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Sample records for array photoacoustic tomographic

  1. Array-based photoacoustic spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Autrey, S. Thomas; Posakony, Gerald J.; Chen, Yu

    2005-03-22

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous or sequential, rapid analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. A photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array including a body having at least three recesses or affinity masses connected thereto is used in conjunction with a photoacoustic spectroscopy system. At least one acoustic detector is positioned near the recesses or affinity masses for detection of acoustic waves emitted from species of interest within the recesses or affinity masses.

  2. Photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessels and photoacoustic spectroscopy methods for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Amonette, James E.; Autrey, S. Thomas; Foster-Mills, Nancy S.

    2006-02-14

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous or sequential, rapid analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. Particularly, a photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel including a vessel body having multiple sample cells connected thereto is disclosed. At least one acoustic detector is acoustically positioned near the sample cells. Methods for analyzing the multiple samples in the sample array vessels using photoacoustic spectroscopy are provided.

  3. Photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel and photoacoustic spectroscopy method for using the same

    DOEpatents

    Amonette, James E.; Autrey, S. Thomas; Foster-Mills, Nancy S.; Green, David

    2005-03-29

    Methods and apparatus for analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. Particularly, a photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array vessel including a vessel body having multiple sample cells connected thereto is disclosed. At least one acoustic detector is acoustically coupled with the vessel body. Methods for analyzing the multiple samples in the sample array vessels using photoacoustic spectroscopy are provided.

  4. Spin scan tomographic array-based imager.

    PubMed

    Hovland, Harald

    2014-12-29

    This work presents a novel imaging device based on tomographic reconstruction. Similar in certain aspects to the earlier presented tomographic scanning (TOSCA) principle, it provides several important enhancements. The device described generates a stream of one-dimensional projections from a linear array of thin stripe detectors onto which the (circular) image of the scene is rotated. A two-dimensional image is then reproduced from the one-dimensional signals using tomographic processing techniques. A demonstrator is presented. Various aspects of the design and construction are discussed, and resulting images and movies are presented. PMID:25607168

  5. Photoacoustic Imaging of Animals with an Annular Transducer Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Di-Wu; Zhou, Zhi-Bin; Zeng, Lv-Ming; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Xing-Hui

    2014-07-01

    A photoacoustic system with an annular transducer array is presented for rapid, high-resolution photoacoustic tomography of animals. An eight-channel data acquisition system is applied to capture the photoacoustic signals by using multiplexing and the total time of data acquisition and transferring is within 3 s. A limited-view filtered back projection algorithm is used to reconstruct the photoacoustic images. Experiments are performed on a mouse head and a rabbit head and clear photoacoustic images are obtained. The experimental results demonstrate that this imaging system holds the potential for imaging the human brain.

  6. Tomographical imaging using uniformly redundant arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, T. M.; Fenimore, E. E.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the behavior of two types of uniformly redundant array (URA) when used for close-up imaging. One URA pattern is a quadratic residue array whose characteristics for imaging planar sources have been simulated by Fenimore and Cannon (1978), while the second is based on m sequences that have been simulated by Gunson and Polychronopulos (1976) and by MacWilliams and Sloan (1976). Close-up imaging is necessary in order to obtain depth information for tomographical purposes. The properties of the two URA patterns are compared with a random array of equal open area. The goal considered in the investigation is to determine if a URA pattern exists which has the desirable defocus properties of the random array while maintaining artifact-free image properties for in-focus objects.

  7. Impact of inhomogeneous optical scattering coefficient distribution on recovery of optical absorption coefficient maps using tomographic photoacoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoqi; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-02-01

    We present a study through extensive simulation that considers the impact of inhomogeneous optical scattering coefficient distribution on recovery of optical absorption coefficient maps using tomographic photoacoustic data collected from media mimicking breast tissue. We found that while the impact of scattering heterogeneities/targets is modest on photoacoustic recovery of optical absorption coefficients, the impact of scattering contrast caused by adipose tissue, a layer of normal tissue along the boundary of the breast, is dramatic on reconstruction of optical absorption coefficients using photoacoustic data—up to 25.8% relative error in recovering the absorption coefficient is estimated in such cases. To overcome this problem, we propose a new method to enhance photoacoustic recovery of the optical absorption coefficient in heterogeneous media by considering inhomogeneous scattering coefficient distribution provided by diffuse optical tomography (DOT). Results from extensive simulations show that photoacoustic recovery of absorption coefficient maps can be improved considerably with a priori scattering information from DOT.

  8. Thin polymer etalon arrays for high-resolution photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yang; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Ashkenazi, Shai; Witte, Russell; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Thin polymer etalons are demonstrated as high-frequency ultrasound sensors for three-dimensional (3-D) high-resolution photoacoustic imaging. The etalon, a Fabry-Perot optical resonator, consists of a thin polymer slab sandwiched between two gold layers. It is probed with a scanning continuous-wave (CW) laser for ultrasound array detection. Detection bandwidth of a 20-μm-diam array element exceeds 50 MHz, and the ultrasound sensitivity is comparable to polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) equivalents of similar size. In a typical photoacoustic imaging setup, a pulsed laser beam illuminates the imaging target, where optical energy is absorbed and acoustic waves are generated through the thermoelastic effect. An ultrasound detection array is formed by scanning the probing laser beam on the etalon surface in either a 1-D or a 2-D configuration, which produces 2-D or 3-D images, respectively. Axial and lateral resolutions have been demonstrated to be better than 20 μm. Detailed characterizations of the optical and acoustical properties of the etalon, as well as photoacoustic imaging results, suggest that thin polymer etalon arrays can be used as ultrasound detectors for 3-D high-resolution photoacoustic imaging applications. PMID:19123679

  9. Small-animal whole-body imaging using a photoacoustic full ring array system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun; Guo, Zijian; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    In this report, we present a novel 3D photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system for small-animal whole-body imaging. The PACT system, based on a 512-element full-ring transducer array, received photoacoustic signals primarily from a 2-mm-thick slice. The light was generated by a pulse laser, and can either illuminate from the top or be reshaped to illuminate the sample from the side, using a conical lens and an optical condenser. The PACT system was capable of acquiring an in-plane image in 1.6 s; by scanning the sample in the elevational direction, a 3D tomographic image could be constructed. We tested the system by imaging a cylindrical phantom made of human hairs immersed in a scattering medium. The reconstructed image achieved an in-plane resolution of 0.1 mm and an elevational resolution of 1 mm. After deconvolution in the elevational direction, the 3D image was found to match well with the phantom. The system was also used to image a baby mouse in situ; the spinal cord and ribs can be seen easily in the reconstructed image. Our results demonstrate that the PACT system has the potential to be used for fast small-animal whole-body tomographic imaging.

  10. Photoacoustic emission from Au nanoparticles arrayed on thermal insulation layer.

    PubMed

    Namura, Kyoko; Suzuki, Motofumi; Nakajima, Kaoru; Kimura, Kenji

    2013-04-01

    Efficient photoacoustic emission from Au nanoparticles on a porous SiO(2) layer was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The Au nanoparticle arrays/porous SiO(2)/SiO(2)/Ag mirror sandwiches, namely, local plasmon resonators, were prepared by dynamic oblique deposition (DOD). Photoacoustic measurements were performed on the local plasmon resonators, whose optical absorption was varied from 0.03 (3%) to 0.95 by varying the thickness of the dielectric SiO(2) layer. The sample with high absorption (0.95) emitted a sound that was eight times stronger than that emitted by graphite (0.94) and three times stronger than that emitted by the sample without the porous SiO(2) layer (0.93). The contribution of the porous SiO(2) layer to the efficient photoacoustic emission was analyzed by means of a numerical method based on a one-dimensional heat transfer model. The result suggested that the low thermal conductivity of the underlying porous layer reduces the amount of heat escaping from the substrate and contributes to the efficient photoacoustic emission from Au nanoparticle arrays. Because both the thermal conductivity and the spatial distribution of the heat generation can be controlled by DOD, the local plasmon resonators produced by DOD are suitable for the spatio-temporal modulation of the local temperature. PMID:23571958

  11. Deep Tissue Photoacoustic Imaging Using a Miniaturized 2-D Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducer Array

    PubMed Central

    Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Ma, Te-Jen; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Oralkan, Ömer

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate 3-D photoacoustic imaging (PAI) of light absorbing objects embedded as deep as 5 cm inside strong optically scattering phantoms using a miniaturized (4 mm × 4 mm × 500 µm), 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array of 16 × 16 elements with a center frequency of 5.5 MHz. Two-dimensional tomographic images and 3-D volumetric images of the objects placed at different depths are presented. In addition, we studied the sensitivity of CMUT-based PAI to the concentration of indocyanine green dye at 5 cm depth inside the phantom. Under optimized experimental conditions, the objects at 5 cm depth can be imaged with SNR of about 35 dB and a spatial resolution of approximately 500 µm. Results demonstrate that CMUTs with integrated front-end amplifier circuits are an attractive choice for achieving relatively high depth sensitivity for PAI. PMID:22249594

  12. Interferometric array layout design by tomographic projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Villiers, M.

    2007-07-01

    Context: This study pertains to the optimization of the layout of a single configuration interferometric array to achieve a desired natural tapering for the density distribution of its UV plane coverage. Existing techniques that seek this goal determine a two dimensional density gradient that acts on the UV samples and in turn on the antenna positions. This gradient is commonly computed by gridding the UV plane, and is sometimes averaged over a number of different scales due to the sparseness of the UV samples. Aims: The goal of this study is to demonstrate a new method that can move antenna positions to achieve an ideal density distribution for the UV samples without the need for gridding. Methods: An approach is described where the UV samples are projected into a one dimensional vector. If an equivalent projection is done for an ideal model distribution, the difference between these vectors yields correction terms which can be mapped to new antenna positions. Such modifications are made in all directions until a close match is achieved to the desired UV plane coverage and equivalently, by the Fourier transform, the ideal point spread function. Results: Results are provided that relate achievable resolution (for Gaussian UV coverage) to the number of antennas available to the algorithm, for a few different observation modes. Preliminary layouts are shown for the Square Kilometer Array pathfinder project, the Karoo Array Telescope. Conclusions: The proposed method is applicable to very few as well as a large number of antennas. Multiple objective optimization is not considered.

  13. Tomographic image reconstruction using systolic array algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, S.G.; DeGroot, A.J.; Schneberk, D.J.; Brase, J.M.; Martz, H.E.; Jain, A.K.; Current, K.W.; Hurst, P.J.

    1988-12-22

    Image reconstruction for Computed Tomography (CT) is a time consuming operation on current uniprocessor computers and even on array processors. This is particularly true for three-dimensional data sets or for limited-data reconstructions requiring iterative procedures. In these cases, the projection operation (Radon transform) and its inverse (filtered back-projection) are major computational tasks that are performed many times. Multiprocessor computers, especially in systolic array configurations, can provide dramatic improvements in reconstruction times at reasonable costs. An in-house systolic processor, called SPRINT, has been programmed to demonstrate these improved speeds while achieving near 100% efficiency of all processor elements. We report on these results in this paper. In addition, two proposed hardware implementations of a new architecture are shown to have even greater speedup possibilities. One, using standard DSP chips, has been simulated to give a factor of three improvement over SPRINT, while the other, using custom VLSI that is now in the early stages of design, could potentially perform 512/sup 2/ reconstructions at video rates (100 times further speedup). These processors are also interconnected in a systolic array configuration. Experimental and projected results, with future plans, are also reported in this paper. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Three-dimensional endoscopic photoacoustic imaging based on multielement linear transducer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yi; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2011-09-01

    An implementation system of three-dimensional endoscopic photoacoustic imaging is presented. The developed endoscopic photoacoustic detector integrates a multielement linear transducer array, a reflective device, a Plexiglass tube, and ultrasonic coupling medium. To match with the acoustic impendence of Plexiglass tube, a glycerin solution with 45% volume percentage was used as the ultrasonic coupling medium. This ultrasonic coupling medium can decrease photoacoustic pressure transmission loss during the progress of photoacoustic signal propagation. The capability of the system for three-dimensional imaging was verified with chicken breast tissue. Furthermore, pig normal rectal tissue and mouse breast tumor tissue in an ex vivo cavity model were imaged by the system. The reconstructed three-dimensional photoacoustic image presented the structural information of normal and lesion tissue. The experimental results demonstrate the multielement-based endoscopic photoacoustic imaging system with inside-out laser exciting mode has the ability of reconstructing three-dimensional images of biology tissue.

  15. Photoacoustic-guided ultrasound therapy with a dual-mode ultrasound array.

    PubMed

    Prost, Amaury; Funke, Arik; Tanter, Mickaël; Aubry, Jean-François; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustics has recently been proposed as a potential method to guide and/or monitor therapy based on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). We experimentally demonstrate the creation of a HIFU lesion at the location of an optical absorber, by use of photoacoustic signals emitted by the absorber detected on a dual mode transducer array. To do so, a dedicated ultrasound array intended to both detect photoacoustic waves and emit HIFU with the same elements was used. Such a dual-mode array provides automatically coregistered reference frames for photoacoustic detection and HIFU emission, a highly desired feature for methods involving guidance or monitoring of HIFU by use of photoacoustics. The prototype is first characterized in terms of both photoacoustic and HIFU performances. The probe is then used to perform an idealized scenario of photoacoustic-guided therapy, where photoacoustic signals generated by an absorbing thread embedded in a piece of chicken breast are used to automatically refocus a HIFU beam with a time-reversal mirror and necrose the tissue at the location of the absorber. PMID:22734735

  16. Photoacoustic-guided ultrasound therapy with a dual-mode ultrasound array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prost, Amaury; Funke, Arik; Tanter, Mickaël; Aubry, Jean-François; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustics has recently been proposed as a potential method to guide and/or monitor therapy based on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). We experimentally demonstrate the creation of a HIFU lesion at the location of an optical absorber, by use of photoacoustic signals emitted by the absorber detected on a dual mode transducer array. To do so, a dedicated ultrasound array intended to both detect photoacoustic waves and emit HIFU with the same elements was used. Such a dual-mode array provides automatically coregistered reference frames for photoacoustic detection and HIFU emission, a highly desired feature for methods involving guidance or monitoring of HIFU by use of photoacoustics. The prototype is first characterized in terms of both photoacoustic and HIFU performances. The probe is then used to perform an idealized scenario of photoacoustic-guided therapy, where photoacoustic signals generated by an absorbing thread embedded in a piece of chicken breast are used to automatically refocus a HIFU beam with a time-reversal mirror and necrose the tissue at the location of the absorber.

  17. Three-dimensional endoscopic photoacoustic imaging based on multi-element linear transducer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yi; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    An implementation system of three-dimensional endoscopic photoacoustic imaging is presented. The developed endoscopic photoacoustic detector integrates a multielement linear transducer array, a reflective device, a Plexiglass tube and ultrasonic coupling medium. To match with the acoustic impendence of Plexiglass tube, a glycerin solution with 45% volume percentage was used as the ultrasonic coupling medium. This ultrasonic coupling medium can decrease photoacoustic pressure transmission loss during the progress of photoacoustic signal propagation. The capability of the system for three-dimensional imaging was verified with chicken breast tissue. The experimental results demonstrate the multielement-based endoscopic photoacoustic imaging system with inside-out laser exciting mode has the ability of reconstructing three-dimensional images of biology tissue.

  18. Three-dimensional endoscopic photoacoustic imaging based on multi-element linear transducer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yi; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2011-11-01

    An implementation system of three-dimensional endoscopic photoacoustic imaging is presented. The developed endoscopic photoacoustic detector integrates a multielement linear transducer array, a reflective device, a Plexiglass tube and ultrasonic coupling medium. To match with the acoustic impendence of Plexiglass tube, a glycerin solution with 45% volume percentage was used as the ultrasonic coupling medium. This ultrasonic coupling medium can decrease photoacoustic pressure transmission loss during the progress of photoacoustic signal propagation. The capability of the system for three-dimensional imaging was verified with chicken breast tissue. The experimental results demonstrate the multielement-based endoscopic photoacoustic imaging system with inside-out laser exciting mode has the ability of reconstructing three-dimensional images of biology tissue.

  19. Attempts to increase penetration of photoacoustic system using LED array light souce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agano, Toshitaka; Sato, Naoto; Nakatsuka, Hitoshi; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Hanaoka, Takamitsu; Morisono, Koji; Shigeta, Yusuke

    2015-03-01

    When we consider the needle visualization in the field of point of care by utilizing the photoacoustic imaging system, and using the conventional solid state laser light source, the issue arises such as device size and not a green system due to the high power consumption. Therefore, we aimed at an environmentally friendly and compact system with low power consumption by using a NIR-LED array light source. The intensity of NIR-LED light is weak, but, by averaging photoacoustic signals with multiple pulse, we have improved S/N of the photoacoustic signal. As a result, we've achieved penetration depth of 30mm.

  20. Investigation of a diffuse optical measurements-assisted quantitative photoacoustic tomographic method in reflection geometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Kumavor, Patrick D; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustic tomography provides the distribution of absorbed optical energy density, which is the product of optical absorption coefficient and optical fluence distribution. We report the experimental investigation of a novel fitting procedure that quantitatively determines the optical absorption coefficient of chromophores. The experimental setup consisted of a hybrid system of a 64-channel photoacoustic imaging system with a frequency-domain diffused optical measurement system. The fitting procedure included a complete photoacoustic forward model and an analytical solution of a target chromophore using the diffusion approximation. The fitting procedure combines the information from the photoacoustic image and the background information from the diffuse optical measurements to minimize the photoacoustic measurements and forward model data and recover the target absorption coefficient quantitatively. 1-cm-cube phantom absorbers of high and low contrasts were imaged at depths of up to 3.0 cm. The fitted absorption coefficient results were at least 80% of their true values. The sensitivities of this fitting procedure to target location, target radius, and background optical properties were also investigated. We found that this fitting procedure was most sensitive to the accurate determination of the target radius and depth. Blood sample in a thin tube of radius 0.58 mm, simulating a blood vessel, was also studied. The photoacoustic images and fitted absorption coefficients are presented. These results demonstrate the clinical potential of this fitting procedure to quantitatively characterize small lesions in breast imaging. PMID:22734743

  1. Investigation of a diffuse optical measurements-assisted quantitative photoacoustic tomographic method in reflection geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chen; Kumavor, Patrick D.; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustic tomography provides the distribution of absorbed optical energy density, which is the product of optical absorption coefficient and optical fluence distribution. We report the experimental investigation of a novel fitting procedure that quantitatively determines the optical absorption coefficient of chromophores. The experimental setup consisted of a hybrid system of a 64-channel photoacoustic imaging system with a frequency-domain diffused optical measurement system. The fitting procedure included a complete photoacoustic forward model and an analytical solution of a target chromophore using the diffusion approximation. The fitting procedure combines the information from the photoacoustic image and the background information from the diffuse optical measurements to minimize the photoacoustic measurements and forward model data and recover the target absorption coefficient quantitatively. 1-cm-cube phantom absorbers of high and low contrasts were imaged at depths of up to 3.0 cm. The fitted absorption coefficient results were at least 80% of their true values. The sensitivities of this fitting procedure to target location, target radius, and background optical properties were also investigated. We found that this fitting procedure was most sensitive to the accurate determination of the target radius and depth. Blood sample in a thin tube of radius 0.58 mm, simulating a blood vessel, was also studied. The photoacoustic images and fitted absorption coefficients are presented. These results demonstrate the clinical potential of this fitting procedure to quantitatively characterize small lesions in breast imaging.

  2. Guided Wave Annular Array Sensor Design for Improved Tomographic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koduru, Jaya Prakash; Rose, Joseph L.

    2009-03-01

    Guided wave tomography for structural health monitoring is fast emerging as a reliable tool for the detection and monitoring of hotspots in a structure, for any defects arising from corrosion, crack growth etc. To date guided wave tomography has been successfully tested on aircraft wings, pipes, pipe elbows, and weld joints. Structures practically deployed are subjected to harsh environments like exposure to rain, changes in temperature and humidity. A reliable tomography system should take into account these environmental factors to avoid false alarms. The lack of mode control with piezoceramic disk sensors makes it very sensitive to traces of water leading to false alarms. In this study we explore the design of annular array sensors to provide mode control for improved structural tomography, in particular, addressing the false alarm potential of water loading. Clearly defined actuation lines in the phase velocity dispersion curve space are calculated. A dominant in-plane displacement point is found to provide a solution to the water loading problem. The improvement in the tomographic images with the annular array sensors in the presence of water traces is clearly illustrated with a series of experiments. An annular array design philosophy for other problems in NDE/SHM is also discussed.

  3. Handheld array-based photoacoustic probe for guiding needle biopsy of sentinel lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Erpelding, Todd N.; Maslov, Konstantin; Jankovic, Ladislav; Akers, Walter J.; Song, Liang; Achilefu, Samuel; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Pashley, Michael D.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-07-01

    By modifying a clinical ultrasound array system, we develop a novel handheld photoacoustic probe for image-guided needle biopsy. The integration of optical fiber bundles for pulsed laser light delivery enables photoacoustic image-guided insertion of a needle into rat axillary lymph nodes with accumulated indocyanine green (ICG). Strong photoacoustic contrast of the needle is achieved. After subcutaneous injection of the dye in the left forepaw, sentinel lymph nodes are easily detected, in vivo and in real time, beneath 2-cm-thick chicken breast overlaying the axillary region. ICG uptake in axillary lymph nodes is confirmed with fluorescence imaging both in vivo and ex vivo. These results demonstrate the clinical potential of this handheld photoacoustic system for facile identification and needle biopsy of sentinel lymph nodes for cancer staging and metastasis detection in humans.

  4. Real-time clinically oriented array-based in vivo combined photoacoustic and power Doppler imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Tyler; Jeffery, Dean; Wiebe, Edward; Zemp, Roger J.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has great potential for identifying vascular regions for clinical imaging. In addition to assessing angiogenesis in cancers, there are many other disease processes that result in increased vascularity that present novel targets for photoacoustic imaging. Doppler imaging can provide good localization of large vessels, but poor imaging of small or low flow speed vessels and is susceptible to motion artifacts. Photoacoustic imaging can provide visualization of small vessels, but due to the filtering effects of ultrasound transducers, only shows the edges of large vessels. Thus, we have combined photoacoustic imaging with ultrasound power Doppler to provide contrast agent- free vascular imaging. We use a research-oriented ultrasound array system to provide interlaced ultrasound, Doppler, and photoacoustic imaging. This system features realtime display of all three modalities with adjustable persistence, rejection, and compression. For ease of use in a clinical setting, display of each mode can be disabled. We verify the ability of this system to identify vessels with varying flow speeds using receiver operating characteristic curves, and find that as flow speed falls, photoacoustic imaging becomes a much better method for identifying blood vessels. We also present several in vivo images of the thyroid and several synovial joints to assess the practicality of this imaging for clinical applications.

  5. A photoacoustic imaging system employing a curved-phased ultrasonic array and parallel electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurudis, Anastasios; Huang, Fei; Guo, Puyun; Yan, Shikui; Castillo, Diego; Wang, Lihong V.; Zhu, Quing

    2006-02-01

    Real-time photoacoustic imaging requires ultrasonic array receivers and parallel data acquisition systems for the simultaneous detection of weak photoacoustic signals. In this paper, we introduce a newly completed ultrasonic receiving array system and report preliminary results of our measured point spread function. The system employs a curved ultrasonic phased array consisting of 128-elements, which span a quarter of a complete circle. The center frequency of the array is 5 MHz and the bandwidth is greater than 60%. In order to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio for photoacoustic signal detection, we utilized special designs for the analog front-end electronics. First, the 128 transducer-element signals were routed out using a 50-Ohm impedance matching PCB board to sustain signal integrity. We also utilize 128 low-noise pre-amplifiers, connected directly to the ultrasonic transducer, to amplify the weak photoacoustic signals before they were multiplexed to a variable-gain multi-stage amplifier chain. All front-end circuits were placed close to the transducer array to minimize signal lose due to cables and therefore improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Sixteen analog-to-digital converters were used to sample signals at a rate of 40 mega-samples per second with a resolution of 10-bits per sample. This allows us to perform a complete electronic scan of all 128 elements using just eight laser pulses.

  6. In vivo three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging based on a clinical matrix array ultrasound probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Erpelding, Todd N.; Jankovic, Ladislav; Guo, Zijian; Robert, Jean-Luc; David, Guillaume; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-06-01

    We present an integrated photoacoustic and ultrasonic three-dimensional (3-D) volumetric imaging system based on a two-dimensional (2-D) matrix array ultrasound probe. A wavelength-tunable dye laser pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser serves as the light source and a modified commercial ultrasound imaging system (iU22, Philips Healthcare) with a 2-D array transducer (X7-2, Philips Healthcare) detects both the pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustic signals. A multichannel data acquisition system acquires the RF channel data. The imaging system enables rendering of co-registered 3-D ultrasound and photoacoustic images without mechanical scanning. The resolution along the azimuth, elevation, and axial direction are measured to be 0.69, 0.90 and 0.84 mm for photoacoustic imaging. In vivo 3-D photoacoustic mapping of the sentinel lymph node was demonstrated in a rat model using methylene blue dye. These results highlight the clinical potential of 3-D PA imaging for identification of sentinel lymph nodes for cancer staging in humans.

  7. In vivo three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging based on a clinical matrix array ultrasound probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Erpelding, Todd N; Jankovic, Ladislav; Guo, Zijian; Robert, Jean-Luc; David, Guillaume; Wang, Lihong V

    2012-06-01

    We present an integrated photoacoustic and ultrasonic three-dimensional (3-D) volumetric imaging system based on a two-dimensional (2-D) matrix array ultrasound probe. A wavelength-tunable dye laser pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser serves as the light source and a modified commercial ultrasound imaging system (iU22, Philips Healthcare) with a 2-D array transducer (X7-2, Philips Healthcare) detects both the pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustic signals. A multichannel data acquisition system acquires the RF channel data. The imaging system enables rendering of co-registered 3-D ultrasound and photoacoustic images without mechanical scanning. The resolution along the azimuth, elevation, and axial direction are measured to be 0.69, 0.90 and 0.84 mm for photoacoustic imaging. In vivo 3-D photoacoustic mapping of the sentinel lymph node was demonstrated in a rat model using methylene blue dye. These results highlight the clinical potential of 3-D PA imaging for identification of sentinel lymph nodes for cancer staging in humans. PMID:22734738

  8. In vivo imaging of inducible tyrosinase gene expression with an ultrasound array-based photoacoustic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Tyler; Paproski, Robert J.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-02-01

    Tyrosinase, a key enzyme in the production of melanin, has shown promise as a reporter of genetic activity. While green fluorescent protein has been used extensively in this capacity, it is limited in its ability to provide information deep in tissue at a reasonable resolution. As melanin is a strong absorber of light, it is possible to image gene expression using tyrosinase with photoacoustic imaging technologies, resulting in excellent resolutions at multiple-centimeter depths. While our previous work has focused on creating and imaging MCF-7 cells with doxycycline-controlled tyrosinase expression, we have now established the viability of these cells in a murine model. Using an array-based photoacoustic imaging system with 5 MHz center frequency, we capture interleaved ultrasound and photoacoustic images of tyrosinase-expressing MCF-7 tumors both in a tissue mimicking phantom, and in vivo. Images of both the tyrosinase-expressing tumor and a control tumor are presented as both coregistered ultrasound-photoacoustic B-scan images and 3-dimensional photoacoustic volumes created by mechanically scanning the transducer. We find that the tyrosinase-expressing tumor is visible with a signal level 12dB greater than that of the control tumor in vivo. Phantom studies with excised tumors show that the tyrosinase-expressing tumor is visible at depths in excess of 2cm, and have suggested that our imaging system is sensitive to a transfection rate of less than 1%.

  9. High frame rate photoacoustic imaging using multiple wave-length LED array light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agano, Toshitaka; Sato, Naoto; Nakatsuka, Hitoshi; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Hanaoka, Takamitsu; Morisono, Koji; Shigeta, Yusuke; Tanaka, Chizuyo

    2016-03-01

    We have successfully imaged photoacoustic differences of light absorbance between two images acquired by different wave-length LED array light source. Compared to photoacoustic imaging system using conventional solid-state laser light source, LED light source can be driven at higher frequency pulses, so we were able to get the subtraction image at higher frame rate that calculated from two images which were captured at each wave-length LED light pulse timing. We developed LED array light source which is composed to have two different wave-length chips, so each wave-length light pulse can be controlled and emitted freely. Thus LED array light source can be composed as multiple selectable wavelength more than two, and a various combination of subtraction image may become available at high frame rate.

  10. A photoacoustic imager with light illumination through an infrared-transparent silicon CMUT array.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingkuang; Wang, Mengli; Cheng, Jui-Ching; Wang, Yu-Hsin; Li, Pai-Chi; Cheng, Xiaoyang

    2012-04-01

    A novel hardware design and preliminary experimental results for photoacoustic imaging are reported in this paper. This imaging system makes use of an infrared-transparent capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) chip for ultrasound reception and illuminates the image target through the CMUT array. The cascaded arrangement between the light source and transducer array allows for a more compact imager head and results in more uniform illumination. Taking advantage of the low optical absorption coefficient of silicon in the near infrared spectrum as well as the broad acoustic bandwidth that CMUTs provide, an infrared-transparent CMUT array has been developed for ultrasound reception. The center frequency of the polysilicon-membrane CMUT devices used in this photoacoustic system is 3.5 MHz, with a fractional bandwidth of 118% in reception mode. The silicon substrate of the CMUT array has been thinned to 100 μm and an antireflection dielectric layer is coated on the back side to improve the infrared-transmission rate. Initial results show that the transmission rate of a 1.06-μm Nd:Yag laser through this CMUT chip is 12%. This transmission rate can be improved if the thickness of silicon substrate and the thin-film dielectrics in the CMUT structure are properly tailored. Imaging of a metal wire phantom using this cascaded photoacoustic imager is demonstrated. PMID:22547287

  11. Isotropic-resolution linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography through inverse Radon transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Xia, Jun; Li, Lei; Wang, Lidai; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Linear transducer arrays are readily available for ultrasonic detection in photoacoustic computed tomography. They offer low cost, hand-held convenience, and conventional ultrasonic imaging. However, the elevational resolution of linear transducer arrays, which is usually determined by the weak focus of the cylindrical acoustic lens, is about one order of magnitude worse than the in-plane axial and lateral spatial resolutions. Therefore, conventional linear scanning along the elevational direction cannot provide high-quality three-dimensional photoacoustic images due to the anisotropic spatial resolutions. Here we propose an innovative method to achieve isotropic resolutions for three-dimensional photoacoustic images through combined linear and rotational scanning. In each scan step, we first elevationally scan the linear transducer array, and then rotate the linear transducer array along its center in small steps, and scan again until 180 degrees have been covered. To reconstruct isotropic three-dimensional images from the multiple-directional scanning dataset, we use the standard inverse Radon transform originating from X-ray CT. We acquired a three-dimensional microsphere phantom image through the inverse Radon transform method and compared it with a single-elevational-scan three-dimensional image. The comparison shows that our method improves the elevational resolution by up to one order of magnitude, approaching the in-plane lateral-direction resolution. In vivo rat images were also acquired.

  12. Coherent-weighted three-dimensional image reconstruction in linear-array-based photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Depeng; Wang, Yuehang; Zhou, Yang; Lovell, Jonathan F; Xia, Jun

    2016-05-01

    While the majority of photoacoustic imaging systems used custom-made transducer arrays, commercially-available linear transducer arrays hold the benefits of affordable price, handheld convenience and wide clinical recognition. They are not widely used in photoacoustic imaging primarily because of the poor elevation resolution. Here, without modifying the imaging geometry and system, we propose addressing this limitation purely through image reconstruction. Our approach is based on the integration of two advanced image reconstruction techniques: focal-line-based three-dimensional image reconstruction and coherent weighting. We first numerically validated our approach through simulation and then experimentally tested it in phantom and in vivo. Both simulation and experimental results proved that the method can significantly improve the elevation resolution (up to 4 times in our experiment) and enhance object contrast. PMID:27231634

  13. Coherent-weighted three-dimensional image reconstruction in linear-array-based photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Depeng; Wang, Yuehang; Zhou, Yang; Lovell, Jonathan F.; Xia, Jun

    2016-01-01

    While the majority of photoacoustic imaging systems used custom-made transducer arrays, commercially-available linear transducer arrays hold the benefits of affordable price, handheld convenience and wide clinical recognition. They are not widely used in photoacoustic imaging primarily because of the poor elevation resolution. Here, without modifying the imaging geometry and system, we propose addressing this limitation purely through image reconstruction. Our approach is based on the integration of two advanced image reconstruction techniques: focal-line-based three-dimensional image reconstruction and coherent weighting. We first numerically validated our approach through simulation and then experimentally tested it in phantom and in vivo. Both simulation and experimental results proved that the method can significantly improve the elevation resolution (up to 4 times in our experiment) and enhance object contrast. PMID:27231634

  14. Photoacoustic imaging of brachytherapy seeds using a channel-domain ultrasound array system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-03-01

    Brachytherapy is a technique commonly used in the treatment of prostate cancer that relies on the precise placement of small radioactive seeds near the tumor location. The advantage of this technique over traditional radiation therapies is that treatment can be continuous and uniform, resulting in fewer clinic visits and a shorter treatment duration. Two important phases of this treatment are needle guidance for implantation, and post-placement verification for dosimetry. Ultrasound is a common imaging modality used for these purposes, but it can be difficult to distinguish the seeds from surrounding tissues, often requiring other imaging techniques such as MRI or CT. Photoacoustic imaging may offer a viable alternative. Using a photoacoustic system based on an L7- 4 array transducer and a realtime ultrasound array system capable of parallel channel data acquisition streamed to a multi-core computer via PCI-express, we have demonstrated imaging of these seeds at an ultrasound depth of 16 mm and laser penetration depths ranging up to 50 mm in chicken tissue with multiple optical wavelengths. Ultrasound and photoacoustic images are coregistered via an interlaced pulse sequence. Two laser pulses are used to form a photoacoustic image, and at these depths, the brachytherapy seeds are detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of over 26dB. To obtain this result, 1064nm light was used with a fluence of 100mJ/cm2, the ANSI limit for human skin exposure at this wavelength. This study demonstrates the potential for photoacoustic imaging as a candidate technology for brachytherapy seed placement guidance and verification.

  15. Multiview Hilbert transformation for full-view photoacoustic computed tomography using a linear array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Li, Lei; Zhu, Liren; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-06-01

    Due to their low cost, hand-held convenience, wide selection of bandwidths, and ultrasound imaging capability, linear ultrasonic transducer arrays have been widely studied for photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT). As linear-array PACT suffers from a limited view, full-view imaging requires either the transducer or the object to be rotated. So far, both the central frequencies and bandwidth of linear transducer arrays applied in full-view PACT are low, limiting the spatial resolutions of the reconstructed images. Here, we present a multiview high-frequency PACT imaging system implemented with a commercial 40-MHz central frequency linear transducer array. By rotating the object through multiple angles with respect to the linear transducer array, we acquired full-view photoacoustic pressure measurements. Further, to quantify the unipolar initial pressures and overcome the limitations of the single-view Hilbert transformation, we developed a multiview Hilbert transformation method. The in-plane spatial resolution of this full-view linear-array PACT was quantified to be isotropically 60 μm within a 10×10 mm2 field of view. The system was demonstrated by imaging both a leaf skeleton and a zebrafish in vivo.

  16. Multiview Hilbert transformation for full-view photoacoustic computed tomography using a linear array

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo; Li, Lei; Zhu, Liren; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Due to their low cost, hand-held convenience, wide selection of bandwidths, and ultrasound imaging capability, linear ultrasonic transducer arrays have been widely studied for photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT). As linear-array PACT suffers from a limited view, full-view imaging requires either the transducer or the object to be rotated. So far, both the central frequencies and bandwidth of linear transducer arrays applied in full-view PACT are low, limiting the spatial resolutions of the reconstructed images. Here, we present a multiview high-frequency PACT imaging system implemented with a commercial 40-MHz central frequency linear transducer array. By rotating the object through multiple angles with respect to the linear transducer array, we acquired full-view photoacoustic pressure measurements. Further, to quantify the unipolar initial pressures and overcome the limitations of the single-view Hilbert transformation, we developed a multiview Hilbert transformation method. The in-plane spatial resolution of this full-view linear-array PACT was quantified to be isotropically 60  μm within a 10×10  mm2 field of view. The system was demonstrated by imaging both a leaf skeleton and a zebrafish in vivo. PMID:26112369

  17. Fast 3D dark-field reflection-mode photoacoustic microscopy in vivo with a 30-MHz ultrasound linear array

    PubMed Central

    Song, Liang; Maslov, Konstantin; Bitton, Rachel; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-01-01

    We present an in vivo dark-field reflection-mode photoacoustic microscopy system that performs cross-sectional (B-scan) imaging at 50 Hz with realtime beamforming and 3D imaging consisting of 166 B-scan frames at 1 Hz with post-beamforming. To our knowledge, this speed is currently the fastest in photoacoustic imaging. A custom-designed light delivery system is integrated with a 30-MHz ultrasound linear array to realize dark-field reflection-mode imaging. Linear mechanical scanning of the array produces 3D images. The system has axial, lateral, and elevational resolutions of 25, 70, and 200 μm, respectively, and can image 3 mm deep in scattering biological tissues. Volumetric images of subcutaneous vasculature in rats are demonstrated in vivo. Fast 3D photoacoustic microscopy is anticipated to facilitate applications of photoacoustic imaging in biomedical studies that involve dynamics and clinical procedures that demand immediate diagnosis. PMID:19021408

  18. Interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging with a clinical linear array ultrasound probe for guiding nerve blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; West, Simeon J.; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate identification of tissue structures such as nerves and blood vessels is critically important for interventional procedures such as nerve blocks. Ultrasound imaging is widely used as a guidance modality to visualize anatomical structures in real-time. However, identification of nerves and small blood vessels can be very challenging, and accidental intra-neural or intra-vascular injections can result in significant complications. Multi-spectral photoacoustic imaging can provide high sensitivity and specificity for discriminating hemoglobin- and lipid-rich tissues. However, conventional surface-illumination-based photoacoustic systems suffer from limited sensitivity at large depths. In this study, for the first time, an interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging (IMPA) system was used to image nerves in a swine model in vivo. Pulsed excitation light with wavelengths in the ranges of 750 - 900 nm and 1150 - 1300 nm was delivered inside the body through an optical fiber positioned within the cannula of an injection needle. Ultrasound waves were received at the tissue surface using a clinical linear array imaging probe. Co-registered B-mode ultrasound images were acquired using the same imaging probe. Nerve identification was performed using a combination of B-mode ultrasound imaging and electrical stimulation. Using a linear model, spectral-unmixing of the photoacoustic data was performed to provide image contrast for oxygenated and de-oxygenated hemoglobin, water and lipids. Good correspondence between a known nerve location and a lipid-rich region in the photoacoustic images was observed. The results indicate that IMPA is a promising modality for guiding nerve blocks and other interventional procedures. Challenges involved with clinical translation are discussed.

  19. Fast photo-acoustic imaging based on multi-element linear transducer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Bangzheng; Xing, Da; Yang, Diwu; Tan, Yi; Chen, Qun

    2005-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging combines the contrast advantage of pure optical imaging and the resolution advantage of pure ultrasonic imaging. It has become a popular research subject at present. A fast photoacoustic imaging system based on multi-element linear transducer array and phase-controlled focus method was developed and tested on phantoms and tissues. A Q switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 532nm was used in our experiment as thermal source. The multi-element linear transducer array consists of 320 elements. By phase-controlled focus method, 64 signals, one of which gathered by 11-group element, make up of an image. Experiment results can map the distribution of the optical absorption correctly. The same transducer array also can operate as a conventional phase array and produced ultrasound imaging. Compared to other existing technology and algorithm, the PA imaging based on transducer array was characterize by speediness and convenience. It can provide a new approach for tissue functional imaging in vivo, and may have potentials in developing into an appliance for clinic diagnosis.

  20. 3D electrical tomographic imaging using vertical arrays of electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, S. C.; Stanley, S. J.; Rhodes, D.; York, T. A.

    2006-11-01

    Linear arrays of electrodes in conjunction with electrical impedance tomography have been used to spatially interrogate industrial processes that have only limited access for sensor placement. This paper explores the compromises that are to be expected when using a small number of vertically positioned linear arrays to facilitate 3D imaging using electrical tomography. A configuration with three arrays is found to give reasonable results when compared with a 'conventional' arrangement of circumferential electrodes. A single array yields highly localized sensitivity that struggles to image the whole space. Strategies have been tested on a small-scale version of a sludge settling application that is of relevance to the industrial sponsor. A new electrode excitation strategy, referred to here as 'planar cross drive', is found to give superior results to an extended version of the adjacent electrodes technique due to the improved uniformity of the sensitivity across the domain. Recommendations are suggested for parameters to inform the scale-up to industrial vessels.

  1. Standoff photoacoustic detections with high-sensitivity microphones and acoustic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choa, Fow-Sen; Wang, Chen-Chia; Khurgin, Jacob; Samuels, Alan; Trivedi, Sudhir; Gupta, Deepa

    2016-05-01

    Standoff detection of dangerous chemicals like explosives, nerve gases, and harmful aerosols has continuously been an important subject due to the serious concern about terrorist threats to both overseas and homeland lives and facility. Compared with other currently available standoff optical detection techniques, like Raman, photo-thermal, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy,...etc., photoacoustic (PA) sensing has the advantages of background free and very high detection sensitivity, no need of back reflection surfaces, and 1/R instead of 1/R2 signal decay distance dependence. Furthermore, there is still a great room for PA sensitivity improvement by using different PA techniques, including lockin amplifier, employing new microphones, and microphone array techniques. Recently, we have demonstrated standoff PA detection of isopropanol vapor, solid phase TNT and RDX at a standoff distance. To further calibrate the detection sensitivity, we use nerve gas simulants that were generated and calibrated by a commercial vapor generator. For field operations, array of microphones and microphone-reflector pairs can be utilized to achieve noise rejection and signal enhancement. We have experimentally demonstrated signal enhancement and noise reduction using an array of 4 microphone/4 reflector system as well as an array of 16-microphone/1 reflector. In this work we will review and compare different standoff techniques and discuss the advantages of using different photoacoustic techniques. We will also discuss new advancement of using new types of microphone and the performance comparison of using different structure of microphone arrays and combining lock-in amplifier with acoustic arrays. Demonstration of out-door real-time operations with high power mid-IR laser and microphone array will be presented.

  2. Real-time photoacoustic imaging based on multielement linear transducer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Bangzheng; Xing, Da; Wang, Yi; Zeng, Yaguang; Tan, Yi

    2005-01-01

    A real-time photoacoustic (PA) imaging system based on multi-element linear transducer array was developed and test on phantoms. A Q switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 532 nm and 20Hz repeat rate was used in our experiment as thermal source. The multi-element linear transducer array consists of 320 elements. By phase-controlled method, 64 signals, one of which gathered by 11-group element, make up of an image. It was acquired in only about 3 seconds. Phantom experiment results can map the distribution of the optical absorption correctly. Compared to other existing technology and algorithm, the PA imaging based on transducer array was characterize by speediness and convenience. It can provide a new approach for tissue functional imaging in vivo, and may have potentials in developing into an appliance for clinic diagnosis.

  3. In vivo mouse brain tomography by fast dual-scanning photoacoustic imaging system based on array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2008-12-01

    A full-view photoacoustic tomography system with dual-scanning using a linear transducer array for fast imaging of complicated blood network was developed. In this system, a 128-element linear transducer array was used to detect photoacoustic signals by combined scanning of electronic scan and mechanical scan. An improved limited-field filtered back projection algorithm with directivity factors was applied to reconstruct the distribution of the absorbed optical energy deposit. An in vivo experiment on a mouse brain was performed to evaluate the ability of this composite system. A clear view of the cerebrovascular network on the brain cortex was acquired successfully. Furthermore, the reconstruct images with different number of scanning positions were also investigated and analyzed to induce a compromised proposal between scanning time and scanning number. The experimental results demonstrate the multi-element photoacoustic imaging system has the potential to acquire the time-resolved functional information for fundamental research of small animal brain imaging.

  4. Photoacoustic projection imaging using a 64-channel fiber optic detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Felbermayer, Karoline; Bouchal, Klaus-Dieter; Veres, Istvan A.; Grün, Hubert; Burgholzer, Peter; Berer, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    In this work we present photoacoustic projection imaging with a 64-channel integrating line detector array, which average the pressure over cylindrical surfaces. For imaging, the line detectors are arranged parallel to each other on a cylindrical surface surrounding a specimen. Thereby, the three-dimensional imaging problem is reduced to a twodimensional problem, facilitating projection imaging. After acquisition of a dataset of pressure signals, a twodimensional photoacoustic projection image is reconstructed. The 64 channel line detector array is realized using optical fibers being part of interferometers. The parts of the interferometers used to detect the ultrasonic pressure waves consist of graded-index polymer-optical fibers (POFs), which exhibit better sensitivity than standard glass-optical fibers. Ultrasonic waves impinging on the POFs change the phase of light in the fiber-core due to the strain-optic effect. This phase shifts, representing the pressure signals, are demodulated using high-bandwidth balanced photo-detectors. The 64 detectors are optically multiplexed to 16 detection channels, thereby allowing fast imaging. Results are shown on a Rhodamine B dyed microsphere.

  5. Continuous real-time photoacoustic demodulation via field programmable gate array for dynamic imaging of zebrafish cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Scott P; Shelton, Ryan L; Maxson, Ryan T; Applegate, Brian E

    2013-01-01

    A four dimensional data set of the cardiac cycle of a zebrafish embryo was acquired using postacquisition synchronization of real time photoacoustic b-scans. Utilizing an off-axis photoacoustic microscopy (OA-PAM) setup, we have expanded upon our previous work with OA-PAM to develop a system that can sustain 100 kHz line rates while demodulating the bipolar photoacoustic signal in real-time. Real-time processing was accomplished by quadrature demodulation on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) in line with the signal digitizer. Simulated data acquisition verified the system is capable of real-time processing up to a line rate of 1 MHz. Galvanometer-scanning of the excitation laser inside the focus of the ultrasonic transducer enables real data acquisition of a 200 by 200 by 200 pixel, volumetric data set across a 2 millimeter field of view at a rate of 2.5 Hz. PMID:24010007

  6. Comparison of reconstruction algorithms for sparse-array detection photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, G.; Roumeliotis, M.; Carson, J. J. L.; Anastasio, M. A.

    2010-02-01

    A photoacoustic tomography (PAT) imaging system based on a sparse 2D array of detector elements and an iterative image reconstruction algorithm has been proposed, which opens the possibility for high frame-rate 3D PAT. The efficacy of this PAT implementation is highly influenced by the choice of the reconstruction algorithm. In recent years, a variety of new reconstruction algorithms have been proposed for medical image reconstruction that have been motivated by the emerging theory of compressed sensing. These algorithms have the potential to accurately reconstruct sparse objects from highly incomplete measurement data, and therefore may be highly suited for sparse array PAT. In this context, a sparse object is one that is described by a relatively small number of voxel elements, such as typically arises in blood vessel imaging. In this work, we investigate the use of a gradient projection-based iterative reconstruction algorithm for image reconstruction in sparse-array PAT. The algorithm seeks to minimize an 1-norm penalized least-squares cost function. By use of computer-simulation studies, we demonstrate that the gradient projection algorithm may further improve the efficacy of sparse-array PAT.

  7. Single-side access, isotropic resolution, and multispectral three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging with rotate-translate scanning of ultrasonic detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gateau, Jérôme; Gesnik, Marc; Chassot, Jean-Marie; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2015-05-01

    Photoacoustic imaging can achieve high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of optical absorbers at penetration depths of ˜1 cm in biological tissues by detecting optically induced high ultrasound frequencies. Tomographic acquisition with ultrasound linear arrays offers an easy implementation of single-side access, parallelized, and high-frequency detection, but usually comes with an image quality impaired by the directionality of the detectors. Indeed, a simple translation of the array perpendicular to its median imaging plane is often used, but results both in a poor resolution in the translation direction and strong limited-view artifacts. To improve the spatial resolution and the visibility of complex structures while retaining a planar detection geometry, we introduce, in this paper, a rotate-translate scanning scheme and investigate the performance of a scanner implemented at 15 MHz center frequency. The developed system achieved a quasi-isotropic uniform 3-D resolution of ˜170 μm over a cubic volume of side length 8.5 mm, i.e., an improvement in the resolution in the translation direction by almost one order of magnitude. Dual-wavelength imaging was also demonstrated with ultrafast wavelength shifting. The validity of our approach was shown in vitro. We discuss the ability to enable in vivo imaging for preclinical and clinical studies.

  8. Single-side access, isotropic resolution, and multispectral three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging with rotate-translate scanning of ultrasonic detector array.

    PubMed

    Gateau, Jérôme; Gesnik, Marc; Chassot, Jean-Marie; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2015-05-01

    Photoacoustic imaging can achieve high-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of optical absorbers at penetration depths of ∼1 cm in biological tissues by detecting optically induced high ultrasound frequencies. Tomographic acquisition with ultrasound linear arrays offers an easy implementation of single-side access, parallelized, and high-frequency detection, but usually comes with an image quality impaired by the directionality of the detectors. Indeed, a simple translation of the array perpendicular to its median imaging plane is often used, but results both in a poor resolution in the translation direction and strong limited-view artifacts.To improve the spatial resolution and the visibility of complex structures while retaining a planar detection geometry, we introduce, in this paper, a rotate-translate scanning scheme and investigate the performance ofa scanner implemented at 15 MHz center frequency. The developed system achieved a quasi-isotropic uniform 3-D resolution of ∼170 μm over a cubic volume of side length 8.5 mm, i.e., an improvement in the resolution in the translation direction by almost one order of magnitude. Dual-wavelength imaging was also demonstrated with ultrafast wavelength shifting. The validity of our approach was shown in vitro. We discuss the ability to enable in vivo imaging for preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:25970085

  9. High-throughput fiber-array transvaginal ultrasound/photoacoustic probe for ovarian cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Hassan S.; Kumavor, Patrick D.; Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Wang, Tianheng; Zhu, Quing

    2014-03-01

    A high-throughput ultrasound/photoacoustic probe for delivering high contrast and signal-to-noise ratio images was designed, constructed, and tested. The probe consists of a transvaginal ultrasound array integrated with four 1mm-core optical fibers and a sheath. The sheath encases transducer and is lined with highly reflecting aluminum for high intensity light output and uniformity while at the same time remaining below the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) recommended by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The probe design was optimized by simulating the light fluence distribution in Zemax. The performance of the probe was evaluated by experimental measurements of the fluence and real-time imaging of polyethylene-tubing filled with blood. These results suggest that our probe has great potential for in vivo imaging and characterization of ovarian cancer.

  10. Photoacoustic imaging for deep targets in the breast using a multichannel 2D array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhixing; Wang, Xueding; Morris, Richard F.; Padilla, Frederic R.; Lecarpentier, Gerald L.; Carson, Paul L.

    2011-03-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) imaging system was developed to achieve high sensitivity for the detection and characterization of vascular anomalies in the breast in the mammographic geometry. Signal detection from deep in the breast was achieved by a broadband 2D PVDF planar array that has a round shape with one side trimmed straight to improve fit near the chest wall. This array has 572 active elements and a -6dB bandwidth of 0.6-1.7 MHz. The low frequency enhances imaging depth and increases the size of vascular collections displayed without edge enhancement. The PA signals from all the elements go through low noise preamplifiers in the probe that are very close to the array elements for optimized noise control. Driven by 20 independent on-probe signal processing channels, imaging with both high sensitivity and good speed was achieved. To evaluate the imaging depth and the spatial resolution of this system,2.38mm I.D. artificial vessels embedded deeply in ex vivo breasts harvested from fresh cadavers and a 3mm I.D. tube in breast mimicking phantoms made of pork loin and fat tissues were imaged. Using near-infrared laser light with incident energy density within the ANSI safety limit, imaging depths of up to 49 mm in human breasts and 52 mm in phantoms were achieved. With a high power tunable laser working on multiple wavelengths, this system might contribute to 3D noninvasive imaging of morphological and physiological tissue features throughout the breast.

  11. Continuous, high-speed, volumetric photoacoustic microscopy via a field programmable gate array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattison, Scott P.; Shelton, Ryan L.; Maxson, Ryan T.; Applegate, Brian E.

    2013-03-01

    The ability to collect data in real time is important in all biological imaging modalities that aim to image dynamic processes. Photoacoustic Microscopy (PAM) is a rapidly growing biomedical imaging technique that is often used to image microvasculature and melanoma, and is capable of fully rendering three-dimensional images. However, due to the bi-polar nature of the PAM signal, post processing through demodulation is required to accurately display morphological data. Typically, demodulation requires post processing of the data, limiting its use in real-time applications. This results in many PAM systems displaying data through maximum amplitude projection (MAP) images, completely ignoring the axial dimension of their scans and throwing away useful data. We overcome this processing limit by utilizing a configurable integrated circuit known as a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The FPGA allows us to perform quadrature demodulation of the photoacoustic signal as it is being collected. The result is a PAM system capable of producing continuous, morphologically accurate B-scans and volumes at a rate limited only by the repetition rate of the laser. This allows us to generate accurately rendered volumes at the same speed as MAP images. With a 100 KHz actively q-switched laser we are able to generate 200 by 200 pixel b-scans at a rate of 500 Hz. The imaging potential of the system has been demonstrated in volumes of human hair phantoms and chick embryo vasculature. This system is capable of 50 x 50 x 50 volume stacks processed and displayed at better than video rate.

  12. Micromachined silicon parallel acoustic delay lines as time-delayed ultrasound detector array for real-time photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y.; Chang, C.-C.; Wang, L. V.; Zou, J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the development of a new 16-channel parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) array for real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT). The PADLs were directly fabricated from single-crystalline silicon substrates using deep reactive ion etching. Compared with other acoustic delay lines (e.g., optical fibers), the micromachined silicon PADLs offer higher acoustic transmission efficiency, smaller form factor, easier assembly, and mass production capability. To demonstrate its real-time photoacoustic imaging capability, the silicon PADL array was interfaced with one single-element ultrasonic transducer followed by one channel of data acquisition electronics to receive 16 channels of photoacoustic signals simultaneously. A PAT image of an optically-absorbing target embedded in an optically-scattering phantom was reconstructed, which matched well with the actual size of the imaged target. Because the silicon PADL array allows a signal-to-channel reduction ratio of 16:1, it could significantly simplify the design and construction of ultrasonic receivers for real-time PAT.

  13. A micromachined silicon parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) array for real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young Y.; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Wang, Lihong V.; Zou, Jun

    2015-03-01

    To achieve real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT), massive transducer arrays and data acquisition (DAQ) electronics are needed to receive the PA signals simultaneously, which results in complex and high-cost ultrasound receiver systems. To address this issue, we have developed a new PA data acquisition approach using acoustic time delay. Optical fibers were used as parallel acoustic delay lines (PADLs) to create different time delays in multiple channels of PA signals. This makes the PA signals reach a single-element transducer at different times. As a result, they can be properly received by single-channel DAQ electronics. However, due to their small diameter and fragility, using optical fiber as acoustic delay lines poses a number of challenges in the design, construction and packaging of the PADLs, thereby limiting their performances and use in real imaging applications. In this paper, we report the development of new silicon PADLs, which are directly made from silicon wafers using advanced micromachining technologies. The silicon PADLs have very low acoustic attenuation and distortion. A linear array of 16 silicon PADLs were assembled into a handheld package with one common input port and one common output port. To demonstrate its real-time PAT capability, the silicon PADL array (with its output port interfaced with a single-element transducer) was used to receive 16 channels of PA signals simultaneously from a tissue-mimicking optical phantom sample. The reconstructed PA image matches well with the imaging target. Therefore, the silicon PADL array can provide a 16× reduction in the ultrasound DAQ channels for real-time PAT.

  14. Real-time photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging: a simple solution for clinical ultrasound systems with linear arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla, Leonardo G.; Olafsson, Ragnar; Bauer, Daniel R.; Witte, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic imaging (PAI) provides important diagnostic information during a routine breast exam for cancer. PAI enhances contrast between blood vessels and background tissue, which can help characterize suspicious lesions. However, most PAI systems are either not compatible with commercial ultrasound systems or inefficiently deliver light to the region of interest, effectively reducing the sensitivity of the technique. To address and potentially overcome these limitations, we developed an accessory for a standard linear ultrasound array that optimizes light delivery for PAI. The photoacoustic enabling device (PED) exploits an optically transparent acoustic reflector to help direct laser illumination to the region of interest. This study compares the PED with standard fiber bundle illumination in scattering and non-scattering media. In scattering media with the same incident fluence, the PED enhanced the photoacoustic signal by 18 dB at a depth of 5 mm and 6 dB at a depth of 20 mm. To demonstrate in vivo feasibility, we also used the device to image a mouse with a pancreatic tumor. The PED identified blood vessels at the periphery of the tumor, suggesting that PAI provides complementary contrast to standard pulse echo ultrasound. The PED is a simple and inexpensive solution that facilitates the translation of PAI technology to the clinic for routine screening of breast cancer.

  15. Real-time photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging: a simple solution for clinical ultrasound systems with linear arrays.

