler radar and aircraft data from the Phoenix II experiment indicate that the boundary layer of the Colorado High Plains is not a purely convective boundary layer and it is influenced by the mountains to the west. The purpose of this study is to investigate the atmospheric boundary layer on one particular day on the Colorado High Plains. This research applies a LES nested within larger grids, which contain realistic topography and can simulate the larger-scale circulations initiated by the presence of the mountain barrier. How and to what extent the atmospheric boundary layer of the Colorado High Plains is influenced by larger scale circulations and other phenomena associated with the mountain barrier to the west is investigated. The nested grid LES reproduces the characteristics of the atmosphere for the case study day reasonably well. The mountains influence the atmospheric boundary layer over the plains to the east in several ways. The mountains contribute to the vertical shear of the horizontal winds through the thermally-induced mountain-plains circulation. As a consequence of the wind shear, the boundary layer that develops over the mountains is advected eastward over the top of the plains boundary layer, which is developing separately. This layer is marked by a mixture of gravity waves and turbulence and is atypical of a purely convective boundary layer. Just below this layer, the capping inversion of the plains boundary layer is weak and poorly defined compared to the inversions capping purely convective boundary layers. Gravity waves, triggered by the obstacle of the Rocky Mountains and by convection in the mountain boundary layer, also influence the atmosphere above the Colorado High Plains. These influences are found to have significant effects on the turbulence statistics and the energy spectra.

  6. Methods for determining the height of the atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Nasstrom, J S; Sugiyama, G

    1999-02-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an operational emergency response program which provides real-time dose assessments of airborne pollutant releases. This report reviews methodologies for determining the height of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), which were investigated for use in the next generation of ARAC diagnostic and dispersion models. The ABL height, hABL, is an essential parameter in atmospheric dispersion modeling, controlling the extent of the vertical mixing of pollutants near the surface. Although eventually instrumentation (radiosonde, lidar, sodar, etc.) may provide accurate means for determining hABL, at present the availability of such data is too limited to provide a general capability for ARAC. The current operational ARAC diagnostic models use a fixed value of hABL for any given time. ARAC? s new models support a horizontally-varying atmospheric boundary layer height, which is used to generate meteorological (mean wind, temperature, etc.) and turbulence fields. The purpose of the present work is to develop methods to derive the ABL height for all atmospheric stability regimes. One of our key requirements is to provide approaches which are applicable to routinely available data, which may be of limited temporal and spatial resolution. The final objective is to generate a consistent set of meteorological and turbulence or eddy diffusivity fields to drive the new ARAC dispersion model. A number of alternative definitions of the atmospheric boundary layer exist, leading to different approaches to deriving hABL. The definitions are based on either the turbulence characteristics of the atmosphere or the vertical structure of one or more meteorological variables. Most diagnostic analyses determine hABL from profiles of temperature or occasionally wind. A class of methods of considerable current interest are based on Richardson number criteria. Prognostic methods calculate the time evolution of the top of the ABL from a rate equation. A number of commonly used methods of both types are reviewed along with considerations on their applicability to various types of meteorological data and atmospheric conditions.

  7. Friction of a slider on a granular layer: Nonmonotonic thickness dependence and effect of boundary conditions

    E-print Network

    Kudrolli, Arshad

    Friction of a slider on a granular layer: Nonmonotonic thickness dependence and effect of boundary the effective friction encountered by a mass sliding on a granular layer as a function of bed thickness and boundary roughness conditions. The observed friction has minima for a small number of layers before

  8. Effect of Strong External Turbulence on a Wall Jet Boundary Layer

    E-print Network

    Hunt, Julian

    Effect of Strong External Turbulence on a Wall Jet Boundary Layer Y. S. Tsai & J. C. R. Hunt & F. T turbulence and the flow inside the boundary layer, resulting in the modifications of the velocity profile the length scale of the external turbulence is relatively large compared with the shear layer thickness [7

  9. Heat transport by laminar boundary layer flow with polymers

    E-print Network

    Roberto Benzi; Emily S. C. Ching.; Vivien W. S. Chu

    2011-04-23

    Motivated by recent experimental observations, we consider a steady-state Prandtl-Blasius boundary layer flow with polymers above a slightly heated horizontal plate and study how the heat transport might be affected by the polymers. We discuss how a set of equations can be derived for the problem and how these equations can be solved numerically by an iterative scheme. By carrying out such a scheme, we find that the effect of the polymers is equivalent to producing a space-dependent effective viscosity that first increases from the zero-shear value at the plate then decreases rapidly back to the zero-shear value far from the plate. We further show that such an effective viscosity leads to an enhancement in the drag, which in turn leads to a reduction in heat transport.

  10. Turbulent thermal boundary layer on a permeable flat plate

    SciTech Connect

    Vigdorovich, I. I.

    2007-06-15

    Scaling laws are established for the profiles of temperature, turbulent heat flux, rms temperature fluctuation, and wall heat transfer in the turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate with transpiration. In the case of blowing, the temperature distribution represented in scaling variables outside the viscous sublayer has a universal form known from experimental data for flows over impermeable flat plates. In the case of suction, the temperature distribution is described by a one-parameter family of curves. A universal law of heat transfer having the form of a generalized Reynolds analogy provides a basis for representation of the heat flux distributions corresponding to different Reynolds numbers and transpiration velocities in terms of a function of one variable. The results are obtained without invoking any special closure hypotheses.

  11. Combined core/boundary layer transport simulations in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Prinja, A.K.; Schafer, R.F. Jr.; Conn, R.W.; Howe, H.C.

    1986-04-01

    Significant new numerical results are presented from self-consistent core and boundary or scrape-off layer plasma simulations with 3-D neutral transport calculations. For a symmetric belt limiter it is shown that, for plasma conditions considered here, the pump limiter collection efficiency increases from 11% to 18% of the core efflux as a result of local reionization of blade deflected neutrals. This hitherto unobserved effect causes a significant amplification of upstream ion flux entering the pump limiter. Results from coupling of an earlier developed two-zone edge plasma model ODESSA to the PROCTR core plasma simulation code indicates that intense recycling divertor operation may not be possible because of stagnation of upstream flow velocity. This results in a self-consistent reduction of density gradient in an intermediate region between the central plasma and separatrix, and a concomitant reduction of core-efflux. There is also evidence of increased recycling at the first wall.

  12. Numerical Simulations of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Chun Y.; Trumble, Kerry A.; Campbell, Charles H.; Lessard, Victor R.; Wood, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were used to study the possible effects that the Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Flight Experiments may have on the heating environment of the Space Shuttle during its entry to Earth. To investigate this issue, hypersonic calculations using the Data-Parallel Line Relaxation (DPLR) and Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation (LAURA) CFD codes were computed for a 0.75 tall protuberance at flight conditions of Mach 15 and 18. These initial results showed high surface heating on the BLT trip and the areas surrounding the protuberance. Since the predicted peak heating rates would exceed the thermal limits of the materials selected to construct the BLT trip, many changes to the geometry were attempted in order to reduce the surface heat flux. The following paper describes the various geometry revisions and the resulting heating environments predicted by the CFD codes.

  13. Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Trip Development for Hyper-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Auslender, Aaron H.; Dilley, Authur D.; Calleja, John F.

    2000-01-01

    Boundary layer trip devices for the Hper-X forebody have been experimentally examined in several wind tunnels. Five different trip configurations were compared in three hypersonic facilities, the LaRC 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel, the LaRC 31 -Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel, and in the HYPULSE Reflected Shock Tunnel at GASL. Heat transfer distributions, utilizing the phosphor thermography and thin-film techniques, shock system details, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. Parametric variations include angles-of-attack of 0-deg, 2-deg, and 4-deg; Reynolds numbers based on model length of 1.2 to 15.4 million: and inlet cowl door simulated in both open and closed positions. Comparisons of transition due to discrete roughness elements have led to the selection of a trip configuration for the Hyper-X Mach 7 flight vehicle.

  14. An algorithm for the automatic control of boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, P. A.; Rioual, J.-L.

    1994-05-01

    Interest has recently been renewed in the use of distributed suction for the production of laminar flow over substantial areas of the surface of aircraft wings and engine nacelles. Suction may be most efficiently applied by using a number of independently controllable panels through which fluid is withdrawn. It becomes necessary to determine the distribution of suction flowrates that results in a given streamwise location of boundary layer transition with minimum power consumed in providing suction. This problem is formulated here in terms of nonlinearly constrained optimization. An algorithm is presented which has proved successful in both experimental and numerical studies in determining the optimal suction distribution. Of particular concern in this work is the stability of the basic algorithm and the limits to its rate of convergence to the optimal solution.

  15. Radiative transfer in a polluted urban planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viskanta, R.; Johnson, R. O.; Bergstrom, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Radiative transfer in a polluted urban atmosphere is studied using a dynamic model. The diurnal nature of radiative transfer for summer conditions is simulated for an urban area 40 km in extent and the effects of various parameters arising in the problem are investigated. The results of numerical computations show that air pollution has the potential of playing a major role in the radiative regime of the urban area. Absorption of solar energy by aerosols in realistic models of urban atmosphere are of the same order of magnitude as that due to water vapor. The predicted effect of the air pollution aerosol in the city is to warm the earth-atmosphere system, and the net effect of gaseous pollutant is to warm the surface and cool the planetary boundary layer, particularly near the top.

  16. One-dimensional theory of the wave boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalikov, D. V.; Belevich, M. Yu.

    1993-02-01

    Results obtained in a 2-D modeling of the statistical structure of the wave boundary layer (WBL) are used for elaboration of the general approach to 1-D modeling taking into account the spectral properties of wave drag for an arbitrary wave field. In the case of the wave field described by the JONSWAP spectrum, the momentum and energy spectral density exchange, vertical profiles of the wave-induced momentum flux and dependence of total roughness parameter and drag coefficient on peak frequency are given. The reasons that the total roughness parameter increases with decreasing fetch are explained. The role of wind waves as an active element of the ocean-atmosphere dynamic system is also discussed.

  17. Modelling Unsteady Wall Pressures Beneath Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, B-K.; Graham, W. R.; Rizzi, S. A.

    2004-01-01

    As a structural entity of turbulence, hairpin vortices are believed to play a major role in developing and sustaining the turbulence process in the near wall region of turbulent boundary layers and may be regarded as the simplest conceptual model that can account for the essential features of the wall pressure fluctuations. In this work we focus on fully developed typical hairpin vortices and estimate the associated surface pressure distributions and their corresponding spectra. On the basis of the attached eddy model, we develop a representation of the overall surface pressure spectra in terms of the eddy size distribution. Instantaneous wavenumber spectra and spatial correlations are readily derivable from this representation. The model is validated by comparison of predicted wavenumber spectra and cross-correlations with existing emperical models and experimental data.

  18. Effect of crossflow on Goertler instability in incompressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zurigat, Y. H.; Malik, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    Linear stability theory is used to study the effect of crossflow on Goertler instability in incompressible boundary layers. The results cover a wide range of sweep angle, pressure gradient, and wall curvature parameters. It is shown that the crossflow stabilizes Goertler disturbances by reducing the maximum growth rate and shrinking the unstable band of spanwise wave numbers. On the other hand, the effect of concave wall curvature on crossflow instability is destabilizing. Calculations show that the changeover from Goertler to crossflow instabilities is a function of Goertler number, pressure gradient, and sweep angle. The results demonstrate that Goertler instability may still be relevant in the transition process on swept wings even at large angles of sweep if the pressure gradient is sufficiently small. The influence of pressure gradient and sweep can be combined by defining a crossflow Reynolds number. Thus, the changeover from Goertler to crossflow instability takes place at some critical crossflow Reynolds number whose value increases with Goertler number.

  19. Control of Unstable Waves in Three Dimensional Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S.

    1996-01-01

    Stability experiments are conducted in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel on a 45 deg. swept airfoil. The pressure gradient is designed to provide purely crossflow-dominated transition; that is, the boundary layer is subcritical to Tollmien- Schlichting (T-S) disturbances. The airfoil surface is hand polished to a 0.25 micron rms finish. Under these conditions, stationary crossflow disturbances grow to nonuniform amplitude due to submicron surface irregularities near the leading edge. Spectral de-compositions isolate single-mode growth rates for the fundamental and harmonic disturbances. The measurements show early nonlinear growth causing amplitude saturation well before transition. Comparisons with nonlinear PSE calculations show excellent agreement in both the amplitude saturation and the disturbance mode shape.

  20. Small particle transport across turbulent nonisothermal boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Fernandez De La Mora, J.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction between turbulent diffusion, Brownian diffusion, and particle thermophoresis in the limit of vanishing particle inertial effects is quantitatively modeled for applications in gas turbines. The model is initiated with consideration of the particle phase mass conservation equation for a two-dimensional boundary layer, including the thermophoretic flux term directed toward the cold wall. A formalism of a turbulent flow near a flat plate in a heat transfer problem is adopted, and variable property effects are neglected. Attention is given to the limit of very large Schmidt numbers and the particle concentration depletion outside of the Brownian sublayer. It is concluded that, in the parameter range of interest, thermophoresis augments the high Schmidt number mass-transfer coefficient by a factor equal to the product of the outer sink and the thermophoretic suction.

  1. Aeroelectric structures and turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, S. V.; Mareev, E. A.; Shikhova, N. M.; Shatalina, M. V.; Galichenko, S. V.; Zilitinkevich, S. S.

    2013-10-01

    Complex electrical measurements with the use of sodar data show that electric field pulsation analysis is useful for electrodynamics/turbulence monitoring under different conditions. In particular, the number of aeroelectric structures (AES) generated per hour is a convenient measure of the turbulence intensity. During convectively unstable periods, as many as 5-10 AES form per hour. Under stable conditions, AES occasionally form as well, indicating the appearance of occasional mixing events reflected in the electric field perturbations. AES magnitudes under stable conditions are relatively small, except in special cases such as high humidity and fog. The analysis of electric field (EF) spectra gives additional useful information on the parameters of the atmospheric boundary layer and its turbulence. A rather sharp change in the spectrum slope takes place in the vicinity of 0.02 Hz under stable conditions. The characteristic slope of the spectrum and its change are reproduced in a simple model of EF formation.

  2. Noise propagation in the atmosphere's surface and planetary boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    Interest in the characteristics of atmospheric sound propagation has recently been renewed as a consequence of publicity regarding the sound emitted by some types of wind turbine generators. Although traditionally studies in meteorological acoustics have most frequently been concerned with analysis of the refractive effects of the stratosphere, since about 1968 as a result of the development of sodar systems for indirect atmospheric probing, substantial knowledge regarding the propagation and scattering of audible frequency sound in the lower atmosphere also has been accumulated. There have been, however, only a few studies concerned with the dependence of refractive sound propagation on the temporally and spatially variable conditions in the atmosphere's planetary boundary layer (PBL). The structure of the PBL whose depth can easily vary from 200 to 2000 m in the course of a day is strongly dependent upon not only the ambient general meteorological conditions but also details of the underlying surface (e.g., topography and land use).

