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Sample records for arrest defective-1 controls

  1. Immunohistochemical analysis of human arrest-defective-1 expressed in cancers in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yu, Min; Gong, Junli; Ma, Mingxing; Yang, Hui; Lai, Jianhua; Wu, Hong; Li, Lin; Li, Lamei; Tan, Deyong

    2009-04-01

    The arrest-defective-1 (ARD1) gene has been reported to be important in yeast cell cycle regulation, and recent studies have shown that human arrest-defective-1 (hARD1) is related to cancer cell proliferation. To investigate the expression pattern of hARD1 protein in cancer tissues, immunohistochemical analysis was performed to analyze the hARD1 expression pattern in 400 cases of 19 types of common cancer and 133 non-cancer samples from 11 tissue types. hARD1 protein was expressed extensively in cancer tissues including glandular carcinoma and squamous cancer, and the positive rate was 71.5% (15/20) in urinary bladder cancer, 62.5% (30/48) in breast cancer and 57.1% (8/14) in cervical carcinoma. The average hARD1-positive rate was 52.3% in cancers and 31.5% in non-cancers, for which the difference was significant (p<0.005). Comparing the staining intensity of different fields in the same section, the hARD1 protein was highly accumulated in cancer cells when compared to the cells adjacent to cancer. The positive rate of breast and intestinal cancer was obviously higher than corresponding non-cancers (p<0.05 and 0.01). These findings suggest that the accumulation of hARD1 protein may be related to carcinogenesis of various types of cancer. PMID:19287988

  2. To grow or not to grow: nutritional control of development during Caenorhabditis elegans L1 arrest.

    PubMed

    Baugh, L Ryan

    2013-07-01

    It is widely appreciated that larvae of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans arrest development by forming dauer larvae in response to multiple unfavorable environmental conditions. C. elegans larvae can also reversibly arrest development earlier, during the first larval stage (L1), in response to starvation. "L1 arrest" (also known as "L1 diapause") occurs without morphological modification but is accompanied by increased stress resistance. Caloric restriction and periodic fasting can extend adult lifespan, and developmental models are critical to understanding how the animal is buffered from fluctuations in nutrient availability, impacting lifespan. L1 arrest provides an opportunity to study nutritional control of development. Given its relevance to aging, diabetes, obesity and cancer, interest in L1 arrest is increasing, and signaling pathways and gene regulatory mechanisms controlling arrest and recovery have been characterized. Insulin-like signaling is a critical regulator, and it is modified by and acts through microRNAs. DAF-18/PTEN, AMP-activated kinase and fatty acid biosynthesis are also involved. The nervous system, epidermis, and intestine contribute systemically to regulation of arrest, but cell-autonomous signaling likely contributes to regulation in the germline. A relatively small number of genes affecting starvation survival during L1 arrest are known, and many of them also affect adult lifespan, reflecting a common genetic basis ripe for exploration. mRNA expression is well characterized during arrest, recovery, and normal L1 development, providing a metazoan model for nutritional control of gene expression. In particular, post-recruitment regulation of RNA polymerase II is under nutritional control, potentially contributing to a rapid and coordinated response to feeding. The phenomenology of L1 arrest will be reviewed, as well as regulation of developmental arrest and starvation survival by various signaling pathways and gene regulatory

  3. Fus3p and Kss1p control G1 arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through a balance of distinct arrest and proliferative functions that operate in parallel with Far1p.

    PubMed Central

    Cherkasova, V; Lyons, D M; Elion, E A

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mating pheromones activate two MAP kinases (MAPKs), Fus3p and Kss1p, to induce G1 arrest prior to mating. Fus3p is known to promote G1 arrest by activating Far1p, which inhibits three Clnp/Cdc28p kinases. To analyze the contribution of Fus3p and Kss1p to G1 arrest that is independent of Far1p, we constructed far1 CLN strains that undergo G1 arrest from increased activation of the mating MAP kinase pathway. We find that Fus3p and Kss1p both control G1 arrest through multiple functions that operate in parallel with Far1p. Fus3p and Kss1p together promote G1 arrest by repressing transcription of G1/S cyclin genes (CLN1, CLN2, CLB5) by a mechanism that blocks their activation by Cln3p/Cdc28p kinase. In addition, Fus3p and Kss1p counteract G1 arrest through overlapping and distinct functions. Fus3p and Kss1p together increase the expression of CLN3 and PCL2 genes that promote budding, and Kss1p inhibits the MAP kinase cascade. Strikingly, Fus3p promotes proliferation by a novel function that is not linked to reduced Ste12p activity or increased levels of Cln2p/Cdc28p kinase. Genetic analysis suggests that Fus3p promotes proliferation through activation of Mcm1p transcription factor that upregulates numerous genes in G1 phase. Thus, Fus3p and Kss1p control G1 arrest through a balance of arrest functions that inhibit the Cdc28p machinery and proliferative functions that bypass this inhibition. PMID:10049917

  4. 33 CFR 154.822 - Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Detonation arresters, flame... BULK Vapor Control Systems § 154.822 Detonation arresters, flame arresters, and flame screens. (a) Each detonation arrester required by this part must: (1) Be capable of arresting a detonation from either side...

  5. Bcl-xL controls a switch between cell death modes during mitotic arrest

    PubMed Central

    Bah, N; Maillet, L; Ryan, J; Dubreil, S; Gautier, F; Letai, A; Juin, P; Barillé-Nion, S

    2014-01-01

    Antimitotic agents such as microtubule inhibitors (paclitaxel) are widely used in cancer therapy while new agents blocking mitosis onset are currently in development. All these agents impose a prolonged mitotic arrest in cancer cells that relies on sustained activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint and may lead to subsequent cell death by incompletely understood molecular events. We have investigated the role played by anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members in the fate of mitotically arrested mammary tumor cells treated with paclitaxel, or depleted in Cdc20, the activator of the anaphase promoting complex. Under these conditions, a weak and delayed mitotic cell death occurs that is caspase- and Bax/Bak-independent. Moreover, BH3 profiling assays indicate that viable cells during mitotic arrest are primed to die by apoptosis and that Bcl-xL is required to maintain mitochondrial integrity. Consistently, Bcl-xL depletion, or treatment with its inhibitor ABT-737 (but not with the specific Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-199), during mitotic arrest converts cell response to antimitotics to efficient caspase and Bax-dependent apoptosis. Apoptotic priming under conditions of mitotic arrest relies, at least in part, on the phosphorylation on serine 62 of Bcl-xL, which modulates its interaction with Bax and its sensitivity to ABT-737. The phospho-mimetic S62D-Bcl-xL mutant is indeed less efficient than the corresponding phospho-deficient S62A-Bcl-xL mutant in sequestrating Bax and in protecting cancer cells from mitotic cell death or yeast cells from Bax-induced growth inhibition. Our results provide a rationale for combining Bcl-xL targeting to antimitotic agents to improve clinical efficacy of antimitotic strategy in cancer therapy. PMID:24922075

  6. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment for cardiac arrest. It is a medical device that gives an electrical shock to the heart. The shock can get the heart beating normally again. Small, portable defibrillators are often available in public areas for ...

  7. Occurrence and control of sporadic proliferation in growth arrested Swiss 3T3 feeder cells.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Rishi Man; Chaturvedi, Madhusudan; Yerneni, Lakshmana Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Growth arrested Swiss mouse embryonic 3T3 cells are used as feeders to support the growth of epidermal keratinocytes and several other target cells. The 3T3 cells have been extensively subcultured owing to their popularity and wide distribution in the world and, as a consequence selective inclusion of variants is a strong possibility in them. Inadvertently selected variants expressing innate resistance to mitomycin C may continue to proliferate even after treatment with such growth arresting agents. The failure of growth arrest can lead to a serious risk of proliferative feeder contamination in target cell cultures. In this study, we passaged Swiss 3T3 cells (CCL-92, ATCC) by different seeding densities and incubation periods. We tested the resultant cultures for differences in anchorage-independent growth, resumption of proliferation after mitomycin C treatment and occurrence of proliferative feeder contaminants in an epidermal keratinocyte co-culture system. The study revealed subculture dependent differential responses. The cultures of a particular subculture procedure displayed unique cell size distribution and disintegrated completely in 6 weeks following mitomycin C treatment, but their repeated subculture resulted in feeder regrowth as late as 11 weeks after the growth arrest. In contrast, mitomycin C failed to inhibit cell proliferation in cultures of the other subculture schemes and also in a clone that was established from a transformation focus of super-confluent culture. The resultant proliferative feeder cells contaminated the keratinocyte cultures. The anchorage-independent growth appeared in late passages as compared with the expression of mitomycin C resistance in earlier passages. The feeder regrowth was prevented by identifying a safe subculture protocol that discouraged the inclusion of resistant variants. We advocate routine anchorage-independent growth assay and absolute confirmation of feeder disintegration to qualify feeder batches and

  8. Risk of Diabetes Mellitus on Incidence of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Young Sun; Song, Kyoung Jun; Kim, Joo Yeong; Lee, Eui Jung; Lee, Yu Jin; Ahn, Ki Ok; Hong, Ki Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine the risk of diabetes mellitus (DM) on incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and to investigate whether difference in effects of DM between therapeutic methods was observed. Methods This study was a case-control study using the Cardiac Arrest Pursuit Trial with Unique Registration and Epidemiologic Surveillance (CAPTURES) project database and 2013 Korean Community Health Survey (CHS). Cases were defined as EMS-treated adult (18 year old and older) OHCA patients with presumed cardiac etiology collected at 27 emergency departments from January to December 2014. OHCA patients whose arrest occurred at nursing homes or clinics and cases with unknown information on DM were excluded. Four controls were matched to one case with strata including age, gender, and county from the Korean CHS database. Multivariable conditional logistic regression analysis was conducted to estimate the risk of DM and treatment modality on incidence of OHCA. Results Total 1,386 OHCA patients and 5,544 community-based controls were analyzed. A total of 370 (26.7%) among cases and 860 (15.5%) among controls were diagnosed with DM. DM was associated with increasing risk of OHCA (AOR: 1.92 (1.65–2.24)). By DM treatment modality comparing with non-DM group, AOR (95% CI) was the highest in non-pharmacotherapy only group (4.65 (2.00–10.84)), followed by no treatment group (4.17 (2.91–5.96)), insulin group (2.69 (1.82–3.96)), and oral hypoglycemic agent group (1.55 (1.31–1.85)). Conclusion DM increased the risk of OHCA, which was the highest in the non-pharmacotherapy group and decreased in magnitude with pharmacotherapy. PMID:27105059

  9. Molecular analysis of H2O2-induced senescent-like growth arrest in normal human fibroblasts: p53 and Rb control G1 arrest but not cell replication.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Q M; Bartholomew, J C; Campisi, J; Acosta, M; Reagan, J D; Ames, B N

    1998-01-01

    Human diploid fibroblasts lose the capacity to proliferate and enter a state termed replicative senescence after a finite number of cell divisions in culture.When treated with sub-lethal concentrations of H2O2, pre-senescent human fibroblasts enter long-term growth arrest resembling replicative senescence. To understand the molecular basis for the H2O2-induced growth arrest, we determined the cell cycle distribution, levels of p53 tumour suppressor and p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor proteins, and the status of Rb phosphorylation in H2O2-treated cells. A 2-h pulse of H2O2 arrested the growth of IMR-90 fetal lung fibroblasts for at least 15 days. The arrested cells showed a G1 DNA content. The level of p53 protein increased 2- to 3-fold within 1.5 h after H2O2 exposure but returned to the control level by 48 h. The induction of p53 protein was dose dependent, beginning at 50-75 microM and reaching a maximum at 100-250 microM. The induction of p53 did not appear to correlate with the level of DNA damage as measured by the formation of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine in DNA. The level of p21 protein increased about 18 h after H2O2 exposure and remained elevated for at least 21 days. During this period, Rb remained underphosphorylated. The induction of p53 by H2O2 was abolished by the iron chelator deferoxamine and the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. The human papillomavirus protein E6, when introduced into the cells, abolished the induction of p53, reduced the induction of p21 to a minimal level and allowed Rb phosphorylation and entry of the cells into S-phase. The human papillomavirus protein E7 reduced the overall level of Rb and also abolished H2O2-induced G1 arrest. Inactivating G1 arrest by E6, E7 or both did not restore the replicative ability of H2O2-treated cells. Thus H2O2-treated cells show a transient elevation of p53, high level of p21, lack of Rb phosphorylation, G1 arrest and inability to replicate when G1 arrest is inactivated. PMID:9576849

  10. Sensory Cortical Control of a Visually Induced Arrest Behavior via Corticotectal Projections

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Feixue; Xiong, Xiaorui R.; Zingg, Brian; Ji, Xu-ying; Zhang, Li I.; Tao, Huizhong W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Innate defense behaviors (IDBs) evoked by threatening sensory stimuli are essential for animal survival. Although subcortical circuits are implicated in IDBs, it remains largely unclear whether sensory cortex modulates IDBs and what are the underlying neural pathways. Here, we show that optogenetic silencing of corticotectal projections from layer 5 (L5) of the mouse primary visual cortex (V1) to the superior colliculus (SC) significantly reduces a SC-dependent innate behavior, i.e. temporary suspension of locomotion upon a sudden flash of light as short as milliseconds. Surprisingly, optogenetic activation of SC-projecting neurons in V1 or their axon terminals in SC sufficiently elicits the behavior, in contrast to other major L5 corticofugal projections. Thus, via the same corticofugal projection, visual cortex not only modulates the light-induced arrest behavior, but also can directly drive the behavior. Our results suggest that sensory cortex may play a previously unrecognized role in the top-down initiation of sensory-motor behaviors. PMID:25913860

  11. Identification and transcription control of fission yeast genes repressed by an ammonium starvation growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, C; Perret, E; Dumont, X; Picard, A; Caput, D; Lenaers, G

    2000-01-15

    In fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, ammonium starvation induces a growth arrest, a cell cycle exit in G(1) and a further switch to meiosis. This process is regulated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase and the Wis1-dependent MAP kinase cascade, and downstream transcription factors. In order to understand how cells adapt their genetic programme to the switch from mitotic cycling to starvation, a differential transcript analysis comparing mRNA from exponentially growing and ammonium-starved cells was performed. Genes repressed by this stimulus mainly concern cell growth, i.e. protein synthesis and global metabolism. Comparison of the expression of two of them, the ribosomal proteins Rps6 and TCTP, in many different growing conditions, evidenced a strong correlation, suggesting that their transcriptions are coordinately regulated. Nevertheless, by repeating the ammonium starvation on strains constitutively activated for the PKA pathway (Deltacgs1), or unable to activate the Wis1-dependent MAP kinase pathway (Deltawis1), or with both characteristics (Deltacgs1+Deltawis1), the transcriptional inhibition was found to be governed either by the PKA pathway, or by the Wis1 pathway, or by both. These results suggest that during the switch from exponential growth to ammonium starvation, cell homeostasis is maintained by downregulating the transcription of the most expressed genes by a PKA and a Wis1-dependent process. Accession Nos for the S30 and L14 ribosomal protein cDNA sequences are AJ2731 and AJ2732, respectively. PMID:10620772

  12. Faulting arrested by control of ground-water withdrawal in Houston, Texas.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, T.; Gabrysch, R.K.; Verbeek, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    More than 86 historically active faults with an aggregate length of 150 miles have been identified within and adjacent to the Houston, Texas, metropolitan area. Although scarps of these faults grow gradually and without causing damaging earthquakes, historical fault offset has cost millions of dollars in damage to houses and other buildings, utilities, and highways that were built on or across the faults. The historical fault activity results from renewed movement along preexisting faults and appears to be caused principally by withdrawal of ground water for municipal, industrial, and agricultural uses in the Houston area. Approximately one-half of the area's water supply is obtained from local ground water. Monitoring by the US Geological Survey of heights of fault scarps indicates that many of the scarps have recently stopped increasing in height. The area where faulting has ceased coincides with the area where ground-water pumping was cut back in the mid-1970s to slow the damage caused by land subsidence along Galveston Bay and the Houston Ship Channel. Thus, it appears that efforts to halt land subsidence in the coastal area have provided the additional benefit of arresting damaging surface faulting. -from Authors

  13. Mechanical versus manual chest compressions for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lu; Gu, Wan-Jie; Wang, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence regarding mechanical chest compressions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is conflicting. The objective of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to compare the effect of mechanical versus manual chest compressions on resuscitation outcomes in OHCA. PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the ClinicalTrials.gov registry were searched. In total, five RCTs with 12,510 participants were included. Compared with manual chest compressions, mechanical chest compressions did not significantly improve survival with good neurological outcome to hospital discharge (relative risks (RR) 0.80, 95% CI 0.61-1.04, P = 0.10; I(2) = 65%), return of spontaneous circulation (RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.95-1.09, P = 0.59; I(2) = 0%), or long-term (≥6 months) survival (RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.79-1.16, P = 0.65; I(2) = 16%). In addition, mechanical chest compressions were associated with worse survival to hospital admission (RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.89-1.00, P = 0.04; I(2) = 0%) and to hospital discharge (RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.78-0.99, P = 0.03; I(2) = 0%). Based on the current evidence, widespread use of mechanical devices for chest compressions in OHCA cannot be recommended. PMID:26503429

  14. Intra-arrest hypothermia during cardiac arrest: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Therapeutic hypothermia is largely used to protect the brain following return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest (CA), but it is unclear whether we should start therapeutic hypothermia earlier, that is, before ROSC. Methods We performed a systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and Ovid/Medline databases using "arrest" OR "cardiac arrest" OR "heart arrest" AND "hypothermia" OR "therapeutic hypothermia" OR "cooling" as keywords. Only studies using intra-arrest therapeutic hypothermia (IATH) were selected for this review. Three authors independently assessed the validity of included studies and extracted data regarding characteristics of the studied cohort (animal or human) and the main outcomes related to the use of IATH: Mortality, neurological status and cardiac function (particularly, rate of ROSC). Results A total of 23 animal studies (level of evidence (LOE) 5) and five human studies, including one randomized controlled trial (LOE 1), one retrospective and one prospective controlled study (LOE 3), and two prospective studies without a control group (LOE 4), were identified. IATH improved survival and neurological outcomes when compared to normothermia and/or hypothermia after ROSC. IATH was also associated with improved ROSC rates and with improved cardiac function, including better left ventricular function, and reduced myocardial infarct size, when compared to normothermia. Conclusions IATH improves survival and neurological outcome when compared to normothermia and/or conventional hypothermia in experimental models of CA. Clinical data on the efficacy of IATH remain limited. PMID:22397519

  15. To blow or not to blow: a randomised controlled trial of compression-only and standard telephone CPR instructions in simulated cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Woollard, Malcolm; Smith, Anna; Whitfield, Richard; Chamberlain, Douglas; West, Robert; Newcombe, Robert; Clawson, Jeff

    2003-10-01

    This randomised controlled trial used a manikin model of cardiac arrest to compare skill performance in untrained lay persons randomised to receive either compression-only telephone CPR (Compression-only tel., n=29) or standard telephone CPR instructions (Standard tel., n=30). Performance was evaluated during standardised 10 min cardiac arrest simulations using a video recording and data from a laptop computer connected to the training manikin. A number of subjects in both groups did not open the airway. More than 75% in the Standard tel. group failed to deliver two effective initial rescue breaths, and only 17% provided an adequate inflation volume for subsequent breaths, delivering a median of only five inflations during the entire scenario. Most subjects in both groups gave chest compressions that were too shallow and at an inappropriately rapid rate. Hand position was also poor, but was worse in the group given simplified instructions. There was a significant delay to first compression in both groups, although this interval was shortened by over a minute when ventilations were eliminated from the telephone instruction algorithm (245 vs. 184 s, P<0.001). Over two-and-a-half times as many chest compressions were delivered during an average ambulance response time with compression-only telephone directions compared with standard CPR (461 vs. 186, P<0.001). These variables may be critical in predicting survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Further research is necessary to establish if modifications to scripted telephone instructions can remedy the identified performance deficiencies. Eliminating instructions for rescue breaths from scripted telephone directions will have little impact on the ventilation of most patients. Research is required to determine if the consequent reduction in the delay to starting chest compressions and the significant increase in the number of compressions delivered can increase survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. PMID

  16. Zerumbone, a Sesquiterpene, Controls Proliferation and Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Laryngeal Carcinoma Cell Line Hep-2.

    PubMed

    Jegannathan, Srimathi Devi; Arul, Santhosh; Dayalan, Haripriya

    2016-07-01

    Zerumbone (ZER), a sesquiterpene found in Zingiber zerumbet Smith, has been shown to possess antiproliferative, anticancer, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activity against various types of human carcinoma. The molecular mechanism by which ZER mediates its activity against many cancer types is revealed by many studies. Upregulation of proapoptotic molecules and suppression of antiapoptotic gene expression are few of the mechanisms by which ZER mediates its effect. The present study is focused on investigating the effect of ZER on proliferation of laryngeal carcinoma cells (Hep-2). MTT assay results showed that ZER (0.01-100 μM) induced death of Hep-2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner; significant suppression of proliferation of Hep-2 cells was seen with a IC50 value of 15 µM. ZER at a concentration of 15 and 30 μM for 48 h showed early signs of apoptosis as evidenced by confocal microscopy imaging. Flow cytometry studies showed that ZER induced cell cycle arrest. ZER arrested Hep-2 proliferation at S and G2/M phases of cell cycle. In conclusion, these results indicate that ZER has antiproliferative effect and arrests cell cycle in Hep-2 cells in vitro. This could be a potential anticancer drug against laryngeal carcinoma. PMID:27045964

  17. Effects of humeral intraosseous versus intravenous epinephrine on pharmacokinetics and return of spontaneous circulation in a porcine cardiac arrest model: A randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Don; Garcia-Blanco, Jose; Burgert, James; Fulton, Lawrence; Kadilak, Patrick; Perry, Katherine; Burke, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), defibrillation, and epinephrine administration are pillars of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). Intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative route for epinephrine administration when intravenous (IV) access is unobtainable. Previous studies indicate the pharmacokinetics of epinephrine administration via IO and IV routes differ, but it is not known if the difference influences return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The purpose of this prospective, experimental study was to determine the effects of humeral IO (HIO) and IV epinephrine administration during cardiac arrest on pharmacokinetics, ROSC, and odds of survival. Swine (N = 21) were randomized into 3 groups: humeral IO (HIO), peripheral IV (IV) and CPR/defibrillation control. Cardiac arrest was induced under general anesthesia. The swine remained in arrest for 2 min without intervention. Chest compressions were initiated and continued for 2 min. Epinephrine was administered and serial blood samples collected for pharmacokinetic analysis over 4 min. Defibrillation and epinephrine administration proceeded according to ACLS guidelines continuing for 20 min or until ROSC. Seven HIO swine, 4 IV swine, and no control swine had ROSC. There were no significant differences in ROSC, maximum concentration; except at 30 s, and time-to-concentration-maximum between the HIO and IV groups. Significant differences existed between the experimental groups and the control. The HIO delivers a higher concentration of epinephrine than the IV route at 30 s which may be a survival advantage. Clinicians may consider using the IO route to administer epinephrine during CA when there is no preexisting IV access or when IV access is unobtainable. PMID:26468375

  18. Effects of humeral intraosseous versus intravenous epinephrine on pharmacokinetics and return of spontaneous circulation in a porcine cardiac arrest model: A randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Don; Garcia-Blanco, Jose; Burgert, James; Fulton, Lawrence; Kadilak, Patrick; Perry, Katherine; Burke, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), defibrillation, and epinephrine administration are pillars of advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). Intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative route for epinephrine administration when intravenous (IV) access is unobtainable. Previous studies indicate the pharmacokinetics of epinephrine administration via IO and IV routes differ, but it is not known if the difference influences return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The purpose of this prospective, experimental study was to determine the effects of humeral IO (HIO) and IV epinephrine administration during cardiac arrest on pharmacokinetics, ROSC, and odds of survival. Swine (N = 21) were randomized into 3 groups: humeral IO (HIO), peripheral IV (IV) and CPR/defibrillation control. Cardiac arrest was induced under general anesthesia. The swine remained in arrest for 2 min without intervention. Chest compressions were initiated and continued for 2 min. Epinephrine was administered and serial blood samples collected for pharmacokinetic analysis over 4 min. Defibrillation and epinephrine administration proceeded according to ACLS guidelines continuing for 20 min or until ROSC. Seven HIO swine, 4 IV swine, and no control swine had ROSC. There were no significant differences in ROSC, maximum concentration; except at 30 s, and time-to-concentration-maximum between the HIO and IV groups. Significant differences existed between the experimental groups and the control. The HIO delivers a higher concentration of epinephrine than the IV route at 30 s which may be a survival advantage. Clinicians may consider using the IO route to administer epinephrine during CA when there is no preexisting IV access or when IV access is unobtainable. PMID:26468375

  19. Deterrence and arrest ratios.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Stephanie E; Piquero, Alex R

    2006-02-01

    In the limited research on the origins of sanction threat perceptions, researchers have focused on either the effects of actively engaging in crime or the effects of formal sanctioning but rarely on both (i.e., the arrest ratio or the number of arrests relative to the number of crimes committed). This article extends this line of research by using a sample of Colorado inmates and measures arrest ratios and sanction perceptions for eight different crime types. Analyses reveal that the offenders report both significant experiential and arrest ratio effects. Theoretical and policy implications, limitations, and directions for future research are outlined. PMID:16397123

  20. Alcohol, drug and other prior crimes and risk of arrest in handgun purchasers: protocol for a controlled observational study

    PubMed Central

    Wintemute, Garen J; Kass, Philip H; Stewart, Susan L; Cerdá, Magdalena; Gruenewald, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Alcohol abuse is common in the USA and is a well-established risk factor for violence. Other drug use and criminal activity are risk factors as well and frequently occur together with alcohol abuse. Firearm ownership is also common; there are >50 million firearm owners in the USA. This study assesses the relationships between alcohol and drug abuse and future violence among firearm owners, which no prior research has done. Design and study population This records-based retrospective cohort study will involve all persons who legally purchased handguns in California in 2001—approximately 116 000 individuals—with follow-up through the end of 2013. Methods The principal exposures include prior convictions for alcohol-related and drug-related offenses. The primary outcome measure is an arrest following handgun purchase for a violent Crime Index offense: homicide, rape, robbery or aggravated assault. Subjects will be considered at risk for outcome events for only as long as their residence in California can be established independently of outcome events. Covariates include individual characteristics (eg, age, sex, criminal history, firearm purchase history) and community characteristics (eg, demographics, socioeconomic measures, firearm ownership and alcohol outlet density). We will employ survival analytic methods, expressing effects as HRs. Discussion The results of this large-scale study are likely to be generalisable and to have important implications for violence prevention policies and programmes. PMID:26498316

  1. Cardiac arrest in children.

    PubMed

    Tress, Erika E; Kochanek, Patrick M; Saladino, Richard A; Manole, Mioara D

    2010-07-01

    Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners. PMID:20930971

  2. Situational ambiguity and gendered patterns of arrest for intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Durfee, Alesha

    2012-01-01

    Using data from the 2005 National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS), this analysis focuses on the impacts that domestic violence mandatory arrest policies have on arrest outcomes in "situationally ambiguous" cases: cases where both the female and male partners have been identified by police as both a victim and an offender. Results indicate that although officers arrest male partners more frequently than female partners, after controlling for incident and individual factors, mandatory arrest policies disproportionately affect women. Furthermore, correlates of arrest differ for male-only arrests versus female-only arrests. These findings are discussed in the context of changing legal responses to domestic violence. PMID:22411299

  3. Permanent embryo arrest: molecular and cellular concepts.

    PubMed

    Betts, D H; Madan, P

    2008-08-01

    Developmental arrest is one of the mechanisms responsible for the elevated levels of embryo demise during the first week of in vitro development. Approximately 10-15% of IVF embryos permanently arrest in mitosis at the 2- to 4-cell cleavage stage showing no indication of apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in this process and must be controlled in order to optimize embryo production. A stress sensor that can provide a key understanding of permanent cell cycle arrest and link ROS with cellular signaling pathway(s) is p66Shc, an adaptor protein for apoptotic-response to oxidative stress. Deletion of the p66Shc gene in mice results in extended lifespan, which is linked to their enhanced resistance to oxidative stress and reduced levels of apoptosis. p66Shc has been shown to generate mitochondrial H(2)O(2) to trigger apoptosis, but may also serve as an integration point for many signaling pathways that affect mitochondrial function. We have detected elevated levels of p66Shc and ROS within arrested embryos and believe that p66Shc plays a central role in regulating permanent embryo arrest. In this paper, we review the cellular and molecular aspects of permanent embryo arrest and speculate on the mechanism(s) and etiology of this method of embryo demise. PMID:18511487

  4. Mild therapeutic hypothermia in patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Villablanca, Pedro A.; Makkiya, Mohammed; Einsenberg, Evann; Briceno, David F.; Panagiota, Christia; Menegus, Mark; Garcia, Mario; Sims, Daniel; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Guidelines recommend mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) for survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, there is little literature demonstrating a survival benefit. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of MTH in patients successfully resuscitated from OHCA. Materials and Methods: Electronic databases were searched for RCT involving MTH in survivors of OHCA, and the results were put through a meta-analysis. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality, and the secondary endpoint was favorable neurological function. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using the Mantel–Haenszel method. A fixed-effect model was used and, if heterogeneity (I2) was >40, effects were analyzed using a random model. Results: Six RCT (n = 1400 patients) were included. Overall survival was 50.7%, and favorable neurological recovery was 45.5%. Pooled data demonstrated no significant all-cause mortality (OR, 0.81; 95% CI 0.55–1.21) or neurological recovery (OR, 0.77; 95% CI 0.47–1.24). No evidence of publication bias was observed. Conclusion: This meta-analysis demonstrated that MTH did not confer benefit on overall survival rate and neurological recovery in patients resuscitated from OHCA. PMID:26750667

  5. 41. #1 ARRESTING GEAR ENGINE AFT LOOKING FORWARD PORT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. #1 ARRESTING GEAR ENGINE - AFT LOOKING FORWARD PORT TO STARBOARD SHOWING ARRESTING GEAR ENGINE ACCUMULATOR, AIR FLASK, CONTROL VALVE, WITH CONTROL RAM, SHEAVES AND WIRES UNDERNEATH ENGINE STAND. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  6. Adjunctive rifampicin to reduce early mortality from Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (ARREST): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia is a common and serious infection, with an associated mortality of ~25%. Once in the blood, S. aureus can disseminate to infect almost any organ, but bones, joints and heart valves are most frequently affected. Despite the infection’s severity, the evidence guiding optimal antibiotic therapy is weak: fewer than 1,500 patients have been included in 16 randomised controlled trials investigating S. aureus bacteraemia treatment. It is uncertain which antibiotics are most effective, their route of administration and duration, and whether antibiotic combinations are better than single agents. We hypothesise that adjunctive rifampicin, given in combination with a standard first-line antibiotic, will enhance killing of S. aureus early in the treatment course, sterilise infected foci and blood faster, and thereby reduce the risk of dissemination, metastatic infection and death. Our aim is to determine whether adjunctive rifampicin reduces all-cause mortality within 14 days and bacteriological failure or death within 12 weeks from randomisation. Methods We will perform a parallel group, randomised (1:1), blinded, placebo-controlled trial in NHS hospitals across the UK. Adults (≥18 years) with S. aureus (meticillin-susceptible or resistant) grown from at least one blood culture who have received ≤96 h of active antibiotic therapy for the current infection and do not have contraindications to the use of rifampicin will be eligible for inclusion. Participants will be randomised to adjunctive rifampicin (600-900mg/day; orally or intravenously) or placebo for the first 14 days of therapy in combination with standard single-agent antibiotic therapy. The co-primary outcome measures will be all-cause mortality up to 14 days from randomisation and bacteriological failure/death (all-cause) up to 12 weeks from randomisation. 940 patients will be recruited, providing >80% power to detect 45% and 30% reductions in the two co

  7. Cardiac arrest and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Tabitha A; Sanson, Tracy G

    2009-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary arrest in pregnancy is rare occurring in 1 in 30,000 pregnancies. When it does occur, it is important for a clinician to be familiar with the features peculiar to the pregnant state. Knowledge of the anatomic and physiologic changes of pregnancy is helpful in the treatment and diagnosis. Although the main focus should be on the mother, it should not be forgotten that there is another potential life at stake. Resuscitation of the mother is performed in the same manner as in any other patient, except for a few minor adjustments because of the changes of pregnancy. The specialties of obstetrics and neonatology should be involved early in the process to ensure appropriate treatment of both mother and the newborn. This article will explore the changes that occur in pregnancy and their impact on treatment. The common causes of maternal cardiac arrest will be discussed briefly. PMID:19561954

  8. Arrested demixing opens route to bigels

    PubMed Central

    Varrato, Francesco; Di Michele, Lorenzo; Belushkin, Maxim; Dorsaz, Nicolas; Nathan, Simon H.; Eiser, Erika; Foffi, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and, ultimately, controlling the properties of amorphous materials is one of the key goals of material science. Among the different amorphous structures, a very important role is played by colloidal gels. It has been only recently understood that colloidal gels are the result of the interplay between phase separation and arrest. When short-ranged attractive colloids are quenched into the phase-separating region, density fluctuations are arrested and this results in ramified amorphous space-spanning structures that are capable of sustaining mechanical stress. We present a mechanism of aggregation through arrested demixing in binary colloidal mixtures, which leads to the formation of a yet unexplored class of materials––bigels. This material is obtained by tuning interspecies interactions. Using a computer model, we investigate the phase behavior and the structural properties of these bigels. We show the topological similarities and the geometrical differences between these binary, interpenetrating, arrested structures and their well-known monodisperse counterparts, colloidal gels. Our findings are supported by confocal microscopy experiments performed on mixtures of DNA-coated colloids. The mechanism of bigel formation is a generalization of arrested phase separation and is therefore universal. PMID:23129616

  9. Effects of dichloroacetate following canine asphyxial arrest.

    PubMed

    Gin-Shaw, S L; Barsan, W G; Eymer, V; Hedges, J

    1988-05-01

    Sodium dichloroacetate (DCA) has been shown to lower elevated serum lactate levels produced by hypoxia, exercise, and phenformin. We conducted a study to investigate the effect of DCA treatment on lactic acidosis following resuscitation from asphyxial cardiac arrest. Conditioned dogs were anesthetized with pentobarbital (30 mg/kg), endotracheally intubated, and mechanically ventilated to maintain an arterial pCO2 of 30 to 40 mm Hg. Asphyxial cardiac arrest was produced by endotracheal tube occlusion for six to eight minutes. After five minutes of cardiac arrest, the endotracheal tube was unclamped and closed-chest CPR was begun. Six animals received DCA 100 mg/kg IV push after one minute of CPR. Control animals (n = 6) received an equal volume of saline. CPR was continued until the return of a spontaneous pulse, when mechanical ventilation was resumed. Arterial and venous blood gases, glucose, and lactate levels were obtained at baseline and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after resuscitation. Mean arterial blood pressure, pulse, and glucose, and venous and arterial blood gases were similar in both groups throughout the study. By 45 minutes after resuscitation, the DCA-treated group showed a significantly faster rate of decline in lactate levels that continued to the final sampling period. By 90 minutes, arterial lactate in DCA animals was not significantly different from baseline (pre-arrest) values. DCA given during cardiac arrest will cause a more rapid normalization of arterial lactate after successful resuscitation. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effects of lowered lactic acid on survival and neurological outcome following cardiac arrest. PMID:3129970

  10. Registry of Unexplained Cardiac Arrest

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Cardiac Arrest; Long QT Syndrome; Brugada Syndrome; Catecholaminergi Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia; Idiopathic VentricularFibrillation; Early Repolarization Syndrome; Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

  11. Controlled transient respiratory arrest along with rapid right ventricular pacing for improving balloon stability during balloon valvuloplasty in pediatric patients with congenital aortic stenosis--a retrospective case series analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sampa Dutta; Das, Soumi; Ghose, Tapas; Sarkar, Achyut; Goswami, Anupam; Kundu, Sudeshna

    2010-01-01

    Rapid right ventricular pacing is safe, effective, and established method to provide balloon stability during balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV). Controlled transient respiratory arrest at this point of time may further reduce left ventricular stroke volume, providing an additional benefit to maintain balloon stability. Two groups were studied. Among the 10 patients, five had rapid pacing alone (Group A), while the other five were provided with cessation of positive pressure breathing as well (Group B). The outcomes of BAV in the two groups of patients were studied. One patient in Group A had failed balloon dilatation even after the fourth attempt, while in Group B there were no failures. The peak systolic gradient reduction was higher in Group B (70.05% in comparison to 52.16% of group A). In Group A, five subjects developed aortic regurgitation (grade 2 in four and grade 3 in one, while no grade 3 aortic regurgitation developed in any patient in Group B). Controlled transient respiratory arrest along with rapid ventricular pacing may be effective in maintaining balloon stability and improve the outcome of BAV. PMID:20826965

  12. Arrest of cytoplasmic streaming induces algal proliferation in green paramecia.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Shirai, Yohji; Kosaka, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    A green ciliate Paramecium bursaria, bearing several hundreds of endosymbiotic algae, demonstrates rotational microtubule-based cytoplasmic streaming, in which cytoplasmic granules and endosymbiotic algae flow in a constant direction. However, its physiological significance is still unknown. We investigated physiological roles of cytoplasmic streaming in P. bursaria through host cell cycle using video-microscopy. Here, we found that cytoplasmic streaming was arrested in dividing green paramecia and the endosymbiotic algae proliferated only during the arrest of cytoplasmic streaming. Interestingly, arrest of cytoplasmic streaming with pressure or a microtubule drug also induced proliferation of endosymbiotic algae independently of host cell cycle. Thus, cytoplasmic streaming may control the algal proliferation in P. bursaria. Furthermore, confocal microscopic observation revealed that a division septum was formed in the constricted area of a dividing paramecium, producing arrest of cytoplasmic streaming. This is a first report to suggest that cytoplasmic streaming controls proliferation of eukaryotic cells. PMID:18159235

  13. Relationship between Intrauterine Bacterial Infection and Early Embryonic Developmental Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shao-Fei; Liu, Xin-Yan; Cheng, Yun-Fei; Li, Zhi-Yi; Ou, Jie; Wang, Wei; Li, Feng-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Early embryonic developmental arrest is the most commonly understudied adverse outcome of pregnancy. The relevance of intrauterine infection to spontaneous embryonic death is rarely studied and remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between intrauterine bacterial infection and early embryonic developmental arrest. Methods: Embryonic chorion tissue and uterine swabs for bacterial detection were obtained from 33 patients who underwent artificial abortion (control group) and from 45 patients who displayed early embryonic developmental arrest (trial group). Results: Intrauterine bacterial infection was discovered in both groups. The infection rate was 24.44% (11/45) in the early embryonic developmental arrest group and 9.09% (3/33) in the artificial abortion group. Classification analysis revealed that the highest detection rate for Micrococcus luteus in the early embryonic developmental arrest group was 13.33% (6/45), and none was detected in the artificial abortion group. M. luteus infection was significantly different between the groups (P < 0.05 as shown by Fisher's exact test). In addition, no correlation was found between intrauterine bacterial infection and history of early embryonic developmental arrest. Conclusions: M. luteus infection is related to early embryonic developmental arrest and might be one of its causative factors. PMID:27270541

  14. Gnb isoforms control a signaling pathway comprising Rac1, Plcβ2, and Plcβ3 leading to LFA-1 activation and neutrophil arrest in vivo.

    PubMed

    Block, Helena; Stadtmann, Anika; Riad, Daniel; Rossaint, Jan; Sohlbach, Charlotte; Germena, Giulia; Wu, Dianqing; Simon, Scott I; Ley, Klaus; Zarbock, Alexander

    2016-01-21

    Chemokines are required for leukocyte recruitment and appropriate host defense and act through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which induce downstream signaling leading to integrin activation. Although the α and β subunits of the GPCRs are the first intracellular molecules that transduce signals after ligand binding and are therefore indispensable for downstream signaling, relatively little is known about their contribution to lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) activation and leukocyte recruitment. We used knockout mice and short hairpin RNA to knock down guanine nucleotide binding protein (GNB) isoforms (GNB1, GNB2, GNB4, and GNB5) in HL60 cells and primary murine hematopoietic cells. Neutrophil function was assessed by using intravital microscopy, flow chamber assays, and chemotaxis and biochemistry studies. We unexpectedly discovered that all expressed GNB isoforms are required for LFA-1 activation. Their downregulation led to a significant impairment of LFA-1 activation, which was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we showed that GPCR activation leads to Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1)-dependent activation of both phospholipase C β2 (Plcβ2) and Plcβ3. They act nonredundantly to produce inositol triphosphate-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) flux and LFA-1 activation that support chemokine-induced arrest in vivo. In a complex inflammatory disease model, Plcβ2-, Plcβ3-, or Rac1-deficient mice were protected from lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury. Taken together, we demonstrated that all Gnb isoforms are required for chemokine-induced downstream signaling, and Rac1, Plcβ2, and Plcβ3 are critically involved in integrin activation and leukocyte arrest. PMID:26468229

  15. Juvenile Arrests, 1998. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This report provides a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data in the United States. In 1998, law enforcement agencies made an estimated 2.6 million arrests of persons under age 18. Federal Bureau of Investigations statistics indicate that juveniles account for 18% of all arrests, and 17% of all violent crime arrests in…

  16. 10 CFR 1047.4 - Arrest authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Arrest authority. 1047.4 Section 1047.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.4 Arrest authority. (a) Under the Act, the authority of a DOE protective force officer to arrest without warrant...

  17. 10 CFR 1047.4 - Arrest authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arrest authority. 1047.4 Section 1047.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.4 Arrest authority. (a) Under the Act, the authority of a DOE protective force officer to arrest without warrant...

  18. 10 CFR 1047.4 - Arrest authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Arrest authority. 1047.4 Section 1047.4 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.4 Arrest authority. (a) Under the Act, the authority of a DOE protective force officer to arrest without warrant...

  19. Structure-biological function relationship extended to mitotic arrest-deficient 2-like protein Mad2 native and mutants-new opportunity for genetic disorder control.