    PubMed

    Montilla, Leonardo G; Olafsson, Ragnar; Bauer, Daniel R; Witte, Russell S

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic imaging (PAI) provides important diagnostic information during a routine breast exam for cancer. PAI enhances contrast between blood vessels and background tissue, which can help characterize suspicious lesions. However, most PAI systems are either not compatible with commercial ultrasound systems or inefficiently deliver light to the region of interest, effectively reducing the sensitivity of the technique. To address and potentially overcome these limitations, we developed an accessory for a standard linear ultrasound array that optimizes light delivery for PAI. The photoacoustic enabling device (PED) exploits an optically transparent acoustic reflector to help direct laser illumination to the region of interest. This study compares the PED with standard fiber bundle illumination in scattering and non-scattering media. In scattering media with the same incident fluence, the PED enhanced the photoacoustic signal by 18 dB at a depth of 5 mm and 6 dB at a depth of 20 mm. To demonstrate in vivo feasibility, we also used the device to image a mouse with a pancreatic tumor. The PED identified blood vessels at the periphery of the tumor, suggesting that PAI provides complementary contrast to standard pulse echo ultrasound. The PED is a simple and inexpensive solution that facilitates the translation of PAI technology to the clinic for routine screening of breast cancer. PMID:23221479

  16. Real-time photoacoustic tomograpghy using linear array probe and detection of line structure using Hough transform.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung-Won; Park, Jaebyung; Shin, Dong Ho; Song, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Kyeong-Seop

    2015-01-01

    A real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system is developed using a linear array probe and phantom images are acquired with a pattern of line structure. Moreover, it is attempted to detect line structures from the acquired images by Hough transform. This effort leads to the measurement of a process of magenta passing through a tube and acquisition of images at a speed of about 2 frame/sec. Besides, it is confirmed that the Hough transform applied on the acquired PAT images has the detection rate of about 50% for delineating a line structure. PMID:26405912

  17. High-frequency annular array with coaxial illumination for dual-modality ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Filoux, Erwan; Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Chitnis, Parag V; Aristizábal, Orlando; Ketterling, Jeffrey A

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a combined ultrasound and photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) system used to obtain high-quality, co-registered images of mouse-embryo anatomy and vasculature. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU, >20 MHz) is utilized to obtain high-resolution anatomical images of small animals while PAI provides high-contrast images of the vascular network. The imaging system is based on a 40 MHz, 5-element, 6 mm aperture annular-array transducer with a 800 μm diameter hole through its central element. The transducer was integrated in a cage-plate assembly allowing for a collimated laser beam to pass through the hole so that the optical and acoustic beams were collinear. The assembly was mounted on a two-axis, motorized stage to enable the simultaneous acquisition of co-registered HFU and PA volumetric data. Data were collected from all five elements in receive and a synthetic-focusing algorithm was applied in post-processing to beamform the data and increase the spatial resolution and depth-of-field (DOF) of the HFU and PA images. Phantom measurements showed that the system could achieve high-resolution images (down to 90 μm for HFU and 150 μm for PAI) and a large DOF of >8 mm. Volume renderings of a mouse embryo showed that the scanner allowed for visualizing morphologically precise anatomy of the entire embryo along with corresponding co-registered vasculature. Major head vessels, such as the superior sagittal sinus or rostral vein, were clearly identified as well as limb bud vasculature. PMID:23742556

  18. High-frequency annular array with coaxial illumination for dual-modality ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filoux, Erwan; Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Chitnis, Parag V.; Aristizábal, Orlando; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a combined ultrasound and photoacoustic (PA) imaging (PAI) system used to obtain high-quality, co-registered images of mouse-embryo anatomy and vasculature. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU, >20 MHz) is utilized to obtain high-resolution anatomical images of small animals while PAI provides high-contrast images of the vascular network. The imaging system is based on a 40 MHz, 5-element, 6 mm aperture annular-array transducer with a 800 μm diameter hole through its central element. The transducer was integrated in a cage-plate assembly allowing for a collimated laser beam to pass through the hole so that the optical and acoustic beams were collinear. The assembly was mounted on a two-axis, motorized stage to enable the simultaneous acquisition of co-registered HFU and PA volumetric data. Data were collected from all five elements in receive and a synthetic-focusing algorithm was applied in post-processing to beamform the data and increase the spatial resolution and depth-of-field (DOF) of the HFU and PA images. Phantom measurements showed that the system could achieve high-resolution images (down to 90 μm for HFU and 150 μm for PAI) and a large DOF of >8 mm. Volume renderings of a mouse embryo showed that the scanner allowed for visualizing morphologically precise anatomy of the entire embryo along with corresponding co-registered vasculature. Major head vessels, such as the superior sagittal sinus or rostral vein, were clearly identified as well as limb bud vasculature.

  19. A circular array transducer for photoacoustic imaging by using piezoelectric single crystal lead magnesium niobate-lead zirconate titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yonggang; Ha, Kanglyeol; Kim, Moojoon; Kang, Hyunwook; Oh, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Jungsoon

    2015-07-01

    The ultrasound transducers of which center frequencies are lower than 10 MHz are commonly used in low frequency photoacoustic (PA) imaging systems. However, the improvement of their sensitivity is still needed to detect weak PA signals. In this study, a circular array transducer was constructed by using 120 needle hydrophones made of piezoelectric single crystal lead magnesium niobate-lead zirconate titanate (PMN-PZT). The needle hydrophone was designed to have high sensitivity and wide bandwidth through the Krimtholz-Leedom-Matthaei (KLM) simulation of receiving impulse response. The sensitivity of the fabricated PMN-PZT hydrophone was compared with a commercial poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) needle hydrophone. The usefulness of the circular array transducer was demonstrated by applying it to a PA system for obtaining images.

  20. Multi-view Hilbert transformation in full-ring-transducer-array based photoacoustic computed tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Li, Guo; Zhu, Liren; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) exploits optical contrast and ultrasonic detection principles to form images of absorbed optical energy density within tissue. Based on the photoacoustic effect, PAT directly and quantitatively measures specific optical absorption. A full-ring ultrasonic transducer array based photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system was recently developed for small animal whole-body imaging with a full-view detection angle and high in-plane resolution (100 µm). However, due to the band-pass frequency response of the piezoelectric transducer elements, the reconstructed images present bipolar (both positive and negative) pixel values, which is artificial and counterintuitive for physicians and biologists seeking to interpret the image. Moreover, bipolar pixel values hinder quantification of physiological parameters, such as oxygen saturation and blood flow speed. Unipolar images can be obtained by deconvolving the raw channel data with the transducer's electrical impulse response and applying non-negativity during iteration, but this process requires complex transducer modeling and time-consuming computation. Here, we present a multi-view Hilbert transformation method to recover the unipolar initial pressure for full-ring PACT. Multi-view Hilbert transformation along the acoustic wave propagation direction minimizes reconstruction artifacts during envelope extraction and maintains the signal-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed images. The in-plane isotropic spatial resolution of this method was quantified to 168 μm within a 20 × 20 mm2 field of view. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm was first validated by numerical simulations and then demonstrated with ex-vivo mouse brain structural imaging and in-vivo mouse wholebody imaging.

  1. Real-time pulse echo and photoacoustic imaging using an ultrasound array and in-line reflective illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla, Leonardo G.; Olafsson, Ragnar; Witte, Russell S.

    2010-02-01

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic (PA) imaging, in conjunction with pulse echo (PE) ultrasound is a promising modality for diagnosing breast cancer. However, existing devices are unwieldy and are hard to integrate into the clinical environment. In addition, it is difficult to illuminate thick samples because light must be directed around the transducer. Conventional PA imaging designs involve off-axis illumination or transillumination through the object. Whereas transillumination works best with thin objects, off-axis illumination may not uniformly illuminate the region of interest. To overcome these problems we have developed an attachment to an existing clinical linear array that can efficiently deliver light in line with the image plane. This photoacoustic enabling device (PED) exploits an optically transparent acoustic reflector to co-align the illumination with the acoustic waves, enabling realtime PA and PE imaging. Based on this concept, we describe results from three types of PEDs in phantoms and rat tissue. The most recent version is fabricated by rapid prototyping, and attached to a 10 MHz linear array. Real-time PA and PE images of a 127-μm diameter wire were consistent with our expectations based on the properties of the ultrasound transducer. Comparisons with and without the PED of another test phantom printed on transparency demonstrated that the PED does not appreciably degrade or distort image quality. The PED offers a simple and inexpensive solution towards a real-time dual-modality imaging system for breast cancer detection. It could also be adapted for virtually any kind of ultrasound transducer array and integrated into routine ultrasound exams for detection of cancerous lesions within 1-2 cm from the probe surface.

  2. Tripling the detection view of high-frequency linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography by using two planar acoustic reflectors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo; Xia, Jun; Wang, Kun; Maslov, Konstantin; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) suffers from a limited view. Circular scanning does increase the detection view angle but is time-consuming. Therefore, it is desirable to increase the detection view angle of linear-array-based PACT without sacrificing imaging speed. Methods Two planar acoustic reflectors placed at 120 degrees to each other were added to a linear-array-based PACT system. Each reflector redirects originally undetectable photoacoustic waves back to the transducer array elements, and together they triple the original detection view angle of the PACT system. Results Adding two reflectors increased the detection view angle from 80 to 240 degrees. As a comparison, a single-reflector PACT has a detection view angle of only 160 degrees. A leaf skeleton phantom with a rich vascular network was imaged with the double-reflector PACT, and most of its features were recovered. Conclusions The two acoustic reflectors triple the detection view angle of a linear-array-based PACT without compromising the original imaging speed. This nearly full-view detection capability produces higher-quality images than single-reflector PACT or conventional PACT without reflectors. PMID:25694954

  3. Coherence-Weighted Synthetic Focusing Applied to Photoacoustic Imaging Using a High-Frequency Annular-Array Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Aristizábal, Orlando; Filoux, Erwan; Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Mamou, Jonathan; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive synthetic-focusing scheme that, when applied to photoacoustic (PA) data acquired using an annular array, improves focusing across a greater imaging depth and enhances spatial resolution. The imaging system was based on a 40-MHz, 5-element, annular-array transducer with a focal length of 12 mm and an 800-μm diameter hole through its central element to facilitate coaxial delivery of 532-nm laser. The transducer was raster-scanned to facilitate 3D acquisition of co-registered ultrasound and PA image data. Three synthetic-focusing schemes were compared for obtaining PA A-lines for each scan location: delay-and-sum (DAS), DAS weighted with a coherence factor (DAS + CF), and DAS weighted with a sign-coherence factor (DAS + SCF). Bench-top experiments that used an 80-μm hair were performed to assess the enhancement provided by the two coherence-based schemes. Both coherence-based schemes increased the signal-to-noise ratio by approximately 10 dB. When processed using the DAS-only scheme, the lateral dimension of the hair in a PA image with 20 dB dynamic range was between 300 μm and 1 mm for imaging depth ranging from 8 to 20 mm. In comparison, the DAS + CF scheme resulted in a lateral dimension of 200 to 450 μm over the same range. The DAS + SCF synthetic focusing further improved the smallest-resolvable dimension, which was between 150 and 400 μm over the same range of imaging depth. When used on PA data obtained from a 12-day-old mouse embryo, the DAS + SCF processing improved visualization of neurovasculature. PMID:25925675

  4. Coherence-Weighted Synthetic Focusing Applied to Photoacoustic Imaging Using a High-Frequency Annular-Array Transducer.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Parag V; Aristizábal, Orlando; Filoux, Erwan; Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Mamou, Jonathan; Ketterling, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive synthetic-focusing scheme that, when applied to photoacoustic (PA) data acquired using an annular array, improves focusing across a greater imaging depth and enhances spatial resolution. The imaging system was based on a 40-MHz, 5-element, annular-array transducer with a focal length of 12 mm and an 800-µm diameter hole through its central element to facilitate coaxial delivery of 532-nm laser. The transducer was raster-scanned to facilitate 3D acquisition of co-registered ultrasound and PA image data. Three synthetic-focusing schemes were compared for obtaining PA A-lines for each scan location: delay-and-sum (DAS), DAS weighted with a coherence factor (DAS + CF), and DAS weighted with a sign-coherence factor (DAS + SCF). Bench-top experiments that used an 80-µm hair were performed to assess the enhancement provided by the two coherence-based schemes. Both coherence-based schemes increased the signal-to-noise ratio by approximately 10 dB. When processed using the DAS-only scheme, the lateral dimension of the hair in a PA image with 20 dB dynamic range was between 300 µm and 1 mm for imaging depth ranging from 8 to 20 mm. In comparison, the DAS + CF scheme resulted in a lateral dimension of 200 to 450 µm over the same range. The DAS + SCF synthetic focusing further improved the smallest-resolvable dimension, which was between 150 and 400 µm over the same range of imaging depth. When used on PA data obtained from a 12-day-old mouse embryo, the DAS + SCF processing improved visualization of neurovasculature. PMID:25925675

  5. Clamshell tomograph

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Budinger, Thomas F.

    1984-01-01

    In brief, the invention is a tomograph modified to be in a clamshell configuration so that the ring or rings may be moved to multiple sampling positions. The tomograph includes an array of detectors arranged in successive adjacent relative locations along a closed curve in a first position in a selected plane, and means for securing the detectors in the relative locations in a first sampling position. The securing means is movable in the plane in two sections and pivotable at one p The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California.

  6. Objective Assessment and Design Improvement of a Staring, Sparse Transducer Array by the Spatial Crosstalk Matrix for 3D Photoacoustic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kosik, Ivan; Raess, Avery

    2015-01-01

    Accurate reconstruction of 3D photoacoustic (PA) images requires detection of photoacoustic signals from many angles. Several groups have adopted staring ultrasound arrays, but assessment of array performance has been limited. We previously reported on a method to calibrate a 3D PA tomography (PAT) staring array system and analyze system performance using singular value decomposition (SVD). The developed SVD metric, however, was impractical for large system matrices, which are typical of 3D PAT problems. The present study consisted of two main objectives. The first objective aimed to introduce the crosstalk matrix concept to the field of PAT for system design. Figures-of-merit utilized in this study were root mean square error, peak signal-to-noise ratio, mean absolute error, and a three dimensional structural similarity index, which were derived between the normalized spatial crosstalk matrix and the identity matrix. The applicability of this approach for 3D PAT was validated by observing the response of the figures-of-merit in relation to well-understood PAT sampling characteristics (i.e. spatial and temporal sampling rate). The second objective aimed to utilize the figures-of-merit to characterize and improve the performance of a near-spherical staring array design. Transducer arrangement, array radius, and array angular coverage were the design parameters examined. We observed that the performance of a 129-element staring transducer array for 3D PAT could be improved by selection of optimal values of the design parameters. The results suggested that this formulation could be used to objectively characterize 3D PAT system performance and would enable the development of efficient strategies for system design optimization. PMID:25875177

  7. Enhancement of photoacoustic tomography by ultrasonic computed tomography based on optical excitation of elements of a full-ring transducer array

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jun; Huang, Chao; Maslov, Konstantin; Anastasio, Mark A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) is a hybrid technique that combines optical excitation and ultrasonic detection to provide high resolution images in deep tissues. In the image reconstruction, a constant speed of sound (SOS) is normally assumed. This assumption, however, is often not strictly satisfied in deep tissue imaging, due to acoustic heterogeneities within the object and between the object and coupling medium. If these heterogeneities are not accounted for, they will cause distortions and artifacts in the reconstructed images. In this paper, we incorporated ultrasonic computed tomography (USCT), which measures the SOS distribution within the object, into our full-ring array PACT system. Without the need for ultrasonic transmitting electronics, USCT was performed using the same laser beam as for PACT measurement. By scanning the laser beam on the array surface, we can sequentially fire different elements. As a first demonstration of the system, we studied the effect of acoustic heterogeneities on photoacoustic vascular imaging. We verified that constant SOS is a reasonable approximation when the SOS variation is small. When the variation is large, distortion will be observed in the periphery of the object, especially in the tangential direction. PMID:24104670

  8. Multiple-illumination photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Quinn M.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-03-01

    Previously we described the potential for multiple illumination photoacoustic tomography to provide quantitative reconstructions, however this work used only simulated data. We have developed a custom photoacoustic-ultrasound tomography system capable of multiple illuminations and parallel acquisition from a 256 element 5 MHz transducer ring array with 8-cm diameter. The multiple illumination scheme uses a free-space light delivery geometry where a rotational stage scans a pulsed laser beam onto different incident locations around the sample. For each illumination location a photoacoustic image is reconstructed using a modified backprojection algorithm. Images from different source locations have the potential to be combined to form an improved deep-tissue image using our previously developed iterative algorithms. We complement the photoacoustic imaging data with unique ultrasound imaging data. Most previous ultrasound tomography methods have used migration algorithms, iterative ray-based analysis, wave-equation modeling, or frequency-based algorithms that all demand large amounts of data and computational power. We propose a new UST method that offers isotropic resolution, provides scattering contrast, as well as the potential for measuring ultrasound scattering anisotropy and decoupling density and compressibility contributions. The imaging system is driven by a Verasonics scan engine and programmed for both ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging modes. Resolution has been measured to be 150 μm for ultrasound and 200 μm for photoacoustic images. Imaging capabilities are demonstrated on phantoms with custom-tailored ultrasound scattering and optical properties, as well as in murine models.

  9. Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong V.

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) refers to imaging that is based on the photoacoustic effect. Although the photoacoustic effect as a physical phenomenon was first reported on by Alexander Graham Bell in 1880 [1], PAT as an imaging technology was developed only after the advent of ultrasonic transducers, computers, and lasers [2-31]. A review on biomedical photoacoustics is available [32]. The motivation for PAT is to combine optical-absorption contrast with ultrasonic spatial resolution for deep imaging in the optical quasi-diffusive or diffusive regime. In PAT, the tissue is irradiated by usually a short-pulsed laser beam to achieve a thermal and acoustic impulse response (Fig. 19.1). Locally absorbed light is converted into heat, which is further converted to a pressure rise via thermo-elastic expansion. The initial pressure rise - determined by the local optical absorption coefficient (μ â ), fluence (ψ) and other thermal and mechanical properties - propagates as an ultrasonic wave, which is referred to as a photoacoustic wave.

  10. Assessment of neurovascular dynamics during transient ischemic attack by the novel integration of micro-electrocorticography electrode array with functional photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Hang; Liao, Lun-De; Tan, Stacey Sze Hui; Kwon, Ki Yong; Ling, Ji Min; Bandla, Aishwarya; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Tan, Eddie Tung Wee; Li, Wen; Ng, Wai Hoe; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin; Thakor, Nitish V

    2015-10-01

    This study developed a novel system combining a 16-channel micro-electrocorticography (μECoG) electrode array and functional photoacoustic microscopy (fPAM) to examine changes in neurovascular functions following transient ischemic attack (TIA) in rats. To mimic the pathophysiology of TIA, a modified photothrombotic ischemic model was developed by using 3 min illumination of 5 mW continuous-wave (CW) green laser light focusing on a distal branch of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Cerebral blood volume (CBV), hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2), somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) and alpha-to-delta ratio (ADR) were measured pre- and post-ischemia over a focal cortical region (i.e., 1.5×1.5 mm(2)). Unexpectedly, the SO2, peak-to-peak amplitude (PPA) of SSEPs and ADR recovered and achieved levels greater than the baseline values at the 4th hour post-ischemia induction without any intervention, whereas the CBV value only partially recovered. In other words, transient ischemia led to increased neural activity when the relative CBV was reduced, which may further compromise neural integrity or lead to subsequent vascular disease. This novel μECoG-fPAM system complements currently available imaging techniques and represents a promising technology for studying neurovascular coupling in animal models. PMID:26149348

  11. Photoacoustic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a hybrid in vivo imaging technique that acoustically detects optical contrast via the photoacoustic effect. Unlike pure optical microscopic techniques, PAM takes advantage of the weak acoustic scattering in tissue and thus breaks through the optical diffusion limit (~1 mm in soft tissue). With its excellent scalability, PAM can provide high-resolution images at desired maximum imaging depths up to a few millimeters. Compared with backscattering-based confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography, PAM provides absorption contrast instead of scattering contrast. Furthermore, PAM can image more molecules, endogenous or exogenous, at their absorbing wavelengths than fluorescence-based methods, such as wide-field, confocal, and multi-photon microscopy. Most importantly, PAM can simultaneously image anatomical, functional, molecular, flow dynamic and metabolic contrasts in vivo. Focusing on state-of-the-art developments in PAM, this Review discusses the key features of PAM implementations and their applications in biomedical studies. PMID:24416085

  12. Photoacoustic Cystography

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2013-01-01

    Conventional pediatric cystography, which is based on diagnostic X-ray using a radio-opaque dye, suffers from the use of harmful ionizing radiation. The risk of bladder cancers in children due to radiation exposure is more significant than many other cancers. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of nonionizing and noninvasive photoacoustic (PA) imaging of urinary bladders, referred to as photoacoustic cystography (PAC), using near-infrared (NIR) optical absorbents (i.e. methylene blue, plasmonic gold nanostructures, or single walled carbon nanotubes) as an optical-turbid tracer. We have successfully imaged a rat bladder filled with the optical absorbing agents using a dark-field confocal PAC system. After transurethral injection of the contrast agents, the rat's bladders were photoacoustically visualized by achieving significant PA signal enhancement. The accumulation was validated by spectroscopic PA imaging. Further, by using only a laser pulse energy of less than 1 mJ/cm2 (1/20 of the safety limit), our current imaging system could map the methylene-blue-filled-rat-bladder at the depth of beyond 1 cm in biological tissues in vivo. Both in vivo and ex vivo PA imaging results validate that the contrast agents were naturally excreted via urination. Thus, there is no concern regarding long-term toxic agent accumulation, which will facilitate clinical translation. PMID:23792925

  13. Multiple-bandwidth photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Ku, Geng; Wang, Xueding; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V

    2004-04-01

    Photoacoustic tomography, also referred to as optoacoustic tomography, employs short laser pulses to generate ultrasonic waves in biological tissues. The reconstructed images can be characterized by the convolution of the structure of samples, the laser pulse and the impulse response of the ultrasonic transducer used for detection. Although the laser-induced ultrasonic waves cover a wide spectral range, a single transducer can receive only part of the spectrum because of its limited bandwidth. To systematically analyse this problem, we constructed a photoacoustic tomographic system that uses multiple ultrasonic transducers simultaneously, each at a different central frequency. The photoacoustic images associated with the different transducers were compared and analysed. The system was tested by imaging both mouse brains and phantom samples. The vascular vessels in the brain were revealed by all of the transducers, but the image resolutions differed. The higher frequency detectors provided better image resolution while the lower frequency detectors delineated the major structural traits with a higher signal-noise ratio. PMID:15128208

  14. Plasmon enhanced photoacoustic generation from volumetric electromagnetic hotspots.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Gil; Yang, Seung-Bum; Ahn, Myeong-Su; Oh, Young-Jae; Kim, Yong Tae; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-01-14

    This work reports plasmon enhanced photoacoustic generation by using a three dimensional plasmonic absorber. The 3D plasmonic absorber comprises a thin polymer film on glass nanopillar arrays with nanogap-rich silver nanoislands. The 3D plasmonic absorber clearly shows 24.6 times higher enhancement of photoacoustic signals at an excitation wavelength of 630 nm than a simple polymeric absorber. The photoacoustic enhancement results from the volumetric electromagnetic field enhancement on a light-absorbing polymer through 3D plasmonic nanostructures. This novel photoacoustic absorber provides a new direction for highly efficient ultrasonic generation. PMID:26659557

  15. Photoacoustic microcantilevers

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Van Neste, Charles W.; Brown, Gilbert M.; Senesac, Lawrence R.

    2012-06-05

    A system generates a photoacoustic spectrum in an open or closed environment with reduced noise. A source focuses a beam on a target substance disposed on a base. The base supports a cantilever that measures acoustic waves generated as light is absorbed by the target substance. By focusing a chopped/pulsed light beam on the target substance, a range of optical absorbance may be measured as the wavelength of light changes. An identifying spectrum of the target may detected by monitoring the vibration intensity variation of the cantilever as a function of illuminating wavelength or color.

  16. Prospects of photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lihong V.

    2008-01-01

    Commercially available high-resolution three-dimensional optical imaging modalities—including confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and optical coherence tomography—have fundamentally impacted biomedicine. Unfortunately, such tools cannot penetrate biological tissue deeper than the optical transport mean free path (∼1 mm in the skin). Photoacoustic tomography, which combines strong optical contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality, has broken through this fundamental depth limitation and achieved superdepth high-resolution optical imaging. In parallel, radio frequency-or microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography is being actively developed to combine radio frequency or microwave contrast with ultrasonic resolution. In this Vision 20∕20 article, the prospects of photoacoustic tomography are envisaged in the following aspects: (1) photoacoustic microscopy of optical absorption emerging as a mainstream technology, (2) melanoma detection using photoacoustic microscopy, (3) photoacoustic endoscopy, (4) simultaneous functional and molecular photoacoustic tomography, (5) photoacoustic tomography of gene expression, (6) Doppler photoacoustic tomography for flow measurement, (7) photoacoustic tomography of metabolic rate of oxygen, (8) photoacoustic mapping of sentinel lymph nodes, (9) multiscale photoacoustic imaging in vivo with common signal origins, (10) simultaneous photoacoustic and thermoacoustic tomography of the breast, (11) photoacoustic and thermoacoustic tomography of the brain, and (12) low-background thermoacoustic molecular imaging. PMID:19175133

  17. Tomographic Imaging of the Magmatic System at Mount St. Helens with the iMUSH Broadband Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulberg, C. W.; Creager, K. C.; Levander, A.; Kiser, E.; Moran, S. C.; Abers, G. A.; Schmandt, B.; Vidale, J. E.; Houston, H.; Denlinger, R. P.; Williams, M. C. B.

    2015-12-01

    We deployed 70 broadband seismometers in the summer of 2014 to image the velocity structure beneath Mount St. Helens (MSH), Washington, USA as part of a collaborative project called imaging Magma Under St. Helens (iMUSH). Our goal is to illuminate the MSH magmatic system, using active- and passive-source seismology, magnetotellurics and petrology. Details of the velocity structure, coupled with other geophysical and geologic data, can help constrain the geometry and physical state of any bodies of melt beneath the volcano. The broadband array has a diameter of ~100 km centered on MSH with an average station spacing of 10 km, and will remain deployed through summer 2016. It is augmented by dozens of permanent stations in the area. We determine P-wave arrival times using Antelope software and incorporate permanent network picks for the region. We use the program struct3DP to invert travel times to obtain a 3-D seismic velocity model and relocate hypocenters, computing travel times using a 3-D eikonal-equation solver. There were more than 500 useable local events during the first year of iMUSH broadband recording, which to date have provided 5000 arrival times, with the number growing rapidly. The local events include 23 active shots that were set off in the summer of 2014 as part of the iMUSH experiment, which recorded with good signal-to-noise ratios across the entire array. The absolute P times will be augmented by differential times calculated by cross-correlation between observations at the same station for nearby event pairs. These will be incorporated into our model using double-difference tomography. We anticipate that our 3D velocity model will provide the highest resolution image of volcanic plumbing at MSH thus far. Our model interpretation will incorporate results from active-source and ambient noise tomography, receiver functions, magnetotellurics, and petrology.

  18. Experimental evaluation of cMUT and PZT transducers in receive only mode for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warshavski, O.; Meynier, C.; Sénégond, N.; Chatain, P.; Felix, N.; Nguyen-Dinh, A.

    2016-03-01

    In photoacoustic imaging, the angular reception performance of ultrasonic transducers is a critical parameter to be considered for system designers. The quantitative comparison between cMUT and PZT emphasizes the difference between the transducer requirements and specifications between conventional ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging. In this present work, we show significant benefits of cMUT based array transducers over conventional PZT arrays for the improvement of quality in photoacoustic imaging systems.

  19. Integrative System of Fast Photoacoustic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Tan

    An integrative fast (Photoacoustic) PA imaging system based on multi-element linear ultrasonic transducer array was developed, which integrates laser delivery, photoacoustic excitation and photoacoustic detection into a portable system. It collects PA signals by a multi-element linear transducer array in a reflection mode. The PA images with high spatial resolution and high contrast were obtained. Compared to other existing PA imaging methods, the integrative PA imaging system is characterized by rapidness, convenience and high practicality. The integrative system is mobile and portable, and it is suitable for imaging samples in natural condition with various different shapes. It will provide a novel and effective PA imaging approach for clinic diagnosis of neoplasm and tissue functional imaging in vivo, and has potential to be developed into a practical apparatus used in the early non-invasive detection of breast-cancer.

  20. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy. PMID:23346370

  1. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  2. Photoacoustic imaging with rotational compounding for improved signal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, A.; Heinmiller, A.; Jose, J.; Needles, A.; Hirson, D.

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy with linear array transducers enables fast two-dimensional, cross-sectional photoacoustic imaging. Unfortunately, most ultrasound transducers are only sensitive to a very narrow angular acceptance range and preferentially detect signals along the main axis of the transducer. This often limits photoacoustic microscopy from detecting blood vessels which can extend in any direction. Rotational compounded photoacoustic imaging is introduced to overcome the angular-dependency of detecting acoustic signals with linear array transducers. An integrate system is designed to control the image acquisition using a linear array transducer, a motorized rotational stage, and a motorized lateral stage. Images acquired at multiple angular positions are combined to form a rotational compounded image. We found that the signal-to-noise ratio improved, while the sidelobe and reverberation artifacts were substantially reduced. Furthermore, the rotational compounded images of excised kidneys and hindlimb tumors of mice showed more structural information compared with any single image collected.

  3. Reflection-artifact-free photoacoustic imaging using PAFUSion (photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuniyil Ajith Singh, Mithun; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-03-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities are a main challenge to deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging. Photoacoustic transients generated by the skin surface and superficial vasculature will propagate into the tissue and reflect back from echogenic structures to generate reflection artifacts. These artifacts can cause problems in image interpretation and limit imaging depth. In its basic version, PAFUSion mimics the inward travelling wave-field from blood vessel-like PA sources by applying focused ultrasound pulses, and thus provides a way to identify reflection artifacts. In this work, we demonstrate reflection artifact correction in addition to identification, towards obtaining an artifact-free photoacoustic image. In view of clinical applications, we implemented an improved version of PAFUSion in which photoacoustic data is backpropagated to imitate the inward travelling wave-field and thus the reflection artifacts of a more arbitrary distribution of PA sources that also includes the skin melanin layer. The backpropagation is performed in a synthetic way based on the pulse-echo acquisitions after transmission on each single element of the transducer array. We present a phantom experiment and initial in vivo measurements on human volunteers where we demonstrate significant reflection artifact reduction using our technique. The results provide a direct confirmation that reflection artifacts are prominent in clinical epi-photoacoustic imaging, and that PAFUSion can reduce these artifacts significantly to improve the deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging.

  4. Photoacoustic imaging of carotid artery atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruizinga, Pieter; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; de Jong, Nico; Springeling, Geert; Robertus, Jan Lukas; van der Lugt, Aad; van Soest, Gijs

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a method for photoacoustic imaging of the carotid artery, tailored toward detection of lipid-rich atherosclerotic lesions. A common human carotid artery was obtained at autopsy, embedded in a neck mimicking phantom and imaged with a multimodality imaging system using interstitial illumination. Light was delivered through a 1.25-mm-diameter optical probe that can be placed in the pharynx, allowing the carotid artery to be illuminated from within the body. Ultrasound imaging and photoacoustic signal detection is achieved by an external 8-MHz linear array coupled to an ultrasound imaging system. Spectroscopic analysis of photoacoustic images obtained in the wavelength range from 1130 to 1250 nm revealed plaque-specific lipid accumulation in the collagen structure of the artery wall. These spectroscopic findings were confirmed by histology.

  5. Taking advantage of acoustic inhomogeneities in photoacoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, Anabela; Handschin, Charles; Riedinger, Christophe; Piasecki, Julien; Mensah, Serge; Litman, Amélie; Akhouayri, Hassan

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic offers promising perspectives in probing and imaging subsurface optically absorbing structures in biological tissues. The optical uence absorbed is partly dissipated into heat accompanied with microdilatations that generate acoustic pressure waves, the intensity which is related to the amount of fluuence absorbed. Hence the photoacoustic signal measured offers access, at least potentially, to a local monitoring of the absorption coefficient, in 3D if tomographic measurements are considered. However, due to both the diffusing and absorbing nature of the surrounding tissues, the major part of the uence is deposited locally at the periphery of the tissue, generating an intense acoustic pressure wave that may hide relevant photoacoustic signals. Experimental strategies have been developed in order to measure exclusively the photoacoustic waves generated by the structure of interest (orthogonal illumination and detection). Temporal or more sophisticated filters (wavelets) can also be applied. However, the measurement of this primary acoustic wave carries a lot of information about the acoustically inhomogeneous nature of the medium. We propose a protocol that includes the processing of this primary intense acoustic wave, leading to the quantification of the surrounding medium sound speed, and, if appropriate to an acoustical parametric image of the heterogeneities. This information is then included as prior knowledge in the photoacoustic reconstruction scheme to improve the localization and quantification.

  6. In vivo demonstration of reflection artifact reduction in photoacoustic imaging using synthetic aperture photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound (PAFUSion)

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mithun Kuniyil Ajith; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-01-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities are a critical problem in epi-mode biomedical photoacoustic imaging. High light fluence beneath the probe results in photoacoustic transients, which propagate into the tissue and reflect back from echogenic structures. These reflection artifacts cause problems in image interpretation and significantly impact the contrast and imaging depth. We recently proposed a method called PAFUSion (Photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound) to identify such reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging. In its initial version, PAFUSion mimics the inward-travelling wavefield from small blood vessel-like PA sources by applying ultrasound pulses focused towards these sources, and thus provides a way to identify the resulting reflection artifacts. In this work, we demonstrate reduction of reflection artifacts in phantoms and in vivo measurements on human volunteers. In view of the spatially distributed PA sources that are found in clinical applications, we implemented an improved version of PAFUSion where photoacoustic signals are backpropagated to imitate the inward travelling wavefield and thus the reflection artifacts. The backpropagation is performed in a synthetic way based on the pulse-echo acquisitions after transmission on each single element of the transducer array. The results provide a direct confirmation that reflection artifacts are prominent in clinical epi-photoacoustic imaging, and that PAFUSion can strongly reduce these artifacts to improve deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging. PMID:27570690

  7. Photoacoustic clutter reduction by inversion of a linear scatter model using plane wave ultrasound measurements.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Hans-Martin; Beckmann, Martin F; Schmitz, Georg

    2016-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging aims to visualize light absorption properties of biological tissue by receiving a sound wave that is generated inside the observed object as a result of the photoacoustic effect. In clinical applications, the strong light absorption in human skin is a major problem. When high amplitude photoacoustic waves that originate from skin absorption propagate into the tissue, they are reflected back by acoustical scatterers and the reflections contribute to the received signal. The artifacts associated with these reflected waves are referred to as clutter or skin echo and limit the applicability of photoacoustic imaging for medical applications severely. This study seeks to exploit the acoustic tissue information gained by plane wave ultrasound measurements with a linear array in order to correct for reflections in the photoacoustic image. By deriving a theory for clutter waves in k-space and a matching inversion approach, photoacoustic measurements compensated for clutter are shown to be recovered. PMID:27446669

  8. Photoacoustic clutter reduction by inversion of a linear scatter model using plane wave ultrasound measurements

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Hans-Martin; Beckmann, Martin F.; Schmitz, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging aims to visualize light absorption properties of biological tissue by receiving a sound wave that is generated inside the observed object as a result of the photoacoustic effect. In clinical applications, the strong light absorption in human skin is a major problem. When high amplitude photoacoustic waves that originate from skin absorption propagate into the tissue, they are reflected back by acoustical scatterers and the reflections contribute to the received signal. The artifacts associated with these reflected waves are referred to as clutter or skin echo and limit the applicability of photoacoustic imaging for medical applications severely. This study seeks to exploit the acoustic tissue information gained by plane wave ultrasound measurements with a linear array in order to correct for reflections in the photoacoustic image. By deriving a theory for clutter waves in k-space and a matching inversion approach, photoacoustic measurements compensated for clutter are shown to be recovered. PMID:27446669

  9. Gynecologic electrical impedance tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korjenevsky, A.; Cherepenin, V.; Trokhanova, O.; Tuykin, T.

    2010-04-01

    Electrical impedance tomography extends to the new and new areas of the medical diagnostics: lungs, breast, prostate, etc. The feedback from the doctors who use our breast EIT diagnostic system has induced us to develop the 3D electrical impedance imaging device for diagnostics of the cervix of the uterus - gynecologic impedance tomograph (GIT). The device uses the same measuring approach as the breast imaging system: 2D flat array of the electrodes arranged on the probe with handle is placed against the body. Each of the 32 electrodes of the array is connected in turn to the current source while the rest electrodes acquire the potentials on the surface. The current flows through the electrode of the array and returns through the remote electrode placed on the patient's limb. The voltages are measured relative to another remote electrode. The 3D backprojection along equipotential surfaces is used to reconstruct conductivity distribution up to approximately 1 cm in depth. Small number of electrodes enables us to implement real time imaging with a few frames per sec. rate. The device is under initial testing and evaluation of the imaging capabilities and suitability of usage.

  10. Photoacoustic image-guided needle biopsy of sentinel lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Erpelding, Todd N.; Akers, Walter J.; Maslov, Konstantin; Song, Liang; Jankovic, Ladislav; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Achilefu, Samuel; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    We have implemented a hand-held photoacoustic and ultrasound probe for image-guided needle biopsy using a modified clinical ultrasound array system. Pulsed laser light was delivered via bifurcated optical fiber bundles integrated with the hand-held ultrasound probe. We photoacoustically guided needle insertion into rat sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) following accumulation of indocyanine green (ICG). Strong photoacoustic image contrast of the needle was achieved. After intradermal injection of ICG in the left forepaw, deeply positioned SLNs (beneath 2-cm thick chicken breast) were easily indentified in vivo and in real time. Further, we confirmed ICG uptake in axillary lymph nodes with in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging. These results demonstrate the clinical potential of this hand-held photoacoustic system for facile identification and needle biopsy of SLNs for cancer staging and metastasis detection in humans.

  11. Tomographic phase microscopy using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habaza, Mor; Gilboa, Barak; Roichman, Yael; Shaked, Natan T.

    2015-07-01

    We review our technique for tomographic phase microscopy with optical tweezers [1]. This tomographic phase microscopy approach enables full 3-D refractive-index reconstruction. Tomographic phase microscopy measures quantitatively the 3- D distribution of refractive-index in biological cells. We integrated our external interferometric module with holographic optical tweezers for obtaining quantitative phase maps of biological samples from a wide range of angles. The close-tocommon- path, off-axis interferometric system enables a full-rotation tomographic acquisition of a single cell using holographic optical tweezers for trapping and manipulating with a desired array of traps, while acquiring phase information of a single cell from all different angles and maintaining the native surrounding medium. We experimentally demonstrated two reconstruction algorithms: the filtered back-projection method and the Fourier diffraction method for 3-D refractive index imaging of yeast cells.

  12. Photoacoustics with coherent light

    PubMed Central

    Bossy, Emmanuel; Gigan, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction in the mid-nineties, photoacoustic imaging of biological tissue has been one of the fastest growing biomedical imaging modality, and its basic principles are now considered as well established. In particular, light propagation in photoacoustic imaging is generally considered from the perspective of transport theory. However, recent breakthroughs in optics have shown that coherent light propagating through optically scattering medium could be manipulated towards novel imaging approaches. In this article, we first provide an introduction to the relevant concepts in the field, and then review the recent works showing that it is possible to exploit the coherence of light in conjunction with photoacoustics. We illustrate how the photoacoustic effect can be used as a powerful feedback mechanism for optical wavefront shaping in complex media, and conversely show how the coherence of light can be exploited to enhance photoacoustic imaging, for instance in terms of spatial resolution or for designing minimally invasive endoscopic devices. Finally, we discuss the current challenges and perspectives down the road towards practical applications in the field of photoacoustic imaging. PMID:27069874

  13. Photoacoustics with coherent light.

    PubMed

    Bossy, Emmanuel; Gigan, Sylvain

    2016-03-01

    Since its introduction in the mid-nineties, photoacoustic imaging of biological tissue has been one of the fastest growing biomedical imaging modality, and its basic principles are now considered as well established. In particular, light propagation in photoacoustic imaging is generally considered from the perspective of transport theory. However, recent breakthroughs in optics have shown that coherent light propagating through optically scattering medium could be manipulated towards novel imaging approaches. In this article, we first provide an introduction to the relevant concepts in the field, and then review the recent works showing that it is possible to exploit the coherence of light in conjunction with photoacoustics. We illustrate how the photoacoustic effect can be used as a powerful feedback mechanism for optical wavefront shaping in complex media, and conversely show how the coherence of light can be exploited to enhance photoacoustic imaging, for instance in terms of spatial resolution or for designing minimally invasive endoscopic devices. Finally, we discuss the current challenges and perspectives down the road towards practical applications in the field of photoacoustic imaging. PMID:27069874

  14. Multifocal optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy in reflection mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Compared with single-focus optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), multifocal OR-PAM utilizes both multifocal optical illumination and an ultrasonic array transducer, significantly increasing the imaging speed. Here we present a reflection-mode multifocal OR-PAM system based on a microlens array that provides multiple foci and an ultrasonic array transducer that receives the excited photoacoustic waves from all foci simultaneously. By using a customized microprism to reflect the incident laser beam to the microlens array, we align the multiple optical foci confocally with the focal zone of the ultrasonic array transducer. Experiments show our reflection-mode multifocal ORPAM system is capable of imaging microvessels in vivo, and it can image a 9 mm x 5 mm x 2.5 mm volume at 16 μm lateral resolution in ~4 min, limited by the signal multiplexing ratio and laser pulse repetition rate.

  15. Reflection-mode multifocal optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Compared with single-focus optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), multifocal OR-PAM utilizes both multifocal optical illumination and an ultrasonic array transducer, significantly increasing the imaging speed. A reflection-mode multifocal OR-PAM system based on a microlens array that provides multiple foci as well as an ultrasonic array transducer that receives the excited photoacoustic waves from all foci simultaneously is presented. Using a customized microprism to reflect the incident laser beam to the microlens array, the multiple optical foci are aligned confocally with the focal zone of the ultrasonic array transducer. Experiments show the reflection-mode multifocal OR-PAM is capable of imaging microvessels in vivo, and it can image a 6×5×2.5 mm3 volume at 16 μm lateral resolution in ˜2.5 min, which was limited by the signal multiplexing ratio and laser pulse repetition rate.

  16. Photoacoustic microscopy for ovarian tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianheng; Yang, Yi; Alqasemi, Umar; Kumavor, Patrick D.; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we present the construction of an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) system and studies done on the characterization of human ovarian tissue with malignant and benign features ex vivo. PAM images of the ovaries showed more detailed blood vessel distributions with much higher resolution compared with conventional photoacoustic images obtained with array transducers. In all, 29 PAM images (20 from normal ovaries and 9 from malignant ovaries) were studied. Eight different features were extracted quantitatively from the PAM images, and a generalized linear model (GLM) was used to classify the ovaries as normal or malignant. By using the GLM, a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 100% were obtained for the training set. These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of our PAM system in mapping microvasculature networks, as well as characterizing the ovarian tissue, and could be extremely valuable in assisting surgeons for in vivo evaluation of ovarian tissue.

  17. Photoacoustic determination of blood vessel diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkman, Roy G. M.; Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Hopman, Jeroen C. W.; de Mul, Frits F. M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Thijssen, Johan M.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2004-10-01

    A double-ring sensor was applied in photoacoustic tomographic imaging of artificial blood vessels as well as blood vessels in a rabbit ear. The peak-to-peak time (tgrpp) of the laser (1064 nm) induced pressure transient was used to estimate the axial vessel diameter. Comparison with the actual vessel diameter showed that the diameter could be approximated by 2ctgrpp, with c the speed of sound in blood. Using this relation, the lateral diameter could also precisely be determined. In vivo imaging and monitoring of changes in vessel diameters was feasible. Finally, acoustic time traces were recorded while flushing a vessel in the rabbit ear with saline, which proved that the main contribution to the laser-induced pressure transient is caused by blood inside the vessel and that the vessel wall gives only a minor contribution.

  18. Multi-contrast Photoacoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Junjie

    Photoacoustic microscopy is a hybrid imaging modality with high spatial resolution, moderate imaging depth, excellent imaging contrast and functional imaging capability. Taking full advantage of this powerful weapon, we have investigated different anatomical, functional, flow dynamic and metabolic parameter measurements using photoacoustic microscopy. Specifically, Evans-blue dye was used to enhance photoacoustic microscopy of capillaries; label-free transverse and axial blood flow was measured based on bandwidth broadening and time shift of the photoacoustic signals; metabolic rate of oxygen was quantified in vivo from all the five parameters measured by photoacoustic microcopy; whole cross-sectional imaging of small intestine was achieved on a double-illumination photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of focus and imaging depth; hemodynamic imaging was performed on a MEMS-mirror enhanced photoacoustic microscopy with a cross-sectional imaging rate of 400 Hz. As a maturing imaging technique, PAM is expected to find new applications in both fundamental life science and clinical practice.

  19. Computationally intelligent pulsed photoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukić, Mladena; Ćojbašić, Žarko; Rabasović, Mihailo D.; Markushev, Dragan D.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the application of computational intelligence in pulsed photoacoustics is discussed. Feedforward multilayer perception networks are applied for real-time simultaneous determination of the laser beam spatial profile and vibrational-to-translational relaxation time of the polyatomic molecules in gases. Networks are trained and tested with theoretical data adjusted for a given experimental set-up. Genetic optimization has been used for calculation of the same parameters, fitting the photoacoustic signals with a different number of generations. Observed benefits from the application of computational intelligence in pulsed photoacoustics and advantages over previously developed methods are discussed, such as real-time operation, high precision and the possibility of finding solutions in a wide range of parameters, similar to in experimental conditions. In addition, the applicability for practical uses, such as the real-time in situ measurements of atmospheric pollutants, along with possible further developments of obtained results, is argued.

  20. Stimulated Raman photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Zhang, Hao F.; Noojin, Gary D.; Denton, Michael L.; Thomas, Robert J.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving label-free, molecular-specific imaging with high spatial resolution in deep tissue is often considered the grand challenge of optical imaging. To accomplish this goal, significant optical scattering in tissues has to be overcome while achieving molecular specificity without resorting to extrinsic labeling. We demonstrate the feasibility of developing such an optical imaging modality by combining the molecularly specific stimulated Raman excitation with the photoacoustic detection. By employing two ultrashort excitation laser pulses, separated in frequency by the vibrational frequency of a targeted molecule, only the specific vibrational level of the target molecules in the illuminated tissue volume is excited. This targeted optical absorption generates ultrasonic waves (referred to as stimulated Raman photoacoustic waves) which are detected using a traditional ultrasonic transducer to form an image following the design of the established photoacoustic microscopy. PMID:21059930

  1. Fast multi-element phase-controlled photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Da; Gu, Huaimin; Yang, Diwu

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, we have constructed an integrative fast photoacoustic (PA) imaging system for fast photoacoustic imaging, which includes a fiber, ultrasonic coupling medium, and a multi-element linear transducer array (MLTA). The PA signals were received by the MLTA in a reflection mode arid collected by a computer, reconstructed by limited-field filtered back projection algorithm. The PA images of different depth of phantom and animal blood vessels of different diameters were obtained. The lateral resolution of the system was 0.2mm. It would provide a new approach to tissue functional images in vivo and may have potentials in developing into an appliance for clinic diagnosis of disease.

  2. Photoacoustic monitoring of changes in the blood circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilatou, Magdalena C.; Siphanto, Ronald I.; van Adrichem, Leon N. A.; de Mul, Frits F. M.

    2003-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) signal generation can be used as the basis for a new medical tomographic technique. In this article, we present results, which have been obtained by applying the PA technique on animals and more specifically on Wistar rats. The primary goal was to investigate the possibility of using PA for monitoring the changes in the blood circulation. This was achieved by tracking the vessel position with one-dimensional scans and by monitoring the changes in the signal due to artificially induced changes in the blood circulation.

  3. Photoacoustic molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, William L., Jr.; Reinecke, Daniel; DeGrado, Timothy; Bhattacharyya, Sibaprasad; Kruger, Robert A.

    2007-02-01

    It is well documented that photoacoustic imaging has the capability to differentiate tissue based on the spectral characteristics of tissue in the optical regime. The imaging depth in tissue exceeds standard optical imaging techniques, and systems can be designed to achieve excellent spatial resolution. A natural extension of imaging the intrinsic optical contrast of tissue is to demonstrate the ability of photoacoustic imaging to detect contrast agents based on optically absorbing dyes that exhibit well defined absorption peaks in the infrared. The ultimate goal of this project is to implement molecular imaging, in which Herceptin TM, a monoclonal antibody that is used as a therapeutic agent in breast cancer patients that over express the HER2 gene, is labeled with an IR absorbing dye, and the resulting in vivo bio-distribution is mapped using multi-spectral, infrared stimulation and subsequent photoacoustic detection. To lay the groundwork for this goal and establish system sensitivity, images were collected in tissue mimicking phantoms to determine maximum detection depth and minimum detectable concentration of Indocyanine Green (ICG), a common IR absorbing dye, for a single angle photoacoustic acquisition. A breast mimicking phantom was constructed and spectra were also collected for hemoglobin and methanol. An imaging schema was developed that made it possible to separate the ICG from the other tissue mimicking components in a multiple component phantom. We present the results of these experiments and define the path forward for the detection of dye labeled Herceptin TM in cell cultures and mice models.

  4. Interlaced realtime channel-domain photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging offers a new and complementary contrast mechanism to the traditional structural contrast of ultrasound. While the combination of these two modes has been demonstrated in the past with single-element transducers, array transducers offer clear advantages in both modes by eliminating mechanical scanning and allowing image formation from a single excitation. Given the abundance of commercially available ultrasound systems, it is desirable to use them as much as possible. However, these systems often only allow access to beamformed RF data. We discuss the applicability of ultrasound beamformers for photoacoustic imaging, and find that with only software-defined control over the speed of sound, walking aperture reconstruction is optimally performed using a speed correction factor of 1.414. When sector-scanning is used, a different strategy is required. We also demonstrate a new photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging system based on a Verasonics ultrasound array system. The system streams raw channel data to a 6-core PC at up to 1.4GB/s via PCI-Express, allowing interlaced ultrasound and photoacoustic data to be acquired and reconstructed at realtime rates. Using an L7-4 linear array transducer, we demonstrate the performance of this system and discuss potential applications. The system should provide new opportunities for clinical and pre-clinical imaging.

  5. Photoacoustic effect and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, M.; Qian, M.

    1985-03-01

    Photoacoustic detection characteristics, as well as the principle and applications of the photoacoustic effect in gases and solids are introduced. Figures show a gas photoacoustic detection system; a photoacoustic spectrum of benzene and Lamb's depression for methyl alcohol as displayed by a CO2 laser; a correlation curve of pure CH4; resonance curves for (C-12)O2 and (C-13)O2; a photoacoustic resonator of a microphone detection system; a transducer-specimen assembly of detection system of a piezoelectric transducer; a weak-absorption set-up for photoacoustic detection of solids; an optico-acoustical spectrum for the epidermis of guinea-pigs; and determination of photoelectric quantum efficiency Q of thin dye films. Tables give the P (tau) values of the oscillatory relaxation of CH4 determined by several methods, and a comparison of results of weak absorption determination.

  6. Photoacoustic Measurements in Brain Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Kasili, P.M.; Mobley, J.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    1999-09-19

    In this work, we develop and evaluate the photoacoustic technique for recording spectra of white and gray mammalian brain tissues. In addition to the experimental work, we also discuss the geometric aspects of photoacoustic signal generation using collimated light. Spectra constructed from the peak-to-peak amplitude of the photoacoustic waveforms indicate differences in the two tissue types at wavelengths between 620 and 695 nm. The potential of the technique for non-invasive diagnosis is discussed.

  7. Pulsed photoacoustic flow imaging with a handheld system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Pim J.; Daoudi, Khalid; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-02-01

    Flow imaging is an important technique in a range of disease areas, but estimating low flow speeds, especially near the walls of blood vessels, remains challenging. Pulsed photoacoustic flow imaging can be an alternative since there is little signal contamination from background tissue with photoacoustic imaging. We propose flow imaging using a clinical photoacoustic system that is both handheld and portable. The system integrates a linear array with 7.5 MHz central frequency in combination with a high-repetition-rate diode laser to allow high-speed photoacoustic imaging-ideal for this application. This work shows the flow imaging performance of the system in vitro using microparticles. Both two-dimensional (2-D) flow images and quantitative flow velocities from 12 to 75 mm/s were obtained. In a transparent bulk medium, flow estimation showed standard errors of ˜7% the estimated speed; in the presence of tissue-realistic optical scattering, the error increased to 40% due to limited signal-to-noise ratio. In the future, photoacoustic flow imaging can potentially be performed in vivo using fluorophore-filled vesicles or with an improved setup on whole blood.

  8. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate, by means of internal light delivery, photoacoustic imaging of the deep brain of rats in vivo. With fiber illumination via the oral cavity, we delivered light directly into the bottom of the brain, much more than can be delivered by external illumination. The study was performed using a photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system equipped with a 512-element full-ring transducer array, providing a full two-dimensional view aperture. Using internal illumination, the PACT system provided clear cross sectional photoacoustic images from the palate to the middle brain of live rats, revealing deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  9. Photoacoustic imaging of clinical metal needle by a LED light source integrated transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agano, Toshitaka; Sato, Naoto; Nakatsuka, Hitoshi; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Hanaoka, Takamitsu; Morisono, Koji; Shigeta, Yusuke; Tanaka, Chizuyo

    2016-03-01

    We have achieved penetration depth of 30mm by photoacoustic imaging system using LED light source integrated transducer to image a clinical metal needle inserted into a tissue mimicking phantom. We developed the transducer that integrated near-infrared LED array light source, which was connected to a photoacoustic imaging system which drove LED array light source and controlled photoacoustic data acquisition process. Conventionally solid-state laser has been used as the light source for photoacoustic imaging system. Because LED is diffused light source, laser safety glasses is not necessary, also inflexible fibers are not used to guide light close to a transducer, and we integrated LED light source inside the transducer, which became compact and practical size for conventional ultrasound equipment users. We made LED light source unit as detachable to the transducer easily, so wave-length of light can be selectable by changing the LED light source unit.

  10. Initial results of imaging melanoma metastasis in resected human lymph nodes using photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Jithin; Grootendorst, Diederik J.; Vijn, Thomas W.; Wouters, Michel W.; van Boven, Hester; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Ruers, Theo J. M.; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-09-01

    The pathological status of the sentinel lymph node is important for accurate melanoma staging, ascertaining prognosis and planning treatment. The standard procedure involves biopsy of the node and histopathological assessment of its status. Drawbacks of this examination include a finite sampling of the node with the likelihood of missing metastases, and a significant time-lag before histopathological results are available to the surgeon. We studied the applicability of photoacoustic computed tomographic imaging as an intraoperative modality for examining the status of resected human sentinel lymph nodes. We first applied the technique to image ex vivo pig lymph nodes carrying metastases-simulating melanoma cells using multiple wavelengths. The experience gained was applied to image a suspect human lymph node. We validated the photoacoustic imaging results by comparing a reconstructed slice with a histopathological section through the node. Our results suggest that photoacoustics has the potential to develop into an intraoperative imaging method to detect melanoma metastases in sentinel lymph nodes.

  11. Towards nonionizing photoacoustic cystography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Jeon, Mansik; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    Normally, urine flows down from kidneys to bladders. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the abnormal flow of urine from bladders back to kidneys. VUR commonly follows urinary tract infection and leads to renal infection. Fluoroscopic voiding cystourethrography and direct radionuclide voiding cystography have been clinical gold standards for VUR imaging, but these methods are ionizing. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a novel and nonionizing process for VUR mapping in vivo, called photoacoustic cystography (PAC). Using a photoacoustic (PA) imaging system, we have successfully imaged a rat bladder filled with clinically being used methylene blue dye. An image contrast of ~8 was achieved. Further, spectroscopic PAC confirmed the accumulation of methylene blue in the bladder. Using a laser pulse energy of less than 1 mJ/cm2, bladder was clearly visible in the PA image. Our results suggest that this technology would be a useful clinical tool, allowing clinicians to identify bladder noninvasively in vivo.

  12. Sensitivity of photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Building on its high spatial resolution, deep penetration depth and excellent image contrast, 3D photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has grown tremendously since its first publication in 2005. Integrating optical excitation and acoustic detection, PAM has broken through both the optical diffusion and optical diffraction limits. PAM has 100% relative sensitivity to optical absorption (i.e., a given percentage change in the optical absorption coefficient yields the same percentage change in the photoacoustic amplitude), and its ultimate detection sensitivity is limited only by thermal noise. Focusing on the engineering aspects of PAM, this Review discusses the detection sensitivity of PAM, compares the detection efficiency of different PAM designs, and summarizes the imaging performance of various endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. It then describes representative PAM applications with high detection sensitivity, and outlines paths to further improvement. PMID:25302158

  13. Tutorial on photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V

    2016-06-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has become one of the fastest growing fields in biomedical optics. Unlike pure optical imaging, such as confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, PAT employs acoustic detection to image optical absorption contrast with high-resolution deep into scattering tissue. So far, PAT has been widely used for multiscale anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging of biological tissues. We focus on PAT’s basic principles, major implementations, imaging contrasts, and recent applications. PMID:27086868

  14. Pure optical photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhixing; Chen, Sung-Liang; Ling, Tao; Guo, L. Jay; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding

    2011-01-01

    The concept of pure optical photoacoustic microscopy(POPAM) was proposed based on optical rastering of a focused excitation beam and optically sensing the photoacoustic signal using a microring resonator fabricated by a nanoimprinting technique. After the refinements of the microring’s working wavelength and in the resonator structure and mold fabrication, an ultrahigh Q factor of 3.0×105 was achieved which provided high sensitivity with a noise equivalent detectable pressure(NEDP) value of 29Pa. This NEDP is much lower than the hundreds of Pascals achieved with existing optical resonant structures such as etalons, fiber gratings and dielectric multilayer interference filters available for acoustic measurement. The featured high sensitivity allowed the microring resonator to detect the weak photoacoustic signals from micro- or submicroscale objects. The inherent superbroad bandwidth of the optical microring resonator combined with an optically focused scanning beam provided POPAM with high resolution in the axial as well as both lateral directions while the axial resolution of conventional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) suffers from the limited bandwidth of PZT detectors. Furthermore, the broadband microring resonator showed similar sensitivity to that of our most sensitive PZT detector. The current POPAM system provides a lateral resolution of 5 μm and an axial resolution of 8 μm, comparable to that achieved by optical microscopy while presenting the unique contrast of optical absorption and functional information complementing other optical modalities. The 3D structure of microvasculature, including capillary networks, and even individual red blood cells have been discerned successfully in the proof-of-concept experiments on mouse bladders ex vivo and mouse ears in vivo. The potential of approximately GHz bandwidth of the microring resonator also might allow much higher resolution than shown here in microscopy of optical absorption and acoustic propagation

  15. Tutorial on photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-06-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has become one of the fastest growing fields in biomedical optics. Unlike pure optical imaging, such as confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, PAT employs acoustic detection to image optical absorption contrast with high-resolution deep into scattering tissue. So far, PAT has been widely used for multiscale anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging of biological tissues. We focus on PAT's basic principles, major implementations, imaging contrasts, and recent applications.