  3. Temperature and velocity profiles in sooting free boundary layer flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ang, J. A.; Pagni, P. J.; Mataga, T. G.; Margle, J. M.; Lyons, V. J.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature and velocity profiles are presented for cyclohexane, n-heptane, and iso-octane free, laminar, boundary layer, sooting, diffusion flames. Temperatures are measured with 3 mil Pt/Pt-13 percent Rh thermocouples. Corrected gas temperatures are derived by performing an energy balance of convection to and radiation from the thermocouple bead incorporating the variation of air conductivity and platinum emissivity with temperature. Velocities are measured using laser doppler velocimetry techniques. Profiles are compared with previously reported analytic temperature and velocity fields. Comparison of theoretical and experimental temperature profiles suggests improvement in the analytical treatment is needed, which accounts more accurately for the local soot radiation. The velocity profiles are in good agreement, with the departure of the theory from observation partially due to the small fluctuations inherent in these free flows.

  4. Stochastic Parameterization of Intermittent Mixing in the Stable Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, A. H.; He, Y.; McFarlane, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    The diurnal cycle of the probability density function (pdf) of lower-atmospheric wind speeds is characterised by a long tail toward high wind speeds within the shallow nocturnal stable boundary layer (SBL). A potential mechanism for the generation of this tail is intermittent mixing between the normally quiescent SBL and the higher-momentum fluid above. When included in a state-of-the-art single column model, a stochastic parameterisation of this intermittent mixing is shown to result in simulations of the diurnal evolution of the wind speed pdf that are in close agreement with observations at a tall tower in Cabauw, Netherlands. In particular, the presence of enhanced wind speed pdf tails in the nocturnal SBL is simulated.

  5. Resonant Alfven wave heating of the plasma sheet boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrold, B. G.; Goertz, C. K.; Smith, R. A.; Hansen, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    The exchange of energy between the plasma mantle and the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) is examined with a one-dimensional magnetotail model. The energy exchange occurs via Poynting flux generated by the localized mode conversion of a surface wave to an Alfven wave. This Poynting flux propagates through the lobe and into the PSBL where it is absorbed by two processes. The first arises from a gradient in the plasma beta causing a smooth absorption of Poynting flux. The second process results from the localized mode conversion of the decaying surface wave to an Alfven wave, causing a localized absorption of energy. A numerical solution of the linearized ideal MHD equations is obtained by assuming an adiabatic equation of state.

  6. Boundary-layer-ingesting inlet flow control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R. (Inventor); Allan, Brian G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system for reducing distortion at the aerodynamic interface plane of a boundary-layer-ingesting inlet using a combination of active and passive flow control devices is disclosed. Active flow control jets and vortex generating vanes are used in combination to reduce distortion across a range of inlet operating conditions. Together, the vortex generating vanes can reduce most of the inlet distortion and the active flow control jets can be used at a significantly reduced control jet mass flow rate to make sure the inlet distortion stays low as the inlet mass flow rate varies. Overall inlet distortion, measured and described as average SAE circumferential distortion descriptor, was maintained at a value of 0.02 or less. Advantageous arrangements and orientations of the active flow control jets and the vortex generating vanes were developed using computational fluid dynamics simulations and wind tunnel experimentations.

  7. Axial turbulent stress transport in high and low Reynolds number boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klewicki, J.; Priyadarshana, P.; Sadr, R.; Metzger, M.

    2000-11-01

    A six wire hot-wire probe consisting of a vertical array of three closely spaced x-arrays was used to acquire time resolved measurements of terms in the transport equation for the axial stress, baru^2 . Measurements were acquired in zero pressure gradient boundary layers at R_? \\cong 2 × 10^3 and R_? \\cong 5 × 10^6 . The low R_? experiments were conducted in a 17.1m wind tunnel at the Unversity of Utah. The high R_? experiments were conducted at the SLTEST facility in Utah's west desert. Because of the large scales and low speeds of both the high and low R_? flows, the measurements were well resolved in both space and time. Comparisons were made for measurements in the logarithmic layer. Of particular interest is the wall-normal turbulent transport term, fracpartial(u^2v)partial y . The results are interpreted in terms of R_? dependencies, and, in particular, the widening disparity between the large and small scales with increasing R_? .

  8. Vortex dynamics of in-line twin synthetic jets in a laminar boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xin; Tang, Hui; Duan, Fei

    2015-08-01

    An experimental investigation is conducted on the vortices induced by twin synthetic jets (SJs) in line with a laminar boundary layer flow over a flat plate. The twin SJs operating at four different phase differences, i.e., ?? = 0°, 90°, 180°, and 270°, are visualized using a stereoscopic color dye visualization system and measured using a two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. It is found that depending on the phase difference of twin SJs, three types of vortex structures are produced. At ?? = 90°, the two hairpin vortices interact in a very constructive way in terms of the vortex size, strength, and celerity, forming one combined vortex. At ?? = 270°, the two individual hairpin vortices do not have much interaction, forming two completely separated hairpin vortices that behave like doubling the frequency of the single SJ case. At ?? = 0° and 180°, the two hairpin vortices produced by the twin SJ actuators are close enough, with the head of one hairpin vortex coupled with the legs of the other, forming partially interacting vortex structures. Quantitative analysis of the twin SJs is conducted, including the time histories of vortex circulation in the mid-span plane as well as a selected spanwise-wall-normal plane, and the influence of the twin SJs on the boundary layer flow filed. In addition, dynamic mode decomposition analysis of the PIV data is conducted to extract representative coherent structures. Through this study, a better understanding in the vortex dynamics associated with the interaction of in-line twin SJs in laminar boundary layers is achieved, which provides useful information for future SJ-array applications.

  9. Using Intel Xeon Phi to accelerate the WRF TEMF planetary boundary layer scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielikainen, Jarno; Huang, Bormin; Huang, Allen

    2014-05-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is designed for numerical weather prediction and atmospheric research. The WRF software infrastructure consists of several components such as dynamic solvers and physics schemes. Numerical models are used to resolve the large-scale flow. However, subgrid-scale parameterizations are for an estimation of small-scale properties (e.g., boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation). Those have a significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. For the cloudy planetary boundary layer (PBL), it is fundamental to parameterize vertical turbulent fluxes and subgrid-scale condensation in a realistic manner. A parameterization based on the Total Energy - Mass Flux (TEMF) that unifies turbulence and moist convection components produces a better result that the other PBL schemes. For that reason, the TEMF scheme is chosen as the PBL scheme we optimized for Intel Many Integrated Core (MIC), which ushers in a new era of supercomputing speed, performance, and compatibility. It allows the developers to run code at trillions of calculations per second using the familiar programming model. In this paper, we present our optimization results for TEMF planetary boundary layer scheme. The optimizations that were performed were quite generic in nature. Those optimizations included vectorization of the code to utilize vector units inside each CPU. Furthermore, memory access was improved by scalarizing some of the intermediate arrays. The results show that the optimization improved MIC performance by 14.8x. Furthermore, the optimizations increased CPU performance by 2.6x compared to the original multi-threaded code on quad core Intel Xeon E5-2603 running at 1.8 GHz. Compared to the optimized code running on a single CPU socket the optimized MIC code is 6.2x faster.

  10. A cloudiness transition in a marine boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Alan K.; Boers, Reinout

    1990-01-01

    Boundary layer cloudiness plays several important roles in the energy budget of the earth. Low level stratocumulus are highly reflective clouds which reduce the net incoming shortwave radiation at the earth's surface. Climatically, the transition to a small area fraction of scattered cumulus clouds occurs as the air flows over warmer water. Although these clouds reflect less sunlight, they still play an important role in the boundary layer equilibrium by transporting water vapor upwards, and enhancing the surface evaporation. The First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) Regional Experiment (FIRE) included a marine stratocumulus experiment off the southern California coast from June 29 to July 19, 1987. The objectives of this experiment were to study the controls on fractional cloudiness, and to assess the role of cloud-top entrainment instability (CTEI) and mesoscale structure in determining cloud type. The focus is one research day, July 7, 1987, when coordinated aircraft missions were flown by four research aircraft, centered on a LANDSAT scene at 1830 UTC. The remarkable feature of this LANDSAT scene is the transition from a clear sky in the west through broken cumulus to solid stratocumulus in the east. The dynamic and thermodynamic structure of this transition in cloudiness is analyzed using data from the NCAR Electra. By averaging the aircraft data, the internal structure of the different cloud regimes is documented, and it is shown that the transition between broken cumulus and stratocumulus is associated with a change in structure with respect to the CTEI condition. However, this results not from sea surface temperature changes, but mostly from a transition in the air above the inversion, and the breakup appears to be at a structure on the unstable side of the wet virtual adiabat.

  11. Numerical Computations of Hypersonic Boundary-Layer over Surface Irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Surface irregularities such as protuberances inside a hypersonic boundary layer may lead to premature transition on the vehicle surface. Early transition in turn causes large localized surface heating that could damage the thermal protection system. Experimental measurements as well as numerical computations aimed at building a knowledge base for transition Reynolds numbers with respect to different protuberance sizes and locations have been actively pursued in recent years. This paper computationally investigates the unsteady wake development behind large isolated cylindrical roughness elements and the scaled wind-tunnel model of the trip used in a recent flight measurement during the reentry of space shuttle Discovery. An unstructured mesh, compressible flow solver based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for the flow past a roughness element under several wind-tunnel conditions. For a cylindrical roughness element with a height to the boundary-layer thickness ratio from 0.8 to 2.5, the wake flow is characterized by a mushroom-shaped centerline streak and horse-shoe vortices. While time-accurate solutions converged to a steady-state for a ratio of 0.8, strong flow unsteadiness is present for a ratio of 1.3 and 2.5. Instability waves marked by distinct disturbance frequencies were found in the latter two cases. Both the centerline streak and the horse-shoe vortices become unstable downstream. The oscillatory vortices eventually reach an early breakdown stage for the largest roughness element. Spectral analyses in conjunction with the computed root mean square variations suggest that the source of the unsteadiness and instability waves in the wake region may be traced back to possible absolute instability in the front-side separation region.

  12. Boundary layer eddies at the Goodnoe Hills site

    SciTech Connect

    Aspliden, C.I.; Wendell, L.L.; Clem, K.S.; Gower, G.L.

    1991-05-01

    Data from nine instrumented meteorological towers at the MOD-2 wind turbine site at Goodnoe Hills in Washington State were analyzed to evaluate high-frequency perturbations, which were observed in the lower boundary-layer flow. Horizontal winds and temperature measurements for a period of 8 min, undisturbed by turbine operation, were available for this study. The data are in 1-s values from June 27, 1985. Throughout the study, departures from the mean for the period and for each sensor were used on area maps and on line-time and tower-time cross sections. Conventional streamline and isotach analyses were employed; they show highly organized flow fields with embedded perturbations traversing the site. Most of the flow fields have a well-developed vortical structure that reaches from the surface through the top level of the highest tower. These structures consist of a system of clockwise and counter-clockwise circulations. The wave length is about 500 to 600 m. Their wave speed is slightly greater than the mean wind speed and their movement is in the general direction of the mean flow. The results of the study show two main reasons why wind conditions and turbine power output in a wind farm may vary in a remarkable and abrupt fashion in space and time under certain circumstances: (1) The boundary-layer flow contains highly organized coherent perturbations with a typical size of 300 {times} 300 M{sup 2}. (2) The transition zones between the perturbations moving through a wind farm are associated with very definitive changes in the wind field that are on the order of meters and seconds. 2 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Active Flow Control on a Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, Susan Althoff; Owens, Lewis R.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Allan, Brian G.; Schuster, Ernest P.

    2004-01-01

    Boundary layer ingestion (BLI) is explored as means to improve overall system performance for Blended Wing Body configuration. The benefits of BLI for vehicle system performance benefit are assessed with a process derived from first principles suitable for highly-integrated propulsion systems. This performance evaluation process provides framework within which to assess the benefits of an integrated BLI inlet and lays the groundwork for higher-fidelity systems studies. The results of the system study show that BLI provides a significant improvement in vehicle performance if the inlet distortion can be controlled, thus encouraging the pursuit of active flow control (AFC) as a BLI enabling technology. The effectiveness of active flow control in reducing engine inlet distortion was assessed using a 6% scale model of a 30% BLI offset, diffusing inlet. The experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel with a model inlet designed specifically for this type of testing. High mass flow pulsing actuators provided the active flow control. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow through the duct and the actuators. The distortion was determined by 120 total pressure measurements located at the aerodynamic interface plane. The test matrix was limited to a maximum freestream Mach number of 0.15 with scaled mass flows through the inlet for that condition. The data show that the pulsed actuation can reduce distortion from 29% to 4.6% as measured by the circumferential distortion descriptor DC60 using less than 1% of inlet mass flow. Closed loop control of the actuation was also demonstrated using a sidewall surface static pressure as the response sensor.

  14. Study of boundary-layer transition using transonic-cone preston tube data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, T. D.; Moretti, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    The laminar boundary layer on a 10 degree cone in a transonic wind tunnel was studied. The inviscid flow and boundary layer development were simulated by computer programs. The effects of pitch and yaw angles on the boundary layer were examined. Preston-tube data, taken on the boundary-layer-transition cone in the NASA Ames 11 ft transonic wind tunnel, were used to develope a correlation which relates the measurements to theoretical values of laminar skin friction. The recommended correlation is based on a compressible form of the classical law-of-the-wall. The computer codes successfully simulates the laminar boundary layer for near-zero pitch and yaw angles. However, in cases of significant pitch and/or yaw angles, the flow is three dimensional and the boundary layer computer code used here cannot provide a satisfactory model. The skin-friction correlation is thought to be valid for body geometries other than cones.

  15. Comparison of several methods for predicting separation in a compressible turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhart, P. M.; Bober, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Several methods for predicting the separation point for a compressible turbulent boundary layer were applied to the flow over a bump on a wind-tunnel wall. Measured pressure distributions were used as input. Two integral boundary-layer methods, three finite-difference boundary-layer methods, and three simple methods were applied at five free-stream Mach numbers ranging from 0.354 to 0.7325. Each of the boundary-layer methods failed to explicitly predict separation. However, by relaxing the theoretical separation criteria, several boundary-layer methods were made to yield reasonable separation predictions, but none of the methods accurately predicted the important boundary-layer parameters at separation. Only one of the simple methods consistently predicted separation with reasonable accuracy in a manner consistent with the theory. The other methods either indicated several possible separation locations or only sometimes predicted separation.