    PubMed

    Avram, Speranta; Milac, Adina; Mernea, Maria; Mihailescu, Dan; Putz, Mihai V; Buiu, Catalin

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of mitotic arrest-deficient proteins Mad1 and Mad2, two components of spindle assembly checkpoint, is a risk factor for chromosomal instability (CIN) and a trigger of many genetic disorders. Mad2 transition from inactive open (O-Mad2) to active closed (C-Mad2) conformations or Mad2 binding to specific partners (cell-division cycle protein 20 (Cdc20) or Mad1) were targets of previous pharmacogenomics studies. Here, Mad2 binding to Cdc20 and the interconversion rate from open to closed Mad2 were predicted and the molecular features with a critical contribution to these processes were determined by extending the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method to large-size proteins such as Mad2. QSAR models were built based on available published data on 23 Mad2 mutants inducing CIN-related functional changes. The most relevant descriptors identified for predicting Mad2 native and mutants action mechanism and their involvement in genetic disorders are the steric (van der Waals area and solvent accessible area and their subdivided) and energetic van der Waals energy descriptors. The reliability of our QSAR models is indicated by significant values of statistical coefficients: Cross-validated correlation q2 (0.53-0.65) and fitted correlation r2 (0.82-0.90). Moreover, based on established QSAR equations, we rationally design and analyze nine de novo Mad2 mutants as possible promoters of CIN. PMID:25411801

  20. Global arrest of translation during invertebrate quiescence.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, G E; Hand, S C

    1994-08-30

    Comparing the translational capacities of cell-free systems from aerobically developing embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana vs. quiescent embryos has revealed a global arrest of protein synthesis. Incorporation rates of [3H]leucine by lysates from 4-h anoxic embryos were 8% of those from aerobic (control) embryos, when assayed at the respective pH values measured for each treatment in vivo. Exposure of embryos to 4 h of aerobic acidosis (elevated CO2 in the presence of oxygen) suppressed protein synthesis to 3% of control values. These latter two experimental treatments promote developmental arrest of Artemia embryos and, concomitantly, cause acute declines in intracellular pH. When lysates from each treatment were assayed over a range of physiologically relevant pH values (pH 6.4-8.0), amino acid incorporation rates in lysates from quiescent embryos were consistently lower than values for the aerobic controls. Acute reversal of pH to alkaline values during the 6-min assays was not sufficient to return the incorporation rates of quiescent lysates to control values. Thus, a stable alteration in translational capacity of quiescent lysates is indicated. Addition of exogenous mRNA did not rescue the suppressed protein synthesis in quiescent lysates, which suggests that the acute blockage of amino acid incorporation is apparently not due to limitation in message. Thus, the results support a role for intracellular pH as an initial signaling event in translational control during quiescence yet, at the same time, indicate that a direct proton effect on the translational machinery is not the sole proximal agent for biosynthetic arrest in this primitive crustacean. PMID:8078909

  1. Global arrest of translation during invertebrate quiescence.

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, G E; Hand, S C

    1994-01-01

    Comparing the translational capacities of cell-free systems from aerobically developing embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana vs. quiescent embryos has revealed a global arrest of protein synthesis. Incorporation rates of [3H]leucine by lysates from 4-h anoxic embryos were 8% of those from aerobic (control) embryos, when assayed at the respective pH values measured for each treatment in vivo. Exposure of embryos to 4 h of aerobic acidosis (elevated CO2 in the presence of oxygen) suppressed protein synthesis to 3% of control values. These latter two experimental treatments promote developmental arrest of Artemia embryos and, concomitantly, cause acute declines in intracellular pH. When lysates from each treatment were assayed over a range of physiologically relevant pH values (pH 6.4-8.0), amino acid incorporation rates in lysates from quiescent embryos were consistently lower than values for the aerobic controls. Acute reversal of pH to alkaline values during the 6-min assays was not sufficient to return the incorporation rates of quiescent lysates to control values. Thus, a stable alteration in translational capacity of quiescent lysates is indicated. Addition of exogenous mRNA did not rescue the suppressed protein synthesis in quiescent lysates, which suggests that the acute blockage of amino acid incorporation is apparently not due to limitation in message. Thus, the results support a role for intracellular pH as an initial signaling event in translational control during quiescence yet, at the same time, indicate that a direct proton effect on the translational machinery is not the sole proximal agent for biosynthetic arrest in this primitive crustacean. PMID:8078909

  2. Growth Arrest by Trehalose-6-Phosphate: An Astonishing Case of Primary Metabolite Control over Growth by Way of the SnRK1 Signaling Pathway1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Delatte, Thierry L.; Sedijani, Prapti; Kondou, Youichi; Matsui, Minami; de Jong, Gerhardus J.; Somsen, Govert W.; Wiese-Klinkenberg, Anika; Primavesi, Lucia F.; Paul, Matthew J.; Schluepmann, Henriette

    2011-01-01

    The strong regulation of plant carbon allocation and growth by trehalose metabolism is important for our understanding of the mechanisms that determine growth and yield, with obvious applications in crop improvement. To gain further insight on the growth arrest by trehalose feeding, we first established that starch-deficient seedlings of the plastidic phosphoglucomutase1 mutant were similarly affected as the wild type on trehalose. Starch accumulation in the source cotyledons, therefore, did not cause starvation and consequent growth arrest in the growing zones. We then screened the FOX collection of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing full-length cDNAs for seedling resistance to 100 mm trehalose. Three independent transgenic lines were identified with dominant segregation of the trehalose resistance trait that overexpress the bZIP11 (for basic region/leucine zipper motif) transcription factor. The resistance of these lines to trehalose could not be explained simply through enhanced trehalase activity or through inhibition of bZIP11 translation. Instead, trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P) accumulation was much increased in bZIP11-overexpressing lines, suggesting that these lines may be insensitive to the effects of T6P. T6P is known to inhibit the central stress-integrating kinase SnRK1 (KIN10) activity. We confirmed that this holds true in extracts from seedlings grown on trehalose, then showed that two independent transgenic lines overexpressing KIN10 were insensitive to trehalose. Moreover, the expression of marker genes known to be jointly controlled by SnRK1 activity and bZIP11 was consistent with low SnRK1 or bZIP11 activity in seedlings on trehalose. These results reveal an astonishing case of primary metabolite control over growth by way of the SnRK1 signaling pathway involving T6P, SnRK1, and bZIP11. PMID:21753116

  3. Neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sandroni, Claudio; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Prediction of neurological prognosis in patients who are comatose after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest remains difficult. Previous guidelines recommended ocular reflexes, somatosensory evoked potentials and serum biomarkers for predicting poor outcome within 72h from cardiac arrest. However, these guidelines were based on patients not treated with targeted temperature management and did not appropriately address important biases in literature. Recent findings Recent evidence reviews detected important limitations in prognostication studies, such as low precision and, most importantly, lack of blinding, which may have caused a self-fulfilling prophecy and overestimated the specificity of index tests. Maintenance of targeted temperature using sedatives and muscle relaxants may interfere with clinical examination, making assessment of neurological status before 72 h or more after cardiac arrest unreliable. Summary No index predicts poor neurological outcome after cardiac arrest with absolute certainty. Prognostic evaluation should start not earlier than 72 h after ROSC and only after major confounders have been excluded so that reliable clinical examination can be made. Multimodality appears to be the most reasonable approach for prognostication after cardiac arrest. PMID:25922894

  4. Hypothermia improves outcome from cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Bernard, S A

    2005-12-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is common and patients who are initially resuscitated by ambulance officers and transported to hospital are usually admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). In the past, the treatment in the ICU consisted of supportive care only, and most patients remained unconscious due to the severe anoxic neurological injury. It was this neurological injury rather than cardiac complications that caused the high rate of morbidity and mortality. However, in the early 1990's, a series of animal experiments demonstrated convincingly that mild hypothermia induced after return of spontaneous circulation and maintained for several hours dramatically reduced the severity of the anoxic neurological injury. In the mid-1990's, preliminary human studies suggested that mild hypothermia could be induced and maintained in post-cardiac arrest patients without an increase in the rate of cardiac or other complications. In the late 1990's, two prospective, randomised, controlled trials were conducted and the results confirmed the animal data that mild hypothermia induced after resuscitation and maintained for 12 - 24 hours dramatically improved neurological and overall outcomes. On the basis of these studies, mild hypothermia was endorsed in 2003 by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation as a recommended treatment for comatose patients with an initial cardiac rhythm of ventricular fibrillation. However, the application of this therapy into routine clinical critical care practice has been slow. The reasons for this are uncertain, but may relate to the relative complexity of the treatment, unfamiliarity with the pathophysiology of hypothermia, lack of clear protocols and/or uncertainty of benefit in particular patients. Therefore, recent research in this area has focused on the development of feasible, inexpensive techniques for the early, rapid induction of mild hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Currently, the most promising strategy is a rapid

  5. DUI Arrests and Academic Attrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Kevin M.; Richardson, Katie

    2008-01-01

    A sobering 2002 study reported that over 2 million college students drove under the influence of alcohol (DUI) in 1999. Among those driving while intoxicated, approximately 1.7% or roughly 34,000 students reported being arrested on DUI charges. Regrettably, a significant proportion of the 1,400 college student deaths and 500,000 injuries are…

  6. Cardiac arrest during dipyridamole imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, M.S.; McCauley, C.S.

    1988-05-01

    A case of cardiac arrest and subsequent acute myocardial infarction occurring during thallium-201 imaging with oral dipyridamole augmentation is presented. Previous reports emphasizing the safety of this procedure are briefly reviewed and a recommendation for close hemodynamic and arrhythmia monitoring during the study is made. Large doses of oral dipyridamole may be contraindicated in patients with unstable angina.

  7. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  8. Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159651.html Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest: Study Heart disease tends to develop earlier than ... About one in nine men will suffer a cardiac arrest before the age of 70, compared to about ...

  9. 25 CFR 11.301 - Arrests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arrests. 11.301 Section 11.301 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Procedure § 11.301 Arrests. (a) Arrest is the taking of a person into police custody in order...

  10. Dually Diagnosed Patients with Arrests for Violent and Nonviolent Offenses: Two-Year Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Timko, Christine; Finlay, Andrea; Schultz, Nicole R.; Blonigen, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the history of arrests among dually diagnosed patients entering treatment, compare groups with different histories on use of treatment and mutual-help groups and functioning, at intake to treatment and six-month, one-year, and two-year follow-ups, and examine correlates and predictors of legal functioning at the study endpoint. At treatment intake, 9.2% of patients had no arrest history, 56.3% had been arrested for nonviolent offenses only, and 34.5% had been arrested for violent offenses. At baseline, the violent group had used the most outpatient psychiatric treatment and reported poorer functioning (psychiatric, alcohol, drug, employment, and family/social). Both arrest groups had used more inpatient/residential treatment and had more mutual-help group participation than the no-arrest group. The arrest groups had higher likelihood of substance use disorder treatment or mutual-help group participation at follow-ups. Generally, all groups were comparable on functioning at follow-ups (with baseline functioning controlled). With baseline arrest status controlled, earlier predictors of more severe legal problems at the two-year follow-up were more severe psychological, family/social, and drug problems. Findings suggest that dually diagnosed patients with a history of arrests for violent offenses may achieve comparable treatment outcomes to those of patients with milder criminal histories. PMID:27119040

  11. Enforcement following 0.08% BAC law change: sex-specific consequences of changing arrest practices?

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jennifer; Davaran, Ardavan

    2013-10-01

    This research evaluated effects of stricter 0.08% BAC drunken driving law on changes in sex-specific DUI arrest rates, controlling for increased law enforcement resources and shifts in DUI-related behaviors. Another main purpose, the study assessed female/male differences in arrest increases due to broader enforcement standards and efforts. Panel data was assembled for 24 states over 1990-2007 on DUI arrests, alcohol policy, law enforcement resources, drinking and drunken driving prevalence. Two-way fixed-effects seemingly unrelated regression models predicted female versus male changes in DUI arrests following implementation of lower legal limits of intoxication, net controls. Findings suggest, first, that a broader legal definition of drunken driving intending to officially sanction less serious offenders (0.08% vs. 0.10% BAC) was associated with increased DUI arrests for both sexes. Second, growth in specialized DUI-enforcement units also was related to increased arrests. Whereas male and female arrest trends were equally affected by the direct net-widening effects of 0.08% BAC alcohol-policy, specialized DUI-enforcement efforts to dig deeper into the offender-pool had stronger arrest-producing effects on females, particularly prior to law change. Specifying how changes in law and enforcement resources affect arrest outcomes is an important pre-cursor to alcohol-policy analyses of effectiveness. A potential unintended consequence, effects of law and enforcement may differ across population segments. PMID:23773958

  12. Mild therapeutic hypothermia is superior to controlled normothermia for the maintenance of blood pressure and cerebral oxygenation, prevention of organ damage and suppression of oxidative stress after cardiac arrest in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mild therapeutic hypothermia (HT) has been implemented in the management of post cardiac arrest (CA) syndrome after the publication of clinical trials comparing HT with common practice (ie, usually hyperthermia). Current evidence on the comparison between therapeutic HT and controlled normothermia (NT) in CA survivors, however, remains insufficient. Methods Eight female swine (sus scrofa domestica; body weight 45 kg) were randomly assigned to receive either mild therapeutic HT or controlled NT, with four animals per group. Veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was established and at minimal ECMO flow (0.5 L/min) ventricular fibrillation was induced by rapid ventricular pacing. After 20 min of CA, circulation was restored by increasing the ECMO flow to 4.5 L/min; 90 min of reperfusion followed. Target core temperatures (HT: 33°C; NT: 36.8°C) were maintained using the heat exchanger on the oxygenator. Invasive blood pressure was measured in the aortic arch, and cerebral oxygenation was assessed using near-infrared spectroscopy. After 60 min of reperfusion, up to three defibrillation attempts were performed. After 90 min of reperfusion, blood samples were drawn for the measurement of troponin I (TnI), myoglobin (MGB), creatine-phosphokinase (CPK), alanin-aminotransferase (ALT), neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and cystatin C (CysC) levels. Reactive oxygen metabolite (ROM) levels and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) were also measured. Results Significantly higher blood pressure and cerebral oxygenation values were observed in the HT group (P<0.05). Sinus rhythm was restored in all of the HT animals and in one from the NT group. The levels of TnI, MGB, CPK, ALT, and ROM were significantly lower in the HT group (P<0.05); levels of NSE, CysC, and BAP were comparable in both groups. Conclusions Our results from animal model of cardiac arrest indicate that HT may be superior to NT for the maintenance of blood pressure, cerebral

  13. Hydroxylated PBDEs induce developmental arrest in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Usenko, Crystal Y. Hopkins, David C.; Trumble, Stephen J. Bruce, Erica D.

    2012-07-01

    The ubiquitous spread of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) has led to concerns regarding the metabolites of these congeners, in particular hydroxylated PBDEs. There are limited studies regarding the biological interactions of these chemicals, yet there is some concern they may be more toxic than their parent compounds. In this study three hydroxylated PBDEs were assessed for toxicity in embryonic zebrafish: 3-OH-BDE 47, 5-OH-BDE 47, and 6-OH-BDE 47. All three congeners induced developmental arrest in a concentration-dependent manner; however, 6-OH-BDE 47 induced adverse effects at lower concentrations than the other congeners. Furthermore, all three induced cell death; however apoptosis was not observed. In short-term exposures (24–28 hours post fertilization), all hydroxylated PBDEs generated oxidative stress in the region corresponding to the cell death at 5 and 10 ppm. To further investigate the short-term effects that may be responsible for the developmental arrest observed in this study, gene regulation was assessed for embryos exposed to 0.625 ppm 6-OH-BDE 47 from 24 to 28 hpf. Genes involved in stress response, thyroid hormone regulation, and neurodevelopment were significantly upregulated compared to controls; however, genes related to oxidative stress were either unaffected or downregulated. This study suggests that hydroxylated PBDEs disrupt development, and may induce oxidative stress and potentially disrupt the cholinergic system and thyroid hormone homeostasis. -- Highlights: ► OH-PBDEs induce developmental arrest in a concentration-dependent manner. ► Hydroxyl group location influences biological interaction. ► OH-PBDEs induce oxidative stress. ► Thyroid hormone gene regulation was disrupted following exposure. ► To our knowledge, this is the first whole organism study of OH-PBDE toxicity.

  14. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Scheller, RoseAnn L; Johnson, Laurie; Lorts, Angela; Ryan, Thomas D

    2016-09-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in the pediatric population is a rare and potentially devastating occurrence. An understanding of the differential diagnosis for the etiology of the cardiac arrest allows for the most effective emergency care and provides the patient with the best possible outcome. Pediatric SCA can occur with or without prodromal symptoms and may occur during exercise or rest. The most common cause is arrhythmia secondary to an underlying channelopathy, cardiomyopathy, or myocarditis. After stabilization, evaluation should include electrocardiogram, chest radiograph, and echocardiogram. Management should focus on decreasing the potential for recurring arrhythmia, maintaining cardiac preload, and thoughtful medication use to prevent exacerbation of the underlying condition. The purpose of this review was to provide the emergency physician with a concise and current review of the incidence, differential diagnosis, and management of pediatric patients presenting with SCA. PMID:27585126

  15. Neuroprognostication After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Topjian, Alexis A.; Hammond, Rachel; Illes, Judy; Abend, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Management decisions and parental counseling after pediatric cardiac arrest depend on the ability of physicians to make accurate and timely predictions regarding neurological recovery. We evaluated neurologists and intensivists performing neuroprognostication after cardiac arrest to determine prediction agreement, accuracy, and confidence. METHODS Pediatric neurologists (n = 10) and intensivists (n = 9) reviewed 18 cases of children successfully resuscitated from a cardiac arrest and managed in the pediatric intensive care unit. Cases were sequentially presented (after arrest day 1, days 2–4, and days 5–7), with updated examinations, neurophysiologic data, and neuroimaging data. At each time period, physicians predicted outcome by Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category and specified prediction confidence. RESULTS Predicted discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category versus actual hospital discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category outcomes were compared. Exact (Predicted Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category – Actual Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category = 0) and close (Predicted Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category – Actual Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category = ±1) outcome prediction accuracies for all physicians improved over successive periods (P < 0.05). Prediction accuracy did not differ significantly between physician groups at any period or overall. Agreement improved over time among neurologists (day 1 Kappa [κ], 0.28; days 2–4 κ, 0.43; days 5–7 κ, 0.68) and among intensivists (day 1 κ, 0.30; days 2–4 κ, 0.44; days 5–7 κ, 0.57). Prediction confidence increased over time (P < 0.001) and did not differ between physician groups. CONCLUSIONS Inter-rater agreement among neurologists and among intensivists improved over time and reached moderate levels. For all physicians, prediction accuracy and confidence improved over time. Further prospective research is needed to better characterize how physicians

  16. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mutants seemingly stop development in the late segmentation stages, and maintain a body shape similar to a 20 hour embryo. Mutations in speed bump, ogre, zombie, specter, poltergeist and troll were tested for cell lethality by transplanting mutant cells into wild-type hosts. With poltergeist, transplanted mutant cells all survive. The remainder of the mutants tested were autonomously but conditionally lethal: mutant cells, most of which lyse, sometimes survive to become notochord, muscles, or, in rare cases, large neurons, all cell types which become postmitotic in the gastrula. Some of the genes of the early arrest group may be necessary for progression though the cell cycle; if so, the survival of early differentiating cells may be based on having their terminal mitosis before the zygotic requirement for these genes. PMID:9007229

  17. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  18. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  19. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  20. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  1. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  2. Detainees arrested for the first time in French police stations.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Renaud; Beaufrère, Aurélie; Chariot, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    The psychological impact of incarceration vary from individual to individual and most people first entering prison experience severe stress. Our objective was to describe the characteristics of detainees arrested for the first time and who had medical examination during custody. The study sample included 200 detainees arrested for the first time in 2012 and examined for the second time before May 31, 2013, 200 detainees arrested for the first time in 2012 and who had not a second examination by May 31, 2013, and a control group of 200 individuals who had been arrested before. Collected data related to persons' characteristics, the course of detention, alleged assaults and traumatic injuries. In our sample, victimization was the most frequent motivation for requesting a medical examination and affected 31-46% of patients who requested the examination. The medical examination was less frequently requested by the detainee at the first detention than at subsequent detentions (35% and 31% vs. 51%, P < 0.001). Unremarkable psychic states were found in most cases in all groups. Detainees expressed a good or very good opinion on custody in 40-51% of cases. In 75-89% of cases, detainees were considered to be unconditionally fit for detention. The present findings suggest only minor differences between clinical features of individuals arrested for the first time and their clinical status when they were arrested for the second time. The systematic collection of more detailed description of the detainees' psychic state could be relevant at the time of medical examinations in police cells. PMID:25735776

  3. Drug therapy in cardiac arrest: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Andreas; Djärv, Therese; Engdahl, Johan; Hollenberg, Jacob; Nordberg, Per; Ravn-Fischer, Annika; Ringh, Mattias; Rysz, Susanne; Svensson, Leif; Herlitz, Johan; Lundgren, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the literature on human studies of drug therapy in cardiac arrest during the last 25 years. In May 2015, a systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and CRD databases. Prospective interventional and observational studies evaluating a specified drug therapy in human cardiac arrest reporting a clinical endpoint [i.e. return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) or survival] and published in English 1990 or later were included, whereas animal studies, case series and reports, studies of drug administration, drug pharmacology, non-specified drug therapies, preventive drug therapy, drug administration after ROSC, studies with primarily physiological endpoints, and studies of traumatic cardiac arrest were excluded. The literature search identified a total of 8936 articles. Eighty-eight articles met our inclusion criteria and were included in the review. We identified no human study in which drug therapy, compared with placebo, improved long-term survival. Regarding adrenaline and amiodarone, the drugs currently recommended in cardiac arrest, two prospective randomized placebo-controlled trials, were identified for adrenaline, and one for amiodarone, but they were all underpowered to detect differences in survival to hospital discharge. Of all reviewed studies, only one recent prospective study demonstrated improved neurological outcome with one therapy over another using a combination of vasopressin, steroids, and adrenaline as the intervention compared with standard adrenaline administration. The evidence base for drug therapy in cardiac arrest is scarce. However, many human studies on drug therapy in cardiac arrest have not been powered to identify differences in important clinical outcomes such as survival to hospital discharge and favourable neurological outcome. Efforts are needed to initiate large multicentre prospective randomized clinical trials to evaluate both currently recommended and

  4. Patients with polycystic ovary syndrome have successful embryo arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Baoli; Hao, Haoying; Wei, Duo; Song, Xiaobing; Xie, Juanke; Zhang, Cuilian

    2015-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we investigate the relationship between embryo arrest and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) during in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET). In this study, 667 subjects were enrolled, including 330 patients with PCOS and 337 subjects without PCOS. The subjects underwent in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection and embryo transfer (IVF/ICSI-ET) cycles at the Reproductive Medical Centre of Henan Provincial Hospital from January 2009 to December 2012. Four protocols were used to stimulate the ovaries, including long protocol, super-long down-regulation protocol, short protocol and antagonist protocol. Oocytes were retrieved using transvaginal ultrasound guidance. Pronuclei were checked on the next morning after IVF/ICSI. Cleavage stage embryo was assessed after 62-66 hours. Women with PCOS had significantly elevated body mass index, basal luteinizing hormone, estradiol and testosterone compared with normal women. Basal Follicle stimulating hormone level in PCOS patients was lower compared with that in control group. After IVF-ET, PCOS patients had more available oocytes than subjects in control group. PCOS patients had slightly lower fertilization rate than the controls in IVF cycles, but in ICSI cycles, fertilization rate in PCOS patients was significantly higher than that in controls. For either IVF or ICSI, the embryo arrest rate was not changed by PCOS. Moreover, there was no significant difference in embryo arrest rate between both groups adopting different stimulation protocols. Interestingly, embryo arrest rate was not correlated with testosterone for patients in PCOS group. The data indicated that patients with PCOS had successful early embryo arrest during IVF-ET. PMID:26131233

  5. Cognitive and Functional Consequence of Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Perez, Claudia A; Samudra, Niyatee; Aiyagari, Venkatesh

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac arrest is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Better-quality bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation training, cardiocerebral resuscitation principles, and intensive post-resuscitation hospital care have improved survival. However, cognitive and functional impairment after cardiac arrest remain areas of concern. Research focus has shifted beyond prognostication in the immediate post-arrest period to identification of mechanisms for long-term brain injury and implementation of promising protocols to reduce neuronal injury. These include therapeutic temperature management (TTM), as well as pharmacologic and psychological interventions which also improve overall neurological function. Comprehensive assessment of cognitive function post-arrest is hampered by heterogeneous measures among studies. However, the domains of attention, long-term memory, spatial memory, and executive function appear to be affected. As more patients survive cardiac arrest for longer periods of time, there needs to be a greater focus on interventions that can enhance cognitive and psychosocial function post-arrest. PMID:27311306

  6. Evidence for arrested bone formation during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. T.; Bobyn, J. D.; Duvall, P.; Morey, E. R.; Baylink, D. J.; Spector, M.

    1982-01-01

    Addressing the question of whether the bone formed in space is unusual, the morphology of bone made at the tibial diaphysis of rats before, during, and after spaceflight is studied. Evidence of arrest lines in the bone formed in space is reported suggesting that bone formation ceases along portions of the periosteum during spaceflight. Visualized by microradiography, the arrest lines are shown to be less mineralized than the surrounding bone matrix. When viewed by scanning electron microscopy, it is seen that bone fractures more readily at the site of an arrest line. These observations are seen as suggesting that arrest lines are a zone of weakness and that their formation may result in decreased bone strength in spite of normalization of bone formation after flight. The occurrence, location, and morphology of arrest lines are seen as suggesting that they are a visible result of the phenomenon of arrested bone formation.

  7. The relationship between academic achievement and likelihood of police arrest among delinquents.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ilhong; Cheong, Jinseong; Walsh, Anthony

    2014-05-01

    Drawing upon a recent study on the association between low self-control and differential responses from the criminal justice system, this study examined whether academic performance, a construct linked to self-control, was also associated with the probability of police arrest. The result indicated that academic performance did have a statistically significant inverse association with the likelihood of police arrest, net of low self-control and delinquency. PMID:23539519

  8. Buoyant currents arrested by convective dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMinn, Christopher W.; Juanes, Ruben

    2013-05-01

    When carbon dioxide (CO2) dissolves into water, the density of water increases. This seemingly insubstantial phenomenon has profound implications for geologic carbon sequestration. Here we show, by means of laboratory experiments with analog fluids, that the up-slope migration of a buoyant current of CO2 is arrested by the convective dissolution that ensues from a fingering instability at the moving CO2-groundwater interface. We consider the effectiveness of convective dissolution as a large-scale trapping mechanism in sloping aquifers, and we show that a small amount of slope is beneficial compared to the horizontal case. We study the development and coarsening of the fingering instability along the migrating current and predict the maximum migration distance of the current with a simple sharp-interface model. We show that convective dissolution exerts a powerful control on CO2 plume dynamics and, as a result, on the potential of geologic carbon sequestration.

  9. Simulated Cardiopulmonary Arrests in a Hospital Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishkin, Barbara H.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes a simulated interdisciplinary role rehearsal for cardiopulmonary arrest to prepare nurses to function effectively. Includes needs analysis, program components, and responses of program participants. (Author)

  10. [Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest].

    PubMed

    Virkkunen, Ilkka; Hoppu, Sanna; Kämäräinen, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac arrest as the first symptom of coronary artery disease is not uncommon. Some of previously healthy people with sudden cardiac arrest may be saved by effective resuscitation and post-resuscitative therapy. The majority of cardiac arrest patients experience the cardiac arrest outside of the hospital, in which case early recognition of lifelessness, commencement of basic life support and entry to professional care without delay are the prerequisites for recovery. After the heart has started beating again, the clinical picture of post-resuscitation syndrome must be recognized and appropriate treatment utilized. PMID:22204143

  11. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  12. Children exposed to the arrest of a family member: Associations with mental health

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Frank J.; Kaufman, Joy S.; Finley, Meghan K.; Griffin, Amy; Anderson, Janet; Marshall, Tim; Radway, Susan; Stack, Virginia; Crusto, Cindy A.

    2013-01-01

    The arrest of a parent or other family member can be detrimental to children’s health. To study the impact of exposure to the arrest of a family member on children’s mental health and how said association may change across developmental periods, we examined baseline data for children (birth through 11 years) entering family-based systems of care (SOC). Children exposed to the arrest of a family member had experienced significantly more 5.38 (SD = 2.59) different types of potentially traumatic events (PTE) than children not exposed to arrest 2.84 (SD = 2.56). Multiple regression model results showed that arrest exposure was significantly associated with greater behavioral and emotional challenges after controlling for children’s age, gender, race/ethnicity, household income, caregiver’s education, parenting factors, and other PTE exposure. Further analyses revealed differences in internalizing and externalizing behaviors associated with arrest exposure across developmental levels. This study highlights some of the mental health challenges for children exposed to the arrest of a family member, while adding to our knowledge of how such an event affects children across different developmental periods. More trauma-informed, developmentally appropriate systems need to be in place at all levels to assist children and families experiencing arrest. PMID:24829537

  13. Approaches to Arresting Dental Caries: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Puranik, Manjunath P.; K.R., Sowmya

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental caries is one of the most prevalent chronic oral diseases across the globe that can be both treated and prevented. Preventive management strategies can effectively arrest and even completely reverse the caries process. This article aimed to review the literature on different approaches explored towards arresting caries progression. Materials and Methods Literature search of publications in Pubmed/Medline was carried out. Total 73 articles including clinical trials, invitro studies, case reports and review articles were reviewed. Results Twenty-two clinical trials and invitro studies were selected for review. Most studies suggested use of Silver Diamine Fluoride (SDF) as simple and effective caries arresting approach. Fluoride varnish treatment effectively arrests caries by inhibiting demineralization, resulting in highly significant caries reductions. Arginine with an insoluble calcium compound enhances arresting and reversing buccal, coronal and root caries. A few clinical studies have shown that sealants placed in caries fissures can arrest the caries process. Conclusion Various fluoride containing agents are clinically effective in arresting progression of carious lesion. However, these materials should be used appropriately understanding their scope and limitations to arrest dental caries. PMID:26155592

  14. Juvenile Arrests 1996. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    In 1996, law enforcement agencies in the United States made an estimated 2.9 million arrests of persons under the age of 18. According to Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) figures, juveniles accounted for 19% of all arrests and 19% of all violent crime in 1996. The substantial growth in juvenile crime that began in the late 1980s peaked in…

  15. Juvenile Arrests, 2000. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This bulletin examines the national and state juvenile arrest rate in 2000 using data reported annually by local law enforcement agencies nationwide to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting program. Results indicate that the murder rate in 2000 was the lowest since 1965; juvenile arrests for violence in 2000 were the lowest since 1988; few juveniles…

  16. The course of circulatory and cerebral recovery after circulatory arrest: influence of pre-arrest, arrest and post-arrest factors.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, E O; Holm, S

    1999-11-01

    We evaluated the influence of pre-arrest, arrest and post-arrest factors on circulatory and neurological recovery for up to 1 year following circulatory arrest of cardio-pulmonary aetiology in 231 patients. Initially, all patients were unconscious and 106 had some cortical activity recorded in the immediate post-resuscitation EEG (Group I), while 125 had no such activity initially (Group II). The following variables were explored: age, sex, medical history, cause and location of arrest, initial cardiac dysrhythmia, duration of life support, metabolic acidosis, pulse-pressure product and heart pump function capacity early after resuscitation. Outcome measures were duration and quality of circulatory survival, cause of death, neurological recovery and ultimate outcome. First year survival was 33% in Group I and 16% in Group II. Severe heart failure and brain death occurred mainly in Group II. Circulatory recovery was negatively influenced by out-of-hospital arrest, metabolic acidosis and pulse-pressure products below 150. Neurological recovery was negatively influenced by initial dysrhythmias other than ventricular fibrillation, pulse-pressure products below 150, post-arrest heart failure and/or pulmonary complications. It seems that circulatory and cerebral outcomes are mainly determined by the global ischaemic insults sustained during the circulatory arrest period. PMID:10625157

  17. 36 CFR 222.76 - Arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Arrest. 222.76 Section 222.76 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RANGE MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.76 Arrest. Any employee designated by the...

  18. 36 CFR 222.76 - Arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arrest. 222.76 Section 222.76 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RANGE MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.76 Arrest. Any employee designated by the...

  19. 36 CFR 222.36 - Arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Arrest. 222.36 Section 222.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RANGE MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.36 Arrest. Any employee designated by the...

  20. 36 CFR 222.36 - Arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arrest. 222.36 Section 222.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RANGE MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.36 Arrest. Any employee designated by the...

  1. 36 CFR 222.36 - Arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arrest. 222.36 Section 222.36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RANGE MANAGEMENT Management of Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros § 222.36 Arrest. Any employee designated by the...

  2. The Arrest Records of Rosa Parks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredhoff, Stacey; Schamel, Wynell; Potter, Lee Ann

    1999-01-01

    Provides background information on the arrest of Rosa Parks and the effects this event had on the Civil Rights Movement. Offers a collection of teaching activities in which the students examine the arrest records of Rosa Parks and explains that these activities are designed to accompany a unit on racial segregation. (CMK)

  3. Psychopathology in Women Arrested for Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Gregory L.; Moore, Todd M.; Gordon, Kristina Coop; Ramsey, Susan E.; Kahler, Christopher W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of psychopathology among women arrested for violence and whether the experience of intimate partner violence (IPV) was associated with Axis I psychopathology. Women who were arrested for domestic violence perpetration and court referred to violence intervention programs (N=103) completed measures of IPV…

  4. AIDS activists arrested in India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R

    2000-05-27

    Health activists in India are outraged over the arrests of 11 AIDS activists belonging to the nongovernmental organization (NGO) Sahyog. These AIDS activists were charged with obscenity and rioting. Rioting broke out when the local print media published details of a report entitled ¿AIDS and Us¿ that was produced by Sahyog in Hindi. The report tackled prevalent sexual practices, very low level of awareness, and other risk factors related to contracting HIV infection or developing AIDS in the rural areas of the Almora district. Critics charged the activists with destroying the image of the people of the region, portraying them as promiscuous and practicing high-risk sexual behavior. Consequently, Sahyog issued a statement of apology and promised to withdraw the report, but the district administration still banned their work in the area. Several NGOs also feel that the presentation of the report should have been more cautious. PMID:10827034

  5. The TIP GROWTH DEFECTIVE1 S-Acyl Transferase Regulates Plant Cell Growth in ArabidopsisW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hemsley, Piers A.; Kemp, Alison C.; Grierson, Claire S.

    2005-01-01

    TIP GROWTH DEFECTIVE1 (TIP1) of Arabidopsis thaliana affects cell growth throughout the plant and has a particularly strong effect on root hair growth. We have identified TIP1 by map-based cloning and complementation of the mutant phenotype. TIP1 encodes an ankyrin repeat protein with a DHHC Cys-rich domain that is expressed in roots, leaves, inflorescence stems, and floral tissue. Two homologues of TIP1 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and human (Homo sapiens) have been shown to have S-acyl transferase (also known as palmitoyl transferase) activity. S-acylation is a reversible hydrophobic protein modification that offers swift, flexible control of protein hydrophobicity and affects protein association with membranes, signal transduction, and vesicle trafficking within cells. We show that TIP1 binds the acyl group palmitate, that it can rescue the morphological, temperature sensitivity, and yeast casein kinase2 localization defects of the yeast S-acyl transferase mutant akr1Δ, and that inhibition of acylation in wild-type Arabidopsis roots reproduces the Tip1− mutant phenotype. Our results demonstrate that S-acylation is essential for normal plant cell growth and identify a plant S-acyl transferase, an essential research tool if we are to understand how this important, reversible lipid modification operates in plant cells. PMID:16100337

  6. Growth arrest and differentiation-associated phosphoproteins in mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, R.L.; Scott, R.E.

    1986-03-05

    Cancer is thought to result from the expression of defects in the control of both cell proliferation and differentiation. In murine mesenchymal stem cells they have established that differentiation and proliferation can be mediated at a variety of distinct states in the G/sub 1/ phase of the cell cycle. In order to evaluate the role of cellular phosphoprotein (PP) expression in these regulatory processes, five different growth and differentiation-dependent states were compared. Cells in the following states were studied: (1) exponential growth; (2) arrest in serum-deficient medium; (3) arrest at the predifferentiation arrest state; (4) arrest at a state of nonterminal differentiation; and (5) arrest at a state of terminal differentiation. Whole cell lysates from each group were phosphorylated in vitro using (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP and analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two most interesting observations were established. First, a distinct PP with a molecular weight of 37 kD was expressed in all growth arrested cells but was not evident in rapidly growing cells. Second, two distinct differentiation-associated PP with molecular weights of 72 kD and 29 kD were expressed exclusively in nonterminally and terminally differentiated cells. Since the identification of the 37 kD cell cycle-dependent growth arrest-associated PP could be of great significance, they plan to further investigate the functional role of this phosphoprotein in the control of cellular proliferation.

  7. Mechanisms Linking Advanced Airway Management and Cardiac Arrest Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Justin L.; Prince, David K.; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced airway management – such as endotracheal intubation (ETI) or supraglottic airway (SGA) insertion – is one of the most prominent interventions in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) resuscitation. While randomized controlled trials are currently in progress to identify the best advanced airway technique in OHCA, the mechanisms by which airway management may influence OHCA outcomes remain unknown. We provide a conceptual model describing potential mechanisms linking advanced airway management with OHCA outcomes. PMID:26073275

  8. Chromosomal Aneuploidies and Early Embryonic Developmental Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Maria; Ebner, Thomas; Puchner, Manuela; Mayer, Richard Bernhard; Shebl, Omar; Oppelt, Peter; Duba, Hans-Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background Selecting the best embryo for transfer, with the highest chance of achieving a vital pregnancy, is a major goal in current in vitro fertilization (IVF) technology. The high rate of embryonic developmental arrest during IVF treatment is one of the limitations in achieving this goal. Chromosomal abnormalities are possibly linked with chromosomal arrest and selection against abnormal fertilization products. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in preimplantation embryos with developmental arrest. Materials and Methods This cohort study included blastomeres of embryos with early developmental arrest that were biopsied and analyzed by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) with probes for chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21 and 22. Forty-five couples undergoing IVF treatment were included, and 119 arrested embryos were biopsied. All probes were obtained from the Kinderwunsch Zentrum, Linz, Austria, between August 2009 and August 2011. Results Of these embryos, 31.6% were normal for all chromosomes tested, and 68.4% were abnormal. Eleven embryos were uniformly aneuploid, 20 were polyploid, 3 were haploid, 11 displayed mosaicism and 22 embryos exhibited chaotic chromosomal complement. Conclusion Nearly 70% of arrested embryos exhibit chromosomal errors, making chromosomal abnormalities a major cause of embryonic arrest and may be a further explanation for the high developmental failure rates during culture of the embryos in the IVF setting. PMID:26644858

  9. Myocardial Dysfunction and Shock after Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Jentzer, Jacob C.; Chonde, Meshe D.; Dezfulian, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Postarrest myocardial dysfunction includes the development of low cardiac output or ventricular systolic or diastolic dysfunction after cardiac arrest. Impaired left ventricular systolic function is reported in nearly two-thirds of patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Hypotension and shock requiring vasopressor support are similarly common after cardiac arrest. Whereas shock requiring vasopressor support is consistently associated with an adverse outcome after cardiac arrest, the association between myocardial dysfunction and outcomes is less clear. Myocardial dysfunction and shock after cardiac arrest develop as the result of preexisting cardiac pathology with multiple superimposed insults from resuscitation. The pathophysiology involves cardiovascular ischemia/reperfusion injury and cardiovascular toxicity from excessive levels of inflammatory cytokine activation and catecholamines, among other contributing factors. Similar mechanisms occur in myocardial dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass, in sepsis, and in stress-induced cardiomyopathy. Hemodynamic stabilization after resuscitation from cardiac arrest involves restoration of preload, vasopressors to support arterial pressure, and inotropic support if needed to reverse the effects of myocardial dysfunction and improve systemic perfusion. Further research is needed to define the role of postarrest myocardial dysfunction on cardiac arrest outcomes and identify therapeutic strategies. PMID:26421284

  10. Theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juárez-Maldonado, R.; Medina-Noyola, M.

    2008-05-01

    We present a first-principles theory of dynamic arrest in colloidal mixtures based on the multicomponent self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of colloid dynamics [M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 72, 031107 (2005); M. A. Chávez-Rojo and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E76, 039902 (2007)]. We illustrate its application with a description of dynamic arrest in two simple model colloidal mixtures: namely, hard-sphere and repulsive Yukawa binary mixtures. Our results include observation of the two patterns of dynamic arrest, one in which both species become simultaneously arrested and the other involving the sequential arrest of the two species. The latter case gives rise to mixed states in which one species is arrested while the other species remains mobile. We also derive the (”bifurcation” or fixed-point”) equations for the nonergodic parameters of the system, which takes the surprisingly simple form of a system of coupled equations for the localization length of the particles of each species. The solution of this system of equations indicates unambiguously which species is arrested (finite localization length) and which species remains ergodic (infinite localization length). As a result, we are able to draw the entire ergodic-nonergodic phase diagram of the binary hard-sphere mixture.

  11. [Mechanism of myocardial protection with potassium arrest in isolated ischemic rat hearts].

    PubMed

    Yoshino, H

    1991-11-01

    Isolated working rat hearts were exposed to 25 min ischemia, and functional recovery was assessed by aortic flow (AoF) and rate-pressure product (RPP) to evaluate the beneficial effects of potassium (20 mM) induced arrest (K-arrest) prior to ischemia. K-arrest improved the recovery of function after 30 min of reperfusion compared with the control group (%AoF: 68 +/- 6 vs 0%, %RPP: 90 +/- 3% vs 60 +/- 3%, p less than 0.01). The accumulation of Ca++ at the end of reperfusion was less in hearts with K-arrest (2.2 +/- 0.1 vs 4.5 +/- 0.3 mumol/g dry, p less than 0.01). There was no difference between the two groups in high energy phosphate content at the end of ischemia. The increase in intracellular Na+ (Nai) during ischemia was reduced in hearts with K-arrest (delta: 19 vs 46 mumol/g dry), and the level of intracellular K+ (Ki) was higher at the end of ischemia in hearts with K-arrest (341 +/- 4 vs 318 +/- 2 mumol/g dry, p less than 0.01). During the first 5 min of reperfusion, the level of Ki in K-arrested hearts jumped to a higher level than in the control group (delta: 15 vs 2 mumol/g dry, p less than 0.01). The level of Nai was lower in hearts with K-arrest after 5 min of reperfusion. These data suggested that K-arrest might preserve the activity of Na+/K+ ATPase during ischemia and early reperfusion, and that it attenuated the increase in Nai during ischemia and reperfusion, which resulted in less Ca++ overload during reperfusion via the Na+/Ca++ exchange mechanism and led to improved recovery. PMID:1663647

  12. Innovation in polymer arrester moisture sealing testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.A.; Mackevich, J.P.; Mosso, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    The vast majority of porcelain distribution arrester failures are the result of moisture ingress. Standards lag technology and do not currently address the unique design aspects of polymer arresters. Traditional sealing test methods cannot be run on polymer arresters because of lack of internal air space. A novel design test is proposed which involves sensitive interfacial leakage current measurements as the diagnostic. Samples are thermally cycled in water to produce thermal excursions and aging, while encouraging water ingress, should the sealing system be compromised. The proposed test is a modification of a protocol established for polymer insulators, which has been correlated to field service.

  13. Innovations in polymer arrester moisture sealing testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.A.; Mackevich, J.P.; Mosso, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    The vast majority of porcelain distribution arrester failures are the result of moisture ingress. Standards lag technology and do not currently address the unique design aspects of polymer arresters. Traditional sealing test methods cannot be run on polymer arresters because of lack of internal air space. A novel design test is proposed which involves sensitive interfacial leakage current measurements as the diagnostic. Samples are thermally cycled in water to produce thermal excursions and aging, while encouraging water ingress, should the sealing system be compromised. The proposed test is a modification of a protocol established for polymer insulators, which has been correlated to field service.

  14. History of Juvenile Arrests and Vocational Career Outcomes for At-Risk Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Margit; Kim, Hyoun K.; Capaldi, Deborah M.

    2009-01-01

    This study used longitudinal data from the Oregon Youth Study (OYS) to examine prospective effects of juvenile arrests, and of early versus late onset of juvenile offending, on two labor market outcomes by age 29/30 years. It was expected that those with more juvenile arrests and those with an early onset of offending would show poorer outcomes on both measures, controlling for propensity factors. Data were available for 203 men from the OYS, including officially recorded arrests and self-reported information on the men's work history across 9 years. Analyses revealed unexpected specificity in prospective effects: Juvenile arrests and mental health problems predicted the number of months unemployed; in contrast, being fired from work was predicted by poor child inhibitory control and adolescent substance use. Onset age of offending did not significantly predict either outcome. Implications of the findings for applied purposes and for developmental taxonomies of crime are discussed. PMID:20448840

  15. Cerebral oximetry and cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Skhirtladze-Dworschak, Keso; Dworschak, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Cerebral oximetry is a Food and Drug Administration-approved technology that allows monitoring of brain oxygen saturation in accessible superficial brain cortex regions, which are amongst the most vulnerable in regard to ischemic or hypoxic injury. Since most oxygen in the area of interest is located in the venous compartment, the determined regional brain oxygen saturation approximately reflects the local balance between oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption. Major systemic alterations in blood oxygen content and oxygen delivery will be accompanied by corresponding changes in regional brain saturation. This systematic review, which is based on a Medline search, focuses on the characteristic changes in regional cerebral oxygen saturation that occur, when global oxygen supply to the brain ceases. It further highlights the potential application of cerebral oximetry in the management of cardiac arrest victims, the predictability of clinical outcome after global cerebral ischemia, and it also indicates possible potentials for the management of cerebral reperfusion after having instituted return of spontaneous circulation. PMID:23782549

  16. Arrested Growth: Myth or Reality

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mukesh; Goyal, Manish; Navit, Pragati; Narayan, Abhishek

    2014-01-01

    In Class II, Division I malocclusion is a common problem often associated with mal-relationship of dental bases and mal-alignment of dentition. The approaches to treat Class II, Division I malocclusion include growth modulation, dental camouflage and surgical orthodontics. A 16-year-old female patient with Class II, Division I malocclusion associated with excessive over jet, deep bite, and retrognathic mandible reported to the Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Kothiwal Dental College and Research Center and Hospital, Moradabad. The case was treated with twin block appliance by taking into consideration the over jet which was to the tune of 13 mm and the mandible which was fully locked within the maxilla. The patient was post-pubertal by 3 years and by seeing lateral cephalogram, it falls in CVMI5 stage which mean normally that the growth is only 10% left and theoretically, not appropriate for functional appliance therapy. The patient was treated with twin block appliance to catch up with the arrested growth of mandible followed by fixed mechanotherapy. The result was tremendous and up to the mark. PMID:25628491

  17. Traumatic cardiac arrest: a unique approach.

    PubMed

    Harris, Tim; Masud, Syed; Lamond, Anna; Abu-Habsa, Mamoun

    2015-04-01

    Resuscitation of patients who sustain a cardiac arrest as a result of trauma (traumatic cardiac arrest) has previously been described as 'futile'. Several published series have since contradicted this claim and reported survival-to-discharge data ranging from 0 to 35%. International resuscitation guidelines (European Resuscitation Council and American Heart Association) promote a consistent approach to cardiopulmonary resuscitation on the basis of up-to-date evidence and consensus opinions. This minimizes de-novo decision-making under high-stress situations, promotes a rational approach and reduces the burden on an individual clinician. This narrative review sets out to highlight the differences in aetiology of traumatic cardiac arrest as compared with medical cardiac arrest and the consequent priorities in resuscitation. PMID:25163026

  18. Understand Your Risk for Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The first six months after a heart attack is a particularly high-risk period for sudden cardiac arrest in patients with atherosclerotic heart disease . ...

  19. Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159651.html Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest: Study Heart ... 30, 2016 THURSDAY, June 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Men are significantly more likely to have their heart ...

  20. Arrested of coalescence of emulsion droplets of arbitrary size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbanga, Badel L.; Burke, Christopher; Blair, Donald W.; Atherton, Timothy J.

    2013-03-01

    With applications ranging from food products to cosmetics via targeted drug delivery systems, structured anisotropic colloids provide an efficient way to control the structure, properties and functions of emulsions. When two fluid emulsion droplets are brought in contact, a reduction of the interfacial tension drives their coalescence into a larger droplet of the same total volume and reduced exposed area. This coalescence can be partially or totally hindered by the presence of nano or micron-size particles that coat the interface as in Pickering emulsions. We investigate numerically the dependance of the mechanical stability of these arrested shapes on the particles size, their shape anisotropy, their polydispersity, their interaction with the solvent, and the particle-particle interactions. We discuss structural shape changes that can be induced by tuning the particles interactions after arrest occurs, and provide design parameters for the relevant experiments.