  16. Photoacoustic computed microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lei; Xi, Lei; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-05-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is emerging as a powerful technique for imaging microvasculature at depths beyond the ~1 mm depth limit associated with confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy and optical coherence tomography. PAM, however, is currently qualitative in nature and cannot quantitatively measure important functional parameters including oxyhemoglobin (HbO2), deoxyhemoglobin (HbR), oxygen saturation (sO2), blood flow (BF) and rate of oxygen metabolism (MRO2). Here we describe a new photoacoustic microscopic method, termed photoacoustic computed microscopy (PACM) that combines current PAM technique with a model-based inverse reconstruction algorithm. We evaluate the PACM approach using tissue-mimicking phantoms and demonstrate its in vivo imaging ability of quantifying HbO2, HbR, sO2, cerebral BF and cerebral MRO2 at the small vessel level in a rodent model. This new technique provides a unique tool for neuroscience research and for visualizing microvasculature dynamics involved in tumor angiogenesis and in inflammatory joint diseases.

  17. Error estimates for universal back-projection-based photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Prabodh K.; Naik, Naren; Munshi, Prabhat; Pradhan, Asima

    2015-07-01

    Photo-acoustic tomography is a hybrid imaging modality that combines the advantages of optical as well as ultrasound imaging techniques to produce images with high resolution and good contrast at high penetration depths. Choice of reconstruction algorithm as well as experimental and computational parameters plays a major role in governing the accuracy of a tomographic technique. Therefore error estimates with the variation of these parameters have extreme importance. Due to the finite support, that photo-acoustic source has, the pressure signals are not band-limited, but in practice, our detection system is. Hence the reconstructed image from ideal, noiseless band-limited forward data (for future references we will call this band-limited reconstruction) is the best approximation that we have for the unknown object. In the present study, we report the error that arises in the universal back-projection (UBP) based photo-acoustic reconstruction for planer detection geometry due to sampling and filtering of forward data (pressure signals).Computational validation of the error estimates have been carried out for synthetic phantoms. Validation with noisy forward data has also been carried out, to study the effect of noise on the error estimates derived in our work. Although here we have derived the estimates for planar detection geometry, the derivations for spherical and cylindrical geometries follow accordingly.

  18. Partially coherent lensfree tomographic microscopy⋄

    PubMed Central

    Isikman, Serhan O.; Bishara, Waheb; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Optical sectioning of biological specimens provides detailed volumetric information regarding their internal structure. To provide a complementary approach to existing three-dimensional (3D) microscopy modalities, we have recently demonstrated lensfree optical tomography that offers high-throughput imaging within a compact and simple platform. In this approach, in-line holograms of objects at different angles of partially coherent illumination are recorded using a digital sensor-array, which enables computing pixel super-resolved tomographic images of the specimen. This imaging modality, which forms the focus of this review, offers micrometer-scale 3D resolution over large imaging volumes of, for example, 10–15 mm3, and can be assembled in light weight and compact architectures. Therefore, lensfree optical tomography might be particularly useful for lab-on-a-chip applications as well as for microscopy needs in resource-limited settings. PMID:22193016

  19. Medical tomograph system using ultrasonic transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, Richard C. (Inventor); Nathan, Robert (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Ultrasonic energy transmission in rectilinear array scanning patterns of soft tissue provides projection density values of the tissue which are recorded as a function of scanning position and angular relationship, .theta., of the subject with a fixed coordinate system. A plurality of rectilinear scan arrays in the same plane for different angular relationships .theta..sub.1 . . . .theta..sub.n thus recorded are superimposed. The superimposition of intensity values thus yields a tomographic image of an internal section of the tissue in the scanning plane.

  20. Organosilicon phantom for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Avigo, Cinzia; Di Lascio, Nicole; Armanetti, Paolo; Kusmic, Claudia; Cavigli, Lucia; Ratto, Fulvio; Meucci, Sandro; Masciullo, Cecilia; Cecchini, Marco; Pini, Roberto; Faita, Francesco; Menichetti, Luca

    2015-04-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging technique. Although commercially available photoacoustic imaging systems currently exist, the technology is still in its infancy. Therefore, the design of stable phantoms is essential to achieve semiquantitative evaluation of the performance of a photoacoustic system and can help optimize the properties of contrast agents. We designed and developed a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantom with exceptionally fine geometry; the phantom was tested using photoacoustic experiments loaded with the standard indocyanine green dye and compared to an agar phantom pattern through polyethylene glycol-gold nanorods. The linearity of the photoacoustic signal with the nanoparticle number was assessed. The signal-tonoiseratio and contrast were employed as image quality parameters, and enhancements of up to 50 and up to 300%, respectively, were measured with the PDMS phantom with respect to the agar one. A tissue-mimicking (TM)-PDMS was prepared by adding TiO2 and India ink; photoacoustic tests were performed in order to compare the signal generated by the TM-PDMS and the biological tissue. The PDMS phantom can become a particularly promising tool in the field of photoacoustics for the evaluation of the performance of a PA system and as a model of the structure of vascularized soft tissues. PMID:25894254

  1. Reflection mode photoacoustic imaging through infant skull toward noninvasive imaging of neonatal brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Chamberland, David L.; Xi, Guohua; Carson, Paul L.

    2009-02-01

    The feasibility of transcranial imaging of neonatal brains with reflection mode photoacoustic technology has been explored. By using unembalmed infant skulls and fresh canine brains, experiments have been conducted to examine the ultrasound and light attenuation in the skull bone as well as consequent photoacoustic images through the skull. Mapping of blood vessels in a transcranial manner has been successfully achieved by employing the raster scan of a single-element transducer or a 2D PVDF array transducer. Experimental results indicate that noninvasive photoacoustic imaging of neonatal brain with a depth of 2 cm or more beneath the skull is feasible when working with near-infrared light. This study suggests that the emerging photoacoustic technology may become a powerful tool in the future for noninvasive diagnosis, monitoring and prognosis of disorders in prenatal or neonatal brains.

  2. Combined ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of pancreatic cancer using nanocage contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Kimberly; Shah, Jignesh; Gomez, Sobeyda; Gensler, Heidi; Karpiouk, Andrei; Brannon-Peppas, L.; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2009-02-01

    A new metallodielectric nanoparticle consisting of a silica core and silver outer cage was developed for the purpose of enhancing photoacoustic imaging contrast in pancreatic tissue. These nanocages were injected into an ex vivo porcine pancreas and imaged using a combined photoacoustic and ultrasound (PAUS) assembly. This custom-designed PAUS assembly delivered 800 nm light through a fiber optical light delivery system integrated with 128 element linear array transducer operating at 7.5 MHz center frequency. Imaging results prove that the nanocage contrast agents have the ability to enhance photoacoustic imaging contrast. Furthermore, the value of the combined PAUS imaging modality was demonstrated as the location of nanocages against background native tissue was evident. Future applications of these nanocage contrast agents could include targeting them to pancreatic cancer for enhancement of photoacoustic imaging for diagnosis and therapy.

  3. Fiber optic photoacoustic probe with ultrasonic tracking for guiding minimally invasive procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Mosse, Charles A.; Colchester, Richard J.; Mari, Jean Martial; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; West, Simeon J.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2015-07-01

    In a wide range of clinical procedures, accurate placement of medical devices such as needles and catheters is critical to optimize patient outcomes. Ultrasound imaging is often used to guide minimally invasive procedures, as it can provide real-time visualization of patient anatomy and medical devices. However, this modality can provide low image contrast for soft tissues, and poor visualization of medical devices that are steeply angled with respect to the incoming ultrasound beams. Photoacoustic sensors can provide information about the spatial distributions of tissue chromophores that could be valuable for guiding minimally invasive procedures. In this study, a system for guiding minimally invasive procedures using photoacoustic sensing was developed. This system included a miniature photoacoustic probe with three optical fibers: one with a bare end for photoacoustic excitation of tissue, a second for photoacoustic excitation of an optically absorbing coating at the distal end to transmit ultrasound, and a third with a Fabry-Perot cavity at the distal end for receiving ultrasound. The position of the photoacoustic probe was determined with ultrasonic tracking, which involved transmitting pulses from a linear-array ultrasound imaging probe at the tissue surface, and receiving them with the fiber-optic ultrasound receiver in the photoacoustic probe. The axial resolution of photoacoustic sensing was better than 70 μm, and the tracking accuracy was better than 1 mm in both axial and lateral dimensions. By translating the photoacoustic probe, depth scans were obtained from different spatial positions, and two-dimensional images were reconstructed using a frequency-domain algorithm.

  4. Field-portable lensfree tomographic microscope†

    PubMed Central

    Isikman, Serhan O.; Bishara, Waheb; Sikora, Uzair; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Yeah, John; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-01-01

    We present a field-portable lensfree tomographic microscope, which can achieve sectional imaging of a large volume (~20 mm3) on a chip with an axial resolution of <7 μm. In this compact tomographic imaging platform (weighing only ~110 grams), 24 light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that are each butt-coupled to a fibre-optic waveguide are controlled through a cost-effective micro-processor to sequentially illuminate the sample from different angles to record lensfree holograms of the sample that is placed on the top of a digital sensor array. In order to generate pixel super-resolved (SR) lensfree holograms and hence digitally improve the achievable lateral resolution, multiple sub-pixel shifted holograms are recorded at each illumination angle by electromagnetically actuating the fibre-optic waveguides using compact coils and magnets. These SR projection holograms obtained over an angular range of ~50° are rapidly reconstructed to yield projection images of the sample, which can then be back-projected to compute tomograms of the objects on the sensor-chip. The performance of this compact and light-weight lensfree tomographic microscope is validated by imaging micro-beads of different dimensions as well as a Hymenolepis nana egg, which is an infectious parasitic flatworm. Achieving a decent three-dimensional spatial resolution, this field-portable on-chip optical tomographic microscope might provide a useful toolset for telemedicine and high-throughput imaging applications in resource-poor settings. PMID:21573311

  5. Quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, several algorithms that allow for quantitative photoacoustic reconstruction of tissue optical, acoustic and physiological properties are described in a finite-element method based framework. These quantitative reconstruction algorithms are compared, and the merits and limitations associated with these methods are discussed. In addition, a multispectral approach is presented for concurrent reconstructions of multiple parameters including deoxyhaemoglobin, oxyhaemoglobin and water concentrations as well as acoustic speed. Simulation and in vivo experiments are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the reconstruction algorithms presented. PMID:19581254

  6. Combined ultrasonic and photoacoustic system for deep tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Erpelding, Todd N.; Jankovic, Ladislav; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    A combined ultrasonic and photoacoustic imaging system is presented that is capable of deep tissue imaging. The system consists of a modified clinical ultrasound array system and tunable dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser. The system is designed for noninvasive detection of sentinel lymph nodes and guidance of needle biopsies for axillary lymph node staging in breast cancer patients. Using a fraction of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) safety limit, photoacoustic imaging of methylene blue achieved penetration depths of greater than 5 cm in chicken breast tissue. Photoacoustic imaging sensitivity was measured by varying the concentration of methylene blue dye placed at a depth of 3 cm within surrounding chicken breast tissue. Signal-to-noise ratio, noise equivalent sensitivity, and axial spatial resolution were quantified versus depth based on in vivo and chicken breast tissue experiments. The system has been demonstrated in vivo for detecting sentinel lymph nodes in rats following intradermal injection of methylene blue. These results highlight the clinical potential of photoacoustic image-guided identification and needle biopsy of sentinel lymph nodes for axillary staging in breast cancer patients.

  7. Scanning tomographic acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hua

    2002-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of the design and development of the scanning tomographic acoustic microscopy (STAM). This research effort spans over a period of more than 12 years, which successfully elevated the acoustic microscopy from the traditional intensity-mapping mode to the level of holographic and tomographic imaging. The tomographic imaging capability of STAM was developed on the platform of the scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM), which operates in a coherent transmission mode with plane-wave illumination and scanning laser wavefield detection. The image formation techniques were based on the backward propagation method implemented in the plane-to-plane format. In this paper, the key elements of the design and development, including the modification of the data-acquisition hardware, implementation of image reconstruction algorithms for multiple-frequency and multiple-angle tomography, and the high-precision phase-correction and image registration techniques for the superposition of coherent sub-images, will be discussed. Results of full-scale experiments will also be included to demonstrate the capability of holographic and tomographic image formation in microscopic scale.

  8. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Favazza, Christopher P.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-05-18

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography.

  9. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Favazza, Christopher P.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography. PMID:26045627

  10. Nonlinear photoacoustic spectroscopy of hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Favazza, Christopher P.; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-05-01

    As light intensity increases in photoacoustic imaging, the saturation of optical absorption and the temperature dependence of the thermal expansion coefficient result in a measurable nonlinear dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) signal on the excitation pulse fluence. Here, under controlled conditions, we investigate the intensity-dependent photoacoustic signals from oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin at varied optical wavelengths and molecular concentrations. The wavelength and concentration dependencies of the nonlinear PA spectrum are found to be significantly greater in oxygenated hemoglobin than in deoxygenated hemoglobin. These effects are further influenced by the hemoglobin concentration. These nonlinear phenomena provide insights into applications of photoacoustics, such as measurements of average inter-molecular distances on a nm scale or with a tuned selection of wavelengths, a more accurate quantitative PA tomography.

  11. Photoacoustic imaging of blood vessel equivalent phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Paul C.

    2002-06-01

    Various phantoms have been used to assess the ability of transmission mode photoacoustic imaging to visualize blood vessels. A Q switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.06micrometers was used as the pulsed excitation source. Detection of the photoacoustic signals was achieved by mechanically scanning a photodiode across the reflected output beam of a Fabry Perot polymer film ultrasound sensor to simulate 1D and 2D detector arrays. The depth profile of a 1.3mm thick polymer sheet ((mu) a=0.8mm-1) immersed to a depth of 2cm in an Intralipid scattering solution ((mu) s=1mm-1, (mu) a=0.03mm-1 was imaged using a 1D detector scan and a simple line-of-sight approach to image reconstruction. An arrangement comprising three 3 lines of PMMA tubing of internal diameter 62.5micrometers , arranged at different heights and filled with human blood, was immersed at depths of up to 7mm in the Intralipid solution. Using a radial backprojection algorithm, 2D and 3D images were reconstructed from 1D and 2D detector scans respectively. The vessels could be observed as high contrast features on the images. Lateral resolution, limited by the detector aperture was 0.33mm and the axial resolution was 0.15mm.

  12. Transurethral light delivery for prostate photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has broad clinical potential to enhance prostate cancer detection and treatment, yet it is challenged by the lack of minimally invasive, deeply penetrating light delivery methods that provide sufficient visualization of targets (e.g., tumors, contrast agents, brachytherapy seeds). We constructed a side-firing fiber prototype for transurethral photoacoustic imaging of prostates with a dual-array (linear and curvilinear) transrectal ultrasound probe. A method to calculate the surface area and, thereby, estimate the laser fluence at this fiber tip was derived, validated, applied to various design parameters, and used as an input to three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations. Brachytherapy seeds implanted in phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo canine prostates at radial distances of 5 to 30 mm from the urethra were imaged with the fiber prototype transmitting 1064 nm wavelength light with 2 to 8 mJ pulse energy. Prebeamformed images were displayed in real time at a rate of 3 to 5 frames per second to guide fiber placement and beamformed offline. A conventional delay-and-sum beamformer provided decreasing seed contrast (23 to 9 dB) with increasing urethra-to-target distance, while the short-lag spatial coherence beamformer provided improved and relatively constant seed contrast (28 to 32 dB) regardless of distance, thus improving multitarget visualization in single and combined curvilinear images acquired with the fiber rotating and the probe fixed. The proposed light delivery and beamforming methods promise to improve key prostate cancer detection and treatment strategies.

  13. Photoacoustic tomography of vascular compliance in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Liang, Jinyang; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-12-01

    Characterization of blood vessel elastic properties can help in detecting thrombosis and preventing life-threatening conditions such as acute myocardial infarction or stroke. Vascular elastic photoacoustic tomography (VE-PAT) is proposed to measure blood vessel compliance in humans. Implemented on a linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography system, VE-PAT can quantify blood vessel compliance changes due to simulated thrombosis and occlusion. The feasibility of the VE-PAT system was first demonstrated by measuring the strains under uniaxial loading in perfused blood vessel phantoms and quantifying their compliance changes due to the simulated thrombosis. The VE-PAT system detected a decrease in the compliances of blood vessel phantoms with simulated thrombosis, which was validated by a standard compression test. The VE-PAT system was then applied to assess blood vessel compliance in a human subject. Experimental results showed a decrease in compliance when an occlusion occurred downstream from the measurement point in the blood vessels, demonstrating VE-PAT's potential for clinical thrombosis detection.

  14. Vascular elastic photoacoustic tomography in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Liang, Jinyang; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Quantification of vascular elasticity can help detect thrombosis and prevent life-threatening conditions such as acute myocardial infarction or stroke. Here, we propose vascular elastic photoacoustic tomography (VE-PAT) to measure vascular elasticity in humans. VE-PAT was developed by incorporating a linear-array-based photoacoustic computed tomography system with a customized compression stage. By measuring the deformation of blood vessels under uniaxial loading, VE-PAT was able to quantify the vascular compliance. We first demonstrated the feasibility of VE-PAT in blood vessel phantoms. In large vessel phantoms, VE-PAT detected a decrease in vascular compliance due to simulated thrombosis, which was validated by a standard compression test. In small blood vessel phantoms embedded 3 mm deep in gelatin, VE-PAT detected elasticity changes at depths that are difficult to image using other elasticity imaging techniques. We then applied VE-PAT to assess vascular compliance in a human subject and detected a decrease in vascular compliance when an occlusion occurred downstream from the measurement point, demonstrating the potential of VE-PAT in clinical applications such as detection of deep venous thrombosis.

  15. Photoacoustic measurement of epidermal melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viator, John A.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Aguilar, Guillermo; Choi, Bernard; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2003-06-01

    Most dermatologic laser procedures must consider epidermal melanin, as it is a broadband optical absorber which affects subsurface fluence, effectively limiting the amount of light reaching the dermis and targeted chromophores. An accurate method for quantifying epidermal melanin content would aid clinicians in determining proper light dosage for therapeutic laser procedures. While epidermal melanin content has been quantified non-invasively using optical methods, there is currently no way to determine the melanin distribution in the epidermis. We have developed a photoacoustic probe that uses a Q-switched, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser operating at 532nm to generate acoustic pulses in skin in vivo. The probe contained a piezoelectric element that detected photoacoustic waves which were then analyzed for epidermal melanin content, using a photoacoustic melanin index (PAMI). We tested 15 human subjects with skin types I--VI using the photoacoustic probe. We also present photoacoustic data for a human subject with vitiligo. Photoacoustic measurement showed melanin in the vitiligo subject was almost completely absent.

  16. A novel fiber laser development for photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavas, Seydi; Aytac-Kipergil, Esra; Arabul, Mustafa U.; Erkol, Hakan; Akcaalan, Onder; Eldeniz, Y. Burak; Ilday, F. Omer; Unlu, Mehmet B.

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy, as an imaging modality, has shown promising results in imaging angiogenesis and cutaneous malignancies like melanoma, revealing systemic diseases including diabetes, hypertension, tracing drug efficiency and assessment of therapy, monitoring healing processes such as wound cicatrization, brain imaging and mapping. Clinically, photoacoustic microscopy is emerging as a capable diagnostic tool. Parameters of lasers used in photoacoustic microscopy, particularly, pulse duration, energy, pulse repetition frequency, and pulse-to-pulse stability affect signal amplitude and quality, data acquisition speed and indirectly, spatial resolution. Lasers used in photoacoustic microscopy are typically Q-switched lasers, low-power laser diodes, and recently, fiber lasers. Significantly, the key parameters cannot be adjusted independently of each other, whereas microvasculature and cellular imaging, e.g., have different requirements. Here, we report an integrated fiber laser system producing nanosecond pulses, covering the spectrum from 600 nm to 1100 nm, developed specifically for photoacoustic excitation. The system comprises of Yb-doped fiber oscillator and amplifier, an acousto-optic modulator and a photonic-crystal fiber to generate supercontinuum. Complete control over the pulse train, including generation of non-uniform pulse trains, is achieved via the AOM through custom-developed field-programmable gate-array electronics. The system is unique in that all the important parameters are adjustable: pulse duration in the range of 1-3 ns, pulse energy up to 10 μJ, repetition rate from 50 kHz to 3 MHz. Different photocoustic imaging probes can be excited with the ultrabroad spectrum. The entire system is fiber-integrated; guided-beam-propagation rendersit misalignment free and largely immune to mechanical perturbations. The laser is robust, low-cost and built using readily available components.

  17. Polymer Microring Resonators for High-Sensitivity and Wideband Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Ling, Tao; Ashkenazi, Shai; Guo, L. Jay

    2010-01-01

    Polymer microring resonators have been exploited for high-sensitivity and wideband photoacoustic imaging. To demonstrate high-sensitivity ultrasound detection, high-frequency photoacoustic imaging of a 49-μm-diameter black bead at an imaging depth of 5 mm was imaged photoacoustically using a synthetic 2-D array with 249 elements and a low laser fluence of 0.35 mJ/cm2. A bandpass filter with a center frequency of 28 MHz and a bandwidth of 16 MHz was applied to all element data but without signal averaging, and a signal-to-noise ratio of 16.4 dB was obtained. A wideband detector response is essential for imaging reconstruction of multiscale objects, e.g., various sizes of tissues, by using a range of characteristic acoustic wavelengths. A simulation of photoacoustic tomography of beads shows that objects with their boundaries characteristic of high spatial frequencies and the inner structure primarily of low spatial frequency components can be faithfully reconstructed using such a detector. Photoacoustic tomography experiments of 49- and 301-μm-diameter beads were presented. A high resolution of 12.5 μm was obtained. The boundary of a 301-μm bead was imaged clearly. The results demonstrated that the high sensitivity and broadband response of polymer microring resonators have potential for high resolution and high-fidelity photoacoustic imaging. PMID:19942534

  18. Integrated transrectal probe for translational ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Kevan L.; Harrison, Tyler; Usmani, Nawaid; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-03-01

    A compact photoacoustic transrectal probe is constructed for improved imaging in brachytherapy treatment. A 192 element 5 MHz linear transducer array is mounted inside a small 3D printed casing along with an array of optical fibers. The device is fed by a pump laser and tunable NIR-optical parametric oscillator with data collected by a Verasonics ultrasound platform. This assembly demonstrates improved imaging of brachytherapy seeds in phantoms with depths up to 5 cm. The tuneable excitation in combination with standard US integration provides adjustable contrast between the brachytherapy seeds, blood filled tubes and background tissue.

  19. Photoacoustic imaging: current status and future development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Jiang, Jingying; Su, Yixiong; Wang, Ruikang K.; Zhang, Fan; Yao, Jianquan

    2006-09-01

    Photo-acoustic tomography(PAT) is a new ultrasound-mediated biomedical imaging technology which combines the advantages of high optical contrast and high ultrasonic resolution. In theory, PAT can image object embedded several centimeters under the surface of sample with the resolution of tens of microns. In this paper, several representative image reconstruction algorithms are discussed. Because the PA signal is wide band signal, it is hard to get the whole frequency spectrum due to the tremendous calculation needed. Therefore, the most applicable reconstruction algorithms are all performed in time domain such as "delay-and-sum" and "back projection". The current research methods have been focused on optical detecting and piezoelectric detecting. The optical method has the advantage of high spatial sensitivity due to the short wavelength of the probe laser beam. PA signal detecting using piezoelectric sensor has two main modes i.e. using unfocused transducer or transducer array or using focused transducer array or linear transducer array. When a focused transducer array is used, the "delay-and-sum" method is often used for image reconstruction. The advantage of the method is that its data acquisition time can be reduced to several minutes or even several seconds by employing the phase control linear scan technique. The future development in PAT research and its potential clinic application is also presented.

  20. Reverse photoacoustic standoff spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Van Neste, Charles W.; Senesac, Lawrence R.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2011-04-12

    A system and method are disclosed for generating a reversed photoacoustic spectrum at a greater distance. A source may emit a beam to a target and a detector measures signals generated as a result of the beam being emitted on the target. By emitting a chopped/pulsed light beam to the target, it may be possible to determine the target's optical absorbance by monitoring the intensity of light collected at the detector at different wavelengths. As the wavelength of light is changed, the target may absorb or reject each optical frequency. Rejection may increase the intensity at the sensing element and absorption may decrease the intensity. Accordingly, an identifying spectrum of the target may be made with the intensity variation of the detector as a function of illuminating wavelength.

  1. Photoacoustic point spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Van Neste, Charles W.; Senesac, Lawrence R.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2011-06-14

    A system and method are disclosed for generating a photoacoustic spectrum in an open or closed environment with reduced noise. A source may emit a beam to a target substance coated on a detector that measures acoustic waves generated as a result of a light beam being absorbed by the target substance. By emitting a chopped/pulsed light beam to the target substance on the detector, it may be possible to determine the target's optical absorbance as the wavelength of light is changed. Rejection may decrease the intensity of the acoustic waves on the detector while absorption may increase the intensity. Accordingly, an identifying spectrum of the target may be made with the intensity variation of the detector as a function of illuminating wavelength.

  2. Medical ultrasonic tomographic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, R. C.; Lecroissette, D. H.; Nathan, R.; Wilson, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    An electro-mechanical scanning assembly was designed and fabricated for the purpose of generating an ultrasound tomogram. A low cost modality was demonstrated in which analog instrumentation methods formed a tomogram on photographic film. Successful tomogram reconstructions were obtained on in vitro test objects by using the attenuation of the fist path ultrasound signal as it passed through the test object. The nearly half century tomographic methods of X-ray analysis were verified as being useful for ultrasound imaging.

  3. Kinky tomographic reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.; Bilisoly, R.L.

    1996-05-01

    We address the issue of how to make decisions about the degree of smoothness demanded of a flexible contour used to model the boundary of a 2D object. We demonstrate the use of a Bayesian approach to set the strength of the smoothness prior for a tomographic reconstruction problem. The Akaike Information Criterion is used to determine whether to allow a kink in the contour.

  4. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of nude mice vasculature using a photoacoustic imaging system based on a commercial ultrasound scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, Ladislav; Shahzad, Khalid; Wang, Yao; Burcher, Michael; Scholle, Frank-Detlef; Hauff, Peter; Mofina, Sabine; Skobe, Mihaela

    2008-02-01

    In-vivo photoacoustic/ultrasound (PA/US) imaging of nude mice was investigated using a photoacoustic imaging system based on a commercial ultrasound scanner HDI-5000. Raw per-channel data was captured and beamformed to generate each individual photoacoustic image with a single laser shot. An ultra-broadband CL15-7 linear array with a center frequency of 8 MHz, combined with a Schott Glass fiber bundle, was used as a compact high resolution imaging probe, with lateral and axial PA resolutions of about 300µm and 200µm, respectively. The imaging system worked in a dual PA-US mode, with the ultrasound outlining the tissue structure and the photoacoustic image showing the blood vessels. PA signals were generated by exposing mice to ultra-short optical pulses from a Nd:YAG-pumped OPO laser operating in a wavelength range of 700-950nm. The corresponding ultrasound images were generated in the regular B-mode with standard delay-and-sum beamforming algorithm. The system resolution was sufficiently high to identify and clearly distinguish the dorsal artery and the two lateral veins in the mouse tail. Both the saphena artery and the ischiatic vein on the cross-section of the mouse leg were clearly outlined in the PA images and correctly overlaid on the ultrasound image of the tissue structure. Similarly, cross-section PA images of the mouse abdomen revealed mesenteric vasculatures located below the abdominal wall. Finally, a successful PA imaging of the mouse thoracic cavity unveiled the ascending and descending aorta. These initial results demonstrate a great potential for a dual photoacoustic/ultrasound imaging modality implemented on a commercial ultrasound imaging scanner.

  5. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds with transurethral light delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel approach to photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds utilizing an existing urinary catheter for transurethral light delivery. Two canine prostates were surgically implanted with brachyther- apy seeds under transrectal ultrasound guidance. One prostate was excised shortly after euthanasia and fixed in gelatin. The second prostate was imaged in the native tissue environment shortly after euthanasia. A urinary catheter was inserted in the urethra of each prostate. A 1-mm core diameter optical fiber coupled to a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser was inserted into the urinary catheter. Light from the fiber was either directed mostly parallel to the fiber axis (i.e. end-fire fire) or mostly 90° to the fiber axis (i.e. side-fire fiber). An Ultrasonix SonixTouch scanner, transrectal ultrasound probe with curvilinear (BPC8-4) and linear (BPL9-5) arrays, and DAQ unit were utilized for synchronized laser light emission and photoacoustic signal acquisition. The implanted brachytherapy seeds were visualized at radial distances of 6-16 mm from the catheter. Multiple brachytherapy seeds were si- multaneously visualized with each array of the transrectal probe using both delay-and-sum (DAS) and short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamforming. This work is the first to demonstrate the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds using a transurethral light delivery method.

  6. Photoacoustic tomography and sensing in biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changhui; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-01-01

    Photoacoustics has been broadly studied in biomedicine, for both human and small animal tissues. Photoacoustics uniquely combines the absorption contrast of light or radio frequency waves with ultrasound resolution. Moreover, it is non-ionizing and non-invasive, and is the fastest growing new biomedical method, with clinical applications on the way. This article provides a brief review of recent developments in photoacoustics in biomedicine, from basic principles to applications. The emphasized areas include the new imaging modalities, hybrid detection methods, photoacoustic contrast agents, and the photoacoustic Doppler effect, as well as translational research topics. PMID:19724102

  7. Photoacoustic imaging: a potential new tool for arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding

    2012-12-01

    The potential application of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technology to diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis has been explored. The feasibility of our bench-top joint imaging systems in delineating soft articular tissue structures in a noninvasive manner was validated first on rat models and then on human peripheral joints. Based on the study on commonly used arthritis rat models, the capability of PAI to differentiate arthritic joints from the normal was also examined. With sufficient imaging depth, PAI can realize tomographic imaging of a human peripheral joint or a small-animal joint as a whole organ noninvasively. By presenting additional optical contrast and tissue functional information such as blood volume and blood oxygen saturation, PAI may provide an opportunity for early diagnosis of inflammatory joint disorders, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, and for monitoring of therapeutic outcomes with improved sensitivity and accuracy.

  8. Medical imaging with a microwave tomographic scanner.

    PubMed

    Jofre, L; Hawley, M S; Broquetas, A; de los Reyes, E; Ferrando, M; Elias-Fusté, A R

    1990-03-01

    A microwave tomographic scanner for biomedical applications is presented. The scanner consists of a 64 element circular array with a useful diameter of 20 cm. Electronically scanning the transmitting and receiving antennas allows multiview measurements with no mechanical movement. Imaging parameters are appropriate for medical use: a spatial resolution of 7 mm and a contrast resolution of 1% for a measurement time of 3 s. Measurements on tissue-simulating phantoms and volunteers, together with numerical simulations, are presented to assess the system for absolute imaging of tissue distribution and for differential imaging of physiological, pathological, and induced changes in tissues. PMID:2329003

  9. Photoacoustic spectroscopy for chemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthoff, Ellen L.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2012-06-01

    The Global War on Terror has made rapid detection and identification of chemical and biological agents a priority for Military and Homeland Defense applications. Reliable real-time detection of these threats is complicated by our enemy's use of a diverse range of materials. Therefore, an adaptable platform is necessary. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful monitoring technique that is well suited for trace detection of gaseous media. This method routinely exhibits detection limits at the parts-per-billion (ppb) or sub-ppb range. The versatility of PAS also allows for the investigation of solid and liquid analytes. Current research utilizes quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in combination with an air-coupled solid-phase photoacoustic cell design for the detection of condensed phase material films deposited on a surface. Furthermore, variation of the QCL pulse repetition rate allows for identification and molecular discrimination of analytes based solely on photoacoustic spectra collected at different film depths.

  10. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of condensed matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy is a new analytical tool that provides a simple nondestructive technique for obtaining information about the electronic absorption spectrum of samples such as powders, semisolids, gels, and liquids. It can also be applied to samples which cannot be examined by conventional optical methods. Numerous applications of this technique in the field of inorganic and organic semiconductors, biology, and catalysis have been described. Among the advantages of photoacoustic spectroscopy, the signal is almost insensitive to light scattering by the sample and information can be obtained about nonradiative deactivation processes. Signal saturation, which can modify the intensity of individual absorption bands in special cases, is a drawback of the method.

  11. Scanning Tomographic Acoustic Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, G.; Meyyappan, A.

    1988-07-01

    The technology for "seeing" with sound has an important and interesting history. Some of nature's creatures have been using sound waves for many millenia to image otherwise unobservable objects. The human species, lacking this natural ability, have overcome this deficiency by developing several different ultrasonic imaging techniques. acoustic microscopy is one such technique, which produces high resolution images of detailed structure of small objects in a non-destructive fashion. Two types of acoustic microscopes have evolved for industrial exploitation. They are the scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM) and the scanning acoustic microscope (SAM). In this paper, we review the principles of SLAM and describe how we use elements of SLAM to realize the scanning tomographic acoustic microscope (STAM). We describe the data acquisition process and the image reconstruction procedure. We also describe techniques to obtain projection data from different angles of wave incidence enabling us to reconstruct different planes of a complex specimen tomo-graphically. Our experimental results show that STAM is capable of producing high-quality high-resolution subsurface images.

  12. Optimization of the image reconstruction procedure in multi-focal photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Hongying; Wang, Depeng; Meng, Jing; Song, Liang; Ying, Leslie; Xia, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic-computed microscopy (PACM) differs from conventional photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) imaging techniques in a way that thousands of optical foci are generated simultaneously using a two-dimensional microlens array, and raster-scanning these optical foci provides wide-field images. A major limitation of PACM is the slow imaging speed caused by the high power pulsed lasers and large amount of acoustic detectors. Here, we addressed this problem through compressed sensing and image inpainting. Compressed sensing minimizes the number of transducer elements used to acquire each frame, while inpainting minimizes the scanning steps. Combining these two approaches, we improved the imaging speed by sixteen times.

  13. Real-time multispectral 3-D photoacoustic imaging of blood phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosik, Ivan; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is exquisitely sensitive to blood and can infer blood oxygenation based on multispectral images. In this work we present multispectral real-time 3D photoacoustic imaging of blood phantoms. We used a custom-built 128-channel hemispherical transducer array coupled to two Nd:YAG pumped OPO laser systems synchronized to provide double pulse excitation at 680 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths, all during a triggered series of ultrasound pressure measurements lasting less than 300 μs. The results demonstrated that 3D PAI is capable of differentiating between oxygenated and deoxygenated blood at high speed at mm-level resolution.

  14. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Li, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Using internal illumination with an optical fiber in the oral cavity, we demonstrate, for the first time, photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) of the deep brain of rats in vivo. The experiment was performed on a full-ring-array PACT system, with the capability of providing high-speed cross-sectional imaging of the brain. Compared with external illumination through the cranial skull, internal illumination delivers more light to the base of the brain. Consequently, in vivo photoacoustic images clearly reveal deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  15. In vitro and ex vivo evaluation of silica-coated super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) as biomedical photoacoustic contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwi, Rudolf; Telenkov, Sergey A.; Mandelis, Andreas; Leshuk, Timothy; Gu, Frank; Oladepo, Sulayman; Michaelian, Kirk; Dickie, Kristopher

    2013-03-01

    The employment of contrast agents in photoacoustic imaging has gained significant attention within the past few years for their biomedical applications. In this study, the use of silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (SPION) was investigated as a contrast agent in biomedical photoacoustic imaging. SPIONs have been widely used as Food-and-Drug-Administration (FDA)-approved contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and are known to have an excellent safety profile. Using our frequency-domain photoacoustic correlation technique ("the photoacoustic radar") with modulated laser excitation, we examined the effects of nanoparticle size, concentration and biological medium (e.g. serum, sheep blood) on its photoacoustic response in turbid media (intralipid solution). Maximum detection depth and minimum measurable SPION concentration were determined experimentally. The detection was performed using a single element transducer. The nanoparticle-induced optical contrast ex vivo in dense muscular tissues (avian pectus) was evaluated using a phased array photoacoustic probe and the strong potential of silicacoated SPION as a possible photoacoustic contrast agent was demonstrated. This study opens the way for future clinical applications of nanoparticle-enhanced photoacoustic imaging in cancer therapy.

  16. Initial experiences in the photoacoustic detection of melanoma metastases in resected lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grootendorst, D.; Jose, J.; Van der Jagt, P.; Van der Weg, W.; Nagel, K.; Wouters, M.; Van Boven, H.; Van Leeuwen, T. G.; Steenbergen, W.; Ruers, T.; Manohar, S.

    2011-03-01

    Accurate lymph node analysis is essential to determine the prognosis and treatment of patients suffering from melanoma. The initial results of a tomographic photoacoustic modality to detect melanoma metastases in resected lymph nodes are presented based on phantom models and a human lymph node. The results show melanoma metastases detection is feasible and the setup is capable of distinguishing absorbing structures down to 1 mm. In addition, the use of longer laser wavelengths could result in an image containing a higher contrast ratio. Future research shall be focused on using the melanin characteristics to improve contrast and detection possibilities.

  17. Transurethral light delivery for prostate photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Danny Y; Boctor, Emad M

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has broad clinical potential to enhance prostate cancer detection and treatment, yet it is challenged by the lack of minimally invasive, deeply penetrating light delivery methods that provide sufficient visualization of targets (e.g., tumors, contrast agents, brachytherapy seeds). We constructed a side-firing fiber prototype for transurethral photoacoustic imaging of prostates with a dual-array (linear and curvilinear) transrectal ultrasound probe. A method to calculate the surface area and, thereby, estimate the laser fluence at this fiber tip was derived, validated, applied to various design parameters, and used as an input to three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations. Brachytherapy seeds implanted in phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo canine prostates at radial distances of 5 to 30 mm from the urethra were imaged with the fiber prototype transmitting 1064 nm wavelength light with 2 to 8 mJ pulse energy. Prebeamformed images were displayed in real time at a rate of 3 to 5 frames per second to guide fiber placement and beamformed offline. A conventional delay-and-sum beamformer provided decreasing seed contrast (23 to 9 dB) with increasing urethra-to-target distance, while the short-lag spatial coherence beamformer provided improved and relatively constant seed contrast (28 to 32 dB) regardless of distance, thus improving multitarget visualization in single and combined curvilinear images acquired with the fiber rotating and the probe fixed. The proposed light delivery and beamforming methods promise to improve key prostate cancer detection and treatment strategies. PMID:25734406

  18. Photoacoustic characterization of radiofrequency ablation lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, Richard; Dana, Nicholas; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-02-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) procedures are used to destroy abnormal electrical pathways in the heart that can cause cardiac arrhythmias. Current methods relying on fluoroscopy, echocardiography and electrical conduction mapping are unable to accurately assess ablation lesion size. In an effort to better visualize RFA lesions, photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasonic (US) imaging were utilized to obtain co-registered images of ablated porcine cardiac tissue. The left ventricular free wall of fresh (i.e., never frozen) porcine hearts was harvested within 24 hours of the animals' sacrifice. A THERMOCOOLR Ablation System (Biosense Webster, Inc.) operating at 40 W for 30-60 s was used to induce lesions through the endocardial and epicardial walls of the cardiac samples. Following lesion creation, the ablated tissue samples were placed in 25 °C saline to allow for multi-wavelength PA imaging. Samples were imaged with a VevoR 2100 ultrasound system (VisualSonics, Inc.) using a modified 20-MHz array that could provide laser irradiation to the sample from a pulsed tunable laser (Newport Corp.) to allow for co-registered photoacoustic-ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. PA imaging was conducted from 750-1064 nm, with a surface fluence of approximately 15 mJ/cm2 maintained during imaging. In this preliminary study with PA imaging, the ablated region could be well visualized on the surface of the sample, with contrasts of 6-10 dB achieved at 750 nm. Although imaging penetration depth is a concern, PA imaging shows promise in being able to reliably visualize RF ablation lesions.

  19. Multi-contrast photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S.; Sohn, R.; Lu, Z.-H.; Soetikno, B.; Zhong, Q.; Yao, J.; Maslov, K.; Arbeit, J. M.; Wang, L. V.

    2012-02-01

    We developed multi-contrast photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) for in vivo anatomical, functional, metabolic, and molecular imaging. This technical innovation enables comprehensive understanding of the tumor microenvironment. With multi-contrast PAM, we longitudinally determined tumor vascular anatomy, blood flow, oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, and oxygen extraction fraction.

  20. Realtime photoacoustic microscopy of murine cardiovascular and respiratory dynamics in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemp, Roger J.; Song, Liang; Bitton, Rachel; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2008-02-01

    While photoacoustic imaging has emerged as a promising modality in recent years, a key drawback of practical and widespread use of the technique has been slow imaging rates. We present a 30-MHz array-based photoacoustic imaging system that can acquire and display photoacoustic images in realtime. Realtime display is very helpful and provides the system operator the ability to better navigate and position the probe for selecting a desired anatomical field of view. The system is capable of imaging at 50 frames per second to depths of a few mm in tissue. We used this system to successfully image the beating hearts of young athymic nude mice in vivo. Also of interest was the ability to visualize microvascular changes during respiration.

  1. Photoacoustic imaging by using a bundle of thin hollow-optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, A.; Iwai, K.; Katagiri, T.; Matsuura, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a photoacoustic imaging system composed of a flexible bundle of thin hollow-optical fibers that enables endoscopic diagnosis. The hollow-fiber bundle involves 37 fibers with an inner diameter of 100 μm and the total diameter of the bundle is 1.2 mm. A laser beam for photoacoustic excitation is scanned at the input end of fiber bundle and therefore, no scanning mechanism is necessary at the distal end. In addition, owing to the small numerical aperture of hollow optical fibers, a high resolution image is obtained without using a micro-lens array at the end. By using the fiber bundle probe, photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels in the ovarian membrane of fish were successfully obtained with a laser fluence of around 2.8 mJ/cm2.

  2. Photoacoustic flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional flow cytometry using scattering and fluorescent detection methods has been a fundamental tool of biological discoveries for many years. Invasive extraction of cells from a living organism, however, may lead to changes in cell properties and prevents the long-term study of cells in their native environment. Here, we summarize recent advances of new generation flow cytometry for in vivo noninvasive label-free or targeted detection of cells in blood, lymph, bone, cerebral and plant vasculatures using photoacoustic (PA) detection techniques, multispectral high-pulse-repetition-rate lasers, tunable ultrasharp (up to 0.8 nm) rainbow plasmonic nanoprobes, positive and negative PA contrasts, in vivo magnetic enrichment, time-of-flight cell velocity measurement, PA spectral analysis, and integration of PA, photothermal (PT), fluorescent, and Raman methods. Unique applications of this tool are reviewed with a focus on ultrasensitive detection of normal blood cells at different functional states (e.g., apoptotic and necrotic) and rare abnormal cells including circulating tumor cells (CTCs), cancer stem cells, pathogens, clots, sickle cells as well as pharmokinetics of nanoparticles, dyes, microbubbles and drug nanocarriers. Using this tool we discovered that palpation, biopsy, or surgery can enhance CTC release from primary tumors, increasing the risk of metastasis. The novel fluctuation flow cytometry provided the opportunity for the dynamic study of blood rheology including red blood cell aggregation and clot formation in different medical conditions (e.g., blood disorders, cancer, or surgery). Theranostics, as a combination of PA diagnosis and PT nanobubble-amplified multiplex therapy, was used for eradication of CTCs, purging of infected blood, and thrombolysis of clots using PA guidance to control therapy efficiency. In vivo flow cytometry using a portable fiber-based devices can provide a breakthrough platform for early diagnosis of cancer, infection and

  3. Biomedical photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, also called optoacoustic imaging, is a new biomedical imaging modality based on the use of laser-generated ultrasound that has emerged over the last decade. It is a hybrid modality, combining the high-contrast and spectroscopic-based specificity of optical imaging with the high spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging. In essence, a PA image can be regarded as an ultrasound image in which the contrast depends not on the mechanical and elastic properties of the tissue, but its optical properties, specifically optical absorption. As a consequence, it offers greater specificity than conventional ultrasound imaging with the ability to detect haemoglobin, lipids, water and other light-absorbing chomophores, but with greater penetration depth than purely optical imaging modalities that rely on ballistic photons. As well as visualizing anatomical structures such as the microvasculature, it can also provide functional information in the form of blood oxygenation, blood flow and temperature. All of this can be achieved over a wide range of length scales from micrometres to centimetres with scalable spatial resolution. These attributes lend PA imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine, preclinical research and basic biology for studying cancer, cardiovascular disease, abnormalities of the microcirculation and other conditions. With the emergence of a variety of truly compelling in vivo images obtained by a number of groups around the world in the last 2–3 years, the technique has come of age and the promise of PA imaging is now beginning to be realized. Recent highlights include the demonstration of whole-body small-animal imaging, the first demonstrations of molecular imaging, the introduction of new microscopy modes and the first steps towards clinical breast imaging being taken as well as a myriad of in vivo preclinical imaging studies. In this article, the underlying physical principles of the technique, its practical

  4. Biomedical photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Beard, Paul

    2011-08-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, also called optoacoustic imaging, is a new biomedical imaging modality based on the use of laser-generated ultrasound that has emerged over the last decade. It is a hybrid modality, combining the high-contrast and spectroscopic-based specificity of optical imaging with the high spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging. In essence, a PA image can be regarded as an ultrasound image in which the contrast depends not on the mechanical and elastic properties of the tissue, but its optical properties, specifically optical absorption. As a consequence, it offers greater specificity than conventional ultrasound imaging with the ability to detect haemoglobin, lipids, water and other light-absorbing chomophores, but with greater penetration depth than purely optical imaging modalities that rely on ballistic photons. As well as visualizing anatomical structures such as the microvasculature, it can also provide functional information in the form of blood oxygenation, blood flow and temperature. All of this can be achieved over a wide range of length scales from micrometres to centimetres with scalable spatial resolution. These attributes lend PA imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine, preclinical research and basic biology for studying cancer, cardiovascular disease, abnormalities of the microcirculation and other conditions. With the emergence of a variety of truly compelling in vivo images obtained by a number of groups around the world in the last 2-3 years, the technique has come of age and the promise of PA imaging is now beginning to be realized. Recent highlights include the demonstration of whole-body small-animal imaging, the first demonstrations of molecular imaging, the introduction of new microscopy modes and the first steps towards clinical breast imaging being taken as well as a myriad of in vivo preclinical imaging studies. In this article, the underlying physical principles of the technique, its practical

  5. Acoustic resonance phase locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-08-19

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell to generate a photoacoustic signal, the acoustic source having a source frequency; continuously measuring detection phase of the photoacoustic signal with respect to source frequency or a harmonic thereof; and employing the measured detection phase to provide magnitude and direction for correcting the source frequency to the resonance frequency.

  6. [Multislice computed tomographic myelography].

    PubMed

    Klingebiel, R; Masuhr, F; Rogalla, P; Hein, E; Juran, R; Bauknecht, H C; Bohner, G

    2006-02-01

    While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the first line modality in depicting intramedullary spinal lesions, computed tomographic (CT) myelography has gained renewed attention due to the introduction of multislice scanning (MS-CT). Compared with conventional CT, MS-CT permits rapid, high-resolution imaging of various spinal pathologies with extended scan length. Although soft tissue contrast is inferior to that with MRI, MS-CT myelography performs best in detailed assessment of osseous pathologies, 3D imaging of orthopedic and anesthesiologic implants, and showing dural leakage and causes of CSF circulation impairment. Whenever MRI is not available or contraindicated, MS-CT myelography is the method of choice for evaluating spinal lesions. PMID:16283150

  7. Tomographic diagnostics of nonthermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisova, Natalia

    2009-10-01

    In the previous work [1], we discussed a ``technology'' of tomographic method and relations between the tomographic diagnostics in thermal (equilibrium) and nonthermal (nonequilibrium) plasma sources. The conclusion has been made that tomographic reconstruction in thermal plasma sources is the standard procedure at present, which can provide much useful information on the plasma structure and its evolution in time, while the tomographic reconstruction of nonthermal plasma has a great potential at making a contribution to understanding the fundamental problem of substance behavior in strongly nonequilibrium conditions. Using medical terminology, one could say, that tomographic diagnostics of the equilibrium plasma sources studies their ``anatomic'' structure, while reconstruction of the nonequilibrium plasma is similar to the ``physiological'' examination: it is directed to study the physical mechanisms and processes. The present work is focused on nonthermal plasma research. The tomographic diagnostics is directed to study spatial structures formed in the gas discharge plasmas under the influence of electrical and gravitational fields. The ways of plasma ``self-organization'' in changing and extreme conditions are analyzed. The analysis has been made using some examples from our practical tomographic diagnostics of nonthermal plasma sources, such as low-pressure capacitive and inductive discharges. [0pt] [1] Denisova N. Plasma diagnostics using computed tomography method // IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 2009 37 4 502.

  8. Multi-acoustic lens design methodology for a low cost C-scan photoacoustic imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinni, Bhargava; Han, Zichao; Brown, Nicholas; Vallejo, Pedro; Jacobs, Tess; Knox, Wayne; Dogra, Vikram; Rao, Navalgund

    2016-03-01

    We have designed and implemented a novel acoustic lens based focusing technology into a prototype photoacoustic imaging camera. All photoacoustically generated waves from laser exposed absorbers within a small volume get focused simultaneously by the lens onto an image plane. We use a multi-element ultrasound transducer array to capture the focused photoacoustic signals. Acoustic lens eliminates the need for expensive data acquisition hardware systems, is faster compared to electronic focusing and enables real-time image reconstruction. Using this photoacoustic imaging camera, we have imaged more than 150 several centimeter size ex-vivo human prostate, kidney and thyroid specimens with a millimeter resolution for cancer detection. In this paper, we share our lens design strategy and how we evaluate the resulting quality metrics (on and off axis point spread function, depth of field and modulation transfer function) through simulation. An advanced toolbox in MATLAB was adapted and used for simulating a two-dimensional gridded model that incorporates realistic photoacoustic signal generation and acoustic wave propagation through the lens with medium properties defined on each grid point. Two dimensional point spread functions have been generated and compared with experiments to demonstrate the utility of our design strategy. Finally we present results from work in progress on the use of two lens system aimed at further improving some of the quality metrics of our system.

  9. Forward-viewing photoacoustic imaging probe with bundled ultra-thin hollow optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, A.; Iwai, K.; Katagiri, T.; Matsuura, Y.

    2016-07-01

    A photoacoustic imaging system composed of a flexible bundle of thin hollow-optical fibers is proposed for endoscopic diagnosis. In this system, a bundle of 127 hollow-optical fibers with an inner diameter of 100 μm was fabricated. The total diameter of the bundle was 2.1 mm, and the minimum bending radius was around 10 mm. Owing to the small numerical aperture of hollow optical fibers, a high resolution image was obtained without using a lens array at the distal end. In the imaging system, the hollow fibers in the bundle were aligned at the input end, so the hollow fibers were sequentially excited by linearly scanning the laser beam at the input end. Photoacoustic imaging systems consisting of the bundled fibers for excitation of acoustic wave and piezoelectric probes for detection of photoacoustic signals were built. By using the systems, photoacoustic images of blood vessels in the ovarian membrane of fish were taken to test the feasibility of the system. As a result, photoacoustic images of the vessel were successfully obtained with a laser fluence of around 6.6 mJ cm‑2.

  10. Coregistered three-dimensional ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system for ovarian tissue characterization

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Andres; Guo, Puyun; Gamelin, John; Yan, Shikui; Sanders, Mary M.; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality of all gynecologic cancers, with a five-year survival rate of only 30% or less. Current imaging techniques are limited in sensitivity and specificity in detecting early stage ovarian cancer prior to its widespread metastasis. New imaging techniques that can provide functional and molecular contrasts are needed to reduce the high mortality of this disease. One such promising technique is photoacoustic imaging. We develop a 1280-element coregistered 3-D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system based on a 1.75-D acoustic array. Volumetric images over a scan range of 80 deg in azimuth and 20 deg in elevation can be achieved in minutes. The system has been used to image normal porcine ovarian tissue. This is an important step toward better understanding of ovarian cancer optical properties obtained with photoacoustic techniques. To the best of our knowledge, such data are not available in the literature. We present characterization measurements of the system and compare coregistered ultrasound and photoacoustic images of ovarian tissue to histological images. The results show excellent coregistration of ultrasound and photoacoustic images. Strong optical absorption from vasculature, especially highly vascularized corpora lutea and low absorption from follicles, is demonstrated. PMID:19895116

  11. Optical-resolution photoacoustic endomicroscopy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Rao, Bin; Yao, Junjie; Yeh, Cheng-Hung; Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) has become a major experimental tool of photoacoustic tomography, with unique imaging capabilities for various biological applications. However, conventional imaging systems are all table-top embodiments, which preclude their use in internal organs. In this study, by applying the OR-PAM concept to our recently developed endoscopic technique, called photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE), we created an optical-resolution photoacoustic endomicroscopy (OR-PAEM) system, which enables internal organ imaging with a much finer resolution than conventional acoustic-resolution PAE systems. OR-PAEM has potential preclinical and clinical applications using either endogenous or exogenous contrast agents. PMID:25798315

  12. Photoacoustic tomography: principles and advances

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jun; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging imaging modality that shows great potential for preclinical research and clinical practice. As a hybrid technique, PAT is based on the acoustic detection of optical absorption from either endogenous chromophores, such as oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin, or exogenous contrast agents, such as organic dyes and nanoparticles. Because ultrasound scatters much less than light in tissue, PAT generates high-resolution images in both the optical ballistic and diffusive regimes. Over the past decade, the photoacoustic technique has been evolving rapidly, leading to a variety of exciting discoveries and applications. This review covers the basic principles of PAT and its different implementations. Strengths of PAT are highlighted, along with the most recent imaging results. PMID:25642127

  13. Photoacoustic characterization of ovarian tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Andres; Gamelin, John; Guo, Puyun; Yan, Shikui; Sanders, Mary; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2009-02-01

    Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality of all gynecologic cancers with a five-year survival rate of only 30%. Because current imaging techniques (ultrasound, CT, MRI, PET) are not capable of detecting ovarian cancer early, most diagnoses occur in later stages (III/IV). Thus many women are not correctly diagnosed until the cancer becomes widely metastatic. On the other hand, while the majority of women with a detectable ultrasound abnormality do not harbor a cancer, they all undergo unnecessary oophorectomy. Hence, new imaging techniques that can provide functional and molecular contrasts are needed for improving the specificity of ovarian cancer detection and characterization. One such technique is photoacoustic imaging, which has great potential to reveal early tumor angiogenesis through intrinsic optical absorption contrast from hemoglobin or extrinsic contrast from conjugated agents binding to appropriate molecular receptors. To better understand the cancer disease process of ovarian tissue using photoacoustic imaging, it is necessary to first characterize the properties of normal ovarian tissue. We have imaged ex-vivo ovarian tissue using a 3D co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system. The system is capable of volumetric imaging by means of electronic focusing. Detecting and visualizing small features from multiple viewing angles is possible without the need for any mechanical movement. The results show strong optical absorption from vasculature, especially highly vascularized corpora lutea, and low absorption from follicles. We will present correlation of photoacoustic images from animals with histology. Potential application of this technology would be the noninvasive imaging of the ovaries for screening or diagnostic purposes.

  14. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A.; Berer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  15. Frequency domain photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Langer, Gregor; Buchegger, Bianca; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A; Berer, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We report on simultaneous frequency domain optical-resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence microscopy with sub-µm lateral resolution. With the help of a blood smear, we show that photoacoustic and fluorescence images provide complementary information. Furthermore, we compare theoretically predicted signal-to-noise ratios of sinusoidal modulation in frequency domain with pulsed excitation in time domain. PMID:27446698

  16. Time-resolved tomographic images of a relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, H.A.; Jacoby, B.A.; Nelson, M.

    1984-07-01

    We obtained a sequential series of time-resolved tomographic two-dimensional images of a 4.5-MeV, 6-kA, 30-ns electron beam. Three linear fiber-optic arrays of 30 or 60 fibers each were positioned around the beam axis at 0/sup 0/, 61/sup 0/, and 117/sup 0/. The beam interacting with nitrogen at 20 Torr emitted light that was focused onto the fiber arrays and transmitted to a streak camera where the data were recorded on film. The film was digitized, and two-dimensional images were reconstructed using the maximum-entropy tomographic technique. These images were then combined to produce an ultra-high-speed movie of the electron-beam pulse.

  17. Virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changho; Lee, Donghyun; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Chulhong

    2015-07-01

    A virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy at 1064 nm wavelength (VISPAM) system was designed and fabricated by integrating a commercial type surgical microscope and laser scanning photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) with a 1064 nm pulsed laser. Based on simple augmented reality device, VISPAM could simultaneously provide 2D depth-resolved photoacoustic and magnified microscope images of surgery regions on the same vision of surgeon via an eyepiece of the microscope. The invisible 1064 nm laser removed the interruption of surgical sight due to visible laser scanning of previous report, and decreased the danger of tissue damage caused by over irradiated laser. In addition, to approach the real practical surgery application, a needle-type transducer was utilized without a water bath for PA signal coupling. In order to verify our system's performance, we conducted needle guiding as ex vivo phantom study and needle guiding and injection of carbon particles mixtures into a melanoma tumor region as in vivo study. We expect that VISPAM can be essential tool of brain and ophthalmic microsurgery.

  18. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy Analysis of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lu; Zhao, Bin-xing; Xiao, Hong-tao; Tong, Rong-sheng; Gao, Chun-ming

    2013-09-01

    Chinese medicine is a historic cultural legacy of China. It has made a significant contribution to medicine and healthcare for generations. The development of Chinese herbal medicine analysis is emphasized by the Chinese pharmaceutical industry. This study has carried out the experimental analysis of ten kinds of Chinese herbal powder including Fritillaria powder, etc., based on the photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) method. First, a photoacoustic spectroscopy system was designed and constructed, especially a highly sensitive solid photoacoustic cell was established. Second, the experimental setup was verified through the characteristic emission spectrum of the light source, obtained by using carbon as a sample in the photoacoustic cell. Finally, as the photoacoustic spectroscopy analysis of Fritillaria, etc., was completed, the specificity of the Chinese herb medicine analysis was verified. This study shows that the PAS can provide a valid, highly sensitive analytical method for the specificity of Chinese herb medicine without preparing and damaging samples.