  16. Turbulence transition in the asymptotic suction boundary layer

    E-print Network

    Kreilos, Tobias; Schneider, Tobias M; Veble, Gregor; Duguet, Yohann; Schlatter, Philipp; Henningson, Dan S; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    We study the transition to turbulence in the asymptotic suction boundary layer (ASBL) by direct numerical simulation. Tracking the motion of trajectories intermediate between laminar and turbulent states we can identify the invariant object inside the laminar-turbulent boundary, the edge state. In small domains, the flow behaves like a travelling wave over short time intervals. On longer times one notes that the energy shows strong bursts at regular time intervals. During the bursts the streak structure is lost, but it reforms, translated in the spanwise direction by half the domain size. Varying the suction velocity allows to embed the flow into a family of flows that interpolate between plane Couette flow and the ASBL. Near the plane Couette limit, the edge state is a travelling wave. Increasing the suction, the travelling wave and a symmetry-related copy of it undergo a saddle-node infinite-period (SNIPER) bifurcation that leads to bursting and discrete-symmetry shifts. In wider domains, the structures loc...

  17. Planetary boundary layer response to surface temperature anomalies forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Xavier; Lapeyre, Guillaume; Plougonven, Riwal

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies showed that strong sea surface temperature (SST) fronts, on the scale of the western boundary currents, strongly affect the planetary boundary layer (PBL) but also all the troposphere. This renewed the interest of air-sea interactions at oceanic meso-scales. Mainly two mechanisms are proposed in the literature, the first one (due to Wallace et al 1989) is based on the destabilization of the PBL above SST anomalies, the second one (Lindzen and Nigam 1987) is based on the pressure anomalies linked to the atmosphere temperature adjustment to the SST. These two mechanisms predict different responses of the PBL to the SST. We did numerical simulations with a meso-scale atmospheric model (WRF) with the same configuration as the one described in Lambert et al 2013. The model is forced by a SST anomaly which is first a zonally or meridionally constant field and secondly a field of meso-scale structures. Firstly we studied the influence of the initial wind strength on the PBL response for the two different types of SST anomalies. We showed that the dominant mechanism can change according to weak or strong wind and to the orientation of the SST anomaly. Secondly after considering a dry atmosphere we switched on the humidity in our configuration. We studied how it influences the PBL response and whether the mechanism driving the PBL response is still the same as in the dry case.

  18. The evolution of co-rotating vortices in a canonical boundary layer with inclined jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin

    2003-12-01

    The evolution of co-rotating streamwise vortices in a canonical flat plate turbulent boundary layer (thickness of the boundary layer ?0.99=25 mm) is studied. The vortices are produced by an array of inclined jets (diameter D=14 mm) with the same orientation (skew angle ? and pitch angle ? of 45°). The focus of the investigation is on the immediate vicinity of the jet exit and downstream locations up to 40 D. The Reynolds number based on the diameter of the jet nozzle ranges from 9700 to 29 000, at various jet speed ratios. The main method of investigation is laser Doppler anemometry. Both mean and statistic data are collected and analyzed. The streamwise vortices are a product of complex fluid flow process, featuring horseshoe vortices in front of the nozzle exit, recirculating flow to the lee side of the nozzle, contra-rotating vortices from the rolling up of vortex sheet around the jet, strong and induced spanwise flow. Two types of streamwise vortices are produced: (a) weak vortices at a jet speed ratio ? of 0.5 located close to the wall and featuring diametrically opposed, secondary, near-wall flows in between the vortices, (b) strong vortices at higher jet speed ratio featuring significant spanwise movement. The vortices are accompanied by high levels of turbulence, with distinct normal and shear stress distributions. Both turbulence production and convection play important roles in defining the normal stress but only the turbulence production is important in determining the shear stress.

  19. Interactions among gravity waves, shallow drainage flows and turbulence in the stable boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Román-Cascón, Carlos; Yagüe, Carlos; Sastre, Mariano; Mahrt, Larry; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Van de Boer, Anneke; Maqueda, Gregorio; Ander Arrillaga, Jon

    2015-04-01

    The interactions among turbulence and non-turbulent motions have been analysed for a single night using data from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign. The peculiarity of this night falls on the observation of several and different stable-boundary-layer (SBL) processes, including local shallow drainage flows, gravity waves and deeper katabatic winds during the SBL formation stage and early night. The local character of the shallow drainage flows (less than ten meters depth) has been analysed using wind and temperature time series at several locations. On the other hand, gravity waves features have been studied using high-frequency and precise data from an array of microbarometers. Finally, the interactions among these submeso motions and turbulence have been studied using data from several sonic anemometers deployed at different heights and locations. Multiscale techniques as wavelet analysis and Multi Resolution Flux Decomposition (MRFD) have been employed to carry out the study and have been demonstrated as very useful for this type of analyses.

  20. Boundary Layer Separation and Reattachment Detection on Airfoils by Thermal Flow Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Hannes; Dumstorff, Gerrit; Busche, Peter; Westermann, Dieter; Lang, Walter

    2012-01-01

    A sensor concept for detection of boundary layer separation (flow separation, stall) and reattachment on airfoils is introduced in this paper. Boundary layer separation and reattachment are phenomena of fluid mechanics showing characteristics of extinction and even inversion of the flow velocity on an overflowed surface. The flow sensor used in this work is able to measure the flow velocity in terms of direction and quantity at the sensor's position and expected to determine those specific flow conditions. Therefore, an array of thermal flow sensors has been integrated (flush-mounted) on an airfoil and placed in a wind tunnel for measurement. Sensor signals have been recorded at different wind speeds and angles of attack for different positions on the airfoil. The sensors used here are based on the change of temperature distribution on a membrane (calorimetric principle). Thermopiles are used as temperature sensors in this approach offering a baseline free sensor signal, which is favorable for measurements at zero flow. Measurement results show clear separation points (zero flow) and even negative flow values (back flow) for all sensor positions. In addition to standard silicon-based flow sensors, a polymer-based flexible approach has been tested showing similar results. PMID:23202160

  1. Mitigation of Adverse Effects Caused by Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interactions Through Optimal Wall Shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, May-Fun; Lee, Byung Joon

    2013-01-01

    It is known that the adverse effects of shock wave boundary layer interactions in high speed inlets include reduced total pressure recovery and highly distorted flow at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP). This paper presents a design method for flow control which creates perturbations in geometry. These perturbations are tailored to change the flow structures in order to minimize shock wave boundary layer interactions (SWBLI) inside supersonic inlets. Optimizing the shape of two dimensional micro-size bumps is shown to be a very effective flow control method for two-dimensional SWBLI. In investigating the three dimensional SWBLI, a square duct is employed as a baseline. To investigate the mechanism whereby the geometric elements of the baseline, i.e. the bottom wall, the sidewall and the corner, exert influence on the flow's aerodynamic characteristics, each element is studied and optimized separately. It is found that arrays of micro-size bumps on the bottom wall of the duct have little effect in improving total pressure recovery though they are useful in suppressing the incipient separation in three-dimensional problems. Shaping sidewall geometry is effective in re-distributing flow on the side wall and results in a less distorted flow at the exit. Subsequently, a near 50% reduction in distortion is achieved. A simple change in corner geometry resulted in a 2.4% improvement in total pressure recovery.

  2. Application of algebraic-RNG eddy viscosity model to simulation of transitional boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakhot, Alexander; Kedar, Omer; Orszag, Steven A.

    1992-01-01

    An algebraic eddy-viscosity model is derived from the renormalization group (RNG) theory of turbulence. A new length scale, based on boundary layer characteristics (displacement thickness, shape factor), is proposed. The model was applied to transitional boundary layer flow over a flat plate. Integral characteristics, such as the total skin friction coefficient, and mean velocity profile across the boundary layer, are found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  3. Further development and testing of a second-order bulk boundary layer model. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Krasner, R.D.

    1993-05-03

    A one-layer bulk boundary layer model is developed. The model predicts the mixed layer values of the potential temperature, mixing ratio, and u- and v-momentum. The model also predicts the depth of the boundary layer and the vertically integrated turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). The TKE is determined using a second-order closure that relates the rate of dissipation to the TKE. The fractional area covered by rising motion sigma and the entrainment rate (E) are diagnostically determined. The model is used to study the clear convective boundary layer (CBL) using data from the Wangara, Australia boundary layer experiment. The Wangara data is also used as an observation base to validate model results. A further study is accomplished by simulating the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over an ocean surface. This study is designed to find the steady-state solutions of the prognostic variable.

  4. Boundary Layer Flow Control with a One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Surface Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. Reece; Sherman, Daniel M.; Wilkinson, Stephen P.

    1998-01-01

    Low speed wind tunnel data have been acquired for planar panels covered by a uniform, glow-discharge surface plasma in atmospheric pressure air known as the One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP). Streamwise and spanwise arrays of flush, plasma-generating surface electrodes have been studied in laminar, transitional, and fully turbulent boundary layer flow. Plasma between symmetric streamwise electrode strips caused large increases in panel drag, whereas asymmetric spanwise electrode configurations produced a significant thrust. Smoke wire flow visualization and mean velocity diagnostics show the primary cause of the phenomena to be a combination of mass transport and vortical structures induced by strong paraelectric ElectroHydroDynamic (EHD) body forces on the flow.

  5. A `Balanced' Approach to Stable Boundary Layer Dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbyshire, S. H.

    1994-12-01

    Semiempirical arguments from Roach and Nieuwstadt concerning Richardson numbers Ri, Rf in stably stratified shear layers and boundary layers appear to bypass uncertainties of turbulence closures. Here it is shown that these arguments can be expressed systematically as a Richardson number `balance' condition, derived formally from standard closure models implementing critical Richardson numbers. The range of validity of this procedure, and hence of the semiempirical arguments, is examined for both slow and rapid modes, and their stability analyzed. The rapid mode is stable under any reasonable assumptions, but the slow or balanced mode could be destabilized if a generalized form of the z/L stability parameter decreased with increasing Ri. Particular measured profiles are shown for illustration, and examples are given of how a Richardson number balance generates previously unsuspected quantitative predictions, which have been validated with models and simulations. Balance, where valid, is a radical simplifying approximation that generates a mathematical structure parallel in several respects to, for example, quasigeostrophic theory. A numerical implementation of balance is defined and may be a useful tool for further investigations.

  6. Studies of planetary boundary layer by infrared thermal imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Albina, Bogdan; Dimitriu, Dan Gheorghe Gurlui, Silviu Octavian; Cazacu, Marius Mihai; Timofte, Adrian

    2014-11-24

    The IR camera is a relatively novel device for remote sensing of atmospheric thermal processes from the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) based on measurements of the infrared radiation. Infrared radiation is energy radiated by the motion of atoms and molecules on the surface of aerosols, when their temperature is more than absolute zero. The IR camera measures directly the intensity of radiation emitted by aerosols which is converted by an imaging sensor into an electric signal, resulting a thermal image. Every image pixel that corresponds to a specific radiance is pre-processed to identify the brightness temperature. The thermal infrared imaging radiometer used in this study, NicAir, is a precision radiometer developed by Prata et al. The device was calibrated for the temperature range of 270–320 K and using a calibration table along with image processing software, important information about variations in temperature can be extracted from acquired IR images. The PBL is the lowest layer of the troposphere where the atmosphere interacts with the ground surfaces. The importance of PBL lies in the fact that it provides a finite but varying volume in which pollutants can disperse. The aim of this paper is to analyze the PBL altitude and thickness variations over Iasi region using the IR imaging camera as well as its behavior from day to night and thermal processes occurring in PBL.

  7. Structure of the nocturnal boundary layer over a complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, M.J.; Raman, S.

    1992-08-01

    The complex nature of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) has been shown extensively in the literature Project STABLE was conducted in 1988 to study NBL turbulence and diffusion over the complex terrain of the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Augusta, Georgia. The third night of the study was particularly interesting because of the unusual phenomena observed in the structure of the NBL. Further analyses of microscale and mesoscale data from this night are presented using data from SRS network of eight 61 m towers over 900 km{sup 2}, from six launches of an instrumented tethersonde, from permanent SRL meteorological instrumentation at seven levels of the 304 m (1,000 ft) WJBF-TV tower near SRS, and additional data collected at 36 m (CC) by North Carolina State University (NCSU) including a one dimensional sonic anemometer, fine wire thermocouple, and a three dimensional propeller anemometer. Also, data from the nearby Plant Vogtle nuclear power plant observation tower and the National Weather Service at Augusta`s Bush Field (AGS) are presented. The passage of a mesoscale phenomenon, defined as a microfront (with an explanation of the nomenclature used), and a vertical composite schematic of the NBL which shows dual low level wind maxima, dual inversions, and a persistent, elevated turbulent layer over a complex terrain are described.

  8. Structure of the nocturnal boundary layer over a complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, M.J. ); Raman, S. . Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The complex nature of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) has been shown extensively in the literature Project STABLE was conducted in 1988 to study NBL turbulence and diffusion over the complex terrain of the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Augusta, Georgia. The third night of the study was particularly interesting because of the unusual phenomena observed in the structure of the NBL. Further analyses of microscale and mesoscale data from this night are presented using data from SRS network of eight 61 m towers over 900 km{sup 2}, from six launches of an instrumented tethersonde, from permanent SRL meteorological instrumentation at seven levels of the 304 m (1,000 ft) WJBF-TV tower near SRS, and additional data collected at 36 m (CC) by North Carolina State University (NCSU) including a one dimensional sonic anemometer, fine wire thermocouple, and a three dimensional propeller anemometer. Also, data from the nearby Plant Vogtle nuclear power plant observation tower and the National Weather Service at Augusta's Bush Field (AGS) are presented. The passage of a mesoscale phenomenon, defined as a microfront (with an explanation of the nomenclature used), and a vertical composite schematic of the NBL which shows dual low level wind maxima, dual inversions, and a persistent, elevated turbulent layer over a complex terrain are described.

  9. On the computation of planetary boundary layer height using the bulk Richardson number method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Gao, Z.; Li, D.; Li, Y.; Zhang, N.; Zhao, X.; Chen, J.

    2014-06-01

    Experimental data from four intensive field campaigns are used to explore the variability of the critical bulk Richardson number, which is a key parameter for calculating the planetary boundary layer height (PBLH) in numerical weather and climate models with the bulk Richardson method. First, the PBLHs of three different thermally-stratified boundary layers (i.e., strongly stable boundary layer, weakly stable boundary layer, and unstable boundary layer) from the four field campaigns are determined using the turbulence method, the potential temperature gradient method, the low-level jet method, or the modified parcel method. Then for each type of boundary layer, an optimal critical Richardson numbers is obtained through linear fitting and statistical error minimization methods so that the bulk Richardson method with this optimal critical bulk Richardson number yields similar estimates of PBLHs as the methods mentioned above. We find that the optimal critical bulk Richardson number increases as the atmosphere becomes more unstable: 0.24 for strongly stable boundary layer, 0.31 for weakly stable boundary layer, and 0.39 for unstable boundary layer. Compared with previous schemes that use a single value of critical bulk Richardson number for calculating the PBLH, the new values of critical bulk Richardson number that proposed by this study yield more accurate estimate of PBLH.