  1. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  2. Interim Methadone Treatment: Impact on Arrests

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Robert P.; Jaffe, Jerome H.; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Kinlock, Timothy W.; Gordon, Michael S.; Kelly, Sharon M.; Wilson, Monique E.; Ahmed, Ashraf

    2009-01-01

    AIMS This study examines the frequency and severity of arrest charges among heroin addicts randomly assigned to either interim methadone maintenance (IM) or to remain on a waiting list for methadone treatment. It was hypothesized that IM participants would have a: 1) lower number of arrests at 6 and 12 months and 2) lower mean crime severity scores at 6 and 12 months post-baseline. METHODS Available official arrest data were obtained for all 319 study participants for a period of 2 years before and after study enrollment. Crime severity ratings of charges were made using an established measure of crime severity. FINDINGS Participants randomly assigned to IM as compared to those on a waiting list had a significant reduction in number of arrests at 6 but not at 12 months from study enrollment. There were no significant differences in whether participants were arrested for a more severe crime but frequency of severe crime was relatively low in both groups. Additional post hoc analyses based on whether participants were in methadone treatment at 4 and 10 months after original random assignment to treatment condition revealed that those participants not in treatment at these follow-up assessment points were significantly more likely to be arrested and to have a higher mean crime severity rating at 12 and 24 months post-baseline assessment. CONCLUSIONS IM as compared to the waiting list condition, had a significant reduction in number of officially- recorded arrests from baseline to 6 months post-baseline. Those who were enrolled in methadone treatment at the 4 and 10 month follow-up assessment, regardless of initial assignment, had fewer arrests at 12 and 24 months post-baseline. PMID:19443133

  3. Surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nick

    2016-05-01

    Emergency care nurses have been urged to play their part in Scotland's push to revolutionise care for cardiac arrest patients - by teaching others how to save a life. This article discusses the Scottish out-of-hospital cardiac arrest strategy, with particular focus on the drive to increase bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rates, and on how emergency nurses are being enlisted to help promote the training of members of the public. PMID:27165393

  4. Cardiac arrest equipment to support circulation.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Matthew; Jevon, Phil

    Cardiac arrest trolleys must be equipped with all the instruments and medication needed to deal with an acute adult cardiac arrest. Nurses must not only be familiar with these contents but also know how to use, check and maintain them. This first part of this two-part series looked at equipment to aid airway and breathing; this second part focuses on circulation. Note that drug doses mentioned here relate to the adult patient and will be different for children. PMID:25223000

  5. Cardiac arrest equipment to support airway.

    PubMed

    Aldridge, Matthew; Jevon, Phil

    Each hospital should have standardised cardiac arrest trolleys equipped with all the instruments and medication needed to deal with an acute adult cardiac arrest. Nurses must know the contents of these trolleys and how to use them to fulfil their common role as first responder. This first article in a two-part series looks at equipment to aid airway management and breathing; part two will focus on circulation. PMID:25174131

  6. Sex Disparities in Arrest Outcomes for Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Melissa; Worthen, Meredith G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Domestic violence arrests have been historically focused on protecting women and children from abusive men. Arrest patterns continue to reflect this bias with more men arrested for domestic violence compared to women. Such potential gender variations in arrest patterns pave the way to the investigation of disparities by sex of the offender in…

  7. Therapeutic hypothermia after in-hospital cardiac arrest: a critique.

    PubMed

    Hessel, Eugene A

    2014-06-01

    More than 210,000 in-hospital cardiac arrests occur annually in the United States. Use of moderate therapeutic hypothermia (TH) in comatose survivors after return of spontaneous circulation following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OOH-CA) caused by ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia is recommended strongly by many professional organizations and societies. The use of TH after cardiac arrest associated with nonshockable rhythms and after in-hospital cardiac arrest (IH-CA) is recommended to be considered by these same organizations and is being applied widely. The use in these latter circumstances is based on an extrapolation of the data supporting its use after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest associated with shockable rhythms. The purpose of this article is to review the limitations of existing data supporting these extended application of TH after cardiac arrest and to suggest approaches to this dilemma. The data supporting its use for OOH-CA appear to this author, and to some others, to be rather weak, and the data supporting the use of TH for IH-CA appear to be even weaker and to include no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or supportive observational studies. The many reasons why TH might be expected to be less effective following IH-CA are reviewed. The degree of neurologic injury may be more severe in many of these cases and, thus, may not be responsive to TH as currently practiced following OOH-CA. The potential adverse consequences of the routine use of TH for IH-CA are listed and include complications associated with TH, interference with diagnostic and interventional therapy, and use of scarce personnel and financial resources. Most importantly, it inhibits the ability of researchers to conduct needed RCTs. The author believes that the proper method of providing TH in these cases needs to be better defined. Based on this analysis the author concludes that TH should not be used indiscriminantly following most cases of IH-CA, and

  8. THE RACE/ETHNICITY DISPARITY IN MISDEMEANOR MARIJUANA ARRESTS IN NEW YORK CITY*

    PubMed Central

    GOLUB, ANDREW; JOHNSON, BRUCE D.; DUNLAP, ELOISE

    2008-01-01

    Research Summary This article examines the growth in marijuana misdemeanor arrests in New York City (NYC) from 1980 to 2003 and its differential impact on blacks and Hispanics. Since 1980, the New York City Police Department (NYPD) expanded its use of arrest and detention for minor offenses under its quality-of-life (QOL) policing initiative. Arrest data indicate that during the 1990s the primary focus of QOL policing became smoking marijuana in public view (MPV). By 2000, MPV had become the most common misdemeanor arrest, accounting for 15% of all NYC adult arrests and rivaling controlled substance arrests as the primary focus of drug abuse control. Of note, most MPV arrestees have been black or Hispanic. Furthermore, black and Hispanic MPV arrestees have been more likely to be detained prior to arraignment, convicted, and sentenced to jail than their white counterparts. Policy Implications In light of the disparities, we recommend that the NYPD consider scaling back on MPV enforcement and reducing the harshness of treatment by routinely issuing Desk Appearance Tickets when the person is not wanted on other charges, so that most MPV arrestees would not be detained. Furthermore, we recommend that legislators should consider making smoking marijuana in public a violation and not a misdemeanor. Lastly, we suggest ways that NYC could monitor the effectiveness of these policy modifications to assure that the city continues to meet its goals for order maintenance. PMID:18841246

  9. Advances in crack-arrest technology for reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is continuing to improve the understanding of conditions that govern the initiation, rapid propagation, arrest, and ductile tearing of cracks in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This paper describes recent advances in a coordinated effort being conducted under the HSST Program by ORNL and several subcontracting groups to develop the crack-arrest data base and the analytical tools required to construct inelastic dynamic fracture models for RPV steels. Large-scale tests are being carried out to generate crack-arrest toughness data at temperatures approaching and above the onset of Charpy upper-shelf behavior. Small- and intermediate-size specimens subjected to static and dynamic loading are being developed and tested to provide additional fracture data for RPV steels. Viscoplastic effects are being included in dynamic fracture models and computer programs and their utility validated through analyses of data from carefully controlled experiments. Recent studies are described that examine convergence problems associated with energy-based fracture parameters in viscoplastic-dynamic fracture applications. Alternative techniques that have potential for achieving convergent solutions for fracture parameters in the context of viscoplastic-dynamic models are discussed. 46 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Hyperoxia toxicity after cardiac arrest: What is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Llitjos, Jean-François; Mira, Jean-Paul; Duranteau, Jacques; Cariou, Alain

    2016-12-01

    This review gives an overview of current knowledge on hyperoxia pathophysiology and examines experimental and human evidence of hyperoxia effects after cardiac arrest. Oxygen plays a pivotal role in critical care management as a lifesaving therapy through the compensation of the imbalance between oxygen requirements and supply. However, growing evidence sustains the hypothesis of reactive oxygen species overproduction-mediated toxicity during hyperoxia, thus exacerbating organ failure by various oxidative cellular injuries. In the cardiac arrest context, evidence of hyperoxia effects on outcome is fairly conflicting. Although prospective data are lacking, retrospective studies and meta-analysis suggest that hyperoxia could be associated with an increased mortality. However, data originate from retrospective, heterogeneous and inconsistent studies presenting various biases that are detailed in this review. Therefore, after an original and detailed analysis of all experimental and clinical studies, we herein provide new ideas and concepts that could participate to improve knowledge on oxygen toxicity and help in developing further prospective controlled randomized trials on this topic. Up to now, the strategy recommended by international guidelines on cardiac arrest (i.e., targeting an oxyhemoglobin saturation of 94-98 %) should be applied in order to avoid deleterious hypoxia and potent hyperoxia. PMID:27003426

  11. Physiology and pathophysiology of respiratory arrest by cyanide poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Klimmek, R.

    1993-05-13

    Respiratory arrest, preceded by hyperventilation, is the primary cause of death in acute cyanide poisoning. Hyperventilation followed by apnea is also observed without intoxication. Hyperventilation and apnea in untoxicated subjects and animals are analyzed for the underlying physiological and biochemical changes and compared with those found during cyanide poisoning. The study reveals that the respiratory autoregulation appears to be the same under both conditions. Respiratory arrest is controlled by cerebral PCO2 and can occur without hypoxia or inhibition of cytochrome oxidase. It is postulated that respiratory arrest is a 'desperate act' thrust on the respiratory neurons by a critical exhaustion of their energy store (ATP) due to the rapid firing in the period of hyperventilation. The point of no return may be reached when anoxia and/or partial inhibition of cytochrome oxidase prevent the neurons from replenishing the ATP store. The formation of Fe3+ cyanide complexes. exemplified by the metHb producer DMAP, appears to give the best results with regard to the restoration of spontaneous respiration. The study of respiratory autoregulation may also be helpful in developing and understanding other therapeutic approaches.

  12. Arrested coalescence of viscoelastic droplets: polydisperse doublets.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Prerna; Caggioni, Marco; Spicer, Patrick T

    2016-07-28

    Arrested droplet coalescence produces stable anisotropic shapes and is a key mechanism for microstructure development in foods, petroleum and pharmaceutical formulations. Past work has examined the dynamic elastic arrest of coalescing monodisperse droplet doublets and developed a simple model of doublet strain as a function of physical variables. Although the work describes experimental data well, it is limited to describing same-size droplets. A new model incorporating a generalized description of doublet shape is developed to describe polydisperse doublet formation in more realistic emulsion systems. Polydisperse doublets are shown to arrest at lower strains than monodisperse doublets as a result of the smaller contribution of surface area in a given pair. Larger droplet size ratios have lower relative degrees of strain because coalescence is arrested at an earlier stage than in more monodisperse cases. Experimental observations of polydisperse doublet formation indicate that the model under-predicts arrest strains at low solid levels and small droplet sizes. The discrepancy is hypothesized to be the result of nonlinear elastic deformation at high strains.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298435

  13. Synchronized Cell Cycle Arrest Promotes Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Minsuk; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Kyunghee; Park, So-Young; Lim, Hyun-Sook; Kim, Taesoo; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclast progenitors undergo cell cycle arrest before differentiation into osteoclasts, induced by exposure to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). The role of such cell cycle arrest in osteoclast differentiation has remained unclear, however. We here examined the effect of synchronized cell cycle arrest on osteoclast formation. Osteoclast progenitors deprived of M-CSF in culture adopted a uniform morphology and exhibited cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase in association with both down-regulation of cyclins A and D1 as well as up-regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1. Such M-CSF deprivation also promoted the differentiation of osteoclast progenitors into multinucleated osteoclasts expressing high levels of osteoclast marker proteins such as NFATc1, c-Fos, Atp6v0d2, cathepsin K, and integrin β3 on subsequent exposure to M-CSF and RANKL. Our results suggest that synchronized arrest and reprogramming of osteoclast progenitors renders them poised to respond to inducers of osteoclast formation. Further characterization of such effects may facilitate induction of the differentiation of heterogeneous and multipotent cells into desired cell lineages. PMID:27517906

  14. Synchronized Cell Cycle Arrest Promotes Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Minsuk; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Kyunghee; Park, So-Young; Lim, Hyun-Sook; Kim, Taesoo; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclast progenitors undergo cell cycle arrest before differentiation into osteoclasts, induced by exposure to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). The role of such cell cycle arrest in osteoclast differentiation has remained unclear, however. We here examined the effect of synchronized cell cycle arrest on osteoclast formation. Osteoclast progenitors deprived of M-CSF in culture adopted a uniform morphology and exhibited cell cycle arrest at the G₀-G₁ phase in association with both down-regulation of cyclins A and D1 as well as up-regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(Kip1). Such M-CSF deprivation also promoted the differentiation of osteoclast progenitors into multinucleated osteoclasts expressing high levels of osteoclast marker proteins such as NFATc1, c-Fos, Atp6v0d2, cathepsin K, and integrin β3 on subsequent exposure to M-CSF and RANKL. Our results suggest that synchronized arrest and reprogramming of osteoclast progenitors renders them poised to respond to inducers of osteoclast formation. Further characterization of such effects may facilitate induction of the differentiation of heterogeneous and multipotent cells into desired cell lineages. PMID:27517906

  15. Prolonged cardiac arrest and resuscitation by extracorporeal life support: favourable outcome without preceding anticoagulation in an experimental setting.

    PubMed

    Foerster, K; D'Inka, M; Beyersdorf, F; Benk, C; Nguyen-Thanh, T; Mader, I; Fritsch, B; Ihling, C; Mueller, K; Heilmann, C; Trummer, G

    2013-11-01

    State-of-the-art cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) restores circulation with inconsistent blood-flow and pressure. Extracorporeal life support (ECLS) following CPR opens the opportunity for "controlled reperfusion". In animal experiments investigating CPR with ECLS, systemic anticoagulation before induced cardiac arrest is normal, but a major point of dispute, since preliminary heparinization in patients undergoing unwitnessed cardiac arrest is impossible. In this study, we investigated options for ECLS after an experimental 15 minutes normothermic cardiac arrest, without preceding anticoagulation, in pigs. Neurological recovery was assessed by a scoring system, electroencephalography and brain magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, brain histology was performed on day seven after cardiac arrest. We demonstrated that preliminary heparin administration was not necessary for survival or neurological recovery in this setting. Heparin flushing of the cannulae seemed sufficient to avoid thrombus formation. These findings may ease the way to using ECLS in patients with sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:23827862

  16. An Analysis of Alternatives to New York City's Current Marijuana Arrest and Detention Policy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Bruce D; Golub, Andrew; Dunlap, Eloise; Sifaneck, Stephen J

    2008-01-01

    During the 1990s, the New York Police Department (NYPD) instituted a policy of arresting and detaining people for minor offenses that occur in public as part of their quality-of-life (hereafter QOL) policing initiative. The number of NYPD arrests for smoking marijuana in public view (MPV) increased from 3,000 in 1994 to over 50,000 in 2000, and have been about 30,000 in the mid 2000s. Most of these arrestees (84%) have been minority; blacks have been 2.7 more likely and Hispanics 1.8 times more likely to be detained than whites for an MPV arrest. Minorities have been most likely to receive more severe dispositions, even controlling for demographics and prior arrest histories.This paper examines the pros and cons of the current policy; this is compared with possible alternatives including the following: arrest and issue a desk appearance ticket (DAT); issue a non-criminal citation (violation); street warnings; and tolerate public marijuana smoking. The authors recommend that the NYPD change to issuing DATs on a routine basis. Drug policy reformers might wish to further pursue changing statutes regarding smoking marijuana in public view into a violation (noncriminal) or encourage the wider use of street warnings. Any of these policy changes would help reduce the disproportionate burden on minorities associated with the current arrest and detention policy. These policies could help maintain civic norms against smoking marijuana in public. PMID:18726007

  17. Juvenile Arrest and Collateral Educational Damage in the Transition to Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, David S.; Sampson, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Official sanctioning of students by the criminal justice system is a long-hypothesized source of educational disadvantage, but its explanatory status remains unresolved. Few studies of the educational consequences of a criminal record account for alternative explanations such as low self-control, lack of parental supervision, deviant peers, and neighborhood disadvantage. Moreover, virtually no research on the effect of a criminal record has examined the “black box” of mediating mechanisms or the consequence of arrest for postsecondary educational attainment. Analyzing longitudinal data with multiple and independent assessments of theoretically relevant domains, this paper estimates the direct effect of arrest on later high school dropout and college enrollment for adolescents with otherwise equivalent neighborhood, school, family, peer, and individual characteristics as well as similar frequency of criminal offending. We present evidence that arrest has a substantively large and robust impact on dropping out of high school among Chicago public school students. We also find a significant gap in four-year college enrollment between arrested and otherwise similar youth without a criminal record. We assess intervening mechanisms hypothesized to explain the process by which arrest disrupts the schooling process, and, in turn, produces collateral educational damage. The results imply that institutional responses and disruptions in students’ educational trajectories, rather than social psychological factors, are responsible for the arrest-education link. PMID:25309003

  18. An Analysis of Alternatives to New York City's Current Marijuana Arrest and Detention Policy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Bruce D.; Golub, Andrew; Dunlap, Eloise; Sifaneck, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    During the 1990s, the New York Police Department (NYPD) instituted a policy of arresting and detaining people for minor offenses that occur in public as part of their quality-of-life (hereafter QOL) policing initiative. The number of NYPD arrests for smoking marijuana in public view (MPV) increased from 3,000 in 1994 to over 50,000 in 2000, and have been about 30,000 in the mid 2000s. Most of these arrestees (84%) have been minority; blacks have been 2.7 more likely and Hispanics 1.8 times more likely to be detained than whites for an MPV arrest. Minorities have been most likely to receive more severe dispositions, even controlling for demographics and prior arrest histories. This paper examines the pros and cons of the current policy; this is compared with possible alternatives including the following: arrest and issue a desk appearance ticket (DAT); issue a non-criminal citation (violation); street warnings; and tolerate public marijuana smoking. The authors recommend that the NYPD change to issuing DATs on a routine basis. Drug policy reformers might wish to further pursue changing statutes regarding smoking marijuana in public view into a violation (noncriminal) or encourage the wider use of street warnings. Any of these policy changes would help reduce the disproportionate burden on minorities associated with the current arrest and detention policy. These policies could help maintain civic norms against smoking marijuana in public. PMID:18726007

  19. Juvenile Arrest and Collateral Educational Damage in the Transition to Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Kirk, David S; Sampson, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Official sanctioning of students by the criminal justice system is a long-hypothesized source of educational disadvantage, but its explanatory status remains unresolved. Few studies of the educational consequences of a criminal record account for alternative explanations such as low self-control, lack of parental supervision, deviant peers, and neighborhood disadvantage. Moreover, virtually no research on the effect of a criminal record has examined the "black box" of mediating mechanisms or the consequence of arrest for postsecondary educational attainment. Analyzing longitudinal data with multiple and independent assessments of theoretically relevant domains, this paper estimates the direct effect of arrest on later high school dropout and college enrollment for adolescents with otherwise equivalent neighborhood, school, family, peer, and individual characteristics as well as similar frequency of criminal offending. We present evidence that arrest has a substantively large and robust impact on dropping out of high school among Chicago public school students. We also find a significant gap in four-year college enrollment between arrested and otherwise similar youth without a criminal record. We assess intervening mechanisms hypothesized to explain the process by which arrest disrupts the schooling process, and, in turn, produces collateral educational damage. The results imply that institutional responses and disruptions in students' educational trajectories, rather than social psychological factors, are responsible for the arrest-education link. PMID:25309003

  20. Studies of Shuttle orbiter arrestment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Pamela A.; Stubbs, Sandy M.

    1993-01-01

    Scale model studies of the Shuttle Orbiter Arrestment System (AS) were completed with a 1/27.5-scale model at the NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of these studies was to determine the proper configuration for a net arrestment system to bring the orbiter to a safe stop with minimal damage in the event of a runway overrun. Tests were conducted for runway on-centerline and off-centerline engagements at simulated speeds up to approximately 100 knots (full scale). The results of these tests defined the interaction of the net and the orbiter, the dynamics of off-centerline engagements, and the maximum number of vertical net straps that may become entangled with the nose gear. In addition to these tests, a test program with a 1/8-scale model was conducted by the arrestment system contractor, and the results are presented in the appendix.

  1. Corrosion of retractable type fall arresters.

    PubMed

    Baszczyński, Krzysztof; Jachowicz, Marcin

    2009-01-01

    Retractable type fall arresters constitute a most effective group of components used in personal protection systems protecting against falls from a height. They are designed primarily for outdoor use, which results in exposure to atmospheric factors associated with risk of corrosion of metal elements. This paper presents the results of a study, in which retractable type fall arresters were exposed to a simulated corrosive environment, a neutral salt spray. It discusses the development of corrosion processes depending on the duration of exposure to corrosive conditions. Tests demonstrated that corrosion of elements decreased their strength and impaired the functioning of mobile parts. The article presents methods of testing the correct functioning of devices, necessary for assessing their resistance to corrosion, which have been developed for this purpose. It also analyzes the correlation between corrosion-related damage of retractable type fall arresters and potential hazards for their users. PMID:19744368

  2. Management of cardiac arrest in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jeejeebhoy, Farida; Windrim, Rory

    2014-05-01

    Cardiac arrest in pregnancy is a rare event in routine obstetric practice, but is increasing in frequency. Resuscitation of cardiac arrest is more complex for pregnant women because of a number of factors unique to pregnancy: the altered physiologic state induced by pregnancy; the requirement to consider both maternal and fetal issues during resuscitation; and the consequent possibility of perimortem caesarean section during resuscitation. These extra considerations create a unique clinical emergency and decision pathway requiring the co-ordinated response of medical, obstetric, and neonatal teams. Although many research questions remain in this area, recent consensus has been reached on appropriate resuscitation of a pregnant woman. Centres offering care for birthing women need to be aware of the changing demographics and resuscitation guidelines in this important area, and implement measures to ensure dependable and optimal team responses to maternal cardiac arrest. PMID:24797653

  3. ADULTHOOD ANIMAL ABUSE AMONG MEN ARRESTED FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

    PubMed Central

    Febres, Jeniimarie; Brasfield, Hope; Shorey, Ryan C.; Elmquist, Joanna; Ninnemann, Andrew; Schonbrun, Yael C.; Temple, Jeff R.; Recupero, Patricia R.; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2014-01-01

    Learning more about intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators could aid the development of more effective treatments. The prevalence of adulthood animal abuse (AAA) perpetration and its association with IPV perpetration, antisociality, and alcohol use in 307 men arrested for domestic violence was examined. 41% (n = 125) of the men committed at least one act of animal abuse since the age of 18, in contrast to the 3.0% prevalence rate reported by men in the general population. Controlling for antisociality and alcohol use, AAA showed a trend towards a significant association with physical and severe psychological IPV perpetration. PMID:25324474

  4. Adulthood animal abuse among men arrested for domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Febres, Jeniimarie; Brasfield, Hope; Shorey, Ryan C; Elmquist, Joanna; Ninnemann, Andrew; Schonbrun, Yael C; Temple, Jeff R; Recupero, Patricia R; Stuart, Gregory L

    2014-09-01

    Learning more about intimate partner violence (IPV), perpetrators could aid the development of more effective treatments. The prevalence of adulthood animal abuse (AAA) perpetration and its association with IPV perpetration, antisociality, and alcohol use in 307 men arrested for domestic violence were examined. Forty-one percent (n = 125) of the men committed at least one act of animal abuse since the age of 18, in contrast to the 1.5% prevalence rate reported by men in the general population. Controlling for antisociality and alcohol use, AAA showed a trend toward a significant association with physical and severe psychological IPV perpetration. PMID:25324474

  5. Clinical investigation: thyroid function test abnormalities in cardiac arrest associated with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iltumur, Kenan; Olmez, Gonul; Arıturk, Zuhal; Taskesen, Tuncay; Toprak, Nizamettin

    2005-01-01

    Introduction It is known that thyroid homeostasis is altered during the acute phase of cardiac arrest. However, it is not clear under what conditions, how and for how long these alterations occur. In the present study we examined thyroid function tests (TFTs) in the acute phase of cardiac arrest caused by acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and at the end of the first 2 months after the event. Method Fifty patients with cardiac arrest induced by ACS and 31 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) who did not require cardioversion or cardiopulmonary resuscitation were enrolled in the study, as were 40 healthy volunteers. The patients were divided into three groups based on duration of cardiac arrest (<5 min, 5–10 min and >10 min). Blood samples were collected for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), tri-iodothyronine (T3), free T3, thyroxine (T4), free T4, troponin-I and creatine kinase-MB measurements. The blood samples for TFTs were taken at 72 hours and at 2 months after the acute event in the cardiac arrest and AMI groups, but only once in the control group. Results The T3 and free T3 levels at 72 hours in the cardiac arrest group were significantly lower than in both the AMI and control groups (P < 0.0001). On the other hand, there were no significant differences between T4, free T4 and TSH levels between the three groups (P > 0.05). At the 2-month evaluation, a dramatic improvement was observed in T3 and free T3 levels in the cardiac arrest group (P < 0.0001). In those patients whose cardiac arrest duration was in excess of 10 min, levels of T3, free T3, T4 and TSH were significantly lower than those in patients whose cardiac arrest duration was under 5 min (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.005 and P < 0.05, respectively). Conclusion TFTs are significantly altered in cardiac arrest induced by ACS. Changes in TFTs are even more pronounced in patients with longer periods of resuscitation. The changes in the surviving patients were characterized by euthyroid sick

  6. 14 CFR 1203b.103 - Arrest authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Arrest authority. 1203b.103 Section 1203b... committing any felony cognizable under the laws of the United States. (c) The Office of the General Counsel, NASA Headquarters, or the Installation Chief Counsel's Office, as appropriate, shall provide...

  7. Gene copy number and cell cycle arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bose, Indrani

    2006-03-01

    The cell cycle is an orderly sequence of events which ultimately lead to the division of a single cell into two daughter cells. In the case of DNA damage by radiation or chemicals, the damage checkpoints in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle are activated. This results in an arrest of the cell cycle so that the DNA damage can be repaired. Once this is done, the cell continues with its usual cycle of activity. We study a mathematical model of the DNA damage checkpoint in the G2 phase which arrests the transition from the G2 to the M (mitotic) phase of the cell cycle. The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a key role in activating the pathways leading to cell cycle arrest in mammalian systems. If the DNA damage is severe, the p53 proteins activate other pathways which bring about apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death. Loss of the p53 gene results in the proliferation of cells containing damaged DNA, i.e., in the growth of tumors which may ultimately become cancerous. There is some recent experimental evidence which suggests that the mutation of a single copy of the p53 gene (in the normal cell each gene has two identical copies) is sufficient to trigger the formation of tumors. We study the effect of reducing the gene copy number of the p53 and two other genes on cell cycle arrest and obtain results consistent with experimental observations.

  8. Juvenile Arrests, 1999. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.

    This bulletin presents a summary and analysis of national and state juvenile arrest data for 1999. Data come from the FBI's annual "Crime in the United States" report, which offers the estimated number of crimes reported to law enforcement agencies. The 1999 murder rate was the lowest since 1966. Of the nearly 1,800 juveniles murdered in 1999, 33…

  9. Juvenile Arrests, 2007. Juvenile Justice Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puzzanchera, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This Bulletin summarizes 2007 juvenile crime and arrest data reported by local law enforcement agencies across the country and cited in the FBI report, "Crime in the United States 2007." The Bulletin describes the extent and nature of juvenile crime that comes to the attention of the justice system. It serves as a baseline for comparison for…

  10. The Organizational Determinants of Police Arrest Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Allison T.; MacDonald, John M.; Manz, Patrick W.

    2006-01-01

    A limited amount of research has examined the relationship between characteristics of police organizations and policing styles. In particular, few studies have examined the link between organizational structures and police officer arrest decisions. Wilson's (1968) pioneering case study of police organizations suggested that individual police…

  11. Drug and Alcohol Arrests Increased in 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicklin, Julie L.

    2001-01-01

    U.S. Department of Education (DOE) data showed a 1999 increase in drug and alcohol arrests on college campuses. Also, the number of reported sex offenses rose by 6 percent from 1998-99. Some experts question the validity of the year-to-year comparisons and the DOE data. Presents statistics on sex offenses, drug use, and drinking and football. (SM)

  12. Arrest History among Men and Sexual Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Dennis G.; Milroy, Michael E.; Reynolds, Grace L.; Klahn, Jennifer A.; Wood, Michele M.

    2004-01-01

    This study explored associations between ever having been arrested and other variables among 490 male drug users. Participants were classified into three groups based on recent sexual history: men who had not had sex (NOSEX), men who had had sex with women (HETERO), and men who had had sex with men (MSM). We found that MSM who had been arrested…

  13. Maternal Cardiac Arrest: A Practical and Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Jeejeebhoy, Farida M.; Morrison, Laurie J.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest during pregnancy is a dedicated chapter in the American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care; however, a robust maternal cardiac arrest knowledge translation strategy and emergency response plan is not usually the focus of institutional emergency preparedness programs. Although maternal cardiac arrest is rare, the emergency department is a high-risk area for receiving pregnant women in either prearrest or full cardiac arrest. It is imperative that institutions review and update emergency response plans for a maternal arrest. This review highlights the most recent science, guidelines, and recommended implementation strategies related to a maternal arrest. The aim of this paper is to increase the understanding of the important physiological differences of, and management strategies for, a maternal cardiac arrest, as well as provide institutions with the most up-to-date literature on which they can build emergency preparedness programs for a maternal arrest. PMID:23956861

  14. 33 CFR 154.2106 - Detonation arresters installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... arrester, line size expansions must be in a straight pipe run and must be no closer than 120 times the pipe's diameter from the detonation arrester unless the manufacturer has test data to show the...

  15. Women Get Worse Cardiac Arrest Care Than Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_159505.html Women Get Worse Cardiac Arrest Care Than Men: Study They need to be ... June 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women who survive cardiac arrest are less likely than men to get aggressive, ...

  16. Dynamic crack arrest in ceramics and ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, A. S.; Yang, K. H.

    1989-01-01

    The results of past dynamic crack arrest experiments involving structural ceramics and ceramic composites are reviewed and analyzed. The lack of dynamic crack arrest in very brittle materials is discussed and contrasted with dynamic crack arrest in somewhat brittle metallic and polymeric materials. Numerical analyses show that the lack of crack arrest is due to reduced dynamic fracture resistance of the material and is not due to the kinetic energy.

  17. Gender-Sensitive Substance Abuse Treatment and Arrest Outcomes for Women

    PubMed Central

    Kissin, Wendy B.; Tang, Zhiqun; Campbell, Kevin M.; Claus, Ronald E.; Orwin, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    The present study links an empirically-developed quantitative measure of gender-sensitive (GS) substance abuse treatment to arrest outcomes among 5,109 substance abusing women in mixed-gender short-term residential programs in Washington State. Frailty models of survival analysis and 3-level hierarchical linear models were conducted to test the beneficial effects of GS treatment on decreasing criminal justice involvement. Propensity scores were used to control for the pre-existing differences among women due to the quasi-experimental nature of the study. Men's arrest outcomes were used to control for confounding at the program level. Results show that women in more GS treatment programs had a lower risk of drug-related arrests, and women in more GS treatment programs who also completed treatment had a significant reduction in overall arrests from two years before- to two years after treatment, above and beyond the reduction in arrests due to treatment alone. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:24209383

  18. School Behavioral Profiles of Arrested versus Nonarrested Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Hill M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Fifth grade social behavioral profiles of 75 arrested and nonarrested adolescent boys were assessed to determine their ability to predict the later arrest status of the boys in grades 5-7. Using such measures as teacher ratings of social skills and observations of negative aggressive behavior, 75 percent of subsequently arrested subjects were…

  19. Arrests for Major Crimes: Trends and Patterns for Elderly Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapp, Allen D.

    1989-01-01

    Examined data from the Uniform Crime Reports of the Federal Bureau of Investigation for 1972 through 1981. Findings indicated that the percentage of all arrests that were arrests of the elderly was declining while the elderly population itself was rapidly increasing; and the percentage of elderly arrests for index (major) crimes was increasing…

  20. [Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. A cold intravenous fluid, a cooling helmet and a cooling blanket efficiently reduce body temperature].

    PubMed

    Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Cronberg, Tobias; Widner, Håkan; Englund, Elisabet; Ersson, Anders

    2004-07-22

    Two controlled randomized trials have shown that mild systemic hypothermia after cardiac arrest is beneficial for neurological outcome and one of the studies shows an improved survival rate. A pilot study was performed to evaluate a model of induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest, using cold intravenous fluids and surface cooling with a cold helmet and a coldwater blanket (Thermowrap). The main purpose was to evaluate our cooling method regarding efficacy, safety and usability. Five unconscious patients after cardiac arrest were treated with induced hypothermia of whom three survived with good recovery to six-month follow up. Two patients died in the ICU without regaining consciousness. There were no adverse events during treatment. We conclude that our method is reasonably fast compared to other published methods, it is easy to perform and it offers a good temperature control during cooling and rewarming. Routines for evaluating prognosis and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest and hypothermia treatment need to be revised. PMID:15314936

  1. Glycopyrrolate-induced respiratory arrest: an unusual side effect.

    PubMed

    D'souza, S; Gowler, V

    2015-03-01

    A descriptive case report of a 22-year-old woman, scheduled for elective laparotomy who had a respiratory arrest after premedication with inj glycopyrrolate and ondansetron. Respiratory arrest is an uncommon side effect of glycopyrrolate with very few published reports. Ondansteron can also cause respiratory arrest, however is most often associated with bradycardia. This patient had tachycardia and respiratory arrest and is suggestive of glycopyrrolate-induced respiratory arrest. This case report highlights the importance of strict vigilance by the anaesthesiologist even during premedication. PMID:25557856

  2. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-Li; Liu, Yuan-Shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-Dong; Chang, Rui-Ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-Gen; Fang, Xiang-Shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-Yuan; Huang, Zi-Tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:27489503

  3. Carbon Monoxide Improves Neurologic Outcomes by Mitochondrial Biogenesis after Global Cerebral Ischemia Induced by Cardiac Arrest in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Yao, Lan; Zhou, Li-li; Liu, Yuan-shan; Chen, Ming-di; Wu, Hai-dong; Chang, Rui-ming; Li, Yi; Zhou, Ming-gen; Fang, Xiang-shao; Yu, Tao; Jiang, Long-yuan; Huang, Zi-tong

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to brain injury following global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest. Carbon monoxide treatment has shown potent cytoprotective effects in ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules on brain mitochondrial dysfunction and brain injury following resuscitation after cardiac arrest in rats. A rat model of cardiac arrest was established by asphyxia. The animals were randomly divided into the following 3 groups: cardiac arrest and resuscitation group, cardiac arrest and resuscitation plus carbon monoxide intervention group, and sham control group (no cardiac arrest). After the return of spontaneous circulation, neurologic deficit scores (NDS) and S-100B levels were significantly decreased at 24, 48, and 72 h, but carbon monoxide treatment improved the NDS and S-100B levels at 24 h and the 3-day survival rates of the rats. This treatment also decreased the number of damaged neurons in the hippocampus CA1 area and increased the brain mitochondrial activity. In addition, it increased mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing the expression of biogenesis factors including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor-1, nuclear respiratory factor-2 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Thus, this study showed that carbon monoxide treatment alleviated brain injury after cardiac arrest in rats by increased brain mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:27489503

  4. HSST crack-arrest studies overview

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, C.E.; Whitman, G.D.

    1985-01-01

    An overview is given of the efforts underway in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program to better understand and model crack-arrest behavior in reactor pressure vessel steels. The efforts are both experimental and analytical. The experimental work provides K/sub Ia/ data from laboratory-sized specimens, from thick-wall cylinders which exhibit essentially-full restraint and from nonisothermal wide-plate specimens. These data serve to define toughness-temperature trends and to provide validation data under prototypical reactor conditions. The analytical efforts interpret and correlate the data, plus provide LEFM, elastodynamic and viscoplastic methods for analyzing crack run-arrest behavior in reactor vessels. The analysis methods are incorporated into finite element computer programs which are under development at three separate laboratories. 22 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Crack propagation and arrest in pressurized containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Delale, F.; Owczarek, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of crack propagation and arrest in a finite volume cylindrical container filled with pressurized gas is considered. It is assumed that the cylinder contains a symmetrically located longitudinal part-through crack with a relatively small net ligament. The net ligament suddenly ruptures initiating the process of fracture propagation and depressurization in the cylinder. Thus the problem is a coupled gas dynamics and solid mechanics problem the exact formulation of which does not seem to be possible. The problem is reduced to a proper initial value problem by introducing a dynamic fracture criterion which relates the crack acceleration to the difference between a load factor and the corresponding strength parameter. The results indicate that generally in gas filled cylinders fracture arrest is not possible unless the material behaves in a ductile manner and the container is relatively long.

  6. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  7. Nuclear reactor melt arrest and coolability device

    DOEpatents

    Theofanous, Theo G.; Dinh, Nam Truc; Wachowiak, Richard M.

    2016-06-14

    Example embodiments provide a Basemat-Internal Melt Arrest and Coolability device (BiMAC) that offers improved spatial and mechanical characteristics for use in damage prevention and risk mitigation in accident scenarios. Example embodiments may include a BiMAC having an inclination of less than 10-degrees from the basemat floor and/or coolant channels of less than 4 inches in diameter, while maintaining minimum safety margins required by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  8. Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Due to Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kjellemo, Hugo; Hansen, Andreas E; Øines, Dennis A; Nilsen, Thor O; Wik, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Survival from pediatric cardiac arrest due to trauma has been reported to be 0.0%-8.8%. Some argue that resuscitation efforts in the case of trauma-related cardiac arrests are futile. We describe a successful outcome in the case of a child who suffered cardiac arrest caused by external traumatic airway obstruction. Our case illustrates how to deal with pediatric traumatic cardiac arrests in an out-of-hospital environment. It also illustrates how good clinical treatment in these situations may be supported by correct treatment after hospital admission when it is impossible to ventilate the patient to provide sufficient oxygen delivery to vital organs. This case relates to a lifeless child of 3-5 years, blue, and trapped by an electrically operated garage door. The first ambulance arrived to find several men trying to bend the frame and the door apart in order to extricate the child, who was hanging in the air with head and neck squeezed between the horizontally-moving garage door and the vertical door frame. One paramedic found a car jack and used it to push the door and the frame apart, allowing the lifeless child to be extricated. Basic life support was then initiated. Intubation was performed by the anesthesiologist without drugs. With FiO2 1.0 the first documented SaO2 was <50%. Restoration of Spontaneous Circulation was achieved after thirty minutes, and she was transported to the hospital. After a few hours she was put on venous-arterial ECMO for 5.5 days and discharged home after two months. Outpatient examinations during the rest of 2013 were positive, and the child found not to be suffering from any injuries, either physical or mental. The last follow-up in October 2014 demonstrated she had made a 100% recovery and she started school in August 2014. PMID:26930137

  9. Respiratory arrest during dipyridamole stress testing.

    PubMed Central

    Hillis, G. S.; al-Mohammad, A.; Jennings, K. P.

    1997-01-01

    There is an increasing usage of radionuclide scanning to assess myocardial perfusion, with dipyridamole, the most commonly used stress agent. Although this is an effective, and usually very safe, means by which to assess myocardial blood supply, there have been several incidents of acute bronchospasm in asthmatic patients. There have, however, been no previous reports of respiratory arrest occurring in patients with emphysema. This case illustrates the dangers of administering intravenous dipyridamole, or even adenosine, to patients with chronic lung disease. PMID:9196707

  10. Detonation-flame arrester devices for gasoline cargo vapor recovery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, R. A.; Ryason, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    Empirical data on the deflagration-to-detonation run-up distance for flowing mixtures of gasoline and air in 15.2-cm- (6.0-in.-) diameter piping simulating a vapor recovery system are presented. The quenching capability of eight selected flame control devices subjected to repeated stable detonations was evaluated. The successful detonation-flame arresters were: (1) spiral-wound, crimped aluminum ribbon, (2) foamed nickel-chrome metal, (3) vertically packed bed of aluminum Ballast rings, and (4) water-trap or hydraulic back-pressure valve. Installation configurations for two of the more applicable arresters, the spiral-wound, crimped stainless-steel ribbon and the vertically packed bed of aluminum Ballast rings, were further optimized by a series of parametric tests. The final configuration of these two arresters was demonstrated with repeated detonation tests at conditions that simulated vapor recovery system operation. On these tests, the combustible mixture of gasoline and air continued to flow through the piping for periods up to 120 seconds after the initial detonation had been arrested. There was no indication of continuous burning or reignition occurring on either side of the test arresters.

  11. Cardiorespiratory arrest in children (out of hospital)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Cardiorespiratory arrest outside hospital occurs in approximately 1/10,000 children a year in resource-rich countries, with two-thirds of arrests occurring in children under 18 months of age. Approximately 45% of cases have undetermined causes, including sudden infant death syndrome. Of the rest, 20% are caused by trauma, 10% by chronic disease, and 6% by pneumonia. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review aiming to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for non-submersion out-of-hospital cardiorespiratory arrest in children? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to December 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 15 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: airway management and ventilation (bag–mask ventilation and intubation), bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, direct-current cardiac shock, hypothermia, intravenous sodium bicarbonate, standard dose of intravenous adrenaline (epinephrine), and training parents to perform resuscitation. PMID:21406131

  12. Intracellular pH in Gastric and Rectal Tissue Post Cardiac Arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Elaine M.; Steiner, Richard P.; LaManna, Joseph C.

    We directly measured pHi using the pH sensitive dye, neutral red. We defined pHi for rectal and gastric tissue in whole tissue and by layer under control and arrest conditions. Fifteen minutes of arrest was not sufficient time to alter the pHi at the rectal or gastric site. On initial inspection, the stomach may be more sensitive to ischemic changes than the rectum. Understanding the mechanism by which PCO2 generation is used to track clinical changes is vital to the early detection of tissue dysoxia in order to effectively treat and manage critically ill patients.

  13. Cell cycle arrest is not yet senescence, which is not just cell cycle arrest: terminology for TOR-driven aging.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2012-03-01

    Cell cycle arrest is not yet senescence. When the cell cycle is arrested, an inappropriate growth-promotion converts an arrest into senescence (geroconversion). By inhibiting the growth-promoting mTOR pathway, rapamycin decelerates geroconversion of the arrested cells. And as a striking example, while causing arrest, p53 may decelerate or suppress geroconversion (in some conditions). Here I discuss the meaning of geroconversion and also the terms gerogenes, gerossuppressors, gerosuppressants, gerogenic pathways, gero-promoters, hyperfunction and feedback resistance, regenerative potential, hypertrophy and secondary atrophy, pro-gerogenic and gerogenic cells. PMID:22394614

  14. The NOXA-MCL1-BIM axis defines lifespan on extended mitotic arrest.

    PubMed

    Haschka, Manuel D; Soratroi, Claudia; Kirschnek, Susanne; Häcker, Georg; Hilbe, Richard; Geley, Stephan; Villunger, Andreas; Fava, Luca L

    2015-01-01

    Cell death on extended mitotic arrest is considered arguably most critical for the efficacy of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) in anticancer therapy. While the molecular machinery controlling mitotic arrest on MTA treatment, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), appears well defined, the molecular components executing cell death, as well as factors connecting both networks remain poorly understood. Here we conduct a mini screen exploring systematically the contribution of individual BCL2 family proteins at single cell resolution to death on extended mitotic arrest, and demonstrate that the mitotic phosphorylation of BCL2 and BCLX represent a priming event for apoptosis that is ultimately triggered by NOXA-dependent MCL1 degradation, enabling BIM-dependent cell death. Our findings provide a comprehensive model for the initiation of apoptosis in cells stalled in mitosis and provide a molecular basis for the increased efficacy of combinatorial treatment of cancer cells using MTAs and BH3 mimetics. PMID:25922916

  15. The NOXA–MCL1–BIM axis defines lifespan on extended mitotic arrest

    PubMed Central

    Haschka, Manuel D.; Soratroi, Claudia; Kirschnek, Susanne; Häcker, Georg; Hilbe, Richard; Geley, Stephan; Villunger, Andreas; Fava, Luca L.

    2015-01-01

    Cell death on extended mitotic arrest is considered arguably most critical for the efficacy of microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) in anticancer therapy. While the molecular machinery controlling mitotic arrest on MTA treatment, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), appears well defined, the molecular components executing cell death, as well as factors connecting both networks remain poorly understood. Here we conduct a mini screen exploring systematically the contribution of individual BCL2 family proteins at single cell resolution to death on extended mitotic arrest, and demonstrate that the mitotic phosphorylation of BCL2 and BCLX represent a priming event for apoptosis that is ultimately triggered by NOXA-dependent MCL1 degradation, enabling BIM-dependent cell death. Our findings provide a comprehensive model for the initiation of apoptosis in cells stalled in mitosis and provide a molecular basis for the increased efficacy of combinatorial treatment of cancer cells using MTAs and BH3 mimetics. PMID:25922916

  16. Maintenance of CSF arrest: A role for Cdc2 and PP2A-mediated regulation of Emi2

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qiju; Guo, Yanxiang; Yamada, Ayumi; Perry, Jennifer A.; Wang, Michael Z.; Araki, Marito; Freel, Christopher D.; Tung, Jeffrey J.; Tang, Wanli; Margolis, Seth S.; Jackson, Peter K.; Yamano, Hiroyuki; Asano, Maki; Kornbluth, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background Vertebrate oocytes are arrested in metaphase II of meiosis prior to fertilization by cytostatic factor (CSF). CSF enforces a cell cycle arrest by inhibiting the anaphase promoting complex (APC), an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets Cyclin B for degradation. Although Cyclin B synthesis is ongoing during CSF arrest, constant Cyclin B levels are maintained. To achieve this, oocytes allow continuous slow Cyclin B degradation, without eliminating the bulk of Cyclin B, which would induce release from CSF arrest. However, the mechanism that controls this continuous degradation is not understood. Results We report here the molecular details of a negative feedback loop wherein Cyclin B promotes its own destruction through Cdc2/Cyclin B-mediated phosphorylation and inhibition of the APC inhibitor, Emi2. Emi2 bound to the core APC and this binding was disrupted by Cdc2/Cyclin B, without affecting Emi2 protein stability. Cdc2 mediated phosphorylation of Emi2 was antagonized by PP2A, which could bind to Emi2 and promote Emi2-APC interactions. Conclusions Constant Cyclin B levels are maintained during a CSF arrest through the regulation of Emi2 activity. A balance between Cdc2 and PP2A controls Emi2 phosphorylation, which in turn controls the ability of Emi2 to bind to and inhibit the APC. This balance allows proper maintenance of Cyclin B levels and Cdc2 kinase activity during CSF arrest. PMID:17276914

  17. Metal Halogen Battery Construction with Combustion Arrester to Prevent Self Propagation of Hydrogen-Halogen Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, M. J.; Kilic, S.