  19. Characterization of novel molecular photoacoustic contrast agents for in vivo photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laoui, Samir

    Photoacoustic tomography is a hybrid imaging modality that takes advantage of the high contrast of pure optical imaging and the high intrinsic resolution of ultrasound without the necessity of ionizing radiation. Photoacoustic imaging (PM) is neither purely optical nor purely acoustical in nature, but a combination of the two. It is fundamentally based on light excitation and ultrasonic detection. Photoacoustic imaging has been successful without the introduction of exogenous contrast agents; however, to image deeper regions of biological tissue, a contrast agent is necessary. Several types of photoacoustic contrast agents have been made available for diagnostic purposes; however, the majority of literature has focused on gold nanoparticle systems for which the surface-plasmon resonance effect is important. The only option currently available for molecular PM contrast agents is to choose an existing near infrared absorbing fluorescent probes with the hope that they may generate a substantial photoacoustic (PA) response. However, these dyes have been designed with an optimized fluorescence emission response and are not anticipated to generate an adequate photoacoustic response. This dissertation addresses this lack of precedence in the literature for understanding the mechanism of a photoacoustic signal generation from strongly absorbing dye molecules including BODIPY, cyanine and curcumin systems. This work represents preliminary efforts in bringing novel molecular photoacoustic contrast agents (MPACs) into the photoacoustic imaging arena. To this end, photoacoustic and optical Z-scan experiments, and quenching studies were employed to demonstrate correlation of photoacoustic emission enhancement with excited state absorption mechanisms. To investigate further the photoacoustic emission in a practical imaging setting, MPACs were imaged using a recently developed photoacoustic imaging tomography system which was constructed exclusively for the purpose of this study.

  20. Tomographic multiphase flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Sætre, C; Johansen, G A; Tjugum, S A

    2012-07-01

    Measurement of multiphase flow of gas, oil and water is not at all trivial and in spite of considerable achievements over the past two decades, important challenges remain (Corneliussen et al., 2005). These are related to reducing measurement uncertainties arising from variations in the flow regime, improving long term stability and developing new means for calibration, adjustment and verification of the multiphase flow meters. This work focuses on the first two issues using multi gamma beam (MGB) measurements for identification of the type of flow regime. Further gamma ray tomographic measurements are used for reference of the gas/liquid distribution. For the MGB method one Am-241 source with principal emission at 59.5 keV is used because this relatively low energy enables efficient collimation and thereby shaping of the beams, as well as compact detectors. One detector is placed diametrically opposite the source whereas the second is positioned to the side so that this beam is close to the pipe wall. The principle is then straight forward to compare the measured intensities of these detectors and through that identify the flow pattern, i.e. the instantaneous cross-sectional gas-liquid distribution. The measurement setup also includes Compton scattering measurements, which can provide information about the changes in the water salinity for flow segments with high water liquid ratio and low gas fractions. By measuring the transmitted intensity in short time slots (<100 ms), rapid regime variations are revealed. From this we can select the time sections suitable for salinity measurements. Since the salinity variations change at the time scale of hours, a running average can be performed to increase the accuracy of the measurements. Recent results of this work will be presented here. PMID:22341954

  1. Photoacoustic Imaging with a Commercial Ultrasound System and a Custom Probe

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueding; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Hu, Changhong; Carson, Paul L.

    2010-01-01

    Building photoacoustic imaging (PAI) systems by using stand-alone ultrasound (US) units makes it convenient to take advantage of the state-of-the-art ultrasonic technologies. However, the sometimes limited receiving sensitivity and the comparatively narrow bandwidth of commercial US probes may not be sufficient to acquire high quality photoacoustic images. In this work, a high-speed PAI system has been developed using a commercial US unit and a custom built 128-element piezoelectric-polymer array (PPA) probe using a P(VDF-TrFE) film and flexible circuit to define the elements. Since the US unit supports simultaneous signal acquisition from 64 parallel receive channels, PAI data for synthetic image formation from a 64 or 128 element array aperture can be acquired after a single or dual laser firing, respectively. Therefore, 2D B-scan imaging can be achieved with a maximum frame rate up to 10 Hz, limited only by the laser repetition rate. The uniquely properties of P(VDF-TrFE) facilitated a wide -6 dB receiving bandwidth of over 120 % for the array. A specially designed 128-channel preamplifier board made the connection between the array and the system cable which not only enabled element electrical impedance matching but also further elevated the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to further enhance the detection of weak photoacoustic signals. Through the experiments on phantoms and rabbit ears, the good performance of this PAI system was demonstrated. PMID:21276653

  2. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  3. Ultrasound to video registration using a bi-plane transrectal probe with photoacoustic markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Alexis; Kang, Hyun Jae; Zhang, Haichong K.; Taylor, Russell H.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-03-01

    Modern surgical scenarios typically provide surgeons with additional information through fusion of video and other imaging modalities. To provide this information, the tools and devices used in surgery must be registered together with interventional guidance equipment and surgical navigation systems. In this work, we focus explicitly on registering ultrasound with a stereo camera system using photoacoustic markers. Previous work has shown that photoacoustic markers can be used in this registration task to achieve target registration errors lower than the current available systems. Photoacoustic markers are defined as a set of non-collinear laser spots projected onto some surface. They can be simultaneously visualized by a stereo camera system and an ultrasound transducer because of the photoacoustic effect. In more recent work, the three-dimensional ultrasound volume was replaced by images from a single ultrasound image pose from a convex array transducer. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated, but the accuracy was lacking due to the physical limitations of the convex array transducer. In this work, we propose the use of a bi-plane transrectal ultrasound transducer. The main advantage of using this type of transducer is that the ultrasound elements are no longer restricted to a single plane. While this development would be limited to prostate applications, liver and kidney applications are also feasible if a suitable transducer is built. This work is demonstrated in two experiments, one without photoacoustic sources and one with. The resulting target registration error for these experiments were 1.07mm±0.35mm and 1.27mm+/-0.47mm respectively, both of which are better than current available navigation systems.

  4. Photoacoustic resonance spectroscopy for biological tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2014-06-01

    By "listening to photons," photoacoustics allows the probing of chromosomes in depth beyond the optical diffusion limit. Here we report the photoacoustic resonance effect induced by multiburst modulated laser illumination, which is theoretically modeled as a damped mass-string oscillator and a resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) circuit. Through sweeping the frequency of multiburst modulated laser, the photoacoustic resonance effect is observed experimentally on phantoms and porcine tissues. Experimental results demonstrate different spectra for each phantom and tissue sample to show significant potential for spectroscopic analysis, fusing optical absorption and mechanical vibration properties. Unique RLC circuit parameters are extracted to quantitatively characterize phantom and biological tissues.

  5. Photoacoustic resonance spectroscopy for biological tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2014-06-01

    By "listening to photons," photoacoustics allows the probing of chromosomes in depth beyond the optical diffusion limit. Here we report the photoacoustic resonance effect induced by multiburst modulated laser illumination, which is theoretically modeled as a damped mass-string oscillator and a resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) circuit. Through sweeping the frequency of multiburst modulated laser, the photoacoustic resonance effect is observed experimentally on phantoms and porcine tissues. Experimental results demonstrate different spectra for each phantom and tissue sample to show significant potential for spectroscopic analysis, fusing optical absorption and mechanical vibration properties. Unique RLC circuit parameters are extracted to quantitatively characterize phantom and biological tissues. PMID:24928154

  6. Photoacoustic phasoscopy super-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-05-26

    Phasoscopy is a recently proposed concept correlating electromagnetic (EM) absorption and scattering properties based on energy conservation. Phase information can be extracted from EM absorption induced acoustic wave and scattered EM wave for biological tissue characterization. In this paper, an imaging modality, termed photoacoustic phasoscopy imaging (PAPS), is proposed and verified experimentally based on phasoscopy concept with laser illumination. Both endogenous photoacoustic wave and scattered photons are collected simultaneously to extract the phase information. The PAPS images are then reconstructed on vessel-mimicking phantom and ex vivo porcine tissues to show significantly improved contrast than conventional photoacoustic imaging.

  7. Photoacoustic characterization of photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mello, S.M.N.; Ghizoni, C.C.; Miranda, L.C.M.; Vargas, H.

    1987-06-01

    The photoacoustic characterization of Si solar-cell samples having distinct internal resistances, both at low and high modulation frequencies, yielded results significantly different from each other. For large samples with very small internal resistances (--0.1 ..cap omega..), the additional contribution of the current dissipation near short-circuit conditions yielded results similar to those obtained with photothermal radiometry or the pyroelectric detection. For small samples, the results for the conversion efficiency, both at low and high modulation frequencies, are similar to ones obtained from the conventional electrical measurements.

  8. Development of MEMS photoacoustic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Eichenfield, Matthew S.; Griffin, Benjamin; Harvey, Heidi Alyssa; Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Langlois, Eric; Resnick, Paul James; Shaw, Michael J.; Young, Ian; Givler, Richard C.; Reinke, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    After years in the field, many materials suffer degradation, off-gassing, and chemical changes causing build-up of measurable chemical atmospheres. Stand-alone embedded chemical sensors are typically limited in specificity, require electrical lines, and/or calibration drift makes data reliability questionable. Along with size, these "Achilles' heels" have prevented incorporation of gas sensing into sealed, hazardous locations which would highly benefit from in-situ analysis. We report on development of an all-optical, mid-IR, fiber-optic based MEMS Photoacoustic Spectroscopy solution to address these limitations. Concurrent modeling and computational simulation are used to guide hardware design and implementation.

  9. Wavelength-modulated differential photoacoustic radar imager (WM-DPARI): accurate monitoring of absolute hemoglobin oxygen saturation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung Soo Sean; Lashkari, Bahman; Dovlo, Edem; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Accurate monitoring of blood oxy-saturation level (SO2) in human breast tissues is clinically important for predicting and evaluating possible tumor growth at the site. In this work, four different non-invasive frequency-domain photoacoustic (PA) imaging modalities were compared for their absolute SO2 characterization capability using an in-vitro sheep blood circulation system. Among different PA modes, a new WM-DPAR imaging modality could estimate the SO2 with great accuracy when compared to a commercial blood gas analyzer. The developed WM-DPARI theory was further validated by constructing SO2 tomographic images of a blood-containing plastisol phantom. PMID:27446691

  10. Wavelength-modulated differential photoacoustic radar imager (WM-DPARI): accurate monitoring of absolute hemoglobin oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung Soo Sean; Lashkari, Bahman; Dovlo, Edem; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Accurate monitoring of blood oxy-saturation level (SO2 ) in human breast tissues is clinically important for predicting and evaluating possible tumor growth at the site. In this work, four different non-invasive frequency-domain photoacoustic (PA) imaging modalities were compared for their absolute SO2 characterization capability using an in-vitro sheep blood circulation system. Among different PA modes, a new WM-DPAR imaging modality could estimate the SO2 with great accuracy when compared to a commercial blood gas analyzer. The developed WM-DPARI theory was further validated by constructing SO2 tomographic images of a blood-containing plastisol phantom. PMID:27446691

  11. Investigation of effective system designs for transcranial photoacoustic tomography of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuhashi, Kenji; Schoonover, Robert W.; Huang, Chao; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) holds great promise for transcranial brain imaging. However, the strong reflection, scattering and attenuation of acoustic waves in the skull present significant challenges to developing this method. We report on a systematic computer-simulation study of transcranial brain imaging using PACT. The goal of this study was to identify an effective imaging system design that can be translated for clinical use. The propagation of photoacoustic waves through a model skull was studied by use of an elastic finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The acoustic radiation pattern from a photoacoustic source just beneath the skull was observed with a ring transducer array that was level with the source. The observed radiation pattern was found to contain stronger contributions from waves that were converted to shear waves in skull than longitudinal waves that did not undergo mode conversion. Images reconstructed from the pressure data that contain shear wave components possess better resolution than images reconstructed from the data that only contain the longitudinal wave signals. These observations revealed that the detection system should be designed to capture photoacoustic signals that travel through the skull in the form of shear waves as well as in the form of longitudinal waves. A preliminary investigation on the effect of the presence of absorption in the skull is also reported. This study provides an insight into the wave phenomena in transcranial PACT imaging, as well as a concrete detection design strategy that mitigates the degraded resolution of reconstructed images.

  12. An interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging platform for the guidance of minimally invasive procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; Mari, Jean Martial; West, Simeon J.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2015-07-01

    Precise and efficient guidance of medical devices is of paramount importance for many minimally invasive procedures. These procedures include fetal interventions, tumor biopsies and treatments, central venous catheterisations and peripheral nerve blocks. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used for guidance, but it often provides insufficient contrast with which to identify soft tissue structures such as vessels, tumors, and nerves. In this study, a hybrid interventional imaging system that combines ultrasound imaging and multispectral photoacoustic imaging for guiding minimally invasive procedures was developed and characterized. The system provides both structural information from ultrasound imaging and molecular information from multispectral photoacoustic imaging. It uses a commercial linear-array ultrasound imaging probe as the ultrasound receiver, with a multimode optical fiber embedded in a needle to deliver pulsed excitation light to tissue. Co-registration of ultrasound and photoacoustic images is achieved with the use of the same ultrasound receiver for both modalities. Using tissue ex vivo, the system successfully discriminated deep-located fat tissue from the surrounding muscle tissue. The measured photoacoustic spectrum of the fat tissue had good agreement with the lipid spectrum in literature.

  13. Design of miniaturized illumination for transvaginal co-registered photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Hassan S.; Wang, Tianheng; Kumavor, Patrick D.; Li, Hai; Zhu, Quing

    2014-01-01

    A novel lens-array based illumination design for a compact co-registered photoacoustic/ultrasound transvaginal probe has been demonstrated. The lens array consists of four cylindrical lenses that couple the laser beams into four 1-mm-core multi-mode optical fibers with optical coupling efficiency of ~87%. The feasibility of our lens array was investigated by simulating the lenses and laser beam profiles using Zemax. The laser fluence on the tissue surface was experimentally measured and was below the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) safety limit. Spatial distribution of hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) of a mouse tumor was obtained in vivo using photoacoustic measurements at multiple wavelengths. Furthermore, benign and malignant ovaries were imaged ex vivo and evaluated histologically. The co-registered images clearly showed different patterns of blood vasculature. These results highlight the clinical potential of our system for noninvasive photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging of ovarian tissue and cancer detection and diagnosis. PMID:25401021

  14. Temperature mapping using photoacoustic and thermoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Haixin; Erpelding, Todd N.; Jankovic, Ladislav; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) and thermoacoustic (TA) effects are based on the generation of acoustic waves after tissues absorb electromagnetic energy. The amplitude of the acoustic signal is related to the temperature of the absorbing target tissue. A combined photoacoustic and thermoacoustic imaging system built around a modified commercial ultrasound scanner was used to obtain an image of the target's temperature, using reconstructed photoacoustic or thermoacoustic images. To demonstrate these techniques, we used photoacoustic imaging to monitor the temperature changes of methylene blue solution buried at a depth of 1.5 cm in chicken breast tissue from 12 to 42 °C. We also used thermoacoustic imaging to monitor the temperature changes of porcine muscle embedded in 2 cm porcine fat from 14 to 28 °C. The results demonstrate that these techniques can provide noninvasive real-time temperature monitoring of embedded objects and tissue.

  15. Photoacoustic excitation profiles of gold nanoparticles☆

    PubMed Central

    Feis, Alessandro; Gellini, Cristina; Salvi, Pier Remigio; Becucci, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of the laser-induced photoacoustic signal amplitude has been measured for water dispersions of 10, 61, and 93 nm diameter gold nanospheres. The whole region of the localized surface plasmon resonance has been covered. This “photoacoustic excitation profile” can be overlayed with the extinction spectrum between 450 nm and 600 nm in the case of the smallest nanoparticles. At variance, the larger-sized nanoparticles display a progressive deviation from the extinction spectrum at longer wavelength, where the photoacoustic signal becomes relatively smaller. Considering that photoacoustics is intrinsically insensitive to light scattering, at least for optically thin samples, the results are in agreement with previous theoretical work predicting (i) an increasing contribution of scattering to extinction when the nanoparticle size increases and (ii) a larger scattering component at longer wavelengths. Therefore, the method has a general validity and can be applied to selectively determine light absorption by plasmonic systems. PMID:25302155

  16. Photoacoustic tomography imaging of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yixiong; Wang, Ruikang K.; Xu, Kexin; Zhang, Fan; Yao, Jianquan

    2005-01-01

    Non-invasive laser-induced photoacoustic tomography is attracting more and more attentions in the biomedical optical imaging field. This imaging modality takes the advantages in that the tomography image has the optical contrast similar to the optical techniques while enjoying the high spatial resolution comparable to the ultrasound. Currently, its biomedical applications are mainly focused on breast cancer diagnosis and small animal imaging. In this paper, we report in detail a photoacoustic tomography experiment system constructed in our laboratory. In our system, a Q-switched ND:YAG pulse laser operated at 532nm with a 10ns pulse width is employed to generate photoacoustic signal. A tissue-mimicking phantom was built to test the system. When imaged, the phantom and detectors were immersed in a water tank to facilitate the acoustic detection. Based on filtered back-projection process of photoacoustic imaging, the two-dimension distribution of optical absorption in tissue phantom was reconstructed.

  17. Photoacoustic Imaging for Cancer Detection and Staging

    PubMed Central

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Yoon, Soon Joon; Yeager, Douglas; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Diagnosing a cancer at its early stages of development can decrease the mortality rate significantly and reduce healthcare costs. Over the past two decades, photoacoustic imaging has seen steady growth and has demonstrated notable capabilities to detect cancerous cells and stage cancer. Furthermore, photoacoustic imaging combined with ultrasound imaging and augmented with molecular targeted contrast agents is capable of imaging cancer at the cellular and molecular level, thus opening diverse opportunities to improve diagnosis of tumors, detect circulating tumor cells and identify metastatic lymph nodes. In this paper we introduce the principles of photoacoustic imaging, and review recent developments in photoacoustic imagingas an emerging imaging modality for cancer diagnosis and staging. PMID:24032095

  18. On the tomographic description of classical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibort, A.; López-Yela, A.; Man'ko, V. I.; Marmo, G.; Simoni, A.; Sudarshan, E. C. G.; Ventriglia, F.

    2012-03-01

    After a general description of the tomographic picture for classical systems, a tomographic description of free classical scalar fields is proposed both in a finite cavity and the continuum. The tomographic description is constructed in analogy with the classical tomographic picture of an ensemble of harmonic oscillators. The tomograms of a number of relevant states such as the canonical distribution, the classical counterpart of quantum coherent states and a new family of so-called Gauss-Laguerre states, are discussed. Finally the Liouville equation for field states is described in the tomographic picture offering an alternative description of the dynamics of the system that can be extended naturally to other fields.

  19. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of Entamoeba histolytica strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Avalos, D.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Silva, E. F.; Orozco, E.; de Menezes, L. F.; Vargas, H.

    2005-06-01

    Pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of E. histolytica are studied using photoacoustic spectroscopy. It is shown that the pathogenic strain presents a spectrum similar to that of iron sulfur proteins. The non-pathogenic strain does not show any relevant absorption at the studied wavelength range. The differences observed between the optical absorption spectra of both strains opens the possibility of using photoacoustic spectroscopy as a reliable and simple technique to identify different types of E. histolytica strains.

  20. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of β-hematin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, Edward B.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Whiteside, Paul J. D.; Sudduth, Amanda S. M.; Custer, John R.; Beerntsen, Brenda; Viator, John A.

    2012-06-01

    Malaria affects over 200 million individuals annually, resulting in 800 000 fatalities. Current tests use blood smears and can only detect the disease when 0.1-1% of blood cells are infected. We are investigating the use of photoacoustic flowmetry to sense as few as one infected cell among 10 million or more normal blood cells, thus diagnosing infection before patients become symptomatic. Photoacoustic flowmetry is similar to conventional flow cytometry, except that rare cells are targeted by nanosecond laser pulses to induce ultrasonic responses. This system has been used to detect single melanoma cells in 10 ml of blood. Our objective is to apply photoacoustic flowmetry to detection of the malaria pigment hemozoin, which is a byproduct of parasite-digested hemoglobin in the blood. However, hemozoin is difficult to purify in quantities greater than a milligram, so a synthetic analog, known as β-hematin was derived from porcine hemin. The specific purpose of this study is to establish the efficacy of using β-hematin, rather than hemozoin, for photoacoustic measurements. We characterized β-hematin using UV-vis spectroscopy, TEM, and FTIR, then tested the effects of laser irradiation on the synthetic product. We finally determined its absorption spectrum using photoacoustic excitation. UV-vis spectroscopy verified that β-hematin was distinctly different from its precursor. TEM analysis confirmed its previously established nanorod shape, and comparison of the FTIR results with published spectroscopy data showed that our product had the distinctive absorbance peaks at 1661 and 1206 cm-1. Also, our research indicated that prolonged irradiation dramatically alters the physical and optical properties of the β-hematin, resulting in increased absorption at shorter wavelengths. Nevertheless, the photoacoustic absorption spectrum mimicked that generated by UV-vis spectroscopy, which confirms the accuracy of the photoacoustic method and strongly suggests that

  1. Photoacoustic endoscopic imaging of the rabbit mediastinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Favazza, Christopher; Chen, Ruimin; Yao, Junjie; Cai, Xin; Li, Chiye; Maslov, Konstantin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Like ultrasound endoscopy, photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) could become a valuable addition to clinical practice due to its deep imaging capability. Results from our recent in vivo transesophageal endoscopic imaging study on rabbits demonstrate the technique's capability to image major organs in the mediastinal region, such as the lung, trachea, and cardiovascular systems. Here, we present various features from photoacoustic images from the mediastinal region of several rabbits and discuss possible clinical contributions of this technique and directions of future technology development.

  2. Acceleration of tomographic hyperspectral restoration algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schau, Harvey C.

    2006-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging spectrometers have proven to be both versatile and powerful instruments with applications in diverse areas such as medical diagnosis, land usage, military target detection, and art forgery. In many applications scanning systems cannot be effectively employed and true "flash" operation is necessary. Multiplex systems have been developed which can gather information in multispectral bands simultaneously, and then produce a datacube after mathematical restoration. Such system enjoy compact size, robust construction, inexpensive costs and zero moving parts at the cost of highly complex mathematical restoration operations. Currently the limiting feature of such tomographic hyperspectral imagers such as the FMDIS [1,2] is the speed of restoration. Due to the large sizes of the restoration kernel, restorations are typically recursive and require many iterations to achieve satisfactory results. Little can be done to make the systems smaller since the size is determined by the number of colors and pixel size of the focal plane arrays (FPA) employed. Thus, techniques must be investigated to speed up the restoration either by reducing the number of iterations or reducing the number of operations within an iteration. It is assumed that little can be done to reduce the number of operations in an iteration since the operations are done in sparse format, we therefore investigate reducing the number of iterations through mathematical accelerations. We assume this acceleration will work to advantage regardless of the mechanism (PC-based or dedicated processor such as a gate array) by which the restoration is implemented.

  3. Novel Ultrasound Tomograph for Anatomical Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouyer, Julien; Lasaygues, Philippe; Mensah, Serge

    A device for ultrasound computed tomography (UCT) is introduced here. An half-ring transducer array was designed in conformity with the breast anatomy and the cancer growth region to perform an early detection. The array comprises 1,024 elements set in a 190-degree circular arc with a radius of 100 mm. The nominal frequency is 3 MHz with a 79% -6 dB bandwidth. The front-end electronics incorporate 32 independent transmit/receive parallel channels and a 32-to-1,024 multiplexer unit. The acquisition circuitries have a variable sampling frequency of up to 80 MHz and a precision of 12 bits. Arbitrary waveforms are synthesized to improve the signal-to-noise ratio and to increase the in-depth resolution. Tomographic acquisitions were realized in diffraction mode using a restricted aperture. The backscattered field was recorded in the case of a string phantom (0.08-mm diameter steel threads) and a breast-shaped phantom containing inclusions. Data were processed with dedicated correction tools processes such as pulse compression. Objects were reconstructed with the ellipsoidal back-projection method.

  4. 3D photoacoustic imaging of a moving target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ephrat, Pinhas; Roumeliotis, Michael; Prato, Frank S.; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a fast 3D photoacoustic imaging system based on a sparse array of ultrasound detectors and iterative image reconstruction. To investigate the high frame rate capabilities of our system in the context of rotational motion, flow, and spectroscopy, we performed high frame-rate imaging on a series of targets, including a rotating graphite rod, a bolus of methylene blue flowing through a tube, and hyper-spectral imaging of a tube filled with methylene blue under a no flow condition. Our frame-rate for image acquisition was 10 Hz, which was limited by the laser repetition rate. We were able to track the rotation of the rod and accurately estimate its rotational velocity, at a rate of 0.33 rotations-per-second. The flow of contrast in the tube, at a flow rate of 180 μL/min, was also well depicted, and quantitative analysis suggested a potential method for estimating flow velocity from such measurements. The spectrum obtained did not provide accurate results, but depicted the spectral absorption signature of methylene blue , which may be sufficient for identification purposes. These preliminary results suggest that our high frame-rate photoacoustic imaging system could be used for identifying contrast agents and monitoring kinetics as an agent propagates through specific, simple structures such as blood vessels.

  5. An adaptive filtered back-projection for photoacoustic image reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Bustamante, Gilbert; Peterson, Ralph; Ye, Jing Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop an improved filtered-back-projection (FBP) algorithm for photoacoustic tomography (PAT), which allows image reconstruction with higher quality compared to images reconstructed through traditional algorithms. Methods: A rigorous expression of a weighting function has been derived directly from a photoacoustic wave equation and used as a ramp filter in Fourier domain. The authors’ new algorithm utilizes this weighting function to precisely calculate each photoacoustic signal’s contribution and then reconstructs the image based on the retarded potential generated from the photoacoustic sources. In addition, an adaptive criterion has been derived for selecting the cutoff frequency of a low pass filter. Two computational phantoms were created to test the algorithm. The first phantom contained five spheres with each sphere having different absorbances. The phantom was used to test the capability for correctly representing both the geometry and the relative absorbed energy in a planar measurement system. The authors also used another phantom containing absorbers of different sizes with overlapping geometry to evaluate the performance of the new method for complicated geometry. In addition, random noise background was added to the simulated data, which were obtained by using an arc-shaped array of 50 evenly distributed transducers that spanned 160° over a circle with a radius of 65 mm. A normalized factor between the neighbored transducers was applied for correcting measurement signals in PAT simulations. The authors assumed that the scanned object was mounted on a holder that rotated over the full 360° and the scans were set to a sampling rate of 20.48 MHz. Results: The authors have obtained reconstructed images of the computerized phantoms by utilizing the new FBP algorithm. From the reconstructed image of the first phantom, one can see that this new approach allows not only obtaining a sharp image but also showing

  6. An adaptive filtered back-projection for photoacoustic image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, He; Bustamante, Gilbert; Peterson, Ralph; Ye, Jing Yong

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop an improved filtered-back-projection (FBP) algorithm for photoacoustic tomography (PAT), which allows image reconstruction with higher quality compared to images reconstructed through traditional algorithms. Methods: A rigorous expression of a weighting function has been derived directly from a photoacoustic wave equation and used as a ramp filter in Fourier domain. The authors’ new algorithm utilizes this weighting function to precisely calculate each photoacoustic signal’s contribution and then reconstructs the image based on the retarded potential generated from the photoacoustic sources. In addition, an adaptive criterion has been derived for selecting the cutoff frequency of a low pass filter. Two computational phantoms were created to test the algorithm. The first phantom contained five spheres with each sphere having different absorbances. The phantom was used to test the capability for correctly representing both the geometry and the relative absorbed energy in a planar measurement system. The authors also used another phantom containing absorbers of different sizes with overlapping geometry to evaluate the performance of the new method for complicated geometry. In addition, random noise background was added to the simulated data, which were obtained by using an arc-shaped array of 50 evenly distributed transducers that spanned 160° over a circle with a radius of 65 mm. A normalized factor between the neighbored transducers was applied for correcting measurement signals in PAT simulations. The authors assumed that the scanned object was mounted on a holder that rotated over the full 360° and the scans were set to a sampling rate of 20.48 MHz. Results: The authors have obtained reconstructed images of the computerized phantoms by utilizing the new FBP algorithm. From the reconstructed image of the first phantom, one can see that this new approach allows not only obtaining a sharp image but also showing

  7. Photoacoustic imaging of the excited state lifetime of fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Märk, Julia; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Laufer, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging using pump-probe excitation has been shown to allow the detection and visualization of fluorescent contrast agents. The technique relies upon inducing stimulated emission using pump and probe pulses at excitation wavelengths that correspond to the absorption and fluorescence spectra. By changing the time delay between the pulses, the excited state lifetime of the fluorophore is modulated to vary the amount of thermalized energy, and hence PA signal amplitude, to provide fluorophore-specific PA contrast. In this study, this approach was extended to the detection of differences in the excited state lifetime of fluorophores. PA waveforms were measured in solutions of a near-infrared fluorophore using simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation. The lifetime of the fluorophore solutions was varied by using different solvents and quencher concentrations. By calculating difference signals and by plotting their amplitude as a function of pump-probe time delay, a correlation with the excited state lifetime of the fluorophore was observed. The results agreed with the output of a forward model of the PA signal generation in fluorophores. The application of this method to tomographic PA imaging of differences in the excited state lifetime was demonstrated in tissue phantom experiments.

  8. Detecting both melanoma depth and volume in vivo with a handheld photoacoustic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Li, Guo; Zhu, Liren; Li, Chiye; Cornelius, Lynn A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    We applied a linear-array-based photoacoustic probe to detect the tumor depth and volume of melanin-containing melanoma in nude mice in vivo. We demonstrated the ability of this linear-array-based system to measure both the depth and volume of melanoma through phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments. The volume detection ability also enables us to accurately calculate the rate of growth of the tumor, which is important in quantifying tumor activity. Our results show that this system can be used for clinical melanoma diagnosis and treatment at the bedside.

  9. Off-Axis Photoacoustic Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Ryan L.

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a high-contrast, high-resolution imaging modality, used primarily for imaging hemoglobin and melanin. Important applications include mapping of the microvasculature and melanoma tumor margins. We demonstrate a novel PAM design that markedly simplifies the implementation by separating the optical illumination from the acoustic detection path. This modification enables the use of high-quality commercial optics and transducers, and may be readily adapted to commercial light microscopes. The designed PAM system is only sensitive to signals generated in the overlap of the illumination and detection solid angles, providing the additional benefit of quasi-dark-field detection. An off-axis PAM system with a lateral resolution of 26 μm and a modest axial resolution of 410 μm has been assembled and characterized using tissue samples. The axial resolution is readily scaled down to tens of micrometers within the same design, by utilizing commercially available high-frequency acoustic transducers. PMID:20176531

  10. Gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanwan; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a biomedical imaging modality that provides functional information regarding the cellular and molecular signatures of tissue by using endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. There has been tremendous effort devoted to the development of PA imaging agents, and gold nanoparticles as exogenous contrast agents have great potential for PA imaging due to their inherent and geometrically induced optical properties. The gold-based nanoparticles that are most commonly employed for PA imaging include spheres, rods, shells, prisms, cages, stars and vesicles. This article provides an overview of the current state of research in utilizing these gold nanomaterials for PA imaging of cancer, atherosclerotic plaques, brain function and image-guided therapy. PMID:25600972

  11. Off-axis photoacoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Ryan L; Applegate, Brian E

    2010-08-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a high-contrast, high-resolution imaging modality, used primarily for imaging hemoglobin and melanin. Important applications include mapping of the microvasculature and melanoma tumor margins. We demonstrate a novel PAM design that markedly simplifies the implementation by separating the optical illumination from the acoustic detection path. This modification enables the use of high-quality commercial optics and transducers, and may be readily adapted to commercial light microscopes. The designed PAM system is only sensitive to signals generated in the overlap of the illumination and detection solid angles, providing the additional benefit of quasi-dark-field detection. An off-axis PAM system with a lateral resolution of 26 microm and a modest axial resolution of 410 microm has been assembled and characterized using tissue samples. The axial resolution is readily scaled down to tens of micrometers within the same design, by utilizing commercially available high-frequency acoustic transducers. PMID:20176531

  12. Quantitative photoacoustic elastography in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Gong, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-06-01

    We report quantitative photoacoustic elastography (QPAE) capable of measuring Young's modulus of biological tissue in vivo in humans. By combining conventional PAE with a stress sensor having known stress-strain behavior, QPAE can simultaneously measure strain and stress, from which Young's modulus is calculated. We first demonstrate the feasibility of QPAE in agar phantoms with different concentrations. The measured Young's modulus values fit well with both the empirical expectation based on the agar concentrations and those measured in an independent standard compression test. Next, QPAE was applied to quantify the Young's modulus of skeletal muscle in vivo in humans, showing a linear relationship between muscle stiffness and loading. The results demonstrated the capability of QPAE to assess the absolute elasticity of biological tissue noninvasively in vivo in humans, indicating its potential for tissue biomechanics studies and clinical applications.

  13. Gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanwan; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a biomedical imaging modality that provides functional information regarding the cellular and molecular signatures of tissue by using endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. There has been tremendous effort devoted to the development of PA imaging agents, and gold nanoparticles as exogenous contrast agents have great potential for PA imaging due to their inherent and geometrically induced optical properties. The gold-based nanoparticles that are most commonly employed for PA imaging include spheres, rods, shells, prisms, cages, stars and vesicles. This article provides an overview of the current state of research in utilizing these gold nanomaterials for PA imaging of cancer, atherosclerotic plaques, brain function and image-guided therapy. PMID:25600972

  14. Photoacoustic biopsy: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Tomlins, Scott A.; Siddiqui, Javed; Davis, Mandy A.; Kunju, Lakshmi P.; Wei, John T.; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) measurements encode the information associated with both physical microstructures and chemical contents in biological tissues. A two-dimensional physio-chemical spectrogram (PCS) can be formulated by combining the power spectra of PA signals acquired at a series of optical wavelengths. The analysis of PCS, or namely PA physio-chemical analysis (PAPCA), enables the quantification of the concentrations and the spatial distributions of a variety of chemical components in the tissue. The chemical components and their distribution are the two major features observed in the biopsy procedures which have been regarded as the gold standard of the diagnosis of many diseases. Taking non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and prostate cancer for example, this study investigates the feasibility of PAPCA in characterizing the histopathological changes in the diseased conditions in biological tissue. A catheter based setup facilitating measurement in deep tissues was also proposed and tested.

  15. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-06-01

    We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique's benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument's flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system.

  16. Tomographic reconstruction of polar plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchère, F.; Guennou, C.; Barbey, N.

    2012-06-01

    We present a tomographic reconstruction of polar plumes as observed in the Extreme Ultraviolet in January 2010. Plumes are elusive structures visible in polar coronal holes that may play an important role in the acceleration of the solar wind. However, despite numerous observations, little is irrefutably known about them. Because of line of sight effects, even their geometry is subject to debate. Are they genuine cylindrical features of the corona or are they only chance alignments along the line of sight? Tomography provides a means to reconstruct the volume of an optically thin object from a set of observations taken from different vantage points. In the case of the Sun, these are typically obtained by using a solar rotation worth of images, which limits the ability to reconstruct short lived structures. We present here a tomographic inversion of the solar corona obtained using only 6 days of data. This is achieved by using simultaneously three space telescopes (EUVI/STEREO and SWAP/PROBA2) in a very specific orbital configuration. The result is the shortest possible tomographic snapshot of polar plumes. The 3D reconstruction shows both quasi-cylindrical plumes and a network pattern that can mimic them by line of sight superimpositions. This suggests that the controversy on plume geometry is due to the coexistence of both types of structures.

  17. Spatial filtering improved tomographic PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discetti, Stefano; Natale, Andrea; Astarita, Tommaso

    2013-04-01

    Tomographic reconstruction accuracy is of fundamental importance to obtain reliable three-dimensional three-components velocity field measurements when implementing tomographic particle image velocimetry. Algebraic methods (Herman and Lent 1976) are quite well established to handle the problem in case of high spatial frequency spots on a dark background imaged by a limited number of simultaneous views; however, their efficacy is limited in case of dense distributions to be reconstructed. In the present work, an easy implementable modified version of the commonly used multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique is proposed, allowing a remarkable improvement of the tomographic reconstruction quality only slightly increasing the computational cost. The technique is based on artificial diffusion applied by Gaussian smoothing after each iteration of the reconstruction procedure. Numerical simulations show that the increase in the reconstruction quality leads to a significant reduction of the modulation effects in the velocity measurement due to the coherent ghost particles motion. An experimental application in fractal grid turbulence highlights an improvement of the signal strength and a reduction of the uncertainty in the velocity measurement.

  18. Off-axis photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Ryan; Applegate, Brian E.

    2010-02-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) is a high-contrast, high-resolution imaging modality used primarily for imaging hemoglobin and melanin. Important applications include mapping of the microvasculature and melanoma tumor margins. We have developed a novel photoacoustic microscope design, which substantially simplifies construction by enabling the use of unmodified commercial optics and ultrasonic transducers. Moreover, the simple design may be readily incorporated into a standard light microscope, thus providing a familiar imaging platform for clinical researchers. A proof-of-concept Off-Axis PAM system with a lateral resolution of 26 μm and a modest axial resolution of 410 μm has been assembled and characterized using tissue samples. We have derived the appropriate equations to describe the relevant design parameters and verified the equations via measurements made on our prototype Off-Axis PAM system. A consequence of the simple design is a reduction in axial resolution compared to coaxial designs. The reduction is inversely proportional to the cosine of the angle between excitation and detection and equal to 15% and 41% for angles of 30º and 45º, respectively. While resolution is negatively affected by off-axis detection, the ability to measure weak signals at depth is enhanced. Off-axis detection has an inherent dark-field quality; chromophores excited outside the numerical aperture of the ultrasonic detector will not be detected. The physical geometry of Off-Axis PAM enables the placement of the ultrasonic transducer at the minimum distance from the sample with no obstructions between the sample and transducer. This may prove to be an additional advantage of Off-Axis PAM over designs that incorporate long working distance ultrasonic transducers and/or require the propagation of the acoustic wave through the laser excitation optics to achieve co-axial detection.

  19. Breast imaging using the Twente photoacoustic mammoscope (PAM): new clinical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijblom, Michelle; Piras, Daniele; Ten Tije, Ellen; Xia, Wenfeng; van Hespen, Johan; Klaase, Joost; van den Engh, Frank; van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-07-01

    Worldwide, yearly about 450,000 women die from the consequences of breast cancer. Current imaging modalities are not optimal in discriminating benign from malignant tissue. Visualizing the malignancy-associated increased hemoglobin concentration might significantly improve early diagnosis of breast cancer. Since photoacoustic imaging can visualize hemoglobin in tissue with optical contrast and ultrasound-like resolution, it is potentially an ideal method for early breast cancer imaging. The Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope (PAM) has been developed specifically for breast imaging. Recently, a large clinical study has been started in the Medisch Spectrum Twente in Oldenzaal using PAM. In PAM, the breast is slightly compressed between a window for laser light illumination and a flat array ultrasound detector. The measurements are performed using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, pulsed at 1064 nm and a 1 MHz unfocused ultrasound detector array. Three-dimensional data are reconstructed using a delay and sum reconstruction algorithm. Those reconstructed images are compared with conventional imaging and histopathology. In the first phase of the study 12 patients with a malignant lesion and 2 patients with a benign cyst have been measured. The results are used to guide developments in photoacoustic mammography in order to pave the way towards an optimal technique for early diagnosis of breast cancer.

  20. Quantitative Photoacoustic Image Reconstruction using Fluence Dependent Chromophores

    PubMed Central

    Cox, B.T.; Laufer, J.G.; Beard, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    In biomedical photoacoustic imaging the images are proportional to the absorbed optical energy density, and not the optical absorption, which makes it difficult to obtain a quantitatively accurate image showing the concentration of a particular absorbing chromophore from photoacoustic measurements alone. Here it is shown that the spatially varying concentration of a chromophore whose absorption becomes zero above a threshold light fluence can be estimated from photoacoustic images obtained at increasing illumination strengths. This technique provides an alternative to model-based multiwavelength approaches to quantitative photoacoustic imaging, and a new approach to photoacoustic molecular and functional imaging. PMID:21258458

  1. Investigating femtosecond-laser-induced two-photon photoacoustic generation

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Ben E.; Yi, Ji; Yakovlev, Vladislav; Zhang, Hao F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We investigated two-photon absorption-based photoacoustic generation and compared it with corresponding photoluminescence emission. Experimental results revealed expected quadratic dependences on the incident optical fluence in both photoacoustic and photoluminescence processes. We also investigated the influence of optical scattering on the generation of two-photon photoacoustic and photoluminescence signals and found that photoacoustic signals attenuated more slowly than photoluminescence signals when the optical scattering coefficient was increased, which was attributed to a weaker ultrasonic attenuation than that the optical attenuation in the scattering medium. Finally, we showed three-dimensional two-photon photoacoustic imaging. PMID:25084119

  2. Theranostic probe for simultaneous in vivo photoacoustic imaging and confined photothermolysis by pulsed laser at 1064 nm in 4T1 breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Ku, Geng; Pageon, Laura; Li, Chun

    2014-12-21

    Here, we report that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated copper(II) sulfide nanoparticles (PEG-CuS NPs) with their peak absorption tuned to 1064 nm could be used both as a contrast agent for photoacoustic tomographic imaging of mouse tumor vasculature and as a mediator for confined photothermolysis of tumor cells in an orthotopic syngeneic 4T1 breast tumor model. PEG-CuS NPs showed stronger photoacoustic signal than hollow gold nanospheres and single-wall carbon nanotubes at 1064 nm. MicroPET imaging of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice showed a gradual accumulation of the NPs in the tumor over time. About 6.5% of injected dose were taken up in each gram of tumor tissue at 24 h after intravenous injection of (64)Cu-labeled PEG-CuS NPs. For both photoacoustic imaging and therapeutic studies, nanosecond (ns)-pulsed laser was delivered with Q-switched Nd:YAG at a wavelength of 1064 nm. Unlike conventional photothermal ablation therapy mediated by continuous wave laser with which heat could spread to the surrounding normal tissue, interaction of CuS NPs with short pulsed laser deliver heat rapidly to the treatment volume keeping the thermal damage confined to the target tissues. Our data demonstrated that it is possible to use a single-compartment nanoplatform to achieve both photoacoustic tomography and highly selective tumor destruction at 1064 nm in small animals. PMID:25379880

  3. A new approach to depict bone surfaces in finger imaging using photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, S. K.; van Es, P.; Steenbergen, W.; Manohar, S.

    2015-03-01

    Imaging the vasculature close around the finger joints is of interest in the field of rheumatology. Locally increased vasculature in the synovial membrane of these joints can be a marker for rheumatoid arthritis. In previous work we showed that part of the photoacoustically induced ultrasound from the epidermis reflects on the bone surface within the finger. These reflected signals could be wrongly interpreted as new photoacoustic sources. In this work we show that a conventional ultrasound reconstruction algorithm, that considers the skin as a collection of ultrasound transmitters and the PA tomography probe as the detector array, can be used to delineate bone surfaces of a finger. This can in the future assist in the localization of the joint gaps. This can provide us with a landmark to localize the region of the inflamed synovial membrane. We test the approach on finger mimicking phantoms.

  4. Sono-photoacoustic imaging of gold nanoemulsions: Part II. Real time imaging

    PubMed Central

    Arnal, Bastien; Wei, Chen-Wei; Perez, Camilo; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Lombardo, Michael; Pelivanov, Ivan; Pozzo, Lilo D.; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging using exogenous agents can be limited by degraded specificity due to strong background signals. This paper introduces a technique called sono-photoacoustics (SPA) applied to perfluorohexane nanodroplets coated with gold nanospheres. Pulsed laser and ultrasound (US) excitations are applied simultaneously to the contrast agent to induce a phase-transition ultimately creating a transient microbubble. The US field present during the phase transition combined with the large thermal expansion of the bubble leads to 20–30 dB signal enhancement. Aqueous solutions and phantoms with very low concentrations of this agent were probed using pulsed laser radiation at diagnostic exposures and a conventional US array used both for excitation and imaging. Contrast specificity of the agent was demonstrated with a coherent differential scheme to suppress US and linear PA background signals. SPA shows great potential for molecular imaging with ultrasensitive detection of targeted gold coated nanoemulsions and cavitation-assisted theranostic approaches. PMID:25893170

  5. Interlaced photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system with real-time coregistration for ovarian tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Yuan, Guangqian; Kumavor, Patrick; Zanganeh, Saeid; Zhu, Quing

    2014-07-01

    Coregistered ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic imaging are emerging techniques for mapping the echogenic anatomical structure of tissue and its corresponding optical absorption. We report a 128-channel imaging system with real-time coregistration of the two modalities, which provides up to 15 coregistered frames per second limited by the laser pulse repetition rate. In addition, the system integrates a compact transvaginal imaging probe with a custom-designed fiber optic assembly for in vivo detection and characterization of human ovarian tissue. We present the coregistered US and photoacoustic imaging system structure, the optimal design of the PC interfacing software, and the reconfigurable field programmable gate array operation and optimization. Phantom experiments of system lateral resolution and axial sensitivity evaluation, examples of the real-time scanning of a tumor-bearing mouse, and ex vivo human ovaries studies are demonstrated.

  6. Interlaced photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system with real-time coregistration for ovarian tissue characterization

    PubMed Central

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Yuan, Guangqian; Kumavor, Patrick; Zanganeh, Saeid; Zhu, Quing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Coregistered ultrasound (US) and photoacoustic imaging are emerging techniques for mapping the echogenic anatomical structure of tissue and its corresponding optical absorption. We report a 128-channel imaging system with real-time coregistration of the two modalities, which provides up to 15 coregistered frames per second limited by the laser pulse repetition rate. In addition, the system integrates a compact transvaginal imaging probe with a custom-designed fiber optic assembly for in vivo detection and characterization of human ovarian tissue. We present the coregistered US and photoacoustic imaging system structure, the optimal design of the PC interfacing software, and the reconfigurable field programmable gate array operation and optimization. Phantom experiments of system lateral resolution and axial sensitivity evaluation, examples of the real-time scanning of a tumor-bearing mouse, and ex vivo human ovaries studies are demonstrated. PMID:25069009

  7. Photoacoustic cell for ultrasound contrast agent characterization.

    PubMed

    Alippi, A; Bettucci, A; Biagioni, A; D'Orazio, A; Germano, M; Passeri, D

    2010-10-01

    Photoacoustics has emerged as a tool for the study of liquid gel suspension behavior and has been recently employed in a number of new biomedical applications. In this paper, a photoacoustic sensor is presented which was designed and realized for analyzing photothermal signals from solutions filled with microbubbles, commonly used as ultrasound contrast agents in echographic imaging techniques. It is a closed cell device, where photothermal volume variation of an aqueous solution produces the periodic deflection of a thin membrane closing the cell at the end of a short pipe. The cell then acts as a Helmholtz resonator, where the displacement of the membrane is measured through a laser probe interferometer, whereas photoacoustic signal is generated by a laser chopped light beam impinging onto the solution through a glass window. Particularly, the microbubble shell has been modeled through an effective surface tension parameter, which has been then evaluated from experimental data through the shift of the resonance frequencies of the photoacoustic sensor. This shift of the resonance frequencies of the photoacoustic sensor caused by microbubble solutions is high enough for making such a cell a reliable tool for testing ultrasound contrast agent, particularly for bubble shell characterization. PMID:21034110

  8. Photoacoustic cell for ultrasound contrast agent characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alippi, A.; Bettucci, A.; Biagioni, A.; D'Orazio, A.; Germano, M.; Passeri, D.

    2010-10-01

    Photoacoustics has emerged as a tool for the study of liquid gel suspension behavior and has been recently employed in a number of new biomedical applications. In this paper, a photoacoustic sensor is presented which was designed and realized for analyzing photothermal signals from solutions filled with microbubbles, commonly used as ultrasound contrast agents in echographic imaging techniques. It is a closed cell device, where photothermal volume variation of an aqueous solution produces the periodic deflection of a thin membrane closing the cell at the end of a short pipe. The cell then acts as a Helmholtz resonator, where the displacement of the membrane is measured through a laser probe interferometer, whereas photoacoustic signal is generated by a laser chopped light beam impinging onto the solution through a glass window. Particularly, the microbubble shell has been modeled through an effective surface tension parameter, which has been then evaluated from experimental data through the shift of the resonance frequencies of the photoacoustic sensor. This shift of the resonance frequencies of the photoacoustic sensor caused by microbubble solutions is high enough for making such a cell a reliable tool for testing ultrasound contrast agent, particularly for bubble shell characterization.

  9. Photoacoustic tomography of the human finger: towards the assessment of inflammatory joint diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Es, P.; Biswas, S. K.; Bernelot Moens, H. J.; Steenbergen, W.; Manohar, S.

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory arthritis is often manifested in finger joints. The growth of new or withdrawal of old blood vessels can be a sensitive marker for these diseases. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has great potential in this respect since it allows the sensitive and highly resolved visualization of blood. We systematically investigated PA imaging of finger vasculature in healthy volunteers using a newly developed PA tomographic system. We present the PA results which show excellent detail of the vasculature. Vessels with diameters ranging between 100 μm and 1.5 mm are visible along with details of the skin, including the epidermis and the subpapillary plexus. The focus of all the studies is at the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints, and in the context of ultimately visualizing the inflamed synovial membrane in patients. This work is important in laying the foundation for detailed research into PA imaging of the phalangeal vasculature in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Tomographic elastography of contracting skeletal muscles from their natural vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabra, Karim G.; Archer, Akibi

    2009-11-01

    Conventional elastography techniques require an external mechanical or radiation excitation to measure noninvasively the viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscles and thus monitor human motor functions. We developed instead a passive elastography technique using only an array of skin-mounted accelerometers to record the low-frequency vibrations of the biceps brachii muscle naturally generated during voluntary contractions and to determine their two-dimensional directionality. Cross-correlating these recordings provided travel-times measurements of these muscle vibrations between multiple sensor pairs. Travel-time tomographic inversions yielded spatial variations of their propagation velocity during isometric elbow flexions which indicated a nonuniform longitudinal stiffening of the biceps.

  11. Multicolor photoacoustic imaging by a single transducer with piezoelectric copolymer film in a wide frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Tsutomu; Ishihara, Miya; Tsujita, Kazuhiro; Bansaku, Isao; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    We built a photoacoustic tomographic (PAT) imaging system by scanning a single detector (φ 3.5 mm) made of piezoelectric copolymer poly(vinylidene difluoride-trifluoroethylene), P(VDF-TrFE), which had been fabricated for diagnostic photoacoustic measurement of cartilage tissues in our group. The PAT images of a phantom were obtained at two excitation wavelength of 687.5 nm and 795 nm. The phantom was made of agar including a black hair and agarose gels dissolving indocyanine green (ICG) and methylene blue (MB). Laser pulses (685-900 nm) were generated from a Ti:Sappire tunable laser to excite ICG and MB molecules. The PAT image at 687.5 nm shows signals due to all absorption sources. This is good agreement with dimension of the phantom. The PAT image at 795 nm shows a strong signal due to the ICG-dyed gel and almost no signal due to the MB-dyed gel. This result indicated that absorption sources were extracted by excitation wavelength according to their absorption spectra. The signal/noise ratio of the PAT images were compared between the P(VDF-TrFE) transducer in our group and a PZT transducer (Parametrics V309, 5 MHz, φ 12.7 mm) which is commercially available. The P(VDF-TrFE) transducer was more sensitive by 9 times (120 times per area) than the PZT transducer. By using this imaging system with a P(VDF-TrFE) transducer which is highly sensitive in a wide frequency range, we will achieve frequency analysis of the PAT images to associate photoacoustic waveforms with physical properties of sample tissues.

  12. Enhanced photoacoustic detection using photonic crystal substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yunfei; Liu, Kaiyang; McClelland, John; Lu, Meng

    2014-04-21

    This paper demonstrates the enhanced photoacoustic sensing of surface-bound light absorbing molecules and metal nanoparticles using a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) substrate. The PC structure functions as an optical resonator at the wavelength where the analyte absorption is strong. The optical resonance of the PC sensor provides an intensified evanescent field with respect to the excitation light source and results in enhanced optical absorption by surface-immobilized samples. For the analysis of a light absorbing dye deposited on the PC surface, the intensity of photoacoustic signal was enhanced by more than 10-fold in comparison to an un-patterned acrylic substrate. The technique was also applied to detect gold nanorods and exhibited more than 40 times stronger photoacoustic signals. The demonstrated approach represents a potential path towards single molecule absorption spectroscopy with greater performance and inexpensive instrumentation.

  13. Ultrasonically Encoded Photoacoustic Flowgraphy in Biological Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lidai; Xia, Jun; Yao, Junjie; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-11-01

    Blood flow speed is an important functional parameter. Doppler ultrasound flowmetry lacks sufficient sensitivity to slow blood flow (several to tens of millimeters per second) in deep tissue. To address this challenge, we developed ultrasonically encoded photoacoustic flowgraphy combining ultrasonic thermal tagging with photoacoustic imaging. Focused ultrasound generates a confined heat source in acoustically absorptive fluid. Thermal waves propagate with the flow and are directly visualized in pseudo color using photoacoustic computed tomography. The Doppler shift is employed to calculate the flow speed. This method requires only acoustic and optical absorption, and thus is applicable to continuous fluid. A blood flow speed as low as 0.24mm·s-1 was successfully measured. Deep blood flow imaging was experimentally demonstrated under 5-mm-thick chicken breast tissue.

  14. Intravascular photoacoustic imaging of human coronary atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Krista; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Springeling, Geert; van Beusekom, Heleen M. M.; Oosterhuis, J. Wolter; van Soest, Gijs

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate intravascular photoacoustic imaging of human coronary atherosclerotic plaque. We specifically imaged lipid content, a key factor in vulnerable plaques that may lead to myocardial infarction. An integrated intravascular photoacoustics (IVPA) and ultrasound (IVUS) catheter with an outer diameter of 1.25 mm was developed. The catheter comprises an angle-polished optical fiber adjacent to a 30 MHz single-element transducer. The ultrasonic transducer was optically isolated to eliminate artifacts in the PA image. We performed measurements on a cylindrical vessel phantom and isolated point targets to demonstrate its imaging performance. Axial and lateral point spread function widths were 110 μm and 550 μm, respectively, for PA and 89 μm and 420 μm for US. We imaged two fresh human coronary arteries, showing different stages of disease, ex vivo. Specific photoacoustic imaging of lipid content, is achieved by spectroscopic imaging at different wavelengths between 1180 and 1230 nm.

  15. Quantum correlations and tomographic representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man'ko, O. V.; Chernega, V. N.

    2013-07-01

    We review the probabilistic representation of quantum mechanics within which states are described by the probability distribution rather than by the wavefunction and density matrix. Uncertainty relations have been obtained in the form of integral inequalities containing measurable optical tomograms of quantum states. Formulas for the transition probabilities and purity parameter have been derived in terms of the tomographic probability distributions. Inequalities for Shannon and Rényi entropies associated with quantum tomograms have been obtained. A scheme of the star product of tomograms has been developed.

  16. Early detection of dental caries using photoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Witte, R.; Koh, I.; Ashkenazi, S.; O'Donnell, M.

    2006-02-01

    For decades, visual, tactile and radiographic examinations have been the standard for diagnosing caries. Nonetheless, the extent of variation in the diagnosis of dental caries is substantial among dental practitioners using these traditional techniques. Therefore, a more reliable standard for detecting incipient caries would be desirable. Using photoacoustics, near-infrared (NIR) optical contrast between sound and carious dental tissues can be relatively easily and accurately detected at ultrasound resolution. In this paper, a pulsed laser (Nd:YAG, Quanta-Ray) was used to probe extracted human molars at different disease stages determined from periapical radiographs. Both fundamental (1064nm) and first harmonic (532nm) pulses (15ns pulse length, 100mJ at fundamental and 9mJ at first harmonic , 10Hz pulse repetition rate) were used to illuminate the occlusal surface of tooth samples placed in a water tank. The photoacoustic signal was recorded with an unfocused wideband single-element piezoelectric transducer (centered at 12 MHz, bandwidth 15 MHz) positioned at small angle (less than 30 degrees) to the laser beam close to the occlusal surface. At the fundamental wavelength, total photoacoustic energy increases from normal to incipient stage disease by as much as a factor of 10. Differences between photoacoustic energy at the fundamental and first harmonic wavelength further indicate spectral absorption changes of the underlying structure with disease progression. Using a focused laser beam, an extracted molar with suspected incipient caries was scanned along the occulusal surface to help localize the caries inside enamel and dentin. The significantly increasing photoacoustic signal at a specific scan line both at fundamental and first harmonic indicates the local development of the incipient caries. The photoacoustic results compare well with visual inspection after layer by layer dissection. Preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of detecting incipient

  17. Array signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Haykin, S.; Justice, J.H.; Owsley, N.L.; Yen, J.L.; Kak, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    This is the first book to be devoted completely to array signal processing, a subject that has become increasingly important in recent years. The book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1, which is introductory, reviews some basic concepts in wave propagation. The remaining five chapters deal with the theory and applications of array signal processing in (a) exploration seismology, (b) passive sonar, (c) radar, (d) radio astronomy, and (e) tomographic imaging. The various chapters of the book are self-contained. The book is written by a team of five active researchers, who are specialists in the individual fields covered by the pertinent chapters.

  18. Determination of Tequila Quality by Photoacoustic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Pérez, Atzin; Pérez-Castañeda, J. I.; Castañeda-Guzmán, R.; Pérez-Ruiz, S. J.

    2013-09-01

    A pulsed laser photoacoustic (PLPA) technique is proposed to distinguish original from adulterated tequila. In fact, it brings a reliable cheaper and more sensible method in adulteration detection, in comparison with traditional techniques. The method proposed is comparative and non-destructive, and it is based on a correlation analysis of photoacoustic signals, obtained by exciting tequila samples with short laser pulses (7 ns), in the UV region (355 nm). Eleven samples of tequila were analyzed. From a reference sample, all other samples were classified.

  19. Thermoacoustic and photoacoustic sensing of temperature

    PubMed Central

    Pramanik, Manojit; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel temperature-sensing technique using thermoacoustic and photoacoustic measurements. This noninvasive method has been demonstrated using a tissue phantom to have high temporal resolution and temperature sensitivity. Because both photoacoustic and thermoacoustic signal amplitudes depend on the temperature of the source object, the signal amplitudes can be used to monitor the temperature. A temperature sensitivity of 0.15°C was obtained at a temporal resolution as short as 2 s, taking the average of 20 signals. The deep-tissue imaging capability of this technique can potentially lead us to in vivo temperature monitoring in thermal or cryogenic applications. PMID:19895126

  20. Photoacoustic lifetime imaging and its biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qi

    Even though oxygen plays a crucial role in body function and cancer biology, methods of measuring oxygen level in tissue are all limited. The current gold standard relies on an invasive electrode for only single-point reading at a time. The photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) approach overcomes these major limitations by applying photoacoustic probing to oxygen-sensitive optical transient absorption. The capability of assessing oxygen distribution is demonstrated by imaging tumor hypoxia in a small animal model, and monitoring changes of tissue oxygen induced by external modulations. Proposed applications of this imaging technique includes imaging-guided photodynamic therapy (PDT) and activatable probes for molecular imaging.