  10. Modelled influences of non-exchanging trichomes on leaf boundary layers and gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Schreuder, M D; Brewer, C A; Heine, C

    2001-05-01

    The two main resistances in the exchange of gases between plants and the atmosphere are stomatal and boundary layer resistances. We modeled boundary layer dynamics over glabrous and pubescent leaves (assuming non-exchanging trichomes) with leaf lengths varying from 0.01 to 0.2 m, and windspeeds of 0.1-5.0 m x s(-1). Results from theoretical and semi-empirical formulae were compared. As expected, boundary layer thickness decreased with decreasing leaf length and increasing windspeed. The presence of trichomes increased leaf surface roughness, resulting in lowered Reynolds numbers at which the boundary layer became turbulent. This effect is especially important at low windspeeds and over small leaves, where the Reynolds number over glabrous surfaces would be low. We derived a new simple dimensionless number, the trip factor, to distinguish field conditions that would lead to a turbulent boundary layer based on the influence of trichomes. Because modeled rates of CO2 and H2O(v) exchange over turbulent boundary layers are one or more orders of magnitude faster than over laminar boundary layers, a turbulent boundary layer may lead to increased carbon uptake by plants. The biological trade-off is potentially increased transpirational water loss. However, in understory habitats characterized by low windspeeds, even a few trichomes may increase turbulence in the boundary layer, thus facilitating photosynthetic gas exchange. Preliminary field data show that critical trip factors are exceeded for several plant species, both in understory and open habitats. PMID:11343428

  11. Three dimensional flow field inside compressor rotor, including blade boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galmes, J. M.; Pouagere, M.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1982-01-01

    The Reynolds stress equation, pressure strain correlation, and dissipative terms and diffusion are discussed in relation to turbulence modelling using the Reynolds stress model. Algebraic modeling of Reynolds stresses and calculation of the boundary layer over an axial cylinder are examined with regards to the kinetic energy model for turbulence modelling. The numerical analysis of blade and hub wall boundary layers, and an experimental study of rotor blade boundary layer in an axial flow compressor rotor are discussed. The Patankar-Spalding numerical method for two dimensional boundary layers is included.

  12. Interaction between surface and atmosphere in a convective boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, Anirban

    Solar heating of the surface causes the near surface air to warm up and with sufficient buoyancy it ascends through the atmosphere as surface-layer plumes and thermals. The cold fluid from the upper part of the boundary layer descends as downdrafts. The downdrafts and thermals form streamwise roll vortices. All these turbulent coherent structures are important because they contribute most of the momentum and heat transport. While these structures have been studied in depth, their imprint on the surface through energy budget in a convective atmospheric boundary layer has received little attention. The main objective of the present study is to examine the turbulence-induced surface temperature fluctuations for different surface properties and stratification. Experiments were performed to measure atmospheric turbulence using sonic anemometers, fine wire thermocouples and LIDAR; and surface temperature using an infra-red camera over grass and artificial turf fields. The surface temperature fluctuations were found to be highly correlated to the turbulent coherent structures and follow the processes postulated in the surface renewal theory. The spatio-temporal scales and advection speed of the surface temperature fluctuation were found to match with those of turbulent coherent structures. A parametric direct numerical simulation (DNS) study was then performed by solving the solid-fluid heat transport mechanism numerically for varying solid thermal properties, solid thickness and strength of stratification. Even though there were large differences in the friction Reynolds and Richardson numbers between the experiments and numerical simulations, similar turbulent characteristics were observed. The ejection (sweep) events tend to be aligned with the streamwise direction to form roll vortices with unstable stratification. The solid-fluid interfacial temperature fluctuations increase with the decreases in solid thermal inertia; and with the increase in solid thickness to attain a constant value for a sufficiently thick solid. The temperature fluctuation changes from a Gaussian distribution near the wall to a positively skewed distribution away from the wall. The turbulent temperature fluctuations influence the solid interfacial temperature by thermal conduction only. These studies provided unique insights into the solid-fluid coupled heat transport in low and high Reynolds number flows. This turbulence induced surface temperature fluctuation can influence the performances of several satellite remote sensing models.

  13. Estimation of velocity boundaries in basement - sedimentary layer system of Yokohama region by means of nonstationary ray decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagishi, M.; Kinoshita, S.

    2011-12-01

    We estimated the velocity boundaries in a sedimentary layer-basement system in Yokohama by applying nonstationary ray decomposition method (NRDM) to the strong motion data recorded at the Yokohama dense strong motion array (YKH array). NRDM is a method to estimate the velocity boundaries of real layered structure from surface recordings by decomposing power of an SH-wave into instantaneous power of wave associated with rays in a homogeneous half space. The estimated results obtained by applying this method to seismograms are represented as a function of lapse time and depth time, which is travel time from surface toward depth-direction. A total of 10080 surface seismograms obtained at the YKH array for the 128 earthquakes that occurred in the Kanto area from 2000 to 2010 were used. The recordings were measured by acceleration seismometers. The data were obtained for the events having JMA magnitudes in the range of from 2.8 to 6.5. NRDM was applied to the transverse component data of velocity seismogram. Since the seismograms obtained at the YKH array predominate in high frequencies due to the weak subsurface structure, we applied bandpass filtering to the seismograms by using several intrinsic mode functions that are narrowband signals with different center frequencies. After such a processing, the data were converted to analytic signals, and then, the signals were used to estimate the instantaneous power by means of Wigner-Ville distribution. We have estimated the velocity boundaries in sediment in Yokohama region using 37 sites which were located in a rectangular area with a width of 4 km and a length of 40 km south-southeast of the FCH array. We were able to estimate two velocity boundaries, one in sediment (K-M) and the other being the upper boundary of the pre-Tertiary basement (M-B). On the whole, the upper boundary of the pre-Tertiary basement is dipping toward the south-southeast. The estimated depth times at K-M and M-B were from 1.5 to 2.2 s and from 2.4 to 3.2 s, respectively. The depth times for two velocity discontinuity boundaries were revealed to change synchronously from the FCH array area to Yokohama. However, we were not able to estimate the near-surface boundary (S-K) overlying the K-M, because the reflected phases are masked by multi-reflected waves generated in the soft subsurface. In the poster session, we will present the results for velocity discontinuity boundaries in sediment in the whole Yokohama region. In addition to the NRDM, we will also introduce the statistical nonstationary ray decomposition method (SNRDM) which uses the NRDM in a statistical manner. We estimated the velocity boundaries by applying the SNRDM to the data recorded at the 86 sites of the YKH array for the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku earthquake (143.15E, 38.03N, Mw = 9.0, Focal depth = 24 km). In this method, we can estimate the velocity boundaries using data for only one event, and, particularly, the S-K boundary was better estimated as compared to the ordinary NRDM. The SNRDM will be a useful tool for compensating for ordinary NRDM.

  14. Large-eddy simulation of the hurricane boundary layer: Evaluation of the planetary boundary-layer parametrizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh-Choobari, O.

    2015-03-01

    The organized roll vortices are the integral part of the hurricane boundary layer (HBL) where they have an important contribution in the vertical transport of momentum, heat and moisture. Large-eddy simulations (LESs) were conducted to explicitly resolve the organized roll vortices in the HBL over the ocean using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The LESs were nested within the WRF mesoscale model to provide two-way up-scale and down-scale exchange at the nest interfaces, and explicitly resolve large eddies. Downdrafts in the organized roll vortices correspond to transport of high-momentum air down to the surface, while updrafts tend to transport low-momentum air upwards. The downdrafts and updrafts therefore lead to a well-organized band-like structure of alternating strong and relatively weak near-surface winds, respectively. The upward legs of the roll vortices are also associated with transport of moist air to the upper levels, while drier air is brought down to the surface in the downward legs. Organized roll vortices contribute a significant portion to the vertical transport of heat and moisture. Three planetary boundary-layer (PBL) parametrizations were examined against the LES. Results indicate that PBL parametrizations cannot capture the band-like structure of alternating strong and relatively weak near-surface winds as they are subgrid scale features, and are unable to adequately represent the surface heat fluxes and wind profiles in the hurricane conditions. PBL parametrizations show overall less variability in the extremes of the wind field.

  15. Relative advantages of thin-layer Navier-Stokes and interactive boundary-layer procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U.; Chang, K. C.; Cebeci, T.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical procedures for solving the thin-shear-layer Navier-Stokes equations and for the interaction of solutions to inviscid and boundary-layer equations are described and evaluated. To allow appraisal of the numerical and fluid dynamic abilities of the two schemes, they have been applied to one airfoil as a function of angle of attack at two slightly different Reynolds numbers. The NACA 0012 airfoil has been chosen because it allows comparison with measured lift, drag, and moment and with surface-pressure distributions. Calculations have been performed with algebraic eddy-viscosity formulations, and they include consideration of transition. The results are presented in a form that allows easy appraisal of the accuracy of both procedures and of the relative costs. The interactive procedure is computationally efficient but restrictive relative to the thin-layer Navier-Stokes procedure. The latter procedure does a better job of predicting drag than does the former. In both procedures, the location of transition is crucial for accurate or detailed computations, particularly at high angles of attack. When the upstream influence of pressure field through the shear layer is important, the thin-layer Navier-Stokes procedure has an edge over the interactive procedure.

  16. On the Relationship between SST Gradients, Boundary Layer Winds, and Convergence over the Tropical Oceans

    E-print Network

    Bretherton, Christopher S.

    A linear mixed layer model that skillfully reproduces observed surface winds and convergence over the tropical oceans is used to examine the relative influence of boundary layer and free-tropospheric processes on the ...

  17. Laminar boundary layer in conditions of natural transition to turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polyakov, N. F.

    1986-01-01

    Results of experimental study of regularities of a natural transition of a laminar boundary layer to a turbulent layer at low subsonic air flow velocities are presented, analyzed and compared with theory and model experiments.

  18. An Examination of the Effect of Boundary Layer Ingestion on Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felder, James L.; Kim, Huyn Dae; Brown, Gerald V.; Chu, Julio

    2011-01-01

    A Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion (TeDP) system differs from other propulsion systems by the use of electrical power to transmit power from the turbine to the fan. Electrical power can be efficiently transmitted over longer distances and with complex topologies. Also the use of power inverters allows the generator and motors speeds to be independent of one another. This decoupling allows the aircraft designer to place the core engines and the fans in locations most advantageous for each. The result can be very different installation environments for the different devices. Thus the installation effects on this system can be quite different than conventional turbofans where the fan and core both see the same installed environments. This paper examines a propulsion system consisting of two superconducting generators, each driven by a turboshaft engine located so that their inlets ingest freestream air, superconducting electrical transmission lines, and an array of superconducting motor driven fan positioned across the upper/rear fuselage area of a hybrid wing body aircraft in a continuous nacelle that ingests all of the upper fuselage boundary layer. The effect of ingesting the boundary layer on the design of the system with a range of design pressure ratios is examined. Also the impact of ingesting the boundary layer on off-design performance is examined. The results show that when examining different design fan pressure ratios it is important to recalculate of the boundary layer mass-average Pt and MN up the height for each inlet height during convergence of the design point for each fan design pressure ratio examined. Correct estimation of off-design performance is dependent on the height of the column of air measured from the aircraft surface immediately prior to any external diffusion that will flow through the fan propulsors. The mass-averaged Pt and MN calculated for this column of air determine the Pt and MN seen by the propulsor inlet. Since the height of this column will change as the amount of air passing through the fans change as the propulsion system is throttled, and since the mass-average Pt and MN varies by height, this capture height must be recalculated as the airflow through the propulsor is varied as the off-design performance point is converged.

  19. Wind farm performance in conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layers with varying inversion strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2014-06-01

    In this study we consider large wind farms in a conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer. In large wind farms the energy extracted by the turbines is dominated by downward vertical turbulent transport of kinetic energy from the airflow above the farm. However, atmospheric boundary layers are almost always capped by an inversion layer which slows down the entrainment rate and counteracts boundary layer growth. In a suite of large eddy simulations the effect of the strength of the capping inversion on the boundary layer and on the performance of a large wind farm is investigated. For simulations with and without wind turbines the results indicate that the boundary layer growth is effectively limited by the capping inversion and that the entrainment rate depends strongly on the inversion strength. The power output of wind farms is shown to decrease for increasing inversions.

  20. Quadrant Analysis of the Heat and Momentum Fluxes at the Transition Layer between the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer and the developed Internal Boundary Layer close to the coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotis Raptis, Ioannis; Helmis, Constantinos

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the main characteristics and the micro-structure of the Transition Layer between the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) and the developed Internal Boundary Layer (IBL), which is created downwind close to the coastline. The dynamics and the structure of this Transition Layer, which could be defined as the region where the growing IBL perturbations enter the MABL and mix the air, are of major interest affecting a variety of MABL' parameters. For this study data collected from CBLAST field campaign, conducted during summer 2003 at Nantucket Island USA, were used. More specifically data from sonic anemometer measurements at 20 Hz sampling frequency, at 10m height and 80m distance from the coastline were studied. According to our measurements during the night the recorded characteristics of the surface layer at 10m height had the behavior of the MABL, while during the day in most cases the developed IBL was recorded. Thus a diurnal cycle was noticed with the mechanically generated IBL during the night, being lower than the height of our instruments (10m) while a thermally generated IBL during the day was easily observed with characteristic perturbations. In many cases an intermediate state was observed, indicating the existence of the Transition Layer. In order to identify the layers and their characteristics, a conditional analysis was developed using multiple criteria, based mainly on values of the heat and momentum fluxes estimated by the eddy covariance method. We used the quadrant analysis method to study the coherent structures and compare the results under different atmospheric conditions. This method decomposes shear stress into four quadrants, separating the events that contribute to the downward and upward momentum fluxes. Events in quadrants 2 (ejections) and 4 (sweeps) compose the coherent turbulent structures while events in quadrants 1 and 3 compose the incoherent structures. The parameters ? and exuberance provide info on the relation between the ejection and the sweep mechanisms and coherent/incoherent structures accordingly. Within the IBL layer the ejections are the governing state, implying that they are the dominant mechanism of the growing layer, where the more powerful eddies are sweeping mass from the overlaying layer. Within the MABL layer a more balanced state between ejections/sweeps is observed implying that the MABL is more stable energy is more equilibrated and there are more incoherent motions. At the Transition Layer, we recorded more ejections than sweeps, but less than within the IBL. In that case it seems that an invasion of strong eddies from the underlying layer to the stable layer is the main mechanism. By concluding, the Transition Layer features significantly different behavior compared with the pure MABL and IBL layers, thus a separate study of the structure of this zone could enhance the knowledge of the turbulent processes of a growing layer and explain the complicated states observed in field experiments.