    1983-12-27

    A metal halogen battery construction containing a special reactor means having a combustion arrester device and a reaction initiator device, whereby the reactor means permits controlled recombination of hydrogen gas and halogen gas in the system to form hydrogen halide, which is then dispersed into the store means of the battery.

  18. Foucault and Colonial Strategy in Douglas C. Jones' "Arrest Sitting Bull"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Peter G.

    2004-01-01

    "Arrest Sitting Bull," a novel written by Douglas C. Jones that relates the personal stories of individuals involved in the military and the political domination of the Sioux Indian during the period leading to the Sitting Bull killing is described. The incessant quest to establish and maintain control and the integral roles played by fear and…

  19. Connexin arrests the cell cycle through cytosolic retention of an E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qian; Jiang, Jean X

    2016-03-01

    The gap junction proteins connexins play important roles in cell growth and differentiation; however, the underlying mechanism remains largely elusive. We recently identified a channel-independent role of connexins in cell cycle control in which connexin 50 directly interacts with S-phase kinase 2 and prevents its nuclear localization, resulting in p27/p57 protection and cell cycle arrest. PMID:27308638

  20. Teenagers' High Arrest Rates: Features of Young Age or Youth Poverty?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Males, Mike A.; Brown, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    The association of more crime with youthful age is widely accepted in social science. However, a literature search revealed no studies of the age-crime relationship that controlled for young ages' economic disadvantage. This research gap is addressed using the California Criminal Justice Statistics Center's arrest detail and Census…

  1. Computation Molecular Kinetics Model of HZE Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ren, Lei

    2004-01-01

    Cell culture models play an important role in understanding the biological effectiveness of space radiation. High energy and charge (HZE) ions produce prolonged cell cycle arrests at the G1/S and G2/M transition points in the cell cycle. A detailed description of these phenomena is needed to integrate knowledge of the expression of DNA damage in surviving cells, including the determination of relative effectiveness factors between different types of radiation that produce differential types of DNA damage and arrest durations. We have developed a hierarchical kinetics model that tracks the distribution of cells in various cell phase compartments (early G1, late G1, S, G2, and M), however with transition rates that are controlled by rate-limiting steps in the kinetics of cyclin-cdk's interactions with their families of transcription factors and inhibitor molecules. The coupling of damaged DNA molecules to the downstream cyclin-cdk inhibitors is achieved through a description of the DNA-PK and ATM signaling pathways. For HZE irradiations we describe preliminary results, which introduce simulation of the stochastic nature of the number of direct particle traversals per cell in the modulation of cyclin-cdk and cell cycle population kinetics. Comparison of the model to data for fibroblast cells irradiated photons or HZE ions are described.

  2. Arrest History and Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration in a Sample of Men and Women Arrested for Domestic Violence

    PubMed Central

    Shorey, Ryan C.; Ninnemann, Andrew; Elmquist, Joanna; Labrecque, Lindsay; Zucosky, Heather; Febres, Jeniimarie; Brasfield, Hope; Temple, Jeff R.; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2014-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious and prevalent problem throughout the United States. Currently, individuals arrested for domestic violence are often court mandated to batterer intervention programs (BIPs). However, little is known about the arrest histories of these individuals, especially women. The current study examined the arrest histories of men (n = 303) and women (n = 82) arrested for domestic violence and court-referred to BIPs. Results demonstrated that over 30% of the entire sample had been previously arrested for a non-violent offense, and over 25% of the participants had been previously arrested for a violent offense other than domestic violence. Moreover, men were arrested significantly more frequently for violence-related and non-violent offenses than their female counterparts. In addition, men were more likely than women to have consumed binge-levels of alcohol prior to the offense that led to their most recent arrest and court-referral to a BIP. Lastly, arrest history was positively associated with physical and psychological aggression perpetration against an intimate partner for men only, such that more previous arrests were associated with more frequent aggression. These results provide evidence that many men and women arrested for domestic violence have engaged in a number of diverse criminal acts during their lifetimes, suggesting that BIPs may need to address general criminal behavior. PMID:25379068

  3. Modeling cardiac arrest and resuscitation in the domestic pig

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Brandon H; Nguyen, Anh Q; Hollrah, Roger A; Olivencia-Yurvati, Albert H; Mallet, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrest remains a leading cause of death and permanent disability worldwide. Although many victims are initially resuscitated, they often succumb to the extensive ischemia-reperfusion injury inflicted on the internal organs, especially the brain. Cardiac arrest initiates a complex cellular injury cascade encompassing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, Ca2+ overload, ATP depletion, pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, mitochondrial dysfunction, and neuronal glutamate excitotoxity, which injures and kills cells, compromises function of internal organs and ignites a destructive systemic inflammatory response. The sheer complexity and scope of this cascade challenges the development of experimental models of and effective treatments for cardiac arrest. Many experimental animal preparations have been developed to decipher the mechanisms of damage to vital internal organs following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and to develop treatments to interrupt the lethal injury cascades. Porcine models of cardiac arrest and resuscitation offer several important advantages over other species, and outcomes in this large animal are readily translated to the clinical setting. This review summarizes porcine cardiac arrest-CPR models reported in the literature, describes clinically relevant phenomena observed during cardiac arrest and resuscitation in pigs, and discusses numerous methodological considerations in modeling cardiac arrest/CPR. Collectively, published reports show the domestic pig to be a suitable large animal model of cardiac arrest which is responsive to CPR, defibrillatory countershocks and medications, and yields extensive information to foster advances in clinical treatment of cardiac arrest. PMID:25685718

  4. The Impact of Legalizing Syringe Exchange Programs on Arrests Among Injection Drug Users in California

    PubMed Central

    Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Lorvick, Jennifer; Anderson, Rachel; Flynn, Neil; Kral, Alex H.

    2007-01-01

    Legislation passed in 2000 allowed syringe exchange programs (SEPs) in California to operate legally if local jurisdictions declare a local HIV public health emergency. Nonetheless, even in locales where SEPs are legal, the possession of drug paraphernalia, including syringes, remained illegal. The objective of this paper is to examine the association between the legal status of SEPs and individual arrest or citation for drug paraphernalia among injection drug users (IDUs) in California from 2001 to 2003. Using data from three annual cross-sections (2001-03) of IDUs attending 24 SEPs in 16 California counties (N = 1,578), we found that overall, 14% of IDUs in our sample reported arrest or citation for paraphernalia in the 6 months before the interview. Further analysis found that 17% of IDUs attending a legal SEP (defined at the county level) reported arrest or citation for drug paraphernalia compared to 10% of IDUs attending an illegal SEP (p = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the adjusted odds ratio of arrest or citation for drug paraphernalia was 1.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2, 2.3] for IDUs attending legal SEPs compared to IDUs attending illegal SEPs, after controlling for race/ethnicity, age, homelessness, illegal income, injection of amphetamines, years of injection drug use, frequency of SEP use, and number of needles received at last visit. IDUs attending SEPs with legal status may be more visible to police, and hence, more subject to arrest or citation for paraphernalia. These findings suggest that legislative efforts to decriminalize the operation of SEPs without concurrent decriminalization of syringe possession may result in higher odds of arrest among SEP clients, with potentially deleterious implications for the health and well-being of IDUs. More comprehensive approaches to removing barriers to accessing sterile syringes are needed if our public health goals for reducing new HIV/HCV infections are to be obtained. PMID:17265133

  5. Abulia following an episode of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Naik, Vismay Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    The word 'abulia' means a lack of will, initiative or drive. The symptoms of abulia include lack of spontaneous action and speech, reduced emotional responsiveness and social interaction, poor attention and easy distractibility. These symptoms are independent of reduced levels of consciousness or cognitive impairment. We describe a case of a socially active 72-year-old female patient who presented with symptoms of abulia which may have occurred due to damage of the frontosubcortical circuits following an episode of cardiac arrest. The patient's symptoms improved dramatically following treatment with bromocriptine. PMID:26135487

  6. Essentials in cardiac arrest during cesarean section.

    PubMed

    van Liempt, Susan W J D; Stoecklein, Katrin; Tjiong, Ming Y; Schwarte, Lothar A; de Groot, Christianne J M; Teunissen, Pim W

    2015-01-28

    Cardiac arrest during cesarean section is very rare. Obstetrical teams have low exposure to these critical situations necessitating frequent rehearsal and knowledge of its differential diagnosis and treatment. A 40-year-old woman pregnant with triplets underwent cesarean sections because of vaginal bleeding due to a placenta previa at 35.2 weeks of gestation. Spinal anesthesia was performed. Asystole occurred during uterotomy. Immediate resuscitation and delivery of the neonates eventually resulted in good maternal and neonatal outcomes. The differential diagnosis is essential and should include obstetric and non-obstetric causes. We describe the consideration of Bezold Jarisch reflex and amniotic fluid embolism as most appropriate in this case. PMID:25918626

  7. Cardiac arrest: first presentation of anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Ewan, Sian-Lee; Moynihan, Patricia C

    2013-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl collapsed in cardiac arrest in a hospital car park. Investigations revealed a potassium level of 1.8. Following a 5-day intensive care unit admission she described behaviours consistent with restrictive-purging type anorexia nervosa, which had been concealed from her parents and health professionals. Long-term management has been difficult due to poor patient engagement. Further, recurrent episodes of hypokalaemia continue to feature. Here we explore the cardiac complications of anorexia nervosa and challenges with long-term management of this condition. PMID:24092611

  8. Modes of induced cardiac arrest: hyperkalemia and hypocalcemia - Literature review

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseini; Cortez, José Luis Lasso; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    The entry of sodium and calcium play a key effect on myocyte subjected to cardiac arrest by hyperkalemia. They cause cell swelling, acidosis, consumption of adenosine triphosphate and trigger programmed cell death. Cardiac arrest caused by hypocalcemia maintains intracellular adenosine triphosphate levels, improves diastolic performance and reduces oxygen consumption, which can be translated into better protection to myocyte injury induced by cardiac arrest. PMID:25372919

  9. [Emphysematous Pyelonephritis with Cardio-Pulmonary Arrest : A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Gaku; Tsutahara, Koichi; Kuribayashi, Sohei; Kawamura, Masataka; Nakano, Kosuke; Kishimoto, Nozomu; Tanigawa, Go; Matsushima, Asako; Fujimi, Satoshi; Takao, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2016-08-01

    A 40-year-old woman withuntreated type II diabetes mellitus was discovered withcardiopulmonary arrest in her room. On admission, she had ventricular fibrillation. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation, her own pulse restarted. The plasma glucose was 722 mg/dl and venous PH was 6.704. Abdominal computed tomography revealed gas within the parenchyma of the left kidney. We diagnosed her with emphysematous pyelonephritis and conducted emergency nephrectomy. Urinary and blood cultures were positive for Escherichia coli. Antibiotic therapy was initiated with doripenem and she was restrictively treated with intravenous insulin to control her plasma glucose. On the 8th day of hospital stay, she underwent resection of the small intestine because of necrosis. After multidisciplinary therapy, she was discharged with complete resolution of the infection. PMID:27624108

  10. Crack propagation and arrest in pressurized containers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Delale, F.; Owczarek, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of crack propagation and arrest in a finite volume cylindrical container filled with pressurized gas is considered. It is assumed that the cylinder contains a symmetrically located longitudinal part-through crack with a relatively small net ligament. The net ligament suddenly ruptures initiating the process of fracture propagation and depressurization in the cylinder. The problem is formulated by making two major assumptions, namely, that the shell problem is quasi-static and the gas dynamics problem is one-dimensional. The problem is reduced to a proper initial value problem by introducing a dynamic fracture criterion which relates the crack acceleration to the difference between a load factor and the corresponding strength parameter. The main results are demonstrated by considering two examples, an aluminum cylinder which may behave in a quasi-brittle manner, and a steel cylinder which undergoes ductile fracture. The results indicate that generally in gas-filled cylinders fracture arrest is not possible unless the material behaves in a ductile manner and the container is relatively long.

  11. Respiratory syncytial virus matrix protein induces lung epithelial cell cycle arrest through a p53 dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Bian, Tao; Gibbs, John D; Örvell, Claes; Imani, Farhad

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of viral respiratory infections in children. Our previous study showed that the RSV infection induced lung epithelial cell cycle arrest, which enhanced virus replication. To address the mechanism of RSV-induced cell cycle arrest, we examined the contribution of RSV-matrix (RSV-M) protein. In this report, we show that in both the A549 cell line and primary human bronchial epithelial (PHBE) cells, transfection with RSV-M protein caused the cells to proliferate at a slower rate than in control cells. The cell cycle analysis showed that RSV-M protein induced G1 phase arrest in A549 cells, and G1 and G2/M phase arrest in PHBE cells. Interestingly, RSV-M expression induced p53 and p21 accumulation and decreased phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb). Further, induction of cell cycle arrest by RSV-M was not observed in a p53-deficient epithelial cell line (H1299). However, cell cycle arrest was restored after transfection of p53 cDNA into H1299 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that RSV-M protein regulates lung epithelial cell cycle through a p53-dependent pathway, which enhances RSV replication. PMID:22662266

  12. Long-term increase in coherence between the basal ganglia and motor cortex after asphyxial cardiac arrest and resuscitation in developing rats

    PubMed Central

    Aravamuthan, Bhooma R.; Shoykhet, Michael

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The basal ganglia are vulnerable to injury during cardiac arrest. Movement disorders are a common morbidity in survivors. Yet, neuronal motor network changes post-arrest remain poorly understood. METHODS We compared function of the motor network in adult rats that, during postnatal week 3, underwent 9.5 min of asphyxial cardiac arrest (n = 9) or sham intervention (n = 8). Six months after injury, we simultaneously recorded local field potentials (LFP) from the primary motor cortex (MCx) and single neuron firing and LFP from the rat entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), which corresponds to the primate globus pallidus pars interna. Data were analyzed for firing rates, power, and coherence between MCx and EPN spike and LFP activity. RESULTS Cardiac arrest survivors display chronic motor deficits. EPN firing rate is lower in cardiac arrest survivors (19.5 ± 2.4 Hz) compared with controls (27.4 ± 2.7 Hz; P < 0.05). Cardiac arrest survivors also demonstrate greater coherence between EPN single neurons and MCx LFP (3—100 Hz; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS This increased coherence indicates abnormal synchrony in the neuronal motor network after cardiac arrest. Increased motor network synchrony is thought to be antikinetic in primary movement disorders. Characterization of motor network synchrony after cardiac arrest may help guide management of post-hypoxic movement disorders. PMID:26083760

  13. Metaphase I arrest and spontaneous parthenogenetic activation of strain LTXBO oocytes: chimeric reaggregated ovaries establish primary lesion in oocytes.

    PubMed

    Eppig, J J; Wigglesworth, K; Hirao, Y

    2000-08-01

    Oocytes of strain LT mice, and related strains such as LTXBO, exhibit a high incidence of arrest in the progression of meiosis at metaphase I (MI) and in spontaneous parthenogenetic activation. Activation of these oocytes within the ovary leads to the formation of ovarian teratomas. In this study, the role of the oocyte's companion granulosa cells, the cumulus cells, was investigated using fully grown oocytes matured in vitro after isolation from LTXBO mice. Results showed that the role of cumulus cells in MI arrest is dichotomous. Cumulus cells temporarily helped to sustain MI arrest, but they also promoted a delayed progression to metaphase II. Cumulus cells also promoted parthenogenetic activation that occurred in association with the delayed progression to metaphase II. Next, the question of whether the lesion(s) promoting MI arrest and spontaneous activation is due to defects in the somatic cells or is intrinsic to the oocyte was addressed using chimeric reaggregated ovaries. An improved method for completely exchanging the germ cell and the somatic cell compartments of ovaries from newborn mice is described. These chimeric reaggregated ovaries, grafted beneath the renal capsule of SCID mice, allowed the complete development of LTXBO oocytes to occur in association with somatic cells from control (B6SJLF(1)) ovaries and development of control oocytes in association with LTXBO somatic cells. Oocyte growth and follicular development appeared generally normal in reaggregated ovaries. High incidences of MI arrest and spontaneous activation of LTXBO oocytes occurred regardless of the genotype of the somatic cells. Moreover, there was a low incidence of MI arrest and spontaneous activation of control oocytes, even though they underwent complete development and maturation associated with LTXBO somatic cells. It is concluded that the phenotypes of MI arrest and parthenogenetic activation in LTXBO oocytes are defects caused by lesions intrinsic to the oocyte

  14. Arrested segregative phase separation in capillary tubes.

    PubMed

    Tromp, R Hans; Lindhoud, Saskia

    2006-09-01

    Phase separation in a capillary tube with one of the phases fully wetting the capillary wall is arrested when the typical size of the phase domains reaches the value of the diameter of the tube. The arrested state consists of an alternating sequence of concave-capped and convex-capped cylindrical domains, called "plugs," "bridges," or "lenses," of wetting and nonwetting phase, respectively. A description of this arrested plug state for an aqueous mixture of two polymer solutions is the subject of this work. A phase separating system consisting of two incompatible polymers dissolved in water was studied. The phase volume ratio was close to unity. The initial state from which plugs evolve is characterized by droplets of wetting phase in a continuous nonwetting phase. Experiments show the formation of plugs by a pathway that differs from the theoretically well-described instabilities in the thickness of a fluid thread inside a confined fluid cylinder. Plugs appear to form after the wetting layer (the confined fluid cylinder) has become unstable after merging of droplet with the wetting layer. The relative density of the phases could be set by the addition of salt, enabling density matching. As a consequence, the capillary length can in principle be made infinitely large and the Bond number (which represents the force of gravity relative to the capillary force) zero, without considerably changing the interfacial tension. Using the possibility of density matching, the relations among capillary length and capillary diameter on the one hand, and the presence of plugs and their average size on the other were studied. It was found that stable plugs are present when the capillary radius does not exceed a certain value, which is probably smaller than the capillary length. However, the average plug size is independent of capillary length. At constant capillary length, average plug size was found to scale with the capillary diameter to a power 1.3, significantly higher than the

  15. Using Drosophila Larval Imaginal Discs to Study Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shian-Jang; Li, Willis X.

    2012-01-01

    Under genotoxic stress, activation of cell cycle checkpoint responses leads to cell cycle arrest, which allows cells to repair DNA damage before continuing to cycle. Drosophila larval epithelial sacs, called imaginal discs, are an excellent in vivo model system for studying radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. Larval imaginal discs go into cell cycle arrest after being subjected to low-dose irradiation, are subject to easy genetic manipulation, are not crucial for survival of the organism, and can be dissected easily for further molecular or cellular analysis. In this chapter, we describe methods for assessing low-dose irradiation-induced cell cycle arrest. Mitotic cells are identified by immunofluorescence staining for the mitotic marker phosphorylated histone H3 (phospho-histone H3 or pH3). When wandering third-instar control larvae, without transgene expression, are exposed to 500 rads of X-ray or γ-ray irradiation, the number of pH3-positive cells in wing imaginal discs is reduced from hundreds before irradiation to approximately 30 after irradiation, with an equal distribution between the anterior and posterior compartments (Yan et al., 2011, FASEB J). Using the GAL4/UAS system, RNAi, cDNA, or microRNA sponge transgenes can be expressed in the posterior compartment of the wing disc using drivers such as engrailed (en)-Gal4, while the anterior compartment serves as an internal control. This approach makes it possible to do genome-wide genetic screening for molecules involved in radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. PMID:21870287

  16. Using Drosophila larval imaginal discs to study low-dose radiation-induced cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shian-Jang; Li, Willis X

    2011-01-01

    Under genotoxic stress, activation of cell cycle checkpoint responses leads to cell cycle arrest, which allows cells to repair DNA damage before continuing to cycle. Drosophila larval epithelial sacs, called imaginal discs, are an excellent in vivo model system for studying radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. Larval imaginal discs go into cell cycle arrest after being subjected to low-dose irradiation, are subject to easy genetic manipulation, are not crucial for survival of the organism, and can be dissected easily for further molecular or cellular analysis. In this chapter, we describe methods for assessing low-dose irradiation-induced cell cycle arrest. Mitotic cells are identified by immunofluorescence staining for the mitotic marker phosphorylated histone H3 (phospho-histone H3 or pH3). When wandering third-instar control larvae, without transgene expression, are exposed to 500 rads of X-ray or γ-ray irradiation, the number of pH3-positive cells in wing imaginal discs is reduced from hundreds before irradiation to approximately 30 after irradiation, with an equal distribution between the anterior and posterior compartments (Yan et al., 2011, FASEB J). Using the GAL4/UAS system, RNAi, cDNA, or microRNA sponge transgenes can be expressed in the posterior compartment of the wing disc using drivers such as engrailed (en)-Gal4, while the anterior compartment serves as an internal control. This approach makes it possible to do genome-wide genetic screening for molecules involved in radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. PMID:21870287

  17. Dux4 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase through upregulation of p21 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongliang; Wang, Zhaoxia; Jin, Suqin; Hao, Hongjun; Zheng, Lemin; Zhou, Boda; Zhang, Wei; Lv, He; Yuan, Yun

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Dux4 induced TE671 cell proliferation defect and G1 phase arrest. • Dux4 upregulated p21 expression without activating p53. • Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. • Sp1 binding site was required for Dux4-induced p21 promoter activation. - Abstract: It has been implicated that Dux4 plays crucial roles in development of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy. But the underlying myopathic mechanisms and related down-stream events of this retrogene were far from clear. Here, we reported that overexpression of Dux4 in a cell model TE671 reduced cell proliferation rate, and increased G1 phase accumulation. We also determined the impact of Dux4 on p53/p21 signal pathway, which controls the checkpoint in cell cycle progression. Overexpression of Dux4 increased p21 mRNA and protein level, while expression of p53, phospho-p53 remained unchanged. Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, we demonstrated that enhanced Dux4 expression increased p21 promoter activity and elevated expression of Sp1 transcription factor. Mutation of Sp1 binding site decreased dux4 induced p21 promoter activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the Dux4-induced binding of Sp1 to p21 promoter in vivo. These results suggest that Dux4 might induce proliferation inhibition and G1 phase arrest through upregulation of p21.

  18. Evolution of the dragonfly head-arresting system

    PubMed Central

    Gorb, S. N.

    1999-01-01

    The arrester or fixation system of the head in adult Odonata is unique among arthropods. This system involves the organs of two body segments: the head and the neck. It consists of a skeleton–muscle apparatus that sets the arrester parts in motion. The parts comprise formations covered with complicated microstructures: fields of microtrichia on the rear surface of the head and post-cervical sclerites of the neck. The arrester immobilizes the head during feeding or when the dragonfly is in tandem flight. Thus, it may serve as an adaptation to save the head from violent mechanical disturbance and to stabilize gaze in a variety of behavioural situations. This study shows the evolutionary trend of the arrester in the order Odonata by using scanning electron microscopy and measurements of arrester structures in 227 species from 26 odonate families. The arrester design occurring in the Epiophlebiidae, Gomphidae, Neopetaliidae, Petaluridae and Chlorogomphinae is suggested to be the basic one. Two convergent pathways of head-arrester evolution among Zygoptera and Anisoptera are proposed. The possible functional significance of the arrester system is discussed.

  19. Women Get Worse Cardiac Arrest Care Than Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Women Get Worse Cardiac Arrest Care Than Men: Study They need to be treated as aggressively as men when their hearts stop, experts say To use ... who survive cardiac arrest are less likely than men to get aggressive, lifesaving care at the hospital, ...

  20. Colleges Report Increases in Arrests for Drug and Alcohol Violations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicklin, Julie L.

    1999-01-01

    Arrests for violations of drug/alcohol laws at colleges and universities rose 7.2 and 3.6%, respectively, from 1996 to 1997. Campus police attribute the increases not to increased drug and alcohol use but to more aggressive enforcement. However, some health researchers feel usage has risen. Campus weapons violations and forcible rape arrests have…

  1. Sex Differences in Urban Arrest Patterns, 1934-79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffensmeier, Darrell J.; Cobb, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    Federal Bureau of Investigation statistics show that women have made large gains in arrests for petty property crimes and smaller gains for other offenses. However, alternate sources of data as well as changes in reporting and statistical coverage suggest that female arrest gains are more apparent than real. (Author/GC)

  2. A comprehensive test method for inline flame arresters

    SciTech Connect

    Roussakis, N.; Lapp, K. )

    1991-04-01

    The certification test standards that presently exist for flame arresters are highly inadequate for inline applications. A proper flame arrester test method should ensure that a unit will work with any flame front conditions that it could be exposed to in actual use. When evaluating flame arrester performance, it is just as dangerous to neglect deflagration testing as detonation testing. The comprehensive inline flame arrester test method outlined here involves exposing a unit to the entire flame propagation pressure spectrum. This includes low, medium and high pressure deflagrations as well as overdriven and stable detonations. The test method also takes into account the following factors: flow restriction on the protected side of the flame arrester, flame propagation through a flowing gas, initial system pressure and temperature, and specified gas mixture. Flow restriction on the protected side of the flame arrester has a very significant effect on performance and has not previously been given consideration in flame arrester testing. Besides moving flame front tests, endurance burn testing and hydrostatic pressure testing are also discussed here. Major regulatory organizations have recently adopted these findings as the basis for new standards proposed to cover an inline flame arrester test method.

  3. Vascular ring diagnosis following respiratory arrest

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Evie Alexandra; Scott, Alison; Chetcuti, Philip; Crabbe, David

    2014-01-01

    Vascular rings can present with non-specific respiratory and/or oesophageal symptoms. Early diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. This case report describes an uncommon acute presentation of a vascular ring. We report a thriving 14-month-old child with a long history of recurrent wheeze and ‘noisy breathing’. He presented acutely with food bolus impaction in the oesophagus which led to a respiratory arrest. Oesophagoscopy and bronchoscopy suggested vascular ring anomaly. A contrast-enhanced CT scan demonstrated a right-sided aortic arch with left ligamentum arteriosum encircling the oesophagus and airway. The ligament was ligated and divided. At follow-up 6 months later, the infant had mild persistent stridor but was otherwise well. PMID:24895385

  4. Meteoroids from periodic comet d'Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Z.; Schuster, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    The predicted anomalous tail of periodic comet d'Arrest was photographed and photometrically studied. The derived particle-size distribution function varies inversely according to slightly higher than the 4-th power of the size. Particle dimensions span a few orders of magnitude, the mean size being in the general range of 0.01 to 0.1 cm depending on the assumed bulk density. The determination of the amount of the ejected dust is complicated by large uncertainties in the particle albedo. The product of the particle albedo and of the production rate of meteoroids that remain gravitationally bound to the solar system is found to be about 3000 g/s at the time of maximum activity and some 200 g/s when averaged over the comet's revolution period. The contribution of the comet to the interplanetary dust cloud is insignificant, unless the albedo of the debris from the comet is as low as 0.1 percent.

  5. Intravascular access in pediatric cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; Fischer, R

    1988-11-01

    All cases of patients aged less than 48 months who presented in cardiac arrest to the Hennepin County Medical Center's emergency department (ED) during the years 1984 to 1986 were reviewed retrospectively. The ED record, initial and subsequent chest radiographs, hospital charts, and autopsy reports were analyzed. A total of 33 cases were reviewed. The average patient age was 5 months. The average time needed to establish intravascular access was 7.9 +/- 4.2 minutes. Success rates were 77% for central venous catheterization, 81% for surgical vein cutdown, 83% for intraosseous infusion, and 17% for percutaneous peripheral catheterization. Percutaneous peripheral catheterization, when successful, and bone marrow needle placement were the fastest methods of obtaining intravascular access. There were no major immediate complications, and delayed complications were minimal. Attempts at peripheral intravenous catheter placement should be brief, with rapid progression to intraosseous infusion if peripheral attempts are not successful. PMID:3178949

  6. Arrested Bubble Rise in a Narrow Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamstaes, Catherine; Eggers, Jens

    2016-06-01

    If a long air bubble is placed inside a vertical tube closed at the top it can rise by displacing the fluid above it. However, Bretherton found that if the tube radius, R, is smaller than a critical value Rc=0.918 ℓ_c , where ℓ_c=√{γ /ρ g} is the capillary length, there is no solution corresponding to steady rise. Experimentally, the bubble rise appears to have stopped altogether. Here we explain this observation by studying the unsteady bubble motion for Rarrested motion.

  7. The Influence of Mandatory Arrest Policies, Police Organizational Characteristics, and Situational Variables on the Probability of Arrest in Domestic Violence Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eitle, David

    2005-01-01

    Prior research into factors predicting arrest in domestic violence cases is limited in three regards: (a) no examination of whether mandatory arrest policies are associated with increased risk of arrest across multiple jurisdictions; (b) little consideration of whether police organizational characteristics influence arrest in such cases; and (c)…

  8. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest: outcome predictors

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Rodrigo Nazário; Ávila, Paulo; Cavaco, Raquel; Germano, Nuno; Bento, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Objective The determination of coma patient prognosis after cardiac arrest has clinical, ethical and social implications. Neurological examination, imaging and biochemical markers are helpful tools accepted as reliable in predicting recovery. With the advent of therapeutic hypothermia, these data need to be reconfirmed. In this study, we attempted to determine the validity of different markers, which can be used in the detection of patients with poor prognosis under hypothermia. Methods Data from adult patients admitted to our intensive care unit for a hypothermia protocol after cardiac arrest were recorded prospectively to generate a descriptive and analytical study analyzing the relationship between clinical, neurophysiological, imaging and biochemical parameters with 6-month outcomes defined according to the Cerebral Performance Categories scale (good 1-2, poor 3-5). Neuron-specific enolase was collected at 72 hours. Imaging and neurophysiologic exams were carried out in the 24 hours after the rewarming period. Results Sixty-seven patients were included in the study, of which 12 had good neurological outcomes. Ventricular fibrillation and electroencephalographic theta activity were associated with increased likelihood of survival and improved neurological outcomes. Patients who had more rapid cooling (mean time of 163 versus 312 minutes), hypoxic-ischemic brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging or neuron-specific enolase > 58ng/mL had poor neurological outcomes (p < 0.05). Conclusion Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury on magnetic resonance imaging and neuron-specific enolase were strong predictors of poor neurological outcomes. Although there is the belief that early achievement of target temperature improves neurological prognoses, in our study, there were increased mortality and worse neurological outcomes with earlier target-temperature achievement. PMID:26761469

  9. Flashback flame arrester devices for fuel cargo tank vapor vents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, R. A.; Kushida, R. O.

    1981-01-01

    The flame quenching capability of four types of flame arresting devices suitable for installation on fuel cargo tank vents of marine transport vessels is evaluated. A single 30 mesh screen, a dual 20 mesh screen, a spiral wound crimped metal ribbon, and a packed bed of ballast rings were tested. Flame speed and flame penetration of the test arresters were determined. Eight fuels representative of bulk cargoes were tested. The test arresters quenched a minimum of three flashback flames from all eight fuels, with one exception: high speed ethylene flames penetrated the dual 20 mesh screen on three tests. The arresters withstood the sustained flame from a propane/air mixture for 30 minutes. None of the arresters withstood the sustained flame from an ethylene/air mixture for more than 7 minutes.

  10. Education for cardiac arrest--Treatment or prevention?

    PubMed

    Smith, Gary B; Welch, John; DeVita, Michael A; Hillman, Ken M; Jones, Daryl

    2015-07-01

    In-hospital cardiac arrests (IHCA) occur infrequently and individual staff members working on general wards may only rarely encounter one. Mortality following IHCA is high and the evidence for the benefits of many advanced life support (ALS) interventions is scarce. Nevertheless, regular, often frequent, ALS training is mandatory for many hospital medical staff and nurses. The incidence of pre-cardiac arrest deterioration is much higher than that of cardiac arrests, and there is evidence that intervention prior to cardiac arrest can reduce the incidence of IHCA. This article discusses a proposal to reduce the emphasis on widespread ALS training and to increase education in the recognition and response to pre-arrest clinical deterioration. PMID:25921543

  11. Acute hemodynamic effects of angiotensin- converting enzyme inhibition after prolonged cardiac arrest with Bretschneider's solution.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Alexandro; Kempfert, Jörg; Pritzwald-Stegmann, Patrick; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Dhein, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Evidence as to how ACE inhibitors attenuate ischemia-reperfusion injury (IR) after cardioplegic arrest remains scarce. Twenty-four rabbit hearts were perfused on a Langendorff apparatus. Control hearts (n = 6) were arrested with pure histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK)-Bretschneider. Treatment groups received added to the cardioplegic solution (n = 6) captopril (100 μmol/l) and losartan (100 μmol/l) for selective AT1-receptor antagonism or BQ123 (100 nmol/l) for selective ETA-receptor antagonism. Pre-ischemic equilibration of 45 min was followed by 90 min of cardioplegic arrest and 30 min of reperfusion. Indices of myocardial contractility (LVP, dp/dt max, dp/dt min), coronary flow, heart rate, and O2 consumption were recorded before and after ischemic arrest. Tissue adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were measured to evaluate energy content and oxidative stress, respectively. After selective cardiac arrest with Bretschneider, captopril-treated hearts showed improved hemodynamics compared to control and the other treatment groups. Oxygen consumption was significantly decreased during early reperfusion in captopril-treated hearts (34 ± 3 μmol/min/g/mmHg) compared to controls and losartan- and BQ123-treated hearts (controls: 77 ± 9 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.003; losartan: 54 ± 9 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.015; BQ123: 64 ± 13 μmol/min/g/mmHg, p = 0.046). The ATP content of the reperfused tissue was significantly elevated after captopril treatment compared to control group (24 ± 2 vs. 16 ± 2 μmol/g, p = 0.033), whereas the level of MDA was substantially decreased (0.58 ± 0.163 vs. 1.5 ± 0.28 μmol/g, p = 0.009). ACE inhibition leads to a significantly greater and faster recovery of myocardial contractility after prolonged cardiac arrest with Bretschneider solution. Due to decreased oxygen consumption, myocardial protection is enhanced. The association between ACE and ischemia cannot be clarified by selective blockade of

  12. Grain setting defect1, Encoding a Remorin Protein, Affects the Grain Setting in Rice through Regulating Plasmodesmatal Conductance1[W

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Jinshan; Liu, Chang; Shen, Junhui; Li, Laigeng

    2014-01-01

    Effective grain filling is one of the key determinants of grain setting in rice (Oryza sativa). Grain setting defect1 (GSD1), which encodes a putative remorin protein, was found to affect grain setting in rice. Investigation of the phenotype of a transfer DNA insertion mutant (gsd1-Dominant) with enhanced GSD1 expression revealed abnormalities including a reduced grain setting rate, accumulation of carbohydrates in leaves, and lower soluble sugar content in the phloem exudates. GSD1 was found to be specifically expressed in the plasma membrane and plasmodesmata (PD) of phloem companion cells. Experimental evidence suggests that the phenotype of the gsd1-Dominant mutant is caused by defects in the grain-filling process as a result of the impaired transport of carbohydrates from the photosynthetic site to the phloem. GSD1 functioned in affecting PD conductance by interacting with rice ACTIN1 in association with the PD callose binding protein1. Together, our results suggest that GSD1 may play a role in regulating photoassimilate translocation through the symplastic pathway to impact grain setting in rice. PMID:25253885

  13. Protective effects of NHE1 inhibition with sabiporide in an experimental model of asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest in piglets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xinchun; Lee, Dongwon; Wu, Dongmei

    2013-04-01

    The present study investigated the protective effects of a novel NHE1 selective inhibitor, sabiporide, in a porcine model of asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest. Asphyxial cardiac arrest was induced by endotracheal tube clamping (ETC). The animals remained untreated for 3 min after loss of aortic pulsations (LOAP), and followed by chest compression and defibrillation. Sixteen of eighteen pigs had return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and were randomly assigned to two study groups. Group 1: vehicle control. Group 2: 3mg/kg sabiporide was given at 15 min after ROSC. Post-arrest myocardial dysfunction was present in both groups, and progressed over hours. Animals treated with sabiporide had less wall motion abnormality and higher left ventricular ejection fraction than control animals (33% in control group vs. 47% in sabiporide group). Sabopiride treatment also significantly improved post-arrest arterial blood pressure by 25% and cardiac stroke volume by 44%, and improved mixed-venous blood oxygen saturation by 38% and oxygen delivery by 118%. Furthermore, compared to the control group, the sabiporide group also had higher blood flows in the brain, heart, kidney, liver and spleen at 30 min after ROSC. There was no significant blood flow difference in distal ileum mucosa between control and sabiporide groups. In addition, sabiporide treatment significantly reduced cardiac myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity by 53% and cardiac troponin I by 51%, and reduced the plasma level of TNF-α by 52% and IL-6 by 41%. This study shows that post-arrest pharmacological conditioning with sabiporide affords protection from whole body ischemia-reperfusion injury in this model of asphyxia-induced cardiac arrest and resuscitation. PMID:22989728

  14. Crack arrest toughness of a heat-affected zone containing local brittle zones

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, L.; Pussegoda, L.N.; Graville, B.A.; Tyson, W.R.

    1996-11-01

    The awareness of the presence of local brittle zones (LBZs) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of welds has led to the requirements for minimum initiation toughness for the HAZ for critical applications. A fracture control philosophy that is proposed to be an attractive alternative for heat-affected zones containing LBZs is the prevention of crack propagation rather than of crack initiation. Such an approach would be viable if it could be demonstrated that cracks initiated in the LBZs will be arrested without causing catastrophic failure, notwithstanding the low initiation (CTOD) toughness resulting from the presence of LBZs. Unstable propagation of a crack initiating from an LBZ requires the rupture of tougher microstructural regions surrounding the LBZ in HAZ, and therefore the CTOD value reflecting the presence of LBZ is unlikely to provide a true indication of the potential for fast fracture along the heat-affected zone. Base metal specifications usually ensure that small unstable cracks propagating from the weld zone into the base metal would be arrested. To investigate the likelihood of fast fracture within the HAZ, a test program has been carried out that involved performing compact plane strain and plane stress crack arrest tests on a heat-affected zone that contained LBZs, and thus exhibited unacceptable low CTOD toughness for resistance to brittle fracture initiation. The results indicated that the crack arrest toughness was little influenced by the presence of local brittle zones. Instead, the superior toughness of the larger proportion of finer-grain HAZ surrounding the LBZ present along the crack path has a greater influence on the crack arrest toughness.

  15. Modulation of Medium pH by Caulobacter crescentus Facilitates Recovery from Uranium-Induced Growth Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dan M.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidized form of uranium [U(VI)] predominates in oxic environments and poses a major threat to ecosystems. Due to its ability to mineralize U(VI), the oligotroph Caulobacter crescentus is an attractive candidate for U(VI) bioremediation. However, the physiological basis for U(VI) tolerance is unclear. Here we demonstrated that U(VI) caused a temporary growth arrest in C. crescentus and three other bacterial species, although the duration of growth arrest was significantly shorter for C. crescentus. During the majority of the growth arrest period, cell morphology was unaltered and DNA replication initiation was inhibited. However, during the transition from growth arrest to exponential phase, cells with shorter stalks were observed, suggesting a decoupling between stalk development and the cell cycle. Upon recovery from growth arrest, C. crescentus proliferated with a growth rate comparable to that of a control without U(VI), although a fraction of these cells appeared filamentous with multiple replication start sites. Normal cell morphology was restored by the end of exponential phase. Cells did not accumulate U(VI) resistance mutations during the prolonged growth arrest, but rather, a reduction in U(VI) toxicity occurred concomitantly with an increase in medium pH. Together, these data suggest that C. crescentus recovers from U(VI)-induced growth arrest by reducing U(VI) toxicity through pH modulation. Our finding represents a unique U(VI) detoxification strategy and provides insight into how microbes cope with U(VI) under nongrowing conditions, a metabolic state that is prevalent in natural environments. PMID:25002429

  16. How Cool It Is: Targeted Temperature Management for Brain Protection Post-Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2016-02-01

    Neurological recovery often determines outcome in patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Temperature control as a neuroprotective strategy has become standard of care. The first randomized trials showing improved neurological outcomes in patients treated with hypothermia with a target temperature of 33°C over a decade ago led to the inclusion of this intervention in practice guidelines and the broad adoption of hypothermia protocols across the world. More recently, large randomized trials showed no difference from targeting a temperature of 33 or 36°C and no benefit from pre-hospital induction of hypothermia. Temperature control remains a crucial part of post-cardiac arrest care. However, the optimal temperature target, timing of induction, duration of temperature control, and speed of rewarming are unclear. Similarly, the value of targeted temperature management in cases of in-hospital arrest and non-shockable rhythms is unknown. This article reviews the neuroprotective mechanisms of hypothermia, the evidence supporting targeted temperature management after cardiac resuscitation, areas of persistent uncertainty and controversy, and future research directions. PMID:26820272

  17. Post-resuscitation care for survivors of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Mangla, Ashvarya; Daya, Mohamud R.; Gupta, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest can occur following a myriad of clinical conditions. With advancement of medical science and improvements in Emergency Medical Services systems, the rate of return of spontaneous circulation for patients who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) continues to increase. Managing these patients is challenging and requires a structured approach including stabilization of cardiopulmonary status, early consideration of neuroprotective strategies, identifying and managing the etiology of arrest and initiating treatment to prevent recurrence. This requires a closely coordinated multidisciplinary team effort. In this article, we will review the initial management of survivors of OHCA, highlighting advances and ongoing controversies. PMID:24568821

  18. Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest –Optimal Management

    PubMed Central

    Frõhlich, Georg M.; Lyon, Richard M; Sasson, Comilla; Crake, Tom; Whitbread, Mark; Indermuehle, Andreas; Timmis, Adam; Meier, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has attracted increasing attention over the past years because outcomes have improved impressively lately. The changes for neurological intact outcomes has been poor but several areas have achieved improving survival rates after adjusting their cardiac arrest care. The pre-hospital management is certainly key and decides whether a cardiac arrest patient can be brought back into a spontaneous circulation. However, the whole chain of resuscitation including the in-hospital care have improved also. This review describes aetiologies of OHCA, risk and potential protective factors and recent advances in the pre-hospital and in-hospital management of these patients. PMID:23228073

  19. Pollution performance of 110 kV metal oxide arresters

    SciTech Connect

    Chrzan, K.; Pohl, Z.; Grzybowski, S.; Koehler, W.

    1997-04-01

    Pollution test results of single unit 110 kV metal oxide surge arresters with porcelain housing according to the solid layer and salt fog methods are presented. During 6 hours of testing, the internal and external charge and maximum temperature along the varistor column were measured. The formation of single stable dry bands on the housing was often observed, especially during salt fog tests. In such cases, the varistor temperature can reach about 70 C. The simple electrical model of the arrester enabling calculations of voltages and currents as a function of arrester and pollution parameters is shown.

  20. Behavior of zinc oxide surge arresters under pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Feser, F.; Kohler, W.; Qiu, D. ); Chrzan, K. )

    1991-04-01

    This paper presents results of pollution tests with AC voltages which were carried out with a multi-unit zinc oxide arrester. The interaction between the polluted porcelain housing and the inner varistor column due to capacitive coupling has been found to be responsible for the temperature rise of varistor elements. The different voltage distribution between inside and outside of the arrester also causes a high radial electric field which can lead to internal discharges if the radial insulation system is not properly designed. These internal discharges may damage varistor elements which are not adequately coated and may cause a total destruction of the arrester.

  1. Soft Semicrystalline Thermoplastic Elastomers by Arrested Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Adam; Register, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Thermoplastic elastomers (TPEs) marry the solid-state behavior of vulcanized rubbers with the melt processability of thermoplastics. Archetypal soft TPEs consist of triblock copolymers comprising a rubbery mid-block flanked by two identical glassy end-blocks. Incorporating crystalline blocks into TPEs can confer solvent resistance as well as reduce the processing costs by giving access to single-phase melts. However, simply substituting crystalline for glassy end-blocks dramatically degrades the solid-state mechanical properties, particularly at large strains. We seek to integrate the benefits of crystallinity into TPEs, while maintaining the desired mechanical properties, using the block architecture: crystalline-glassy-rubbery-glassy-crystalline. Methods have been developed to synthesize highly symmetric, narrow-distribution block copolymers with this architecture using anionic polymerization of butadiene, styrene, and isoprene followed by hydrogenation. Judicious choices of block molecular weights indeed yield homogeneous melts above the melting point of the crystalline component. Upon cooling, crystallization--rather than interblock repulsion--establishes the solid-state microstructure which physically crosslinks the rubbery mid-block, ultimately conferring elasticity. Subsequent vitrification of the adjacent glassy blocks arrests the growth of the crystallites, and protects them from yielding under applied load. As a result, our materials show low initial moduli, strain hardening, and high extensibility, typical of commercial TPEs.