  1. In vivo virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seunghoon Kim, Sehui Kim, Jeehyun E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu; Lee, Changho Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong E-mail: chulhong@postech.edu

    2013-11-11

    We developed a virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy system by combining with a commercial surgical microscope and photoacoustic microscope (PAM). By sharing the common optical path in the microscope and PAM system, we could acquire the PAM and microscope images simultaneously. Moreover, by employing a beam projector to back-project 2D PAM images onto the microscope view plane as augmented reality, the conventional microscopic and 2D cross-sectional PAM images are concurrently mapped on the plane via an ocular lens of the microscope in real-time. Further, we guided needle insertion into phantom ex vivo and mice skins in vivo.

  2. Photoacoustic tomography of water in biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhun; Li, Changhui; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    As an emerging imaging technique that combines high optical contrast and ultrasonic detection, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has been widely used to image optically absorptive objects in both human and animal tissues. PAT overcomes the depth limitation of other high-resolution optical imaging methods, and it is also free from speckle artifacts. To our knowledge, water has never been imaged by PAT in biological tissue. Here, for the first time, we experimentally imaged water in both tissue phantoms and biological tissues using a near infrared (NIR) light source. The differences among photoacoustic images of water with different concentrations indicate that laser-based PAT can usefully detect and image water content in tissue.

  3. Multimodal photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography scanner using an all optical detection scheme for 3D morphological skin imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Edward Z.; Povazay, Boris; Laufer, Jan; Alex, Aneesh; Hofer, Bernd; Pedley, Barbara; Glittenberg, Carl; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Beard, Paul; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    A noninvasive, multimodal photoacoustic and optical coherence tomography (PAT/OCT) scanner for three-dimensional in vivo (3D) skin imaging is described. The system employs an integrated, all optical detection scheme for both modalities in backward mode utilizing a shared 2D optical scanner with a field-of-view of ~13 × 13 mm2. The photoacoustic waves were detected using a Fabry Perot polymer film ultrasound sensor placed on the surface of the skin. The sensor is transparent in the spectral range 590-1200 nm. This permits the photoacoustic excitation beam (670-680 nm) and the OCT probe beam (1050 nm) to be transmitted through the sensor head and into the underlying tissue thus providing a backward mode imaging configuration. The respective OCT and PAT axial resolutions were 8 and 20 µm and the lateral resolutions were 18 and 50-100 µm. The system provides greater penetration depth than previous combined PA/OCT devices due to the longer wavelength of the OCT beam (1050 nm rather than 829-870 nm) and by operating in the tomographic rather than the optical resolution mode of photoacoustic imaging. Three-dimensional in vivo images of the vasculature and the surrounding tissue micro-morphology in murine and human skin were acquired. These studies demonstrated the complementary contrast and tissue information provided by each modality for high-resolution 3D imaging of vascular structures to depths of up to 5 mm. Potential applications include characterizing skin conditions such as tumors, vascular lesions, soft tissue damage such as burns and wounds, inflammatory conditions such as dermatitis and other superficial tissue abnormalities. PMID:21833358

  4. A multislice positron emission computed tomograph (PETT IV) yielding transverse and longitudinal images.

    PubMed

    Ter-Pogossian, M M; Mullani, N A; Hood, J; Higgins, C S; Currie, C M

    1978-08-01

    We designed, built, and tested a positron emission tomograph (PETT IV) capable of providing seven slices of the human body simultaneously. PETT IV utilizes a moving hexagonal array of 48 scintillation detectors placed around the subject. Each detector consists of a cylindrical activated sodium iodide crystal optically coupled to two photomultiplier tubes. The multislice capability is achieved by comparing the light outputs of the two photomultiplier tubes in each detector. The images are displayed either as transverse or as longitudinal tomographic sections. This system provides high sensitivity and resolution, and permits rapid and accurate three-dimensional imaging of the head and body. PMID:663264

  5. Label-free photoacoustic nanoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Winkler, Amy M.; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lidai; Chen, Yun; Dorn, Gerald W.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Super-resolution microscopy techniques—capable of overcoming the diffraction limit of light—have opened new opportunities to explore subcellular structures and dynamics not resolvable in conventional far-field microscopy. However, relying on staining with exogenous fluorescent markers, these techniques can sometimes introduce undesired artifacts to the image, mainly due to large tagging agent sizes and insufficient or variable labeling densities. By contrast, the use of endogenous pigments allows imaging of the intrinsic structures of biological samples with unaltered molecular constituents. Here, we report label-free photoacoustic (PA) nanoscopy, which is exquisitely sensitive to optical absorption, with an 88 nm resolution. At each scanning position, multiple PA signals are successively excited with increasing laser pulse energy. Because of optical saturation or nonlinear thermal expansion, the PA amplitude depends on the nonlinear incident optical fluence. The high-order dependence, quantified by polynomial fitting, provides super-resolution imaging with optical sectioning. PA nanoscopy is capable of super-resolution imaging of either fluorescent or nonfluorescent molecules. PMID:25104412

  6. Fundus Camera Guided Photoacoustic Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tan; Li, Hao; Song, Wei; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of fundus camera guided photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) system and its multimodal imaging capabilities. Methods We integrated PAOM and a fundus camera consisting of a white-light illuminator and a high-sensitivity, high-speed CCD. The fundus camera captures both retinal anatomy and PAOM illumination at the same time to provide a real-time feedback when we position the PAOM illuminating light. We applied the integrated system to image rat eyes in vivo and used full-spectrum, visible (VIS), and near infrared (NIR) illuminations in fundus photography. Results Both albino and pigmented rat eyes were imaged in vivo. During alignment, different trajectories of PAOM laser scanning were successfully visualized by the fundus camera, which reduced the PAOM alignment time from several minutes to 30 s. In albino eyes, in addition to retinal vessels, main choroidal vessels were observed using VIS-illumination, which is similar to PAOM images. In pigmented eyes, the radial striations of retinal nerve fiber layer were visualized by fundus photography using full-spectrum illumination; meanwhile, PAOM imaged both retinal vessels and the retinal pigmented epithelium melanin distribution. Conclusions The results demonstrated that PAOM can be well-integrated with fundus camera without affecting its functionality. The fundus camera guidance is faster and easier comparing with our previous work. The integrated system also set the stage for the next-step verification between oximetry methods based on PAOM and fundus photography. PMID:24131226

  7. Photoacoustic sensor for medical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Marcus; Groninga, Hinrich G.; Harde, Hermann

    2004-03-01

    The development of new optical sensor technologies has a major impact on the progress of diagnostic methods. Of the permanently increasing number of non-invasive breath tests, the 13C-Urea Breath Test (UBT) for the detection of Helicobacter pylori is the most prominent. However, many recent developments, like the detection of cancer by breath test, go beyond gastroenterological applications. We present a new detection scheme for breath analysis that employs an especially compact and simple set-up. Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PAS) represents an offset-free technique that allows for short absorption paths and small sample cells. Using a single-frequency diode laser and taking advantage of acoustical resonances of the sample cell, we performed extremely sensitive and selective measurements. The smart data processing method contributes to the extraordinary sensitivity and selectivity as well. Also, the reasonable acquisition cost and low operational cost make this detection scheme attractive for many biomedical applications. The experimental set-up and data processing method, together with exemplary isotope-selective measurements on carbon dioxide, are presented.

  8. Photoacoustic microscopy of human teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Bin; Cai, Xin; Favazza, Christopher; Yao, Junjie; Li, Li; Duong, Steven; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Holtzman, Jennifer; Wilder-Smith, Petra; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) utilizes short laser pulses to deposit energy into light absorbers and sensitively detects the ultrasonic waves the absorbers generate in response. PAM directly renders a three-dimensional spatial distribution of sub-surface optical absorbers. Unlike other optical imaging technologies, PAM features label-free optical absorption contrast and excellent imaging depths. Standard dental imaging instruments are limited to X-ray and CCD cameras. Subsurface optical dental imaging is difficult due to the highly-scattering enamel and dentin tissue. Thus, very few imaging methods can detect dental decay or diagnose dental pulp, which is the innermost part of the tooth, containing the nerves, blood vessels, and other cells. Here, we conducted a feasibility study on imaging dental decay and dental pulp with PAM. Our results showed that PAM is sensitive to the color change associated with dental decay. Although the relative PA signal distribution may be affected by surface contours and subsurface reflections from deeper dental tissue, monitoring changes in the PA signals (at the same site) over time is necessary to identify the progress of dental decay. Our results also showed that deep-imaging, near-infrared (NIR) PAM can sensitively image blood in the dental pulp of an in vitro tooth. In conclusion, PAM is a promising tool for imaging both dental decay and dental pulp.

  9. One dimensional wavefront sensor development for tomographic flow measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.; Pierson, R.; Chen, E.

    1995-08-01

    Optical diagnostics are extremely useful in fluid mechanics because they generally have high inherent bandwidth, and are non-intrusive. However, since optical probe measurements inherently integrate all information along the optical path, it is often difficult to isolate out-of-plane components in 3-dimensional flow events. It is also hard to make independent measurements of internal flow structure. Using an arrangement of one-dimensional wavefront sensors, we have developed a system that uses tomographic reconstruction to make two-dimensional measurements in an arbitrary flow. These measurements provide complete information in a plane normal to the flow. We have applied this system to the subsonic free jet because of the wide range of flow scales available. These measurements rely on the development of a series of one-dimensional wavefront sensors that are used to measure line-integral density variations in the flow of interest. These sensors have been constructed using linear CCD cameras and binary optics lenslet arrays. In designing these arrays, we have considered the coherent coupling between adjacent lenses and have made comparisons between theory and experimental noise measurements. The paper will present examples of the wavefront sensor development, line-integral measurements as a function of various experimental parameters, and sample tomographic reconstructions.

  10. Real-time interleaved photoacoustic/ultrasound (PAUS) imaging for interventional procedure guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chen-wei; Nguyen, Thu-Mai; Xia, Jinjun; Arnal, Bastien; Pelivanov, Ivan; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided photoacoustic imaging has shown great potential for many clinical applications including vascular visualization, detection of nanoprobes sensing molecular profiles, and guidance of interventional procedures. However, bulky and costly lasers are usually required to provide sufficient pulse energies for deep imaging. The low pulse repetition rate also limits potential real-time applications of integrated photoacoustic/ultrasound (PAUS) imaging. With a compact and low-cost laser operating at a kHz repetition rate, we aim to integrate photoacoustics (PA) into a commercial ultrasound (US) machine utilizing an interleaved scanning approach for clinical translation, with imaging depth up to a few centimeters and frame rates > 30 Hz. Multiple PA sub-frames are formed by scanning laser firings covering a large scan region with a rotating galvo mirror, and then combined into a final frame. Ultrasound pulse-echo beams are interleaved between laser firings/PA receives. The approach was implemented with a diode-pumped laser, a commercial US scanner, and a linear array transducer. Insertion of an 18-gauge needle into a piece of chicken tissue, with subsequent injection of an absorptive agent into the tissue, was imaged with an integrated PAUS frame rate of 30 Hz, covering a 2.8 cm × 2.8 cm imaging plane. Given this real-time image rate and high contrast (> 40 dB at more than 1-cm depth in the PA image), we have demonstrated that this approach is potentially attractive for clinical procedure guidance.

  11. Improving photoacoustic imaging contrast of brachytherapy seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Leo; Baghani, Ali; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Salcudean, Septimiu; Tang, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy for treating prostate cancer where the radiation sources are seeds inserted into the prostate. Accurate localization of seeds during prostate brachytherapy is essential to the success of intraoperative treatment planning. The current standard modality used in intraoperative seeds localization is transrectal ultrasound. Transrectal ultrasound, however, suffers in image quality due to several factors such speckle, shadowing, and off-axis seed orientation. Photoacoustic imaging, based on the photoacoustic phenomenon, is an emerging imaging modality. The contrast generating mechanism in photoacoustic imaging is optical absorption that is fundamentally different from conventional B-mode ultrasound which depicts changes in acoustic impedance. A photoacoustic imaging system is developed using a commercial ultrasound system. To improve imaging contrast and depth penetration, absorption enhancing coating is applied to the seeds. In comparison to bare seeds, approximately 18.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio as well as a doubling of imaging depth are achieved. Our results demonstrate that the coating of the seeds can further improve the discernibility of the seeds.

  12. Photoacoustic tomography: applications for atherosclerosis imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangha, Gurneet S.; Goergen, Craig J.

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is a debilitating condition that increases a patient’s risk for intermittent claudication, limb amputation, myocardial infarction, and stroke, thereby causing approximately 50% of deaths in the western world. Current diagnostic imaging techniques, such as ultrasound, digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and optical imaging remain suboptimal for detecting development of early stage plaques. This is largely due to the lack of compositional information, penetration depth, and/or clinical efficiency of these traditional imaging techniques. Photoacoustic imaging has emerged as a promising modality that could address some of these limitations to improve the diagnosis and characterization of atherosclerosis-related diseases. Photoacoustic imaging uses near-infrared light to induce acoustic waves, which can be used to recreate compositional images of tissue. Recent developments in photoacoustic techniques show its potential in noninvasively characterizing atherosclerotic plaques deeper than traditional optical imaging approaches. In this review, we discuss the significance and development of atherosclerosis, current and novel clinical diagnostic methods, and recent works that highlight the potential of photoacoustic imaging for both experimental and clinical studies of atherosclerosis.

  13. Texture generation in compressional photoacoustic elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, J. W.; Zabihian, B.; Widlak, T.; Glatz, T.; Liu, M.; Drexler, W.; Scherzer, O.

    2015-03-01

    Elastography is implemented by applying a mechanical force to a specimen and visualizing the resulting displacement. As a basis of elastographic imaging typically ultrasound, optical coherence tomography or magnetic resonance imaging are used. Photoacoustics has not been viewed as a primary imaging modality for elastography, but only as a complementary method to enhance the contrast in ultrasound elastography. The reason is that photoacoustics is considered speckle free [3], which hinders application of speckle tracking algorithms. However, while conventional ultrasound only uses a single frequency, photoacoustics utilizes a broad frequency spectrum. We are therefore able to generate artificial texture by using a frequency band limited part of the recorded data. In this work we try to assess the applicability of this technique to photoacoustic tomography. We use Agar phantoms with predefined Young's moduli and laterally apply a 50μm static compression. Pre- and post compression data are recorded via a Fabry Pérot interferometer planar sensor setup and reconstructed via a non-uniform-FFT reconstruction algorithm. A displacement vector field, between pre- and post compressed data is then determined via optical flow algorithms. While the implementation of texture generation during post processing reduces image quality overall, it turns out that it improves the detection of moving patterns and is therefore better suited for elastography.

  14. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  15. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  16. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefitted greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  17. Nonlinear frequency-mixing photoacoustic imaging of a crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chigarev, N.; Zakrzewski, J.; Tournat, V.; Gusev, V.

    2009-08-01

    We present a technique for nonlinear photoacoustic imaging of cracks by laser excitation with intensity modulation at two fundamental frequencies combined with detection at mixed frequencies. By exploiting the strong dependence of the photoacoustic emission efficiency on the state—open or closed—of the contacts between the crack faces, remarkably enhanced image contrast is observed, ˜20 times higher than in linear photoacoustic images at the highest of the fundamental frequencies.

  18. Photoacoustic sample vessel and method of elevated pressure operation

    DOEpatents

    Autrey, Tom; Yonker, Clement R.

    2004-05-04

    An improved photoacoustic vessel and method of photoacoustic analysis. The photoacoustic sample vessel comprises an acoustic detector, an acoustic couplant, and an acoustic coupler having a chamber for holding the acoustic couplant and a sample. The acoustic couplant is selected from the group consisting of liquid, solid, and combinations thereof. Passing electromagnetic energy through the sample generates an acoustic signal within the sample, whereby the acoustic signal propagates through the sample to and through the acoustic couplant to the acoustic detector.

  19. Advances in Clinical and Biomedical Applications of Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jimmy L.; Wang, Bo; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Bayer, Carolyn L.; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Kim, Seungsoo; Homan, Kimberly A.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Photoacoustic imaging is an imaging modality that derives image contrast from the optical absorption coefficient of the tissue being imaged. The imaging technique is able to differentiate between healthy and diseased tissue with either deeper penetration or higher resolution than other functional imaging modalities currently available. From a clinical standpoint, photoacoustic imaging has demonstrated safety and effectiveness in diagnosing diseased tissue regions using either endogenous tissue contrast or exogenous contrast agents. Furthermore, the potential of photoacoustic imaging has been demonstrated in various therapeutic interventions ranging from drug delivery and release to image-guided therapy and monitoring. Areas covered in this review This article reviews the current state of photoacoustic imaging in biomedicine from a technological perspective, highlights various biomedical and clinical applications of photoacoustic imaging, and gives insights on future directions. What the reader will gain Readers will learn about the various applications of photoacoustic imaging, as well as the various contrast agents that can be used to assist photoacoustic imaging. This review will highlight both pre-clinical and clinical uses for photoacoustic imaging, as well as discuss some of the challenges that must be addressed to move photoacoustic imaging into the clinical realm. Take home message Photoacoustic imaging offers unique advantages over existing imaging modalities. The imaging field is broad with many exciting applications for detecting and diagnosing diseased tissue or processes. Photoacoustics is also used in therapeutic applications to identify and characterize the pathology and then to monitor the treatment. Although the technology is still in its infancy, much work has been done in the pre-clinical arena, and photoacoustic imaging is fast approaching the clinical setting. PMID:21344060

  20. Tomographic Adaptive Optics and Turbulence Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Tim

    2015-04-01

    The use of tomographic adaptive optics is fundamental to fulfilling scientific goals for many proposed instruments at major observatories. Tomographic AO uses knowledge of the atmospheric C2n profile and to date, the majority of the profiles used to design and simulate these systems have come from external turbulence profilers. The C2n profile resolution required for accurate predictions of ELT instrumentation exceeds that of existing instrumentation and here we define the requirements on these profilers for ELT support. However, tomographic AO systems can also measure C2n profiles and we highlight several cases where external profilers can provide critical functionality to support on-sky operations.

  1. Dual-modality imaging system combined fast photoacoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Yuan, Yi

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, we have developed a fast dual-modality imaging system for reconstruction photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging based on a novel digital phased array. The scanning mode and image reconstruction algorithms were modified from our previous work to improve the image quality. A 128-element linear transducer array is connected to a multichannel signal acquisition and digital beam-formation system providing techniques of dynamic receiving focus and dynamic receiving apodization to process the signal. We use the linear transducer array with combined scanning mode to detect signals at multiple locations on a circle around the sample. It makes our dual-modality imaging own the ability of imaging complicated structures of objects. An improved limited-field filtered back projection algorithm with directivity factors was applied in photoacoustic imaging to further improve the lateral resolution. Phase-controlled imaging algorithm was applied to reconstruct acoustical impedance difference in the pure ultrasound imaging. The experiments on phantoms and in vivo early breast cancer detection in a mouse model were performed. The images are clearly, accurately provided.

  2. Tomographic Imaging: Visualization of the Unseeable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaochuan

    2009-03-01

    Tomographic imaging is a noninvasive approach to acquiring information within the subject under study, and it plays an increasingly important role in the improvement of health care by providing valuable information for diagnosis of diseases, for guidance of disease treatment and therapy, and for assessment/monitoring of treatment response. It has also found a wide variety of applications in other disciplines, ranging from molecular imaging to material sciences to security scan to paleontology. Over the last 30 years, biomedical imaging has involved into an important discipline in its own right. Physics and mathematics form the foundation of advanced tomographic imaging. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represent two well-known tomographic imaging modalities. In this talk, I will first introduce the basic physics and mathematics principles on which some of the advanced tomographic imaging techniques such as CT are based, with an emphasis on what and how physical signals are detected, how they are used for producing images, and what physical information is that can be extracted from these images. I will then touch upon some of the recent exciting advances in tomographic imaging technology, followed by a brief discussion of some of the important applications of advanced tomographic imaging in medicine and other areas.

  3. Indocyanine green-loaded photoacoustic nanodroplets: dual contrast nanoconstructs for enhanced photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Alexander; Luke, Geoffrey; Wilson, Katheryne; Homan, Kimberly; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2014-01-28

    Recently, perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanodroplets were introduced as contrast agents for imaging and image-guided therapy. For example, in sonography, high-intensity ultrasound pulses were used to phase-transition liquid perfluorocarbon to produce gas microbubbles. More recently, perfluorocarbon nanodroplets with encapsulated gold nanorods were used as dual ultrasound/photoacoustic contrast agents. To expedite clinical translation, we synthesized and characterized ICG-loaded perfluorocarbon nanodroplets, i.e., constructs comprising biocompatible, nontoxic and biologically safe materials. We then demonstrated enhanced photoacoustic contrast through optically triggered phase transition of PFC nanodroplets and ultrasound contrast from the resulting PFC bubbles. We assessed the quality enhancement of photoacoustic and ultrasound images through analysis of contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio. We further investigated the changes in image contrast due to increased ambient temperature. Our studies suggest that ICG-loaded perfluorocarbon nanodroplets may become a valuable tool for various imaging modalities, and have promising therapeutic applications. PMID:24303934

  4. Noninvasive photoacoustic microscopy of methemoglobin in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Min; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Due to the various causes of methemoglobinemia and its potential to be confused with other diseases, in vivo measurements of methemoglobin have significant applications in the clinic. Using photoacoustic microscopy (PAM), we quantified the average and the distributed percentage of methemoglobin both in vitro and in vivo. Based on the absorption spectra of methemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, and deoxyhemoglobin, three wavelengths were chosen to differentiate methemoglobin from the others. The methemoglobin concentrations calculated from the photoacoustic signals agreed well with the preset concentrations. Then we imaged the methemoglobin percentage in microtubes that mimicked blood vessels. Average percentages calculated for five samples with different methemoglobin concentrations also agreed well with the preset values. Finally, we demonstrated the ability of PAM to detect methemoglobin in vivo in a mouse ear. Our results show that PAM can quantitatively image methemoglobin distribution in vivo. PMID:25760655

  5. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Patimisco, Pietro; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K.; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    A detailed review on the development of quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensors (QEPAS) for the sensitive and selective quantification of molecular trace gas species with resolved spectroscopic features is reported. The basis of the QEPAS technique, the technology available to support this field in terms of key components, such as light sources and quartz-tuning forks and the recent developments in detection methods and performance limitations will be discussed. Furthermore, different experimental QEPAS methods such as: on-beam and off-beam QEPAS, quartz-enhanced evanescent wave photoacoustic detection, modulation-cancellation approach and mid-IR single mode fiber-coupled sensor systems will be reviewed and analysed. A QEPAS sensor operating in the THz range, employing a custom-made quartz-tuning fork and a THz quantum cascade laser will be also described. Finally, we evaluated data reported during the past decade and draw relevant and useful conclusions from this analysis. PMID:24686729

  6. Microcantilever Actuation by Laser Induced Photoacoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Naikun; Zhao, Dongfang; Jia, Ran; Liu, Duo

    2016-01-01

    We present here a combined theoretical and experimental investigation on effective excitation of microcantilever by using photoacoustic waves. The photoacoustic waves arose from a vibrating Al foil induced by an intensity-modulated laser. We demonstrate that, superior to photothermal excitation, this new configuration avoids direct heating of the microcantilever, thus minimizing undesired thermal effects on the vibration of microcantilever, while still keeps the advantage of being a remote, non-contact excitation method. We also measured the vibration amplitude of the microcantilever as a function of distance between the microcantilever and the Al foil and found that the amplitudes decay gradually according to the inverse distance law. This method is universal and can be adopted in bio-microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMs) for the detection of small signals where detrimental thermal effects must be avoided. PMID:26814360

  7. A photoacoustic spectrometer for trace gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telles, E. M.; Bezerra, E.; Scalabrin, A.

    2005-06-01

    A high-resolution external laser photoacoustic spectrometer has been developed for trace gas detection with absorption transitions in coincidence with CO2 laser emission lines (9,2-10,9 μm: 920-1086 cm-1). The CO2 laser operates in 90 CW lines with power of up to 15 W. A PC-controlled step motor can tune the laser lines. The resonance frequency of first longitudinal mode of the photoacoustic cell is at 1600 Hz. The cell Q-factor and cell constant are measured close to 50 and 28 mVcmW-1, respectively. The spectrometer has been tested in preliminary studies to analyze the absorption transitions of ozone (O_3). The ethylene (C_2H_4) from papaya fruit is also investigated using N2 as carrier gas at a constant flow rate.

  8. Human teeth model using photoacoustic frequency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.; El-Sherif, Ashraf F.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, a novel photo-acoustic technique modality utilizing a frequency- modulated Q-switch Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm and coherent frequency domain signal processing is introduced for impulse and frequency responses of biological tissues. We present a photoacoustic technique to monitor the temporal behavior of temperature and pressure in an excised sample of human teeth after either a single laser pulse or during multiple laser pulses at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) from 5 Hz to 100 Hz. Knowledge of the dynamic characteristics of structural elements often means the difference between normal and abnormal tissue. The determination of the resonance characteristics of structures is termed "modal analysis." The results of our study suggest that it is possible to identify the impulse, frequency response and resonance modes of simplified human teeth. This data provided a powerful tool to differentiate between normal and decay teeth.

  9. Photoacoustic and Photothermal Effects in Particulate Suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Diebold, Gerald, J.

    2009-04-30

    A summary of the research areas investigated by the author during the grant period is given. Experiments and theory have been carried out on the photoacoustic effect arising from a number of physical and chemical processes. A number of studies of the photoacoustic effect as it occurs in transient grating experiments have been completed. The research done with the Ludwig-Soret effect on the generation of shock waves is reported. Other research, such as that carried out on interferometric and beam deflection microphones, the use of microphones in vacuum as momentum flux detectors, and chemical generation of sonoluminescence is listed. A list of published research including selected publications, a complete list of journal articles, books, review articles, and reviews are given.

  10. Microcantilever Actuation by Laser Induced Photoacoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Naikun; Zhao, Dongfang; Jia, Ran; Liu, Duo

    2016-01-01

    We present here a combined theoretical and experimental investigation on effective excitation of microcantilever by using photoacoustic waves. The photoacoustic waves arose from a vibrating Al foil induced by an intensity-modulated laser. We demonstrate that, superior to photothermal excitation, this new configuration avoids direct heating of the microcantilever, thus minimizing undesired thermal effects on the vibration of microcantilever, while still keeps the advantage of being a remote, non-contact excitation method. We also measured the vibration amplitude of the microcantilever as a function of distance between the microcantilever and the Al foil and found that the amplitudes decay gradually according to the inverse distance law. This method is universal and can be adopted in bio-microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMs) for the detection of small signals where detrimental thermal effects must be avoided.

  11. Microcantilever Actuation by Laser Induced Photoacoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Gao, Naikun; Zhao, Dongfang; Jia, Ran; Liu, Duo

    2016-01-01

    We present here a combined theoretical and experimental investigation on effective excitation of microcantilever by using photoacoustic waves. The photoacoustic waves arose from a vibrating Al foil induced by an intensity-modulated laser. We demonstrate that, superior to photothermal excitation, this new configuration avoids direct heating of the microcantilever, thus minimizing undesired thermal effects on the vibration of microcantilever, while still keeps the advantage of being a remote, non-contact excitation method. We also measured the vibration amplitude of the microcantilever as a function of distance between the microcantilever and the Al foil and found that the amplitudes decay gradually according to the inverse distance law. This method is universal and can be adopted in bio-microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMs) for the detection of small signals where detrimental thermal effects must be avoided. PMID:26814360

  12. Lifetime-based tomographic multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Scott B.; Boas, David A.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Kumar, Anand T. N.

    2010-07-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence tomography of multiple fluorophores has previously been limited by the bandwidth of the NIR spectral regime and the broad emission spectra of most NIR fluorophores. We describe in vivo tomography of three spectrally overlapping fluorophores using fluorescence lifetime-based separation. Time-domain images are acquired using a voltage-gated, intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) in free-space transmission geometry with 750 nm Ti:sapphire laser excitation. Lifetime components are fit from the asymptotic portion of fluorescence decay curve and reconstructed separately with a lifetime-adjusted forward model. We use this system to test the in vivo lifetime multiplexing suitability of commercially available fluorophores, and demonstrate lifetime multiplexing in solution mixtures and in nude mice. All of the fluorophores tested exhibit nearly monoexponential decays, with narrow in vivo lifetime distributions suitable for lifetime multiplexing. Quantitative separation of two fluorophores with lifetimes of 1.1 and 1.37 ns is demonstrated for relative concentrations of 1:5. Finally, we demonstrate tomographic imaging of two and three fluorophores in nude mice with fluorophores that localize to distinct organ systems. This technique should be widely applicable to imaging multiple NIR fluorophores in 3-D.

  13. Tomographic PIV: particles versus blobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagnat, Frédéric; Cornic, Philippe; Cheminet, Adam; Leclaire, Benjamin; Le Besnerais, Guy; Plyer, Aurélien

    2014-08-01

    We present an alternative approach to tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo-PIV) that seeks to recover nearly single voxel particles rather than blobs of extended size. The baseline of our approach is a particle-based representation of image data. An appropriate discretization of this representation yields an original linear forward model with a weight matrix built with specific samples of the system’s point spread function (PSF). Such an approach requires only a few voxels to explain the image appearance, therefore it favors much more sparsely reconstructed volumes than classic tomo-PIV. The proposed forward model is general and flexible and can be embedded in a classical multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) or a simultaneous multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (SMART) inversion procedure. We show, using synthetic PIV images and by way of a large exploration of the generating conditions and a variety of performance metrics, that the model leads to better results than the classical tomo-PIV approach, in particular in the case of seeding densities greater than 0.06 particles per pixel and of PSFs characterized by a standard deviation larger than 0.8 pixels.

  14. Advanced devices for photoacoustic imaging to improve cancer and cerebrovascular medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla Marien, Leonardo Gabriel

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic imaging (PAI) provides important diagnostic information for breast cancer staging. Despite these promising studies, PAI remains an unfeasible option for clinics due to the cost to implement, the required large modification in user conduct and the inflexibility of the hardware to accommodate other applications for the incremental enhancement in diagnostic information. The research described in this dissertation addresses these issues by designing attachments to clinical ultrasound probes and incorporating custom detectors into commercial ultrasound scanners. The ultimate benefit of these handheld devices is to expand the capability of current ultrasound systems and facilitate the translation of PAI to enhance cancer diagnostics and neurosurgical outcomes. Photoacoustic enabling devices (PEDs) were designed as attachments to two clinical ultrasound probes optimized for breast cancer diagnostics. PAI uses pulsed laser excitation to create transient heating (<1°C) and thermoelastic expansion that is detected as an ultrasonic emission. These ultrasonic emissions are remotely sensed to construct noninvasive images with optical contrast at depths much greater than other optical modalities. The PEDs are feasible in terms of cost, user familiarity and flexibility for various applications. Another possible application for PAI is in assisting neurosurgeons treating aneurysms. Aneurysms are often treated by placing a clip to prevent blood flow into the aneurysm. However, this procedure has risks associated with damaging nearby vessels. One of the developed PEDs demonstrated the feasibility to three-dimensionally image tiny microvasculature (<0.3mm) beyond large blood occlusions (>2.4mm) in a phantom model. The capability to use this during surgery would suggest decreasing the risks associated with these treatments. However, clinical ultrasound arrays are not clinically feasible for microsurgical applications due to

  15. Acoustic resonance frequency locked photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.; Silver, Joel A.

    2003-09-09

    A photoacoustic spectroscopy method and apparatus for maintaining an acoustic source frequency on a sample cell resonance frequency comprising: providing an acoustic source to the sample cell, the acoustic source having a source frequency; repeatedly and continuously sweeping the source frequency across the resonance frequency at a sweep rate; and employing an odd-harmonic of the source frequency sweep rate to maintain the source frequency sweep centered on the resonance frequency.

  16. Dual-modal whole eye photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ning; Ren, Qiushi; Li, Changhui

    2014-09-01

    We developed a prototype dual-modal ocular imaging system integrating optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy and high-frequency ultrasound imaging modalities. This system can perform high-resolution ocular imaging from the anterior region down to the fundus area. The novel system successfully imaged the murine eyes in vivo, including iris, lens, retina, and retinal pigment epithelium. Our results demonstrated that this system has a great potential in the diagnosis of ophthalmic diseases.

  17. Evaluation of Dry Chemicals by Photoacoustic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshimiya, Tsutomu

    1992-10-01

    In this study, an apparatus suitable to photoacoustic (PA) imaging to measure blood-analysis and urinalysis is fabricated and its measurement scheme has been established for the first time. The PA imaging of urinalysis test strip, blood sugar test strip, and cholesterol test strip is performed. A calibration curve of PA measurement is obtained for a urine test strip. The detectivity is better than that obtained by an eye-measurement.

  18. Photoacoustic microscopy of ceramic turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, P. K.; Kinnick, R. R.; Heitman, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Scanning photoacoustic microscopy (SPAM) is evaluated as a nondestructive technique for the detection of both surface and subsurface flaws in polycrystalline ceramics, such as those currently under consideration for the high temperature components of small vehicular and industrial gas turbine engines; the fracture strength of these brittle materials is controlled by small, 25-200 micron flaws. Attention is given to the correlation of SPAM-detected flaws with actual, fracture-controlling flaws in ceramic turbine blades.

  19. Photoacoustics of disperse systems: Below cavitation threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Egerev, Sergey; Ovchinnikov, Oleg

    2012-05-24

    The paper considers photoacoustic (PA) conversion while irradiating suspensions in extra-small volume probes with laser pulses having small fluence values. Only linear and nonlinear thermooptical laser sound generation regimes were observed. Thus, good repeatability of acoustic signal parameters informative about probe content was achieved. The experiment conducted has shown how one can avoid the decrease of particles detection sensitivity for the thermooptical mode.

  20. Thermally Enhanced Photoacoustic Radar Imaging of Biotissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Mandelis, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and imaging depth of photoacoustic (PA) imaging remain limited for clinical applications. The temperature can influence PA signals; the SNR of PA signals can be increased at higher temperatures. Therefore, the imaging quality and depth can be improved by the assistance of heating. Experimental results showed that the maximum imaging depth can be doubled by raising the temperature of the absorbers ( ex-vivo beef muscle) uniformly from to , and the SNR can be increased.

  1. Photoacoustic imaging platforms for multimodal imaging

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging method that exploits both acoustical Epub ahead of print and optical properties and can provide both functional and structural information. Therefore, PA imaging can complement other imaging methods, such as ultrasound imaging, fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and multi-photon microscopy. This article reviews techniques that integrate PA with the above imaging methods and describes their applications. PMID:25754364

  2. Design and evaluation of a laboratory prototype system for 3D photoacoustic full breast tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wenfeng; Piras, Daniele; Singh, Mithun K. A.; van Hespen, Johan C. G.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging can visualize vascularization-driven optical absorption contrast with great potential for breast cancer detection and diagnosis. State-of-the-art photoacoustic breast imaging systems are promising but are limited either by only a 2D imaging capability or by an insufficient imaging field-of-view (FOV). We present a laboratory prototype system designed for 3D photoacoustic full breast tomography, and comprehensively characterize it and evaluate its performance in imaging phantoms. The heart of the system is an ultrasound detector array specifically developed for breast imaging and optimized for high sensitivity. Each detector element has an acoustic lens to enlarge the acceptance angle of the large surface area detector elements to ensure a wide system FOV. We characterized the ultrasound detector array performance in terms of frequency response, directional sensitivity, minimum detectable pressure and inter-element electrical and mechanical cross-talk. Further we evaluated the system performance of the laboratory prototype imager using well-defined breast mimicking phantoms. The system possesses a 2 mm XY plane resolution and a 6 mm vertical resolution. A vasculature mimicking object was successfully visualized down to a depth of 40 mm in the breast phantom. Further, tumor mimicking spherical objects with 5 and 10 mm diameter at 20 mm and 40 mm depths are recovered, indicating high system sensitivity. The system has a 170 × 170 × 170 mm3 FOV, which is well suited for full breast imaging. Various recommendations are provided for performance improvement and to guide this laboratory prototype to a clinical version in future. PMID:24298416

  3. Hands-on resonance-enhanced photoacoustic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euler, Manfred

    2001-10-01

    The design of an improved photoacoustic converter cell using kitchen equipment is described. It operates by changing manually the Helmholtz resonance frequency of bottles by adjusting the distance between the bottleneck and the outer ear. The experiment helps to gain insights in ear performance, in photoacoustic detection methods, in resonance phenomena and their role for detecting small periodic signals in the presence of noise.

  4. Multifunctional Photosensitizer-Based Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; McLaren, Ross; Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U. S.; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid imaging modality combining the high spatial resolution of optical imaging with the high penetration depth of ultrasound imaging. Here, for the first time, we evaluate the efficacy of various photosensitizers that are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents as photoacoustic contrast agents. Photoacoustic imaging of photosensitizers exhibits advantages over fluorescence imaging, which is prone to photobleaching and autofluorescence interference. In this work, we examined the photoacoustic activity of 5 photosensitizers: zinc phthalocyanine, protoporphyrin IX, 2,4-bis [4-(N,N-dibenzylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine, chlorin e6 and methylene blue in phantoms, among which zinc phthalocyanine showed the highest photoacoustic activity. Subsequently, we evaluated its tumor localization efficiency and biodistribution at multiple time points in a murine model using photoacoustic imaging. We observed that the probe localized at the tumor within 10 minutes post injection, reaching peak accumulation around 1 hour and was cleared within 24 hours, thus, demonstrating the potential of photosensitizers as photoacoustic imaging contrast agents in vivo. This means that the known advantages of photosensitizers such as preferential tumor uptake and PDT efficacy can be combined with photoacoustic imaging capabilities to achieve longitudinal monitoring of cancer progression and therapy in vivo. PMID:24938638

  5. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of short-period gyrotropic superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Mityurich, G.S.; Starodubtsev, E.G.

    1994-12-31

    The Rosencwaig-Gersho photoacoustic transformation is extended to the case of the short-period superlattices formed by gytropic nonmagnetic cubic crystals. The potentialities of photoacoustic spectroscopy when applied to superlattices and the control of their parameters are considered. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Photoacoustic technique applied to the study of skin and leather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, M.; Varela, J.; Hernández, L.; González, A.

    1998-08-01

    In this paper the photoacoustic technique is used in bull skin for the determination of thermal and optical properties as a function of the tanning process steps. Our results show that the photoacoustic technique is sensitive to the study of physical changes in this kind of material due to the tanning process.

  7. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of gaseous biomarker in simulated breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; U-Thainual, Paweena; Kim, Do-Hyun

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a photoacoustic detector integrated with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to measure biomarkers in gas samples independently. Simulated exhaled breath samples were created by mixing varying concentrations of acetone, ammonia and ethane. The results of these measurements demonstrate the potential of photoacoustic spectroscopy to detect biomarkers from human breath.

  8. Quantitative Photoacoustic Imaging of Nanoparticles in Cells and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jason R.; Frey, Wolfgang; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative visualization of nanoparticles in cells and tissues, while preserving the spatial information, is very challenging. A photoacoustic imaging technique to depict the presence and quantity of nanoparticles is presented. This technique is based on the dependence of the photoacoustic signal with both the nanoparticle quantity and the laser fluence. Quantitative photoacoustic imaging is a robust technique that doesn’t require knowledge of the local fluence, but a relative change in the fluence. This eliminates the need for sophisticated methods or models to determine the energy distribution of light in turbid media. Quantitative photoacoustic imaging was first applied to nanoparticle-loaded cells and quantitation was validated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Quantitative photoacoustic imaging was then extended to xenograft tumor tissue sections, and excellent agreement with traditional histopathological analysis was demonstrated. Our results suggest that quantitative photoacoustic imaging may be used in many applications including the determination of the efficiency and effectiveness of molecular targeting strategies for cell studies and animal models, the quantitative assessment of photoacoustic contrast agent biodistribution, and the validation of in vivo photoacoustic imaging. PMID:23312348

  9. Image chorioretinal vasculature in albino rats using photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qing; Liu, Tan; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F.

    2014-01-01

    We imaged the microvascular network in both the retina and the choroid in an albino rat eye using photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy guided by optical coherence tomography. Relying on optical absorption and ultrasonic detection, photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy can image both retinal and choroidal vessel networks with high contrast. PMID:24744503

  10. CO 2-laser photoacoustic detection of gaseous n-pentylacetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herecová, Lenka; Hejzlar, Tomáš; Pavlovský, Jiří; Míček, Dalibor; Zelinger, Zdeněk; Kubát, Pavel; Janečková, Radmila; Nevrlý, Václav; Bitala, Petr; Střižík, Michal; Klouda, Karel; Civiš, Svatopluk

    2009-07-01

    The absorption spectra of gaseous n-pentylacetate were investigated by FT IR spectroscopy as well as CO 2-laser photoacoustic spectroscopy for simulation of the dispersion of a nerve agent (sarin) within a modeled atmospheric boundary layer. Three CO 2-laser emission lines were used for photoacoustic detection of n-pentylacetate with detection limit in the range of 1-3 ppm.

  11. Photoacoustic technique applied to the study of skin and leather

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, M.; Varela, J.; Hernandez, L.; Gonzalez, A.

    1998-08-28

    In this paper the photoacoustic technique is used in bull skin for the determination of thermal and optical properties as a function of the tanning process steps. Our results show that the photoacoustic technique is sensitive to the study of physical changes in this kind of material due to the tanning process.

  12. Bayesian Image Reconstruction in Quantitative Photoacoustic Tomography.

    PubMed

    Tarvainen, Tanja; Pulkkinen, Aki; Cox, Ben; Kaipio, Jari; Arridge, Simon

    2013-08-30

    Quantitative photoacoustic tomography is an emerging imaging technique aimed at estimating chromophore concentrations inside tissues from photoacoustic images, which are formed by combining optical information and ultrasonic propagation. This is a hybrid imaging problem in which the solution of one inverse problem acts as the data for another ill-posed inverse problem. In the optical reconstruction of quantitative photoacoustic tomography, the data is obtained as a solution of an acoustic inverse initial value problem. Thus, both the data and the noise are affected by the method applied to solve the acoustic inverse problem. In this paper, the noise of optical data is modelled as Gaussian distributed with mean and covariance approximated by solving several acoustic inverse initial value problems using acoustic noise samples as data. Furthermore, Bayesian approximation error modelling is applied to compensate for the modelling errors in the optical data caused by the acoustic solver. The results show that modelling of the noise statistics and the approximation errors can improve the optical reconstructions. PMID:24001987

  13. Photoacoustic imaging of voltage signals (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Bin; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    Optical imaging of brain voltage signals is significantly limited in depth due to optical scattering and the absorptive property of brain tissue. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging promises to break this hard limit by utilizing both ballistic and diffused photons. To demonstrate the feasibility of PA, we used an in vivo mouse model. The brain cortex tissue was stained with dipicrylamine dye, electrically stimulated, and imaged with a customized dual-isosbestic-wavelength PA microscope (DIW-PAM). DIW-PAM separates voltage-induced PA signals from blood-induced PA signals and thereby allows recording the voltage response of mouse cortex tissue without interference from hemoglobin responses. The resting state PA voltage response signal exhibited a noise-like signal in the frequency domain. Upon 3 Hz electrical stimulation, the PA voltage response signal showed frequency peaks of 3.2 Hz and 6.3 Hz (Fig. 1). Although dipicrylamine dye is not fast enough for recording neuron action potentials, it served well for the purpose of this feasibility study. In conclusion, we successfully demonstrated in vivo photoacoustic imaging of mouse brain voltage signals for the first time. If a fast voltage-sensitive dye is available, using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) instead of PA microscopy could allow acquiring full-field PA action potential images at a speed limited only by the laser pulse repetition rate.

  14. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. Rameez; Yao, Junjie; Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    pH is a tightly regulated indicator of metabolic activity. In mammalian systems, imbalance of pH regulation may result from or result in serious illness. Even though the regulation system of pH is very robust, tissue pH can be altered in many diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus. Traditional high-resolution optical imaging techniques, such as confocal microscopy, routinely image pH in cells and tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent dyes, which change their fluorescence properties with the surrounding pH. Since strong optical scattering in biological tissue blurs images at greater depths, high-resolution pH imaging is limited to penetration depths of 1mm. Here, we report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of commercially available pH-sensitive fluorescent dye in tissue phantoms. Using both opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we explored the possibility of recovering the pH values in tissue phantoms. In this paper, we demonstrate that PAM was capable of recovering pH values up to a depth of 2 mm, greater than possible with other forms of optical microscopy.

  15. Photoacoustic and Colorimetric Visualization of Latent Fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Song, Kai; Huang, Peng; Yi, Chenglin; Ning, Bo; Hu, Song; Nie, Liming; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Nie, Zhihong

    2015-12-22

    There is a high demand on a simple, rapid, accurate, user-friendly, cost-effective, and nondestructive universal method for latent fingerprint (LFP) detection. Herein, we describe a combination imaging strategy for LFP visualization with high resolution using poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride)-b-polystyrene (PSMA-b-PS) functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs). This general approach integrates the merits of both colorimetric imaging and photoacoustic imaging. In comparison with the previous methods, our strategy is single-step and does not require the signal amplification by silver staining. The PSMA-b-PS functionalized GNPs have good stability, tunable color, and high affinity for universal secretions (proteins/polypeptides/amino acids), which makes our approach general and flexible for visualizing LFPs on different substrates (presumably with different colors) and from different people. Moreover, the unique optical property of GNPs enables the photoacoustic imaging of GNPs-deposited LFPs with high resolution. This allows observation of level 3 hyperfine features of LFPs such as the pores and ridge contours by photoacoustic imaging. This technique can potentially be used to identify chemicals within LFP residues. We believe that this dual-modality imaging of LFPs will find widespread use in forensic investigations and medical diagnostics. PMID:26528550

  16. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of mouse embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Jan; Norris, Francesca; Cleary, Jon; Zhang, Edward; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Johnson, Peter; Scambler, Pete; Lythgoe, Mark; Beard, Paul

    2012-06-01

    The ability to noninvasively image embryonic vascular anatomy in mouse models is an important requirement for characterizing the development of the normal cardiovascular system and malformations in the heart and vascular supply. Photoacoustic imaging, which can provide high resolution non invasive images of the vasculature based upon optical absorption by endogenous hemoglobin, is well suited to this application. In this study, photoacoustic images of mouse embryos were obtained ex vivo and in vivo. The images show intricate details of the embryonic vascular system to depths of up to 10 mm, which allowed whole embryos to be imaged in situ. To achieve this, an all-optical photoacoustic scanner and a novel time reversal image reconstruction algorithm, which provide deep tissue imaging capability while maintaining high spatial resolution and contrast were employed. This technology may find application as an imaging tool for preclinical embryo studies in developmental biology as well as more generally in preclinical and clinical medicine for studying pathologies characterized by changes in the vasculature.

  17. Imaging hypoxia using 3D photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The objective is to develop a multivariate in vivo hemodynamic model of tissue oxygenation (MiHMO2) based on 3D photoacoustic spectroscopy. Introduction: Low oxygen levels, or hypoxia, deprives cancer cells of oxygen and confers resistance to irradiation, some chemotherapeutic drugs, and oxygen-dependent therapies (phototherapy) leading to treatment failure and poor disease-free and overall survival. For example, clinical studies of patients with breast carcinomas, cervical cancer, and head and neck carcinomas (HNC) are more likely to suffer local reoccurrence and metastasis if their tumors are hypoxic. A novel method to non invasively measure tumor hypoxia, identify its type, and monitor its heterogeneity is devised by measuring tumor hemodynamics, MiHMO2. Material and Methods: Simulations are performed to compare tumor pO2 levels and hypoxia based on physiology - perfusion, fractional plasma volume, fractional cellular volume - and its hemoglobin status - oxygen saturation and hemoglobin concentration - based on in vivo measurements of breast, prostate, and ovarian tumors. Simulations of MiHMO2 are performed to assess the influence of scanner resolutions and different mathematic models of oxygen delivery. Results: Sensitivity of pO2 and hypoxic fraction to photoacoustic scanner resolution and dependencies on model complexity will be presented using hemodynamic parameters for different tumors. Conclusions: Photoacoustic CT spectroscopy provides a unique ability to monitor hemodynamic and cellular physiology in tissue, which can be used to longitudinally monitor tumor oxygenation and its response to anti-angiogenic therapies.

  18. Photoacoustic imaging and characterization of the microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Song; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-01-01

    Photoacoustic (optoacoustic) tomography, combining optical absorption contrast and highly scalable spatial resolution (from micrometer optical resolution to millimeter acoustic resolution), has broken through the fundamental penetration limit of optical ballistic imaging modalities—including confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, and optical coherence tomography—and has achieved high spatial resolution at depths down to the diffusive regime. Optical absorption contrast is highly desirable for microvascular imaging and characterization because of the presence of endogenous strongly light-absorbing hemoglobin. We focus on the current state of microvascular imaging and characterization based on photoacoustics. We first review the three major embodiments of photoacoustic tomography: microscopy, computed tomography, and endoscopy. We then discuss the methods used to characterize important functional parameters, such as total hemoglobin concentration, hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and blood flow. Next, we highlight a few representative applications in microvascular-related physiological and pathophysiological research, including hemodynamic monitoring, chronic imaging, tumor-vascular interaction, and neurovascular coupling. Finally, several potential technical advances toward clinical applications are suggested, and a few technical challenges in contrast enhancement and fluence compensation are summarized. PMID:20210427

  19. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells

    PubMed Central

    Strohm, Eric M.; Moore, Michael J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level. PMID:27114911

  20. Photoacoustic imaging in cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment guidance

    PubMed Central

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Luke, Geoffrey P.; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Imaging modalities play an important role in the clinical management of cancer, including screening, diagnosis, treatment planning, and therapy monitoring. Owing to increased research efforts in the past two decades, photoacoustic imaging – a non-ionizing, non-invasive technique capable of visualizing optical absorption properties of tissue at reasonable depth, with spatial resolution of ultrasound – has emerged. Ultrasound-guided photoacoustics is regarded for its ability to provide in vivo morphological and functional information about the tumor within the surrounding tissue. With the recent advent of targeted contrast agents, photoacoustics is capable of in vivo molecular imaging, thus facilitating further molecular and cellular characterization of cancer. This review examines the role of photoacoustics and photoacoustic-augmented imaging techniques in comprehensive cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment guidance. PMID:21324541

  1. A tomographic image of mantle structure beneath southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, E.; Clayton, R. W.; Hager, B. H.

    1984-01-01

    The variations in seismic structure beneath southern California were determined by using a tomographic method of inversion on teleseismic P delays recorded with the Southern California Array. The inversion reveals two prominent features beneath the region. The first is a thin, vertical wedge directly beneath the Transverse Ranges that is 2-3 percent faster than the surrounding region. This feature deepens to the east, attaining a maximum depth of about 250 km beneath the San Bernardino Mountains. The second feature is a major zone of low velocity material that is 2-4 percent slow under the Salton Trough rift valley, extending to a depth of about 125 km. Two possible explanations for the spatial association of the Transverse Ranges with the velocity anomaly below are lithospheric subduction or small-scale sublithospheric convection in the region of the Big Bend of the San Andreas Fault. The low velocity anomaly beneath the Salton Trough is consistent with convective upwelling there.

  2. Design and implementation of a noise radar tomographic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmuth, Mark A.; Shin, Hee Jung; Narayanan, Ram M.; Rangaswamy, Muralidhar

    2015-05-01

    A hardware system has been developed to perform ultrawideband (UWB) noise radar tomography over the 3-5 GHz frequency range. The system utilizes RF hardware to transmit multiple independent and identically distributed UWB random noise waveforms. A 3-5 GHz band-limited signal is generated using an arbitrary waveform generator and the waveform is then amplified and transmitted through a horn antenna. A linear scanner with a single antenna is used in place of an antenna array to collect backscatter. The backscatter is collected from the transmission of each waveform and reconstructed to form an image. The images that result from each scan are averaged to produce a single tomographic image of the target. After background subtraction, the scans are averaged to improve the image quality. The experimental results are compared to the theoretical predictions. The system is able to successfully image metallic and dielectric cylinders of different cross sections.

  3. Model-based tomographic reconstruction

    DOEpatents

    Chambers, David H.; Lehman, Sean K.; Goodman, Dennis M.

    2012-06-26

    A model-based approach to estimating wall positions for a building is developed and tested using simulated data. It borrows two techniques from geophysical inversion problems, layer stripping and stacking, and combines them with a model-based estimation algorithm that minimizes the mean-square error between the predicted signal and the data. The technique is designed to process multiple looks from an ultra wideband radar array. The processed signal is time-gated and each section processed to detect the presence of a wall and estimate its position, thickness, and material parameters. The floor plan of a building is determined by moving the array around the outside of the building. In this paper we describe how the stacking and layer stripping algorithms are combined and show the results from a simple numerical example of three parallel walls.

  4. Non-contact photoacoustic tomography and ultrasonography for brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Guy; Blouin, Alain; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre

    2012-02-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) and ultrasonography (US) of biological tissues usually rely on transducer arrays for the detection of ultrasound. Obtaining the best sensitivity requires a physical contact with the tissue using an intermediate coupling fluid (water or gel). This type of contact is a major drawback for several applications such as neurosurgery. Laser-ultrasonics is an established optical technique for the non-contact generation and detection of ultrasound in industrial materials. In this paper, the non-contact detection scheme used in laser-ultrasonics is adapted to allow probing of ultrasound in biological tissues while remaining below laser exposure safety limits. Both non-contact PAT (NCPAT) and non-contact US (NCUS) are demonstrated experimentally using a single-frequency detection laser emitting suitably shaped pulses and a confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer. It is shown that an acceptable sensitivity is obtained while remaining below the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) of biological tissues. Results obtained ex vivo with a calf brain specimen show that sub-mm endogenous and exogenous inclusions can be detected at depths exceeding 1 cm. When fully developed, the technique could be a unique diagnostic tool in neurosurgery providing deep imaging of blood vessels, blood clots and blood oxygenation.

  5. Real-time photoacoustic imaging system for burn diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ida, Taiichiro; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Iwaya, Keiichi; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Sato, Shunichi; Iwai, Toshiaki

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a real-time (8 to 30 fps) photoacoustic (PA) imaging system with a linear-array transducer for burn depth assessment. In this system, PA signals originating from blood in the noninjured tissue layer located under the injured tissue layer are detected and imaged. A compact home-made high-repetition-rate (500 Hz) 532-nm fiber laser was incorporated as a light source. We used an alternating arrangement for the fibers and sensor elements in the probe, which improved the signal-to-noise ratio, reducing the required laser energy power for PA excitation. This arrangement also enabled a hand-held light-weight probe design. A phantom study showed that thin light absorbers embedded in the tissue-mimicking scattering medium at depths >3 mm can be imaged with high contrast. The maximum error for depth measurement was 140 μm. Diagnostic experiments were performed for rat burn models, including superficial dermal burn, deep dermal burn, and deep burn models. Injury depths (zones of stasis) indicated by PA imaging were compared with those estimated by histological analysis, showing discrepancies 200 μm. The system was also used to monitor the healing process of a deep dermal burn. The results demonstrate the potential usefulness of the present system for clinical burn diagnosis. PMID:25127338

  6. Simultaneous photoacoustic and optical attenuation imaging of single cells using photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Michael J.; Strohm, Eric M.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    A new technique for simultaneously acquiring photoacoustic images as well as images based on the optical attenuation of single cells in a human blood smear was developed. An ultra-high frequency photoacoustic microscope equipped with a 1 GHz transducer and a pulsed 532 nm laser was used to generate the images. The transducer and 20X optical objective used for laser focusing were aligned coaxially on opposing sides of the sample. Absorption of laser photons by the sample yielded conventional photoacoustic (PA) signals, while incident photons which were not attenuated by the sample were absorbed by the transducer, resulting in the formation of a photoacoustic signal (tPA) within the transducer itself. Both PA and tPA signals, which are separated in time, were recorded by the system in a single RF-line. Areas of strong signal in the PA images corresponded to dark regions in the tPA images. Additional details, including the clear delineation of the cell cytoplasm and features in red blood cells, were visible in the tPA image but not the corresponding PA image. This imaging method has applications in probing the optical absorption and attenuation characteristics of biological cells with sub-cellular resolution.

  7. Theranostic probe for simultaneous in vivo photoacoustic imaging and confined photothermolysis by pulsed laser at 1064 nm in 4T1 breast cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min; Ku, Geng; Pageon, Laura; Li, Chun

    2014-11-01

    Here, we report that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated copper(ii) sulfide nanoparticles (PEG-CuS NPs) with their peak absorption tuned to 1064 nm could be used both as a contrast agent for photoacoustic tomographic imaging of mouse tumor vasculature and as a mediator for confined photothermolysis of tumor cells in an orthotopic syngeneic 4T1 breast tumor model. PEG-CuS NPs showed stronger photoacoustic signal than hollow gold nanospheres and single-wall carbon nanotubes at 1064 nm. MicroPET imaging of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice showed a gradual accumulation of the NPs in the tumor over time. About 6.5% of injected dose were taken up in each gram of tumor tissue at 24 h after intravenous injection of 64Cu-labeled PEG-CuS NPs. For both photoacoustic imaging and therapeutic studies, nanosecond (ns)-pulsed laser was delivered with Q-switched Nd:YAG at a wavelength of 1064 nm. Unlike conventional photothermal ablation therapy mediated by continuous wave laser with which heat could spread to the surrounding normal tissue, interaction of CuS NPs with short pulsed laser deliver heat rapidly to the treatment volume keeping the thermal damage confined to the target tissues. Our data demonstrated that it is possible to use a single-compartment nanoplatform to achieve both photoacoustic tomography and highly selective tumor destruction at 1064 nm in small animals.Here, we report that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated copper(ii) sulfide nanoparticles (PEG-CuS NPs) with their peak absorption tuned to 1064 nm could be used both as a contrast agent for photoacoustic tomographic imaging of mouse tumor vasculature and as a mediator for confined photothermolysis of tumor cells in an orthotopic syngeneic 4T1 breast tumor model. PEG-CuS NPs showed stronger photoacoustic signal than hollow gold nanospheres and single-wall carbon nanotubes at 1064 nm. MicroPET imaging of 4T1 tumor-bearing mice showed a gradual accumulation of the NPs in the tumor over time. About 6.5% of injected dose were

  8. 40 CFR 1065.369 - H2O, CO, and CO2 interference verification for photoacoustic alcohol analyzers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... alcohol analyzers. (a) Scope and frequency. If you measure ethanol or methanol using a photoacoustic... photoacoustic analyzer by causing a response similar to ethanol or methanol. If the photoacoustic analyzer...