  1. Turbulence Modeling for Shock Wave/Turbulent Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillard, Randolph P.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate aerodynamic computational predictions are essential for the safety of space vehicles, but these computations are of limited accuracy when large pressure gradients are present in the flow. The goal of the current project is to improve the state of compressible turbulence modeling for high speed flows with shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interactions (SWTBLI). Emphasis will be placed on models that can accurately predict the separated region caused by the SWTBLI. These flows are classified as nonequilibrium boundary layers because of the very large and variable adverse pressure gradients caused by the shock waves. The lag model was designed to model these nonequilibrium flows by incorporating history effects. Standard one- and two-equation models (Spalart Allmaras and SST) and the lag model will be run and compared to a new lag model. This new model, the Reynolds stress tensor lag model (lagRST), will be assessed against multiple wind tunnel tests and correlations. The basis of the lag and lagRST models are to preserve the accuracy of the standard turbulence models in equilibrium turbulence, when the Reynolds stresses are linearly related to the mean strain rates, but create a lag between mean strain rate effects and turbulence when nonequilibrium effects become important, such as in large pressure gradients. The affect this lag has on the results for SWBLI and massively separated flows will be determined. These computations will be done with a modified version of the OVERFLOW code. This code solves the RANS equations on overset grids. It was used for this study for its ability to input very complex geometries into the flow solver, such as the Space Shuttle in the full stack configuration. The model was successfully implemented within two versions of the OVERFLOW code. Results show a substantial improvement over the baseline models for transonic separated flows. The results are mixed for the SWBLI assessed. Separation predictions are not as good as the baseline models, but the over prediction of the peak heat flux downstream of the reattachment shock that plagues many models is reduced.

  2. Structure Identification Within a Transitioning Swept-Wing Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Keith; Glauser, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Extensive measurements are made in a transitioning swept-wing boundary layer using hot-film, hot-wire and cross-wire anemometry. The crossflow-dominated flow contains stationary vortices that breakdown near mid-chord. The most amplified vortex wavelength is forced by the use of artificial roughness elements near the leading edge. Two-component velocity and spanwise surface shear-stress correlation measurements are made at two constant chord locations, before and after transition. Streamwise surface shear stresses are also measured through the entire transition region. Correlation techniques are used to identify stationary structures in the laminar regime and coherent structures in the turbulent regime. Basic techniques include observation of the spatial correlations and the spatially distributed auto-spectra. The primary and secondary instability mechanisms are identified in the spectra in all measured fields. The primary mechanism is seen to grow, cause transition and produce large-scale turbulence. The secondary mechanism grows through the entire transition region and produces the small-scale turbulence. Advanced techniques use Linear Stochastic Estimation (LSE) and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) to identify the spatio-temporal evolutions of structures in the boundary layer. LSE is used to estimate the instantaneous velocity fields using temporal data from just two spatial locations and the spatial correlations. Reference locations are selected using maximum RMS values to provide the best available estimates. POD is used to objectively determine modes characteristic of the measured flow based on energy. The stationary vortices are identified in the first laminar modes of each velocity component and shear component. Experimental evidence suggests that neighboring vortices interact and produce large coherent structures with spanwise periodicity at double the stationary vortex wavelength. An objective transition region detection method is developed using streamwise spatial POD solutions which isolate the growth of the primary and secondary instability mechanisms in the first and second modes, respectively. Temporal evolutions of dominant POD modes in all measured fields are calculated. These scalar POD coefficients contain the integrated characteristics of the entire field, greatly reducing the amount of data to characterize the instantaneous field. These modes may then be used to train future flow control algorithms based on neural networks.

  3. Impact Wind Farms on the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, P.; Capps, S. B.; Huang, H. J.; Sun, F.; Badger, J.; Hahmann, A.

    2012-12-01

    We introduce a new, validated wind farm parametrization (Explicit Wake Parametrization, EWP) which is based on the assumption that the downstream propagation of a single turbine wake can be described by a turbulent diffusion process. Thus, the downstream velocity deficit distribution can be described explicitly. Additionally, it allows us to take into account turbine interactions, making it possible to determine the unresolved turbine hub height velocities. Both the EWP wind farm parametrization and the wind farm scheme available in the Weather Research & Forecasting Model (WRF) have been validated against in situ measurements from Horns Rev I (A large offshore wind farm consisting of 80 2MW turbines situated near the west coast of Denmark). The main quantities of interest are the thrust applied to the flow, a consequence of the energy extracted by the wind turbines which determines mainly the wind farm wake extension (around 50 km for Horns Rev I) and the vertical velocity deficit distribution. Results show that the thrust in the WRF-WF scheme is overestimated inside the wind farm. We noticed that the velocity deficit propagates from the first turbine-containing-grid-cell up to the boundary layer top, which is in contrast to the theoretical expected expansion (confirmed by turbulence resolving models and wind tunnel results). The vertical expansion of the velocity deficit is a consequence of the additional turbulence source term in the WRF-WF scheme. The EWP scheme estimates the total amount of thrust correctly and is also able to follow the reduced thrust downstream since it considers the turbine interaction. From the good agreement with the far wake measurement, we can conclude that the formulation of the sub grid scale vertical extension of the velocity deficit must be correct. We will present results from WRF simulations in which we analyze the atmospheric response within the wake of wind farms resulting from the energy extraction of wind turbines. We place hypotetical wind farms in offshore areas with good wind resources near California. The wind farm sizes are choosen to be comparable to present ones errected in the European North Sea. Of particular interest is the influence of wind farms on the persistent stratocumulus clouds of the California coastal region, the thermal stratification of the boundary layer and wind stress changes due to reduced wind speeds near the surface. Although no wind farms are presently constructed along the Californian coast, fast and steady wind speeds makes it an attractive region for future offshore wind farms, especially if the first floating turbines near the coast of Norway are proven to be a success.

  4. FOREWORD: International Conference on Planetary Boundary Layer and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djolov, G.; Esau, I.

    2010-05-01

    One of the greatest achievements of climate science has been the establisment of the concept of climate change on a multitude of time scales. The Earth's complex climate system does not allow a straightforward interpretation of dependences between the external parameter perturbation, internal stochastic system dynamics and the long-term system response. The latter is usually referred to as climate change in a narrow sense (IPCC, 2007). The focused international conference "Planetary Boundary Layers and Climate Change" has addressed only time scales and dynamical aspects of climate change with possible links to the turbulent processes in the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL). Although limited, the conference topic is by no means singular. One should clearly understand that the PBL is the layer where 99% of biosphere and human activity are concentrated. The PBL is the layer where the energy fluxes, which are followed by changes in cryosphere and other known feedbacks, are maximized. At the same time, the PBL processes are of a naturally small scale. What is the averaged long-term effect of the small-scale processes on the long-term climate dynamics? Can this effect be recognized in existing long-term paleo-climate data records? Can it be modeled? What is the current status of our theoretical understanding of this effect? What is the sensitivity of the climate model projections to the representation of small-scale processes? Are there significant indirect effects, e.g. through transport of chemical components, of the PBL processes on climate? These and other linked questions have been addressed during the conference. The Earth's climate has changed many times during the planet's history, with events ranging from ice ages to long periods of warmth. Historically, natural factors such as the amount of energy released from the Sun, volcanic eruptions and changes in the Earth's orbit have affected the Earth's climate. Beginning late in the 18th century, human activities associated with the Industrial Revolution such as the addition of greenhouse gases and aerosols has changed the composition of the atmosphere. These changes are likely to have influenced temperature, precipitation, storms and sea level (IPCC, 2007). However, these features of the climate also vary naturally, so determining what fraction of climate changes are due to natural variability versus human activities is challenging and not yet a solved problem. Africa is vulnerable to climate change as its ability to adaptat and mitigate is considerably dampened (IPCC, 2007). Climate change may impede a nations ability to achieve sustainable development and the Millennium Development Goals, and because of that Africa (particularly sub-tropical Africa) will experience increased levels of water stress and reduced agricultural yields of up to 50% by 2020. An example of the scale of the region's vulnerability was demonstrated during the last very dry year (1991/92) when 30% of the southern African population was put on food aid and more than one million people were displaced. Climate change in Africa is essentially dependent on our understanding of the PBL processes both due to the indispensible role of the atmospheric convection in the African climate and due to its tele-connections to other regions, e.g. the tropical Pacific and Indian monsoon regions. Although numerous publications attribute the observed changes to one or another modification of the convective patterns, further progress is impeded by imperfections of the small-scale process parameterizations in the models. The uncertainties include parameter uncertainties of known physical processes, which could be reduced through better observations/modelling, as well as uncertainties in our knowledge of physical processes themselves (or structural uncertainties), which could be reduced only through theoretical development and design of new, original observations/experiments (Oppenheimer et al., Science, 2007). Arguably, the structural uncertainties is hard to reduce and this could be one of the reasons determinin

  5. Detection properties of phase velocities with SPAC arrays including structural boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, H.; Asanuma, H.

    2013-12-01

    Microtremor survey method (MSM) is a technique to estimate subsurface velocity structures by inverting phase velocities of the surface waves in the microtremors. All the existing inversion techniques for the MSM have been deduced under an implicit assumption of horizontal velocity structure. Velocity structures in shallow sediment are, however, practically very inhomogeneous, and the assumption may not be suitable in many cases of the MSM applications. Therefore we have examined the behavior of estimated phase velocities with the SPAC technique when arrays intersect a structural boundary, because errors in velocity estimation in the MSM for inhomogeneous velocity cases have not been elucidated. An example of theoretical analysis is shown in Figs, where phase differences of two sensors which placed across a structural boundary have been analytically expressed and then the SPAC technique have been performed using complex coherence functions (Shiraishi et. al., 2006). Fig.1 shows the geometry of a SPAC array along with a velocity boundary. Here, we assumed different horizontal velocity model for right and left sides. Fig.2 shows estimated phase velocities for various locations of structural boundaries. This result shows that the estimated velocities gradually vary according to the location of boundaries and it seems that the phase velocities determined by the occupying rate of each structure along the length of the array. Therefore, in the case of the boundary placed inside the center of the array, the estimated velocities would be adopted intermediate value of the two different structures and the error is maximized. We have also examined these properties with three dimensional simulations and have confirmed similar features. Furthermore, we have examined some classifying measures of discontinuous structures within the array. We believe that these results will contribute to derive a new estimation technique for the MSM of covering discontinuous or gradient structures.

  6. Boundary layer flow past a stretching sheet with fluid-particle suspension and convective boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, G. K.; Gireesha, B. J.; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy

    2015-08-01

    The steady two-dimensional boundary layer flow of a viscous dusty fluid over a stretching sheet with the bottom surface of the sheet heated by convection from a hot fluid is considered. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into ordinary differential equations using a similarity transformation, before being solved numerically by a Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method (RKF45 Method) with the help of MAPLE. The effects of convective Biot number, fluid particle interaction parameter, and Prandtl number on the heat transfer characteristics are discussed. It is found that the temperature of both fluid and dust phase increases with increasing Biot number. A comparative study between the previous published and present results in a limiting sense is found in an excellent agreement.

  7. Boundary Layer Instabilities Generated by Freestream Laser Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Amanda; Schneider, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    A controlled, laser-generated, freestream perturbation was created in the freestream of the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel (BAM6QT). The freestream perturbation convected downstream in the Mach-6 wind tunnel to interact with a flared cone model. The geometry of the flared cone is a body of revolution bounded by a circular arc with a 3-meter radius. Fourteen PCB 132A31 pressure transducers were used to measure a wave packet generated in the cone boundary layer by the freestream perturbation. This wave packet grew large and became nonlinear before experiencing natural transition in quiet flow. Breakdown of this wave packet occurred when the amplitude of the pressure fluctuations was approximately 10% of the surface pressure for a nominally sharp nosetip. The initial amplitude of the second mode instability on the blunt flared cone is estimated to be on the order of 10 -6 times the freestream static pressure. The freestream laser-generated perturbation was positioned upstream of the model in three different configurations: on the centerline, offset from the centerline by 1.5 mm, and offset from the centerline by 3.0 mm. When the perturbation was offset from the centerline of a blunt flared cone, a larger wave packet was generated on the side toward which the perturbation was offset. The offset perturbation did not show as much of an effect on the wave packet on a sharp flared cone as it did on a blunt flared cone.

  8. Turbulent boundary layer flow under a sudden contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eloranta, H.; Saarenrinne, P.; Wei, T.

    2002-11-01

    Fluid dynamics plays an essential role in the paper manufacturing process. In this work, a complex turbulent flow taking place in the headbox slice of a modern papermaking machine is studied. A significant source of instabilities in the very last section of the headbox is the slice bar, which is attached to the upper wall of the slice exit. These instabilities are expected to affect the quality of produced paper sheet. The geometry of the headbox slice is simplified to a 2D-channel flow with one-sided forward facing step representing the slice bar. The experiments are carried out in a large-scale water tunnel in which the simplified headbox model is mounted. The forward-facing step generates an intense acceleration and streamline curvature as the flow passes by vertical blockage. The slice bar is also a source of streamwise vortices. These disturbances and their effect to the boundary layer on opposite wall is studied by examining both the time-mean statistics and instantaneous velocity fields measured by a DPIV-system. Experiments are conducted in all three orthogonal planes. Turbulence length-scales, spatial structure and intensities are of special interest. Also flow visualization is performed in the cross-stream (i.e. y-z) plane.

  9. High resolution properties of the marine atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, D.; Cottingame, W.; Eichinger, W.; Forman, P.; Lebeda, C.; Poling, D.; Thorton, R.

    1994-02-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) participated in the Central Equatorial Pacific Experiment (CEPEX) by fielding a water-vapor Raman lidar on board the Research Vessel Vickers. The lidar measured water vapor concentration from the surface to lower tropospheric altitudes in order to support the CEPEX goal of evaluating a hypothesis regarding feedback mechanisms for global circulation models. This report describes some of the features observed within the marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and the lower troposphere. Data was collected continuously 24 hours per day over the equatorial Pacific from March 8th to March 2 1st of 1993 while in route between Guadalcanal and Christmas Island (the transect was at approximately 2{degree} south latitude). The lidar collected vertical transects of water vapor concentration up to 10 km during night operations and 4 km in the day. The vertical lidar profiles of water vapor were produced by summing the data over a period up to 600 seconds. The water-vapor Raman lidar measured the properties of the marine ABL as well as the lower and mid-troposphere. From the lidar water vapor profiles, ``images`` of water vapor concentration versus altitude and date or sea surface temperature will be produced along with other products such as latent heat fluxes. The Raman water vapor lidar data will be used to better understand the role of transport and exchange at the ocean-atmosphere interface and throughout the marine atmosphere.

  10. Spatial and Temporal Scale Dependence of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klipp, Cheryl

    2011-11-01

    Turbulence affects wind turbine performance, often in ways that are not well understood. A better understanding of the atmospheric turbulence may help in understanding effects on the turbines. Analysis of atmospheric boundary layer turbulence needs to account for different scales of motion since turbulence occurs over a wide range of scales from dissipation scales to very large scale motion on the order of tens of kilometers. Using sonic anemometer data from the 60m tower from the CASES99 field experiment near Leon, KS, the variances and covariances are expressed as sums of the variances and covariances due to motions at a range of temporal scales through the use of a multiresolution decomposition. The temporal scales are converted to spatial scales by multiplying by the mean wind value. Turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) has the most energy in scales of motion about 600m at a location 50m agl. This peak is broad; the width at half max covers a range of turbulence scales from 20m to 2500m (1.5 sec - 3.5 min). Individual variances show peak energies at different scales; the vertical variance having peak energy at smaller scales than the TKE peak scales, and streamwise variances having peak energy at larger scales. Analysis of all three covariances shows that the assumption of 2D flow is not a good approximation for the 50m agl.