  2. [Changes in the management of cardiac arrest].

    PubMed

    Genest, Marc; Pochmalicki, Gilbert

    2004-05-22

    NEW RECOMMENDATIONS: for cardio-pulmonary resuscitation Methods such as mouth to mouth or the search for a pulse, until now the fundamental preliminaries, have now become second line. Everything must be organised to allow for defibrillation as rapidly as possible. NEW MODALITIES FOR CARDIAC MASSAGE: The frequency of compressions recommended is currently 100 per minute in the adult with a rhythm of compression-ventilation reaching 15/2 before intubation. Concerning the haemodynamic agents for cardiac arrest, the efficacy of high doses of adrenalin is not greater than with conventional doses. Vasopressin is not superior to intravenous adrenalin regarding survival at 24 hrs exepet in case of asystoly. Dopamine at a "renal" dose is no longer used. ANTIARRYTHMICS: Amiodarone is part of the decisional tree in the case of ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia without a pulse. Semi-automatic defibrillator accessibility should be generalized. INFUSED SOLUTIONS: Sodium bicarbonate does not improve the survival except in particular cases. Physiological serum should be preferred to glucosed serum during reanimation. PMID:15226695

  3. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for pediatric cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Jennie

    2015-02-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) remains a promising treatment for pediatric patients in cardiac arrest unresponsive to traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation. With venoarterial extracorporeal support, blood is drained from the right atrium, oxygenated through the extracorporeal circuit, and transfused back to the body, bypassing the heart and lungs. The use of artificial oxygenation and perfusion thus provides the body a period of hemodynamic stability, while allowing resolution of underlying disease processes. Survival rates for ECPR patients are higher than those for traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), although neurological outcomes require further investigation. The impact of duration of CPR and length of treatment with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation vary in published reports. Furthermore, current guidelines for the initiation and use of ECPR are limited and may lead to confusion about appropriate use of this support. Many ethical concerns arise with this advanced form of life support. More often than not, the dilemma is not whether to withhold ECPR, but rather when to withdraw it. Although clinicians must decide if ECPR is appropriate and when further intervention is futile, the ultimate burden of choice is left to the patient's caregivers. Offering support and guidance to the patient's family as well as the patient is essential. PMID:25639578

  4. Regulation and expression of a growth arrest-specific gene (gas5) during growth, differentiation, and development.

    PubMed Central

    Coccia, E M; Cicala, C; Charlesworth, A; Ciccarelli, C; Rossi, G B; Philipson, L; Sorrentino, V

    1992-01-01

    The growth arrest-specific gas5 gene was isolated from mouse genomic DNA and structurally characterized. The transcriptional unit is divided into 12 exons that span around 7 kb. An alternative splicing mechanism gives rise to two mature mRNAs which contain either 11 or 12 exons, and both are found in the cytoplasm of growth-arrested cells. In vivo, the gas5 gene is ubiquitously expressed in mouse tissues during development and adult life. In Friend leukemia and NIH 3T3 cells, the levels of gas5 gene mRNA were high in saturation density-arrested cells and almost undetectable in actively growing cells. Run-on experiments indicated that the gas5 gene is transcribed at the same level in both growing and arrested cells. On the other hand, in dimethyl sulfoxide-induced differentiating cells a sharp decrease in the rate of transcription was observed shortly before the cells reached the postmitotic stage. These results indicate that in density-arrested cells accumulation of gas5 mRNA is controlled at the posttranscriptional level while in differentiating cells expression is regulated transcriptionally. Images PMID:1630459

  5. 53. NEW BCB AND LIGHTNING ARRESTER ARRANGEMENT, SANTA ANA RIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. NEW BCB AND LIGHTNING ARRESTER ARRANGEMENT, SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, JAN. 24, 1977. SCE drawing no. 455670-0. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  6. Office and operating room management of cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Sabiston, W R; Hicks, J N

    1982-02-01

    Management of cardiac arrest depends on a four-minute period of potential reversibility. Success depends on immediate diagnosis, documentation of the onset of cardiac arrest, and establishment of treatment priorities. Pupillary dilation, complete in two minutes, serves to verify the onset and duration of cardiac arrest. Treatment involves two phases--the emergency phase of oxygenation and perfusion and the definitive phase of restoring the spontaneous effective heartbeat. The two mechanisms of cardiac arrest, ventricular fibrillation and asystole, are characterized, and the conditions necessary for each to occur are listed. The treatment of ventricular fibrillation is defibrillation, whereas ventricular asystole responds to cardiac stimuli--a precordial blow, epinephrine, or calcium. The mnemonic "SALT CAN ADD GOOD TIME" is suggested as a guide for drug dosage, and a treatment flowchart is outlined. PMID:7036965

  7. 156. Detail of lightning arrester on hillside above powerhouse; looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    156. Detail of lightning arrester on hillside above powerhouse; looking west. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  8. 155. Detail of lightning arrester on hillside above powerhouse; looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    155. Detail of lightning arrester on hillside above powerhouse; looking north. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  9. 157. Detail of lightning arresters; looking west. Photo by Jet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    157. Detail of lightning arresters; looking west. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  10. 154. Detail of lightning arrester on hillside above powerhouse; looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    154. Detail of lightning arrester on hillside above powerhouse; looking north. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  11. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Resuscitation Following Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Rittenberger, Jon C; Friess, Stuart; Polderman, Kees H

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac arrest is the most common cause of death in North America. Neurocritical care interventions, including targeted temperature management (TTM), have significantly improved neurological outcomes in patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Therefore, resuscitation following cardiac arrest was chosen as an emergency neurological life support protocol. Patients remaining comatose following resuscitation from cardiac arrest should be considered for TTM. This protocol will review induction, maintenance, and re-warming phases of TTM, along with management of TTM side effects. Aggressive shivering suppression is necessary with this treatment to ensure the maintenance of a target temperature. Ancillary testing, including electrocardiography, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, continuous electroencephalography monitoring, and correction of electrolyte, blood gas, and hematocrit changes, are also necessary to optimize outcomes. PMID:26438463

  12. [Effect of phenibut on the respiratory arrest caused by serotonin].

    PubMed

    Tarakanov, I A; Tarasova, N N; Belova, E A; Safonov, V A

    2006-01-01

    The role of the GABAergic system in mechanisms of the respiratory arrest caused by serotonin administration was studied in anaesthetized rats. Under normal conditions, the systemic administration of serotonin (20-60 mg/kg, i.v.) resulted in drastic changes of the respiratory pattern, whereby the initial phase of increased respiratory rate was followed by the respiratory arrest. The preliminary injection of phenibut (400 mg/kg, i.p.) abolished or sharply reduced the duration of the respiratory arrest phase induced by serotonin. Bilateral vagotomy following the phenibut injection potentiated the anti-apnoesic effect of phenibut, which was evidence of the additive action of vagotomy and phenibut administration. The mechanism of apnea caused by serotonin administration is suggested to include a central GABAergic element, which is activated by phenibut so as to counteract the respiratory arrest. PMID:16579056

  13. 3. DETAIL, LIGHTNING ARRESTER ON SAR TRANSMISSION LINE. EEC print ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL, LIGHTNING ARRESTER ON SAR TRANSMISSION LINE. EEC print no. S-C-01-00478, no date. Photographer unknown. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Transmission Lines, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  14. Diacetylmorphine (heroin) body packer presenting with respiratory arrest.

    PubMed

    Naseem, Arshad; Abbas, Shahid

    2009-04-01

    Intracorporeal concealment of illicit drugs known as 'body packing' is uncommonly reported. A body packer with swallowed capsules containing Diacetylmorphine (heroin) for smuggling purposes presented with respiratory arrest and recovered after ventilatory support and nalaxone infusion. PMID:19356347

  15. 44. #3 ARRESTING GEAR ENGINE AFT LOOKING FORWARD SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. #3 ARRESTING GEAR ENGINE - AFT LOOKING FORWARD SHOWING MURAL OF LUCY AND CHARLIE BROWN ON HYDRAULIC OIL ACCUMULATOR. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  16. The C.elegans MAPK phosphatase LIP-1 is required for the G2/M meiotic arrest of developing oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hajnal, Alex; Berset, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    In the Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite germline, spatially restricted mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling controls the meiotic cell cycle. First, the MAPK signal is necessary for the germ cells to progress through pachytene of meiotic prophase I. As the germ cells exit pachytene and enter diplotene/diakinesis, MAPK is inactivated and the developing oocytes arrest in diakinesis (G2/M arrest). During oocyte maturation, a signal from the sperm reactivates MAPK to promote M phase entry. Here, we show that the MAPK phosphatase LIP-1 dephosphorylates MAPK as germ cells exit pachytene in order to maintain MAPK in an inactive state during oocyte development. Germ cells lacking LIP-1 fail to arrest the cell cycle at the G2/M boundary, and they enter a mitotic cell cycle without fertilization. LIP-1 thus coordinates oocyte cell cycle progression and maturation with ovulation and fertilization. PMID:12169634

  17. New-type steel plate with ultra high crack-arrestability

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, T.; Nomiyama, Y.; Hagiwara, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Oshita, S.; Mabuchi, H.

    1995-12-31

    A new-type steel plate has been developed by controlling the microstructure of the surface layers. The surface layer consists of ultra fine grain ferrite microstructure, which provides excellent fracture toughness even at cryogenic temperature. When an unstable brittle crack propagates in the developed steel plate, shear-lips can be easily formed due to the surface layers with ultra fine grain microstructure. Since unstable running crack behavior is strongly affected by side-ligaments (shear-lips), which are associated with extensive plastic deformation, enhanced formation of the shear-lips can improve crack arrestability. This paper describes the developed steel plates of HT500MPa tensile strength class for shipbuilding use. Fracture mechanics investigations using large-scale fracture testings (including ultrawide duplex ESSO tests) clarified that the developed steel plates have ultra high crack-arrestability. It was also confirmed that the plates possess sufficient properties, including weldability and workability, for ship building use.

  18. Effect of electroconvulsive stimulation on morphological and physiological aspects of post-cardiac arrest cerebral microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Sheleg, Sergey; Hixon, Hugh; Aizberg, Oleg R; Korotkevich, Alexander E; Nedzved, Mikhail K

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effect of electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) on cerebral circulation in vivo using the method for measuring microcirculation in real time with the photosensitizer dye Photosense and the fiber optic spectrofluorometer LESA-01-BIOSPEC. We have found that electroconvulsive stimulation significantly improved cerebral microcirculation (fourfold higher comparing to the control cerebral perfusion) after 30 min of room-temperature cardiac arrest. Morphologic study of the brain tissue showed the absence of rouleaux formation of erythrocytes ("sludged blood") in the cerebral cortex microcirculation after the application of electrical stimulus. Electroconvulsive stimulation may be useful for improving cerebral microcirculation (blood flow) in cases of long-term brain hypoxia/anoxia after prolonged cardiac arrest. PMID:18586374

  19. Al-Qaeda arrest casts shadow over the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacey, James

    2009-11-01

    CERN remains on course for the imminent switch-on of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) despite the media frenzy following the recent arrest of a physicist who had been working at the facility. The researcher in question is a 32-year-old man of Algerian descent who is expected to face trial in France - the country in which he was arrested. His name is yet to be formally identified under French judicial rules.

  20. Cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia in patients taking antipsychotic drugs: cohort study using administrative data

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Sean; Bilker, Warren B; Knauss, Jill S; Margolis, David J; Kimmel, Stephen E; Reynolds, Robert F; Glasser, Dale B; Morrison, Mary F; Strom, Brian L

    2002-01-01

    Objective To examine the rates of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia in patients with treated schizophrenia and in non-schizophrenic controls. Design Cohort study of outpatients using administrative data. Setting 3 US Medicaid programmes. Participants Patients with schizophrenia treated with clozapine, haloperidol, risperidone, or thioridazine; a control group of patients with glaucoma; and a control group of patients with psoriasis. Main outcome measure Diagnosis of cardiac arrest or ventricular arrhythmia. Results Patients with treated schizophrenia had higher rates of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia than controls, with rate ratios ranging from 1.7 to 3.2. Overall, thioridazine was not associated with an increased risk compared with haloperidol (rate ratio 0.9, 95% confidence interval 0.7 to 1.2). However, thioridazine showed an increased risk of events at doses ⩾600 mg (2.6, 1.0 to 6.6; P=0.049) and a linear dose-response relation (P=0.038). Conclusions The increased risk of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia in patients with treated schizophrenia could be due to the disease or its treatment. Overall, the risk with thioridazine was no worse than that with haloperidol. Thioridazine may, however, have a higher risk at high doses, although this finding could be due to chance. To reduce cardiac risk, thioridazine should be prescribed at the lowest dose needed to obtain an optimal therapeutic effect. What is already known on this topicThioridazine seems to prolong the electrocardiographic QT interval more than haloperidolAlthough QT prolongation is used as a marker of arrhythmogenicity, it is unknown whether thioridazine is any worse than haloperidol with regard to cardiac safetyWhat this study addsPatients taking antipsychotic drugs had higher risks of cardiac events than control patients with glaucoma or psoriasisOverall, the risk of cardiac arrest and ventricular arrhythmia was not higher with thioridazine than haloperidolThioridazine may

  1. The Neighborhood Context of Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Arrest

    PubMed Central

    KIRK, DAVID S.

    2008-01-01

    This study assesses the role of social context in explaining racial and ethnic disparities in arrest, with a focus on how distinct neighborhood contexts in which different racial and ethnic groups reside explain variations in criminal outcomes. To do so, I utilize a multilevel, longitudinal research design, combining individual-level data with contextual data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN). Findings reveal that black youths face multiple layers of disadvantage relative to other racial and ethnic groups, and these layers work to create differences in arrest. At the family level, results show that disadvantages in the form of unstable family structures explain much of the disparities in arrest across race and ethnicity. At the neighborhood level, black youths tend to reside in areas with both significantly higher levels of concentrated poverty than other youths as well as lower levels of collective efficacy than white youths. Variations in neighborhood tolerance of deviance across groups explain little of the arrest disparities, yet tolerance of deviance does influence the frequency with which a crime ultimately ends in an arrest. Even after accounting for relevant demographic, family, and neighborhood-level predictors, substantial residual arrest differences remain between black youths and youths of other racial and ethnic groups. PMID:18390291

  2. Respiratory Arrest in an Obese Pregnant Woman with Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    PubMed Central

    Iwashita, Ayumi; Baba, Yosuke; Usui, Rie; Ohkuchi, Akihide; Muto, Shigeaki; Matsubara, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    A pregnant, non-Japanese-speaking Peruvian, and, thus, with communication difficulty, suffered hyperemesis gravidarum and had respiratory arrest, requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The obese pregnant woman (prepregnancy weight: 107 kg) had vomited and lost 15 kg in bodyweight over appropriately 2 weeks prior to the arrest but had not complained due to communication difficulty, which, together with her obesity, prevented a Japanese obstetrician from noticing her severe condition. 1,000 mL of low potassium fluid plus thiamine was administered. She became unable to stand, suggesting lower-extremity-proximal-muscle weakness, and then respiratory arrest occurred. Hypopotassemia (2.3 mEq/L), pulseless electrical activity, and muscle weakness suggested the presence of severe potassium deficiency, which may have caused respiratory muscle paralysis, leading to the respiratory arrest. Hypercapnea was severer than expected for compensatory hypoventilation, indicating the presence of concomitant severe hypoventilation, which may also have contributed to respiratory arrest. She recovered with electrolyte and volume replacement. Respiratory arrest can occur with hyperemesis gravidarum, and obesity and communication difficulties can prevent the early detection of severe conditions. PMID:26693367

  3. Blood transfusion therapy for traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Mitsugi; Tahara, Yoshio; Iwashita, Masayuki; Kosuge, Takayuki; Toyoda, Hiroshi; Arata, Shinju; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    Background: Blood transfusion therapy (BTT), which represents transplantation of living cells, poses several risks. Although BTT is necessary for trauma victims with hemorrhagic shock, it may be futile for patients with blunt traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest (BT-CPA). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively examined the medical records of consecutive patients with T-CPA. The study period was divided into two periods: The first from 1995-1998, when we used packed red cells (PRC) regardless of the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and the second from 1999-2004, when we did not use PRC before ROSC. The rates of ROSC, admission to the ICU, and survival-to-discharge were compared between these two periods. Results: We studied the records of 464 patients with BT-CPA (175 in the first period and 289 in the second period). Although the rates of ROSC and admission to the ICU were statistically higher in the first period, there was no statistical difference in the rate of survival-to-discharge between these two periods. In the first period, the rate of ROSC was statistically higher in the non-BTT group than the BTT group. However, for cases in which ROSC was performed and was successful, there were no statistical differences in the rate of admission and survival-to-discharge between the first and second group, and between the BTT and non-BTT group. Conclusion: Our retrospective consecutive study shows the possibility that BTT before ROSC for BT-CPA and a treatment strategy that includes this treatment improves the success rate of ROSC, but not the survival rate. BTT is thought to be futile as a treatment for BT-CPA before ROSC. PMID:23493056

  4. Prehospital randomised assessment of a mechanical compression device in cardiac arrest (PaRAMeDIC) trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is closely linked to the quality of CPR, but in real life, resuscitation during prehospital care and ambulance transport is often suboptimal. Mechanical chest compression devices deliver consistent chest compressions, are not prone to fatigue and could potentially overcome some of the limitations of manual chest compression. However, there is no high-quality evidence that they improve clinical outcomes, or that they are cost effective. The Prehospital Randomised Assessment of a Mechanical Compression Device In Cardiac Arrest (PARAMEDIC) trial is a pragmatic cluster randomised study of the LUCAS-2 device in adult patients with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods/design The primary objective of this trial is to evaluate the effect of chest compression using LUCAS-2 on mortality at 30 days post out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, compared with manual chest compression. Secondary objectives of the study are to evaluate the effects of LUCAS-2 on survival to 12 months, cognitive and quality of life outcomes and cost-effectiveness. Methods: Ambulance service vehicles will be randomised to either manual compression (control) or LUCAS arms. Adult patients in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, attended by a trial vehicle will be eligible for inclusion. Patients with traumatic cardiac arrest or who are pregnant will be excluded. The trial will recruit approximately 4000 patients from England, Wales and Scotland. A waiver of initial consent has been approved by the Research Ethics Committees. Consent will be sought from survivors for participation in the follow-up phase. Conclusion The trial will assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of the LUCAS-2 mechanical chest compression device. Trial Registration: The trial is registered on the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Registry (ISRCTN08233942). PMID:21054860

  5. Capillary leakage in post-cardiac arrest survivors during therapeutic hypothermia - a prospective, randomised study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fluids are often given liberally after the return of spontaneous circulation. However, the optimal fluid regimen in survivors of cardiac arrest is unknown. Recent studies indicate an increased fluid requirement in post-cardiac arrest patients. During hypothermia, animal studies report extravasation in several organs, including the brain. We investigated two fluid strategies to determine whether the choice of fluid would influence fluid requirements, capillary leakage and oedema formation. Methods 19 survivors with witnessed cardiac arrest of primary cardiac origin were allocated to either 7.2% hypertonic saline with 6% poly (O-2-hydroxyethyl) starch solution (HH) or standard fluid therapy (Ringer's Acetate and saline 9 mg/ml) (control). The patients were treated with the randomised fluid immediately after admission and continued for 24 hours of therapeutic hypothermia. Results During the first 24 hours, the HH patients required significantly less i.v. fluid than the control patients (4750 ml versus 8010 ml, p = 0.019) with comparable use of vasopressors. Systemic vascular resistance was significantly reduced from 0 to 24 hours (p = 0.014), with no difference between the groups. Colloid osmotic pressure (COP) in serum and interstitial fluid (p < 0.001 and p = 0.014 respectively) decreased as a function of time in both groups, with a more pronounced reduction in interstitial COP in the crystalloid group. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain did not reveal vasogenic oedema. Conclusions Post-cardiac arrest patients have high fluid requirements during therapeutic hypothermia, probably due to increased extravasation. The use of HH reduced the fluid requirement significantly. However, the lack of brain oedema in both groups suggests no superior fluid regimen. Cardiac index was significantly improved in the group treated with crystalloids. Although we do not associate HH with the renal failures that developed, caution should be taken when using hypertonic

  6. Mechanisms of neutropenia involving myeloid maturation arrest in burn sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Shoup, M; Weisenberger, J M; Wang, J L; Pyle, J M; Gamelli, R L; Shankar, R

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the mechanisms that lead to the decrease in bone marrow production of neutrophils during burn sepsis. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Impaired bone marrow granulopoiesis during burn sepsis often results in neutropenia despite elevated circulating levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). To date, neither the specific stages of neutrophil maturation involved in the bone marrow suppression nor the mechanisms for the impairment have been determined. METHODS: Peripheral blood absolute neutrophil count and G-CSF levels were determined in mice 3 days after randomization to control, burn alone, or burn plus a topical inoculation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1000 colony-forming units). Bone marrow aspirates were analyzed for their neutrophil differentiation patterns by Gr-1 antigen expression and their G-CSF receptor status. Histologic analysis of liver, lung, spleen, and wound site was performed. RESULTS: In burn sepsis, absolute neutrophil count was reduced whereas plasma G-CSF levels were elevated, and myeloid differentiation was significantly shifted toward the immature mitotic myeloid cells. Bone marrow G-CSF receptor mRNA levels and G-CSF-stimulated proliferation were substantially decreased in burn sepsis. Histologic analysis revealed no significant neutrophil infiltration into the tissues. CONCLUSIONS: In thermal injury with superimposed sepsis, neutropenia and myeloid maturation arrest, despite the elevated levels of G-CSF, correlate with the reduction in bone marrow G-CSF receptor expression. These observations may provide a potential mechanism for neutropenia in sepsis. Images Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 8. Figure 9. PMID:9671075

  7. The Stringent Response and Cell Cycle Arrest in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ferullo, Daniel J.; Lovett, Susan T.

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial stringent response, triggered by nutritional deprivation, causes an accumulation of the signaling nucleotides pppGpp and ppGpp. We characterize the replication arrest that occurs during the stringent response in Escherichia coli. Wild type cells undergo a RelA-dependent arrest after treatment with serine hydroxamate to contain an integer number of chromosomes and a replication origin-to-terminus ratio of 1. The growth rate prior to starvation determines the number of chromosomes upon arrest. Nucleoids of these cells are decondensed; in the absence of the ability to synthesize ppGpp, nucleoids become highly condensed, similar to that seen after treatment with the translational inhibitor chloramphenicol. After induction of the stringent response, while regions corresponding to the origins of replication segregate, the termini remain colocalized in wild-type cells. In contrast, cells arrested by rifampicin and cephalexin do not show colocalized termini, suggesting that the stringent response arrests chromosome segregation at a specific point. Release from starvation causes rapid nucleoid reorganization, chromosome segregation, and resumption of replication. Arrest of replication and inhibition of colony formation by ppGpp accumulation is relieved in seqA and dam mutants, although other aspects of the stringent response appear to be intact. We propose that DNA methylation and SeqA binding to non-origin loci is necessary to enforce a full stringent arrest, affecting both initiation of replication and chromosome segregation. This is the first indication that bacterial chromosome segregation, whose mechanism is not understood, is a step that may be regulated in response to environmental conditions. PMID:19079575

  8. The stringent response and cell cycle arrest in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ferullo, Daniel J; Lovett, Susan T

    2008-12-01

    The bacterial stringent response, triggered by nutritional deprivation, causes an accumulation of the signaling nucleotides pppGpp and ppGpp. We characterize the replication arrest that occurs during the stringent response in Escherichia coli. Wild type cells undergo a RelA-dependent arrest after treatment with serine hydroxamate to contain an integer number of chromosomes and a replication origin-to-terminus ratio of 1. The growth rate prior to starvation determines the number of chromosomes upon arrest. Nucleoids of these cells are decondensed; in the absence of the ability to synthesize ppGpp, nucleoids become highly condensed, similar to that seen after treatment with the translational inhibitor chloramphenicol. After induction of the stringent response, while regions corresponding to the origins of replication segregate, the termini remain colocalized in wild-type cells. In contrast, cells arrested by rifampicin and cephalexin do not show colocalized termini, suggesting that the stringent response arrests chromosome segregation at a specific point. Release from starvation causes rapid nucleoid reorganization, chromosome segregation, and resumption of replication. Arrest of replication and inhibition of colony formation by ppGpp accumulation is relieved in seqA and dam mutants, although other aspects of the stringent response appear to be intact. We propose that DNA methylation and SeqA binding to non-origin loci is necessary to enforce a full stringent arrest, affecting both initiation of replication and chromosome segregation. This is the first indication that bacterial chromosome segregation, whose mechanism is not understood, is a step that may be regulated in response to environmental conditions. PMID:19079575

  9. Circadian variation in witnessed out of hospital cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Soo, L; Gray, D; Young, T; Hampton, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To examine the effect on circadian variation of out of hospital cardiac arrest according to the underlying aetiology and presenting rhythm of arrest, and to explore strategies that might help to improve survival outcome using circadian variation.
DESIGN—Population based retrospective study.
SETTING—County of Nottinghamshire with a total population of 993 914 and an area of 2183 km2.
SUBJECTS—Between 1 January 1991 and 3 December 1994, all witnessed cardiac arrests attended by the Nottinghamshire Ambulance Service, of which 1196 patients had a cardiac cause for their arrest (ICD, 9th revision, codes 390-414 and 420-429) and 339 had a non-cardiac cause.
RESULTS—The circadian variation of the cardiac cases was not significantly different from that of non-cardiac cases (p = 0.587), even when adjusted for age, sex, or presenting rhythm of arrest. For cardiac cases, the circadian variation of those who presented with ventricular fibrillation was significantly different from those presenting with a rhythm other than ventricular fibrillation (p = 0.005), but was similar to the circadian variation of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (p = 0.306) and survivors (p = 0.542). Ambulance response time was also found to have a circadian variation.
CONCLUSIONS—There is a common circadian variation of out of hospital cardiac arrest, irrespective of underlying aetiology, where the presenting rhythm is other than ventricular fibrillation. This is different from the circadian variation of cases of cardiac aetiology presenting with ventricular fibrillation. The circadian variation of ventricular fibrillation, and consequently survival, may be affected by the availability of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the speed of ambulance response.


Keywords: out of hospital; cardiac arrest; circadian variation PMID:10995402

  10. [Cardiac arrest following blunt chest injury. Emergency thoracotomy without ifs or buts?].

    PubMed

    Leidel, B A; Kanz, K G; Kirchhoff, C; Bürklein, D; Wismüller, A; Mutschler, W

    2007-10-01

    In German-speaking countries, most serious thoracic injuries are attributable to the impact of blunt force; they are the second most frequent result of injury after head injury in polytrauma patients with multiple injuries. Almost one in every three polytraumatized patients with significant chest injury develops acute lung failure, and one in every four, acute circulatory failure. The acute circulatory arrest following serious chest injury involves a high mortality rate, and in most cases it reflects a tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, or hemorrhagic shock resulting from injury to the heart or one of the large vessels close to it. Brisk drainage of tension pneumothorax and adequate volume restoration are therefore particularly important in resuscitation of multiply traumatized patients, as are rapid resuscitative thoracotomy to allow direct heart massage, drainage of pericardial tamponade, and control of hemorrhage. However the probability of survival described in the literature is very low for patients sustaining severe chest trauma with acute cardiac arrest. The case report presented here describes a female polytrauma patient who suffered an acute cardiac arrest following cardiac tamponade after admission in the emergency department and who survived without neurological deficits after an emergency thoracotomy. Selections from the topical literature can help the treating physician in the emergency department in making decisions on whether an emergency thoracotomy is indicated after a blunt chest injury and on the procedure itself. PMID:17909734

  11. INHIBITORY EFFECT OF TETRAMETHYLPYRAZINE ON HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA: POSSIBLE ROLE OF APOPTOSIS AND CELL CYCLE ARREST.

    PubMed

    Cao, J; Miao, Q; Zhang, J; Miao, S; Bi, L; Zhang, S; Yang, Q; Zhou, X; Zhang, M; Xie, Y; Wang, S

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer. An important approach to control HCC is chemoprevention. This study aims at investigating the antitumor effect of Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP). Rats were injected with N-Nitrosodiethylamine (DEN) to establish HCC. Tumor development was observed. Liver function was evaluated. Apoptosis and cell cycle arrest-related makers and signaling cascades were determined by Western blot, RT-PCR and flow cytometric analysis. The administration of TMP could significantly inhibit tumor development in DEN-induced HCC rats, shown by reduced incidence of tumor, decreased number of tumor nodules and reduced maximal size of tumor. DEN-induced increase of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase activities were significantly inhibited by TMP. TMP exhibited inhibitory effect on HCC through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in rats. TMP induced apoptosis through increasing Bax, decreasing Bcl-2, increasing the release of cytochrome c, and activating caspase, which consisted of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. TMP induced G2/M cell cycle arrest through down-regulation of cyclin B1/cdc2. In addition, inhibition of Akt and ERK signaling and the antioxidant activities of TMP may also contribute to its antitumor effect. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms underlying the antitumor effect of TMP. PMID:26122217

  12. Dimethyl sulfoxide can initiate cell divisions of arrested callus protoplasts by promoting cortical microtuble assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Hahne, G.; Hoffmann, F.

    1984-09-01

    A serious problem in the technology of plant cell culture is that isolated protoplasts from many species are reluctant to divide. We have succeeded in inducing consecutive divisions in a naturally arrested system i.e., protoplasts from a hibiscus cell line, which do not divide under standard conditions and in an artificially arrested system i.e., colchicine-inhibited callus protoplasts of Nicotiana glutinosa, which do readily divide in the absence of colchicine. In both cases, the reinstallation of a net of cortical microtubules, which had been affected either by colchicine or by the protoplast isolation procedure, resulted in continuous divisions of the formerly arrested protoplasts. Several compounds known to support microtubule assembly in vitro were tested for their ability to promote microtubule assembly in vivo. Best results were obtained by addition of dimethyl sulfoxide to the culture medium. Unlimited amounts of callus could be produced with the dimethyl sulfoxide method from protoplasts which never developed a single callus in control experiments. 30 references, 3 figures.

  13. Powder Cocaine and Crack Use in the United States: An Examination of Risk for Arrest and Socioeconomic Disparities in Use

    PubMed Central

    Palamar, Joseph J.; Davies, Shelby; Ompad, Danielle C.; Cleland, Charles M.; Weitzman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background In light of the current sentencing disparity (18:1) between crack and powder cocaine possession in the United States, we examined socioeconomic correlates of use of each, and relations between use and arrest, to determine who may be at highest risk for arrest and imprisonment. Methods We conducted secondary data analyses on the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 2009–2012. Data were analyzed for adults age ≥18 to determine associations between use and arrest. Socioeconomic correlates of lifetime and annual use of powder cocaine and of crack were delineated using multivariable logistic regression and correlates of frequency of recent use were examined using generalized negative binomial regression. Results Crack users were at higher risk than powder cocaine users for reporting a lifetime arrest or multiple recent arrests. Racial minorities were at low risk for powder cocaine use and Hispanics were at low risk for crack use. Blacks were at increased risk for lifetime and recent crack use, but not when controlling for other socioeconomic variables. However, blacks who did use either powder cocaine or crack tended to use at higher frequencies. Higher education and higher family income were negatively associated with crack use although these factors were sometimes risk factors for powder cocaine use. Conclusions Crack users are at higher risk of arrest and tend to be of lower socioeconomic status compared to powder cocaine users. These findings can inform US Congress as they review the proposed Smarter Sentencing Act of 2014, which would help eliminate cocaine-related sentencing disparities. PMID:25702933

  14. Variation in developmental arrest among male orangutans: a comparison between a Sumatran and a Bornean population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The presence of two sexually active male morphs with different reproductive tactics in a single species is rare among mammals. The most striking case of bimaturism among primates is exhibited by the orangutan (Pongo spp), in which one adult morph, the unflanged male, irreversibly develops into another one, the flanged form, but may remain arrested in the unflanged state for many years. However, it has been suggested that such arrest is less common among Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) compared to Sumatrans (Pongo abelii). To investigate this possible inter-specific difference we compared both the number of developing males and the ratios of the two male morphs at two long-term study sites, Suaq Balimbing on Sumatra and Tuanan on Borneo. Results First, we observed a significantly greater number of flanged than unflanged males per month in the Tuanan study area, whereas the opposite pattern held at Suaq. Second, the same contrast held for the total number of identified individuals over the study, with more flanged than unflanged males at Tuanan and the opposite at Suaq. These differences were mainly due to transient males. For Tuanan, the identification results were confirmed by detailed genetic analyses. Finally, we recorded a higher proportion of unflanged males that became flanged during any given year at Tuanan than at Suaq. Conclusion These results show that developmental arrest is far more common at Suaq than at Tuanan. Preliminary comparisons suggest that this is a general contrast between the island taxa of orangutans and should help efforts to identify the function and proximate control of developmental arrest in orangutan males. PMID:23510027

  15. Influence of Chest Compressions on Circulation during the Peri-Cardiac Arrest Period in Porcine Models

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Walline, Joseph; Zheng, Liangliang; Fu, Yangyang; Yao, Dongqi; Zhu, Huadong; Liu, Xiaohe; Chai, Yanfen; Wang, Zhong; Yu, Xuezhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Starting chest compressions immediately after a defibrillation shock might be harmful, if the victim already had a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and yet was still being subjected to external compressions at the same time. The objective of this study was to study the influence of chest compressions on circulation during the peri-cardiac arrest period. Design Prospective, randomized controlled study. Setting Animal experimental center in Peking Union Medical Collage Hospital, Beijing, China. Subjects Healthy 3-month-old male domestic pigs. Interventions 44 pigs (28±2 kg) were randomly assigned to three groups: Group I (non-arrested with compressions) (n = 12); Group II (arrested with compressions only) (n = 12); Group III (ROSC after compressions and defibrillation) (n = 20). In Groups I and II, compressions were performed to a depth of 5cm (Ia and IIa, n = 6) or a depth of 3cm (Ib and IIb, n = 6) respectively, while in Group III, the animals which had just achieved ROSC (n = 18) were compressed to a depth of 5cm (IIIa, n = 6), a depth of 3cm (IIIb, n = 6), or had no compressions (IIIc, n = 6). Hemodynamic parameters were collected and analyzed. Measurements and Findings Hemodynamics were statistically different between Groups Ia and Ib when different depths of compressions were performed (p < 0.05). In Group II, compressions were beneficial and hemodynamics correlated with the depth of compressions (p < 0.05). In Group III, compressions that continued after ROSC produced a reduction in arterial pressure (p < 0.05). Conclusions Chest compressions might be detrimental to hemodynamics in the early post-ROSC stage. The deeper the compressions were, the better the effect on hemodynamics during cardiac arrest, but the worse the effect on hemodynamics after ROSC. PMID:27168071

  16. Rosuvastatin-induced arrest in progression of renal disease.

    PubMed

    Vidt, Donald G; Cressman, Michael D; Harris, Susan; Pears, John S; Hutchinson, Howard G

    2004-01-01

    Preclinical and limited clinical data suggest that statins decrease the progressive decline in renal function that occurs in patients with renal disease. Pooled analysis of data obtained from a population of hyperlipidemic patients enrolled in the rosuvastatin (Crestor) clinical development program permitted assessment of its effects on renal function both early and later in the course of treatment. Study participants were initially included in controlled clinical trials that evaluated the lipid-lowering efficacy and safety of rosuvastatin when compared with placebo or other lipid-lowering agents (i.e., atorvastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin, cholestyramine, fenofibrate or extended-release niacin). The median duration of treatment with the various doses of statins in these trials was approximately 8 weeks. Following completion of a controlled clinical trial, patients were permitted to enter an open-label extension trial and received rosuvastatin treatment. These data permitted assessment of renal function in a diverse group of over 10,000 patients who received rosuvastatin in its recommended dose range (5-40 mg) for up to 3.8 years. Mean serum creatinine concentrations were lower when compared with baseline both early and later in the course of rosuvastatin treatment. In contrast, no change in mean serum creatinine was observed with placebo. Mean glomerular filtration rates (GFR) predicted from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equation were higher when compared with baseline both early and later in the course of rosuvastatin treatment. No change in GFR was observed in the placebo group. Among patients who received long-term rosuvastatin treatment (> or =96 weeks), GFR was unchanged or tended to increase, rather than decrease, when compared with baseline irrespective of age, gender, hypertensive or diabetic status, level of renal function (GFR > or =60 vs. <60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) at entry or urine dipstick protein status prior to or during the period

  17. Sculpting Pickering Emulsion Droplets by Arrest and Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Christopher; Wei, Zengyi; Caggioni, Marco; Spicer, Patrick; Atherton, Tim

    Pickering emulsion droplets can be arrested into non-spherical shapes--useful for applications such as active delivery--through a general mechanism of deformation followed by absorption of additional colloidal particles onto the interface, relaxation of the droplet caused by surface tension and arrest at some point due to crowding of the particles. We perform simulations of the arrest process to clarify the relative importance of diffusive rearrangement of particles and collective forcing due to surface evolution. Experiment and theory are compared, giving insight into the stability of the resulting capsules and the robustness of the production process for higher-throughput production in, for example, microfluidic systems. We adapt theoretical tools from the jamming literature to better understand the arrested configurations and long timescale evolution of the system: using linear programming and a penalty function approach, we identify unjamming motions in kinetically arrested states. We propose a paradigm of ``metric jamming'' to describe the limiting behavior of this class of system: a structure is metric-jammed if it is stable with respect to collective motion of the particles as well as evolution of the hypersurface on which the packing is embedded. Supported by a Cottrell Award from the Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

  18. Functional Outcomes: One Year after a Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Ketki D.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Holm, Margo B.; Callaway, Clifton W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The study aim was to characterize the time-course of recovery in impairments, activity limitations, participation restrictions, disability, and quality of life during the first year after cardiac arrest. Secondarily, the study described the associations between the instruments used to measure each of these domains. Methods. Measures of global disability (Cerebral Performance Category, CPC, Modified Rankin Scale, mRS), quality of life, activity limitations, participation restrictions, and affective and cognitive impairments were administered to 29 participants 1, 6, and 12 months after cardiac arrest. Results. Global measures of disability indicated recovery between one month and one year after cardiac arrest (mean CPC: 2.1 versus 1.69,  P < 0.05; mean mRS: 2.55 versus 1.83, P < 0.05). While global measures of disability were moderately associated with participation, they were poorly associated with other measures. The cohort endorsed depressive symptomatology throughout the year but did not have detectable cognitive impairment. Conclusions. Recovery from cardiac arrest is multifaceted and recovery continues for months depending upon the measures being used. Measures of global disability, reintegration into the community, and quality of life yield different information. Future clinical trials should include a combination of measures to yield the most complete representation of recovery after cardiac arrest. PMID:26421282

  19. Capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest: Possible Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kido, Kazuhiko; Adams, Val R; Morehead, Richard S; Flannery, Alexander H

    2016-04-01

    We report the case of capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest, possibly secondary to type I Kounis syndrome. A 47-year-old man with a history of T3N1 moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the colon, status-post sigmoid resection, was started on adjuvant capecitabine approximately five months prior to presentation of cardiac arrest secondary to ventricular fibrillation. An electrocardiogram (EKG) revealed ST segment elevation on the lateral leads and the patient was taken emergently to the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The catheterization revealed no angiographically significant stenosis and coronary artery disease was ruled out. After ruling out other causes of cardiac arrest, the working diagnosis was capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest. As such, an inflammatory work up was sent to evaluate for the possibility of a capecitabine hypersensitivity, or Kounis syndrome, and is the first documented report in the literature to do so when evaluating Kounis syndrome. Immunoglobulin E (IgE), tryptase, and C-reactive protein were normal but histamine, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-10 were elevated. Histamine elevation supports the suspicion that our patient had type I Kounis syndrome. Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicates a probable adverse effect due to capecitabine with seven points. A case of capecitabine-induced ventricular fibrillation arrest is reported, with a potential for type 1 Kounis syndrome as an underlying pathology supported by immunologic work up. PMID:25870182

  20. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  1. Gαi2 and Gαi3 Differentially Regulate Arrest from Flow and Chemotaxis in Mouse Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kuwano, Yoshihiro; Adler, Micha; Zhang, Hong; Groisman, Alex; Ley, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    Leukocyte recruitment to inflammation sites progresses in a multistep cascade. Chemokines regulate multiple steps of the cascade, including arrest, transmigration, and chemotaxis. The most important chemokine receptor in mouse neutrophils is CXCR2, which couples through Gαi2- and Gαi3-containing heterotrimeric G proteins. Neutrophils arrest in response to CXCR2 stimulation. This is defective in Gαi2-deficient neutrophils. In this study, we show that Gαi3-deficient neutrophils showed reduced transmigration but normal arrest in mice. We also tested Gαi2- or Gαi3-deficient neutrophils in a CXCL1 gradient generated by a microfluidic device. Gαi3-, but not Gαi2-, deficient neutrophils showed significantly reduced migration and directionality. This was confirmed in a model of sterile inflammation in vivo. Gαi2-, but not Gαi3-, deficient neutrophils showed decreased Ca(2+) flux in response to CXCR2 stimulation. Conversely, Gαi3-, but not Gαi2-, deficient neutrophils exhibited reduced AKT phosphorylation upon CXCR2 stimulation. We conclude that Gαi2 controls arrest and Gαi3 controls transmigration and chemotaxis in response to chemokine stimulation of neutrophils. PMID:26976957

  2. Identification and characterization of a mutation affecting the division arrest signaling of the pheromone response pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimura, Hiroaki Hoechst Japan Ltd., Kawagoe )

    1990-02-01

    Mating pheromones, a- and {alpha}-factors, arrest the division of cells of opposite mating types, {alpha} and a cells, respectively. The author has isolated a sterile mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using EMS that is defective in division arrest in response to {alpha}-factor but not defective in morphological changes and agglutinin induction. The mutation was designated dac2 for division arrest control by mating pheromones. The dac2 mutation was closely linked to gal1 and was different from the previously identified cell type nonspecific sterile mutations (ste4, ste5, ste7, ste11, ste12, ste18, and dac1). Although dac2 cells had no phenotype in the absence of pheromones, they showed morphological alterations and divided continuously in the presence of pheromones. As a result, dac2 cells had a mating defect. The dac2 mutation could suppress the lethality caused by the disruption of the GPA1 gene. These results suggest that the DAC2 product may control the signal for G-protein-mediated cell-cycle arrest and indicate that the synchronization of haploid yeast cell cycles by mating pheromones is essential for cell fusion during conjugation.