  9. Three-dimensional photoacoustic tomography based on the focal-line concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun; Guo, Zijian; Maslov, Konstantin; Aguirre, Andres; Zhu, Quing; Percival, Christopher; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-09-01

    A full ring ultrasonic array-based photoacoustic tomography system was recently developed for small animal brain imaging. The 512-element array is cylindrically focused in the elevational direction, and can acquire a two-dimensional (2D) image in 1.6 s. In this letter, we demonstrate the three-dimensional (3D) imaging capability of this system. A novel 3D reconstruction algorithm was developed based on the focal-line concept. Compared to 3D images acquired simply by stacking a series of 2D images, the 3D focal-line reconstruction method renders images with much less artifacts, and improves the elevational resolution by 30% and the signal-to-noise ratio by two times. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm was first validated by numerical simulations and then demonstrated with a hair phantom experiment and an ex vivo mouse embryo experiment.

  10. Whole-body ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography of small animals in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jun; Chatni, Muhammad R.; Maslov, Konstantin; Guo, Zijian; Wang, Kun; Anastasio, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We report a novel small-animal whole-body imaging system called ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography (RC-PACT). RC-PACT is based on a confocal design of free-space ring-shaped light illumination and 512-element full-ring ultrasonic array signal detection. The free-space light illumination maximizes the light delivery efficiency, and the full-ring signal detection ensures a full two-dimensional view aperture for accurate image reconstruction. Using cylindrically focused array elements, RC-PACT can image a thin cross section with 0.10 to 0.25 mm in-plane resolutions and 1.6  s/frame acquisition time. By translating the mouse along the elevational direction, RC-PACT provides a series of cross-sectional images of the brain, liver, kidneys, and bladder. PMID:22612121

  11. Photoacoustic Imaging: Semiconducting Oligomer Nanoparticles as an Activatable Photoacoustic Probe with Amplified Brightness for In Vivo Imaging of pH (Adv. Mater. 19/2016).

    PubMed

    Miao, Qingqing; Lyu, Yan; Ding, Dan; Pu, Kanyi

    2016-05-01

    Despite the great potential of photoacoustic imaging in the life sciences, the development of smart activatable photoacoustic probes remains elusive. On page 3662, K. Pu and co-workers report a facile nanoengineering approach based on semiconducting oligomer nano-particles to develop ratiometric photoacoustic probes with amplified brightness and enhanced sensing capability for accurate photoacoustic mapping of pH in the tumors of living mice. PMID:27167028

  12. Planoconcave optical microresonator sensors for photoacoustic imaging: pushing the limits of sensitivity (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenheim, James A.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.

    2016-03-01

    Most photoacoustic scanners use piezoelectric detectors but these have two key limitations. Firstly, they are optically opaque, inhibiting backward mode operation. Secondly, it is difficult to achieve adequate detection sensitivity with the small element sizes needed to provide near-omnidirectional response as required for tomographic imaging. Planar Fabry-Perot (FP) ultrasound sensing etalons can overcome both of these limitations and have proved extremely effective for superficial (<1cm) imaging applications. To achieve small element sizes (<100μm), the etalon is illuminated with a focused laser beam. However, this has the disadvantage that beam walk-off due to the divergence of the beam fundamentally limits the etalon finesse and thus sensitivity - in essence, the problem is one of insufficient optical confinement. To overcome this, novel planoconcave micro-resonator sensors have been fabricated using precision ink-jet printed polymer domes with curvatures matching that of the laser wavefront. By providing near-perfect beam confinement, we show that it is possible to approach the maximum theoretical limit for finesse (f) imposed by the etalon mirror reflectivities (e.g. f=400 for R=99.2% in contrast to a typical planar sensor value of f<50). This yields an order of magnitude increase in sensitivity over a planar FP sensor with the same acoustic bandwidth. Furthermore by eliminating beam walk-off, viable sensors can be made with significantly greater thickness than planar FP sensors. This provides an additional sensitivity gain for deep tissue imaging applications such as breast imaging where detection bandwidths in the low MHz can be tolerated. For example, for a 250 μm thick planoconcave sensor with a -3dB bandwidth of 5MHz, the measured NEP was 4 Pa. This NEP is comparable to that provided by mm scale piezoelectric detectors used for breast imaging applications but with more uniform frequency response characteristics and an order-of-magnitude smaller element

  13. Visualization of microcalcifications using photoacoustic imaging: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Tsai-Chu; Wang, Po-Hsun; Fan, Chih-Tai; Cheng, Yao-You; Li, Meng-Lin

    2011-03-01

    Recently, photoacoustic imaging has been intensively studied for blood vessel imaging, and shown its capability of revealing vascular features suggestive of malignancy of breast cancer. In this study, we explore the feasibility of visualization of micro-calcifications using photoacoustic imaging. Breast micro-calcification is also known as one of the most important indicators for early breast cancer detection. The non-ionizing radiation and speckle free nature of photoacoustic imaging overcomes the drawbacks of current diagnostic tools - X-ray mammography and ultrasound imaging, respectively. We employed a 10-MHz photoacoustic imaging system to verify our idea. A sliced chicken breast phantom with granulated calcium hydroxyapatite (HA) - major chemical composition of the breast calcification associated with malignant breast cancers - embedded was imaged. With the near infared (NIR) laser excitation, it is shown that the distribution of ~500 μm HAs can be clearly imaged. In addition, photoacoustic signals from HAs rivals those of blood given an optimal NIR wavelength. In summary, photoacoustic imaging shows its promise for breast micro-calcification detection. Moreover, fusion of the photoacoustic and ultrasound images can reveal the location and distribution of micro-calcifications within anatomical landmarks of the breast tissue, which is clinically useful for biopsy and diagnosis of breast cancer staging.

  14. Steering in spin tomographic probability representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man'ko, V. I.; Markovich, L. A.

    2016-09-01

    The steering property known for two-qubit state in terms of specific inequalities for the correlation function is translated for the state of qudit with the spin j = 3 / 2. Since most steering detection inequalities are based on the correlation functions we introduce analogs of such functions for the single qudit systems. The tomographic probability representation for the qudit states is applied. The connection between the correlation function in the two-qubit system and the single qudit is presented in an integral form with an intertwining kernel calculated explicitly in tomographic probability terms.

  15. Fine-resolution photoacoustic imaging of the eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Ronald H.; Kong, Fanting; Lloyd, Harriet O.; Chen, Y. C.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are widely used techniques for diagnostic imaging of the eye. OCT provides excellent resolution, but limited penetration. Ultrasound provides better penetration, but an order-of-magnitude poorer resolution than OCT. Photoacoustic imaging is relatively insensitive to scattering, and so offers a potential means to image deeper than OCT. Furthermore, photoacoustic imaging detects optical absorption, a parameter that is independent of that detected by conventional ultrasound or OCT. Our aim was to develop a photoacoustic system suitable for imaging the eye. Methods: We developed a prototype system utilizing a focused 20 MHz ultrasound probe with a central aperture through which optics were introduced. The prototype system produced 1-μJ, 5-nsec pulses at 532 or 1064 nm with a 20-μm spot size at a 500 Hz repetition rate. The photoacoustic probe was mounted onto computer-controlled linear stages and pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustic images obtained on ex vivo pig eyes and in vivo mouse eyes. Results: Lateral resolution was significantly improved by use of a laser spot size much smaller than the acoustic beamwidth. Photoacoustic signals were obtained primarily from melanin in ex vivo tissues and from melanin and hemoglobin in vivo. Image fusion allowed superposition of photoacoustic signals upon the anatomic features detected by conventional ultrasound. Conclusion: Photoacoustic imaging detects the presence of clinically relevant pigments, such as melanin and oxyand deoxy-hemoglobin, and, potentially, from other pathologic pigments occurring in disease conditions (tumors, nevii, macular degeneration). Fine-resolution photoacoustic data provides information not detected in current ophthalmic imaging modalities.

  16. Remote Temperature Estimation in Intravascular Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sethuraman, Shriram; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Smalling, Richard W.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2008-01-01

    Intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging is based on the detection of laser-induced acoustic waves generated within the arterial tissue under pulsed laser irradiation. Generally, laser radiant energy levels are kept low (20 mJ/cm2) during photoacoustic imaging to conform to general standards for safe use of lasers on biological tissues. However, safety standards in intravascular photoacoustic imaging are not yet fully established. Consequently, monitoring spatio-temporal temperature changes associated with laser-tissue interaction is important to address thermal safety of IVPA imaging. In this study we utilize the IVUS based strain measurements to estimate the laser induced temperature increase. Temporal changes in temperature were estimated in a phantom modeling a vessel with an inclusion. A cross-correlation based time delay estimator was used to assess temperature induced strains produced by different laser radiant energies. The IVUS based remote measurements revealed temperature increases of 0.7±0.3°C, 2.9±0.2 °C and 5.0±0.2 °C, for the laser radiant energies of 30 mJ/cm2, 60 mJ/cm2 and 85 mJ/cm2 respectively. The technique was then used in imaging of ex vivo samples of a normal rabbit aorta. For arterial tissues, a temperature elevation of 1.1°C was observed for a laser fluence of 60 mJ/cm2 and lesser than 1°C for lower energy levels normally associated with IVPA imaging. Therefore, the developed ultrasound technique can be used to monitor temperature during IVPA imaging. Furthermore, the analysis based on the Arrhenius thermal damage model indicates no thermal injury in the arterial tissue; suggesting the safety of IVPA imaging PMID:17935861

  17. Dedicated 3D photoacoustic breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Robert A.; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Lam, Richard B.; Reinecke, Daniel R.; Del Rio, Stephen P.; Steed, Doreen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the design and imaging methodology of a photoacoustic scanner dedicated to imaging hemoglobin distribution throughout a human breast. Methods: The authors developed a dedicated breast photoacoustic mammography (PAM) system using a spherical detector aperture based on our previous photoacoustic tomography scanner. The system uses 512 detectors with rectilinear scanning. The scan shape is a spiral pattern whose radius varies from 24 to 96 mm, thereby allowing a field of view that accommodates a wide range of breast sizes. The authors measured the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) using a target comprised of 1-mm dots printed on clear plastic. Each dot absorption coefficient was approximately the same as a 1-mm thickness of whole blood at 756 nm, the output wavelength of the Alexandrite laser used by this imaging system. The target was immersed in varying depths of an 8% solution of stock Liposyn II-20%, which mimics the attenuation of breast tissue (1.1 cm−1). The spatial resolution was measured using a 6 μm-diameter carbon fiber embedded in agar. The breasts of four healthy female volunteers, spanning a range of breast size from a brassiere C cup to a DD cup, were imaged using a 96-mm spiral protocol. Results: The CNR target was clearly visualized to a depth of 53 mm. Spatial resolution, which was estimated from the full width at half-maximum of a profile across the PAM image of a carbon fiber, was 0.42 mm. In the four human volunteers, the vasculature was well visualized throughout the breast tissue, including to the chest wall. Conclusions: CNR, lateral field-of-view and penetration depth of our dedicated PAM scanning system is sufficient to image breasts as large as 1335 mL, which should accommodate up to 90% of the women in the United States. PMID:24320471

  18. Imaging nonmelanoma skin cancers with combined ultrasound-photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunar, Ulas; Rohrbach, Daniel J.; Morgan, Janet; Zeitouni, Natalie

    2013-03-01

    PDT has become a treatment of choice especially for the cases with multiple sites and large areas. However, the efficacy of PDT is limited for thicker and deeper tumors. Depth and size information as well as vascularity can provide useful information to clinicians for planning and evaluating PDT. High-resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging can provide information regarding skin structure and vascularity. We utilized combined ultrasound-photoacoustic microscopy for imaging a basal cell carcinoma (BCC) tumor pre-PDT and the results indicate that combined ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging can be useful tool for PDT planning by providing both structural and functional contrasts.

  19. Considering sources and detectors distributions for quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ningning; Deumié, Carole; Da Silva, Anabela

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality that takes advantage of high optical contrast brought by optical imaging and high spatial resolution brought by ultrasound imaging. However, the quantification in photoacoustic imaging is challenging. Multiple optical illumination approach has proven to achieve uncoupling of diffusion and absorption effects. In this paper, this protocol is adopted and synthetic photoacoustic data, blurred with some noise, were generated. The influence of the distribution of optical sources and transducers on the reconstruction of the absorption and diffusion coefficients maps is studied. Specific situations with limited view angles were examined. The results show multiple illuminations with a wide field improve the reconstructions. PMID:25426322

  20. Skull Optical Clearing Solution for Enhancing Ultrasonic and Photoacoustic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoquan; Zhang, Yang; Zhao, Kai; Zhao, Yanjie; Liu, Yanyan; Gong, Hui; Luo, Qingming; Zhu, Dan

    2016-08-01

    The performance of photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) degrades due to the turbidity of the skull that introduces attenuation and distortion of both laser and stimulated ultrasound. In this manuscript, we demonstrated that a newly developed skull optical clearing solution (SOCS) could enhance not only the transmittance of light, but also that of ultrasound in the skull in vitro. Thus the photoacoustic signal was effectively elevated, and the relative strength of the artifacts induced by the skull could be suppressed. Furthermore in vivo studies demonstrated that SOCS could drastically enhance the performance of photoacoustic microscopy for cerebral microvasculature imaging. PMID:26886977

  1. Photoacoustic tomography: Ultrasonically beating optical diffusion and diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong

    2014-03-01

    A decade of research has pushed photoacoustic computed tomography to the forefront of molecular-level imaging, notes SPIE Fellow Lihong Wang (Washington University, St. Louis) in his plenary talk, "Photoacoustic Tomography: Ultrasonically Beating Optical Diffusion and Diffraction." Modern optical microscopy has resolution and diffraction limitations. But noninvasive functional photoacoustic computed tomography has overcome this limit, offering deep penetration with optical contrast and ultrasonic resolution of 1 cm depth or more -- up to 7 cm of penetration in some cases, such as evaluating sentinel lymph nodes for breast cancer staging. This opens up applications in whole body imaging, brain function, oxygen saturation, label-free cell analysis, and noninvasive cancer biopsies.

  2. Combined Photoacoustic-Acoustic Technique for Crack Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrzewski, J.; Chigarev, N.; Tournat, V.; Gusev, V.

    2010-01-01

    Nonlinear imaging of a crack by combination of a common photoacoustic imaging technique with additional acoustic loading has been performed. Acoustic signals at two different fundamental frequencies were launched in the sample, one photoacoustically through heating of the sample surface by the intensity-modulated scanning laser beam and another by a piezoelectrical transducer. The acoustic signal at mixed frequencies, generated due to system nonlinearity, has been detected by an accelerometer. Different physical mechanisms of the nonlinearity contributing to the contrast in linear and nonlinear photoacoustic imaging of the crack are discussed.

  3. Photon-phonon synergy: photoacoustic tomography and beyond (Presentation Video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography is expected to impact biology and medicine broadly by providing multiscale in vivo functional and molecular imaging of structures ranging from subcellular organelles to organs, enabling a noninvasive look at subcutaneous tissue at a deep level. Lihong Wang holds the Gene K. Beare Distinguished Professorship of Biomedical Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, and is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Biomedical Optics. Wang was awarded the 2015 Britton Chance Biomedical Optics Award for his pioneering technical contributions and visionary leadership in the development and application of photoacoustic tomography, photoacoustic microscopy, and photon transport modeling.

  4. Photoacoustic tomography of water in phantoms and tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhun; Li, Changhui; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-05-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has been widely used to image optically absorptive objects in both human and animal tissues. For the first time, we present imaging of water with laser-based PAT. We photoacoustically measure the absorption spectra of water-ethanol mixtures at various water concentrations, and then image water-ethanol and pure-water inclusions in gel and a water inclusion in fat tissue. The significant difference in photoacoustic signals between water and fat tissue indicates that the laser-based PAT has the potential to detect water content in tissue.

  5. Multimodal system for non-contact photoacoustic imaging, optical coherence tomography, and mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiss-Holzinger, E.; Brandstetter, M.; Langer, G.; Buchsbaum, A.; Burgholzer, P.; Lendl, B.; Berer, T.

    2016-03-01

    We present a multimodal optical setup, allowing non-contact photoacoustic imaging, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and non-contact mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy. Photoacoustic signals are generated using a Nd:YAG laser and a tunable quantum cascade laser for photoacoustic imaging and spectroscopy, respectively. Photoacoustic signals are acquired by measuring the surface displacement of a specimen using a fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer. In the same fiber-optic network a spectral-domain OCT system is realized. Light from the photoacoustic detection laser and the OCT source are multiplexed into one fiber and the same objective is used for both imaging modalities. Light reflected from specimens is demultiplexed and guided to the respective imaging systems. To allow fast non-contact PAI and OCT imaging the detection spot is scanned across the specimens' surface using a galvanometer scanner. As the same fiber-network and optical components are used for photoacoustic and OCT imaging the obtained images are co-registered intrinsically. Imaging is demonstrated on tissue mimicking and biological samples; spectral information is obtained for polystyrene and hemoglobin.

  6. Photoacoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS) Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, M; Springston, S; Koontz, A; Aiken, A

    2013-01-17

    The photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS) measures light absorption by aerosol particles. As the particles pass through a laser beam, the absorbed energy heats the particles and in turn the surrounding air, which sets off a pressure wave that can be detected by a microphone. The PASS instruments deployed by ARM can also simultaneously measure the scattered laser light at three wavelengths and therefore provide a direct measure of the single-scattering albedo. The Operator Manual for the PASS-3100 is included here with the permission of Droplet Measurement Technologies, the instrument’s manufacturer.

  7. Testing fruit quality by photoacoustic spectroscopy assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, C.; Dumitras, D. C.; Patachia, M.; Banita, S.

    2014-10-01

    This study was conducted with the aim of testing the hypothesis that raspberry and strawberry fruits from nonorganic farming release more ethylene gas compounds compared to organic ones. At the same time, the experiments focused on evaluation of the potential and capabilities of the laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) method in the assessment of fruit quality related to the effects of nitrogen. Ethylene gas can be harmful and carcinogenic, because it can accelerate the natural ripening process of physiologically mature fruits and makes the fruits more consistent in size. With the advantages of LPAS, we demonstrate that the concentration of ethylene from nonorganic raspberry and strawberry fruits is greater than from organic ones.

  8. Micro-optical-mechanical system photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Kotovsky, Jack; Benett, William J.; Tooker, Angela C.; Alameda, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01

    All-optical photoacoustic spectrometer sensing systems (PASS system) and methods include all the hardware needed to analyze the presence of a large variety of materials (solid, liquid and gas). Some of the all-optical PASS systems require only two optical-fibers to communicate with the opto-electronic power and readout systems that exist outside of the material environment. Methods for improving the signal-to-noise are provided and enable mirco-scale systems and methods for operating such systems.

  9. 21 CFR 892.1740 - Tomographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tomographic x-ray system. 892.1740 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1740 Tomographic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A tomographic x-ray system is an x-ray device intended to be used to produce radiologic images...

  10. A handheld optical fiber parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) probe for photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young; Chang, Cheung-Chung; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong; Wang, Lihong V.; Zou, Jun

    2014-03-01

    In current photoacoustic tomography (PAT), l-D or 2-D ultrasound arrays and multi-channel data acquisition (DAQ) electronics are used to detect the photoacoustic signals simultaneously for "real-time" image construction. However, as the number of transducer elements and DAQ channels increase, the construction and operation of the ultrasound receiving system will become complex and costly. This situation can be addressed by using parallel acoustic delay lines (PADLs) to create true time delays in multiple PA signal channels. The time-delayed PA signals will reach the ultrasound transducer at different times and therefore can be received by one single-element transducer without mixing with each other. In this paper, we report the development of the first miniaturized PADL probe suitable for handheld operations. Fusedsilica optical fibers with low acoustic attenuation were used to construct the 16 PADLs with specific time delays. The handheld probe structure was fabricated using precision laser-micromachining process to provide robust mechanical support and accurate alignment of the PADLs with minimal acoustic distortion and inter-channel coupling. The 16 optical-fiber PADLs were arranged to form one input port and two output ports. Photoacoustic imaging of a black-ink target embedded in an optically-scattering phantom was successfully conducted using the handheld PADL probe with two single-element transducers and two DAQ channels (equal to a channel reduction ratio of 8:1). Our results show that the PADL technique and the handheld probe could provide a promising solution for real-time PAT with significantly reduced complexity and cost of the ultrasound receiver system.

  11. In-vivo continuous monitoring of mixed venous oxygen saturation by photoacoustic transesophageal echocardiography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Subramaniam, Balachundhar; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Andrawes, Michael N.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-02-01

    Mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), measured from pulmonary arteries, is a gold-standard measure of the dynamic balance between the oxygen supply and demand in the body. In critical care, continuous monitoring of SvO2 plays a vital role in early detection of circulatory shock and guiding goal-oriented resuscitation. In current clinical practice, SvO2 is measured by invasive pulmonary artery catheters (PAC), which are associated with a 10% risk of severe complications. To address the unmet clinical need for a non-invasive SvO2 monitor, we are developing a new technology termed photoacoustic transesophageal echocardiography (PA-TEE). PA-TEE integrates transesophageal echocardiography with photoacoustic oximetry, and enables continuous assessment of SvO2 through an esophageal probe that can be inserted into the body in a minimally invasive manner. We have constructed a clinically translatable PA-TEE prototype, which features a mobile OPO laser, a modified ultrasonography console and a dual-modality esophageal probe. Comprised of a rotatable acoustic array detector, a flexible optical fiber bundle and a light-integrating acoustic lens, the oximetric probe has an outer diameter smaller than 15 mm and will be tolerable for most patients. Through custom-made C++/Qt software, our device acquires and displays ultrasonic and photoacoustic images in real time to guide the deployment of the probe. SvO2 is calculated on-line and updated every second. PA-TEE has now been used to evaluate SvO2 in living swine. Our findings show that changing the fraction of oxygen in the inspired gas modulates SvO2 measured by PA-TEE. Statistic comparison between SvO2 measurements from PA-TEE in vivo the gold-standard laboratorial analysis on blood samples drawn from PACs will be presented.

  12. FPGA-based reconfigurable processor for ultrafast interlaced ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Alqasemi, Umar; Li, Hai; Aguirre, Andrés; Zhu, Quing

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we report, to the best of our knowledge, a unique field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based reconfigurable processor for real-time interlaced co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging and its application in imaging tumor dynamic response. The FPGA is used to control, acquire, store, delay-and-sum, and transfer the data for real-time co-registered imaging. The FPGA controls the ultrasound transmission and ultrasound and photoacoustic data acquisition process of a customized 16-channel module that contains all of the necessary analog and digital circuits. The 16-channel module is one of multiple modules plugged into a motherboard; their beamformed outputs are made available for a digital signal processor (DSP) to access using an external memory interface (EMIF). The FPGA performs a key role through ultrafast reconfiguration and adaptation of its structure to allow real-time switching between the two imaging modes, including transmission control, laser synchronization, internal memory structure, beamforming, and EMIF structure and memory size. It performs another role by parallel accessing of internal memories and multi-thread processing to reduce the transfer of data and the processing load on the DSP. Furthermore, because the laser will be pulsing even during ultrasound pulse-echo acquisition, the FPGA ensures that the laser pulses are far enough from the pulse-echo acquisitions by appropriate time-division multiplexing (TDM). A co-registered ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging system consisting of four FPGA modules (64-channels) is constructed, and its performance is demonstrated using phantom targets and in vivo mouse tumor models. PMID:22828830

  13. Computed tomographic findings in bilateral adrenal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilms, G.E.; Baert, A.L.; Kint, E.J.; Pringot, J.H.; Goddeeris, P.G.

    1983-03-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) features of bilateral adrenal tuberculosis are reported in two cases that demonstrate two typical different clinical and morphological manifestations of the disease. The incidence and CT appearance of adrenal tuberculosis are discussed, with emphasis on differential diagnosis.

  14. Tomographic Gamma Scanner Experience: Three Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, David J.

    2014-06-30

    This is a summary of field applications of tomographic gamma scanning (TGS). Three cases are shown: enriched uranium scanning at Rocky Flats, heat-source plutonium at LANL, and plutonium-bearing pyrochemical salts at Rocky Flats. Materials are taken from the references shown below.

  15. A TOMOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUE FOR MAGNETIZED BEAM MATCHING.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    To maintain low electron beam temperatures in the proposed RHIC electron cooler, careful matching of the magnetized beam from the source to the cooler solenoid is mandatory. We propose a tomographic technique to diagnose matching conditions. First simulation results will be presented.

  16. Computed tomographic staging of traumatic epidural bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.

    1982-09-01

    The computed tomographic findings in 45 patients with post-traumatic epidural hemotomas are subdivided into three categories (acute, subacute, and chronic) and correlated with the severity of bleeding, clot formation, and clot resorption. Active epidural bleeding may be identified in acute cases.

  17. Tomographic Image Compression Using Multidimensional Transforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villasenor, John D.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a method for compressing tomographic images obtained using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) by applying transform compression using all available dimensions. This takes maximum advantage of redundancy of the data, allowing significant increases in compression efficiency and performance. (13 references) (KRN)

  18. Tomographic methods in flow diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a viewpoint of tomography that should be well adapted to currently available optical measurement technology as well as the needs of computational and experimental fluid dynamists. The goals in mind are to record data with the fastest optical array sensors; process the data with the fastest parallel processing technology available for small computers; and generate results for both experimental and theoretical data. An in-depth example treats interferometric data as it might be recorded in an aeronautics test facility, but the results are applicable whenever fluid properties are to be measured or applied from projections of those properties. The paper discusses both computed and neural net calibration tomography. The report also contains an overview of key definitions and computational methods, key references, computational problems such as ill-posedness, artifacts, missing data, and some possible and current research topics.

  19. COMPAS: Compositional mineralogy with a photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. Hayden

    1992-01-01

    There is an important need for an in situ method of mineral and rock identification and quantification that provides true absorption spectra for a wide spectral range for lunar lander/rover missions. Many common minerals such as feldspars, magnetite, ilmenite, and amorphous fine solids or glasses, can exhibit flat spectral reflectances in the 400-2500 nm spectral region that render inaccurate or difficult their spectral detection and quantitative analysis. Ideal rock and mineral spectra are, of course, pure absorption spectra that are independent of the spectral effects of scattering, particle size, and distribution that can result in a suppression or distortion of their spectral features. This ideal seldom pertains to real samples. Since sample preparation is difficult and may fundamentally alter the observed diffuse spectral reflectance, an in situ spectral measurement method for rocks and minerals on the Moon, insensitive to the sample morphology, would be invaluable. Photoacoustic spectroscopy is a well-established technique appropriate for this task that has been widely applied in condensed-phase spectral studies of complex, highly light scattering, unprepared samples of everything from coal to whole blood, including rock and mineral characterization. A Compositional Mineralogy Photoacoustic Spectrometer, or COMPAS, can enable in situ spectral measurement of rocks and minerals, bypassing the major limitations of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. COMPAS spectral capabilities for rock and mineral samples will be incorporated into an instrument prototype specifically for lunar measurements, compatible with rover capabilities.

  20. Advanced laser systems for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klosner, Marc; Sampathkumar, Ashwin; Chan, Gary; Wu, Chunbai; Gross, Daniel; Heller, Donald F.

    2015-03-01

    We describe the ongoing development of laser systems for advanced photoacoustic imaging (PAI). We discuss the characteristics of these laser systems and their particular benefits for soft tissue imaging and next-generation breast cancer diagnostics. We provide an overview of laser performance and compare this with other laser systems that have been used for early-stage development of PAI. These advanced systems feature higher pulse energy output at clinically relevant repetition rates, as well as a novel wavelength-cycling output pulse format. Wavelength cycling provides pulse sequences for which the output repeatedly alternates between two wavelengths that provide differential imaging. This capability improves co-registration of captured differential images. We present imaging results of phantoms obtained with a commercial ultrasound detector system and a wavelength-cycling laser source providing ~500 mJ/pulse at 755 and 797 nm, operating at 25 Hz. The results include photoacoustic images and corresponding pulse-echo data from a tissue mimicking phantom containing inclusions, simulating tumors in the breast. We discuss the application of these systems to the contrast-enhanced detection of various tissue types and tumors.

  1. Laser photoacoustic sensor for air toxicity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Coorg R.; Lei, Jie; Shi, Wenhui; Li, Guangkun; Dunayevskiy, Ilya; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2012-06-01

    US EPA's Clean Air Act lists 187 hazardous air pollutants (HAP) or airborne toxics that are considered especially harmful to health, and hence the measurement of their concentration is of great importance. Numerous sensor systems have been reported for measuring these toxic gases and vapors. However, most of these sensors are specific to a single gas or able to measure only a few of them. Thus a sensor capable of measuring many of the toxic gases simultaneously is desirable. Laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) sensors have the potential for true broadband measurement when used in conjunction with one or more widely tunable laser sources. An LPAS gas analyzer equipped with a continuous wave, room temperature IR Quantum Cascade Laser tunable over the wavelength range of 9.4 μm to 9.7 μm was used for continuous real-time measurements of multiple gases/chemical components. An external cavity grating tuner was used to generate several (75) narrow line output wavelengths to conduct photoacoustic absorption measurements of gas mixtures. We have measured various HAPs such as Benzene, Formaldehyde, and Acetaldehyde in the presence of atmospheric interferents water vapor, and carbon dioxide. Using the preliminary spectral pattern recognition algorithm, we have shown our ability to measure all these chemical compounds simultaneously in under 3 minutes. Sensitivity levels of a few part-per-billion (ppb) were achieved with several of the measured compounds with the preliminary laboratory system.

  2. A UV-Vis photoacoustic spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Joseph R; Mathews, L Dalila; Smith, Geoffrey D

    2014-06-17

    A novel photoacoustic spectrophotometer (PAS) for the measurement of gas-phase and aerosol absorption over the UV-visible region of the spectrum is described. Light from a broadband Hg arc lamp is filtered in eight separate bands from 300 to 700 nm using bandpass interference filters (centered at 301 nm, 314 nm, 364 nm, 405 nm, 436 nm, 546 nm, 578 and 687 nm) and modulated with an optical chopper before entering the photoacoustic cell. All wavelength bands feature a 20-s detection limit of better than 3.0 Mm(-1) with the exception of the lower-intensity 687 nm band for which it is 10.2 Mm(-1). Validation measurements of gas-phase acetone and nigrosin aerosol absorption cross sections at several wavelengths demonstrate agreement to within 10% with those measured previously (for acetone) and those predicted by Mie theory (for nigrosin). The PAS instrument is used to measure the UV-visible absorption spectrum of ambient aerosol demonstrating a dramatic increase in the UV region with absorption increasing by 300% from 405 to 301 nm. This type of measurement throughout the UV-visible region and free from artifacts associated with filter-based methods has not been possible previously, and we demonstrate its promise for classifying and quantifying different types of light-absorbing ambient particles. PMID:24905953

  3. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of diabetic vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Arie; Wang, Lidai; Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-06-01

    We used functional photoacoustic microscopy to image diabetes-induced damage to the microvasculature. To produce an animal model for Type 1 diabetes, we used streptozotocin (STZ), which is particularly toxic to the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas in mammals. A set number of ND4 Swiss Webster mice received intraperitoneal injections of STZ for five consecutive days at 50 mg/kg. Most mice developed a significant rise in blood glucose level (~400 mg/dL) within three weeks of the first injection. Changes in vasculature and hemodynamics were monitored for six weeks. The mouse ear was imaged with an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope at a main blood vessel branch from the root of the ear. There are noticeable and measurable changes associated with the disease, including decreased vessel diameter and possible occlusion due to vessel damage and polyurea. We also observed an increase in the blood flow speed in the vein and a decrease in the artery, which could be due to compensation for the dehydration and vessel diameter changes. Functional and metabolic parameters such as hemoglobin oxygen saturation, oxygen extraction fraction, and oxygen consumption rate were also measured, but showed no significant change.

  4. Bone assessment via thermal photoacoustic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ting; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Tian, Chao; Perosky, Joseph; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Deng, Cheri X.; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    The feasibility of an innovative biomedical diagnostic technique, thermal photoacoustic (TPA) measurement, for nonionizing and non-invasive assessment of bone health is investigated. Unlike conventional photoacoustic PA methods which are mostly focused on the measurement of absolute signal intensity, TPA targets the change in PA signal intensity as a function of the sample temperature, i.e. the temperature dependent Grueneisen parameter which is closely relevant to the chemical and molecular properties in the sample. Based on the differentiation measurement, the results from TPA technique is less susceptible to the variations associated with sample and system, and could be quantified with improved accurately. Due to the fact that the PA signal intensity from organic components such as blood changes faster than that from non-organic mineral under the same modulation of temperature, TPA measurement is able to objectively evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) and its loss as a result of osteoporosis. In an experiment on well established rat models of bone loss and preservation, PA measurements of rat tibia bones were conducted over a temperature range from 370 C to 440 C. The slope of PA signal intensity verses temperature was quantified for each specimen. The comparison among three groups of specimens with different BMD shows that bones with lower BMD have higher slopes, demonstrating the potential of the proposed TPA technique in future clinical management of osteoporosis.

  5. Photoacoustic study of the photostability of sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Cruz, V. M. F. R.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; Barja, P. R.

    2008-01-01

    Although solar radiation is essential for maintenance of life in Earth, excessive exposition to the ultraviolet radiation emitted by the sun may cause sunburns, early aging and even cancer lesions. Sunscreens act absorbing or reflecting ultraviolet radiation; in this way, they protect the skin against the damages caused by excessive absorption of ultraviolet radiation. Sunscreens must present photostability, that is the capacity of a product to be retained in skin without degradation by light incidence. The present study aimed to evaluate, through photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) measurements, the photostability of a sunscreen commercially available in Brazil. PAS measurements were performed at 19 Hz, for wavelengths between 270 nm and 400 nm, using a sunscreen with solar protection factor (SPF) 15 applied in skin samples. Photoacoustic spectra of the sunscreen applied to the skin were obtained and analyzed as a function of time after application. Photostability was then evaluated by the comparative study of the integrated areas of the absorption curves for the sunscreen applied to the skin. Results indicate that the sunscreen analyzed was photostable for a large period and was not completely removed by cleaning.

  6. Fast integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Changhoon; Cho, Seunghee; Kim, Taehoon; Park, Sungjo; Park, Hyoeun; Kim, Jinmoo; Lee, Seunghoon; Kang, Yeonsu; Jang, Kiyuk; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    In cardiology, a vulnerable plaque is considered to be a key subject because it is strongly related to atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction. Because conventional intravascular imaging devices exhibit several limitations with regard to vulnerable plaque detection, the need for an effective lipid imaging modality has been continuously suggested. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a medical imaging technique with a high level of ultrasound (US) resolution and strong optical contrast. In this study, we successfully developed an integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound (IV-PAUS) imaging system with a catheter diameter of 1.2 mm for lipid-rich atherosclerosis imaging. An Nd:YAG pulsed laser with an excitation wavelength of 1064 nm was utilized. IV-PAUS offers 5-mm depth penetration and axial and lateral PA imaging resolutions of 94 μm and 203 μm, respectively, as determined by imaging a 6-μm carbon fiber. We initially obtained 3-dimensional (3D) co-registered PA/US images of metal stents. Subsequently, we successfully obtained 3D coregistered PA/US ex vivo images using an iliac artery from a rabbit atherosclerosis model. Accordingly, lipid-rich plaques were sufficiently differentiated from normal tissue in the ex vivo experiment. We validated these findings histologically to confirm the lipid content.

  7. Dynamics of double-pulse photoacoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkashin, Maxim; Brenner, Carsten; Göring, Lena; Döpke, Benjamin; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2016-03-01

    In contrast to the well-established and widely used theory of photoacoustic signal generation by single delta-like pulses, the field of multiple pulse excitation is not yet studied well. Using double-pulse excitation can be beneficial, but as ultrasound transducers have a certain waveform duration, the inter-pulse delays used might be limited. In order to assess the strength of the transducer influence at short delay times and develop data analysis procedure, we investigate the photoacoustic responses of a phantom sample to double-pulse excitation measured with different transducers. Both focused and flat surface single element transducers are used in the study. The central frequencies are chosen in the low-frequency band as they are most widely used in clinical ultrasound and one higher frequency transducer is taken for comparison. Despite not observing signal amplification due to Grueneisen relaxation effect, we show that transducer influence is not exceeding measurement error. Additionally we prove that single pulse subtraction procedure can be used to restore the second pulse waveform in double pulse excitation scheme. We believe using this procedure can be beneficial when transducer's waveform duration is longer than used inter-pulse delays.

  8. In vivo longitudinal photoacoustic imaging of subcutaneous tumours in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Jan; Johnson, Peter; Zhang, Edward; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben; Pedley, Barbara; Beard, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography can provide high resolution 3D images of vascular networks, making it well suited to characterising the development of tumour vasculature and its response to treatment. In this study, photoacoustic images to depths of up to 9 mm were obtained using an all optical ultrasound detection scheme. Two type of colorectal tumours (LS174T and SW1222) implanted subcutaneously in a mouse were studied. 3D photoacoustic images were obtained in vivo revealing the different vascular architectures of each tumour type and their evolution over a period of several days. The results suggest that photoacoustic imaging could play a role in providing essential pre-clinical information on tumour pathophysiology and eliciting the biological mechanisms underlying anti-angiogenic therapies and other treatments.

  9. Application of the Pulsed Photoacoustic Spectroscopy in Biomedicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez-Juarez, G.; Sims, M. J.; Gupta, S. K.; Viator, J. A.

    2008-08-11

    The use of optical spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool in biomedical applications and research has grown considerably in the last two decades. One of them is the pulsed photoacoustic or optoacoustic, which promises to be one of the most important tools for disease diagnostic studies, because while most spectroscopies exploit the optical nature of the light-tissue interaction, this field of photoacoustics uses optical energy to generate an acoustic wave which propagates in the tissue environment. The acoustic wave propagation is fundamentally related to various tissue properties and an analysis of the wave dynamics can provide insights into these properties. This work presents a review on pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy of several photoacoustic methods to derive information about tissue and tissue phantoms.

  10. Photoacoustic Imaging in Oncology: Translational Preclinical and Early Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Valluru, Keerthi S; Wilson, Katheryne E; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2016-08-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has evolved into a clinically translatable platform with the potential to complement existing imaging techniques for the management of cancer, including detection, characterization, prognosis, and treatment monitoring. In photoacoustic imaging, tissue is optically excited to produce ultrasonographic images that represent a spatial map of optical absorption of endogenous constituents such as hemoglobin, fat, melanin, and water or exogenous contrast agents such as dyes and nanoparticles. It can therefore provide functional and molecular information that allows noninvasive soft-tissue characterization. Photoacoustic imaging has matured over the years and is currently being translated into the clinic with various clinical studies underway. In this review, the current state of photoacoustic imaging is presented, including techniques and instrumentation, followed by a discussion of potential clinical applications of this technique for the detection and management of cancer. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:27429141

  11. A photoacoustic and ultrasonic study on jatropha oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Bama, G.; Ramachandran, K.

    2010-03-01

    Using the photoacoustic technique, the thermal diffusivity of a dimethoxymethane + jatropha liquid mixture and pure jatropha oil is measured at room temperature. The result is correlated with the result of ultrasonic measurements.

  12. Detection of atmospheric pollutants by pulsed photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Miruna; Pascu, Mihail-Lucian; Staicu, Angela

    1998-07-01

    Pulsed laser photoacoustic detection of NO2 and SO2 is reported. The laser source is a pulsed molecular nitrogen laser emitting at 337.1 nm. The average energy per pulse is about 350 (mu) J and the pulse duration 10 nsec. For detection we used a piezoelectric transducer (TUSIM-N.I.M.P., resonance frequency 4 MHz) and an electret condenser microphone (Trevi EM 27). The photoacoustic cell was a nonresonant one, with a cylindrical shape. The laser beam was centered along the cylinder axis. Linear dependence of the photoacoustic signal on pollutant pressure was obtained. This linearity is in a good agreement with theoretical considerations. The photoacoustic signal was measured for pollutants pressure between 1 torr and 100 torr for NO2 and between 35 torr and 100 torr for SO2.

  13. Quantitative assessment of photoacoustic tomography systems integrating clinical ultrasound transducers using novel tissue-simulating phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, William C.; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A.; Garra, Brian S.; Pfefer, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT) systems based on commercial ultrasound instruments have the benefit of dualmodality imaging, which increases their appeal from a clinical standpoint. However, factors that influence PAT system performance have not been thoroughly investigated and standardized test methods have not been established for image quality evaluation. To address these issues we have adapted phantom-based approaches from ultrasound imaging standards and implemented them to assess a PAT system developed for vascular imaging. Our system comprises a tunable near-infrared pulsed laser and a commercial ultrasound imaging system, including four interchangeable linear array clinical ultrasound transducers with varying center frequencies, acoustic bandwidths and geometries. Phantoms consisted of a customized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastisol gel that simulates both optical and acoustic properties of breast tissue. One phantom incorporates a sub-resolution filament array suitable for bimodal ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging, while another contains an array of hemoglobin-filled cylindrical inclusions at various depths. Key performance characteristics were evaluated, including spatial resolution, signal uniformity, contrast, and penetration depth. These characteristics were evaluated at 750 nm at radiant exposures below ANSI safety limits. Effects of transducer properties on imaging performance were evaluated. Axial and lateral resolution ranged from 0.27-0.83 mm and 0.28-1.8 mm, respectively, and penetration depths from 1.9-4.2 cm were achieved. These results demonstrate variation in PAT system performance based on clinical transducer selection, as well as the utility of realistic phantom-based test methods in performing benchtop evaluations of system performance.

  14. Multigrid-based reconstruction algorithm for quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengfu; Montcel, Bruno; Yuan, Zhen; Liu, Wanyu; Vray, Didier

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a multigrid inversion framework for quantitative photoacoustic tomography reconstruction. The forward model of optical fluence distribution and the inverse problem are solved at multiple resolutions. A fixed-point iteration scheme is formulated for each resolution and used as a cost function. The simulated and experimental results for quantitative photoacoustic tomography reconstruction show that the proposed multigrid inversion can dramatically reduce the required number of iterations for the optimization process without loss of reliability in the results. PMID:26203371

  15. Modification of a commercial spectrophotometer for photoacoustic measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, S.; Harris, J.M.; Eyring, E.M.

    1983-11-01

    This note describes how a commercial UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer may be adapted to function as a double beam photoacoustic spectrophotometer operating at visible wavelengths. Modification of a Varian Cary 17 spectrophotometer was carried out first by dismounting the photomultiplier tube detector module and the cell compartment of the spectrophotometer. The sample and the reference beams were focused through two externally mounted quartz lenses onto the sample and reference photoacoustic cells, respectively.

  16. Photoacoustic monitoring and imaging of blood vessel size in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkman, Roy G. M.; Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Hopman, Jeroen C. W.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Thijssen, Johan M.; de Mul, Frits F. M.

    2003-06-01

    A double-ring photoacoustic sensor to image and monitor blood content in tissue has been developed. This sensor has a very small opening angle. Using this sensor we are able to image artifical blood vessels, as well as vessels in a rabbit ear. Furthermore, the feasibility of in vivo imaging is demonstrated with a photoacoustic reconstruction of the joining of two palmar veins a few centimeter proximal to the wrist in a human arm.

  17. Multigrid-based reconstruction algorithm for quantitative photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengfu; Montcel, Bruno; Yuan, Zhen; Liu, Wanyu; Vray, Didier

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a multigrid inversion framework for quantitative photoacoustic tomography reconstruction. The forward model of optical fluence distribution and the inverse problem are solved at multiple resolutions. A fixed-point iteration scheme is formulated for each resolution and used as a cost function. The simulated and experimental results for quantitative photoacoustic tomography reconstruction show that the proposed multigrid inversion can dramatically reduce the required number of iterations for the optimization process without loss of reliability in the results. PMID:26203371

  18. A photoacoustic technique to measure the properties of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a new technique to non-invasively determine the diameter and sound speed of single cells using a combined ultrasonic and photoacoustic technique. Two cell lines, B16-F1 melanoma cells and MCF7 breast cancer cells were examined using this technique. Using a 200 MHz transducer, the ultrasound backscatter from a single cell in suspension was recorded. Immediately following, the cell was irradiated with a 532 nm laser and the resulting photoacoustic wave recorded by the same transducer. The melanoma cells contain optically absorbing melanin particles, which facilitated photoacoustic wave generation. MCF7 cells have negligible optical absorption at 532 nm; the cells were permeabilized and stained with trypan blue prior to measurements. The measured ultrasound and photoacoustic power spectra were compared to theoretical equations with the cell diameter and sound speed as variables (Anderson scattering model for ultrasound, and a thermoelastic expansion model for photoacoustics). The diameter and sound speed were extracted from the models where the spectral shape matched the measured signals. However the photoacoustic spectrum for the melanoma cell did not match theory, which is likely because melanin particles are located around the cytoplasm, and not within the nucleus. Therefore a photoacoustic finite element model of a cell was developed where the central region was not used to generate a photoacoustic wave. The resulting power spectrum was in better agreement with the measured signal than the thermoelastic expansion model. The MCF7 cell diameter obtained using the spectral matching method was 17.5 μm, similar to the optical measurement of 16 μm, while the melanoma cell diameter obtained was 22 μm, similar to the optical measurement of 21 μm. The sound speed measured from the MCF7 and melanoma cell was 1573 and 1560 m/s, respectively, which is within acceptable values that have been published in literature.

  19. Photoacoustic Doppler Effect from Flowing Small Light-Absorbing Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hui; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2007-11-01

    From the flow of a suspension of micrometer-scale carbon particles, the photoacoustic Doppler shift is observed. As predicted theoretically, the observed Doppler shift equals half of that in Doppler ultrasound and does not depend on the direction of laser illumination. This new physical phenomenon provides a basis for developing photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry, which can potentially be used for detecting fluid flow in optically scattering media and especially low-speed blood flow of relatively deep microcirculation in biological tissue.

  20. Photoacoustic method for measuring concentration of chemical species

    DOEpatents

    Autrey, S Thomas [West Richland, WA; Posakony, Gerald J [Richland, WA; Amonette, James E [Richland, WA; Foster-Mills, Nancy S [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a transducer for photoacoustic detection having at least two piezoelectric elements wherein at least a first piezoelectric element has a first frequency and at least a second piezoelectric element has a second frequency. The improvement according to the present invention is that at least two piezoelectric elements are longitudinal elements for longitudinal waves; and the first frequency is different from said second frequency. In other words, the invention is a multi-frequency longitudinal transducer for photoacoustic detection.

  1. Low-noise small-size microring ultrasonic detectors for high-resolution photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sung-Liang; Ling, Tao; Guo, L. Jay

    2011-01-01

    Small size polymer microring resonators have been exploited for photoacoustic (PA) imaging. To demonstrate the advantages of the wide acceptance angle of ultrasound detection of small size microrings, photoacoustic tomography (PAT), and delay-and-sum beamforming PA imaging was conducted. In PAT, we compared the imaging quality using different sizes of detectors with similar noise-equivalent pressures and the same wideband response: 500 μm hydrophone and 100, 60, and 40 μm microrings. The results show significantly improved imaging contrast and high resolution over the whole imaging region using smaller size detectors. The uniform high resolution in PAT imaging using 40 μm microrings indicates the potential to resolve microvasculature over a large imaging region. The improved lateral resolution of two-dimensional and three-dimensional delay-and-sum beamforming PA imaging using a synthetic array demonstrate another advantageous application of small microrings. The small microrings can also be applied to other ultrasound-related imaging applications. PMID:21639569

  2. Handheld photoacoustic tomography probe built using optical-fiber parallel acoustic delay lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Yu, Jaesok; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong; Wang, Lihong V.; Zou, Jun

    2014-08-01

    The development of the first miniaturized parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) probe for handheld photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is reported. Using fused-silica optical fibers with low acoustic attenuation, we constructed two arrays of eight PADLs. Precision laser micromachining was conducted to produce robust and accurate mechanical support and alignment structures for the PADLs, with minimal acoustic distortion and interchannel coupling. The 16 optical-fiber PADLs, each with a different time delay, were arranged to form one input port and two output ports. A handheld PADL probe was constructed using two single-element transducers and two data acquisition channels (equal to a channel reduction ratio of 8∶1). Photoacoustic (PA) images of a black-ink target embedded in an optically scattering phantom were successfully acquired. After traveling through the PADLs, the eight channels of differently time-delayed PA signals reached each single-element ultrasonic transducer in a designated nonoverlapping time series, allowing clear signal separation for PA image reconstruction. Our results show that the PADL technique and the handheld probe can potentially enable real-time PAT, while significantly reducing the complexity and cost of the ultrasound receiver system.

  3. Comparison of transrectal photoacoustic, Doppler, and magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Miya; Horiguchi, Akio; Shinmoto, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Irisawa, Kaku; Wada, Takatsugu; Asano, Tomohiko

    2016-03-01

    Transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) is the most popular imaging modality for diagnosing and treating prostate cancer. TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is mandatory for the histological diagnosis of patients with elevated serum prostatespecific antigen (PSA), but its diagnostic accuracy is not satisfactory due to TRUS's low resolution. As a result, a considerable number of patients are required to undergo an unnecessary repeated biopsy. Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) can be used to provide microvascular network imaging using hemoglobin as an intrinsic, optical absorption molecule. We developed an original TRUS-type PAI probe consisting of a micro-convex array transducer with an optical illumination system to provide superimposed PAI and ultrasound images. TRUS-type PAI has the advantage of having much higher resolution and greater contrast than does Doppler TRUS. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the clinical feasibility of the transrectal PAI system. We performed a clinical trial to compare the image of the cancerous area obtained by transrectal PAI with that obtained by TRUS Doppler during prostate biopsy. The obtained prostate biopsy cores were stained with anti-CD34 antibodies to provide a microvascular distribution map. We also confirmed its consistency with PAI and pre-biopsy MRI findings. Our study demonstrated that transrectal identification of tumor angiogenesis under superimposed photoacoustic and ultrasound images was easier than that under TRUS alone. We recognized a consistent relationship between PAI and MRI findings in most cases. However, there were no correspondences in some cases.

  4. Handheld photoacoustic tomography probe built using optical-fiber parallel acoustic delay lines.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Yu, Jaesok; Jeon, Mansik; Kim, Chulhong; Wang, Lihong V; Zou, Jun

    2014-08-01

    The development of the first miniaturized parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) probe for handheld photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is reported. Using fused-silica optical fibers with low acoustic attenuation, we constructed two arrays of eight PADLs. Precision laser micromachining was conducted to produce robust and accurate mechanical support and alignment structures for the PADLs, with minimal acoustic distortion and interchannel coupling. The 16 optical-fiber PADLs, each with a different time delay, were arranged to form one input port and two output ports. A handheld PADL probe was constructed using two single-element transducers and two data acquisition channels (equal to a channel reduction ratio of 8∶1). Photoacoustic (PA) images of a black-ink target embedded in an optically scattering phantom were successfully acquired. After traveling through the PADLs, the eight channels of differently time-delayed PA signals reached each single-element ultrasonic transducer in a designated nonoverlapping time series, allowing clear signal separation for PA image reconstruction. Our results show that the PADL technique and the handheld probe can potentially enable real-time PAT, while significantly reducing the complexity and cost of the ultrasound receiver system. PMID:25104413

  5. Circulating tumor cell detection using photoacoustic spectral methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-03-01

    A method to detect and differentiate circulating melanoma tumor cells (CTCs) from blood cells using ultrasound and photoacoustic signals with frequencies over 100 MHz is presented. At these frequencies, the acoustic wavelength is similar to the dimensions of a cell, which results in unique features in the signal; periodically varying minima and maxima occur throughout the power spectrum. The spacing between minima depends on the ratio of the size to sound speed of the cell. Using a 532 nm pulsed laser and a 375 MHz center frequency wide-bandwidth transducer, the ultrasound and photoacoustic signals were measured from single cells. A total of 80 cells were measured, 20 melanoma cells, 20 white blood cells (WBCs) and 40 red blood cells (RBCs). The photoacoustic spectral spacing Δf between minima was 95 +/- 15 MHz for melanoma cells and greater than 230 MHz for RBCs. No photoacoustic signal was detected from WBCs. The ultrasonic spectral spacing between minima was 46 +/- 9 MHz for melanoma cells and 98 +/- 11 for WBCs. Both photoacoustic and ultrasound signals were detected from melanoma cells, while only ultrasound signals were detected from WBCs. RBCs showed distinct photoacoustic spectral variations in comparison to any other type of cell. Using the spectral spacing and signal amplitudes, each cell type could be grouped together to aid in cell identification. This method could be used for label-free counting and classifying cells in a sample.

  6. In situ photoacoustic characterization for porous silicon growing: Detection principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Gutierrez, C. F.; Castaño-Yepes, J. D.; Rodriguez-García, M. E.

    2016-05-01

    There are a few methodologies for monitoring the in-situ formation of Porous Silicon (PS). One of the methodologies is photoacoustic. Previous works that reported the use of photoacoustic to study the PS formation do not provide the physical explanation of the origin of the signal. In this paper, a physical explanation of the origin of the photoacoustic signal during the PS etching is provided. The incident modulated radiation and changes in the reflectance are taken as thermal sources. In this paper, a useful methodology is proposed to determine the etching rate, porosity, and refractive index of a PS film by the determination of the sample thickness, using scanning electron microscopy images. This method was developed by carrying out two different experiments using the same anodization conditions. The first experiment consisted of growth of the samples with different etching times to prove the periodicity of the photoacoustic signal, while the second one considered the growth samples using three different wavelengths that are correlated with the period of the photoacoustic signal. The last experiment showed that the period of the photoacoustic signal is proportional to the laser wavelength.

  7. High frame rate photoacoustic imaging using clinical ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivasubramanian, Kathyayini; Pramanik, Manojit

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a potential hybrid imaging modality which is gaining attention in the field of medical imaging. Typically a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is used to excite the tissue and generate photoacoustic signals. But, they are not suitable for clinical applications owing to their high cost, large size. Also, their low pulse repetition rate (PRR) of few tens of hertz prevents them from being used in real-time PAT. So, there is a growing need for an imaging system capable of real-time imaging for various clinical applications. In this work, we are using a nanosecond pulsed laser diode as an excitation source and a clinical ultrasound imaging system to obtain the photoacoustic imaging. The excitation laser is ~803 nm in wavelength with energy of ~1.4 mJ per pulse. So far, the reported frame rate for photoacoustic imaging is only a few hundred Hertz. We have demonstrated up to 7000 frames per second framerate in photoacoustic imaging (B-mode) and measured the flow rate of fast moving obje ct. Phantom experiments were performed to test the fast imaging capability and measure the flow rate of ink solution inside a tube. This fast photoacoustic imaging can be used for various clinical applications including cardiac related problems, where the blood flow rate is quite high, or other dynamic studies.

  8. 24 CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Erik C. Westman

    2002-07-01

    This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multi-channel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method of emplacing the array in a long, horizontal borehole. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.

  9. Integrated photoacoustic and diffuse optical tomography system for imaging of human finger joints in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xi, Lei; Jiang, Huabei

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we developed a dual-modality tomographic system that integrated photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and diffuse optical tomography (DOT) into a single platform for imaging human finger joints with fine structures and associated optical properties. In PAI, spherical focused transducers were utilized to collect acoustic signals, and the concept of virtual detector was applied in a conventional back-projection algorithm to improve the image quality. A finite-element based reconstruction algorithm was employed to quantitatively recover optical property distribution in the objects for DOT. The phantom results indicate that PAI has a maximum lateral resolution of 70 µm in resolving structures of targets. DOT was able to recover both optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of targets accurately. To validate the potential of this system in clinical diagnosis of joint diseases, the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints of 4 healthy female volunteers were imaged. We successfully obtained high-resolution images of the phalanx and the surrounding soft tissue via PAI, and recovered both optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of phalanx using DOT. The in vivo results suggest that this dual-modality system has the potential for the early diagnosis of joint diseases such as osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Integrated PAI/DOT imaging interface (top) and typical reconstruction of structures and associated optical properties of a female finger joint via PAI and DOT (bottom). PMID:26431473

  10. Synergistic image reconstruction for hybrid ultrasound and photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Thomas P.; Wang, Kun; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) image reconstruction methods assume that the object and surrounding medium are described by a constant speed-of-sound (SOS) value. In order to accurately recover fine structures, SOS heterogeneities should be quantified and compensated for during PACT reconstruction. To address this problem, several groups have proposed hybrid systems that combine PACT with ultrasound computed tomography (USCT). In such systems, a SOS map is reconstructed first via USCT. Consequently, this SOS map is employed to inform the PACT reconstruction method. Additionally, the SOS map can provide structural information regarding tissue, which is complementary to the functional information from the PACT image. We propose a paradigm shift in the way that images are reconstructed in hybrid PACT-USCT imaging. Inspired by our observation that information about the SOS distribution is encoded in PACT measurements, we propose to jointly reconstruct the absorbed optical energy density and SOS distributions from a combined set of USCT and PACT measurements, thereby reducing the two reconstruction problems into one. This innovative approach has several advantages over conventional approaches in which PACT and USCT images are reconstructed independently: (1) Variations in the SOS will automatically be accounted for, optimizing PACT image quality; (2) The reconstructed PACT and USCT images will possess minimal systematic artifacts because errors in the imaging models will be optimally balanced during the joint reconstruction; (3) Due to the exploitation of information regarding the SOS distribution in the full-view PACT data, our approach will permit high-resolution reconstruction of the SOS distribution from sparse array data.

  11. Photoacoustic computed tomography without accurate ultrasonic transducer responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Qiwei; Wang, Kun; Xia, Jun; Zhu, Liren; Wang, Lihong V.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) image reconstruction methods assume that the object and surrounding medium are described by a constant speed-of-sound (SOS) value. In order to accurately recover fine structures, SOS heterogeneities should be quantified and compensated for during PACT reconstruction. To address this problem, several groups have proposed hybrid systems that combine PACT with ultrasound computed tomography (USCT). In such systems, a SOS map is reconstructed first via USCT. Consequently, this SOS map is employed to inform the PACT reconstruction method. Additionally, the SOS map can provide structural information regarding tissue, which is complementary to the functional information from the PACT image. We propose a paradigm shift in the way that images are reconstructed in hybrid PACT-USCT imaging. Inspired by our observation that information about the SOS distribution is encoded in PACT measurements, we propose to jointly reconstruct the absorbed optical energy density and SOS distributions from a combined set of USCT and PACT measurements, thereby reducing the two reconstruction problems into one. This innovative approach has several advantages over conventional approaches in which PACT and USCT images are reconstructed independently: (1) Variations in the SOS will automatically be accounted for, optimizing PACT image quality; (2) The reconstructed PACT and USCT images will possess minimal systematic artifacts because errors in the imaging models will be optimally balanced during the joint reconstruction; (3) Due to the exploitation of information regarding the SOS distribution in the full-view PACT data, our approach will permit high-resolution reconstruction of the SOS distribution from sparse array data.