  11. Nonlinear Tollmien-Schlichting/vortex interaction in boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, P.; Smith, F. T.

    1988-01-01

    The nonlinear reaction between two oblique 3-D Tollmein-Schlichting (TS) waves and their induced streamwise-vortex flow is considered theoretically for an imcompressible boundary layer. The same theory applies to the destabilization of an incident vortex motion by subharmonic TS waves, followed by interaction. The scales and flow structure involved are addressed for high Reynolds numbers. The nonlionear interaction is powerful, starting at quite low amplitudes with a triple-deck structure for the TS waves but a large-scale structure for the induced vortex, after which strong nonlinear amplification occurs. This includes nonparallel-flow effects. The nonlinear interaction is governed by a partial differential system for the vortex flow coupled with an ordinary-differential one for the TS pressure. The solution properties found sometimes produce a breakup within a finite distance and sometimes further downstream, depending on the input amplitudes upstream and on the wave angles, and that then leads to the second stages of interaction associated with higher amplitudes, the main second stages giving either long-scale phenomena significantly affected by nonparallelism or shorter quasi-parallel ones governed by the full nonlinear triple-deck response.

  12. Nonlinear a Tollmien-Schlichting/vortex interaction in boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, P.; Smith, F. T.

    1989-01-01

    The nonlinear reaction between two oblique three-dimensional Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves and their induced streamwise-vortex flow is considered theoretically for an incompressible boundary layer. The same theory applies to the destabilization of an incident vortex motion by subharmonic TS waves, followed by interaction. The scales and flow structure involved are addressed for high Reynolds numbers. The nonlinear interaction is powerful, starting at quite low amplitudes with a triple-deck structure for the TS waves but a large-scale structure for the induced vortex, after which strong nonlinear amplification occurs. This includes nonparallel-flow effects. The nonlinear interaction is governed by a partial differential system for the vortex flow coupled with an ordinary-differential one for the TS pressure. The solution properties found sometimes produce a breakup within a finite distance and sometimes further downstream, depending on the input amplitudes upstream and on the wave angles, and that then leads to the second stages of interaction associated with higher amplitudes, the main second stages giving either long-scale phenomena significantly affected by nonparallelism or shorter quasi-parallel ones governed by the full nonlinear triple-deck response.

  13. Empirical refinements to boundary layer transition noise models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marboe, Richard C.; Lauchle, Gerald C.

    We have discussed two similar theoretical models for direct radiation from a transitioning boundary layer zone. When Ffowcs Williams suggested that a turbulent spot may yield 'intense sound radiation', he suggested that analysis was insufficient to resolve the growth mechanism and that empiricism was necessary. The predicted radiated noise levels due to the transition process are sensitive to several factors which will require such empirical description in order to practically use the models, whether applied to flow over a wall, around a body of revolution, or over an airfoil or hydrofoil. They include: the effect of the dynamics of the spot substructures identified by Sankaran et al. on the normal surface velocity, v(sub n); accurate displacement thickness rise time, t(sub i) and spatially-dependent normal velocity measurements; and effects of adverse pressure gradient including the possibility of laminar separation prior to transition. The radiated noise component magnitude can be added to the convective and low wavenumber contribution to find the wall pressure forcing spectrum as input to the fluid-structure interaction problems of interest.

  14. Lidar analysis techniques for use in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichinger, William E.; Cooper, Daniel I.; Hof, Doug; Holtkamp, David; Quick, Robert, Jr.; Tiee, Joe; Karl, Robert

    1992-01-01

    There is a growing body of observational and theoretical evidence which suggests that local climate characteristics are associated with variations in the earth's surface. The link between surface variability and local-scale processes must be made if we are to improve our understanding of the feedback mechanisms involved in surface-atmosphere dynamics. However, to understand these interactions, the surface-atmosphere interface must be studied as a large-scale spatial system. Lidars are ideal tools to study the spatial properties of the atmosphere. The described techniques were developed for use with the Los Alamos Water Raman-Lidar, but are applicable to many other types of lidar. The methodology of the analysis of lidar data is summarized in order to determine meteorological parameters in the atmospheric boundary layer. The techniques are not exhaustive but are intended to show the depth and breadth of the information which can be obtained from lidars. Two methods for the computation of water-vapor fluxes were developed. The first uses the fact that the water vapor concentration in the vertical direction follows a logarithmic profile when corrected for atmospheric stability. The second method involves using inertial dissipation techniques in which lidar-derived spatial and temporal power spectra are used to determine the flux.

  15. Three-dimensional boundary layer stability and transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.; Li, F.

    1992-01-01

    Nonparallel and nonlinear stability of a three-dimensional boundary layer, subject to crossflow instability, is investigated using parabolized stability equations (PSEs). Both traveling and stationary disturbances are considered and nonparallel effect on crossflow instability is found to be destabilizing. Our linear PSE results for stationary disturbances agree well with the results from direct solution of Navier-Stokes equations obtained by Spalart (1989). Nonlinear calculations have been carried out for stationary vortices and the computed wall vorticity pattern results in streamwise streaks which resemble remarkably well with the surface oil-flow visualizations in swept-wing experiments. Other features of the stationary vortex development (half-mushroom structure, inflected velocity profiles, vortex doubling, etc.) are also captured in our nonlinear calculations. Nonlinear interaction of the stationary amplitude of the stationary vortex is large as compared to the traveling mode, and the stationary vortex dominates most of the downstream development. When the two modes have the same initial amplitude, the traveling mode dominates the downstream development owing to its higher growth rate, and there is a tendency for the stationary mode to be suppressed. The effect of nonlinear wave development on the skin-friction coefficient is also computed.

  16. Ground-Based Lidar for Atmospheric Boundary Layer Ozone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Shi; Newchurch, Michael J.; Burris, John; Liu, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Ground-based lidars are suitable for long-term ozone monitoring as a complement to satellite and ozonesonde measurements. However, current ground-based lidars are unable to consistently measure ozone below 500 m above ground level (AGL) due to both engineering issues and high retrieval sensitivity to various measurement errors. In this paper, we present our instrument design, retrieval techniques, and preliminary results that focus on the high-temporal profiling of ozone within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) achieved by the addition of an inexpensive and compact mini-receiver to the previous system. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the lowest, consistently achievable observation height has been extended down to 125 m AGL for a ground-based ozone lidar system. Both the analysis and preliminary measurements demonstrate that this lidar measures ozone with a precision generally better than 10% at a temporal resolution of 10 min and a vertical resolution from 150 m at the bottom of the ABL to 550 m at the top. A measurement example from summertime shows that inhomogeneous ozone aloft was affected by both surface emissions and the evolution of ABL structures.

  17. Control of Supersonic Boundary Layers Using Steady Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2006-01-01

    Control of supersonic boundary layers using steady suction through a series of very small two-dimensional strips is numerically investigated at a free stream Mach number of 1.8. The mean flow induced by rows of suction holes is also computed. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using the 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variationdiminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. Computations for the two-dimensional cases are performed at suction coefficients 0.001 and 0.002 to investigate the stabilizing effects of suction. The simulation showed that a series of shock waves are generated at the slots. The stability results showed that the total amplification is reduced up to the end of the computational domain. However, the growth rates become larger at downstream distances away from the suction region. The computations for the suction holes showed the generation of Mach waves from each hole and the formation of longitudinal vortices.

  18. Recommendations for Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Kimmel, Roger; Reshotko, Eli

    2011-01-01

    Much has been learned about the physics underlying the transition process at supersonic and hypersonic speeds through years of analysis, experiment and computation. Generally, the application of this knowledge has been restricted to simple shapes like plates, cones and spherical bodies. However, flight reentry vehicles are in reality never simple. They typically are highly complex geometries flown at angle of attack so three-dimensional effects are very important, as are roughness effects due to surface features and/or ablation. This paper will review our present understanding of the physics of the transition process and look back at some of the recent flight test programs for their successes and failures. The goal of this paper is to develop rationale for new hypersonic boundary layer transition flight experiments. Motivations will be derived from both an inward look at what we believe constitutes a good flight test program as well as an outward review of the goals and objectives of some recent US based unclassified proposals and programs. As part of our recommendations, this paper will address the need for careful experimental work as per the guidelines enunciated years ago by the U.S. Transition Study Group. Following these guidelines is essential to obtaining reliable, usable data for allowing refinement of transition estimation techniques.

  19. Receptivity and Transition of Supersonic Boundary Layers Over Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam; King, Rudolph A.

    2010-01-01

    The receptivity, stability, and transition of three-dimensional supersonic boundary layers over (1) a swept cylinder, (2) a swept wing with a sharp leading edge, and (3) a swept wing with a blunt leading edge are numerically investigated for a free-stream Mach number of 3. These computations are compared to an earlier experimental and computational study performed by Archambaud et al.1 The steady flow fields with and without roughness elements are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations. The N-factors computed in this study at the transition onset locations reported in Ref. 1 for flow over the swept cylinder are approximately 16.5 for traveling crossflow disturbances and 9 for stationary disturbances. The N-factors for the traveling crossflow are high based on our past experiences. However, they are comparatively smaller than those reported by Archambaud et al., who found N-factor values in the range of 20 to 25 for traveling disturbances and 13 to 20 for stationary disturbances. Similarly, the N-factors computed in this study for the traveling and stationary disturbances for the flow over the sharp wing are approximately 7 and 2.5, respectively, and for the flow over the blunt wing are 6.5 and 4.8, respectively. Using the envelope method, Archambaud et al. obtained values of approximately 8.0 and 4.0 for the sharp wing case and 16.0 and 12.0 for the blunt wing case.

  20. Surface pressure fluctuations in hypersonic turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raman, K. R.

    1974-01-01

    The surface pressure fluctuations on a flat plate model at hypersonic Mach numbers of 5.2, 7.4 and 10.4 with an attached turbulent boundary layer were measured using flush mounted small piezoelectric sensors. A high frequency resolution of the pressure field was achieved using specially designed small piezoelectric sensors that had a good frequency response well above 300 KHz. The RMS pressures and non-dimensional energy spectra for all above Mach numbers are presented. The convective velocities, obtained from space time correlation considerations are equal to 0.7 U sub infinity. The results indicate the RMS pressures vary from 5 to 25 percent of the mean static pressures. The ratios of RMS pressure to dynamic pressure are less than the universally accepted subsonic value of 6 x 10/3. The ratio decreases in value as the Mach number or the dynamic pressure is increased. The ratio of RMS pressure to wall shear for Mach number 7.4 satisfies one smaller than or equal to p/tau sub w smaller than or equal to three.

  1. Urban atmospheric boundary layer height by aerosol lidar and ceilometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. H.; Park, M. S.; Park, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    The characteristics of urban atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) height on January, April, July and October 2014 using the gradient method by a ceilometer with a wavelength of 910 nm and an aerosol lidar with a wavelength of 532 and 1064 nm installed at two urban sites (Gwanghwamun and Jungnang) in Korea are analyzed. The Gwanghwamun site located at urban commercial area is 10 km apart from the Jungnang site located at urban residential area. The ABL height is determined by a height with a strong gradient of vertical backscatter intensity. It is found that the ABL height at both sites show a similar pattern and has a strong diurnal variation with a steep increase at 09-12 KST with a maximum in the late afternoon. And it is not determined clearly and the correlation between the ABL height by a ceilometer and that by an aerosol lidar is relatively low in case of high PM10 concentration such as Asian dust, haze and smog. Uncertainty of ABL height is also found to be strongly affected by the weather phenomena such as rain, haze or fog.

  2. Ion beams in the plasma sheet boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.; Runov, A.; Zhou, X.-Z.

    2015-09-01

    We explore characteristics of energetic particles in the plasma sheet boundary layer associated with dipolarization events, based on simulations and observations. The simulations use the electromagnetic fields of an MHD simulation of magnetotail reconnection and flow bursts as basis for test particle tracing. They are complemented by self-consistent fully electrodynamic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The test particle simulations confirm that crescent-shaped earthward flowing ion velocity distributions with strong perpendicular anisotropy can be generated as a consequence of near-tail reconnection, associated with earthward flows and propagating magnetic field dipolarization fronts. Both PIC and test particle simulations show that the ion distribution in the outflow region close to the reconnection site also consist of a beam superposed on an undisturbed population, which, however, does not show strong perpendicular anisotropy. This suggests that the crescent shape is created by quasi-adiabatic deformation from ion motion along the magnetic field toward higher field strength. The simulation results compare favorably with "Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms" observations.

  3. Optimal Disturbances in Boundary Layers Subject to Streamwise Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumin, Anatoli; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Laminar-turbulent transition in shear flows is still an enigma in the area of fluid mechanics. The conventional explanation of the phenomenon is based on the instability of the shear flow with respect to infinitesimal disturbances. The conventional hydrodynamic stability theory deals with the analysis of normal modes that might be unstable. The latter circumstance is accompanied by an exponential growth of the disturbances that might lead to laminar-turbulent transition. Nevertheless, in many cases, the transition scenario bypasses the exponential growth stage associated with the normal modes. This type of transition is called bypass transition. An understanding of the phenomenon has eluded us to this day. One possibility is that bypass transition is associated with so-called algebraic (non-modal) growth of disturbances in shear flows. In the present work, an analysis of the optimal disturbances/streamwise vortices associated with the transient growth mechanism is performed for boundary layers in the presence of a streamwise pressure gradient. The theory will provide the optimal spacing of the control elements in the spanwise direction and their placement in the streamwise direction.

  4. `Log-Chipper' Turbulence in the Convective Boundary Layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Shari J.; Wyngaard, John C.; Otte, Martin J.

    2002-03-01

    Turbulent fluctuations of a conservative scalar in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) can be generated by a scalar flux at the surface, a scalar flux of entrainment at the ABL top, and the `chewing up' of scalar variations on the mesoscale. The first two have been previously studied, while the third is examined in this paper through large-eddy simulation (LES). The LES results show that the scalar fluctuations due to the breakdown of mesoscale variations in advected conservative scalar fields, which the authors call the `log-chipper' component of scalar fluctuations, are uniformly distributed through the depth of the convective ABL, unlike the top-down and bottom-up components.A similarity function, similar to those for the top-down and bottom-up scalars, is derived for the log-chipper scalar variance in the convective ABL and used to compare the relative importance of these three processes for generating scalar fluctuations. Representative mesoscale gradients for water vapor mixing ratio and potential temperature are computed from airplane measurements over both land and water. In situations where the entrainment and surface fluxes are sufficiently small, or the ABL depth, turbulence intensity, or the mesoscale scalar gradient is sufficiently large, the variance of the log-chipper scalar fluctuations in mid-ABL can be of the order of the variance of top-down and bottom-up scalars.