  3. Therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Michael; Behringer, Wilhelm

    2008-12-01

    About 17 million people worldwide die from cardiovascular diseases each year. Impaired neurologic function after sudden cardiac arrest is a major cause of death in these patients. Up to now, no specific post-arrest therapy was available to improve outcome. Recently, two randomized clinical trials of mild therapeutic hypothermia after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest showed improvement of neurological outcome and reduced mortality. A broad implementation of this new therapy could save thousands of lives worldwide, as only 6 patients have to be treated to get one additional patient with favourable neurological recovery. At present, myocardial reperfusion by thrombolytic therapy or primary PCI as early as possible is the most effective therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Mild therapeutic hypothermia might be a promising new therapy to prevent reperfusion injury after myocardial infarction, but its use in daily clinical routine cannot be recommended with the available evidence. PMID:19137812

  4. Alphaherpesvirus Subversion of Stress-Induced Translational Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Finnen, Renée L.; Banfield, Bruce W.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we provide an overview of translational arrest in eukaryotic cells in response to stress and the tactics used specifically by alphaherpesviruses to overcome translational arrest. One consequence of translational arrest is the formation of cytoplasmic compartments called stress granules (SGs). Many viruses target SGs for disruption and/or modification, including the alphaherpesvirus herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Recently, it was discovered that HSV-2 disrupts SG formation early after infection via virion host shutoff protein (vhs), an endoribonuclease that is packaged within the HSV-2 virion. We review this discovery and discuss the insights it has provided into SG biology as well as its potential significance in HSV-2 infection. A model for vhs-mediated disruption of SG formation is presented. PMID:26999187

  5. Alphaherpesvirus Subversion of Stress-Induced Translational Arrest.

    PubMed

    Finnen, Renée L; Banfield, Bruce W

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we provide an overview of translational arrest in eukaryotic cells in response to stress and the tactics used specifically by alphaherpesviruses to overcome translational arrest. One consequence of translational arrest is the formation of cytoplasmic compartments called stress granules (SGs). Many viruses target SGs for disruption and/or modification, including the alphaherpesvirus herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). Recently, it was discovered that HSV-2 disrupts SG formation early after infection via virion host shutoff protein (vhs), an endoribonuclease that is packaged within the HSV-2 virion. We review this discovery and discuss the insights it has provided into SG biology as well as its potential significance in HSV-2 infection. A model for vhs-mediated disruption of SG formation is presented. PMID:26999187

  6. Cardiac arrest due to a missed diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jennifer; Spitzer, David; Phylactou, Maria; Glasser, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A 91-year-old presented with a rare cause of cardiac arrest. He was initially admitted with severe back pain following vomiting and diagnosed with probable aspiration pneumonia. On day 3 of admission, he was discovered in cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was started. On intubation, a left-sided pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema were noted. Needle decompression showed gastric fluid leaking from the cannula. The patient regained a cardiac output, and a subsequent CT scan confirmed a large pneumomediastinum with air tracking to the neck and chest, and bilateral pneumothoraces. A diagnosis of Boerhaave's syndrome was made. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit but did not survive. This case demonstrates the importance of looking for and treating the rarer reversible causes of cardiac arrest, and of maintaining a high index of suspicion for Boerhaave's syndrome. Despite its rarity, Boerhaave's syndrome is often misdiagnosed on initial presentation, leading to delayed treatment and poor outcomes. PMID:27154984

  7. Validation of the Pittsburgh Cardiac Arrest Category illness severity score

    PubMed Central

    Coppler, Patrick J.; Elmer, Jonathan; Calderon, Luis; Sabedra, Alexa; Doshi, Ankur A.; Callaway, Clifton W.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Dezfulian, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to validate the ability of an early post-cardiac arrest illness severity classification to predict patient outcomes. Methods The Pittsburgh Cardiac Arrest Category (PCAC) is a 4-level illness severity score that was found to be strongly predictive of outcomes in the initial derivation study. We assigned PCAC scores to consecutive in and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest subjects treated at two tertiary care centers between January 2011 and September 2013. We made assignments prospectively at Site 1 and retrospectively at Site 2. Our primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Inter-rater reliability of retrospective PCAC assessments was assessed. Secondary outcomes were favorable discharge disposition (home or acute rehabilitation), Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) and modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at hospital discharge. We tested the association of PCAC with each outcome using unadjusted and multivariable logistic regression. Results We included 607 cardiac arrest patients during the study (393 at Site 1 and 214 at Site 2). Site populations differed in age, arrest location, rhythm, use of hypothermia and distribution of PCAC. Inter-rater reliability of retrospective PCAC assignments was excellent (κ=0.81). PCAC was associated with survival (unadjusted odds ratio (OR) for Site 1: 0.33 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.27–0.41)) Site 2: 0.32 (95%CI 0.24–0.43)) even after adjustment for other clinical variables (adjusted OR Site 1: 0.32 (95%CI 0.25–0.41)) Site 2: 0.31 (95%CI 0.22–0.44)). PCAC was predictive of secondary outcomes. Conclusions Our results confirm that PCAC is strongly predictive of survival and good functional outcome after cardiac arrest. PMID:25636896

  8. Swedish ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Ricard; Engström, Åsa

    2013-04-01

    Effective pre-hospital treatment of a person suffering cardiac arrest is a challenging task for the ambulance nurses. The aim of this study was to describe ambulance nurses' experiences of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrest. Qualitative personal interviews were conducted during 2011 in Sweden with seven ambulance nurses with experience of nursing patients suffering cardiac arrests. The interview texts were analyzed using qualitative thematic content analysis, which resulted in the formulation of one theme with six categories. Mutual preparation, regular training and education were important factors in the nursing of patients suffering cardiac arrest. Ambulance nurses are placed in ethically demanding situations regarding if and for how long they should continue cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to accord with pre-hospital cardiac guidelines and patients' wishes. When a cardiac arrest patient is nursed their relatives also need the attention of ambulance nurses. Reflection is one way for ambulance nurses to learn from, and talk about, their experiences. This study provides knowledge of ambulance nurses' experiences in the care of people with cardiac arrest. Better feedback about the care given by the ambulance nurses, and about the diagnosis and nursing care the patients received after they were admitted to the hospital are suggested as improvements that would allow ambulance nurses to learn more from their experience. Further development and research concerning the technical equipment might improve the situation for both the ambulance nurses and the patients. Ambulance nurses need regularly training and education to be prepared for saving people's lives and also to be able to make the right decisions. PMID:23577977

  9. Why Earthquakes Stop: Growth and Arrest in Stochastic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rundle, J.; Preston, E.; McGinnis, S.; Klein, W.

    1998-06-01

    Classical theory predicts that earthquakes growing in a homogeneous stress field should not arrest until the fault boundaries are encountered. However, earthquakes on natural faults, where stresses are heterogeneous, are observed over a wide range of sizes. Here we suggest that heterogeneity should be characterized by the Hausdorff dimension {ital H} of the walk associated with a stochastic stress difference field. The critical value for arrest, H=0.5 , corresonds to a Brownian walk through the stress difference field. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Incidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Rea, Thomas D; Pearce, Rachel M; Raghunathan, Trivellore E; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Jouven, Xavier; Siscovick, David S

    2004-06-15

    Estimates of the incidence of out-of-hospital primary cardiac arrest (CA) have typically relied solely upon emergency medical service or death certificate records and have not investigated incidence in clinical subgroups. Overall and temporal patterns of CA incidence were investigated in clinically defined groups using systematic methods to ascertain CA. Estimates of incidence were derived from a population-based case-control study in a large health plan from 1986 to 1994. Subjects were enrollees aged 50 to 79 years who had had CA (n = 1,275). A stratified random sample of enrollees who had not had CA was used to estimate the population at risk with various clinical characteristics (n = 2,323). Poisson's regression was used to estimate incidence overall and for 3-year time periods (1986 to 1988, 1989 to 1991, and 1992 to 1994). The overall CA incidence was 1.89/1,000 subject-years and varied up to 30-fold across clinical subgroups. For example, incidence was 5.98/1,000 subject-years in subjects with any clinically recognized heart disease compared with 0.82/1,000 subject-years in subjects without heart disease. In subgroups with heart disease, incidence was 13.69/1,000 subject-years in subjects with prior myocardial infarction and 21.87/1,000 subject-years in subjects with heart failure. Risk decreased by 20% from the initial to the final time period, with a greater decrease observed in those with (25%) compared with those without (12%) clinical heart disease. Thus, CA incidence varied considerably across clinical groups. The results provide insights regarding absolute and population-attributable risk in clinically defined subgroups, information that may aid strategies aimed at reducing mortality from CA. PMID:15194012

  11. Evaluation of polymer-housed distribution arresters for use on rural electric power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mackevich, J. P.

    1994-03-01

    Users have converted to polymer-housed distribution surge arresters because of concerns over violent porcelain arrester failure. There is a false perception in the industry that polymer arresters are intrinsically fail-safe. It is proposed that there is a lack of understanding of the differences in failure mechanisms between porcelain and polymer arresters. Polymer arresters have unique design requirements to provide the desired reliability improvements. This paper suggests criteria for rural electric power system user evaluation of polymer arrester design and performance. Users are encouraged to participate in the standards writing process to facilitate changes beneficial to the industry.

  12. Time course of the meiotic arrest in sheep cumulus-oocyte complexes treated with roscovitine.

    PubMed

    Crocomo, Letícia Ferrari; Marques Filho, Wolff Camargo; Ackermann, Camila Louise; Paschoal, Daniela Martins; Guastali, Midyan Daroz; Dias Maziero, Rosiára Rosária; Sudano, Mateus José; Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda da Cruz; Bicudo, Sony Dimas

    2016-04-01

    Temporary meiosis arrest with cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors has been proposed in order to improve the quality of in vitro matured oocytes. In sheep, however, this phenomenon has been rarely investigated. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of different incubation times with roscovitine on nuclear maturation and cumulus cell expansion of sheep cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). For this, COCs were cultured for 0, 6, 12 or 20 h in basic maturation medium (Control) containing 75 μM roscovitine (Rosco). After, they were in vitro matured (IVM) for 18 h in the presence of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). At the end of each treatment, cumulus cell expansion and nuclear maturation were assessed under a stereomicroscope and by Hoechst 33342 staining, respectively. In the Control and Rosco groups, the absence of cumulus cell expansion prevailed at 0, 6, 12 and 20 h. After IVM for 18 h, total cumulus cell expansion in the Rosco treatments was dependent on the exposure time to roscovitine. A significantly high percentage of oocytes treated with roscovitine for 6 h (87%), 12 h or 20 h (65%) were arrested at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage. In contrast, 23% GVBD, 54% metaphase I (MI) and 61% MII oocytes were observed in the Control groups at 6, 12 and 20 h, respectively. In all treatments, a significant percentage of oocytes reached MII after IVM for 18 h. Therefore, roscovitine reversibly arrested the meiosis of sheep oocytes during different culture times with the maximal efficiency of meiotic inhibition reached at 6 h. In addition, reversibility of its inhibitory action on cumulus cells was exposure-time dependent. PMID:26170094

  13. Heart Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person loses consciousness and has no pulse. Death occurs within minutes if the victim does not receive treatment. What is the link? These two distinct heart conditions are linked. Sudden cardiac arrest can occur after a heart attack, or during recovery. Heart attacks increase the risk ...

  14. 32 CFR 553.9 - Power of arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Power of arrest. 553.9 Section 553.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL..., shrub, or plant within the limits of the cemetery and to bring that person before any United...

  15. 32 CFR 553.9 - Power of arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Power of arrest. 553.9 Section 553.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL..., shrub, or plant within the limits of the cemetery and to bring that person before any United...

  16. 32 CFR 553.9 - Power of arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Power of arrest. 553.9 Section 553.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL..., shrub, or plant within the limits of the cemetery and to bring that person before any United...

  17. 32 CFR 553.9 - Power of arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Power of arrest. 553.9 Section 553.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL..., shrub, or plant within the limits of the cemetery and to bring that person before any United...

  18. 32 CFR 553.9 - Power of arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Power of arrest. 553.9 Section 553.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL..., shrub, or plant within the limits of the cemetery and to bring that person before any United...

  19. Ventilation and gas exchange management after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Sutherasan, Yuda; Raimondo, Pasquale; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    For several decades, physicians had integrated several interventions aiming to improve the outcomes in post-cardiac arrest patients. However, the mortality rate after cardiac arrest is still as high as 50%. Post-cardiac arrest syndrome is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to not only poor neurological outcome and cardiovascular failure but also respiratory dysfunction. To minimize ventilator-associated lung injury, protective mechanical ventilation by using low tidal volume ventilation and driving pressure may decrease pulmonary complications and improve survival. Low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can be initiated and titrated with careful cardiac output and respiratory mechanics monitoring. Furthermore, optimizing gas exchange by avoiding hypoxia and hyperoxia as well as maintaining normocarbia may improve neurological and survival outcome. Early multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation intervention is recommended. Minimally invasive monitoring techniques, that is, echocardiography, transpulmonary thermodilution method measuring extravascular lung water, as well as transcranial Doppler ultrasound, might be useful to improve appropriate management of post-cardiac arrest patients. PMID:26670813

  20. Police Management Training Factors Influencing DWI Arrests. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Edward W.

    The development of training material for police management personnel concerning command and supervisory actions appropriate for more effective driving-while-intoxicated (DWI) enforcement is desired. The training is based on two research studies that identified environmental and attitudinal factors influencing a patrolman's arrest decision. These…

  1. Possible intramuscular midazolam-associated cardiorespiratory arrest and death.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J W; Simon, K B

    1990-01-01

    Midazolam hydrochloride is commonly used for dental or endoscopic procedures. Although generally consisted safe when given intramuscularly, intravenous administration is known to cause respiratory and cardiovascular depression. This report describes the first published case of cardiorespiratory arrest and death associated with intramuscular administration of midazolam. Information regarding midazolam use is reviewed to provide recommendation for safe administration. PMID:2375138

  2. 29 CFR 1915.159 - Personal fall arrest systems (PFAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... which another snaphook or other connector is attached; (iv) To a horizontal lifeline; or (v) To any... arresting force on a falling employee to 900 pounds (4 Kn) when used with a body belt; (ii) Limit the...) The attachment point of a body belt shall be located in the center of the wearer's back. (2) Ropes...

  3. 29 CFR 1915.159 - Personal fall arrest systems (PFAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... which another snaphook or other connector is attached; (iv) To a horizontal lifeline; or (v) To any... arresting force on a falling employee to 900 pounds (4 Kn) when used with a body belt; (ii) Limit the...) The attachment point of a body belt shall be located in the center of the wearer's back. (2) Ropes...

  4. 153. View of lightning arrester houses on the hillside above ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    153. View of lightning arrester houses on the hillside above powerhouse (similar view as WA-64-152). Looking southeast. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  5. 152. View of lightning arrester houses on the hillside above ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    152. View of lightning arrester houses on the hillside above powerhouse. To the right is surge tank for penstock no. 1. Looking southeast. Photo by Jet Lowe, HAER, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  6. Warning Signs of Heart Attack, Stroke and Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... head up and check for at least five seconds. Learn more about cardiac arrest If these signs are ... CPR with breaths. Watch the demo video and learn how to save a life in 60 seconds. Login or Sign Up to save and share ...

  7. DNA methylation is stable during replication and cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Vandiver, Amy R.; Idrizi, Adrian; Rizzardi, Lindsay; Feinberg, Andrew P.; Hansen, Kasper D.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification with important functions in development. Large-scale loss of DNA methylation is a hallmark of cancer. Recent work has identified large genomic blocks of hypomethylation associated with cancer, EBV transformation and replicative senescence, all of which change the proportion of actively proliferating cells within the population measured. We asked if replication or cell-cycle arrest affects the global levels of methylation or leads to hypomethylated blocks as observed in other settings. We used fluorescence activated cell sorting to isolate primary dermal fibroblasts in G0, G1 and G2 based on DNA content and Ki67 staining. We additionally examined G0 cells arrested by contact inhibition for one week to determine the effects of extended arrest. We analyzed genome wide DNA methylation from sorted cells using whole genome bisulfite sequencing. This analysis demonstrated no global changes or large-scale hypomethylated blocks in any of the examined cell cycle phases, indicating that global levels of methylation are stable with replication and arrest. PMID:26648411

  8. Description of a collaborative community approach to impacting juvenile arrests.

    PubMed

    Barrett, James G; Janopaul-Naylor, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Although the burden of mental health disorders among youth involved with the juvenile justice system is high, few communities have effectively integrated mental health resources with law enforcement (Myers & Farrell, 2008). The city of Cambridge, Massachusetts has developed the Safety Net Collaborative, which is a multiagency integrated model of preventive services for at-risk youth involving mental health providers, police officers, schools, and the department of youth and families. There are 6,000 youth in the city's public schools under the local police jurisdiction. Youth are referred to this program by schools, courts, and parents. There are approximately 30 active cases each year. Initial outcome measures were tracked, including number of arrests, diversions, and mental health referrals. Rate of decline in arrests was compared pre and post implementation. Community arrests have decreased by more than 50% since implementing this model. Contracting with mental health services has led to an average 94 outpatient mental health provider referral per year. The results show positive trends in arrest rates after implementation of this collaborative model of preventive services. These findings support greater research and utilization of integrated, preventive service models for at-risk youth. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27148947

  9. The gas production rate of periodic comet d'Arrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Festou, Michel C.; Feldman, Paul D.; Ahearn, Michael F.

    1992-01-01

    Comet P/d'Arrest is a potential target for a rendezvous mission to a short period comet. Its light curve is rather peculiar, the comet being active only after perihelion passage. One apparition out of two is easy to observe from the ground. The 1995 apparition of the comet will offer a unique opportunity to characterize the outgassing properties of its nucleus.

  10. The Arrest and Vindication of John H. Hickcox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stimson, Nancy F.; Nobunaga, Wendy Y.

    2004-01-01

    In January 1882, John H. Hickcox, a central government documents figure in his time, and the creator of "United States Government Publications: A Monthly Catalogue" or "Hickcox's Monthly Catalogue" was arrested in Washington, DC, for taking letters addressed to the Librarian of Congress. Although the charges were eventually dismissed, 1882 is the…

  11. Race as a Factor in Juvenile Arrests. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Carl E.; Snyder, Howard E.

    This bulletin examines the effect of race on police decisions to take juvenile offenders into custody. Analysis of 1997 and 1998 data on 17 states from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's National Incident-Based Reporting System indicates that there is no evidence to support the hypothesis that police are more likely to arrest nonwhite juvenile…

  12. Development of a nonfragmenting distribution surge arrester. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, R.E.

    1984-08-01

    This report describes the investigation and testing carried out in the development of a nonfragmenting distribution surge arrester. It is commonly assumed that pressure buildup in a failing surge arrester will cause the porcelain to burst unless the pressure is rapidly relieved. Even after pressure relief, however, the porcelain can shatter from the thermal shock produced by the internal arc. There is little published information on the sequence of events during failure and the relative importance of pressure and thermal stress. A prerequisite for the design of a nonfragmenting arrester is a thorough knowledge of the failure mechanism. Extensive testing was performed to determine the contribution of both pressure and heat to porcelain breakage. This research demonstrated the importance of thermal shock and led to the design of an ablative thermal shield for the porcelain housing. This was combined with pressure relief provided by end-cap venting and a retaining system to prevent ejection of internal parts. The final result was the design and production of nonfragmenting distribution arresters rated 9 kV through 27 kV.

  13. Chemical Society Reinstates Iranian Chemists; Iranian-American Scholar Arrested

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bollag, Burton

    2007-01-01

    The frosty relationship between the United States and Iran has created a chill in many areas of scholarly endeavor. One resulting battle, over whether Iranian scholars can belong to the American Chemical Society, has been largely resolved. But a new imbroglio looms with the arrest of a prominent U.S.-Iranian scholar who was visiting Tehran. The…

  14. Parenting and Women Arrested for Intimate Partner Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Catherine A.; Lehmann, Peter; Dia, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the relationship between parenting and women's use of violence the current study surveyed 106 mothers arrested for intimate partner violence (IPV) related crimes on parenting styles and attitudes toward when using violence against their partner is justified. Findings indicate parenting styles indicative of low belief in using physical…

  15. [Refractory cardiac arrest patients in prehospital care, potential organ donors].

    PubMed

    Le Jan, Arnaud; Dupin, Aurélie; Garrigue, Bruno; Sapir, David

    2016-09-01

    Under the authority of the French Biomedicine Agency, a new care pathway integrates refractory cardiac arrest patients into a process of organ donation. It is a medical, logistical and ethical challenge for the staff of the mobile emergency services. PMID:27596502

  16. Cell cycle arrest in antheridial extract-treated root meristems of Allium cepa and Melandrium noctiflorum.

    PubMed

    Maszewski, J; Kaźmierczak, A; Polit, J

    1998-01-01

    Previous results have demonstrated that extracts derived from maturing male sex organs of Chara tomentosa are capable of inducing profound structural and functional effects upon M-phase cells in the primary root meristems of Melandrium noctiflorum and Allium cepa. Evident changes produced by a putative factor engaged in morphogenesis of antheridial filaments are manifested by: (1) significant shortening of chromosomes, (2) decreased mitotic indices, and (3) altered proportions estimated for the prophase and telophase transit times. The present image analysis of late G2 phase nuclei in antheridial filaments of C. tomentosa supports the concepts that progressive changes of their functional activities correspond closely to the increasing proportion of condensed chromatin. Cytophotometric measurements of Feulgen-stained cell nuclei in root meristems after a prolonged incubation in antheridial extracts revealed that cells which previously divided asynchronously became preferentially arrested in G1 (M. noctiflorum) and G2 (A. cepa). The stages at which the cells arrest are supposed to counterpart restriction checkpoints that prevent the initiation of DNA synthesis and mitosis. This assumption has been confirmed by autoradiographic studies using 3H-thymidine. In terms of the "Principal Control Points" (PCP) hypothesis, the obtained results suggest that two PCPs regulate G1-->S and G2-->M transition in a nuclear structure-dependent and a species-specific manner. Although in antheridial extract-treated roots of both M. noctiflorum and A. cepa there are only slight changes in the levels of chromatin condensation, the relative proportions of G1- and G2-arrested cells and their nuclear density profiles differ, as compared with the control and carbohydrate-starved plants. PMID:9527023

  17. Thyroid Levels in High-Normal Range May Be Linked to Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... in High-Normal Range May Be Linked to Cardiac Arrest Study isn't cause for alarm, cardiologist says, ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Cardiac Arrest Thyroid Tests Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health ...

  18. Interdisciplinary ICU Cardiac Arrest Debriefing Improves Survival Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Heather; Zebuhr, Carleen; Topjian, Alexis A.; Nishisaki, Akira; Niles, Dana E.; Meaney, Peter A.; Boyle, Lori; Giordano, Rita T.; Davis, Daniela; Priestley, Margaret; Apkon, Michael; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Sutton, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In-hospital cardiac arrest is an important public health problem. High-quality resuscitation improves survival but is difficult to achieve. Our objective is to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel, interdisciplinary, postevent quantitative debriefing program to improve survival outcomes after in-hospital pediatric chest compression events. Design, Setting, and Patients Single-center prospective interventional study of children who received chest compressions between December 2008 and June 2012 in the ICU. Interventions Structured, quantitative, audiovisual, interdisciplinary debriefing of chest compression events with front-line providers. Measurements and Main Results Primary outcome was survival to hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes included survival of event (return of spontaneous circulation for ≥ 20 min) and favorable neurologic outcome. Primary resuscitation quality outcome was a composite variable, termed “excellent cardiopulmonary resuscitation,” prospectively defined as a chest compression depth ≥ 38 mm, rate ≥ 100/min, ≤ 10% of chest compressions with leaning, and a chest compression fraction > 90% during a given 30-second epoch. Quantitative data were available only for patients who are 8 years old or older. There were 119 chest compression events (60 control and 59 interventional). The intervention was associated with a trend toward improved survival to hospital discharge on both univariate analysis (52% vs 33%, p = 0.054) and after controlling for confounders (adjusted odds ratio, 2.5; 95% CI, 0.91–6.8; p = 0.075), and it significantly increased survival with favorable neurologic outcome on both univariate (50% vs 29%, p = 0.036) and multivariable analyses (adjusted odds ratio, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.01–7.5; p = 0.047). Cardiopulmonary resuscitation epochs for patients who are 8 years old or older during the debriefing period were 5.6 times more likely to meet targets of excellent cardiopulmonary resuscitation (95% CI, 2.9–10

  19. Girls with Emotional Disturbance and a History of Arrest: Characteristics and School-Based Predictors of Arrest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Nicholas A.; Josephs, Nikki L.; Lunde, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Research suggests that girls receiving special education services for Emotional Disturbance (ED) may have unique characteristics and needs. Similarly, juvenile justice research has identified unique characteristics of court-involved girls. This study examined characteristics of girls with ED and a history of arrest. Additionally, classroom-based…

  20. U.S. Juvenile Arrests: Gang Membership, Social Class, and Labeling Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapia, Mike

    2011-01-01

    This study addresses the link between gang membership and arrest frequency, exploring the Gang x Socioeconomic status interaction on those arrests. Notoriously poor, delinquent, and often well-known to police, America's gang youth should have very high odds of arrest. Yet it is unclear whether mere membership in a gang increases the risk of arrest…

  1. 10 CFR 1047.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1047.5 Section 1047.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.5 Exercise of arrest...

  2. 10 CFR 1047.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1047.5 Section 1047.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.5 Exercise of arrest...

  3. 10 CFR 1047.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1047.5 Section 1047.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.5 Exercise of arrest...

  4. 10 CFR 1047.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1047.5 Section 1047.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.5 Exercise of arrest...

  5. 10 CFR 1049.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines. 1049.5 Section 1049.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.5 Exercise of arrest...

  6. 10 CFR 1049.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines. 1049.5 Section 1049.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.5 Exercise of arrest...

  7. 10 CFR 1049.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines. 1049.5 Section 1049.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.5 Exercise of arrest...

  8. 10 CFR 1049.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines. 1049.5 Section 1049.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.5 Exercise of arrest...

  9. 10 CFR 1047.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1047.5 Section 1047.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.5 Exercise of arrest...

  10. 14 CFR § 1203b.104 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. § 1203b.104 Section § 1203b.104 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... Exercise of arrest authority—general guidelines. (a) In making an arrest, the security force...

  11. 10 CFR 1049.5 - Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-General guidelines. 1049.5 Section 1049.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.5 Exercise of arrest...

  12. 30 CFR 77.508-1 - Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.508-1 Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings. Lightning arresters protecting exposed telephone wires entering buildings shall be provided...

  13. 30 CFR 77.508-1 - Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.508-1 Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings. Lightning arresters protecting exposed telephone wires entering buildings shall be provided...

  14. 30 CFR 77.508-1 - Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.508-1 Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings. Lightning arresters protecting exposed telephone wires entering buildings shall be provided...

  15. 30 CFR 77.508-1 - Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.508-1 Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings. Lightning arresters protecting exposed telephone wires entering buildings shall be provided...

  16. 30 CFR 77.508-1 - Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings... OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.508-1 Lightning arresters; wires entering buildings. Lightning arresters protecting exposed telephone wires entering buildings shall be provided...

  17. An Exploratory Study of Women Arrested for Intimate Partner Violence: Violent Women or Violent Resistance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muftic, Lisa; Bouffard, Jeffrey A.; Bouffard, Leana Allen

    2007-01-01

    With the advent of mandatory and pro-arrest laws for incidents of intimate partner violence, there has been an increase in the number of women arrested for domestic violence. Several explanations are posed in the literature that attempt to explain such a rise, including the hypothesis that women are being arrested not for offensive violence but…

  18. Gender and Relational-Distance Effects in Arrests for Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lally, William; DeMaris, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    This study tests two hypotheses regarding factors affecting arrest of the perpetrator in domestic violence incidents. Black's relational-distance thesis is that the probability of arrest increases with increasing relational distance between perpetrator and victim. Klinger's leniency principle suggests that the probability of arrest is lower for…

  19. Explaining Discrepancies in Arrest Rates between Black and White Male Juveniles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fite, Paula J.; Wynn, Porche'; Pardini, Dustin A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated discrepancies in arrest rates between Black and White male juveniles by examining the role of early risk factors for arrest. Two hypotheses were evaluated: (a) Disproportionate minority arrest is due to increased exposure to early risk factors, and (b) a differential sensitivity to early risk factors contributes to…

  20. 10 CFR 1049.7 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force. 1049.7 Section 1049.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.7 Exercise of arrest...

  1. 10 CFR 1049.7 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force. 1049.7 Section 1049.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.7 Exercise of arrest...

  2. 10 CFR 1049.6 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force. 1049... OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.6 Exercise of arrest authority—Use of non-deadly force. (a) When a Protective Force Officer is authorized to make an arrest...

  3. 10 CFR 1049.6 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force. 1049... OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.6 Exercise of arrest authority—Use of non-deadly force. (a) When a Protective Force Officer is authorized to make an arrest...

  4. 10 CFR 1049.6 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force. 1049... OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.6 Exercise of arrest authority—Use of non-deadly force. (a) When a Protective Force Officer is authorized to make an arrest...

  5. 10 CFR 1049.7 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force. 1049.7 Section 1049.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.7 Exercise of arrest...

  6. 10 CFR 1049.6 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force. 1049... OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.6 Exercise of arrest authority—Use of non-deadly force. (a) When a Protective Force Officer is authorized to make an arrest...

  7. 10 CFR 1049.6 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of non-deadly force. 1049... OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.6 Exercise of arrest authority—Use of non-deadly force. (a) When a Protective Force Officer is authorized to make an arrest...

  8. 10 CFR 1049.7 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force. 1049.7 Section 1049.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.7 Exercise of arrest...

  9. 10 CFR 1049.7 - Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-Use of deadly force. 1049.7 Section 1049.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS OF THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE § 1049.7 Exercise of arrest...

  10. Are Blacks and Hispanics Disproportionately Incarcerated Relative to Their Arrests? Racial and Ethnic Disproportionality Between Arrest and Incarceration

    PubMed Central

    Steffensmeier, Darrell; Ulmer, Jeffrey T.; Painter-Davis, Noah

    2014-01-01

    Do large racial and ethnic disparities in prison populations reflect systematic racial and policy discrimination in the criminal justice system, or do they reflect disproportionate involvement of blacks and Hispanics in “serious” or street crime? Our investigation of this question keys off the approach initiated by Alfred Blumstein is his pioneering studies on the topic. While yielding important findings, there are, however, substantial gaps in the empirical literature on the racial disproportionality issue. We attempt to fill those gaps by (1) using both data on prison admission as well as in-stock prison populations, (2) presenting more recent racially and ethnically disaggregated arrest and incarceration data from Pennsylvania for 2003–2007, and (3) including Hispanic offenders in our racial and ethnic disproportionality comparisons. Our results indicate, first, that the representation of blacks, whites, and Hispanics among offenders admitted to state prison and in the prison population corresponds closely to their representation in arrest statistics. Second, using arrests as a marker of violent offending, the overrepresentation of blacks among offenders admitted to state prisons occurs because they commit a disproportionate number of frequently imprisoned (i.e., violent) crimes. Third, for those offenses where there is a within-race difference between arrest and incarceration representation, Hispanics experience the greatest disadvantage. Fourth, failing to account for Hispanics in white and black estimates tends to inflate white proportions and deflate black proportions of arrests, admissions, and prison population estimates, masking the “true” black and white racial disproportionality. We conclude that while there is a need for continued concern with possible racial discrimination in justice system processing, this concern should not distract attention from what arguably is the more important matter—ameliorating the social environmental conditions

  11. Pediatric defibrillation after cardiac arrest: initial response and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; López-Herce, Jesús; García, Cristina; Domínguez, Pedro; Carrillo, Angel; Bellón, Jose María

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Shockable rhythms are rare in pediatric cardiac arrest and the results of defibrillation are uncertain. The objective of this study was to analyze the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation that included defibrillation in children. Methods Forty-four out of 241 children (18.2%) who were resuscitated from inhospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest had been treated with manual defibrillation. Data were recorded according to the Utstein style. Outcome variables were a sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and one-year survival. Characteristics of patients and of resuscitation were evaluated. Results Cardiac disease was the major cause of arrest in this group. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (PVT) was the first documented electrocardiogram rhythm in 19 patients (43.2%). A shockable rhythm developed during resuscitation in 25 patients (56.8%). The first shock (dose, 2 J/kg) terminated VF or PVT in eight patients (18.1%). Seventeen children (38.6%) needed more than three shocks to solve VF or PVT. ROSC was achieved in 28 cases (63.6%) and it was sustained in 19 patients (43.2%). Only three patients (6.8%), however, survived at 1-year follow-up. Children with VF or PVT as the first documented rhythm had better ROSC, better initial survival and better final survival than children with subsequent VF or PVT. Children who survived were older than the finally dead patients. No significant differences in response rate were observed when first and second shocks were compared. The survival rate was higher in patients treated with a second shock dose of 2 J/kg than in those who received higher doses. Outcome was not related to the cause or the location of arrest. The survival rate was inversely related to the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Conclusion Defibrillation is necessary in 18% of children who suffer cardiac arrest. Termination of VF or PVT after the first defibrillation dose is achieved in a low

  12. Oxygen, pHi and arrest of biosynthesis in brine shrimp embryos.

    PubMed

    Hand, S C

    1997-12-01

    Embryos of the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana are able to withstand bouts of environmental anoxia for several years by entering a quiescent state, during which time metabolism is greatly depressed. Within minutes of oxygen removal, intracellular pH (pHi) drops at least 1.0 unit. This acidification has been strongly implicated in the arrest of both catabolic and anabolic processes in the cytoplasm. A global arrest of cytoplasmic translation accompanies the transition into anoxia or into aerobic acidosis (artificial quiescence imposed by intracellular acidification with CO2 in the presence of oxygen). Similarly, protein synthesis in isolated mitochondria from these embryos is also reduced markedly in response to acidic pH (80% reduction) or anoxia (79% reduction). The constancy of mRNA levels during quiescence indicates that protein synthesis is likely to be controlled at the translational level. Mitochondrial matrix pH is 8.2 during protein synthesis assays performed at the extramitochondrial pH optimum of 7.5. When this proton gradient is abolished with the K+/H+ ionophore nigericin, the extramitochondrial pH optimum for protein synthesis displays an alkaline shift of approximately 0.7 pH unit. These data suggest the presence of proton-sensitive translational components within the mitochondrion. The oxygen dependency of mitochondrial protein synthesis is not explained simply by blockage of the electron transport chain or by the increased redox state. Whereas oxygen deprivation substantially depresses protein synthesis by 77% after 1 h, normoxic incubations with saturating concentrations of cyanide or antimycin A have only a modest effect (36% reduction, cyanide; 20%, antimycin A). This cyanide- and antimycin-insensitive, but hypoxia-sensitive, inhibitory signature for the arrest of protein synthesis suggests the presence of a molecular oxygen sensor within the mitochondrion. PMID:9429663

  13. Fine mapping of a palea defective 1 (pd1), a locus associated with palea and stamen development in rice.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Chunyan; Liang, Xinxing; Chu, Ruizhen; Duan, Min; Cheng, Jinping; Ding, Zhengquan; Wang, Jianfei

    2015-12-01

    KEY MESSAGE : pd1, a genetic factor in a 69 kb region between RM11239 and RM11245 on rice chromosome 1, controls stamen number and palea development. Spikelets are important organs that store photosynthetic products in rice. Spikelet development directly affects grain yield and rice quality. Here, we report a palea defective (pd1) mutant identified from selfing progenies of indica cv. 93-11 after (60)Co γ ray treatment. pd1 mutant flowers only had four stamens (wild-type has six), but pollen fertility was not affected. Compared with 93-11 palea, pd1 mutant palea showed smaller and flatter leaf, which caused the lemma to bend excessively inward. pd1 mutants had only 46% seed setting rate and 21.6 g 1000-grain weight, which led to two-thirds loss of grain yield. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed that pd1 mutants had reduced epidermal cell size and reduced numbers of fibrous sclerenchyma cells in both palea and lemma. To analyze the genetic factors involved, we crossed pd1 mutants with three japonica cultivars and generated F1 and F2 populations. The F1 phenotype and F2 segregation ratio indicated that a recessive gene controlled the mutant traits. Using the F2 population, we found that pd1 mapped between the simple sequence repeat markers RM11236 and RM11280 on rice chromosome 1. From a segregating population of 2836 plants, 77 recombinants were screened by RM11236 and RM11280. High-resolution linkage analysis narrowed the pd1 locus to a 69 kb region between RM11239 and RM11245 that contained 10 open reading frames (ORFs). Sequence alignment and quantitative real-time PCR expression analysis of these ORFs between 93-11 and pd1 mutant plants found no unequivocal evidence to identify the pd1 gene. PMID:26441054

  14. Morphogenesis beyond cytokinetic arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, J; Cid, V J; Cenamor, R; Yuste, M; Molero, G; Nombela, C; Sánchez, M

    1998-12-14

    The budding yeast lyt1 mutation causes cell lysis. We report here that lyt1 is an allele of cdc15, a gene which encodes a protein kinase that functions late in the cell cycle. Neither cdc15-1 nor cdc15-lyt1 strains are able to septate at 37 degreesC, even though they may manage to rebud. Cells lyse after a shmoo-like projection appears at the distal pole of the daughter cell. Actin polarizes towards the distal pole but the septins remain at the mother-daughter neck. This morphogenetic response reflects entry into a new round of the cell cycle: the preference for polarization from the distal pole was lost in bud1 cdc15 double mutants; double cdc15-lyt1 cdc28-4 mutants, defective for START, did not develop apical projections and apical polarization was accompanied by DNA replication. The same phenomena were caused by mutations in the genes CDC14, DBF2, and TEM1, which are functionally related to CDC15. Apical polarization was delayed in cdc15 mutants as compared with budding in control cells and this delay was abolished in a septin mutant. Our results suggest that the delayed M/G1 transition in cdc15 mutants is due to a septin-dependent checkpoint that couples initiation of the cell cycle to the completion of cytokinesis. PMID:9852155

  15. Morphogenesis beyond Cytokinetic Arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Javier; Cid, Víctor J.; Cenamor, Rosa; Yuste, María; Molero, Gloria; Nombela, César; Sánchez, Miguel

    1998-01-01

    The budding yeast lyt1 mutation causes cell lysis. We report here that lyt1 is an allele of cdc15, a gene which encodes a protein kinase that functions late in the cell cycle. Neither cdc15-1 nor cdc15-lyt1 strains are able to septate at 37°C, even though they may manage to rebud. Cells lyse after a shmoo-like projection appears at the distal pole of the daughter cell. Actin polarizes towards the distal pole but the septins remain at the mother–daughter neck. This morphogenetic response reflects entry into a new round of the cell cycle: the preference for polarization from the distal pole was lost in bud1 cdc15 double mutants; double cdc15-lyt1 cdc28-4 mutants, defective for START, did not develop apical projections and apical polarization was accompanied by DNA replication. The same phenomena were caused by mutations in the genes CDC14, DBF2, and TEM1, which are functionally related to CDC15. Apical polarization was delayed in cdc15 mutants as compared with budding in control cells and this delay was abolished in a septin mutant. Our results suggest that the delayed M/G1 transition in cdc15 mutants is due to a septin-dependent checkpoint that couples initiation of the cell cycle to the completion of cytokinesis. PMID:9852155

  16. Cellular Growth Arrest and Persistence from Enzyme Saturation

    PubMed Central

    Ray, J. Christian J.; Wickersheim, Michelle L.; Jalihal, Ameya P.; Adeshina, Yusuf O.; Cooper, Tim F.; Balázsi, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic efficiency depends on the balance between supply and demand of metabolites, which is sensitive to environmental and physiological fluctuations, or noise, causing shortages or surpluses in the metabolic pipeline. How cells can reliably optimize biomass production in the presence of metabolic fluctuations is a fundamental question that has not been fully answered. Here we use mathematical models to predict that enzyme saturation creates distinct regimes of cellular growth, including a phase of growth arrest resulting from toxicity of the metabolic process. Noise can drive entry of single cells into growth arrest while a fast-growing majority sustains the population. We confirmed these predictions by measuring the growth dynamics of Escherichia coli utilizing lactose as a sole carbon source. The predicted heterogeneous growth emerged at high lactose concentrations, and was associated with cell death and production of antibiotic-tolerant persister cells. These results suggest how metabolic networks may balance costs and benefits, with important implications for drug tolerance. PMID:27010473

  17. Elbow dislocation secondary to fall during police arrest.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R J; Clark, K; Kelliher, T

    2014-02-01

    A case of total elbow dislocation with significant swelling and loss of distal pulses during police arrest is described. To date, this specific injury in relation to police arrest has not been described in the literature. Whilst attempting to remove the detainee from a public transport vehicle, the patient and the officers involved fell to the ground with his arm slightly flexed. He was handcuffed to the rear and taken to the police office. Whilst there, it was noted that his left elbow was swelling dramatically and he complained of pain. The detainee and officers attended the emergency room and he was found to have a total dislocation of the left elbow and vascular compromise of the limb. The elbow was promptly reduced with sedation and a post reduction angiogram demonstrated injury to the tissues surrounding the brachial artery. PMID:24485437

  18. [Full Recovery from Cardiopulmonary Arrest caused by Traumatic Asphyxia].

    PubMed

    Hirade, Tomohiro; Murata, Susumu; Saito, Tsukasa; Ogawa, Kohei; Kodani, Nobuhiro; Sakakibara, Manabu; Hirade, Ritsuko; Kushizaki, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Takashi; Minami, Kotaro; Nikai, Tetsuro; Nishina, Masayoshi

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic asphyxia is a crush injury of the chest characterized by facial edema, cyanosis, conjunctival hemorrhage, and petechiae on the face and chest. The prognosis depends on the duration of chest compression and early cardiopulmonary resuscitation after cardiopulmonary arrest. Here we report a case of full recovery from cardiopulmonary arrest caused by traumatic asphyxia. The chest of a 56-year-old man was compressed by a machine while working. Immediately, his colleague started cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which was successful. When he was admitted to our hospital, his consciousness level was E1V2M2(Glasgow coma scale). Our treatment included therapeutic hypothermia, the duration of which was 24 hours at 34 °C. Rewarming his body to 36 °C took place over 48 hours. Thereafter, he recovered completely and was discharged on the 12th hospital day without neurologic sequela. Therapeutic hypothermia was possibly effective in this case. PMID:25743548

  19. Oral Phenytoin Toxicity Causing Sinus Arrest: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Thimmisetty, Ravi K.; Gorthi, Janardhana Rao

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of sinus node arrest leading to symptomatic junctional bradycardia from oral phenytoin toxicity, which is a rare presentation. Our patient had no prior cardiac history and was on phenytoin therapy for seizure disorder. Although bradycardia is more commonly associated with intravenous phenytoin and there were few case reports of bradycardia with oral phenytoin reported, the literature is limited. In this case report, we also reviewed the pathophysiology of phenytoin-induced cardiac toxicity. PMID:25343048

  20. Mutations in TUBB8 and Human Oocyte Meiotic Arrest.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ruizhi; Sang, Qing; Kuang, Yanping; Sun, Xiaoxi; Yan, Zheng; Zhang, Shaozhen; Shi, Juanzi; Tian, Guoling; Luchniak, Anna; Fukuda, Yusuke; Li, Bin; Yu, Min; Chen, Junling; Xu, Yao; Guo, Luo; Qu, Ronggui; Wang, Xueqian; Sun, Zhaogui; Liu, Miao; Shi, Huijuan; Wang, Hongyan; Feng, Yi; Shao, Ruijin; Chai, Renjie; Li, Qiaoli; Xing, Qinghe; Zhang, Rui; Nogales, Eva; Jin, Li; He, Lin; Gupta, Mohan L; Cowan, Nicholas J; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-21

    Background Human reproduction depends on the fusion of a mature oocyte with a sperm cell to form a fertilized egg. The genetic events that lead to the arrest of human oocyte maturation are unknown. Methods We sequenced the exomes of five members of a four-generation family, three of whom had infertility due to oocyte meiosis I arrest. We performed Sanger sequencing of a candidate gene, TUBB8, in DNA samples from these members, additional family members, and members of 23 other affected families. The expression of TUBB8 and all other β-tubulin isotypes was assessed in human oocytes, early embryos, sperm cells, and several somatic tissues by means of a quantitative reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction assay. We evaluated the effect of the TUBB8 mutations on the assembly of the heterodimer consisting of one α-tubulin polypeptide and one β-tubulin polypeptide (α/β-tubulin heterodimer) in vitro, on microtubule architecture in HeLa cells, on microtubule dynamics in yeast cells, and on spindle assembly in mouse and human oocytes. Results We identified seven mutations in the primate-specific gene TUBB8 that were responsible for oocyte meiosis I arrest in 7 of the 24 families. TUBB8 expression is unique to oocytes and the early embryo, in which this gene accounts for almost all the expressed β-tubulin. The mutations affect chaperone-dependent folding and assembly of the α/β-tubulin heterodimer, disrupt microtubule behavior on expression in cultured cells, alter microtubule dynamics in vivo, and cause catastrophic spindle-assembly defects and maturation arrest on expression in mouse and human oocytes. Conclusions TUBB8 mutations have dominant-negative effects that disrupt microtubule behavior and oocyte meiotic spindle assembly and maturation, causing female infertility. (Funded by the National Basic Research Program of China and others.). PMID:26789871

  1. Out of hospital cardiac arrest and associated injury.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, A I; Stuart, M J; Gray, A J

    1998-01-01

    Three patients are described who sustained injuries around the time of a collapse that led to out of hospital cardiac arrest. In this group of patients the importance of taking a complete medical history and recording the circumstances of the syncopal episode cannot be overemphasised. If cardiac output is successfully restored the possibility of occult traumatic injury must be considered in high risk patients. PMID:9639185

  2. Mutations in TUBB8 cause human oocyte meiotic arrest

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ruizhi; Sang, Qing; Kuang, Yanping; Sun, Xiaoxi; Yan, Zheng; Zhang, Shaozhen; Shi, Juanzi; Tian, Guoling; Luchniak, Anna; Fukuda, Yusuke; Li, Bin; Yu, Min; Chen, Junling; Xu, Yao; Guo, Luo; Qu, Ronggui; Wang, Xueqian; Sun, Zhaogui; Liu, Miao; Shi, Huijuan; Wang, Hongyan; Feng, Yi; Shao, Ruijin; Chai, Renjie; Li, Qiaoli; Xing, Qinghe; Zhang, Rui; Nogales, Eva; Jin, Li; He, Lin; Gupta, Mohan L.; Cowan, Nicholas J.; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background Successful human reproduction depends on the fusion of a mature oocyte with a sperm cell to form a fertilized egg. The genetic events that lead to human oocyte maturation arrest are unknown. Methods We recruited a rare four-generation family with female infertility as a consequence of oocyte meiosis I arrest. We applied whole-exome and direct Sanger sequencing to an additional 23 patients following identification of mutations in a candidate gene, TUBB8. Expression of TUBB8 and all other β-tubulin isotypes was measured in human oocytes, early embryos, sperm cells and several somatic tissues by qRT-PCR. The effect of the TUBB8 mutations was assessed on α/β tubulin heterodimer assembly in vitro, on microtubule architecture in HeLa cells, on microtubule dynamics in yeast cells, and on spindle assembly in mouse and human oocytes via microinjection of the corresponding cRNAs. Results We identified seven mutations in the primate-specific gene TUBB8 that are responsible for human oocyte meiosis I arrest in seven families. TUBB8 expression is unique to oocytes and the early embryo, where this gene accounts for almost all of the expressed β-tubulin. The mutations affect the chaperone-dependent folding and assembly of the α/β-tubulin heterodimer, induce microtubule chaos upon expression in cultured cells, alter microtubule dynamics in vivo, and cause catastrophic spindle assembly defects and maturation arrest upon expression in mouse and human oocytes. Conclusions TUBB8 mutations function via dominant negative effects that massively disrupt proper microtubule behavior. TUBB8 is a key gene involved in human oocyte meiotic spindle assembly and maturation. PMID:26789871

  3. Nascent SecM Chain Outside the Ribosome Reinforces Translation Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Funatsu, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    SecM, a bacterial secretion monitor protein, contains a specific amino acid sequence at its C-terminus, called arrest sequence, which interacts with the ribosomal tunnel and arrests its own translation. The arrest sequence is sufficient and necessary for stable translation arrest. However, some previous studies have suggested that the nascent chain outside the ribosome affects the stability of translation arrest. To clarify this issue, we performed in vitro translation assays with HaloTag proteins fused to the C-terminal fragment of E. coli SecM containing the arrest sequence or the full-length SecM. We showed that the translation of HaloTag proteins, which are fused to the fragment, is not effectively arrested, whereas the translation of HaloTag protein fused to full-length SecM is arrested efficiently. In addition, we observed that the nascent SecM chain outside the ribosome markedly stabilizes the translation arrest. These results indicate that changes in the nascent polypeptide chain outside the ribosome can affect the stability of translation arrest; the nascent SecM chain outside the ribosome stabilizes the translation arrest. PMID:25806953

  4. Involvement of miR-15a in G0/G1 Phase Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Rong; Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Wang, Jing; Cao, Yongchang; Xue, Chunyi; Yan, Xu; Liu, Jue

    2016-01-01

    Many viruses exploit the host cell division cycle to favour their own growth. Here we demonstrated that porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), which is a major causative agent of an emerging and important swine disease complex, PCV2-associated diseases, caused G0/G1 cell cycle arrest through degradation of cyclin D1 and E followed by reduction of retinoblastoma phosphorylation in synchronized PCV2-infected cells dependent upon virus replication. This induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest promoted PCV2 replication as evidenced by increased viral protein expression and progeny virus production in the synchronized PCV2-infected cells. To delineate a mechanism of miRNAs in regulating PCV2-induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, we determined expression levels of some relevant miRNAs and found that only miR-15a but not miR-16, miR-21, and miR-34a was significantly changed in the PCV2-infected cells. We further demonstrated that upregulation of miR-15a promoted PCV2-induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest via mediating cyclins D1 and E degradation, in which involves PCV2 growth. These results reveal that G0/G1 cell cycle arrest induced by PCV2 may provide favourable conditions for viral protein expression and progeny production and that miR-15a is implicated in PCV2-induced cell cycle control, thereby contributing to efficient viral replication. PMID:27302568

  5. Involvement of miR-15a in G0/G1 Phase Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Replication.

    PubMed

    Quan, Rong; Wei, Li; Zhu, Shanshan; Wang, Jing; Cao, Yongchang; Xue, Chunyi; Yan, Xu; Liu, Jue

    2016-01-01

    Many viruses exploit the host cell division cycle to favour their own growth. Here we demonstrated that porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), which is a major causative agent of an emerging and important swine disease complex, PCV2-associated diseases, caused G0/G1 cell cycle arrest through degradation of cyclin D1 and E followed by reduction of retinoblastoma phosphorylation in synchronized PCV2-infected cells dependent upon virus replication. This induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest promoted PCV2 replication as evidenced by increased viral protein expression and progeny virus production in the synchronized PCV2-infected cells. To delineate a mechanism of miRNAs in regulating PCV2-induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, we determined expression levels of some relevant miRNAs and found that only miR-15a but not miR-16, miR-21, and miR-34a was significantly changed in the PCV2-infected cells. We further demonstrated that upregulation of miR-15a promoted PCV2-induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest via mediating cyclins D1 and E degradation, in which involves PCV2 growth. These results reveal that G0/G1 cell cycle arrest induced by PCV2 may provide favourable conditions for viral protein expression and progeny production and that miR-15a is implicated in PCV2-induced cell cycle control, thereby contributing to efficient viral replication. PMID:27302568

  6. A Large Specific Deterrent Effect of Arrest for Patronizing a Prostitute

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Devon D.; Potterat, John J.; Muth, Stephen Q.; Roberts, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Background Prior research suggests that arrest, compared with no police detection, of some types of offenders does not decrease the chances they will reoffend. Methodology/Principal Findings We assessed the specific deterrent effect of arrest for patronizing a street prostitute in Colorado Springs by comparing the incidence of arrest for clients of prostitutes first detected through public health surveillance with the incidence of rearrest for clients first detected by police arrest. Although these sets of clients were demographically and behaviorally similar, arrest reduced the likelihood of a subsequent arrest by approximately 70%. In other areas of the United States, arrest did not appear to displace a client's patronizing. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that apprehending clients decreases their patronizing behavior substantially. PMID:17183691

  7. Arrest stress of uniformly sheared wet granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimnazhad Rahbari, S. H.; Brinkmann, M.; Vollmer, J.