  12. Video-rate tomographic phase microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fang-Yen, Christopher; Choi, Wonshik; Sung, Yongjin; Holbrow, Charles J.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Tomographic phase microscopy measures the 3-D refractive index distribution of cells and tissues by combining the information from a series of angle-dependent interferometric phase images. In the original device, the frame rate was limited to 0.1 frames per second (fps) by the technique used to acquire phase images, preventing measurements of moving or rapidly changing samples. We describe an improved tomographic phase microscope in which phase images are acquired via a spatial fringe pattern demodulation method, enabling a full tomogram acquisition rate of 30 fps. In addition, in this system the refractive index is calculated by a diffraction tomography algorithm that accounts for the effects of diffraction in the 3-D reconstruction. We use the instrument to quantitatively monitor rapid changes in refractive index within defined subregions of cells due to exposure to acetic acid or changes in medium osmolarity. PMID:21280892

  13. On the tomographic picture of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibort, A.; Man'ko, V. I.; Marmo, G.; Simoni, A.; Ventriglia, F.

    2010-06-01

    We formulate necessary and sufficient conditions for a symplectic tomogram of a quantum state to determine the density state. We establish a connection between the (re)construction by means of symplectic tomograms with the construction by means of Naimark positive definite functions on the Weyl-Heisenberg group. This connection is used to formulate properties which guarantee that tomographic probabilities describe quantum states in the probability representation of quantum mechanics.

  14. Optical clearing in photoacoustic flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Menyaev, Yulian A; Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Juratli, Mazen A; Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Tuchin, Valery V; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2013-01-01

    Clinical applications of photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for detection of circulating tumor cells in deep blood vessels are hindered by laser beam scattering, that result in loss of PAFC sensitivity and resolution. We demonstrate biocompatible and rapid optical clearing (OC) of skin to minimize light scattering and thus, increase optical resolution and sensitivity of PAFC. OC effect was achieved in 20 min by sequent skin cleaning, microdermabrasion, and glycerol application enhanced by massage and sonophoresis. Using 0.8 mm mouse skin layer over a blood vessel in vitro phantom we demonstrated 1.6-fold decrease in laser spot blurring accompanied by 1.6-fold increase in PA signal amplitude from blood background. As a result, peak rate for B16F10 melanoma cells in blood flow increased 1.7-fold. By using OC we also demonstrated the feasibility of PA contrast improvement for human hand veins. PMID:24409398

  15. Photoacoustic microscopy of bilirubin in tissue phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Chi; Yao, Da-Kang; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-12-01

    Determining both bilirubin's concentration and its spatial distribution are important in disease diagnosis. Here, for the first time, we applied quantitative multiwavelength photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to detect bilirubin concentration and distribution simultaneously. By measuring tissue-mimicking phantoms with different bilirubin concentrations, we showed that the root-mean-square error of prediction has reached 0.52 and 0.83 mg/dL for pure bilirubin and for blood-mixed bilirubin detection (with 100% oxygen saturation), respectively. We further demonstrated the capability of the PAM system to image bilirubin distribution both with and without blood. Finally, by underlaying bilirubin phantoms with mouse skins, we showed that bilirubin can be imaged with consistent accuracy down to >400 μm in depth. Our results show that PAM has potential for noninvasive bilirubin monitoring in vivo, as well as for further clinical applications.

  16. Optical clearing in photoacoustic flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Menyaev, Yulian A.; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Juratli, Mazen A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical applications of photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for detection of circulating tumor cells in deep blood vessels are hindered by laser beam scattering, that result in loss of PAFC sensitivity and resolution. We demonstrate biocompatible and rapid optical clearing (OC) of skin to minimize light scattering and thus, increase optical resolution and sensitivity of PAFC. OC effect was achieved in 20 min by sequent skin cleaning, microdermabrasion, and glycerol application enhanced by massage and sonophoresis. Using 0.8 mm mouse skin layer over a blood vessel in vitro phantom we demonstrated 1.6-fold decrease in laser spot blurring accompanied by 1.6-fold increase in PA signal amplitude from blood background. As a result, peak rate for B16F10 melanoma cells in blood flow increased 1.7-fold. By using OC we also demonstrated the feasibility of PA contrast improvement for human hand veins. PMID:24409398

  17. Multi-quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yufei; Yu, Xin; Yu, Guang; Li, Xudong; Zhang, Jingbo; Chen, Deying; Sun, Rui; Tittel, Frank K.

    2015-07-01

    A multi-quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (M-QEPAS) sensor system for trace gas detection is reported. Instead of a single quartz tuning fork (QTF) as used in QEPAS technique, a dual QTF sensor platform was adopted in M-QEPAS to increase the signal strength by the addition of the detected QEPAS signals. Water vapor was selected as the target analyte. M-QEPAS realized a 1.7 times signal enhancement as compared to the QEPAS method for the same operating conditions. A minimum detection limit of 23.9 ppmv was achieved for the M-QEPAS sensor, with a calculated normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 5.95 × 10-8 cm-1W/√Hz. The M-QEPAS sensor performance can be further improved when more QTFs are employed or an acoustic micro-resonator architecture is used.

  18. Photoacoustic imaging of cerebral hypoperfusion during acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B. Z.; Yang, J. G.; Wu, D.; Zeng, D. W.; Yi, Y.; Yang, N.; Jiang, H. B.

    2015-01-01

    Using acupuncture to treat cerebral hypoperfusion is a hot topic. However, there is a lack of effective tools to clarify the therapeutic effect of acupuncture on cerebral hypoperfusion. Here, we show in a mouse model of cerebral hypoperfusion that photoacoustic tomography (PAT) can noninvasively image cerebral vasculature and track total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration changes in cerebral hypoperfusion with acupuncture stimulation on the YangLingQuan (GB34) point. We measured the changes of HbT concentration and found that the HbT concentration in hypoperfusion regions was clearly lower than that in the control regions when the acupuncture was absent; however, it was significantly increased when the acupuncture was implemented on the GB34 point. We also observed the increase of vessel size and the generation of new vessels in cerebral hypoperfusion during acupuncture. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) was employed to validate some of the PAT findings. PMID:26417495

  19. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  20. Photoacoustic tomography: fundamentals, advances and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-01-01

    Optical microscopy has been contributing to the development of life science for more than three centuries. However, due to strong optical scattering in tissue, its in vivo imaging ability has been restricted to studies at superficial depths. Advances in photoacoustic tomography (PAT) now allow multiscale imaging at depths from sub-millimeter to several centimeters, with spatial resolutions from sub-micrometer to sub-millimeter. Because of this high scalability and its unique optical absorption contrast, PAT is capable of performing anatomical, functional, molecular and fluid-dynamic imaging at various system levels, and is playing an increasingly important role in fundamental biological research and clinical practice. This Review discusses recent technical progress in PAT and presents corresponding applications. It ends with a discussion of several prospects and their technical challenges. PMID:22025335

  1. Monitoring photodynamic therapy with photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Peng; Chapman, David W.; Moore, Ronald B.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2015-10-01

    We present our work on examining the feasibility of monitoring photodynamic therapy (PDT)-induced vasculature change with acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). Verteporfin, an FDA-approved photosensitizer for clinical PDT, was utilized. With a 60-μm-resolution PAM system, we demonstrated the capability of PAM to monitor PDT-induced vasculature variations in a chick chorioallantoic membrane model with topical application and in a rat ear with intravenous injection of the photosensitizer. We also showed oxygen saturation change in target blood vessels due to PDT. Success of the present approach may potentially lead to the application of PAM imaging in evaluating PDT efficacy, guiding treatment, and predicting responders from nonresponders.

  2. Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Shi, Junhui; Hai, Pengfei; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-06-01

    Grueneisen relaxation photoacoustic microscopy (GR-PAM) can achieve optically defined axial resolution, but it has been limited to ex vivo demonstrations so far. Here, we present the first in vivo image of a mouse brain acquired with GR-PAM. To induce the GR effect, an intensity-modulated continuous-wave laser was employed to heat absorbing objects. In phantom experiments, an axial resolution of 12.5 μm was achieved, which is sixfold better than the value achieved by conventional optical-resolution PAM. This axial-resolution improvement was further demonstrated by imaging a mouse brain in vivo, where significantly narrower axial profiles of blood vessels were observed. The in vivo demonstration of GR-PAM shows the potential of this modality for label-free and high-resolution anatomical and functional imaging of biological tissues.

  3. Addition of Tomographic Capabilities to NMIS

    SciTech Connect

    Mullens, J.A.

    2003-03-11

    This paper describes tomographic capabilities for the Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS). The tomographic capabilities add weapons component spatial and material properties information that result in a more detailed item signature (template) and provide more information for physical attributes analyses. The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) is used routinely to confirm the identity of HEU components in sealed containers. It does this through a radiation signature acquired by shining a {sup 252}Cf source through the container and measuring the radiation at four detectors stacked vertically on the other side. This measurement gives a gamma and neutron radiation transmission profile of the weapons component, mixed with the radiation production due to the induced fissions in the fissile materials. This information is sufficient to match an ''unknown'' weapons component signature to a template signature from a reference item when measuring under controlled conditions. Tomography measures the interior of an item by making transmission measurements from all angles around the item, whereas NMIS makes the measurements from a single angle. Figure 1 is a standard example of tomographic reconstruction, the Shepp-Logan human brain phantom. The measured quantity is attenuation so high values (white) are highly attenuating areas.

  4. Tomographic imaging using poissonian detector data

    DOEpatents

    Aspelmeier, Timo; Ebel, Gernot; Hoeschen, Christoph

    2013-10-15

    An image reconstruction method for reconstructing a tomographic image (f.sub.j) of a region of investigation within an object (1), comprises the steps of providing detector data (y.sub.i) comprising Poisson random values measured at an i-th of a plurality of different positions, e.g. i=(k,l) with pixel index k on a detector device and angular index l referring to both the angular position (.alpha..sub.l) and the rotation radius (r.sub.l) of the detector device (10) relative to the object (1), providing a predetermined system matrix A.sub.ij assigning a j-th voxel of the object (1) to the i-th detector data (y.sub.i), and reconstructing the tomographic image (f.sub.j) based on the detector data (y.sub.i), said reconstructing step including a procedure of minimizing a functional F(f) depending on the detector data (y.sub.i) and the system matrix A.sub.ij and additionally including a sparse or compressive representation of the object (1) in an orthobasis T, wherein the tomographic image (f.sub.j) represents the global minimum of the functional F(f). Furthermore, an imaging method and an imaging device using the image reconstruction method are described.

  5. Aerosol optical absorption measurements with photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Many parameters related to radiative forcing in climate research are known only with large uncertainties. And one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing is the contribution from aerosols. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the electromagnetic radiation, thus may have negative or positive effects on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, respectively [1]. And the magnitude of the effect is directly related to the quantity of light absorbed by aerosols [2,3]. Thus, sensitivity and precision measurement of aerosol optical absorption is crucial for climate research. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the light absorption of aerosols [4]. A PAS based sensor for aerosol optical absorption measurement was developed. A 532 nm semiconductor laser with an effective power of 160 mW was used as a light source of the PAS sensor. The PAS sensor was calibrated by using known concentration NO2. The minimum detectable optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosol was determined to be 1 Mm-1. 24 hours continues measurement of OAC of aerosol in the ambient air was carried out. And a novel three wavelength PAS aerosol OAC sensor is in development for analysis of aerosol wavelength-dependent absorption Angstrom coefficient. Reference [1] U. Lohmann and J. Feichter, Global indirect aerosol effects: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, 715-737 (2005) [2] M. Z. Jacobson, Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, Nature 409, 695-697 (2001) [3] V. Ramanathan and G. Carmichae, Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, nature geoscience 1, 221-227 (2008) [4] W.P Arnott, H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description. Atmos. Environ. 33, 2845-2852 (1999).

  6. Technique development for photoacoustic imaging guided interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qian; Zhang, Haonan; Yuan, Jie; Feng, Ting; Xu, Guan; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), i.e. tissue destruction induced by a local increase of temperature by means of laser light energy transmission, has been frequently used for minimally invasive treatments of various diseases such as benign thyroid nodules and liver cancer. The emerging photoacoustic (PA) imaging, when integrated with ultrasound (US), could contribute to LITT procedure. PA can enable a good visualization of percutaneous apparatus deep inside tissue and, therefore, can offer accurate guidance of the optical fibers to the target tissue. Our initial experiment demonstrated that, by picking the strong photoacoustic signals generated at the tips of optical fibers as a needle, the trajectory and position of the fibers could be visualized clearly using a commercial available US unit. When working the conventional US Bscan mode, the fibers disappeared when the angle between the fibers and the probe surface was larger than 60 degree; while working on the new PA mode, the fibers could be visualized without any problem even when the angle between the fibers and the probe surface was larger than 75 degree. Moreover, with PA imaging function integrated, the optical fibers positioned into the target tissue, besides delivering optical energy for thermotherapy, can also be used to generate PA signals for on-line evaluation of LITT. Powered by our recently developed PA physio-chemical analysis, PA measurements from the tissue can provide a direct and accurate feedback of the tissue responses to laser ablation, including the changes in not only chemical compositions but also histological microstructures. The initial experiment on the rat liver model has demonstrated the excellent sensitivity of PA imaging to the changes in tissue temperature rise and tissue status (from native to coagulated) when the tissue is treated in vivo with LITT.

  7. A Micro-Opto-Mechanical Photoacoustic Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kotovsky, J

    2008-10-17

    This report describes progress achieved in a one-year LDRD feasibility study of a Photo Acoustic Spectrometer (PAS). Specifically, this team sought to create an all-optical and very small PhotoAcoustic Spectrometer Sensing system (PASS system). The PASS system includes all the hardware needed within a gas environment to analyze the presence of a large variety of molecules. The all-optical PASS system requires only two optical-fibers to communicate with the opto-electronic power and readout systems that exist outside of the gas environment. These systems can be at any distance from the PASS system as signal loss through the optical fibers is very small. The PASS system is intended to be placed in a small space where gases need to be measured and thus must be very small. The size and all-optical constraints placed on the PASS system demand a new design. The PASS system design includes a novel acoustic chamber, optical sensor, power fiber coupling and sensing fiber coupling. Our collaborators at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) have proven the capabilities of a complete photoacoustic spectrometer that uses a macro-scale PASS system (first 2 references). It was our goal to miniaturize the PASS system and turn it into an all-optical system to allow for its use in confined spaces that prohibit electrical devices. This goal demanded the study of all the system components, selection of an appropriate optical readout system and the design and integration of the optical sensor to the PASS system. A stretch goal was to fabricate a completed PASS system prototype.

  8. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging of nerves with a clinical ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Jean Martial; West, Simeon; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate and efficient identification of nerves is of great importance during many ultrasound-guided clinical procedures, including nerve blocks and prostate biopsies. It can be challenging to visualise nerves with conventional ultrasound imaging, however. One of the challenges is that nerves can have very similar appearances to nearby structures such as tendons. Several recent studies have highlighted the potential of near-infrared optical spectroscopy for differentiating nerves and adjacent tissues, as this modality can be sensitive to optical absorption of lipids that are present in intra- and extra-neural adipose tissue and in the myelin sheaths. These studies were limited to point measurements, however. In this pilot study, a custom photoacoustic system with a clinical ultrasound imaging probe was used to acquire multi-spectral photoacoustic images of nerves and tendons from swine ex vivo, across the wavelength range of 1100 to 1300 nm. Photoacoustic images were processed and overlaid in colour onto co-registered conventional ultrasound images that were acquired with the same imaging probe. A pronounced optical absorption peak centred at 1210 nm was observed in the photoacoustic signals obtained from nerves, and it was absent in those obtained from tendons. This absorption peak, which is consistent with the presence of lipids, provides a novel image contrast mechanism to significantly enhance the visualization of nerves. In particular, image contrast for nerves was up to 5.5 times greater with photoacoustic imaging (0.82 +/- 0.15) than with conventional ultrasound imaging (0.148 +/- 0.002), with a maximum contrast of 0.95 +/- 0.02 obtained in photoacoustic mode. This pilot study demonstrates the potential of photoacoustic imaging to improve clinical outcomes in ultrasound-guided interventions in regional anaesthesia and interventional oncology.

  9. Noninvasive photoacoustic measurement of the composite indicator dilution curve for cardiac output estimation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, DongYel; Huang, Qiaojian; Li, Youzhi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the measurement of indicator dilution curves using a photoacoustic (PA) technology was reported, which showed promising results on the noninvasive estimation of cardiac output (CO) that is an important hemodynamic parameter useful in various clinical situations. However, in clinical practice, measuring PA indicator dilution curves from an arterial blood vessel requires an ultrasound transducer array capable of focusing on the targeted artery. This causes several challenges on the clinical translation of the PA indicator dilution method, such as high sensor cost and complexity. In this paper, we theoretically derived that a composite PA indicator dilution curve simultaneously measured from both arterial and venous blood vessels can be used to estimate CO correctly. The ex-vivo and in-vivo experimental results with a flat ultrasound transducer verified the developed theory. We believe this new concept would overcome the main challenges on the clinical translation of the noninvasive PA indicator dilution technology. PMID:25780743

  10. Doppler photoacoustic and Doppler ultrasound in blood with optical contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinfeld, Adi; Eyal, Avishay

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry as well as Doppler ultrasound were performed in acoustic resolution regime on tubes filled with flowing blood with indocyanine green (ICG) at different concentrations. The photoacoustic excitation utilized a pair of directly-modulated fiber-coupled 830nm laser-diodes, modulated with either CW or tone-bursts for depthresolved measurements. The amplitude of the Doppler peak in photoacoustic Doppler measurements was found to be proportional to the ICG concentration. Photoacoustic Doppler was measured in ICG at human safe concentrations, but not in whole blood. Comparing the results between the two modalities implied that using a wavelength with higher optical absorption may improve the photoacoustic signal in blood.

  11. 21 CFR 892.1740 - Tomographic x-ray system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tomographic x-ray system. 892.1740 Section 892.1740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1740 Tomographic x-ray system. (a) Identification. A tomographic x-ray system is an...

  12. Super-resolution photoacoustic imaging of single gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Kwon, Owoong; Jeon, Mansik; Song, Jaejung; Jo, Minguk; Kim, Sungjee; Son, Junwoo; Kim, Yunseok; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging hybrid imaging modality that can provide a strong optical absorption contrast using the photoacoustic (PA) effect, and breaks through the fundamental imaging depth limit of existing optical microscopy such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), confocal or two-photon microscopy. In PAI, a short-pulsed laser is illuminated to the tissue, and the PA waves are generated by thermoelastic expansion. Despite the high lateral resolution of optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) thanks to the tight optical focus, the lateral resolution of OR-PAM is limited to the optical diffraction limit, which is approximately a half of the excitation wavelength. Here, we demonstrate a new super-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (SR-PAM) system by breaking the optical diffraction limit. The conventional microscopes with nanoscale resolutions such as a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) are typically used to image the structures of nanomaterials, but these systems should work in a high vacuum environment and cannot provide the optical properties of the materials. Our newly developed SR-PAM system provides the optical properties with a nanoscale resolution in a normal atmosphere. We have photoacoustically imaged single gold nanoparticles with an average size of 80 nm in diameter and shown their PA expansion properties individually. The lateral resolution of this system was approximately 20 nm. Therefore, this tool will provide an unprecedented optical absorption property with an accurate nanoscale resolution and greatly impact on materials science and nanotechnology field.

  13. Standoff photoacoustic sensing of trace chemicals by laser Doppler vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Y.; Hu, Q.; Liu, H.

    2016-05-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful technique that suitable for trace detection of chemicals and explosives. Normally a high-sensitive microphone or a quartz tuning fork is used to detect the signal in photoacoustic cell. In recent years, laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is proposed to remote-sense photoacoustic signal on various substrates. It is a high-sensitivity sensor with a displacement resolution of <10pm. In this research, the photoacoustic effect of various chemicals is excited by a quantum cascade laser (QCL) with a scanning wavelength range of 6.89μm to 8.5 μm. A home-developed LDV at 1550nm wavelength is applied to detect the vibration signal. After normalize the vibration amplitude with QCL power, the photoacoustic spectrum of various chemicals can be obtained. Different factors that affect the detection accuracy and sensitivity have also been discussed. The results show the potential of the proposed technique for standoff detection of trace chemicals and explosives.

  14. Evanescent Field Based Photoacoustics: Optical Property Evaluation at Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Benjamin S; Rudy, Anna M; Nowak, Charissa A; Tsay, Yowting; Whiteside, Paul J D; Hunt, Heather K

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a protocol to estimate material and surface optical properties using the photoacoustic effect combined with total internal reflection. Optical property evaluation of thin films and the surfaces of bulk materials is an important step in understanding new optical material systems and their applications. The method presented can estimate thickness, refractive index, and use absorptive properties of materials for detection. This metrology system uses evanescent field-based photoacoustics (EFPA), a field of research based upon the interaction of an evanescent field with the photoacoustic effect. This interaction and its resulting family of techniques allow the technique to probe optical properties within a few hundred nanometers of the sample surface. This optical near field allows for the highly accurate estimation of material properties on the same scale as the field itself such as refractive index and film thickness. With the use of EFPA and its sub techniques such as total internal reflection photoacoustic spectroscopy (TIRPAS) and optical tunneling photoacoustic spectroscopy (OTPAS), it is possible to evaluate a material at the nanoscale in a consolidated instrument without the need for many instruments and experiments that may be cost prohibitive. PMID:27500652

  15. Nondestructive evaluation of structural ceramics by photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandelwal, Pramod K.

    1987-01-01

    A photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) digital imaging system was developed and utilized to characterize silicon nitride material at the various stages of the ceramic fabrication process. Correlation studies revealed that photoacoustic microscopy detected failure initiating defects in substantially more specimens than microradiography and ultrasonic techniques. Photoacoustic microscopy detected 10 to 100 micron size surface and subsurface pores and inclusions, respectively, up to 80 microns below the interrogating surface in machined sintered silicon nitride. Microradiography detected 50 micron diameter fracture controlling pores and inclusions. Subsurface holes were detected up to a depth of 570 microns and 1.00 mm in sintered silicon nitride and silicon carbide, respectively. Seeded voids of 20 to 30 micron diameters at the surface and 50 microns below the interrogating surface were detected by photoacoustic microscopy and microradiography with 1 percent X-ray thickness sensitivity. Tight surface cracks of 96 micron length x 48 micron depth were detected by photoacoustic microscopy. PAM volatilized and removed material in the green state which resulted in linear shallow microcracks after sintering. This significantly limits the use of PAM as an in-process NDE technique.

  16. Characterization of bone microstructure using photoacoustic spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ting; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Xu, Guan; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Deng, Cheri X.; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a progressive bone disease that is characterized by a decrease in bone mass and deterioration in microarchitecture. This study investigates the feasibility of characterizing bone microstructure by analyzing the frequency spectrum of the photoacoustic signals from the bone. Modeling and numerical simulation of photoacoustic signals and their frequency-domain analysis were performed on trabecular bones with different mineral densities. The resulting quasilinear photoacoustic spectra were fit by linear regression, from which spectral parameter slope can be quantified. The modeling demonstrates that, at an optical wavelength of 685 nm, bone specimens with lower mineral densities have higher slope. Preliminary experiment on osteoporosis rat tibia bones with different mineral contents has also been conducted. The finding from the experiment has a good agreement with the modeling, both demonstrating that the frequency-domain analysis of photoacoustic signals can provide objective assessment of bone microstructure and deterioration. Considering that photoacoustic measurement is non-ionizing, non-invasive, and has sufficient penetration in both calcified and noncalcified tissues, this new technology holds unique potential for clinical translation.

  17. First clinical trials of the Twente photoacoustic mammoscope (PAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaartjes, Susanne E.; van Hespen, Johan C. G.; Klaase, Joost M.; van den Engh, Frank M.; Thé, Andy K. H.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Manohar, Srirang

    2007-07-01

    Breast cancer dominates cancers in females. This burden on society and the room for improvements in the current practice of mammography have been stimuli for developing new modalities like photoacoustic mammography. At the University of Twente (UT), an instrument had been developed aimed at performing limited area scans on the human breast. This instrument is called the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope (PAM). The PAM is based on generating laserinduced ultrasound from absorbing structures in the breast. The heart of the instrument is a flat PVDF based detector matrix comprising 590 active elements. We show the performance characteristics of the ultrasound detector. The exciting source is an Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm with 5 ns pulses. A study protocol was designed to explore the feasibility of using the PAM to detect cancer in the breasts of patients. The protocol was executed at the Medisch Spectrum Twente by using the mammoscope to obtain photoacoustic region-of-interest (ROI) images of the suspect/symptomatic breasts. We compare the photoacoustic images obtained with x-ray mammograms and ultrasound images. We show photoacoustic images of ROI in one case where we attribute high intensity regions to tumor vascularization.

  18. Influence of photolysis on multispectral photoacoustic measurement of nitrogen dioxide concentration.

    PubMed

    Tian, Guoxun; Moosmüller, Hans; Arnott, W Patrick

    2013-09-01

    Multispectral photoacoustic instruments are commonly used to measure aerosol and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) light absorption coefficients to determine the radiation budget of the atmosphere. Here a new photoacoustic system is developed to explore the effect of photolysis on the measured signal in a multispectral photoacoustic spectrometer In this system, a 405-nm laser is used primarily as light source for photolysis. Additionally, a well-overlapped 532-nm laser, modulated at the resonant frequency of the photoacoustic instrument, is used to probe the NO2 concentration. As a result, the photolysis effect at 405 nm can be observed by the photoacoustic instrument through the 532-nm laser. This work determines an 11% reduction of the photoacoustic signal caused by the photolysis effect for typical conditions, which needs to be taken into account when calibrating multispectral photoacoustic spectrometers with NO2. PMID:24151684

  19. Photoacoustic detection of blood in dental pulp by using short-time Fourier transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Azusa; Kakino, Satoko; Matsuura, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    A method based on photoacoustic analysis is proposed to diagnose dental pulp vitality. Photoacoustic analysis enables to get signal from deeper tissues than other optical analyses and therefore, signal detection from root canal of thick dental tissues such as molar teeth is expected. As a light source for excitation of photoacoustic waves, a microchip Q-switched YAG laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm was used and owing to large penetration depth of the near infrared laser, photoacoustic signals from dental root were successfully obtained. It was found that the photoacoustic signals from the teeth containing hemoglobin solution in the pulp cavity provide vibration in high frequency region. It was also shown that the intensities of the high frequency component have correlation with the hemoglobin concentration of solution. We applied short-time Fourier transform for evaluation of photoacoustic signals and this analysis clearly showed photoacoustic signals from dental root.

  20. Trapping and dynamic manipulation with magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging of targeted microspheres mimicking metastatic cancer cells trafficking in the vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chenwei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2012-02-01

    Trapping and manipulation of micro-scale objects mimicking metastatic cancer cells in a flow field have been demonstrated with magnetomotive photoacoustic (mmPA) imaging. Coupled contrast agents combining gold nanorods (15 nm × 50 nm; absorption peak around 730 nm) with 15 nm diameter magnetic nanospheres were targeted to 10 μm polystyrene beads recirculating in a 1.6 mm diameter tube mimicking a human peripheral vessel. Targeted objects were then trapped by an external magnetic field produced by a dual magnet system consisting of two disc magnets separated by 6 cm to form a polarizing field (0.04 Tesla in the tube region) to magnetize the magnetic contrast agents, and a custom designed cone magnet array with a high magnetic field gradient (about 0.044 Tesla/mm in the tube region) producing a strong trapping force to magnetized contrast agents. Results show that polystyrene beads linked to nanocomposites can be trapped at flow rates up to 12 ml/min. It is shown that unwanted background in a photoacoustic image can be significantly suppressed by changing the position of the cone magnet array with respect to the tube, thus creating coherent movement of the trapped objects. This study makes mmPA imaging very promising for differential visualization of metastatic cells trafficking in the vasculature.

  1. Tomographic Reconstruction of Breast Characteristics Using Transmitted Ultrasound Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Gursharan; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2012-10-01

    X-ray Mammography has been the standard technique for the detection of breast cancer. However, it uses ionizing radiation, and can cause severe discomfort. It also has low spatial resolution, and can be prone to misdiagnosis. Techniques such as X-ray CT and MRI alleviate some of these issues but are costly. Researchers at Karmanos Cancer Institute developed a tomographic ultrasound device which is able to reconstruct the reflectivity, attenuation, and sound speed characteristics of the breast. A patient places her breast into a ring array of transducers immersed in a water bath, and the device scanning the breast yields a 3d reconstruction. Our work focuses on improving algorithms for attenuation and sound speed imaging. Current time-of-flight tomography provides relatively low resolution images. Improvements are made by considering diffraction effects with the use of the low resolution image as a seed to the Born approximation. Ultimately, full waveform inversion will be used to obtain images with resolution comparable to MRI.

  2. Photoacoustic spectroscopic differences between normal and malignant thyroid tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Xie, Wengming; Li, Hui

    2012-12-01

    The thyroid is one of the main endocrine glands of human body, which plays a crucial role in the body's metabolism. Thyroid cancer mortality ranks only second to ovarian cancer in endocrine cancer. Routine diagnostic methods of thyroid diseases in present clinic exist misdiagnosis and missed diagnosis to varying degrees. Those lead to miss the best period of cancer treatment--early. Photoacoustic spectroscopy technology is a new tool, which provides an effective and noninvasive way for biomedical materials research, being highly sensitive and without sample pretreatment. In this paper, we use photoacoustic spectroscopy technology (PAST) to detect the absorption spectrum between normal and malignant thyroid tissues. The result shows that the photoacoustic spectroscopy technology (PAST) could differentiate malignant thyroid tissue from normal thyroid tissue very well. This technique combined with routine diagnostic methods has the potential to increase the diagnostic accuracy in clinical thyroid cancer diagnosis.

  3. Photoacoustic Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy Of Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidrine, D. Warren

    1981-10-01

    After discovering the photoacoustic effect, Alexander Graham Bell predicted its use in spectrometers, and that it would find its greatest utility "in the ultra-red." More than ninety years were required to fulfil his first prediction, and the second is still a prophecy. There is no record whether he ever imagined that an invention being developed that same winter by a young protege of his named Albert Michelson would ever be combined with his photoacoustic effect. A century later, the combination was made by Farrow Burnham, and Eyring, using a visible-range interferometer spectrometer of their own design. Soon afterwards, Rockley and myself, working independently, applied the technique to infrared measurements of solid samples. Photoacoustic cells are now commercially available as FT-IR accessories, and the technique is in use in the field.

  4. Image reconstruction with uncertainty quantification in photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Tick, Jenni; Pulkkinen, Aki; Tarvainen, Tanja

    2016-04-01

    Photoacoustic tomography is a hybrid imaging method that combines optical contrast and ultrasound resolution. The goal of photoacoustic tomography is to resolve an initial pressure distribution from detected ultrasound waves generated within an object due to an illumination of a short light pulse. In this work, a Bayesian approach to photoacoustic tomography is described. The solution of the inverse problem is derived and computation of the point estimates for image reconstruction and uncertainty quantification is described. The approach is investigated with simulations in different detector geometries, including limited view setup, and with different detector properties such as ideal point-like detectors, finite size detectors, and detectors with a finite bandwidth. The results show that the Bayesian approach can be used to provide accurate estimates of the initial pressure distribution, as well as information about the uncertainty of the estimates. PMID:27106341

  5. SNR and Contrast Enhancement Techniques for the Photoacoustic Radar Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents two methods for photoacoustic signal enhancement in biological tissues. One such method is based on the fact that temperature can affect the signals of the photoacoustic radar. Therefore, thermally assisted methods have been used for photoacoustic imaging contrast improvement. Another method is based on harmonic wavelength modulation which results in a differential PA radar signal to strengthen early cancer detection. Two chirped waveforms modulated out-of-phase between 680 nm and 800 nm can effectively suppress the background noise, greatly enhance the SNR and detect small variations in hemoglobin oxygenation levels, thereby distinguishing pre-malignant tumors. Experimental results demonstrate the accuracy of the frequency-modulated differential measurement with sheep blood at different hemoglobin oxygenation (S_tO2) levels.

  6. Fiber-laser-based photoacoustic microscopy and melanoma cell detection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Maslov, Konstantin; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Song; Yang, Lihmei; Xia, Younan; Liu, Jian; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-01-01

    For broad applications in biomedical research involving functional dynamics and clinical studies, a photoacoustic microscopy system should be compact, stable, and fast. In this work, we use a fiber laser as the photoacoustic irradiation source to meet these goals. The laser system measures 45×56×13 cm3. The stability of the laser is attributed to the intrinsic optical fiber-based light amplification and output coupling. Its 50-kHz pulse repetition rate enables fast scanning or extensive signal averaging. At the laser wavelength of 1064 nm, the photoacoustic microscope still has enough sensitivity to image small blood vessels while providing high optical absorption contrast between melanin and hemoglobin. Label-free melanoma cells in flowing bovine blood are imaged in vitro, yielding measurements of both cell size and flow speed. PMID:21280901

  7. Photoacoustic Study of Fungal Disease of Acai ( Euterpe oleracea) Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, Denise V.; Nunes, O. A. C.; Oliveira, A. C.

    2009-10-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy is introduced as a promising experimental technique to investigate fungus infected Acai ( Euterpe oleracea) seeds. Photoacoustic spectra of healthy and infected Acai seeds with the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides were recorded firstly in the modulation frequency range of 5Hz to 700 Hz, while keeping the wavelength of excitation radiation of a Xe arc-lamp constant, to ascertain the depth of penetration of infection within the seed and secondly, at variable wavelength (wavelength scanning) in the interval 250nm to 1,000 nm, while keeping the modulation frequency constant. In the former, the photoacoustic signal strength from the infected seed was found higher than that of the healthy one, and has been associated with the appearance of new biomolecules associated with the pathogen infection. In the latter, characteristics peaks and bands were observed in the range from 650 nm to 900 nm ascribed to organic compounds with carboxylates and amines (functional groups) forming the typical metabolic structures of the fungus.

  8. Photoacoustic microscopy of tyrosinase reporter gene in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumholz, Arie; Vanvickle-Chavez, Sarah J.; Yao, Junjie; Fleming, Timothy P.; Gillanders, William E.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-08-01

    Photoacoustic tomography is a hybrid modality based on optical absorption excitation and ultrasonic detection. It is sensitive to melanin, one of the primary absorbers in skin. For cells that do not naturally contain melanin, melanin production can be induced by introducing the gene for tyrosinase, the primary enzyme responsible for expression of melanin in melanogenic cells. Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy was used in the ex vivo study reported here, where the signal from transfected cells increased by more than 10 times over wild-type cells. A subsequent in vivo experiment was conducted to demonstrate the capability of photoacoustic microscopy to spectrally differentiate between tyrosinase-catalyzed melanin and various other absorbers in tissue.

  9. Photoacoustic microscopy of tyrosinase reporter gene in vivo.

    PubMed

    Krumholz, Arie; Vanvickle-Chavez, Sarah J; Yao, Junjie; Fleming, Timothy P; Gillanders, William E; Wang, Lihong V

    2011-08-01

    Photoacoustic tomography is a hybrid modality based on optical absorption excitation and ultrasonic detection. It is sensitive to melanin, one of the primary absorbers in skin. For cells that do not naturally contain melanin, melanin production can be induced by introducing the gene for tyrosinase, the primary enzyme responsible for expression of melanin in melanogenic cells. Optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy was used in the ex vivo study reported here, where the signal from transfected cells increased by more than 10 times over wild-type cells. A subsequent in vivo experiment was conducted to demonstrate the capability of photoacoustic microscopy to spectrally differentiate between tyrosinase-catalyzed melanin and various other absorbers in tissue. PMID:21895303

  10. Fiber-laser-based photoacoustic microscopy and melanoma cell detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Maslov, Konstantin; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Song; Yang, Lihmei; Xia, Younan; Liu, Jian; Wang, Lihong V

    2011-01-01

    For broad applications in biomedical research involving functional dynamics and clinical studies, a photoacoustic microscopy system should be compact, stable, and fast. In this work, we use a fiber laser as the photoacoustic irradiation source to meet these goals. The laser system measures 45×56×13 cm3. The stability of the laser is attributed to the intrinsic optical fiber-based light amplification and output coupling. Its 50-kHz pulse repetition rate enables fast scanning or extensive signal averaging. At the laser wavelength of 1064 nm, the photoacoustic microscope still has enough sensitivity to image small blood vessels while providing high optical absorption contrast between melanin and hemoglobin. Label-free melanoma cells in flowing bovine blood are imaged in vitro, yielding measurements of both cell size and flow speed. PMID:21280901

  11. Nonlinear photoacoustic signal amplification from single targets in absorption background☆

    PubMed Central

    Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Menyaev, Yulian A.; Juratli, Mazen A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) detection of single absorbing targets such as nanoparticles or cells can be limited by absorption background. We show here that this problem can be overcome by using the nonlinear photoacoustics based on the differences in PA signal dependences on the laser energy from targets and background. Among different nonlinear phenomena, we focused on laser generation of nanobubbles as more efficient PA signal amplifiers from strongly absorbing, highly localized targets in the presence of spatially homogenous absorption background generating linear signals only. This approach was demonstrated by using nonlinear PA flow cytometry platform for label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells in blood background in vitro and in vivo. Nonlinearly amplified PA signals from overheated melanin nanoclusters in melanoma cells became detectable above still linear blood background. Nonlinear nanobubble-based photoacoustics provide new opportunities to significantly (5–20-fold) increase PA contrast of single nanoparticles, cells, viruses and bacteria in complex biological environments. PMID:24921062

  12. Nonlinear photoacoustic signal amplification from single targets in absorption background.

    PubMed

    Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Menyaev, Yulian A; Juratli, Mazen A; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) detection of single absorbing targets such as nanoparticles or cells can be limited by absorption background. We show here that this problem can be overcome by using the nonlinear photoacoustics based on the differences in PA signal dependences on the laser energy from targets and background. Among different nonlinear phenomena, we focused on laser generation of nanobubbles as more efficient PA signal amplifiers from strongly absorbing, highly localized targets in the presence of spatially homogenous absorption background generating linear signals only. This approach was demonstrated by using nonlinear PA flow cytometry platform for label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells in blood background in vitro and in vivo. Nonlinearly amplified PA signals from overheated melanin nanoclusters in melanoma cells became detectable above still linear blood background. Nonlinear nanobubble-based photoacoustics provide new opportunities to significantly (5-20-fold) increase PA contrast of single nanoparticles, cells, viruses and bacteria in complex biological environments. PMID:24921062

  13. Intravascular photoacoustic tomography for characterization of atherosclerotic lipid and inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Qin, Huan; Shi, Yujiao; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2014-09-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is a fast growing imaging technology depending on its high optical resolution of optics while taking the advantage of the high penetration depth of ultrasound. In this paper, we demonstrate the new progress in the photoacoustic imaging. Atherosclerosis is characterized by a progressive build-up of lipid in the arterial wall, which is known as plaque. Histological studies demonstrate that the primary cause of acute cardiovascular events is the rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Lipid and inflammation within the plaque are related to influence the propensity of plaques to disrupt. Photoacoustic intravascular tomography (IVPAT) holds a great advantage in providing comprehensive morphological and functional information of plaques. Lipid relative concentration maps of atherosclerotic aorta were obtained and compared with histology. Furthermore, by selectively targeting the intravascular inflammatory cytokines, IVPAT is also capable of mapping the inflamed area and determining the degree of inflammation.

  14. Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic sensing and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaoming; Gao, Fei; Qiu, Yishen; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2016-07-01

    Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic (MSEF-PA) phenomenon is demonstrated in this letter. Under simultaneous illumination of pumping light and stimulated emission light, the fluorescence emission process is speeded up by the stimulated emission effect. This leads to nonlinear enhancement of photoacoustic signal while the quantity of absorbed photons is more than that of fluorescent molecules illuminated by pumping light. The electronic states' specificity of fluorescent molecular can also be labelled by the MSEF-PA signals, which can potentially be used to obtain fluorescence excitation spectrum in deep scattering tissue with nonlinearly enhanced photoacoustic detection. In this preliminary study, the fluorescence excitation spectrum is reconstructed by MSEF-PA signals through sweeping the wavelength of exciting light, which confirms the theoretical derivation well.

  15. Label-free photoacoustic microscopy of peripheral nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Thomas Paul; Zhang, Chi; Yao, Da-Kang; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common neurological problem that affects millions of people worldwide. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition are often hindered by the difficulties in making objective, noninvasive measurements of nerve fibers. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has the ability to obtain high resolution, specific images of peripheral nerves without exogenous contrast. We demonstrated the first proof-of-concept imaging of peripheral nerves using PAM. As validated by both standard histology and photoacoustic spectroscopy, the origin of photoacoustic signals is myelin, the primary source of lipids in the nerves. An extracted sciatic nerve sandwiched between two layers of chicken tissue was imaged by PAM to mimic the in vivo case. Ordered fibrous structures inside the nerve, caused by the bundles of myelin-coated axons, could be observed clearly. With further technical improvements, PAM can potentially be applied to monitor and diagnose peripheral neuropathies.

  16. Simultaneous three-dimensional laser-ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurzinger, Gerhild; Nuster, Robert; Schmitner, Nicole; Gratt, Sibylle; Paltauf, Günther

    2013-06-01

    A purely optical setup for simultaneous photoacoustic (PA) and laser-ultrasound (US) tomography is presented. It is shown that combined imaging can be achieved by using the same laser pulse for photoacoustic generation and for launching a broadband ultrasound pulse from an optically absorbing target. Detection of the laser-generated plane waves that have been scattered at the imaging object and of the photoacoustic signals emitted from the sample is done interferometrically. This way data for PA and US imaging are acquired within one single measurement. Distinction between the signals is possible due to their different times of flight. After data separation, image reconstruction is done using standard back-projection algorithms. The resolution of the setup was estimated and images of a zebra fish are shown, demonstrating the complementary information of the two imaging modalities.

  17. Influence of [ω]-filter on photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yi; Xing, Da; Yang, Diwu

    2006-09-01

    Photoacoustic tomography is a potential and noninvasive medical imaging technology. It combines the advantages of pure optic imaging and pure ultrasound imaging. We have explored photoacoustic imaging with different filters, such as RL, SL, Modi-SL arid Kwoh-Reed, which take important roles on reconstructed images. The results of simulations and experiments show that the filter of Kwoh-Reed can restrain noise effectively and improve the contrast of images compares with the filters of RL, SL, ModiSL in the presence of strong noise. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 532nm was used as light source. The laser had a pulse width of 7ns and a repetition frequency of 30Hz. A needle PVDF hydrophone with diameter of I mm was used to detect photoacoustic signals.

  18. Photoacoustic spectroscopy for trace vapor detection and molecular discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holthoff, Ellen; Bender, John; Pellegrino, Paul; Fisher, Almon; Stoffel, Nancy

    2010-04-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful monitoring technique that is well suited for trace gas detection. This method routinely exhibits detection limits at the parts-per-million (ppm) or parts-per-billion (ppb) level for gaseous samples. PAS also possesses favorable detection characteristics when the system dimensions are scaled to a microsystem design. Current research utilizes quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in combination with micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS)-scale photoacoustic cell designs. This sensing platform has provided favorable detection limits for a standard nerve agent simulant. The objective of the present work is to demonstrate an extremely versatile MEMS-scale photoacoustic sensor system that is able to discriminate between different analytes of interest.

  19. Dual-pulse nonlinear photoacoustic technique: a practical investigation

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Chao; Xie, Zhixing; Fabiilli, Mario L.; Liu, Shengchun; Wang, Cheng; Cheng, Qian; Wang, Xueding

    2015-01-01

    The dual-pulse nonlinear photoacoustic technique is a recently developed technology based on temperature dependence of the Grüneisen parameter and involves consecutive excitations of biological tissue using two laser pulses with a short time delay. Here we review the principle of the technique and give a discussion about its technical aspects, including selection and combination of excitation laser wavelengths, determination of laser fluence, estimation of thermal relaxation function and probability of photoablation or cavitation. Comparisons between the dual-pulse technique and conventional photoacoustics as well as thermal photoacoustics are also presented. These investigations are supported by experimental results and will give a practical reference and guide for further developments of the technique. PMID:26309756

  20. Theoretical Analysis of Pulsed Photoacoustic Effect in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domanowska, Alina; Bukowski, Roman J.

    2009-10-01

    This article presents a one-dimensional theory of a photoacoustic cell, working in the pulse regime. A four-layer system with elements of finite thickness has been assumed to represent consecutive parts of the photoacoustic cell. A parabolic heat equation with an instantaneous, bulk heat source has been solved using the Fourier transform of spatial coordinates. The theory allows one to assume that a heat source is existing in every part of the system and that an arbitrary time profile of the initial pulse is applied. Consequently, the system can be treated as an arbitrary photothermic or photoacoustic one-dimensional system. As a result, one obtains temperature profiles in the entire system at any time instant after its excitation with a light pulse. The gas-pressure evolution is dependent on the thermal and optical properties of the sample, the cell geometry, and duration and shape of the initial pulse.

  1. Exponential filtering of singular values improves photoacoustic image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Manish; Gutta, Sreedevi; Yalavarthy, Phaneendra K

    2016-09-01

    Model-based image reconstruction techniques yield better quantitative accuracy in photoacoustic image reconstruction. In this work, an exponential filtering of singular values was proposed for carrying out the image reconstruction in photoacoustic tomography. The results were compared with widely popular Tikhonov regularization, time reversal, and the state of the art least-squares QR-based reconstruction algorithms for three digital phantom cases with varying signal-to-noise ratios of data. It was shown that exponential filtering provides superior photoacoustic images of better quantitative accuracy. Moreover, the proposed filtering approach was observed to be less biased toward the regularization parameter and did not come with any additional computational burden as it was implemented within the Tikhonov filtering framework. It was also shown that the standard Tikhonov filtering becomes an approximation to the proposed exponential filtering. PMID:27607501

  2. Label-free photoacoustic microscopy of peripheral nerves

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Thomas Paul; Zhang, Chi; Yao, Da-Kang; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Peripheral neuropathy is a common neurological problem that affects millions of people worldwide. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition are often hindered by the difficulties in making objective, noninvasive measurements of nerve fibers. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has the ability to obtain high resolution, specific images of peripheral nerves without exogenous contrast. We demonstrated the first proof-of-concept imaging of peripheral nerves using PAM. As validated by both standard histology and photoacoustic spectroscopy, the origin of photoacoustic signals is myelin, the primary source of lipids in the nerves. An extracted sciatic nerve sandwiched between two layers of chicken tissue was imaged by PAM to mimic the in vivo case. Ordered fibrous structures inside the nerve, caused by the bundles of myelin-coated axons, could be observed clearly. With further technical improvements, PAM can potentially be applied to monitor and diagnose peripheral neuropathies. PMID:24395587

  3. Bessel beam Grueneisen photoacoustic microscopy with extended depth of field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Junhui; Wang, Lidai; Noordam, Cedric; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    The short focal depth of a Gaussian beam limits the volumetric imaging speed of optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM). A Bessel beam, which is diffraction-free, provides a long focal depth, but its side-lobes may deteriorate image quality when the Bessel beam is directly employed to excite photoacoustic signals in ORPAM. Here, we present a nonlinear approach based on the Grueneisen relaxation effect to suppress the side-lobe artifacts in photoacoustic imaging. This method extends the focal depth of OR-PAM and speeds up volumetric imaging. We experimentally demonstrated a 1-mm focal depth with a 7-μm lateral resolution and volumetrically imaged a carbon fiber and red blood cell samples.

  4. Two-dimensional Tomographic Inversion Model of Ross Island, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraj, S.; Aster, R. C.; Knox, H. A.; Zandomeneghi, D.; Snelson, C. M.; Kyle, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    A controlled-source seismic refraction experiment (Tomo-Erebus; TE) was undertaken during the 2008-09 Austral summer field season to examine the magmatic system beneath the active Erebus volcano (TE-3D) and the crustal structure beneath Ross Island, including details of the Terror Rift (TE-2D). Previous geophysical studies north of Ross Island have determined the north-south trending Terror Rift within the broader Victoria Land Basin, which are part of the intraplate West Antarctic Rift System. For TE-2D, 21 seismic recorders (Ref Tek 130) with three-component 4.5 Hz geophones (Sercel L-28-3D) were deployed along a 77-km east-west line between Capes Royds and Crozier. For TE-3D, 79 similar instruments were deployed in a 3 x 3 km grid around the crater of Erebus, an array of 8 permanent short period and broadband sensors and 23 three-component sensors (Guralp CMG-40T, 30s-100 Hz) were positioned around the flanks and summit of Erebus. Fifteen chemical sources ranging from 75 to 600 kg of ANFO were used. An additional shot was detonated in the sea (McMurdo Sound) using 200 kg of dynamite. Although the station spacing is ~5 km, the data have a high signal to noise ratio with clear first arrivals and wide-angle reflections across the array. Forward modelling ray tracing was used to develop 1-D P-wave velocity models by matching layers of known velocities with the P-wave first arrival times. 1-D velocity models developed for 3 sources and show ~3 layers with a velocity of ~7 km/s below 6-8 km depth. The 1-D models were used as the starting model for a the P-wave tomographic velocity model.

  5. Handheld photoacoustic probe to detect both melanoma depth and volume at high speed in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liren; Li, Chiye; Cornelius, Lynn A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    We applied a linear-array-based photoacoustic probe to detect melanin-containing melanoma tumor depth and volume in nude mice in vivo. This system can image melanomas at five frames per second (fps), which is much faster than our previous handheld single transducer system (0.1 fps). We first theoretically show that, in addition to the higher frame rate, almost the entire boundary of the melanoma can be detected by the linear-array-based probe, while only the horizontal boundary could be detected by the previous system. Then we demonstrate the ability of this linear-array-based system in measuring both the depth and volume of melanoma through phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments. The volume detection ability also enables us to accurately calculate the rate of growth of the tumor, which is an important parameter in quantifying the tumor activity. Our results show that this system can be used for clinical melanoma diagnosis and treatment in humans at the bedside. PMID:25676898

  6. Semigroups of tomographic probabilities and quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man'ko, V. I.

    2008-08-01

    Semigroups of stochastic and bistochastic matrices constructed by means of spin tomograms or tomographic probabilities and their relations to the problem of Bell's inequalities and entanglement are reviewed. The probability determining the quantum state of spins and the probability densities determining the quantum states of particles with continuous variables are considered. Entropies for semigroups of stochastic and bisctochastic matrices are studied, in view of both the Shannon information entropy and its generalization like Rényi entropy. Qubit portraits of qudit states are discussed in the connection with the problem of Bell's inequality violation for entangled states.

  7. Jugular foramen: anatomic and computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of the jugular foramen was examined in detail, and anatomic and CT sections were correlated. The pars nervosa and pars vascularis were identified, and, with intravenous contrast enhancement, a rapid sequence of scans at a gantry angle of +30/sup 0/ to the canthomeatal line demonstrated cranial nerves IX, X, and XI. The osseous margins of the jugular foramen were best shown by CT at planes of sections parallel and positive (0/sup 0/-30/sup 0/) to the canthomeatal line. CT can be used to evaluate osseous anatomy and the jugular foramen with precision sufficient to confidently exclude an intracanalicular mass.

  8. Chronic beryllium disease: computed tomographic findings.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nidhi; Patel, Jeet; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H

    2010-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease is a rare multisystem granulomatous disease predominantly involving the lungs and resulting from an immunologic response to long-term occupational exposure. Computed tomography of the chest reveals important lung parenchymal and mediastinal findings and plays an important role in the diagnosis and follow-up assessment of patients with chronic beryllium disease. Its significance lies in the exact localization and evaluation of the extent of lesions. We present an overview of the subject and a pictorial review of the spectrum of computed tomographic features of beryllium disease. PMID:21084914

  9. Health risks from computed tomographic screening.

    PubMed

    Krantz, Seth B; Meyers, Bryan F

    2015-05-01

    Results of the recent National Lung Cancer Screening Trial show a significant survival benefit for annual screening with a low-dose computed tomographic (CT) scan in high-risk individuals. This result has led the US Preventive Services Task Force to recommend annual low-dose CT scans for this at-risk population. Less well characterized are the risks from screening. The primary risks from screening are radiation exposure, false-positive results and unnecessary diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, overdiagnosis and overtreatment, and increased psychological distress. This article reviews these risks, which must be considered and weighed against the benefits when discussing enrollment with patients. PMID:25901559

  10. A computed tomographic study of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Siddharatha; Lal, N; Tewari, S C; Dalal, P K; Kohli, N; Srivastava, S

    1997-04-01

    Fifty schizophrenic patients fulfilling DSM-III-R criteria, and group matched normal healthy controls were selected for the study The case and control groups have been compared in terms of VBR, WSF and WTF. In the study schizophrenics have been divided into positive, negative and mixed subgroups on basis of SAPS and SANS, and these subgroups are compared with each other for VBR, WSF & WTF. Tomographic abnormalities were noted in schizophrenics, particularly with negative and mixed subtypes, when compared to controls. PMID:21584057

  11. Model-based Tomographic Reconstruction Literature Search

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D H; Lehman, S K

    2005-11-30

    In the process of preparing a proposal for internal research funding, a literature search was conducted on the subject of model-based tomographic reconstruction (MBTR). The purpose of the search was to ensure that the proposed research would not replicate any previous work. We found that the overwhelming majority of work on MBTR which used parameterized models of the object was theoretical in nature. Only three researchers had applied the technique to actual data. In this note, we summarize the findings of the literature search.

  12. Sunscreen effects in skin analyzed by photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Anjos, Fernanda H.; Rompe, Paula C. B.; Batista, Roberta R.; Martin, Airton A.; Mansanares, Antonio M.; da Silva, Edson C.; Acosta-Avalos, Daniel; Barja, Paulo R.

    2004-06-01

    In the photoacoustic technique, the signal is proportional to the heat produced in a sample as a consequence of modulated light absorption. This technique allows the spectroscopic characterization of multilayer systems: as the thermal diffusion length varies with the light modulation frequency, one can obtain the depth profile of the sample by analyzing the frequency-dependence of the signal. As the photoacoustic signal depends on thermal and optical properties of the sample, structural changes in the system under analysis account for signal variations in time. In this work, photoacoustic spectroscopy was used to characterize samples of sunscreen and the system formed by sunscreen plus skin. We used photoacoustic spectroscopy to monitor the absorption kinetics of sunscreen applied to samples of human skin, characterizing alterations in the human skin after application of sunscreen. Measurements used 250W Xe arc lamp as light source, for wavelengths between 240nm and 400nm. This range corresponds to most of the UV radiation that reaches Earth. Skin samples were about 0,5cm diameter. The absorption spectra of sunscreen was obtained. Finally, photoacoustics was employed to monitor the absorption kinetics of the sunscreen applied to skin samples. This was done by applying sunscreen in a skin sample and recording the photoacoustic spectra in regular time intervals, up to 90 minutes after application. According to measurements, light absorption by the system sunscreen plus skin stabilizes between 25 and 45 minutes after sunscreen application. Results show that this technique can be utilized to monitor drug delivery and farmacokinetics in skin samples.

  13. Acoustic and photoacoustic scattering from transverse isotropic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Yae-lin; Ho, Yi-Ching; Li, Pai-Chi

    2013-03-01

    This research investigated anisotropic scattering of ultrasonic and photoacoustic waves from tissues consisting of transverse isotropic structures. Anisotropic scattering refers to the systematic variation in acoustic scattered energy. Take tendon as an example, the maximum occurs when the arrangement of the transducer and fiber orientation is perpendicular and minimum occurs when the arrangement is parallel. Experimental results indicate the apparent integrated backscatter (AIB), which is widely adopted to compute the scattered energy, for photoacoustic as well as ultrasonic waves decayed as the arrangement changed from perpendicular to parallel. The AIB decrement using transducers with center frequency of 3.5 MHz, 5 MHz, and 20 MHz were 10.50 dB, 18.01 dB, and 20.98 dB, respectively. Photoacoustic AIB decrement detected by transducers with center frequency of 3.5 MHz, 5 MHz, and 20 MHz were 7.63 dB, 15.54 dB, and 17.76 dB, respectively. It is shown that higher detection frequency resulted in a larger decrement. A hypothesis is proposed to explain why photoacoustic waves are less affected by the fibrous tissue. In ultrasonic scattering, incident direction for each scatterer were similar due to the relatively planar wavefront, hence the signal amplitudes scattered at the transducer direction are also similar. In photoacoustic scattering, the spherical-like wavefront causes different incident directions for different scatterers, therefore the variation of the signal amplitude collected by the transducer increases, resulting in a lower correlation with the microstructure. In addition, the decrement of backscattered energy decreased for a single scatterer when the incident wave was spherical. Experimental and simulation results verified the hypothesis. The discovery implies that photoacoustic imaging has the potential to detect tissues with transverse isotropic structure that may be overlooked by conventional ultrasound imaging.

  14. The measurement of hemoglobin oxygen saturation using multiwavelength photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zilin; Yang, Xiaoquan; Yu, Lejun; Gong, Hui

    2009-10-01

    Hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) is one of the most critical functional parameters to the metabolism. In this paper, we mainly introduced some initial results of measuring blood oxygen using multi-wavelength photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). In phantom study, we demonstrate the photoacoustic signal amplitude increases linearly with the concentration of red or blue ink. Then the calculated concentration of red ink in double-ink mixtures with PAM has a 5% difference with the result measured with spectrophotometric analysis. In ex vivo experiment, the measured result exhibt 15% difference between the PAM and spectrophotometric analysis. Experiment results suggest that PAM could be used to determine the SO2 quantitatively.