  5. Evidence of reactive iodine chemistry in the Arctic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Anoop S.; Shaw, Marvin; Oetjen, Hilke; Hornsby, Karen E.; Carpenter, Lucy J.; Kaleschke, Lars; Tian-Kunze, Xiangshan; Lee, James D.; Moller, Sarah J.; Edwards, Peter; Commane, Roisin; Ingham, Trevor; Heard, Dwayne E.; Plane, John M. C.

    2010-10-01

    Although it has recently been established that iodine plays an important role in the atmospheric chemistry of coastal Antarctica, where it occurs at levels which cause significant ozone (O3) depletion and changes in the atmospheric oxidising capacity, iodine oxides have not previously been observed conclusively in the Arctic boundary layer (BL). This paper describes differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) observations of iodine monoxide (IO), along with gas chromatographic measurements of iodocarbons, in the sub-Arctic environment at Kuujjuarapik, Hudson Bay, Canada. Episodes of elevated levels of IO (up to 3.4 ± 1.2 ppt) accompanied by a variety of iodocarbons were observed. Air mass back trajectories show that the observed iodine compounds originate from open water polynyas that form in the sea ice on Hudson Bay. A combination of long-path DOAS and multiaxis DOAS observations suggested that the IO is limited to about 100 m in height. The observations are interpreted using a one-dimensional model, which indicates that the iodocarbon sources from these exposed waters can account for the observed concentrations of IO. These levels of IO deplete O3 at rates comparable to bromine oxide (BrO) and, more importantly, strongly enhance the effect of bromine-catalyzed O3 depletion in the Arctic BL, an effect which has not been quantitatively considered hitherto. However, the measurements and modeling results indicate that the effects of iodine chemistry are on a much more localized scale than bromine chemistry in the Arctic environment.

  6. Changes in the turbulent boundary layer structure associated with net drag reduction by outer layer manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, N.; Falco, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    A specially designed wind tunnel was used to examine the effects of tandemly arranged parallel plate manipulators (TAPPMs) on a turbulent boundary-layer structure and the associated drag. Momentum balances, as well as measurements of the local shear stress from the velocity gradient near the wall, were used to obtain the net drag and local skin friction changes. Two TAPPMs, identical except for the thickness of their plates, were used in the study. Results with .003 inch plates were a maximum net drag reduction of 10 percent at 58 beta sub o (using a momentum balance). At 20 beta sub o, simultaneous laser sheet flow visualization and hot-wire anemometry data showed that the Reynolds stress in the large eddies was significantly reduced, as were the streamwise and normal velocity components. Using space-time correlations the reductions were again identified. Furthermore, quantitative flow visualization showed that the outward normal velocity of the inner region was also significantly decreased in the region around 20 beta sub o. However, throughout the first 130 beta sub o, the measured sublayer thickness with the TAPPMs in place was 15 to 20 percent greater. The data showed that the skin friction, as well as the structure of the turbulence, was strongly modified in the first 35 beta sub o, but that they both significantly relaxed toward unmanipulated boundary layer values by 50 beta sub o.

  7. POTTY ET AL. Simulation of Boundary Layer Structure over the Indian Summer Monsoon Trough

    E-print Network

    Raman, Sethu

    POTTY ET AL. Simulation of Boundary Layer Structure over the Indian Summer Monsoon Trough during The planetary boundary layer (PBL) structure over the Indian summer monsoon trough region has been simulated using a regional numerical model during the passage of a monsoon depression along the monsoon trough

  8. Modeling stratified wave and current bottom boundary layers on the continental shelf

    E-print Network

    Modeling stratified wave and current bottom boundary layers on the continental shelf Richard Styles Brunswick, New Jersey Abstract. The Glenn and Grant [1987] continental shelf bottom boundary layer model acquired during storms on the inner continental shelf. Comparisons between the stratified and neutral

  9. Control and reduction of unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolling, David S.; Barter, John W.

    1995-01-01

    The focus was on developing means of controlling and reducing unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions. Section 1 describes how vortex generators can be used to effectively reduce loads in compression ramp interaction, while Section 2 focuses on the effects of 'boundary-layer separators' on the same interaction.

  10. High Weissenberg number boundary layer structures for UCM J.D. Evans #

    E-print Network

    Bath, University of

    High Weissenberg number boundary layer structures for UCM fluids J.D. Evans # Department for the upper convected Maxwell (UCM) model. One is a single layer structure previously noted by Renardy [7 the main dominant balances that occur for the UCM equations near solid boundaries. For each structure

  11. An Experimental Investigation of the Confluent Boundary Layer on a High L ift System*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Thomas, F. O.; Nelson, R. C.

    1996-11-01

    The flow field physics associated with commercial high lift systems is exceeding ly complex and includes numerous viscous dominated effects for which our present understanding is extremely limited. In this study the results of a detailed exp erimental investigation of the interaction between a turbulent boundary layer an d wake from an upstream body, the so-called "confluent boundary layer", is prese nted. In particular, this work focuses upon the confluent boundary layer generat ed by the merging of the leading edge slat wake and main element boundary layer of a multi-element airfoil. The confluent boundary layer development occurs und er geometric and pressure gradient conditions relevant to commercial high lift s ystems. The turbulence structure of the confluent boundary layer in terms of mea n flow, normal and Reynolds stresses, turbulence production, etc. is investigate d by means of LDV surveys. The nature of the confluent layer and integrated lift are both found to be very sensitive to the position of the slat (in terms of ga p and overhang) relative to the main element. From measurement of both weak and strong wake/boundary layer interactions, the role of the confluent boundary laye r structure on lift generation is clearly documented. *Supported under NASA Ames NAG2-905.S2

  12. One-dimensional simulation of temperature and moisture in atmospheric and soil boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornstein, R. D.; Santhanam, K.

    1981-01-01

    Meteorologists are interested in modeling the vertical flow of heat and moisture through the soil in order to better simulate the vertical and temporal variations of the atmospheric boundary layer. The one dimensional planetary boundary layer model of is modified by the addition of transport equations to be solved by a finite difference technique to predict soil moisture.

  13. Turbulence structure and polymer drag reduction in adverse pressure gradient boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskie, John E.; Tiederman, William G.

    1991-12-01

    The ability of some solutions of long chain polymers to greatly reduce the pressure drop in pipes is well documented and commercially applied. In addition, a number of experiments indicate that large reductions of wall friction are possible by injecting polymer into a boundary layer. Therefore, it is reasonable to expect that drag reducing polymers could significantly improve the performance of submersibles when introduced into the boundary layers on the fore and sides of the vessel. However, once polymer is injected at these locations it is unlikely to leave the boundary layer because these polymers have very low mass diffusivities in water and boundary layers continually entrain fluid rather than eject it. As a result, one can expect that drag reducing polymers will be present in the adverse pressure gradient boundary layers on the aft of a vessel whenever the frictional drag on the fore and sides is reduced with polymers. Direct measurements of adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers in which drag reducing polymers are present are not available. However, at fixed speeds, the net drag on a propeller hydrofoil increases while lift decreases when submerged in polymer solution. This apparent increase in form drag suggests a sudden increase in the displacement thickness of the boundary layers which may indicate separation. Therefore, it is necessary to establish whether conditions exist under which turbulent boundary layers of polymer solutions will not separate when they encounter adverse pressure gradients.

  14. ANGULAR MOMENTUM TRANSPORT BY ACOUSTIC MODES GENERATED IN THE BOUNDARY LAYER. I. HYDRODYNAMICAL THEORY AND SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Stone, James M.

    2013-06-10

    The nature of angular momentum transport in the boundary layers of accretion disks has been one of the central and long-standing issues of accretion disk theory. In this work we demonstrate that acoustic waves excited by supersonic shear in the boundary layer serve as an efficient mechanism of mass, momentum, and energy transport at the interface between the disk and the accreting object. We develop the theory of angular momentum transport by acoustic modes in the boundary layer, and support our findings with three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, using an isothermal equation of state. Our first major result is the identification of three types of global modes in the boundary layer. We derive dispersion relations for each of these modes that accurately capture the pattern speeds observed in simulations to within a few percent. Second, we show that angular momentum transport in the boundary layer is intrinsically nonlocal, and is driven by radiation of angular momentum away from the boundary layer into both the star and the disk. The picture of angular momentum transport in the boundary layer by waves that can travel large distances before dissipating and redistributing angular momentum and energy to the disk and star is incompatible with the conventional notion of local transport by turbulent stresses. Our results have important implications for semianalytical models that describe the spectral emission from boundary layers.

  15. The boundary layers as the primary transport regions of the earth's magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.; Huang, C. Y.

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of ISEE and IMP LEPEDEA plasma measurements in the earth's magnetotail reveals that the magnetospheric boundary layer and the plasma sheet boundary layer are the primary transport regions there. These plasma measurements also reveal various components of the plasma sheet, including the central plasma sheet and plasma sheet boundary layer. A significant new result reported here is that of cold- and hot-plasma components that are spatially co-present within the central plasma sheet. Such plasma components cannot be explained merely by temporal variations in spectra involving the entire plasma sheet. Contributions to a low temperature component of the plasma sheet enter directly from the boundary layer located along the magnetotail flanks. Field-aligned flows predominate within the plasma sheet boundary layer which is almost always present and is located near the high- and low-latitude border of the plasma sheet. The plasma sheet boundary layer comprises highly anisotropic ion distributions, including counter-streaming ion beams, that evolve into the hot, isotropic component of the plasma sheet. Tailward acceleration regions generate these ion beams with plasma input from the magnetospheric boundary layer. Antisunward-flowing ion beams, at E/q less than 1 kV and of ionospheric composition, are frequently observed in the plasma sheet boundary layer and in tail lobes. These ion beams are likely accelerated at low altitude over the polar cap and especially along auroral field lines.

  16. Project EARTH-15-WH1: Trace element cycling in the ocean's bottom boundary layer

    E-print Network

    Henderson, Gideon

    Project EARTH-15-WH1: Trace element cycling in the ocean's bottom boundary layer Supervisors: Dr Will Homoky, Prof. Gideon Henderson (Earth Sciences) The entire ocean floor is overlain by a bottom boundary layer of seawater that hosts dynamic properties[1] , able to moderate the release and uptake of elements

  17. A fast, uncoupled, compressible, two-dimensional, unsteady boundary layer algorithm with separation for engine inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Robert L.; Nelson, Chris; Sakowski, Barbara; Darling, Douglas; Vandewall, Allan G.

    1992-01-01

    A finite difference boundary layer algorithm was developed to model viscous effects when an inviscid core flow solution is given. This algorithm solved each boundary layer equation separately, then iterated to find a solution. Solving the boundary layer equations sequentially was 2.4 to 4.0 times faster than solving the boundary layer equations simultaneously. This algorithm used a modified Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, a weighted average of forward and backward differencing of the pressure gradient, and a backward sweep of the pressure. With these modifications, the boundary layer algorithm was able to model flows with and without separation. The number of grid points used in the boundary layer algorithm affected the stability of the algorithm as well as the accuracy of the predictions of friction coefficients and momentum thicknesses. Results of this boundary layer algorithm compared well with experimental observations of friction coefficients and momentum thicknesses. In addition, when used interactively with an inviscid flow algorithm, this boundary layer algorithm corrected for viscous effects to give a good match with experimental observations for pressures in a supersonic inlet.

  18. A fast, uncoupled, compressible, two-dimensional, unsteady boundary layer algorithm with separation for engine inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Robert L.; Nelson, Chris; Sakowski, Barbara; Darling, Douglas; Van De Wall, Allan G.

    1992-01-01

    A finite difference boundary layer algorithm was developed to model viscous effects when an inviscid core flow solution is given. This algorithm solved each boundary layer equation separately, then iterated to find a solution. Solving the boundary layer equations sequentially was 2.4 to 4.0 times faster than solving the boundary layer equations simultaneously. This algorithm used a modified Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, a weighted average of forward and backward differencing of the pressure gradient, and a backward sweep of the pressure. With these modifications, the boundary layer algorithm was able to model flows with and without separation. The number of grid points used in the boundary layer algorithm affected the stability of the algorithm affected the stability of the algorithm as well as the accuracy of the predictions of friction coefficients and momentum thicknesses. Results of this boundary layer algorithm compared well with experimental observations of friction coefficients and momentum thicknesses. In addition, when used interactively with an inviscid flow algorithm, this boundary layer algorithm corrected for viscous effects to give a good match with experimental observations for pressures in a supersonic inlet.

  19. Boundary Layer Energy Transport and Cumulus Development over a Heated Mountain: An Observational Study

    E-print Network

    Geerts, Bart

    Boundary Layer Energy Transport and Cumulus Development over a Heated Mountain: An Observational an isolated, heated mountain are presented. The data were collected around the Santa Catalina Mountains congestus to cumulonimbus development over the mountain. Flights in the boundary layer around the mountain

  20. Drizzle in Stratiform Boundary Layer Clouds. Part II: Microphysical Aspects Met Office, Exeter, Devon, United Kingdom

    E-print Network

    Wood, Robert

    lead to a reduction in autoconversion rate of between 2 and 4. Radar reflectivity­precipitation rate (ZDrizzle in Stratiform Boundary Layer Clouds. Part II: Microphysical Aspects R. WOOD Met Office This is the second of two observational papers examining drizzle in stratiform boundary layer clouds. Part I details

  1. The seasonal cycle of planetary boundary layer depth determined using COSMIC radio occultation data

    E-print Network

    Wood, Robert

    The seasonal cycle of planetary boundary layer depth determined using COSMIC radio occultation data; published 21 November 2013. [1] The seasonal cycle of planetary boundary layer (PBL) depth is examined depths and their seasonal cycles compare favorably with selected radiosonde-derived estimates at tropical

  2. Shooting method for solution of boundary-layer flows with massive blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, T.-M.; Nachtsheim, P. R.

    1973-01-01

    A modified, bidirectional shooting method is presented for solving boundary-layer equations under conditions of massive blowing. Unlike the conventional shooting method, which is unstable when the blowing rate increases, the proposed method avoids the unstable direction and is capable of solving complex boundary-layer problems involving mass and energy balance on the surface.

  3. Mean inversion strength of the convective boundary layer over the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Alan K.

    1989-01-01

    The present consideration of an equilibrium energy budget for the oceanic convective boundary layer indicates that the mean inversion strength in balance with a radiatively driven subsidence is of the order of 9 K, in keeping with the widely-observed value most recently reported by Kuo and Schubert (1988). Calculations are presented for the convective boundary layer's potential temperature budget.

  4. XXII ICTAM, 2529 August 2008, Adelaide, Australia A COMPARISON OF INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS

    E-print Network

    Marusic, Ivan

    that the width of the large-scale structures in internal geometries are larger than those in boundary layers (by This paper details a preliminary comparison between streamwise velocity fluctuations in turbulent channel flow and in zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate turbulent boundary layers. The unique facilities

  5. Detection and Tracking of Coherent Features in a Mach 4 Turbulent Boundary Layer

    E-print Network

    Interrante, Victoria

    Detection and Tracking of Coherent Features in a Mach 4 Turbulent Boundary Layer Ivan Marusic in a turbulent compressible boundary layer is considered. Several vortex identification methods are evaluated of simulation In this paper, we present a preliminary investigation of a large DNS dataset of a Mach 4 turbulent

  6. Computation of the shock-wave boundary layer interaction with flow separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardonceau, P.; Alziary, T.; Aymer, D.