    2015-06-01

    We conduct extensive independent numerical experiments considering frictionless disks without internal degrees of freedom (rotation, etc.) in two dimensions. We report here that for a large range of the packing fractions below random-close packing, all components of the stress tensor of wet granular materials remain finite in the limit of zero shear rate. This is direct evidence for a fluid-to-solid arrest transition. The offset value of the shear stress characterizes plastic deformation of the arrested state which corresponds to dynamic yield stress of the system. Based on an analytical line of argument, we propose that the mean number of capillary bridges per particle, ν , follows a nontrivial dependence on the packing fraction, ϕ , and the capillary energy, ɛ . Most noticeably, we show that ν is a generic and universal quantity which does not depend on the driving protocol. Using this universal quantity, we calculate the arrest stress, σa, analytically based on a balance of the energy injection rate due to the external force driving the flow and the dissipation rate accounting for the rupture of capillary bridges. The resulting prediction of σa is a nonlinear function of the packing fraction, ϕ , and the capillary energy, ɛ . This formula provides an excellent, parameter-free prediction of the numerical data. Corrections to the theory for small and large packing fractions are connected to the emergence of shear bands and of contributions to the stress from repulsive particle interactions, respectively.

  8. Kinetics of staurosporine-arrest of human diploid fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, A.P.; Bustos, L.D.; Dickson, J.A.; Habbersett, R.C.; Crissman, H.A. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors have previously shown that the general protein kinase inhibitor, staurosporine (Stsp), has a differential effect on the progression of normal and transformed cells. Low levels of Stsp (1.0 ng/ml) reversibly arrested normal diploid cells in early G1 phase, whereas concentrations of Stsp as high as 50-75 ng/ml had no effect on G1 progression in transformed cells. High concentrations of Stsp arrested normal cells in G1 and G2 phases but blocked transformed cells only in G2 phase of the cell cycle. To follow the accumulation of cells in G1 and/or G2 phases, asynchronous cultures of human diploid fibroblasts were treated with 0, 1, 5, 10, 20, 30 or 50 ng/ml staurosporine for 18 hours in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine. The kinetics of labeling with BrdU were determined with a two-laser flow cytometric technique that monitored emission of fluorescence from DNA-species stains that differed in the degree of BrdU-induced quenching of their fluorescence signals. Bivariate plots of Hoechst/mithramycin fluorescence signal ratio vs. Hoechst fluorescence identified the arrested cells as cohorts of cells in different positions across cell cycle at the time of Stsp addition.

  9. Growth disturbances without growth arrest after ACL reconstruction in children.

    PubMed

    Chotel, Franck; Henry, Julien; Seil, Romain; Chouteau, Julien; Moyen, Bernard; Bérard, Jérôme

    2010-11-01

    Growth arrest is a major concern after ACL reconstruction in children. It usually occurs in patients near to closure of the growth plates. Growth disturbances without growth arrest are also possible and more vicious; the authors analyse the mechanism of two patients with growth disturbance due to overgrowth following ACL reconstruction. One was a symmetrical overgrowth process with 15 mm limb length discrepancy treated with percutaneous epiphysiodesis. Full correction at the time of skeletal maturity was achieved. The second patient developed an asymmetrical overgrowth with progressive tibial valgus deformity. This mechanism was similar to a posttraumatic tibial valgus deformity. After nonoperative treatment, a spontaneous correction of the deformity was noticed. Both children were young (7 and 10 years old) at the time of ACL reconstruction with an autologous iliotibial band graft. The clinical relevance of overgrowth disturbance is usually limited when compared to growth arrest but could require a second surgical procedure as reported in this study. Parents must be informed that even in experienced hands, and despite the use of a physeal sparing technique, this specific risk of growth disturbance is still present. PMID:20182870

  10. Crack propagation, arrest and statistics in heterogeneous materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Kierfeld, J.; Vinokur, V.; Materials Science Division; Dortmund Univ. of Technology

    2008-04-01

    We investigate theoretically statistics and thermally activated dynamics of crack nucleation and propagation in a two-dimensional heterogeneous material containing quenched randomly distributed defects. We consider a crack tip dynamics accounting for dissipation, thermal noise and the random forces arising from the elastic interactions of the crack opening with the defects. The equation of motion is based on the generalized Griffith criterion and the dynamic energy release rate and gives rise to Langevin-type stochastic dynamics in a quenched disordered potential. For different types of quenched random forces, which are characterized (a) by the range of elastic interactions with the crack tip and (b) the range of correlations between defects, we derive a number of static and dynamic quantities characterizing crack propagation in heterogeneous materials both at zero temperature and in the presence of thermal activation. In the absence of thermal fluctuations we obtain the nucleation and propagation probabilities, typical arrest lengths, the distribution of crack lengths and of critical forces. For thermally activated crack propagation we calculate the mean time to fracture. Depending on the range of elastic interactions between crack tip and frozen defects, heterogeneous material exhibits brittle or ductile fracture. We find that aggregations of defects generating long-range interaction forces (e.g. clouds of dislocations) lead to anomalously slow creep of the crack tip or even to its complete arrest. We demonstrate that heterogeneous materials with frozen defects contain a large number of arrested microcracks and that their fracture toughness is enhanced to the experimentally accessible timescales.

  11. CRITICAL CARE ECHO ROUNDS: Echo in cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Asrress, Kaleab; Redwood, Simon; Gillon, Stuart; Walker, David

    2014-01-01

    Management of medical cardiac arrest is challenging. The internationally agreed approach is highly protocolised with therapy and diagnosis occurring in parallel. Early identification of the precipitating cause increases the likelihood of favourable outcome. Echocardiography provides an invaluable diagnostic tool in this context. Acquisition of echo images can be challenging in cardiac arrest and should occur in a way that minimises disruption to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In this article, the reversible causes of cardiac arrest are reviewed with associated echocardiography findings. Case A 71-year-old patient underwent right upper lobectomy for lung adenocarcinoma. On the 2nd post-operative day, he developed respiratory failure with rising oxygen requirement and right middle and lower lobe collapse and consolidation on chest X-ray. He was commenced on high-flow oxygen therapy and antibiotics. His condition continued to deteriorate and on the 3rd post-operative day he was intubated and mechanically ventilated. Six hours after intubation, he became suddenly hypotensive with a blood pressure of 50 systolic and then lost cardiac output. ECG monitoring showed pulseless electrical activity. CPR was commenced and return of circulation occurred after injection of 1 mg of adrenaline. Focused echocardiography was performed, which demonstrated signs of massive pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy with tissue plasminogen activator was given and his condition stabilised. PMID:26693304

  12. [Importance of mechanical assist devices in acute circulatory arrest].

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Markus Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical assist devices are indicated for hemodynamic stabilization in acute circulatory arrest if conventional means of cardiopulmonary resuscitation are unable to re-establish adequate organ perfusion. Their temporary use facilitates further diagnostic and therapeutic options in selected patients, e.g. coronary angiography followed by revascularization.External thorax compression devices allow sufficient cardiac massage in case of preclinical or in-hospital circulatory arrest, especially under complex transfer conditions. These devices perform standardized thorax compressions at a rate of 80-100 per minute. Invasive mechanical support devices are used in the catheter laboratory or in the intensive care unit. Axial turbine pumps, e.g. the Impella, continuously pump blood from the left ventricle into the aortic root. The Impella can also provide right ventricle support by pumping blood from the vena cava into the pulmonary artery. So-called emergency systems or ECMO devices consist of a centrifugal pump and a membrane oxygenator allowing complete takeover of cardiac and pulmonary functions. Withdrawing blood from the right atrium and vena cava, oxygenated blood is returned to the abdominal aorta. Isolated centrifugal pumps provide left heart support without an oxygenator after transseptal insertion of a venous cannula into the left atrium.Mechanical assist devices are indicated for acute organ protection and hemodynamic stabilization for diagnostic and therapeutic measures as well as bridge to myocardial recovery. Future technical developments and better insights into the pathophysiology of mechanical circulatory support will broaden the spectrum of indications of such devices in acute circulatory arrest. PMID:26860409

  13. A p53 growth arrest protects fibroblasts from anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    McCormack, E S; Bruskin, A M; Borzillo, G V

    1997-01-01

    Reversible inhibitors of the cell cycle such as the TGF-betas have been exploited to protect dividing cells from exposure to anticancer drugs and radiation. Here, rat embryo fibroblast (REF) lines expressing different p53 mutations were used to test whether the p53 growth arrest could also chemoprotect cells from high doses of anticancer drugs. Whereas the doubling times of the different REF lines at 37 degrees C were similar, cells bearing temperature-sensitive mutations (mouse 135V or human 143A) were growth arrested at 31 degrees C. Temperature-dependent p53 activity was associated with increased levels of MDM2 and p21/WAF1, and the induction of an integrated p53-responsive luciferase gene. The REF lines exhibited similar sensitivities to common anticancer drugs when grown at 37 degrees C. However, when exposed to the same agents following transient incubation at 31 degrees C, the p53-arrested cells exhibited a marked survival advantage as shown by colony-forming assays. Chemoprotection was not universal, in that colony formation was not enhanced significantly after treatment with cisplatin or 5-fluorouracil, two drugs which can cause cellular damage throughout the cell cycle. Like other negative growth regulators, an activated p53 checkpoint may mediate the survival of cells exposed to drugs that target DNA synthesis or mitosis. PMID:9351895

  14. Out-of-hospital therapeutic hypothermia in cardiac arrest victims

    PubMed Central

    Behringer, Wilhelm; Arrich, Jasmin; Holzer, Michael; Sterz, Fritz

    2009-01-01

    Despite many years of research, outcome after cardiac arrest is dismal. Since 2005, the European Resuscitation Council recommends in its guidelines the use of mild therapeutic hypothermia (32-34°) for 12 to 24 hours in patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest. The benefit of resuscitative mild hypothermia (induced after resuscitation) is well established, while the benefit of preservative mild to moderate hypothermia (induced during cardiac arrest) needs further investigation before recommending it for clinical routine. Animal data and limited human data suggest that early and fast cooling might be essential for the beneficial effect of resuscitative mild hypothermia. Out-of-hospital cooling has been shown to be feasible and safe by means of intravenous infusion with cold fluids or non-invasively with cooling pads. A combination of these cooling methods might further improve cooling efficacy. If out-of-hospital cooling will further improve functional outcome as compared with in-hospital cooling needs to be determined in a prospective, randomised, sufficiently powered clinical trial. PMID:19821966

  15. Isolation Syndrome after Cardiac Arrest and Therapeutic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Forgacs, Peter B.; Fridman, Esteban A.; Goldfine, Andrew M.; Schiff, Nicholas D.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the first description of an isolation syndrome in a patient who suffered prolonged cardiac arrest and underwent a standard therapeutic hypothermia protocol. Two years after the arrest, the patient demonstrated no motor responses to commands, communication capabilities, or visual tracking at the bedside. However, resting neuronal metabolism and electrical activity across the entire anterior forebrain was found to be normal despite severe structural injuries to primary motor, parietal, and occipital cortices. In addition, using quantitative electroencephalography, the patient showed evidence for willful modulation of brain activity in response to auditory commands revealing covert conscious awareness. A possible explanation for this striking dissociation in this patient is that altered neuronal recovery patterns following therapeutic hypothermia may lead to a disproportionate preservation of anterior forebrain cortico-thalamic circuits even in the setting of severe hypoxic injury to other brain areas. Compared to recent reports of other severely brain-injured subjects with such dissociation of clinically observable (overt) and covert behaviors, we propose that this case represents a potentially generalizable mechanism producing an isolation syndrome of blindness, motor paralysis, and retained cognition as a sequela of cardiac arrest and therapeutic hypothermia. Our findings further support that highly-preserved anterior cortico-thalamic integrity is associated with the presence of conscious awareness independent from the degree of injury to other brain areas. PMID:27375420

  16. Gadd45 proteins induce G2/M arrest and modulate apoptosis in kidney cells exposed to hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Mak, Sally K; Kültz, Dietmar

    2004-09-10

    Gadd45 proteins are induced by hyperosmolality in renal inner medullary (IM) cells, but their role for cell adaptation to osmotic stress is not known. We show that a cell line derived from murine renal IM cells responds to moderate hyperosmotic stress (540 mosmol/kg) by activation of G(2)/M arrest without significant apoptosis. If the severity of hyperosmotic stress exceeds the tolerance limit of this cell line (620 mosmol/kg) apoptosis is strongly induced. Using transient overexpression of ectopic Gadd45 proteins and simultaneous analysis of transfected versus non-transfected cells by laser-scanning cytometry, we were able to measure the effects of Gadd45 super-induction during hyperosmolality on G(2)/M arrest and apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that induction of all three Gadd45 isoforms inhibits mitosis and promotes G(2)/M arrest during moderate hyperosmotic stress but not in isosmotic controls. Furthermore, all three Gadd45 proteins are also involved in control of apoptosis during severe hyperosmotic stress. Under these conditions Gadd45gamma induction strongly potentiates apoptosis. In contrast, Gadd45alpha/beta induction transiently increases caspase 3/7 and annexin V binding before 12 h but inhibits later stages of apoptosis during severe hyperosmolality. These results show that Gadd45 isoforms function in common but also in distinct pathways during hyperosmolality and that their increased abundance contributes to the low mitotic index and protection of genomic integrity in cells of the mammalian renal inner medulla. PMID:15262964

  17. Descriptive Analysis of Medication Administration During Inpatient Cardiopulmonary Arrest Resuscitation (from the Mayo Registry for Telemetry Efficacy in Arrest Study).

    PubMed

    Snipelisky, David; Ray, Jordan; Matcha, Gautam; Roy, Archana; Dumitrascu, Adrian; Harris, Dana; Bosworth, Veronica; Clark, Brooke; Thomas, Colleen S; Heckman, Michael G; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler; Kusumoto, Fred; Burton, M Caroline

    2016-05-15

    Advanced cardiovascular life support guidelines exist, yet there are variations in clinical practice. Our study aims to describe the utilization of medications during resuscitation from in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. A retrospective review of patients who suffered a cardiopulmonary arrest from May 2008 to June 2014 was performed. Clinical and resuscitation data, including timing and dose of medications used, were extracted from the electronic medical record and comparisons made. A total of 94 patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into different groups based on the medication combination used during resuscitation: (1) epinephrine; (2) epinephrine and bicarbonate; (3) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and calcium; (4) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and epinephrine drip; and (5) epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, and epinephrine drip. No difference in baseline demographics or clinical data was present, apart from history of dementia and the use of calcium channel blockers. The number of medications given was correlated with resuscitation duration (Spearman's rank correlation = 0.50, p <0.001). The proportion of patients who died during the arrest was 12.5% in those who received epinephrine alone, 30.0% in those who received only epinephrine and bicarbonate, and 46.7% to 57.9% in the remaining groups. Patients receiving only epinephrine had shorter resuscitation durations compared to that of the other groups (p <0.001) and improved survival (p = 0.003). In conclusion, providers frequently use nonguideline medications in resuscitation efforts for in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests. Increased duration and mortality rates were found in those resuscitations compared with epinephrine alone, likely due to the longer resuscitation duration in the former groups. PMID:27015887

  18. Equilibrium Liquid Crystal Phase Diagrams and Detection of Kinetic Arrest in Cellulose Nanocrystal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honorato Rios, Camila; Kuhnhold, Anja; Bruckner, Johanna; Dannert, Rick; Schilling, Tanja; Lagerwall, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The cholesteric liquid crystal self-assembly of water-suspended cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) into a helical arrangement was observed already more than 20 years ago and the phenomenon was used to produce iridescent solid films by evaporating the solvent or via sol-gel processing. Yet it remains challenging to produce optically uniform films and to control the pitch reproducibly, reflecting the complexity of the three-stage drying process that is followed in preparing the films. An equilibrium liquid crystal phase formation stage is followed by a non-equilibrium kinetic arrest, which in turn is followed by structural collapse as the remaining solvent is evaporated. Here we focus on the first of these stages, combining a set of systematic rheology and polarizing optics experiments with computer simulations to establish a detailed phase diagram of aqueous CNC suspensions with two different values of the surface charge, up to the concentration where kinetic arrest sets in. We also study the effect of varying ionic strength of the solvent. Within the cholesteric phase regime, we measure the equilibrium helical pitch as a function of the same parameters. We report a hitherto unnoticed change in character of the isotropic-cholesteric transition at increasing ionic strength, with a continuous weakening of the first-order character up to the point where phase coexistence is difficult to detect macroscopically due to substantial critical fluctuations.

  19. Arrested chain growth during magnetic directed particle assembly in yield stress matrix fluids.

    PubMed

    Rich, Jason P; McKinley, Gareth H; Doyle, Patrick S

    2012-02-28

    The process of assembling particles into organized functional structures is influenced by the rheological properties of the matrix fluid in which the assembly takes place. Therefore, tuning these properties represents a viable and as yet unexplored approach for controlling particle assembly. In this Letter, we examine the effect of the matrix fluid yield stress on the directed assembly of polarizable particles into linear chains under a uniform external magnetic field. Using particle-level simulations with a simple yield stress model, we find that chain growth follows the same trajectory as in Newtonian matrix fluids up to a critical time that depends on the balance between the yield stress and the strength of magnetic interactions between particles; subsequently, the system undergoes structural arrest. Appropriate dimensionless groups for characterizing the arresting behavior are determined and relationships between these groups and the resulting structural properties are presented. Since field-induced structures can be indefinitely stabilized by the matrix fluid yield stress and "frozen" into place as desired, this approach may facilitate the assembly of more complex and sophisticated structures. PMID:22335399

  20. When a Cleared Rape Is Not Cleared: A Multilevel Study of Arrest and Exceptional Clearance.

    PubMed

    Walfield, Scott M

    2016-05-01

    As rape remains one of the most underreported and least likely to be cleared of the violent crimes, it is of paramount importance to understand the factors associated with the likelihood of a case being cleared by law enforcement. This study uses data from the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) and the Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics (LEMAS), and a multilevel modeling approach to examine the relationship between victim, offender, incident, and police department characteristics contrasting the two types of clearance: arrest and exceptional clearance. The latter occurs due to reasons outside of law enforcement's control and despite being considered cleared, the offender is not arrested, charged, nor turned over for prosecution. Of the 16,231 cleared rapes in 238 departments, nearly half (47%) results in exceptional clearance when the victim refuses to cooperate or when prosecution is declined. Incident-level variables have a greater effect on the likelihood of exceptional clearance than victim and offender variables. The department explained a nontrivial amount of variation in the dependent variable, as 37% of the variance in type of clearance was between-department variation. Implications for future research on exceptional clearance and NIBRS are discussed. PMID:25646164

  1. SOX10 ablation arrests the cell cycle, induces senescence and suppresses melanomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Julia C.; Watkins-Chow, Dawn E.; Incao, Art; Hasskamp, Joanne H.; Schönewolf, Nicola; Aoude, Lauren G.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Bastian, Boris C.; Dummer, Reinhard; Loftus, Stacie K.; Pavan, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor SOX10 is essential for survival and proper differentiation of neural crest cell lineages, where it plays an important role in the generation and maintenance of melanocytes. SOX10 is also highly expressed in melanoma tumors, but a role in disease progression has not been established. Here we report that melanoma tumor cell lines require wild-type SOX10 expression for proliferation, and SOX10 haploinsufficiency reduces melanoma initiation in the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (Grm1Tg) transgenic mouse model. Stable SOX10 knockdown in human melanoma cells arrested cell growth, altered cellular morphology, and induced senescence. Melanoma cells with stable loss of SOX10 were arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, with reduced expression in the melanocyte determining factor MITF, elevated expression of p21WAF1 and p27KIP2, hypophosphorylated RB and reduced levels of its binding partner E2F1. Since cell cycle dysregulation is a core event in neoplastic transformation, the role for SOX10 in maintaining cell cycle control in melanocytes suggests a rational new direction for targeted treatment or prevention of melanoma. PMID:23913827

  2. Unattached kinetochores rather than intrakinetochore tension arrest mitosis in taxol-treated cells.

    PubMed

    Magidson, Valentin; He, Jie; Ault, Jeffrey G; O'Connell, Christopher B; Yang, Nachen; Tikhonenko, Irina; McEwen, Bruce F; Sui, Haixin; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2016-02-01

    Kinetochores attach chromosomes to the spindle microtubules and signal the spindle assembly checkpoint to delay mitotic exit until all chromosomes are attached. Light microscopy approaches aimed to indirectly determine distances between various proteins within the kinetochore (termed Delta) suggest that kinetochores become stretched by spindle forces and compact elastically when the force is suppressed. Low Delta is believed to arrest mitotic progression in taxol-treated cells. However, the structural basis of Delta remains unknown. By integrating same-kinetochore light microscopy and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that the value of Delta is affected by the variability in the shape and size of outer kinetochore domains. The outer kinetochore compacts when spindle forces are maximal during metaphase. When the forces are weakened by taxol treatment, the outer kinetochore expands radially and some kinetochores completely lose microtubule attachment, a condition known to arrest mitotic progression. These observations offer an alternative interpretation of intrakinetochore tension and question whether Delta plays a direct role in the control of mitotic progression. PMID:26833787

  3. Application of cyanoacrylate in difficult-to-arrest acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Świdnicka-Siergiejko, Agnieszka; Dąbrowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency. Although endoscopic treatment is effective in controlling non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, in cases of persistent bleeding radiological or surgical interventions are required. Application of cyanoacrylate for treatment of difficult-to-arrest non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is poorly investigated. We describe patients in whom cyanoacrylate for acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding was used to stop the bleeding after failure of conventional endoscopic treatment. Five patients were treated with cyanoacrylate application (injection and/or spraying) for persistent bleeding (duodenal ulcer in 3, gastric ulcer in 1 and gastric Dieulafoy's lesion in 1) despite conventional endoscopic therapies. Hemostasis was achieved in all patients (100%). One patient (20%) developed recurrent bleeding 4 days after initial treatment. No complications or adverse events attributed to the cyanoacrylate application during the follow-up period of 57 days were observed. Application of cyanoacrylate is a safe and effective method to achieve immediate hemostasis when conventional endoscopic treatment is unsuccessful. This technique is easy to perform and should be considered in cases of patients with difficult-to-arrest acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25337181

  4. Final report on development of Pulse Arrested Spark Discharge (PASD) for aging aircraft wiring application

    SciTech Connect

    Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Howard, R. Kevin; Pena, Gary Edward; Schneider, Larry X.; Higgins, Matthew B.; Glover, Steven Frank

    2006-09-01

    Pulsed Arrested Spark Discharge (PASD) is a Sandia National Laboratories Patented, non-destructive wiring system diagnostic that has been developed to detect defects in aging wiring systems in the commercial aircraft fleet. PASD was previously demonstrated on relatively controlled geometry wiring such as coaxial cables and shielded twisted-pair wiring through a contract with the U.S. navy and is discussed in a Sandia National Laboratories report, SAND2001-3225 ''Pulsed Arrested Spark Discharge (PASD) Diagnostic Technique for the Location of Defects in Aging Wiring Systems''. This report describes an expansion of earlier work by applying the PASD technique to unshielded twisted-pair and discrete wire configurations commonly found in commercial aircraft. This wiring is characterized by higher impedances as well as relatively non-uniform impedance profiles that have been found to be challenging for existing aircraft wiring diagnostics. Under a three year contract let by the Federal Aviation Administration, Interagency Agreement DTFA-03-00X90019, this technology was further developed for application on aging commercial aircraft wiring systems. This report describes results of the FAA program with discussion of previous work conducted under U.S. Department of Defense funding.

  5. Induction of cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer cells by the dietary compound isoliquiritigenin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeo Myeong; Lim, Do Young; Choi, Hyun Ju; Jung, Jae In; Chung, Won-Yoon; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2009-02-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a flavonoid chalcone that is present in licorice, shallot, and bean sprouts, is known to have antitumorigenic activities. The present study examined whether ISL alters prostate cancer cell cycle progression. DU145 human and MatLyLu (MLL) rat prostate cancer cells were cultured with various concentrations of ISL. In both DU145 and MLL cells treated with ISL, the percentage of cells in the G1 phase increased, and the incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine decreased. ISL decreased the protein levels of cyclin D1, cyclin E, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4, whereas cyclin A and CDK2 expressions were unaltered in cells treated with ISL. The expression of the CDK inhibitor p27(KIP1) was increased in cells treated with 20 micromol/L ISL. In addition, treatment of cells with 20 micromol/L ISL for 24 hours led to G2/M cell cycle arrest. Cell division control (CDC) 2 protein levels remained unchanged. The protein levels of phospho-CDC2 (Tyr15) and cyclin B1 were increased, and the CDC25C level was decreased by ISL dose-dependently. We demonstrate that ISL promotes cell cycle arrest in DU145 and MLL cells, thereby providing insights into the mechanisms underlying its antitumorigenic activities. PMID:19298190

  6. Unattached kinetochores rather than intrakinetochore tension arrest mitosis in taxol-treated cells

    PubMed Central

    Magidson, Valentin; He, Jie; Ault, Jeffrey G.; O’Connell, Christopher B.; Yang, Nachen; Tikhonenko, Irina; McEwen, Bruce F.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetochores attach chromosomes to the spindle microtubules and signal the spindle assembly checkpoint to delay mitotic exit until all chromosomes are attached. Light microscopy approaches aimed to indirectly determine distances between various proteins within the kinetochore (termed Delta) suggest that kinetochores become stretched by spindle forces and compact elastically when the force is suppressed. Low Delta is believed to arrest mitotic progression in taxol-treated cells. However, the structural basis of Delta remains unknown. By integrating same-kinetochore light microscopy and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that the value of Delta is affected by the variability in the shape and size of outer kinetochore domains. The outer kinetochore compacts when spindle forces are maximal during metaphase. When the forces are weakened by taxol treatment, the outer kinetochore expands radially and some kinetochores completely lose microtubule attachment, a condition known to arrest mitotic progression. These observations offer an alternative interpretation of intrakinetochore tension and question whether Delta plays a direct role in the control of mitotic progression. PMID:26833787

  7. Reprogramming Leukemia Cells to Terminal Differentiation and Growth Arrest by RNA Interference of PU.1

    PubMed Central

    Papetti, Michael; Skoultchi, Arthur I.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant transformation often leads to both loss of normal proliferation control and inhibition of cell differentiation. Some tumor cells can be stimulated to reenter their differentiation program and to undergo terminal growth arrest. The in vitro differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells is an important example of tumor cell reprogramming. MEL cells are malignant erythroblasts that are blocked from differentiating into mature RBC due to dysregulated expression of the transcription factor PU.1, which binds to and represses GATA-1, the major transcriptional regulator of erythropoiesis. We used RNA interference to ask whether inhibiting PU.1 synthesis was sufficient to cause MEL cells to lose their malignant properties. We report here that transfection of MEL cells with a PU.1-specific short interfering RNA oligonucleotide causes the cells to resume erythroid differentiation, accumulate hemoglobin, and undergo terminal growth arrest. RNA interference directed at specific, aberrantly expressed transcription factors may hold promise for the development of potent antitumor therapies in other hematologic malignancies. PMID:17951405

  8. Metformin impairs growth of endometrial cancer cells via cell cycle arrest and concomitant autophagy and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective therapies for early endometrial cancer usually involve surgical excision and consequent infertility Therefore, new treatment approaches that preserve fertility should be developed. Metformin, a well-tolerated anti-diabetic drug, can inhibit cancer cell growth. However, the mechanism of metformin action is not well understood. Here we investigate the roles of autophagy and apoptosis in the anti-cancer effects of metformin on endometrial cancer cells. Methods Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells were treated with metformin. WST-8 assays, colony formation assays, flow cytometry, caspase luminescence measurement, immunofluorescence, and western blots were used to assess the effects of metformin on cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and autophagy. Results Metformin-treated cells exhibited significantly lower viability and proliferation and significantly more cell cycle arrest in G1 and G2/M than control cells. These cells also exhibited significantly more apoptosis via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. In addition, metformin treatment induced autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy, either by Beclin1 knockdown or by 3-methyladenine-mediated inhibition of caspase-3/7, suppressed the anti-proliferative effects of metformin on endometrial cancer cells. These findings indicate that the anti-proliferative effects and apoptosis caused by metformin are partially or completely dependent on autophagy. Conclusions We showed that metformin suppresses endometrial cancer cell growth via cell cycle arrest and concomitant autophagy and apoptosis. PMID:24966801

  9. Efficacy of an albendazole feed formulation against bovine gastrointestinal nematodes including arrested larvae of Ostertagia ostertagi.

    PubMed

    Courtney, C H; Greiner, E C; Whitten, R D

    1986-01-01

    The efficacy of an albendazole feed premix formulation was compared with that of an albendazole drench suspension for control of gastrointestinal nematodes in 31 beef cattle. The premix (11 cattle) and drench suspension (9 cattle) were found to have similar efficacies at a dosage of 7.5 mg/kg of body weight. When compared with controls (11 cattle), both formulations caused significant (P less than 0.05) reductions in worm counts with an efficacy of 98% or greater against adult Haemonchus placei, Ostertagia ostertagi, Trichostrongylus axei, Cooperia punctata, and C pectinata. There was no significant effect against arrested 4th-stage larvae of O ostertagi. Adverse effects of albendazole treatment were not observed, and the premix formulation was readily consumed by cattle. PMID:3946888

  10. Meiosis I Arrest Abnormalities Lead to Severe Oligozoospermia in Meiosis 1 Arresting Protein (M1ap)-Deficient Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Arango, Nelson Alexander; Li, Li; Dabir, Deepa; Nicolau, Fotini; Pieretti-Vanmarcke, Rafael; Koehler, Carla; McCarrey, John R.; Lu, Naifang; Donahoe, Patricia K.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Meiosis 1 arresting protein (M1ap) is a novel vertebrate gene expressed exclusively in germ cells of the embryonic ovary and the adult testis. In male mice, M1ap expression, which is present from spermatogonia to secondary spermatocytes, is evolutionarily conserved and has a specific spatial and temporal pattern suggestive of a role during germ cell development. To test its function, mice deficient in M1ap were created. Whereas females had histologically normal ovaries, males exhibited reduced testicular size and a myriad of tubular defects, which led to severe oligozoospermia and infertility. Although some germ cells arrested at the zygotene/pachytene stages, most cells advanced to metaphase I before arresting and entering apoptosis. Cells that reached metaphase I were unable to properly align their chromosomes at the metaphase plate due to abnormal chromosome synapses and failure to form crossover foci. Depending on the state of tubular degeneration, all germ cells, with the exemption of spermatogonia, disappeared; with further deterioration, tubules displaying only Sertoli cells reminiscent of Sertoli cell-only syndrome in humans were observed. Our results uncovered an essential role for M1ap as a novel germ cell gene not previously implicated in male germ cell development and suggest that mutations in M1AP could account for some cases of nonobstructive oligozoospermia in men. PMID:23269666

  11. Assessment of nonpenetrating captive bolt stunning followed by electrical induction of cardiac arrest in veal calves.

    PubMed

    Bartz, B; Collins, M; Stoddard, G; Appleton, A; Livingood, R; Sobcynski, H; Vogel, K D

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of nonpenetrating captive bolt stunning followed by electrical induction of cardiac arrest on veal calf welfare, veal quality, and blood yield. Ninety calves from the same farm were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups in a balanced unpaired comparison design. The first treatment group (the "head-only" method-application of the pneumatic nonpenetrating stun to the frontal plate of the skull at the intersection of 2 imaginary lines extending from the lateral canthus to the opposite poll [CONTROL]) was stunned with a nonpenetrating captive bolt gun ( = 45). The second group ( = 45) was stunned with a nonpenetrating captive bolt gun followed by secondary electrical induction of cardiac arrest (the "head/heart" method-initial application of the pneumatic nonpenetrating captive bolt stun followed by 1 s application of an electrical stun to the ventral region of the ribcage directly caudal to the junction of the humerus and scapula while the stunned calf was in lateral recumbence [HEAD/HEART]). Stunning efficacy was the indicator of animal welfare used in this study. All calves were instantly rendered insensible by the initial stun and did not display common indicators of return to consciousness. For meat quality evaluation, all samples were collected from the 12th rib region of the longissimus thoracis. Meat samples were evaluated for color, drip loss, ultimate pH, cook loss, and Warner-Bratzler shear force. The L* values (measure of meat color lightness) were darker ( < 0.05) in the HEAD/HEART group (45.08 ± 0.72) than the CONTROL group (47.10 ± 0.72). There were no differences ( > 0.05) observed in a* (redness) and b* (yellowness) values between treatments. No differences ( > 0.05) were observed in drip loss, ultimate pH, cook loss, and Warner-Bratzler shear force. The blood yield from the CONTROL group (7,217.9 ± 143.5 g) was greater ( < 0.05) than that from the HEAD/HEART group (6,656.4 ± 143.5 g

  12. Transcriptional stimulation of the retina-specific QR1 gene upon growth arrest involves a Maf-related protein.

    PubMed Central

    Pouponnot, C; Nishizawa, M; Calothy, G; Pierani, A

    1995-01-01

    The avian neural retina (NR) is derived from proliferating neuroectodermal precursors which differentiate after terminal mitosis and become organized in cell strata. Proliferation of postmitotic NR cells can be induced by infection with Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and requires the expression of a functional v-Src protein. QR1 is a retina-specific gene expressed exclusively at the stage of growth arrest and differentiation during retinal development. In NR cells infected with tsPA101, an RSV mutant conditionally defective in pp60v-src mitogenic capacity, QR1 expression is downregulated in proliferating cells at 37 degrees C and is fully restored when the cells become quiescent as a result of pp60v-src inactivation at 41 degrees C. We were able to arrest proliferation of tsPA101-infected quail NR cells expressing an active v-Src protein by serum starvation at 37 degrees C. This allowed us to investigate the role of cell growth in regulating QR1 transcription. We report that QR1 transcription is stimulated in growth-arrested cells at 37 degrees C compared with that in proliferating cells maintained at the same temperature. Growth arrest-dependent stimulation of QR1 transcription requires the integrity of the A box, a previously characterized cis-acting element responsible for QR1 transcriptional stimulation upon v-Src inactivation and during retinal differentiation. We also show that formation of the C1 complex on the A box is increased upon growth arrest by serum starvation in the presence of an active v-Src oncoprotein. Thus, the C1 complex represents an important link between cell cycle and developmental control of QR1 gene transcription during NR differentiation and RSV infection. By using antibodies directed against different Maf proteins of the leucine zipper family and competition with Maf consensus site-containing oligonucleotides in a gel shift assay, we show that the C1 complex is likely to contain a Maf-related protein. We also show that a purified bacterially

  13. Cardiac Arrests in Patients Undergoing Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: A Retrospective Analysis of 73,029 Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Goudra, Basavana; Nuzat, Ahmad; Singh, Preet M.; Gouda, Gowri B.; Carlin, Augustus; Manjunath, Amit K.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Airway difficulties leading to cardiac arrest are frequently encountered during propofol sedation in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. With a noticeable increase in the use of propofol for endoscopic sedation, we decided to examine the incidence and outcome of cardiac arrests in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy with sedation. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, cardiac arrest data obtained from the clinical quality improvement and local registry over 5 years was analyzed. The information of patients who sustained cardiac arrest attributable to sedation was studied in detail. Analysis included comparison of cardiac arrests due to all causes until discharge (or death) versus the cardiac arrests and death occurring during the procedure and in the recovery area. Results: The incidence of cardiac arrest and death (all causes, until discharge) was 6.07 and 4.28 per 10,000 in patients sedated with propofol, compared with non–propofol-based sedation (0.67 and 0.44). The incidence of cardiac arrest during and immediately after the procedure (recovery area) for all endoscopies was 3.92 per 10,000; of which, 72% were airway management related. About 90.0% of all peri-procedural cardiac arrests occurred in patients who received propofol. Conclusions: The incidence of cardiac arrest and death is about 10 times higher in patients receiving propofol-based sedation compared with those receiving midazolam–fentanyl sedation. More than two thirds of these events occur during EGD and ERCP. PMID:26655137

  14. Explaining Discrepancies in Arrest Rates Between Black and White Male Juveniles

    PubMed Central

    Fite, Paula J.; Wynn, Porche’; Pardini, Dustin A.