  15. The measurement of hemoglobin oxygen saturation using multiwavelength photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zilin; Yang, Xiaoquan; Yu, Lejun; Gong, Hui

    2010-02-01

    Hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) is one of the most critical functional parameters to the metabolism. In this paper, we mainly introduced some initial results of measuring blood oxygen using multi-wavelength photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). In phantom study, we demonstrate the photoacoustic signal amplitude increases linearly with the concentration of red or blue ink. Then the calculated concentration of red ink in double-ink mixtures with PAM has a 5% difference with the result measured with spectrophotometric analysis. In ex vivo experiment, the measured result exhibt 15% difference between the PAM and spectrophotometric analysis. Experiment results suggest that PAM could be used to determine the SO2 quantitatively.

  16. Label-free optical-resolution photoacoustic endomicroscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Rao, Bin; Yao, Junjie; Yeh, Cheng-Hung; Danielli, Amos; Maslov, Konstantin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. K.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Intravital microscopy techniques have become increasingly important in biomedical research because they can provide unique microscopic views of various biological or disease developmental processes in situ. Here we present an optical-resolution photoacoustic endomicroscopy (OR-PAEM) system that visualizes internal organs with a much finer resolution than conventional acoustic-resolution photoacoustic endoscopy systems. By combining gradient index (GRIN) lens-based optical focusing and ultrasonic ring transducer-based acoustic focusing, we achieved a transverse resolution as fine as ~10 μm at an optical working distance of 6.5 mm. The OR-PAEM system's high-resolution intravital imaging capability is demonstrated through animal experiments.

  17. In vivo photoacoustic tomography of myoglobin oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Yao, Junjie; Li, Lei; Wang, Lihong V

    2016-06-01

    Myoglobin is an essential oxygen-binding hemoprotein in skeletal and cardiac muscles that buffers intracellular oxygen (O2) concentration in response to hypoxia or elevated muscle activities. We present a method that uses photoacoustic computed tomography to measure the distribution of myoglobin in tissue and the oxygen saturation of myoglobin (sO2-Mb ). From photoacoustic measurements of mice in different oxygenation states, we performed calibration-free quantification of the sO2-Mb change in the backbone muscle in vivo. PMID:26719943

  18. Photoacoustic monitoring of real time blood and hemolymph sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landa, A.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Gutíerrez-Juárez, G.; Vargas-Luna, M.

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of blood and hemolymph sedimentation is studied in real time using the photoacoustic technique. A modified configuration of a conventional photoacoustic cell is used, where the advantage of this methodology is that the sample is not illuminated directly and that the process can be monitored through the measurement of the thermal contact between a reference material and the blood. It is demonstrated that during the process the thermal effusivity decreases at the region of contact between the sample and the reference materials. The usefulness of these results in real time monitoring using photothermal techniques is discussed.

  19. Cellulose nanoparticles: photoacoustic contrast agents that biodegrade to simple sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Bohndiek, Sarah E.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-03-01

    In photoacoustic imaging, nanoparticle contrast agents offer strong signal intensity and long-term stability, but are limited by poor biodistribution and clearance profiles. Conversely, small molecules offer renal clearance, but relatively low photoacoustic signal. Here we describe a cellulose-based nanoparticle with photoacoustic signal superior to gold nanorods, but that undergoes enzymatic cleavage into constituent glucose molecules for renal clearance. Cellulose nanoparticles (CNPs) were synthesized through acidic cleavage of cellulose linters and purified with centrifugation. TEM indicated that the nanoparticles were 132 +/- 46 nm; the polydispersity index was 0.138. Ex vivo characterization showed a photoacoustic limit of detection of 0.02 mg/mL CNPs, and the photoacoustic signal of CNPs was 1.5- to 3.0-fold higher than gold nanorods (also at 700 nm resonance) on a particle-to-particle basis. Cell toxicity assays suggested that overnight doses below 0.31 mg/mL CNPs produced no significant (p>0.05) impact on cell metabolism. Intravenous doses up to 0.24 mg were tolerated well in nude mice. Subcutaneous and orthotopic tumor xenografts of the OV2008 ovarian cancer cell line were then created in nude mice. Data was collected with a Nexus128 scanner from Endra LifeSciences. Spectral data used a LAZR system from Visualsonics both at 700 nm excitation. We injected CNPs (0.024 mg, 0.048 mg, and 0.80 mg) via tail vein and showed that the tumor photoacoustic signal reached maximum increase between 10 and 20 minutes. All injected concentrations were statistically (p<0.05) elevated relative to the control group with n=3 mice in each group, and dose and signal had a linear relationship at R2>0.96 suggesting quantitative signal. CNP biodegradation was demonstrated ex vivo with a glucose assay. CNPs in the presence of cellulase were reduced to free glucose in under than four hours. The glucose concentration before addition of cellulase was not detectable, but increased to

  20. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of surface defects states of semiconductor samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliński, M.; Zakrzewski, J.; Firszt, F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents both theoretical and experimental issues connected with measurements and numerical analysis of the microphone amplitude and phase photoacoustic spectra of semiconductor samples exhibiting surface absorption connected with defects states located on their surfaces. The analytical model of surface absorption in semiconductors is described and the results of computations are compared with experimental amplitude and phase spectra for Zn{0.965}Be{0.035}Se crystal samples. This paper shows the importance of the phase spectra for the proper interpretation of the PA (photoacoustic) results.

  1. In vivo photoacoustic tomography of myoglobin oxygen saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Yao, Junjie; Li, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-06-01

    Myoglobin is an essential oxygen-binding hemoprotein in skeletal and cardiac muscles that buffers intracellular oxygen (O2) concentration in response to hypoxia or elevated muscle activities. We present a method that uses photoacoustic computed tomography to measure the distribution of myoglobin in tissue and the oxygen saturation of myoglobin (sO2-Mb). From photoacoustic measurements of mice in different oxygenation states, we performed calibration-free quantification of the sO2-Mb change in the backbone muscle in vivo.

  2. Nanoparticle Probes for Structural and Functional Photoacoustic Molecular Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haobin; Yuan, Zhen; Wu, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, nanoparticle probes have received extensive attention largely due to its potential biomedical applications in structural, functional, and molecular imaging. In addition, photoacoustic tomography (PAT), a method based on the photoacoustic effect, is widely recognized as a robust modality to evaluate the structure and function of biological tissues with high optical contrast and high acoustic resolution. The combination of PAT with nanoparticle probes holds promises for detecting and imaging diseased tissues or monitoring their treatments with high sensitivity. This review will introduce the recent advances in the emerging field of nanoparticle probes and their preclinical applications in PAT, as well as relevant perspectives on future development. PMID:26609534

  3. Transcranial Photoacoustic Measurements of Cold-Injured Brains in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yoshinori; Sato, Shunichi; Hasegawa, Makoto; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Shima, Katsuji; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2005-09-01

    We performed transcranial photoacoustic measurements of cold-injured brains in rats. Before inducing injury, a signal peak was observed at two locations corresponding to the surfaces of the skull and brain, while after injury, a third peak appeared at a location corresponding to the back surface of the skull; the third peak was found to be caused by subdural hematoma. The signal peak for the brain surface shifted to a deeper region with elapse of time after injury, indicating deformation of the brain. These findings suggest that small hemorrhage and morphological change of the brain can be transcranially detected by photoacoustic measurement.

  4. Microwave-heating-coupled photoacoustic radar for tissue diagnostic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    An investigation of microwave (MW) heating effects on biotissue for enhancing photoacoustic radar (PAR) signals was conducted. Localized tissue heating generated by MWs was used to improve PAR imaging depth and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Elevated temperatures were measured with thermocouples in ex vivo bovine muscle. The measured temperature rise on the heated spot surface by MWs was in agreement with theoretical predictions. The study showed localized MW heating can increase the photoacoustic imaging depth by 11%, and the SNR by 5% in ex vivo bovine muscle.

  5. DMD-based spatially Fourier-encoded photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Li, Chiye; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We present spatially Fourier-encoded photoacoustic microscopy using a digital micromirror device (DMD). The spatial fluence distribution of laser pulses is Fourier-encoded by the DMD, and a series of such encoded photoacoustic (PA) measurements enables decoding of the spatial distribution of optical absorption. By imaging a chromium target, we demonstrated the throughput and Fellgett advantages, which increased the PA signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared to raster scanning. The system was used to image two biological targets, a monolayer of red blood cells, and melanoma cells. The enhanced SNR benefited PA images by increasing the image's contrast-to-noise ratio and target identifiability.

  6. Photoacoustic recovery after photothermal bleaching in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chiye; Zhang, Chi; Gao, Liang; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. We present an innovative method, photoacoustic recovery after photothermal bleaching (PRAP), for studying particle dynamics at micron scale via photoacoustic imaging. As an intuitive way to visualize and quantify dynamic processes, PRAP is demonstrated first in a simple phantom study and then in a more complex measurement involving live cells. Compared with the conventional fluorescence-based approach, PRAP provides high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) imaging with minimal bleaching-induced artifacts during the recovery stage, ideal for monitoring the diffusive and kinetic processes inside a cell. PMID:24089253

  7. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of tyrosinase expressing tumours in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Jan; Jathoul, Amit; Johnson, Peter; Zhang, Edward; Lythgoe, Mark; Pedley, R. Barbara; Pule, Martin; Beard, Paul

    2012-02-01

    Two human tumour cell lines (K562, 293T) were stably transfected to achieve the genetic expression of tyrosinase, which is involved in the production of the pigment eumelanin. The cells were injected subcutaneously into nude mice to form tumour xenografts, which were imaged over a period of up to 26 days using an all-optical photoacoustic imaging system. 3D photoacoustic images of the tumours and the surrounding vasculature were acquired at excitation wavelengths ranging from 600nm to 770nm. The images showed tumour growth and continued tyrosinase expression over the full 26 day duration of the study. These findings were confirmed by histological analysis of excised tumour samples.

  8. Tomographic PIV Study of Hairpin Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatino, Daniel; Rossmann, Tobias

    2014-11-01

    Tomographic PIV is used in a free surface water channel to quantify the flow behavior of hairpin vortices that are artificially generated in a laminar boundary layer. Direct injection from a 32:1 aspect ratio slot at low blowing ratios (0 . 1 < BR < 0 . 2) is used to generate an isolated hairpin vortex in a thick laminar boundary layer (485 < Reδ* < 600). Due to the large dynamic range of length and velocity scales (the resulting vortices have advection velocities 5X greater than their tangential velocities), a tailored optical arrangement and specialized post processing techniques are required to fully capture the small-scale behavior and long-time development of the flow field. Hairpin generation and evolution are presented using the λ2 criterion derived from the instantaneous, three-dimensional velocity field. The insight provided by the tomographic data is also compared to the conclusions drawn from 2D PIV and passive scalar visualizations. Finally, the three-dimensional behavior of the measured velocity field is correlated with that of a simultaneously imaged, passive scalar dye that marks the boundary of the injected fluid, allowing the examination of the entrainment behavior of the hairpin. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant CBET-1040236.

  9. Computed tomographic features of canine nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Shoko; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Robertson, Ian D; Oshima, Fukiko; Fukazawa, Eri; Nakano, Yuko; Ono, Shin; Thrall, Donald E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe pre- and postcontrast computed tomographic (CT) characteristics of confirmed nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma in a group of dogs. Medical records were searched during the period of July 2003 and October 2011 and dogs with histologically confirmed nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma and pre- and postcontrast CT images were recruited. Two observers recorded a consensus opinion for the following CT characteristics for each dog: largest transverse tumor diameter, number of masses, general tumor shape, character of the tumor margin, precontrast appearance, presence of dystrophic calcification, presence of postcontrast enhancement, pattern of postcontrast enhancement, presence of regional lymphadenopathy, and presence of associated cavitary fluid. A total of 17 dogs met inclusion criteria. Tumors were located in the nasal cavity, muscle, mandible, mesentery, subcutaneous tissue, and retroperitoneal space. Computed tomographic features of nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma were similar to those of other soft tissue sarcomas, with most tumors being heterogeneous in precontrast images, invasive into adjacent tissue, and heterogeneously contrast enhancing. One unexpected finding was the presence of intense foci of contrast enhancement in 13 of the 17 tumors (76%). This appearance, which is not typical of other soft tissue sarcomas, was consistent with contrast medium residing in vascular channels. Findings indicated that there were no unique distinguishing CT characteristics for nonparenchymal hemangiosarcoma in dogs; however, the presence of highly attenuating foci of contrast enhancement may warrant further investigation in prospective diagnostic sensitivity and treatment outcome studies. PMID:24382330

  10. Photoacoustic and ultrasound characterization of bone composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkari, Bahman; Yang, Lifeng; Liu, Lixian; Tan, Joel W. Y.; Mandelis, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    This study examines the sensitivity and specificity of backscattered ultrasound (US) and backscattering photoacoustic (PA) signals for bone composition variation assessment. The conventional approach in the evaluation of bone health relies on measurement of bone mineral density (BMD). Although, a crucial and probably the most important parameter, BMD is not the only factor defining the bone health. New trends in osteoporosis research, also pursue the changes in collagen content and cross-links with bone diseases and aging. Therefore, any non-invasive method that can assess any of these parameters can improve the diagnostic tools and also can help with the biomedical studies on the diseases themselves. Our previous studies show that both US and PA are responsive to changes in the BMD, PA is, in addition, sensitive to changes in the collagen content of the bone. Measurements were performed on bone samples before and after mild demineralization and decollagenization at the exact same points. Results show that combining both modalities can enhance the sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic tool.

  11. Bone Composition Diagnostics: Photoacoustics Versus Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lifeng; Lashkari, Bahman; Mandelis, Andreas; Tan, Joel W. Y.

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound (US) backscatter from bones depends on the mechanical properties and the microstructure of the interrogated bone. On the other hand, photoacoustics (PA) is sensitive to optical properties of tissue and can detect composition variation. Therefore, PA can provide complementary information about bone health and integrity. In this work, a comparative study of US backscattering and PA back-propagating signals from animal trabecular bones was performed. Both methods were applied using a linear frequency modulation chirp and matched filtering. A 2.2 MHz ultrasonic transducer was employed to detect both signals. The use of the frequency domain facilitates spectral analysis. The variation of signals shows that in addition to sensitivity to mineral changes, PA exhibits sensitivity to changes in the organic part of the bone. It is, therefore, concluded that the combination of both modalities can provide complementary detailed information on bone health than either method separately. In addition, comparison of PA and US depthwise images shows the higher penetration of US. Surface scan images exhibit very weak correlation between US and PA which could be caused by the different signal generation origins in mechanical versus optical properties, respectively.

  12. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging.

  13. Intracavity quartz-enhanced photoacoustic sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Borri, S. Galli, I.; Mazzotti, D.; Giusfredi, G.; De Natale, P.; Patimisco, P.; Scamarcio, G.; Spagnolo, V.; Akikusa, N.; Yamanishi, M.

    2014-03-03

    We report on a spectroscopic technique named intracavity quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (I-QEPAS) employed for sensitive trace-gas detection in the mid-infrared spectral region. It is based on a combination of QEPAS with a buildup optical cavity. The sensor includes a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser emitting at 4.33 μm. We achieved a laser optical power buildup factor of ∼500, which corresponds to an intracavity laser power of ∼0.75 W. CO{sub 2} has been selected as the target molecule for the I-QEPAS demonstration. We achieved a detection sensitivity of 300 parts per trillion for 4 s integration time, corresponding to a noise equivalent absorption coefficient of 1.4 × 10{sup −8} cm{sup −1} and a normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 3.2 × 10{sup −10} W cm{sup −1} Hz{sup −1/2}.

  14. Photoacoustics of individual live cells and particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Allen, Susan D.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Galitovskaya, E.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2006-02-01

    The photoacoustic (PA) technique has been employed to a number of new biomedical applications based of highly sensitive detection of laser-induced acoustic waves from individual live cells and single absorbing micro-particles or clusters of nanoparticles. These applications involve both linear and non-linear thermoacoustic phenomena initiated by focused nanosecond single laser pulse and detected with a fast PZT-ceramic acoustic transducer. Particularly, we present the following experimental results: 1) monitoring of linear and non-linear PA responses from red blood cells in suspensions in vitro; 2) detection of PA responses from breast cancer cell targeted with gold nanoparticles; 3) PA study of linear and non-linear interaction of laser with colored polystyrene micro-particles as model single absorbers; 4) monitoring of PA responses from moving absorbers in flow in vitro (PA flow cytometry in vitro); 5) recording of PA responses from blood flow in vivo on rat mesentery as animal model (PA flow cytometery in vivo); and 6) monitoring of sedimentation kinetics of particles and cells. The obtained results demonstrate the high sensitivity, low background, simple detection principle, easy data acquisition, and straightforward interpretation of the PA data.

  15. Photoacoustic study of airborne and model aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alebić-Juretić, A.; Zetzsch, C.; Dóka, O.; Bicanic, D.

    2003-01-01

    Airborne particulates of either natural or anthropogenic origin constitute a significant portion of atmospheric pollution. Environmental xenobiotics, among which are polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pesticides, often adsorb to aerosols and as such are transported through the atmosphere with the physicochemical properties of the aerosols determining the lifetime of these organic compounds. As an example, the resistance of some PAHs against the photolysis is explained by the effect of the aerosol's "inner filter" that reduces the intensity of incident light reaching the mineral particles. On the other hand, some constituents of the aerosols can act as catalytic and/or stoichiometric reagents in atmospheric reactions on the solid surfaces. In the study described here the photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy in the UV-Vis was used to investigate natural and model aerosols. The PA spectra obtained from coal and wood ashes and of Saharan sand, all three representatives of airborne aerosols, provide the evidence for the existence of the "inner filter." Furthermore, valuable information about the different nature of the interaction between the model aerosols and adsorbed organics (e.g., PAH-pyranthrene and silica, alumina, and MgO) has been obtained. Finally, the outcome of the study conducted with powdered mixtures of chalk and black carbon suggests that the PA method is a candidate method for determination of carbon content in stack ashes.

  16. Transcranial photoacoustic tomography of the monkey brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Liming; Huang, Chao; Guo, Zijian; Anastasio, Mark; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    A photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system using a virtual point ultrasonic transducer was developed for transcranial imaging of monkey brains. The virtual point transducer provided a 10 times greater field-of-view (FOV) than finiteaperture unfocused transducers, which enables large primate imaging. The cerebral cortex of a monkey brain was accurately mapped transcranially, through up to two skulls ranging from 4 to 8 mm in thickness. The mass density and speed of sound distributions of the skull were estimated from adjunct X-ray CT image data and utilized with a timereversal algorithm to mitigate artifacts in the reconstructed image due to acoustic aberration. The oxygenation saturation (sO2) in blood phantoms through a monkey skull was also imaged and quantified, with results consistent with measurements by a gas analyzer. The oxygenation saturation (sO2) in blood phantoms through a monkey skull was also imaged and quantified, with results consistent with measurements by a gas analyzer. Our experimental results demonstrate that PAT can overcome the optical and ultrasound attenuation of a relatively thick skull, and the imaging aberration caused by skull can be corrected to a great extent.

  17. A photoacoustic immunoassay for biomarker detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunfei; Cao, Mingfeng; McClelland, John F; Shao, Zengyi; Lu, Meng

    2016-11-15

    Challenges in protein biomarker analysis include insufficient sensitivity for detecting low-abundance biomarkers, poor measurement reproducibility, and the high costs and large footprints of detection systems. To address these issues, a new detection modality was developed for analyzing protein biomarkers based on the plasmon-enhanced photoacoustic (PA) effect. The detection modality employed a heterogeneous immunoassay scheme and used gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as the signal reporter. Due to their localized plasmon resonance, AuNPs can strongly interact with intensity-modulated laser excitation and generate strong PA signals, which are subsequently sensed and quantified using a microphone. As an example, the performance of the PA immunoassay was evaluated by detecting the human interleukin 8 chemokine. The PA immunoassay provided approximately 143× lower limit of detection (LOD) than observed with the gold standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay - a decrease from 23pg/mL to 0.16pg/mL. In addition to the significant performance improvement in terms of the LOD, the PA immunoassay also offers advantages in terms of compatibility with low-cost instruments and the long-term stability of assay results. PMID:27183276

  18. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging. PMID:26757620

  19. Magnetic arrays

    DOEpatents

    Trumper, D.L.; Kim, W.; Williams, M.E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays are disclosed which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness. 12 figs.

  20. Magnetic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Trumper, David L.; Kim, Won-jong; Williams, Mark E.

    1997-05-20

    Electromagnet arrays which can provide selected field patterns in either two or three dimensions, and in particular, which can provide single-sided field patterns in two or three dimensions. These features are achieved by providing arrays which have current densities that vary in the windings both parallel to the array and in the direction of array thickness.

  1. 24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Erik C. Westman

    2002-07-01

    This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multi-channel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the development of simple, robust, MSHA-acceptable clamping unit. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.

  2. 24 CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

    SciTech Connect

    Erik C. Westman

    2003-07-01

    This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multichannel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. No work was completed during this reporting period as project personnel are waiting for the mine to become available for final field testing of the array. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.

  3. Initial studies using the RatCAP conscious animal PET tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woody, C.; Vaska, P.; Schlyer, D.; Pratte, J.-F.; Junnarkar, S.; Park, S.-J.; Stoll, S.; Purschke, M.; Southekal, S.; Kriplani, A.; Krishnamoorthy, S.; Maramraju, S.; Lee, D.; Schiffer, W.; Dewey, S.; Neill, J.; Kandasamy, A.; O'Connor, P.; Radeka, V.; Fontaine, R.; Lecomte, R.

    2007-02-01

    The RatCAP is a small, head-mounted PET tomograph designed to image the brain of a conscious rat without the use of anesthesia. The detector is a complete, high-performance 3D tomograph consisting of a 3.8 cm inside-diameter ring containing 12 block detectors, each of which is comprised of a 4×8 array of 2.2×2.2×5 mm 3 LSO crystals readout with a matching APD array and custom ASIC, and has a 1.8 cm axial field of view. Construction of the first working prototype detector has been completed and its performance characteristics have been measured. The results show an intrinsic spatial resolution of 2.1 mm, a time resolution of ˜14 ns FWHM, and a sensitivity of 0.7% at an energy threshold of 150 keV. First preliminary images have been obtained using 18F-FDG and 11C-methamphetamine, which show comparable image quality to those obtained from a commercial MicroPET R4 scanner. Initial studies have also been carried out to study stress levels in rats wearing the RatCAP.

  4. Tomographic Diffuse Fluorescence Flow Cytometry for Enumeration of Rare Circulating Cells in Vitro and in Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, Eric William

    2011-12-01

    Accurate quantification of circulating cell populations is important in many areas of preclinical and clinical biomedical research including the study of metastasized cancers, T-Lymphotocyes and hematopoietic stem cells. Normally this is done either by extraction and analysis of small blood samples or more recently using microscopy-based in vivo fluorescence flow cytometry. In this thesis, a new technological approach to this problem is described using detection of diffuse fluorescent light from relatively large blood vessels in vivo. The 'tomographic diffuse fluorescence flow cytometer' (TDFFC) uses modulated lasers to illuminate a mouse limb and an array of optical fibers coupled to a high-sensitivity photomultiplier tube array operating in photon counting mode to detect weak fluorescence signals from cells. It is first demonstrated that the TDFFC instrument is capable of detecting fluorescent microspheres and Vybrant-DiD labeled cells with excellent accuracy in an optical flow phantom with similar size, optical properties, linear flow rates and autofluorescence as a mouse limb. Preliminary data demonstrating that the TDFFC is capable of detecting circulating cells in nude mice in vivo is also shown. Finally, a number of methods for performing coarse tomographic localization of fluorescent cells within the cross-section of a mouse limb using TDFFC data sets are described, and the feasibility of this approach is demonstrated using in vitro data sets. In principle, this device would allow interrogation of the whole blood volume of a mouse in minutes, with several orders of magnitude sensitivity improvement compared with current approaches.

  5. Wavelength-Modulated Differential Photoacoustic (WM-DPA) imaging: a high dynamic range modality towards noninvasive diagnosis of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Choi, Sung soo Sean; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    This study explores wavelength-modulated differential photo-acoustic (WM-DPA) imaging for non-invasive early cancer detection via sensitive characterization of functional information such as hemoglobin oxygenation (sO2) levels. Well-known benchmarks of tumor formation such as angiogenesis and hypoxia can be addressed this way. While most conventional photo-acoustic imaging has almost entirely employed high-power pulsed lasers, frequency-domain photo-acoustic radar (FD-PAR) has seen significant development as an alternative technique. It employs a continuous wave laser source intensity-modulated and driven by frequency-swept waveforms. WM-DPA imaging utilizes chirp modulated laser beams at two distinct wavelengths for which absorption differences between oxy- and deoxygenated hemoglobin are minimum (isosbestic point, 805 nm) and maximum (680 nm) to simultaneously generate two signals detected using a standard commercial array transducer as well as a single-element transducer that scans the sample. Signal processing is performed using Lab View and Matlab software developed in-house. Minute changes in total hemoglobin concentration (tHb) and oxygenation levels are detectable using this method since background absorption is suppressed due to the out-of-phase modulation of the laser sources while the difference between the two signals is amplified, thus allowing pre-malignant tumors to become identifiable. By regulating the signal amplitude ratio and phase shift the system can be tuned to applications like cancer screening, sO2 quantification and hypoxia monitoring in stroke patients. Experimental results presented demonstrate WM-DPA imaging of sheep blood phantoms in comparison to single-wavelength FD-PAR imaging. Future work includes the functional PA imaging of small animals in vivo.

  6. Joseph F. Keithley Award For Advances in Measurement Science Lecture: Thermophotonic and Photoacoustic Radar Imaging Methods for Biomedical and Dental Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelis, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    In the first part of this presentation I will introduce thermophotonic radar imaging principles and techniques using chirped or binary-phase-coded modulation, methods which can break through the maximum detection depth/depth resolution limitations of conventional photothermal waves. Using matched-filter principles, a methodology enabling parabolic diffusion-wave energy fields to exhibit energy localization akin to propagating hyperbolic wave-fields has been developed. It allows for deconvolution of individual responses of superposed axially discrete sources, opening a new field: depth-resolved thermal coherence tomography. Several examples from dental enamel caries diagnostic imaging to metal subsurface defect thermographic imaging will be discussed. The second part will introduce the field of photoacoustic radar (or sonar) biomedical imaging. I will report the development of a novel biomedical imaging system that utilizes a continuous-wave laser source with a custom intensity modulation pattern, ultrasonic phased array for signal detection and processing coupled with a beamforming algorithm for reconstruction of photoacoustic correlation images. Utilization of specific chirped modulation waveforms (``waveform engineering'') achieves dramatic signal-to-noise-ratio increase and improved axial resolution over pulsed laser photoacoustics. The talk will conclude with aspects of instrumental sensitivity of the PA Radar to optical contrast using cancerous breast tissue-mimicking phantoms, super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast enhancement agents and in-vivo tissue samples.

  7. Transurethral Photoacoustic Endoscopy for Prostate Cancer: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shanshan; Chen, Jian; Samant, Pratik; Stratton, Kelly; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize the configuration of a photoacoustic endoscope (PAE) for prostate cancer detection and therapy monitoring. The placement of optical fiber bundles and ultrasound detectors was chosen to maximize the photoacoustic imaging penetration depth. We performed both theoretical calculations and simulations of this optimized PAE configuration on a prostate-sized phantom containing tumor and various photosensitizer concentrations. The optimized configuration of PAE with transurethral light delivery simultaneously increases the imaging penetration depth and improves image quality. Thermal safety, investigated via COMSOL Multiphysics, shows that there is only a 4 mK temperature rise in the urethra during photoacoustic imaging, which will cause no thermal damage. One application of this PAE has been demonstrated for quasi-quantifying photosensitizer concentrations during photodynamic therapy. The sensitivity of the photoacoustic detection for TOOKAD was 0.18 ng/mg at a 763 nm laser wavelength. Results of this study will greatly enhance the potential of prostate PAE for in vivo monitoring of drug delivery and guidance of the laser-induced therapy for future clinical use. PMID:26886974

  8. Optical focusing in scattering media with photoacoustic wavefront shaping (PAWS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Puxiang; Tay, Jian Wei; Wang, Lidai; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Controllable light delivery to the region of interest is essential to biomedical optical imaging methods like photoacoustic microscopy. It is, however, challenging beyond superficial depths in biological tissue (~1 mm beneath human skin) due to the strong scattering of light that scrambles the photon propagation paths. Recently, optical wavefront shaping has been proposed to modulate the incident light wavefront to compensate for the scattering-induced phase distortions, and consequentially, convey light optimally to a desired location behind or inside turbid media. To reach an optimum wavefront, a searching algorithm is usually required to optimize a feedback signal. In this work, we present our latest explorations, which use photoacoustic signals as the feedback to remotely and non-invasively guide the wavefront shaping process. Our method does not require direct optical access to the target region or the invasive embedding of fluorescence probes inside turbid media. Experimentally, we have demonstrated that diffuse light can be converged to the ultrasound focus by maximizing the amplitude of photoacoustic emissions from the intended absorbing site. Moreover, we show that wavefront-shaped light focusing can enhance existing optical imaging modalities like photoacoustic microscopy, in regard to signal-to-noise ratio, imaging depth, and potentially, resolution.

  9. Photoacoustic transients generated by laser irradiation of thin films.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lian; Ruddock, Jennifer M; Diebold, Gerald J

    2015-06-01

    Irradiation of an optically thin layer immersed in a transparent fluid with pulsed laser radiation can generate photoacoustic waves through two mechanisms. The first of these is the conventional optical heating of the layer followed by thermal expansion, in which the mechanical motion of the expansion launches a pair of oppositely directed sound waves. A second, recently reported mechanism, is operative when heat is conducted to the transparent medium raising its temperature, while at the same time reducing the temperature in the absorbing body. The latter mechanism has been shown to result in compressive transients at the leading edges of the photoacoustic waveforms. Here the photoacoustic effect produced by irradiating thin metal films which undergo negligible thermal expansion under optical irradiation, but which generate sound solely by the heat transfer mechanism is investigated. Solution to the wave equation for the photoacoustic effect from the heat transfer mechanism is given and compared with the results of experiments using nanosecond laser pulses to irradiate thin metal films. PMID:26236642

  10. Stimuli-responsive photoacoustic nanoswitch for in vivo sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kenneth K; Shakiba, Mojdeh; Huynh, Elizabeth; Weersink, Robert A; Roxin, Áron; Wilson, Brian C; Zheng, Gang

    2014-08-26

    Photoacoustic imaging provides high-resolution images at depths beyond the optical diffusion limit. To broaden its utility, there is need for molecular sensors capable of detecting environmental stimuli through alterations in photoacoustic signal. Photosynthetic organisms have evolved ingenious strategies to optimize light absorption through nanoscale ordered dye aggregation. Here, we use this concept to synthesize a stimuli-responsive nanoswitch with a large optical absorbance and sensing capabilities. Ordered dye aggregation between light-harvesting porphyrins was achieved through intercalation within thermoresponsive nanovesicles. This causes an absorbance red-shift of 74 nm and a 2.7-fold increase in absorptivity of the Qy-band, with concomitant changes in its photoacoustic spectrum. This spectral feature can be reversibly switched by exceeding a temperature threshold. Using this thermochromic property, we noninvasively determined a localized temperature change in vivo, relevant for monitoring thermal therapies of solid tumors. Similar strategies may be applied alongside photoacoustic imaging, to detect other stimuli such as pH and enzymatic activity. PMID:25046406

  11. Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic and Thermoacoustic Imaging: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Huang, Lin; Jiang, Max S.; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) are two emerging biomedical imaging techniques that both utilize ultrasonic signals as an information carrier. Unique advantages of PAI and TAI are their abilities to provide high resolution functional information such as hemoglobin and blood oxygenation and tissue dielectric properties relevant to physiology and pathology. These two methods, however, may have a limited detection depth and lack of endogenous contrast. An exogenous contrast agent is often needed to effectively resolve these problems. Such agents are able to greatly enhance the imaging contrast and potentially break through the imaging depth limit. Furthermore, a receptor-targeted contrast agent could trace the molecular and cellular biological processes in tissues. Thus, photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging can be outstanding tools for early diagnosis, precise lesion localization, and molecular typing of various diseases. The agents also could be used for therapy in conjugation with drugs or in photothermal therapy, where it functions as an enhancer for the integration of diagnosis and therapy. In this article, we present a detailed review about various exogenous contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging. In addition, challenges and future directions of photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging in the field of translational medicine are also discussed. PMID:25530615

  12. Photoacoustic elastic bending in thin film—Substrate system

    SciTech Connect

    Todorović, D. M.; Rabasović, M. D.; Markushev, D. D.

    2013-12-07

    Theoretical model for optically excited two-layer elastic plate, which includes plasmaelastic, thermoelastic, and thermodiffusion mechanisms, is given in order to study the dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) elastic bending signal on the optical, thermal, and elastic properties of thin film—substrate system. Thin film-semiconductor sample (in our case Silicon) is modeled by simultaneous analysis of the plasma, thermal, and elastic wave equations. Multireflection effects in thin film are included in theoretical model and analyzed. Relations for the amplitude and phase of electronic and thermal elastic bending in the optically excited two-layer mechanically-supported circular plate are derived. Theoretical analysis of the thermodiffusion, plasmaelastic, and thermoelastic effects in a sample-gas-microphone photoacoustic detection configuration is given. Two normalization procedures of the photoacoustic elastic bending signal in function of the modulation frequency of the optical excitation are established. Given theoretical model can be used for various photoacoustic detection configurations, for example, in the study of optical, thermal, and elastic properties of the dielectric-semiconductor or metal-semiconductor structure, etc., Theoretical analysis shows that it is possible to develop new noncontact and nondestructive experimental method—PA elastic bending method for thin film study, with possibility to obtain the optical, thermal, and elastic parameters of the film thinner than 1 μm.

  13. Engineering Dark Chromoprotein Reporters for Photoacoustic Microscopy and FRET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Forbrich, Alex; Wu, Jiahui; Shao, Peng; Campbell, Robert E.; Zemp, Roger

    2016-01-01

    A subset of the family of fluorescent proteins are the non-fluorescent chromoproteins which are promising probe molecules for use in photoacoustic imaging and as acceptor chromophores in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors. Typical approaches for fluorescent protein optimization by screening of large libraries of variants cannot be effectively applied to chromoproteins due to their characteristic lack of fluorescence. To address this challenge, we have developed a directed evolution method to iteratively screen large libraries of protein variants on the basis of their photoacoustic signal levels. By applying this procedure to the promising Ultramarine and cjBlue chromoprotein templates, we were able to identify improved variants with a 02–04 fold increase in photoacoustic signal-to-noise ratio after only a few evolutionary steps. These improved variants enable more accurate spectral de-mixing and localization of protein-producing bacteria in vivo and serve as effective FRET acceptors for both fluorescence- and photoacoustic-based detection of protease activity. PMID:26926390

  14. Photoacoustic characterization of the mechanical properties of thin film materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feifei; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar; Fei, Dong; Rebinsky, Douglas A.

    2005-05-01

    Two high frequency photoacoustic techniques were applied to investigate the mechanical properties of two sets of thin film materials in this work. Broadband photoacoustic guided-wave method was used to measure the guided-wave phase velocity dispersion curves of nano-structured diamond-like carbon hard coatings. The experimental velocity spectra were analyzed by a nonlinear optimization approach in conjunction with a multi-layer wave-propagation model. The derived Young"s moduli using the broadband photoacoustic technique were compared with line-focus acoustic microscopy and nano-indentation tests and good quantitative agreement is found. In a second set of experiments, ultra-thin two-layer aluminum and silicon nitride thin film materials were tested using the femtosecond transient pump-probe method using high frequency bulk waves generated by the ultra-fast laser pulses. The measured moduli of silicon nitride thin layers are in the range of 270 - 340 GPa. Photoacoustic methods are shown to be suitable for in-situ and non-destructive evaluation of the mechanical properties of thin films.

  15. REPLY TO COMMENT: Photoacoustic studies on multilayer dielectric coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Annieta; Radhakrishnan, P.; Nampoori, V. P.; Vallabhan, C. P. G.

    1996-05-01

    We provide here point by point reply to the comments made on our earlier paper which describes photoacoustic studies on multilayer dielectric films. We clearly establish that the experimental data published by us are indeed correct and the results of simple computations used as the basis for criticism are not applicable in the case of multilayer dielectric coatings.

  16. Design considerations for ultrasound detectors in photoacoustic breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Piras, Daniele; Singh, Mithun K. A.; van Hespen, Johan C. G.; van Veldhoven, Spiridon; Prins, Christian; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelft; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-03-01

    The ultrasound detector is the heart of a photoacoustic imaging system. In photoacoustic imaging of the breast there is a requirement to detect tumors located a few centimeters deep in tissue, where the light is heavily attenuated. Thus a sensitive ultrasound transducer is of crucial importance. As the frequency content of photoacoustic waves are inversely proportional to the dimensions of the absorbing structures, and in tissue can range from hundreds of kHz to tens of MHz, a broadband ultrasound transducer is required centered on an optimum frequency. A single element piezoelectric transducer structurally consists of the active piezoelectric material, front- and back-matching layers and a backing layer. To have both high sensitivity and broad bandwidth, the materials, their acoustic characteristics and their dimensions should be carefully chosen. In this paper, we present design considerations of an ultrasound transducer for imaging the breast such as the detector sensitivity and frequency response, which guides the selection of active material, matching layers and their geometries. We iterate between simulation of detector performance and experimental characterization of functional models to arrive at an optimized implementation. For computer simulation, we use 1D KLM and 3D finite-element based models. The optimized detector has a large-aperture possessing a center frequency of 1 MHz with fractional bandwidth of more than 80%. The measured minimum detectable pressure is 0.5 Pa, which is two orders of magnitude lower than the detector used in the Twente photoacoustic mammoscope.

  17. Optimising the detection parameters for deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T. J.; Beard, P. C.

    2012-02-01

    For deep tissue photoacoustic imaging, piezoelectric ultrasound detectors with large element sizes (>1mm) and relatively low centre frequencies (<5MHz) are generally used, as they can provide the required high sensitivity to achieve imaging depths of several centimetres. However, these detectors are generally not optimised in terms of element size and bandwidth. To identify these parameters in order to improve SNR and spatial resolution, two models were employed. The first was a numerical model and was used to investigate the effect of varying the detector element size on the amplitude and SNR of photoacoustic images. The second model was used to optimise the detector bandwidth. For this, the frequency content of simulated photoacoustic signals were studied for a range of depths and acoustic source sizes. The model was based on an analytical solution to the wave equation for a cylindrical source and incorporated the effects of frequency dependent acoustic attenuation. These models provide a new framework for optimising the design of photoacoustic scanners for breast and other deep tissue imaging applications.

  18. Simple Model of a Photoacoustic System as a CR Circuit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuhara, Akiko; Kaneko, Fumitoshi; Ogawa, Naohisa

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the photoacoustic educational system (PAES), by which we can identify which gas causes the greenhouse effect in a classroom (Kaneko "et al" 2010 "J. Chem. Educ." 87 202-4). PAES is an experimental system in which a pulse of infrared (IR) is absorbed into gas as internal energy, an oscillation of pressure (sound) appears, and then we…

  19. Photoacoustic monitoring of life cycles of Leishmania Mexicana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arguello, C.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Vargas, H.

    1999-03-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy is used to monitor in situ, the difference between the two forms of the protozoan Leishmania Mexicana. Differences are the result of changes in the respiratory chain and could be attributed, according to our results, to the presence of cytochrome b in promastigotes and cytochrome c in amastigotes.

  20. Engineering Dark Chromoprotein Reporters for Photoacoustic Microscopy and FRET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Forbrich, Alex; Wu, Jiahui; Shao, Peng; Campbell, Robert E; Zemp, Roger

    2016-01-01

    A subset of the family of fluorescent proteins are the non-fluorescent chromoproteins which are promising probe molecules for use in photoacoustic imaging and as acceptor chromophores in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors. Typical approaches for fluorescent protein optimization by screening of large libraries of variants cannot be effectively applied to chromoproteins due to their characteristic lack of fluorescence. To address this challenge, we have developed a directed evolution method to iteratively screen large libraries of protein variants on the basis of their photoacoustic signal levels. By applying this procedure to the promising Ultramarine and cjBlue chromoprotein templates, we were able to identify improved variants with a 02-04 fold increase in photoacoustic signal-to-noise ratio after only a few evolutionary steps. These improved variants enable more accurate spectral de-mixing and localization of protein-producing bacteria in vivo and serve as effective FRET acceptors for both fluorescence- and photoacoustic-based detection of protease activity. PMID:26926390

  1. Attempt for percentile analysis of food colorants with photoacoustic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, T. M.; Vidotti, E. C.; Rollemberg, M. C. E.; Baesso, M. L.; Bento, A. C.

    2005-06-01

    In this work the photoacoustic (PAS) method is applied in polyester-type polyurethane foam (PUF) doped with food colorants. Aiming to resolve binary mixtures of synthetic colorants such as Sunset Yellow, Tartrazine, Brilliant Blue and Amaranth, a single spectroscopic method is described. Based upon individual spectra, a Gaussian deconvolution is used and the fraction of each colorant is found.

  2. Laser photoacoustics for gas analysis and materials testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, Markus W.

    1995-07-01

    The application of laser photoacoustics to two different areas is discussed. First, laser-induced spallation and interferometric detection of transient surface displacements is proposed as a powerful noncontact tool for the investigation of adhesion properties of solid surface coatings. Results for nickel and plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings are presented. Delamination processes at the interface between substrate and coating could be detected with excellent spatial and temporal resolution and adhesion strengths in the 0.2 to 2 GPa range be determined. Second, laser photoacoustic spectroscopy is applied to trace gas monitoring. An automated mobile CO2$ laser photoacoustic system is employed for in situ air monitoring with parts per billion sensitivity in industrial, urban, and rural environments. An improvement in detection selectivity for multicomponent gas mixtures is achieved with a continuously tunable high- pressure CO2 laser with a narrow linewidth of 0.017 cm-1. A CO laser photoacoustic system previously used for the analysis of motor vehicle exhausts is now employed for studying dimerization phenomena in fatty acid vapors. Finally, emphasis is put on the development of widely tunable, narrow-band, mid-IR laser sources based on optical parametric oscillation or difference frequency generation employing tunable diode lasers and AgGaSe2 as nonlinear material.

  3. Engineering Dark Chromoprotein Reporters for Photoacoustic Microscopy and FRET Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Forbrich, Alex; Wu, Jiahui; Shao, Peng; Campbell, Robert E.; Zemp, Roger

    2016-03-01

    A subset of the family of fluorescent proteins are the non-fluorescent chromoproteins which are promising probe molecules for use in photoacoustic imaging and as acceptor chromophores in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors. Typical approaches for fluorescent protein optimization by screening of large libraries of variants cannot be effectively applied to chromoproteins due to their characteristic lack of fluorescence. To address this challenge, we have developed a directed evolution method to iteratively screen large libraries of protein variants on the basis of their photoacoustic signal levels. By applying this procedure to the promising Ultramarine and cjBlue chromoprotein templates, we were able to identify improved variants with a 02-04 fold increase in photoacoustic signal-to-noise ratio after only a few evolutionary steps. These improved variants enable more accurate spectral de-mixing and localization of protein-producing bacteria in vivo and serve as effective FRET acceptors for both fluorescence- and photoacoustic-based detection of protease activity.

  4. Photoacoustic elastic bending in thin film—Substrate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorović, D. M.; Rabasović, M. D.; Markushev, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    Theoretical model for optically excited two-layer elastic plate, which includes plasmaelastic, thermoelastic, and thermodiffusion mechanisms, is given in order to study the dependence of the photoacoustic (PA) elastic bending signal on the optical, thermal, and elastic properties of thin film—substrate system. Thin film-semiconductor sample (in our case Silicon) is modeled by simultaneous analysis of the plasma, thermal, and elastic wave equations. Multireflection effects in thin film are included in theoretical model and analyzed. Relations for the amplitude and phase of electronic and thermal elastic bending in the optically excited two-layer mechanically-supported circular plate are derived. Theoretical analysis of the thermodiffusion, plasmaelastic, and thermoelastic effects in a sample-gas-microphone photoacoustic detection configuration is given. Two normalization procedures of the photoacoustic elastic bending signal in function of the modulation frequency of the optical excitation are established. Given theoretical model can be used for various photoacoustic detection configurations, for example, in the study of optical, thermal, and elastic properties of the dielectric-semiconductor or metal-semiconductor structure, etc., Theoretical analysis shows that it is possible to develop new noncontact and nondestructive experimental method—PA elastic bending method for thin film study, with possibility to obtain the optical, thermal, and elastic parameters of the film thinner than 1 μm.

  5. A new art code for tomographic interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, H.; Modarress, D.

    1987-01-01

    A new algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) code based on the iterative refinement method of least squares solution for tomographic reconstruction is presented. Accuracy and the convergence of the technique is evaluated through the application of numerically generated interferometric data. It was found that, in general, the accuracy of the results was superior to other reported techniques. The iterative method unconditionally converged to a solution for which the residual was minimum. The effects of increased data were studied. The inversion error was found to be a function of the input data error only. The convergence rate, on the other hand, was affected by all three parameters. Finally, the technique was applied to experimental data, and the results are reported.

  6. Precision estimates for tomographic nondestructive assay

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T.H.

    1995-12-31

    One technique being applied to improve the accuracy of assays of waste in large containers is computerized tomography (CT). Research on the application of CT to improve both neutron and gamma-ray assays of waste is being carried out at LANL. For example, tomographic gamma scanning (TGS) is a single-photon emission CT technique that corrects for the attenuation of gamma rays emitted from the sample using attenuation images from transmission CT. By accounting for the distribution of emitting material and correcting for the attenuation of the emitted gamma rays, TGS is able to achieve highly accurate assays of radionuclides in medium-density wastes. It is important to develope methods to estimate the precision of such assays, and this paper explores this problem by examining the precision estimators for TGS.

  7. Tomographic PIV behind a prosthetic heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasler, D.; Landolt, A.; Obrist, D.

    2016-05-01

    The instantaneous three-dimensional velocity field past a bioprosthetic heart valve was measured using tomographic particle image velocimetry. Two digital cameras were used together with a mirror setup to record PIV images from four different angles. Measurements were conducted in a transparent silicone phantom with a simplified geometry of the aortic root. The refraction indices of the silicone phantom and the working fluid were matched to minimize optical distortion from the flow field to the cameras. The silicone phantom of the aorta was integrated in a flow loop driven by a piston pump. Measurements were conducted for steady and pulsatile flow conditions. Results of the instantaneous, ensemble and phase-averaged flow field are presented. The three-dimensional velocity field reveals a flow topology, which can be related to features of the aortic valve prosthesis.

  8. 3-dimensional strain fields from tomographic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldrup, K.; Nielsen, S. F.; Mishnaevsky, L., Jr.; Beckmann, F.; Wert, J. A.

    2006-08-01

    Understanding the distributions of strain within solid bodies undergoing plastic deformations has been of interest for many years in a wide range of disciplines, ranging from basic materials science to biology. However, the desire to investigate these strain fields has been frustrated by the inaccessibility of the interior of most samples to detailed investigation without destroying the sample in the process. To some extent, this has been remedied by the development of advanced surface measurement techniques as well as computer models based on Finite Element methods. Over the last decade, this situation has changed by the introduction of a range of tomographic methods based both on advances in computer technology and in instrumentation, advances which have opened up the interior of optically opaque samples for detailed investigations. We present a general method for assessing the strain in the interior of marker-containing specimens undergoing various types of deformation. The results are compared with Finite Element modelling.

  9. Computed tomographic analysis of meteorite inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. R.; Testa, J. P., Jr.; Friedman, P. J.; Kambic, G. X.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of obtaining nondestructively a cross-sectional display of very dense heterogeneous rocky specimens, whether lunar, terrestrial or meteoritic, by using a fourth generation computed tomographic (CT) scanner, with modifications to the software only, is discussed. A description of the scanner, and of the experimental and analytical procedures is given. Using this technique, the interior of heterogeneous materials such as Allende can be probed nondestructively. The regions of material with high and low atomic numbers are displayed quickly; the object can then be cut to obtain for analysis just the areas of interest. A comparison of this technique with conventional industrial and medical techniques is made in terms of image resolution and density distribution display precision.

  10. Tomographical transformation of Malvern spray measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, H. M.; Sun, T. Y.; Chigier, N.

    1987-01-01

    A new method is described which directly transforms Malvern line-integral data into point measurements of the radial drop mean size distribution and liquid volume concentration distribution. The transformed results have been compared with experimental point measurements by photography and the phase/Doppler spray analyzer. The comparison reveals the relation between point measurements and line-of-sight measurements. Three kinds of nozzles were investigated. After tomographical transformation of the Malvern results the different structures of the spray are revealed. A newly derived formula simplifies the transformation procedure. This method provides a direct means to extend the applicability of the Malvern particle sizer and has the potential to be developed for use in unsymmetric sprays.

  11. Advanced Ultrasonic Tomograph of Children's Bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasaygues, Philippe; Lefebvre, Jean-Pierre; Guillermin, Régine; Kaftandjian, Valérie; Berteau, Jean-Philippe; Pithioux, Martine; Petit, Philippe

    This study deals with the development of an experimental device for performing ultrasonic computed tomography (UCT) on bone in pediatric degrees. The children's bone tomographs obtained in this study, were based on the use of a multiplexed 2-D ring antenna (1 MHz and 3 MHz) designed for performing electronic and mechanical scanning. Although this approach is known to be a potentially valuable means of imaging objects with similar acoustical impedances, problems arise when quantitative images of more highly contrasted media such as bones are required. Various strategies and various mathematical procedures for modeling the wave propagation based on Born approximations have been developed at our laboratory, which are suitable for use with pediatric cases. Inversions of the experimental data obtained are presented.

  12. Fast tomographic methods for the tokamak ISTTOK

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, P. J.; Coelho, R.; Neto, A.; Pereira, T.; Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.; Gori, S.; Toussaint, U. v.

    2008-04-07

    The achievement of long duration, alternating current discharges on the tokamak IST-TOK requires a real-time plasma position control system. The plasma position determination based on magnetic probes system has been found to be inadequate during the current inversion due to the reduced plasma current. A tomography diagnostic has been therefore installed to supply the required feedback to the control system. Several tomographic methods are available for soft X-ray or bolo-metric tomography, among which the Cormack and Neural networks methods stand out due to their inherent speed of up to 1000 reconstructions per second, with currently available technology. This paper discusses the application of these algorithms on fusion devices while comparing performance and reliability of the results. It has been found that although the Cormack based inversion proved to be faster, the neural networks reconstruction has fewer artifacts and is more accurate.

  13. Tomographic phase microscopy and its biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wonshik

    2012-12-01

    Conventional interferometric microscopy techniques such as digital holographic microscopy and quantitative phase microscopy are often classified as 3D imaging techniques because a recorded complex field image can be numerically propagated to a different depth. In a strict sense, however, a single complex field image contains only 2D information on a specimen. The measured 2D image is only a subset of the 3D structure. For the 3D mapping of an object, multiple independent 2D images are to be taken, for example at multiple incident angles or wavelengths, and then combined by the so-called optical diffraction tomography (ODT). In this Letter, tomographic phase microscopy (TPM) is reviewed that experimentally realizes the concept of the ODT for the 3D mapping of biological cells in their native state, and some of its interesting biological and biomedical applications are introduced. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Computed tomographic features of primary brain lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Barsky, M F; Coates, R K; Macdonald, D R

    1989-04-01

    Head computed tomographic (CT) examinations of 14 patients with primary brain lymphoma were reviewed to assess the CT features of the presenting and subsequent lesions. Presenting lesions were single in 62% and multiple in 38%. Lesions tended to be iso- or hyperdense and homogeneously enhancing. They were commonly located in the deep hemispheric regions, corpus callosum, and posterior fossa. Despite these characteristic patterns, the diagnosis of lymphoma was initially considered in just three patients. Follow-up CT showed good initial response to radiotherapy in 10 patients although mortality was high and posttherapy changes were frequent. Consideration of primary brain lymphoma by radiologists is important, as needle biopsy and radiotherapy may be preferred to a surgical resection. PMID:2702505

  15. Neck after vertical hemilaryngectomy: computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    DiSantis, D.J.; Balfe, D.M.; Hayden, R.; Sessions, D.; Sagel, S.S.

    1984-06-01

    Computed tomographic scans in 22 postoperative vertical hemilaryngectomy patients were analyzed retrospectively to determine the normal postoperative appearance and to evaluate the role of CT in assessing recurrent neoplasm. Twelve patients without clinical evidence of recurrence illustrated the normal postoperative changes. In the six patients with recurrent neoplasm, the CT manifestations included increased width of the remaining true vocal cord, convexity of the surgically formed pseudocord at glottic level, subglottic tumor, and extralaryngeal neck masses. Recurrence was mimicked in four patients by bulky soft tissue at the endolaryngeal operative site at both CT and laryngoscopy. CT supplemented the physical examination and indirect laryngoscopy, providing information regarding the presence and extent of tumor that was useful in planning the mode or scope of subsequent therapy.

  16. Computed tomographic recognition of gastric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Balthazar, E.J.; Megibow, A.; Naidich, D.; LeFleur, R.S.

    1984-06-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in 13 consecutive patients with proven gastric varices were analyzed and correlated with the radiographic, angiographic, and gastroscopic evaluations. In 11 patients, CT clearly identified large (five) or smaller (six) varices located mainly along the posteromedial wall of the gastric fundus and proximal body of the stomach. Well defined rounded or tubular densities that enhanced during intravenous administration of contrast material and could not be distinguished from the gastric wall were identified. Dense, enhancing, round or tubular, intraluminal filling defects were seen in the cases where the stomach was distended with water. In seven patients, the CT examination correctly diagnosed the pathogenesis of gastric varices by identifying hepatic cirrhosis, calcific pancreatis, and carcinoma of the pancreas.

  17. Airborne Tomographic Swath Ice Sounding Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Xiaoqing; Rodriquez, Ernesto; Freeman, Anthony; Jezek, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets modulate global sea level by storing water deposited as snow on the surface, and discharging water back into the ocean through melting. Their physical state can be characterized in terms of their mass balance and dynamics. To estimate the current ice mass balance, and to predict future changes in the motion of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, it is necessary to know the ice sheet thickness and the physical conditions of the ice sheet surface and bed. This information is required at fine resolution and over extensive portions of the ice sheets. A tomographic algorithm has been developed to take raw data collected by a multiple-channel synthetic aperture sounding radar system over a polar ice sheet and convert those data into two-dimensional (2D) ice thickness measurements. Prior to this work, conventional processing techniques only provided one-dimensional ice thickness measurements along profiles.

  18. Tomographic imaging in civil engineering infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheshlaghi, Farshad

    This research was to assess the potential of tomographic imaging in a variety of geotechnical processes, with emphasis on matrix-based inversion algorithms. While most prior research in tomography has been based on simulated data, this research centers on case histories gathered under well-controlled, yet realistic field conditions. The goal is to invert a velocity image which reflects the state or evolution of a given soil parameter (e.g., stress, pore pressure, ion concentration) using a set of picked travel times. In general, it is assumed that "picked travel times" correspond to paths of shortest travel path (Fermat's principle). If the velocity contrast in the medium is more than 15 to 20 percent, rays bend toward higher velocity regions. In this case, entries in the coefficient matrix depend on a prior estimate of the velocity field. Therefore, the relation between pixel velocities and travel times is non-linear in general. This non-linear inversion problem can be solved by employing iterative solutions with ray tracing. Ray tracing methods can be categorized as: one-point methods, two-point methods, and whole-field methods. The computational time demand for ray tracing methods for each category is evaluated based on the number of segmental travel time calculations. The computational efficiency of the ray tracing methods is also compared for fundamental cases. Prior experience with simulated data has shown that the quality of inversion is unrealistically good when compared to inversions with real data. In part, this reflects the compatibility of forward simulation algorithms with hypotheses made in the inversion stage. A central goal of this thesis is to assess the potential of inversion with real data. A database of case histories has been compiled for this purpose. Part of this study is dedicated to the testing of pre-processing strategies in each case history. It is shown that data pre-processing can be employed to provide foresight about the medium, and

  19. LOTOS code for local earthquake tomographic inversion: benchmarks for testing tomographic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, I. Yu.

    2009-04-01

    We present the LOTOS-07 code for performing local earthquake tomographic (LET) inversion, which is freely available at www.ivan-art.com/science/LOTOS_07. The initial data for the code are the arrival times from local seismicity and coordinates of the stations. It does not require any information about the sources. The calculations start from absolute location of sources and estimates of an optimal 1D velocity model. Then the sources are relocated simultaneously with the 3D velocity distribution during iterative coupled tomographic inversions. The code allows results to be compared based on node or cell parameterizations. Both Vp-Vs and Vp - Vp/Vs inversion schemes can be performed by the LOTOS code. The working ability of the LOTOS code is illustrated with different real and synthetic datasets. Some of the tests are used to disprove existing stereotypes of LET schemes such as using trade-off curves for evaluation of damping parameters and GAP criterion for selection of events. We also present a series of synthetic datasets with unknown sources and velocity models (www.ivan-art.com/science/benchmark) that can be used as blind benchmarks for testing different tomographic algorithms. We encourage other users of tomography algorithms to join the program on creating benchmarks that can be used to check existing codes. The program codes and testing datasets will be freely distributed during the poster presentation.

  20. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jimmy L.; Bouchard, Richard R.; Karpiouk, Andrei B.; Hazle, John D.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy seed therapy is an increasingly common way to treat prostate cancer through localized radiation. The current standard of care relies on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) for imaging guidance during the seed placement procedure. As visualization of individual metallic seeds tends to be difficult or inaccurate under TRUS guidance, guide needles are generally tracked to infer seed placement. In an effort to improve seed visualization and placement accuracy, the use of photoacoustic (PA) imaging, which is highly sensitive to metallic objects in soft tissue, was investigated for this clinical application. The PA imaging properties of bare (i.e., embedded in pure gelatin) and tissue-embedded (at depths of up to 13 mm) seeds were investigated with a multi-wavelength (750 to 1090 nm) PA imaging technique. Results indicate that, much like ultrasonic (US) imaging, an angular dependence (i.e., seed orientation relative to imaging transducer) of the PA signal exists. Despite this shortcoming, however, PA imaging offers improved contrast, over US imaging, of a seed in prostate tissue if sufficient local fluence is achieved. Additionally, although the PA signal of a bare seed is greatest for lower laser wavelengths (e.g., 750 nm), the scattering that results from tissue tends to favor the use of higher wavelengths (e.g., 1064 nm, which is the primary wavelength of Nd:YAG lasers) when the seed is located in tissue. A combined PA and US imaging approach (i.e., PAUS imaging) shows strong potential to visualize both the seed and the surrounding anatomical environment of the prostate during brachytherapy seed placement procedures. PMID:21833361