    1980-01-01

    The boundary layer concept is used to describe the flow near the wall. The external flow is approximated by a pressure displacement relationship (tangent wedge in linearized supersonic flow). The boundary layer equations are solved in finite difference form and the question of the presence and unicity of the solution is considered for the direct problem (assumed pressure) or converse problem (assumed displacement thickness, friction ratio). The coupling algorithm presented implicitly processes the downstream boundary condition necessary to correctly define the interacting boundary layer problem. The algorithm uses a Newton linearization technique to provide a fast convergence.

  7. The Interactions of a Flame and Its Self-Induced Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, James D.; Oran, Elaine S.; Anderson, John D.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of a laminar flame with its self-generated boundary layer in a rectangular channel was numerically simulated using the two-dimensional, reacting, Navier-Stokes equations. A two species chemistry model was implemented which simulates the stoichiometric reaction of acetylene and air. Calculations were performed to investigate the effects of altering the boundary condition of the wall temperature, the Lewis number, the dynamic viscosity, and the ignition method. The purpose of this study was to examine the fundamental physics of the formation of the boundary layer and the interaction of the flame as it propagates into the boundary layer that its own motion has created.

  8. Mean velocity and turbulence measurements in a 90 deg curved duct with thin inlet boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, R. A.; Peters, C. E.; Steinhoff, J.; Hornkohl, J. O.; Nourinejad, J.; Ramachandran, K.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental database established by this investigation of the flow in a large rectangular turning duct is of benchmark quality. The experimental Reynolds numbers, Deans numbers and boundary layer characteristics are significantly different from previous benchmark curved-duct experimental parameters. This investigation extends the experimental database to higher Reynolds number and thinner entrance boundary layers. The 5% to 10% thick boundary layers, based on duct half-width, results in a large region of near-potential flow in the duct core surrounded by developing boundary layers with large crossflows. The turbulent entrance boundary layer case at R sub ed = 328,000 provides an incompressible flowfield which approaches real turbine blade cascade characteristics. The results of this investigation provide a challenging benchmark database for computational fluid dynamics code development.

  9. Discussion of Boundary-Layer Characteristics Near the Wall of an Axial-Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mager, Artur; Mohoney, John J; Budinger, Ray E

    1952-01-01

    The boundary-layer velocity profiles in the tip region of an axial-flow compressor downstream of the guide vanes and downstream of the rotor were measured by use of total-pressure and claw-type yaw probes. These velocities were resolved into two components: one along the streamline of the flow outside the boundary layer, and the other perpendicular to it. The affinity among all profiles was thus demonstrated with the boundary-layer thickness and the deflection of the boundary layer at the wall as the generalizing parameters. By use of these results and the momentum-integral equations, boundary-layer characteristics on the walls of an axial-flow compressor were qualitatively evaluated.

  10. A method for calculating turbulent boundary layers and losses in the flow channels of turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Lawrence F.

    1987-01-01

    An interactive inviscid core flow-boundary layer method is presented for the calculation of turbomachine channel flows. For this method, a one-dimensional inviscid core flow is assumed. The end-wall and blade surface boundary layers are calculated using an integral entrainment method. The boundary layers are assumed to be collateral and thus are two-dimensional. The boundary layer equations are written in a streamline coordinate system. The streamwise velocity profiles are approximated by power law profiles. Compressibility is accounted for in the streamwise direction but not in the normal direction. Equations are derived for the special cases of conical and two-dimensional rectangular diffusers. For these cases, the assumptions of a one-dimensional core flow and collateral boundary layers are valid. Results using the method are compared with experiment and good quantitative agreement is obtained.

  11. Interaction of solar wind with the magnetopause-boundary layer and generation of magnetic impulse events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Wei, C. Q.

    1993-01-01

    The transport of mass, momentum, energy and waves from the solar wind to the Earth's magnetosphere takes place in the magnetopause-boundary layer region. Various plasma processes that may occur in this region have been proposed and studied. In this paper, we present a brief review of the plasma processes in the dayside magnetopause-boundary layer. These processes include (1) flux transfer events at the dayside magnetopause, (2) formation of plasma vortices in the low-latitude boundary layer by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and coupling to the polar ionosphere, (3) the response of the magnetopause to the solar wind dynamic pressure pulses, and (4) the impulsive penetration of solar wind plasma filaments through the dayside magnetopause into the magnetospheric boundary layer. Through the coupling of the magnetopause-boundary layer to the polar ionosphere, those above processes may lead to occurrence of magnetic impulse events observed in the high-latitude stations.

  12. Turbulence measurements in axisymmetric supersonic boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gootzait, E.; Childs, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    Mean flow and turbulence measurements are presented for adiabatic compressible turbulent boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients. The gradients were induced on the wall of an axially symmetric wind tunnel by contoured centerbodies mounted on the wind tunnel centerline. The boundary layer turbulence downstream of a boundary layer bleed section in a zero pressure gradient was also examined. The measurements were obtained using a constant temperature hot-wire anemometer. The adverse pressure gradients were found to significantly alter the turbulence properties of the boundary layer. With flow through the bleed holes there was a measureable decrease in the rms longitudinal velocity fluctuations near the wall and the turbulent shear stress in the boundary layer was reduced.

  13. Unsteady boundary-layer transition in flow periodically disturbed by wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, U. . Thermal Turbomachinery Dept.)

    1993-10-01

    Boundary layers on turbomachinery blades develop in a flow that is periodically disturbed by the wakes of upstream blade cascades. These wakes have a significant effect upon laminar-turbulent boundary-layer transition. In order to study these effects, detailed velocity measurements using hot-wire probes were performed within the boundary-layer of a plate in flow periodically disturbed by wakes produced by bars moving transversely to the flow. The measurements were evaluated using the ensemble-averaging technique. The results show how the wake disturbance enters the boundary-layer and leads to a turbulent patch, which grows and is carried downstream. In favorable pressure gradients, transition due to wake turbulence occurred much earlier than predicted by linear stability theory. Between two wakes, laminar becalmed regions were observed far beyond the point at which the undisturbed boundary-layer was already turbulent.

  14. On the Improvement of Satellite Temperature Retrievals by Means of Boundary Layer Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, R.

    1985-01-01

    The improvement of the accuracy of the satellite temperature retrievals close to the Earth's surface by boundary layer models was determined. The simplest type of boundary layer models that only consider time changes in the mean boundary layer quantities such as equivalent potential temperature and specific humidity, but neglect the details of the turbulent structure in the interior of the layer were used. They can be run with relatively few externally specified parameters: surface wind speed and divergence rate. Model verifications studies show that under certain conditions the mean atmospheric structure can be simulated very well.

  15. The boundary layer as a means of controlling the flow of liquids and gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrenk, Oskar

    1930-01-01

    According to one of the main propositions of the boundary layer theory the scarcely noticeable boundary layer may, under certain conditions, have a decisive influence on the form of the external flow by causing it to separate from the wing surface. These phenomena are known to be caused by a kind of stagnation of the boundary layer at the point of separation. The present report deals with similar phenomena. It is important to note that usually the cause (external interference) directly affects only the layer close to the wall, while its indirect effect extends to a large portion of the external flow.

  16. The dynamics of the plasmasphere boundary layer as determined by ground magnetometers, satellite observations, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zesta, E.; Boudouridis, A.; Yizengaw, E.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Carranza-fulmer, T. L.; Moldwin, M.; Mann, I. R.; Chi, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    The plasmasphere boundary layer (PBL) separates the cold and dense plasmaspheric plasma from the more tenuous and hot plasma sheet plasma and organizes the spatial distribution of ULF and VLF waves that can contribute to acceleration or loss processes of radiation belt particles through wave-particle interactions. The PBL has been traditionally determined by in situ observations and can be given by empirical models. Recent work has shown that a mid-latitude chain of well-spaced ground magnetometers can also determine the PBL location. Spectral properties, like the cross-phase reversal in the standard field-line resonance (FLR) determination between two stations closely aligned in latitude, have been shown to indicate the presence of a sharp PBL. We merge data from many ground magnetometer pairs from the SAMBA (South American Meridional B-field Array), McMAC (Mid continent Magnetoseismic Chain), and CARISMA (Canadian Array for Realtime Investigations of Magnetic Activity) chains to provide the best available spatial coverage in L values spanning the plasmasphere and PBL, for a range of dynamic states (L=1.6 to greater than 5). The PBL location is identified as the L value of the station pair for which a reverse phase difference is observed in the standard FLR determination. We compare the FLR determined PBL with the trough boundary determined by GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) analysis and with model PBL. Initial results demonstrate that the PBL as identified by the reverse phase differences is in general agreement with TEC identifications and reasonable agreement with models. Reverse Phase Differences are regularly observed at the L range of 2.7 to 3.7 and are highly correlated with Dst and Kp, as determined by daily correlations. We further examine the more detailed time sequence of the PBL dynamics by focusing on key periods around storms preceded by quiet periods, and by using the full L range of the ground magnetometer pairs.

  17. The benthic boundary layer under fully-nonlinear internal solitary waves of depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuncheng; Redekopp, Larry

    2010-11-01

    Long internal waves are common features on the continental shelf and in lakes, but their dissipation via benthic boundary layer drag is largely unknown, particularly when the wave amplitudes are large and boundary layer corrections based on linear theory are clearly invalid. In general, the wave-induced boundary layer experiences a continuous favorable-to-adverse variation of the pressure gradient, undergoes transition, may reach a strongly turbulent state, and frequently separates near the point of maximum adverse pressure gradient in the lee of the wave. In this study a model for fully-nonlinear solitary waves of depression in a two-layer stratification is employed as the inviscid base state, and a RANS solver with k-? turbulence model is used to compute the stationary boundary layer under the wave. Local friction coefficients and eddy viscosities are computed in the footprint of the wave. Locations of boundary layer separation are computed as well as the integrated frictional drag over the region of attached boundary layer flow. Boundary layer characteristics are presented for a range of environmental conditions, Reynolds numbers, and surface roughness in an attempt to provide a quantitative measure of the frictional drag of long internal waves in realistic, shallow environs.

  18. Speed and Direction Shear in the Stable Nocturnal Boundary Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K.; Weiss, C. C.; Swift, A. H. P.; Chapman, J.; Kelley, N. D.

    2009-02-01

    Numerous previous works have shown that vertical shear in wind speed and wind direction exist in the atmospheric boundary layer. In this work, meteorological forcing mechanisms, such as the Ekman spiral, thermal wind, and inertial oscillation, are discussed as likely drivers of such shears in the statically stable environment. Since the inertial oscillation, the Ekman spiral, and statically stable conditions are independent of geography, potentially significant magnitudes of speed and direction shear are hypothesized to occur to some extent at any inland site in the world. The frequency of occurrence of non-trivial magnitudes of speed and direction shear are analyzed from observation platforms in Lubbock, Texas and Goodland, Indiana. On average, the correlation between speed and direction shear magnitudes and static atmospheric stability are found to be very high. Moreover, large magnitude speed and direction shears are observed in conditions with relatively high hub-height wind speeds. The effects of speed and direction shear on wind turbine power performance are tested by incorporating a simple steady direction shear profile into the fatigue analysis structures and turbulence simulation code from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. In general, the effect on turbine power production varies with the magnitude of speed and direction shear across the turbine rotor, with the majority of simulated conditions exhibiting power loss relative to a zero shear baseline. When coupled with observational data, the observed power gain is calculated to be as great as 0.5% and depletion as great as 3% relative to a no shear baseline. The average annual power change at Lubbock is estimated to be -0.5%

  19. Iodine Monoxide in the Antarctic Marine Boundary Layer: Recent Discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friess, Udo; Zielcke, Johannes; Pöhler, Denis; Nasse, Jan-Marcus; Platt, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Iodine monoxide (IO) is thought to play an important role in the chemistry of the Antarctic marine boundary layer (MBL). Produced either by organic precursors or by inorganic processes, large areas of enhanced IO were detected by satellite not only around the coast of Antarctica, but also over the continent far from the coastal source regions. In the past, several active and passive remote sensing measurements at coastal stations confirmed the presence of IO, which is expected to have a significant impact on the oxidative capacity and the ozone budget in the MBL. We present a summary of recent findings regarding IO in the Antarctic MBL, with a focus on two measurement campaigns conducted at the German Research Station Neumayer (70°S, 8°W), the New Zealand Station Scott Base (177°E, 78°S) and in the marginal sea ice zone of the Wedell Sea onboard the German research vessel Polarstern in austral summer 2011, spring 2012, and winter/spring 2013, respectively. During all three campaigns, IO was measured using a combination of active and passive DOAS remote sensing instruments, including a newly developed mobile open-path cavity-enhanced DOAS instrument. Satellite measurements indicate that the area around Scott Base in the Ross Sea, but also the marginal sea ice zone, are subject to particularly high levels of IO. However, in contrast to previous ground-based and satellite borne observations, we find surprisingly low IO concentrations at Neumayer, Scott Base and in the marginal sea ice zone, with IO being below the detection limit (< 0.5 ppt) of the active DOAS instruments at all times. This raises the question to what extent IO is of importance for the chemistry of the Antarctic MBL.

  20. Wave mediated angular momentum transport in astrophysical boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertfelder, Marius; Kley, Wilhelm

    2015-07-01

    Context. Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized stars leads to the formation of a boundary layer (BL) where the gas loses its excess kinetic energy and settles onto the star. There are still many open questions concerning the BL, for instance the transport of angular momentum (AM) or the vertical structure. Aims: It is the aim of this work to investigate the AM transport in the BL where the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) is not operating owing to the increasing angular velocity ?(r) with radius. We will therefore search for an appropriate mechanism and examine its efficiency and implications. Methods: We perform 2D numerical hydrodynamical simulations in a cylindrical coordinate system (r,?) for a thin, vertically integrated accretion disk around a young star. We employ a realistic equation of state and include both cooling from the disk surfaces and radiation transport in radial and azimuthal direction. The viscosity in the disk is treated by the ?-model; in the BL there is no viscosity term included. Results: We find that our setup is unstable to the sonic instability which sets in shortly after the simulations have been started. Acoustic waves are generated and traverse the domain, developing weak shocks in the vicinity of the BL. Furthermore, the system undergoes recurrent outbursts where the activity in the disk increases strongly. The instability and the waves do not die out for over 2000 orbits. Conclusions: There is indeed a purely hydrodynamical mechanism that enables AM transport in the BL. It is efficient and wave mediated; however, this renders it a non-local transport method, which means that models of a effective local viscosity like the ?-viscosity are probably not applicable in the BL. A variety of further implications of the non-local AM transport are discussed.