    2010-01-01

    The authors investigated discrepancies in arrest rates between Black and White male juveniles by examining the role of early risk factors for arrest. Two hypotheses were evaluated: (a) Disproportionate minority arrest is due to increased exposure to early risk factors, and (b) a differential sensitivity to early risk factors contributes to disproportionate minority arrest. The study included 481 Black and White boys who were followed from childhood to early adulthood. A higher incidence of early risk factors accounted for racial differences related to any juvenile arrest, as well as differences in violence- and theft-related arrests. However, increased exposure to early risk factors did not explain race differences in drug-related arrests. Minimal support was found for the hypothesis that a differential sensitivity to risk factors accounts for disproportionate rate of minority male arrests. In sum, most racial discrepancies in juvenile male arrests were accounted for by an increased exposure to childhood risk factors. Specifically, Black boys were more likely to display early conduct problems and low academic achievement and experience poor parent–child communication, peer delinquency, and neighborhood problems, which increased their risk for juvenile arrest. PMID:19803571

  15. DNA Damage, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis Induction Caused by Lead in Human Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yedjou, Clement G.; Tchounwou, Hervey M.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the industrial use of lead has been significantly reduced from paints and ceramic products, caulking, and pipe solder. Despite this progress, lead exposure continues to be a significant public health concern. The main goal of this research was to determine the in vitro mechanisms of lead nitrate [Pb(NO3)2] to induce DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in human leukemia (HL-60) cells. To reach our goal, HL-60 cells were treated with different concentrations of Pb(NO3)2 for 24 h. Live cells and necrotic death cells were measured by the propidium idiode (PI) assay using the cellometer vision. Cell apoptosis was measured by the flow cytometry and DNA laddering. Cell cycle analysis was evaluated by the flow cytometry. The result of the PI demonstrated a significant (p < 0.05) increase of necrotic cell death in Pb(NO3)2-treated cells, indicative of membrane rupture by Pb(NO3)2 compared to the control. Data generated from the comet assay indicated a concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage, showing a significant increase (p < 0.05) in comet tail-length and percentages of DNA cleavage. Data generated from the flow cytometry assessment indicated that Pb(NO3)2 exposure significantly (p < 0.05) increased the proportion of caspase-3 positive cells (apoptotic cells) compared to the control. The flow cytometry assessment also indicated Pb(NO3)2 exposure caused cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 checkpoint. The result of DNA laddering assay showed presence of DNA smear in the agarose gel with little presence of DNA fragments in the treated cells compared to the control. In summary, Pb(NO3)2 inhibits HL-60 cells proliferation by not only inducing DNA damage and cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 checkpoint but also triggering the apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation accompanied by secondary necrosis. We believe that our study provides a new insight into the mechanisms of Pb(NO3)2 exposure and its associated adverse health

  16. DNA Damage, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis Induction Caused by Lead in Human Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Yedjou, Clement G; Tchounwou, Hervey M; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the industrial use of lead has been significantly reduced from paints and ceramic products, caulking, and pipe solder. Despite this progress, lead exposure continues to be a significant public health concern. The main goal of this research was to determine the in vitro mechanisms of lead nitrate [Pb(NO₃)₂] to induce DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in human leukemia (HL-60) cells. To reach our goal, HL-60 cells were treated with different concentrations of Pb(NO₃)₂ for 24 h. Live cells and necrotic death cells were measured by the propidium idiode (PI) assay using the cellometer vision. Cell apoptosis was measured by the flow cytometry and DNA laddering. Cell cycle analysis was evaluated by the flow cytometry. The result of the PI demonstrated a significant (p < 0.05) increase of necrotic cell death in Pb(NO₃)₂-treated cells, indicative of membrane rupture by Pb(NO₃)₂ compared to the control. Data generated from the comet assay indicated a concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage, showing a significant increase (p < 0.05) in comet tail-length and percentages of DNA cleavage. Data generated from the flow cytometry assessment indicated that Pb(NO₃)₂ exposure significantly (p < 0.05) increased the proportion of caspase-3 positive cells (apoptotic cells) compared to the control. The flow cytometry assessment also indicated Pb(NO₃)₂ exposure caused cell cycle arrest at the G₀/G₁ checkpoint. The result of DNA laddering assay showed presence of DNA smear in the agarose gel with little presence of DNA fragments in the treated cells compared to the control. In summary, Pb(NO₃)₂ inhibits HL-60 cells proliferation by not only inducing DNA damage and cell cycle arrest at the G₀/G₁ checkpoint but also triggering the apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation accompanied by secondary necrosis. We believe that our study provides a new insight into the mechanisms of Pb

  17. Activation of nuclear PTEN by inhibition of Notch signaling induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, S-J; Lee, H-W; Baek, J-H; Cho, Y-H; Kang, H G; Jeong, J S; Song, J; Park, H-S; Chun, K-H

    2016-01-14

    Mutation in PTEN has not yet been detected, but its function as a tumor suppressor is inactivated in many cancers. In this study we determined that, activated Notch signaling disables PTEN by phosphorylation and thereby contributes to gastric tumorigenesis. Notch inhibition by small interfering RNA or γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. Notch inhibition induced dephosphorylation in the C-terminal domain of PTEN, which led to PTEN nuclear localization. Overexpression of activated Notch1-induced phosphorylation of PTEN and reversed GSI-induced mitotic arrest. Dephosphorylated nuclear PTEN caused prometaphase arrest by interaction with the cyclin B1-CDK1 complex, resulting in their accumulation in the nucleus and subsequent apoptosis. We found a correlation between high expression levels of Notch1 and low survival rates and, similarly, between reduced nuclear PTEN expression and increasing the TNM classification of malignant tumours stages in malignant tissues from gastric cancer patients. The growth of Notch1-depleted gastric tumors was significantly retarded in xenografted mice, and in addition, PTEN deletion restored growth similar to control tumors. We also demonstrated that combination treatment with GSI and chemotherapeutic agents significantly reduced the orthotopically transplanted gastric tumors in mice without noticeable toxicity. Overall, our findings suggest that inhibition of Notch signaling can be employed as a PTEN activator, making it a potential target for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:25823029

  18. Calmodulin Mutations Associated with Recurrent Cardiac Arrest in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Graf, Elisabeth; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Cuneo, Bettina F.; Ovadia, Marc; Papagiannis, John; Feldkamp, Michael D.; Rathi, Subodh G.; Kunic, Jennifer D.; Pedrazzini, Matteo; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Clark, Travis; Shaffer, Christian; Benson, D. Woodrow; Kääb, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M.; Chazin, Walter J.; Schwartz, Peter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Life-threatening disorders of heart rhythm may arise during infancy and can result in the sudden and tragic death of a child. We performed exome sequencing on two unrelated infants presenting with recurrent cardiac arrest to discover a genetic cause. Methods and Results We ascertained two unrelated infants (probands) with recurrent cardiac arrest and dramatically prolonged QTc interval who were both born to healthy parents. The two parent-child trios were investigated using exome sequencing to search for de novo genetic variants. We then performed follow-up candidate gene screening on an independent cohort of 82 subjects with congenital long-QT syndrome without an identified genetic cause. Biochemical studies were performed to determine the functional consequences of mutations discovered in two genes encoding calmodulin. We discovered three heterozygous de novo mutations in either CALM1 or CALM2, two of the three human genes encoding calmodulin, in the two probands and in two additional subjects with recurrent cardiac arrest. All mutation carriers were infants who exhibited life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias combined variably with epilepsy and delayed neurodevelopment. Mutations altered residues in or adjacent to critical calcium binding loops in the calmodulin carboxyl-terminal domain. Recombinant mutant calmodulins exhibited several fold reductions in calcium binding affinity. Conclusions Human calmodulin mutations disrupt calcium ion binding to the protein and are associated with a life-threatening condition in early infancy. Defects in calmodulin function will disrupt important calcium signaling events in heart affecting membrane ion channels, a plausible molecular mechanism for potentially deadly disturbances in heart rhythm during infancy. PMID:23388215

  19. Urine Output Changes During Postcardiac Arrest Therapeutic Hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Raper, Jaron D; Wang, Henry E

    2013-12-01

    While commonly described, no studies have characterized cold-induced diuresis or rewarm anti-diuresis occurring during the delivery of therapeutic hypothermia (TH). We sought to determine urine output changes during the provision of postcardiac arrest TH. We analyzed clinical data on patients receiving postcardiac arrest TH at an urban tertiary care center. TH measures included cooling by cold intravenous fluid, external ice packs, and a commercial external temperature management system. TH treatment was divided into phases: (1) induction, (2) maintenance, (3) rewarm, and (4) post-rewarm. The primary outcome measure was the mean urine output rate (mL/hour). We compared urine output rates between TH phases using a Generalized Estimating Equations model, defining urine output rate (mL/hour) as the dependent variable and TH phase (induction, maintenance, rewarm, and post-rewarm) as the primary exposure variable. We adjusted for age, sex, initial ECG rhythm, location of arrest, shock, acute kidney injury, rate of intravenous fluid input, and body mass index. Complete urine output data were available on 33 patients. Mean urine output rates during induction, maintenance, rewarm, and post-rewarm phases were 157 mL/hour (95% CI: 104-210), 103 mL/hour (95% CI: 82-125), 70 mL/hour (95% CI: 51-88), and 91 mL/hour (95% CI: 65-117), respectively. Compared with the post-rewarm phase, adjusted urine output was higher during the TH induction phase (output rate difference +51 mL/hour; 95% CI: 3-99). Adjusted urine output during the maintenance and rewarm phases did not differ from the post-rewarm phase. In this preliminary study, we observed modest increases in urine output during TH induction. We did not observe urine output changes during TH maintenance or rewarming. PMID:24380030

  20. Feasibility of Cognitive Functional Assessment in Cardiac Arrest Survivors Using an Abbreviated Laptop-Based Neurocognitive Battery

    PubMed Central

    Iannacone, Stephen; Esposito, Emily C.; Ruparel, Kosha; Savitt, Adam; Mott, Allison; Richard, Jan A.; Gur, Ruben C.; Abella, Benjamin S.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest survivors exhibit varying degrees of neurological recovery even in the setting of targeted temperature management (TTM) use, ranging from severe impairments to making a seemingly full return to neurologic baseline function. We sought to explore the feasibility of utilizing a laptop-based neurocognitive battery to identify more subtle cognitive deficits in this population. In a convenience sample of cardiac arrest survivors discharged with a cerebral performance category (CPC) of 1, we evaluated the use of a computerized neurocognitive battery (CNB) in this group compared to a healthy control normative population. The CNB was designed to test 11 specific neurocognitive domains, including such areas as working memory and spatial processing. Testing was scored for both accuracy and speed. In a feasibility convenience sample of 29 cardiac arrest survivors, the mean age was 52.9±16.7 years; 12 patients received postarrest TTM and 17 did not receive TTM. Patients tolerated the battery well and performed at normative levels for both accuracy and speed on most of the 11 domains, but showed reduced accuracy of working memory and speed of spatial memory with large magnitudes (>1 SD), even among those receiving TTM. Across all domains, including those using speed and accuracy, 7 of the 29 subjects (24%) achieved statistically significant scores lower from the normative population in two or more domains. In this population of CPC 1 cardiac arrest survivors, a sensitive neurocognitive battery was feasible and suggests that specific cognitive deficits can be detected compared to a normative population, despite CPC 1 designation. Such testing might allow improved measurement of outcomes following TTM interventions in future trials. PMID:25010524

  1. Deoxyelephantopin from Elephantopus scaber L. induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Miaoxian; Chung, Hau Yin; Li, Yaolan

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Deoxyelephantopin (ESD) inhibited cell proliferation in the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. {yields} ESD induced cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases via modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. {yields} ESD triggered apoptosis by dysfunction of mitochondria and induction of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways. {yields} ESD also triggered Akt, ERK, and JNK signaling pathways. -- Abstract: Deoxyelephantopin (ESD), a naturally occurring sesquiterpene lactone present in the Chinese medicinal herb, Elephantopus scaber L. exerted anticancer effects on various cultured cancer cells. However, the cellular mechanisms by which it controls the development of the cancer cells are unavailable, particularly the human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE cells. In this study, we found that ESD inhibited the CNE cell proliferation. Cell cycle arrest in S and G2/M phases was also found. Western blotting analysis showed that modulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins was responsible for the ESD-induced cell cycle arrest. Besides, ESD also triggered apoptosis in CNE cells. Dysfunction in mitochondria was found to be associated with the ESD-induced apoptosis as evidenced by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential ({Delta}{Psi}m), the translocation of cytochrome c, and the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins. Despite the Western blotting analysis showed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways (cleavage of caspases-3, -7, -8, -9, and -10) were triggered in the ESD-induced apoptosis, additional analysis also showed that the induction of apoptosis could be achieved by the caspase-independent manner. Besides, Akt, ERK and JNK pathways were found to involve in ESD-induced cell death. Overall, our findings provided the first evidence that ESD induced cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in CNE cells. ESD could be a potential chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC).

  2. Collapse Arrest in Instantaneous Kerr Media via Parametric Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquazi, Alessia; Peccianti, Marco; Clerici, Matteo; Conti, Claudio; Morandotti, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate, theoretically and experimentally, that a four-wave mixing parametric interaction is able to arrest the collapse of a two-dimensional multicolor beam in an instantaneous Kerr medium. We consider two weak idlers interacting via a third order nonlinearity with two pump beams and we show that a class of collapse-free quasisolitary solutions can be experimentally observed in a normal dispersion Kerr glass. This observation is sustained by rigorous theoretical analysis demonstrating the stability of the observed self-trapped beams.

  3. Bleeding following deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest in children.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Emad B; Machado, Sandra; Apostolakis, John

    2007-03-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is a technique of extracorporeal circulation commonly used in children with complex congenital heart defects undergoing surgical repairs. The use of profound cooling (20 degrees C) and complete cessation of circulation allow adequate exposure and correction of these complex lesions, with enhanced cerebral protection. However, the profound physiologic state of DHCA results in significant derangement of the coagulation system and a high incidence of postoperative bleeding. This review examines the impact of DHCA on bleeding and transfusion requirements in children and the pathophysiology of DHCA-induced platelet dysfunction. It also focuses on possible pharmacologic interventions to decrease bleeding following DHCA in children. PMID:17484172

  4. Axial crack propagation and arrest in pressurized fuselage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosai, M.; Shimamoto, A.; Yu, C.-T.; Walker, S. I.; Kobayashi, A. S.; Tan, P.

    1994-01-01

    The crack arrest capability of a tear strap in a pressurized precracked fuselage was studied through instrumented axial rupture tests of small scale models of an idealized fuselage. Upon pressurization, rapid crack propagation initiated at an axial through crack along the stringer and immediately kinked due to the mixed modes 1 and 2 state caused by the one-sided opening of the crack flap. The diagonally running crack further turned at the tear straps. Dynamic finite element analysis of the rupturing cylinder showed that the crack kinked and also ran straight in the presence of a mixed mode state according to a modified two-parameter crack kinking criterion.

  5. Unicuspid aortic valve presenting with cardiac arrest in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Tara; Kolcow, Walenty; Smyth, Yvonne; Veerasingham, David

    2015-01-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) is a rare congenital anomaly typically affecting patients in their fourth and fifth decades and presenting with signs of heart failure. Our case is one of a previously asymptomatic teenage girl with a UAV, who presented with cardiac arrest and was successfully treated. Only two other similar cases have been reported in the literature, both were of slightly older male patients. Our case highlights the morbidity associated with the anomaly supporting the need for careful assessment of the valve in cases where UAV is suspected. PMID:26178230

  6. Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Adults With Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh K; Schoenfeld, Elinor; Parnia, Sam; Singer, Adam J; Edelman, Norman

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the use of conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), rates of return of spontaneous circulation and survival with minimal neurologic impairment remain low. Utilization of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for CA in adults is steadily increasing. Propensity-matched cohort studies have reported outcomes associated with ECMO use to be superior to that of conventional CPR alone in in-hospital patients with CA. In this review, we discuss the mechanism, indications, complications, and evidence for ECMO in CA in adults. PMID:25922385

  7. A young mountaineer surviving sudden cardiac arrest at high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Indermuehle, Andreas; Cook, Stéphan; Marty, Hans

    2010-01-01

    A young mountaineer suffered from sudden cardiac arrest at high altitude. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was initiated immediately. After 30 min a rescue team arrived and successfully defibrillated ventricular fibrillation upon which spontaneous circulation returned. The subsequent ECG was suggestive of extensive anterior myocardial infarction. Therefore, the patient was thrombolysed and transferred for primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Echocardiography revealed severely reduced left ventricular function with antero-septo-apical akinesia. However, angiography showed unobstructed coronary arteries. The patient fully recovered and left ventricular function normalised within 2 weeks. It may be speculated that exposure to high altitude resulted in acute coronary thrombosis which dissolved by rapid thrombolysis. PMID:22778291

  8. Impact Energy of Functionally Graded Steels in Crack Arrester Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, A.; Aghazadeh Mohandesi, J.

    2010-10-01

    Charpy impact energy of functionally graded steels produced by electroslag remelting composed of graded ferrite and austenite layers together with bainite or martensite intermediate layer in the form of crack arrester configuration has been investigated. The results obtained in the present study indicate that the notch tip position with respect to bainite or martensite layer significantly affects the impact energy. The closer the notch tip to the tougher layer, the higher the impact energy of the composite due to increment of energy absorbed by plastic deformation zone ahead of the notch and vice versa. Empirical relationships have been determined to correlate the impact energy of functionally graded steels to the morphology of layers.

  9. Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) syndrome following cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Dheeraj; Singla, Deepak; Singh, Jasveer; Jindal, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) appears to be a unique syndrome following brain injury. It can echo many life-threatening conditions, making its early recognition and management a challenge for intensivists. A delay in early recognition and subsequent management may result in increased morbidity, which is preventable in affected patients. Herein, we report the case of a patient who was diagnosed with PAID syndrome following prolonged cardiac arrest, and discuss the pathophysiology, clinical presentation and management of this rare and under-recognised clinical entity. PMID:25189311

  10. Cerebral blood flow in humans following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Cohan, S.L.; Mun, S.K.; Petite, J.; Correia, J.; Tavelra Da Silva, A.T.; Waldhorn, R.E.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 washout in 13 patients 6-46 hours after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Patients regaining consciousness had relatively normal cerebral blood flow before regaining consciousness, but all patients who died without regaining consciousness had increased cerebral blood flow that appeared within 24 hours after resuscitation (except in one patient in whom the first measurement was delayed until 28 hours after resuscitation, by which time cerebral blood flow was increased). The cause of the delayed-onset increase in cerebral blood flow is not known, but the increase may have adverse effects on brain function and may indicate the onset of irreversible brain damage.

  11. Arrest types and co-occurring disorders in persons with schizophrenia or related psychoses.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Patrick J; Christopher, Paul P; Druhn, Nicholas; Roy-Bujnowski, Kristen M; Grudzinskas, Albert J; Fisher, William H

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the patterns of criminal arrest and co-occurring psychiatric disorders among individuals with schizophrenia or related psychosis that were receiving public mental health services and had an arrest history. Within a 10-year period, 65% of subjects were arrested for crimes against public order, 50% for serious violent crimes, and 45% for property crimes. The presence of any co-occurring disorder increased the risk of arrest for all offense categories. For nearly all offense types, antisocial personality disorder and substance use disorders conferred the greatest increase in risk for arrest. Among anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder was associated with a greater risk of arrest for serious violent crimes but not other offense types. Criminal risk assessments and clinical management in this population should focus on co-occurring antisocial personality disorder and substance use disorders in addition to other clinical and non-clinical factors. PMID:22270830

  12. Development of New Type Gap Arrester for Earth Fault Protection in AC Feeding System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajiki, Kohji; Morimoto, Hiroaki; Hisamizu, Yasuzi; Kinoshita, Nobuo; Takai, Wataru; Sato, Ryogo

    A gap arrester is being used for ground fault protection in AC Feeding System. However there are faults in which a conventional gap arrester burns down in a normal state of circuit. We investigated the cause of the fault in which a gap arrester burns. Then, it was found out that the cause of the fault was the discharge of AC current from the surge voltage. Therefore, we developed a new type gap arrester which does not burn down. The new type gap arrester is composed of a discharge tube and a zinc oxide element which are connected in series. Unnecessary AC current discharge is prevented by this structure. The new type gap arrester is actually used at the railroad track.

  13. Joints and Mineral Veins in Limestone-Marl Alternations: Arrest and Fracture Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, S. L.; Reyer, D.

    2009-05-01

    Layering is a common feature of many rock masses. In particular, many sedimentary rocks are layered because of depositional changes (stratification), and diagenetic processes. Mechanical layering, where the mechanical properties, particularly the Young's moduli (stiffness), change between layers, may coincide with changes in grain size, mineral content or facies. The mechanical layering of the rock is important because layering commonly results in abrupt changes in local stress fields that may lead to fracture arrest. However, if all the beds in a rock mass have essentially the same Young's modulus and their contacts are welded together (sealed or healed) the beds may function mechanically as a single layer. Here we explore how mechanical layers relate to sedimentary layers in limestone-marl alternations. This we do by investigating the effects of sedimentary layering of the host rock, on the emplacement and geometries of extension fractures such as joints and mineral veins. Detailed field studies were carried out at two localities of well-exposed limestone-marl alternations: (1) the Jurassic Blue Lias at the Glamorgan Coast of South Wales, UK, and (2) the Triassic Muschelkalk in the Kraichgau area, Southwest Germany. In both study areas, calcite veins occur almost exclusively in the cores and damage zones of faults, whereas jointing is pervasive. Fracture arrest, common in mechanically layered host rocks, is primarily controlled by local variations in the stress field, mainly due to three factors: discontinuities (fractures and contacts), changes in host rock mechanical properties, and stress barriers, where the local stress field is unfavorable to fracture propagation. These factors are related in that changes in stiffness and stress barriers are common at contacts between different rock types. A fourth mechanism, namely the material toughness (critical strain energy release rate) of the contact in relation to that of the adjacent layers has been much studied in

  14. Applications of elastic-viscoplastic constitutive models in dynamic analyses of crack run-arrest events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, B. R.; Pugh, C. E.; Swindeman, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    Applications of nonlinear techniques to the first series of six HSST wide-plate crack-arrest tests that were performed are described. The experiments include crack initiations at low temperatures and relatively long (20 cm) cleavage propagation phases which are terminated by arrest in high temperature regions. Crack arrest are then followed by ductile tearing events. Consequently, the crack front regions are exposed to wide ranges of strain rates and temperatures.

  15. Review of Surge Arresters for Power Systems and Transition of their Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Shingo; Kojima, Soji

    Surge arresters have contributed to supply electric power suppressing lightning surge on transmission lines in case of the occurrence of lightning phenomena.Surge arresters using zinc oxide (ZnO) elements are suitable for insulation coordination, and are enable to reduce LIWV (Lightning Impulse Withstand Voltage) and construction cost of power systems. This paper describes transitions of developments, applications and standard of surge arresters for power systems.

  16. Development of metal-oxide varistors for gas-insulated surge arresters

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, M.E.; Sokoly, T.

    1982-07-01

    Metal-oxide varistors have a high degree of non-linearity in their voltage-current characteristic, making arrester application without gaps possible. This is a particularly significant advantage in gas-insulated substation (GIS) arrester applications. The metal-oxide varistor elements have excellent long-term stability and compatibility in an SF/sub 6/ environment. Using multiple soldered columns of metal-oxide varistors, a gapless arrester assembly has been designed that has a simplified overall construction.

  17. UCSF Protocol for Caries Arrest Using Silver Diamine Fluoride: Rationale, Indications, and Consent

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Jeremy A; Ellenikiotis, Hellene; Milgrom, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration recently cleared silver diamine fluoride for reducing tooth sensitivity. Clinical trials document arrest and prevention of dental caries by silver diamine fluoride; this off-label use is now permissible and appropriate under U.S. law. A CDT code was approved for caries arresting medicaments for 2016 to facilitate documentation and billing. We present a systematic review, clinical indications, clinical protocol, and consent procedure to guide application for caries arrest treatment. PMID:26897901

  18. UCSF Protocol for Caries Arrest Using Silver Diamine Fluoride: Rationale, Indications and Consent.

    PubMed

    Horst, Jeremy A; Ellenikiotis, Hellene; Milgrom, Peter L

    2016-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration recently cleared silver diamine fluoride for reducing tooth sensitivity. Clinical trials document arrest and prevention of dental caries by silver diamine fluoride. This off-label use is now permissible and appropriate under U.S. law. A CDT code was approved for caries arresting medicaments for 2016 to facilitate documentation and billing. We present a systematic review, clinical indications, clinical protocol and consent procedure to guide application for caries arrest treatment. PMID:26897901

  19. Crack propagation and arrest in CFRP materials with strain softening regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilligan, Matthew Anthony

    Understanding the growth and arrest of cracks in composite materials is critical for their effective utilization in fatigue-sensitive and damage susceptible applications such as primary aircraft structures. Local tailoring of the laminate stack to provide crack arrest capacity intermediate to major structural components has been investigated and demonstrated since some of the earliest efforts in composite aerostructural design, but to date no rigorous model of the crack arrest mechanism has been developed to allow effective sizing of these features. To address this shortcoming, the previous work in the field is reviewed, with particular attention to the analysis methodologies proposed for similar arrest features. The damage and arrest processes active in such features are investigated, and various models of these processes are discussed and evaluated. Governing equations are derived based on a proposed mechanistic model of the crack arrest process. The derived governing equations are implemented in a numerical model, and a series of simulations are performed to ascertain the general characteristics of the proposed model and allow qualitative comparison to existing experimental results. The sensitivity of the model and the arrest process to various parameters is investigated, and preliminary conclusions regarding the optimal feature configuration are developed. To address deficiencies in the available material and experimental data, a series of coupon tests are developed and conducted covering a range of arrest zone configurations. Test results are discussed and analyzed, with a particular focus on identification of the proposed failure and arrest mechanisms. Utilizing the experimentally derived material properties, the tests are reproduced with both the developed numerical tool as well as a FEA-based implementation of the arrest model. Correlation between the simulated and experimental results is analyzed, and future avenues of investigation are identified

  20. Effect of Hypothermia-Induced Respiratory Arrest on Cerebral Circulation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Mel'nikova, N N; Petrova, L A

    2016-03-01

    Intravital microscopy was employed to examine cerebral circulation in rats assessed by blood flow in the venules with diameter of 10-30 μ during immersion hypothermia continued to the moment of respiratory arrest and for 10 min thereafter. Circulation in the cerebral microvessels continued during severe hypothermia, and it went on even after hypothermic respiratory arrest while the heart was beating. In pial venules, the blood continued to fl ow for 8-10 min after respiratory arrest. PMID:27021108

  1. Epithelial cell proliferation arrest induced by lactate and acetate from Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium breve.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Takahiro; Pédron, Thierry; Regnault, Béatrice; Mulet, Céline; Hara, Taeko; Sansonetti, Philippe J

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to identify and characterize how symbiotic bacteria of the gut microbiota affect the molecular and cellular mechanisms of epithelial homeostasis, intestinal epithelial cells were co-cultured with either Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium as bona fide symbionts to examine potential gene modulations. In addition to genes involved in the innate immune response, genes encoding check-point molecules controlling the cell cycle were among the most modulated in the course of these interactions. In the m-ICcl2 murine cell line, genes encoding cyclin E1 and cyclin D1 were strongly down regulated by L. casei and B. breve respectively. Cell proliferation arrest was accordingly confirmed. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) were the effectors of this modulation, alone or in conjunction with the acidic pH they generated. These results demonstrate that the production of SCFAs, a characteristic of these symbiotic microorganisms, is potentially an essential regulatory effector of epithelial proliferation in the gut. PMID:23646174

  2. The Prevalence of Mental Health Problems in Men Arrested for Domestic Violence

    PubMed Central

    Shorey, Ryan C.; Febres, Jeniimarie; Brasfield, Hope; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2012-01-01

    The problem of male perpetrated intimate partner violence (IPV) is widespread. In an effort to identify risk factors for perpetrating IPV, researchers have examined mental health problems among perpetrators. However, the majority of research in this area has examined personality psychopathology and/or limited their investigation to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or depression. Thus, the present study examined self-reported Axis I psychopathology among men arrested for domestic violence (N = 308). Results replicated past research showing high rates of PTSD and depression. In addition, the prevalence of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, social phobia, and alcohol and drug disorders were very high. All types of mental health problems were positively associated with aggression perpetration. Males meeting probable diagnostic classification reported significantly more frequent aggression than males not meeting diagnostic classification, even after controlling for social desirability. Directions for future research and implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:23284227

  3. Epithelial Cell Proliferation Arrest Induced by Lactate and Acetate from Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium breve

    PubMed Central

    Regnault, Béatrice; Mulet, Céline; Hara, Taeko; Sansonetti, Philippe J.

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to identify and characterize how symbiotic bacteria of the gut microbiota affect the molecular and cellular mechanisms of epithelial homeostasis, intestinal epithelial cells were co-cultured with either Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium as bona fide symbionts to examine potential gene modulations. In addition to genes involved in the innate immune response, genes encoding check-point molecules controlling the cell cycle were among the most modulated in the course of these interactions. In the m-ICcl2 murine cell line, genes encoding cyclin E1 and cyclin D1 were strongly down regulated by L. casei and B. breve respectively. Cell proliferation arrest was accordingly confirmed. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) were the effectors of this modulation, alone or in conjunction with the acidic pH they generated. These results demonstrate that the production of SCFAs, a characteristic of these symbiotic microorganisms, is potentially an essential regulatory effector of epithelial proliferation in the gut. PMID:23646174

  4. Cell Division and Targeted Cell Cycle Arrest Opens and Stabilizes Basement Membrane Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Matus, David Q.; Chang, Emily; Makohon-Moore, Sasha C.; Hagedorn, Mary A.; Chi, Qiuyi; Sherwood, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Large gaps in basement membrane (BM) occur during organ remodeling and cancer cell invasion. Whether dividing cells, which temporarily reduce their attachment to BM, influence these breaches is unknown. Here we analyse uterine-vulval attachment during development across 21 species of rhabditid nematodes and find that the BM gap that forms between these organs is always bounded by a non-dividing vulval cell. Through cell cycle manipulation and live cell imaging in Caenorhabditis elegans, we show that actively dividing vulval cells facilitate enlargement of this breach by promoting BM movement. In contrast, targeted cell-cycle arrest halts BM movement and limits gap opening. Further, we demonstrate that the BM component laminin accumulates at the BM gap edge and promotes increased integrin levels in non-dividing vulval cells, stabilizing gap position. Together, these studies reveal that cell division can be used as a mechanism to regulate BM breaches, thus controlling the exchange of cells between tissues. PMID:24924309

  5. Higher order nuclear organization in growth arrest of humanmammary epithelial cells: A novel role for telomere-associated proteinTIN2

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminker, Patrick; Plachot, Cedric; Kim, Sahn-Ho; Chung, Peter; Crippen, Danielle; Petersen, Ole W.; Bissell, Mina J.; Campisi, Judith; Lelievre, Sophie A.

    2004-12-15

    Nuclear organization, such as the formation of specific nuclear subdomains, is generally thought to be involved in the control of cellular phenotype; however, there are relatively few specific examples of how mammalian nuclei organize during radical changes in phenotype, such as those which occur during differentiation and growth arrest. Using human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) in which growth arrest is essential for morphological differentiation, we show that the arrest of cell proliferation is accompanied by a reorganization of the telomere-associated protein, TIN2, into one to three large nuclear subdomains. The large TIN2 domains do not contain telomeres and occur concomitant with the continued presence of TIN2 at telomeres. The TIN2 domains were sensitive to DNAse, but not RNAse, occurred frequently, but not exclusively near nucleoli, and overlapped often with dense domains containing heterochromatin protein l{gamma}. Expression of truncated forms of TIN2 simultaneously prevented the formation of TIN2 domains and relaxed the stringent morphogenesis-induced growth arrest in HMECs. Our findings reveal a novel extra-telomeric organization of TIN2 associated with the control of cell proliferation and identify TIN2 as an important regulator of mammary epithelial differentiation.

  6. Epidemiology and Outcomes from Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children: The ROC Epistry-Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Dianne L.; Everson-Stewart, Siobhan; Sears, Gena K.; Daya, Mohamud; Osmond, Martin H.; Warden, Craig R.; Berg, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Population-based data for pediatric cardiac arrest are scant and largely from urban areas. The Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) Epistry-Cardiac Arrest is a population-based emergency medical services (EMS) registry of out-of-hospital non-traumatic cardiac arrest (OHCA). This study examined age-stratified incidence and outcomes of pediatric OHCA. We hypothesized that survival to hospital discharge is less frequent from pediatric OHCA than adult OHCA. METHODS AND RESULTS Design Prospective population-based cohort study. Setting Eleven US and Canadian ROC sites. Population Persons <20 years who a) receive CPR or defibrillation by emergency medical services (EMS) providers and/or receive bystander AED shock or b) pulseless but receive no EMS resuscitation between December 2005 and March 2007. Patients were a priori stratified into 3 groups: <1 year (infants, n = 277), 1–11 years (children, n = 154), and 12–19 years (adolescents, n = 193). The incidence of pediatric OHCA was 8.04/100,000 person-years (72.71 in infants, 3.73 in children, and 6.37 in adolescents) versus 126.52 for adults. Survival for all pediatric OHCA was 6.4% (3.3% for infants, 9.1% for children and 8.9% for adolescents) versus 4.5% for adults (P=0.03). Unadjusted odds ratio (95% CI) for pediatric survival to discharge compared with adults was 0.71 (0.37, 1.39) for infants, 2.11 (1.21, 3.66) for children, and 2.04 (1.24, 3.38) for adolescents. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates that the incidence of OHCA in infants approaches that observed in adults but is lower among children and adolescents. Survival to discharge was more common among children and adolescents than infants or adults. PMID:19273724

  7. Dynamic crack propagation and arrest in orthotropic DCB fiber composite specimens. [Double Cantilever Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.; Kousiounelos, P. N.

    1981-01-01

    An orthotropic double cantilever beam (DCB) model is used to study dynamic crack propagation and arrest in 90 deg unidirectional Hercules AS/3501-6 graphite fiber epoxy composites. The dynamic fracture toughness of the composite is determined from tests performed on the long-strip specimen and DCB crack arrest experiments are conducted. By using the dynamic fracture toughness in a finite-difference solution of the DCB governing partial differential equations, a numerical solution of the crack propagation and arrest events is computed. Excellent agreement between the experimental and numerical crack arrest results are obtained.

  8. Cardiac Arrest during Hospitalization for Delivery in the United States, 1998–2011

    PubMed Central

    Mhyre, Jill M.; Tsen, Lawrence C.; Einav, Sharon; Kuklina, Elena V.; Leffert, Lisa R.; Bateman, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the frequency, distribution of potential etiologies, and survival rates of maternal cardiopulmonary arrest during the hospitalization for delivery in the United States. Methods By using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample during the years 1998 through 2011, the authors obtained weighted estimates of the number of U.S. hospitalizations for delivery complicated by maternal cardiac arrest. Clinical and demographic risk factors, potential etiologies, and outcomes were identified and compared in women with and without cardiac arrest. The authors tested for temporal trends in the occurrence and survival associated with maternal arrest. Results Cardiac arrest complicated 1 in 12,000 or 8.5 per 100,000 hospitalizations for delivery (99% CI, 7.7 to 9.3 per 100,000). The most common potential etiologies of arrest included hemorrhage, heart failure, amniotic fluid embolism, and sepsis. Among patients with cardiac arrest, 58.9% of patients (99% CI, 54.8 to 63.0%) survived to hospital discharge. Conclusions Approximately 1 in 12,000 hospitalizations for delivery is complicated by cardiac arrest, most frequently due to hemorrhage, heart failure, amniotic fluid embolism, or sepsis. Survival depends on the underlying etiology of arrest. PMID:24694844

  9. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Diagnosis of Cor Triatriatum Sinistrum in Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kehrl, Thompson; Dagen, Callie T.; Becker, Brent A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrest in the adolescent population secondary to congenital heart disease (CHD) is rare. Focused cardiac ultrasound (FoCUS) in the emergency department (ED) can yield important clinical information, aid in resuscitative efforts during cardiac arrest and is commonly integrated into the evaluation of patients with pulseless electrical activity (PEA). We report a case of pediatric cardiac arrest in which FoCUS was used to diagnose a critical CHD known as cor triatriatum sinistrum as the likely cause for PEA cardiac arrest and help direct ED resuscitation. PMID:26587102

  10. Altered brain energetics induces mitochondrial fission arrest in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Trushin, Sergey; Christensen, Trace A; Bachmeier, Benjamin V; Gateno, Benjamin; Schroeder, Andreas; Yao, Jia; Itoh, Kie; Sesaki, Hiromi; Poon, Wayne W; Gylys, Karen H; Patterson, Emily R; Parisi, Joseph E; Diaz Brinton, Roberta; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Trushina, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Altered brain metabolism is associated with progression of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Mitochondria respond to bioenergetic changes by continuous fission and fusion. To account for three dimensional architecture of the brain tissue and organelles, we applied 3-dimensional electron microscopy (3D EM) reconstruction to visualize mitochondrial structure in the brain tissue from patients and mouse models of AD. We identified a previously unknown mitochondrial fission arrest phenotype that results in elongated interconnected organelles, "mitochondria-on-a-string" (MOAS). Our data suggest that MOAS formation may occur at the final stages of fission process and was not associated with altered translocation of activated dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria but with reduced GTPase activity. Since MOAS formation was also observed in the brain tissue of wild-type mice in response to hypoxia or during chronological aging, fission arrest may represent fundamental compensatory adaptation to bioenergetic stress providing protection against mitophagy that may preserve residual mitochondrial function. The discovery of novel mitochondrial phenotype that occurs in the brain tissue in response to energetic stress accurately detected only using 3D EM reconstruction argues for a major role of mitochondrial dynamics in regulating neuronal survival. PMID:26729583

  11. Non-equilibrium theory of arrested spinodal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Olais-Govea, José Manuel; López-Flores, Leticia; Medina-Noyola, Magdaleno

    2015-11-07

    The non-equilibrium self-consistent generalized Langevin equation theory of irreversible relaxation [P. E. Ramŕez-González and M. Medina-Noyola, Phys. Rev. E 82, 061503 (2010); 82, 061504 (2010)] is applied to the description of the non-equilibrium processes involved in the spinodal decomposition of suddenly and deeply quenched simple liquids. For model liquids with hard-sphere plus attractive (Yukawa or square well) pair potential, the theory predicts that the spinodal curve, besides being the threshold of the thermodynamic stability of homogeneous states, is also the borderline between the regions of ergodic and non-ergodic homogeneous states. It also predicts that the high-density liquid-glass transition line, whose high-temperature limit corresponds to the well-known hard-sphere glass transition, at lower temperature intersects the spinodal curve and continues inside the spinodal region as a glass-glass transition line. Within the region bounded from below by this low-temperature glass-glass transition and from above by the spinodal dynamic arrest line, we can recognize two distinct domains with qualitatively different temperature dependence of various physical properties. We interpret these two domains as corresponding to full gas-liquid phase separation conditions and to the formation of physical gels by arrested spinodal decomposition. The resulting theoretical scenario is consistent with the corresponding experimental observations in a specific colloidal model system.

  12. Pneumococcal Pneumolysin Induces DNA Damage and Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Rai, Prashant; He, Fang; Kwang, Jimmy; Engelward, Bevin P; Chow, Vincent T K

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae produces pneumolysin toxin as a key virulence factor against host cells. Pneumolysin is a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) toxin that forms lytic pores in host membranes and mediates pneumococcal disease pathogenesis by modulating inflammatory responses. Here, we show that pneumolysin, which is released during bacterial lysis, induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), as indicated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX). Pneumolysin-induced γH2AX foci recruit mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), to sites of DSBs. Importantly, results show that toxin-induced DNA damage precedes cell cycle arrest and causes apoptosis when DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK)-mediated non-homologous end joining is inhibited. Further, we observe that cells that were undergoing DNA replication harbored DSBs in greater frequency during pneumolysin treatment. This observation raises the possibility that DSBs might be arising as a result of replication fork breakdown. Additionally, neutralizing the oligomerization domain of pneumolysin with monoclonal antibody suppresses DNA damage and also cell cycle arrest, indicating that pneumolysin oligomerization is important for causing DNA damage. Taken together, this study reveals a previously unidentified ability of pneumolysin to induce cytotoxicity via DNA damage, with implications in the pathophysiology of S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:27026501

  13. Student perceptions of sudden cardiac arrest: a qualitative inquiry.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Annette; Callan, Krista; Egizio, Katelyn; Kenney, Kaye; Gray, Gillian; Mundry, Gillian; Re, Gillian

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the number one cause of death in young athletes in high school and university settings. Survival and outcomes of SCA is dependent on appropriate recognition of symptoms and immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), along with a shock from an automatic external defibrillator (AED). The three aims of the authors' study presented in this article were: to describe university students' perceptions and beliefs about sudden cardiac arrest, to describe university students' understanding of an AED and their level of preparedness to recognize and respond to a life threatening emergency event, and to identify university students' experiences of responding to handling life-threatening emergency events. Qualitative methodology was employed using semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis. Three major themes emerged from data analysis: confusion, uncertainty, and fear/uncomfortableness. These themes characterised participant's perceptions about SCA. The authors concluded that a lack of understanding of what SCA is and participants' inability to respond to an emergency event was evident. PMID:22585265

  14. Electrophysiological Monitoring of Brain Injury and Recovery after Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ruoxian; Xiong, Wei; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Reliable prognostic methods for cerebral functional outcome of post cardiac-arrest (CA) patients are necessary, especially since therapeutic hypothermia (TH) as a standard treatment. Traditional neurophysiological prognostic indicators, such as clinical examination and chemical biomarkers, may result in indecisive outcome predictions and do not directly reflect neuronal activity, though they have remained the mainstay of clinical prognosis. The most recent advances in electrophysiological methods—electroencephalography (EEG) pattern, evoked potential (EP) and cellular electrophysiological measurement—were developed to complement these deficiencies, and will be examined in this review article. EEG pattern (reactivity and continuity) provides real-time and accurate information for early-stage (particularly in the first 24 h) hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury patients with high sensitivity. However, the signal is easily affected by external stimuli, thus the measurements of EP should be combined with EEG background to validate the predicted neurologic functional result. Cellular electrophysiology, such as multi-unit activity (MUA) and local field potentials (LFP), has strong potential for improving prognostication and therapy by offering additional neurophysiologic information to understand the underlying mechanisms of therapeutic methods. Electrophysiology provides reliable and precise prognostication on both global and cellular levels secondary to cerebral injury in cardiac arrest patients treated with TH. PMID:26528970

  15. Experience with bretylium tosylate by a hospital cardiac arrest team.

    PubMed

    Holder, D A; Sniderman, A D; Fraser, G; Fallen, E L

    1977-03-01

    The effect of bretylium tosylate (BT) was determined in 27 consecutive cases of resistant ventricular fibrillation (VF) encountered by a hospital cardiac arrest team. The VF was sustained and completely resistant to multiple injections of lidocaine, sequential DC shocks at 400 watt-sec and one or a combination of intravenous propranolol, diphenylhydantoin or procainamide. Following 30 min of sustained cardiac massage, BT (5 mg/kg i.v.) was administered. In 20 patients, VF was terminated within 9-12 min after DC shock. Eight of these patients failed to recover while 12 (44%) of all patients resuscitated survived to be discharged from hospital. Eleven out of 20 (55%) of all patients who had a cardiac arrest outside the CCU were survivors; only one out of seven in the CCU were successfully resuscitated. While receiving maintanance BT post-resuscitation (5 mg/kg i.m. q 8-12 hrs x 48 hrs), half the patients developed hypotension and three required vasopressors and/or fluid replacement. The data indicate that BT is a useful agent in patients with sustained VF refractory to repeated lidocaine injections, some other antiarrhythmic agents, and multiple DC shocks. PMID:837490

  16. Pneumococcal Pneumolysin Induces DNA Damage and Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Prashant; He, Fang; Kwang, Jimmy; Engelward, Bevin P.; Chow, Vincent T.K.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae produces pneumolysin toxin as a key virulence factor against host cells. Pneumolysin is a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) toxin that forms lytic pores in host membranes and mediates pneumococcal disease pathogenesis by modulating inflammatory responses. Here, we show that pneumolysin, which is released during bacterial lysis, induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), as indicated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-mediated H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX). Pneumolysin-induced γH2AX foci recruit mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), to sites of DSBs. Importantly, results show that toxin-induced DNA damage precedes cell cycle arrest and causes apoptosis when DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK)-mediated non-homologous end joining is inhibited. Further, we observe that cells that were undergoing DNA replication harbored DSBs in greater frequency during pneumolysin treatment. This observation raises the possibility that DSBs might be arising as a result of replication fork breakdown. Additionally, neutralizing the oligomerization domain of pneumolysin with monoclonal antibody suppresses DNA damage and also cell cycle arrest, indicating that pneumolysin oligomerization is important for causing DNA damage. Taken together, this study reveals a previously unidentified ability of pneumolysin to induce cytotoxicity via DNA damage, with implications in the pathophysiology of S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:27026501

  17. Mitochondrial Uncoupling Protein 2 Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Necrotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Palanisamy, Arun P.; Cheng, Gang; Sutter, Alton G.; Evans, Zachary P.; Polito, Carmen C.; Jin, Lan; Liu, John; Schmidt, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is a mitochondrial membrane protein that regulates energy metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We generated mouse carboxy- and amino-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged UCP2 constructs to investigate the effect of UCP2 expression on cell proliferation and viability. UCP2-transfected Hepa 1–6 cells did not show reduced cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) but showed increased levels of glutathione. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that transfected cells were less proliferative than nontransfected controls, with most cells blocked at the G1 phase. The effect of UCP2 on cell cycle arrest could not be reversed by providing exogenous ATP or oxidant supply, and was not affected by the chemical uncoupler carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP). However, this effect of UCP2 was augmented by treatment with genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, which by itself did not affect cell proliferation on control hepatocytes. Western blotting analysis revealed decreased expression levels of CDK6 but not CDK2 and D-type cyclins. Examination of cell viability in UCP2-transfected cells with Trypan Blue and Annexin-V staining revealed that UCP2 transfection led to significantly increased cell death. However, characteristics of apoptosis were absent in UCP2-transfected Hepa 1–6 cells, including lack of oligonucleosomal fragmentation (laddering) of chromosomal DNA, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, and cleavage of caspase-3. In conclusion, our results indicate that UCP2 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and causes nonapoptotic cell death, suggesting that UCP2 may act as a powerful influence on hepatic regeneration and cell death in the steatotic liver. PMID:24320727

  18. Direct inhibition of Retinoblastoma phosphorylation by Nimbolide causes cell cycle arrest and suppresses glioblastoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jane; Liu, Xiaona; Henry, Heather; Gasilina, Anjelika; Nassar, Nicholas; Ghosh, Jayeeta; Clark, Jason P; Kumar, Ashish; Pauletti, Giovanni M.; Ghosh, Pradip K; Dasgupta, Biplab

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Classical pharmacology allows the use and development of conventional phytomedicine faster and more economically than conventional drugs. This approach should be tested for their efficacy in terms of complementarity and disease control. The purpose of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms by which nimbolide, a triterpenoid found in the well-known medicinal plant Azadirachta indica controls glioblastoma (GBM) growth. Experimental Design Using in vitro signaling, anchorage-independent growth, kinase assays, and xenograft models, we investigated the mechanisms of its growth inhibition in glioblastoma. Results We show that nimbolide or an ethanol soluble fraction of A. indica leaves (Azt) that contains nimbolide as the principal cytotoxic agent is highly cytotoxic against GBM in vitro and in vivo. Azt caused cell cycle arrest, most prominently at the G1-S stage in GBM cells expressing EGFRvIII, an oncogene present in about 20-25% of GBMs. Azt/nimbolide directly inhibited CDK4/CDK6 kinase activity leading to hypophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein, cell cycle arrest at G1-S and cell death. Independent of RB hypophosphorylation, Azt also significantly reduced proliferative and survival advantage of GBM cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts by downregulating Bcl2 and blocking growth factor induced phosphorylation of Akt, Erk1/2 and STAT3. These effects were specific since Azt did not affect mTOR or other cell cycle regulators. In vivo, Azt completely prevented initiation and inhibited progression of GBM growth. Conclusions Our preclinical findings demonstrate Nimbolide as a potent anti-glioma agent that blocks cell cycle and inhibits glioma growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24170547

  19. Grain setting defect1 (GSD1) function in rice depends on S-acylation and interacts with actin 1 (OsACT1) at its C-terminal

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Jinshan; Zheng, Shuai; Shen, Junhui; Li, Laigeng

    2015-01-01

    Grain setting defect1 (GSD1), a plant-specific remorin protein specifically localized at the plasma membrane (PM) and plasmodesmata of phloem companion cells, affects grain setting in rice through regulating the transport of photoassimilates. Here, we show new evidence demonstrating that GSD1 is localized at the cytoplasmic face of the PM and a stretch of 45 amino acid residues at its C-terminal is required for its localization. Association with the PM is mediated by S-acylation of cysteine residues Cys-524 and Cys-527, in a sequence of 45 amino acid residues essential for GSD1 function in rice. Furthermore, the coiled-coil domain in GSD1 is necessary for sufficient interaction with OsACT1. Together, these results reveal that GSD1 attaches to the PM through S-acylation and interacts with OsACT1 through its coiled-coil domain structure to regulate plasmodesmata conductance for photoassimilate transport in rice. PMID:26483819

  20. Modification of a Specific Class of Plasmodesmata and Loss of Sucrose Export Ability in the sucrose export defective1 Maize Mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Russin, W. A.; Evert, R. F.; Vanderveer, P. J.; Sharkey, T. D.; Briggs, S. P.

    1996-01-01

    We report on the export capability and structural and ultrastructural characteristics of leaves of the sucrose export defective1 (sed1; formerly called sut1) maize mutant. Whole-leaf autoradiography was combined with light and transmission electron microscopy to correlate leaf structure with differences in export capacity in both wild-type and sed1 plants. Tips of sed1 blades had abnormal accumulations of starch and anthocyanin and distorted vascular tissues in the minor veins, and they did not export sucrose. Bases of sed1 blades were structurally identical to those of the wild type and did export sucrose. Electron microscopy revealed that only the plasmodesmata at the bundle sheath-vascular parenchyma cell interface in sed1 minor veins were structurally modified. Aberrant plasmodesmal structure at this critical interface results in a symplastic interruption and a lack of phloem-loading capability. These results clarify the pathway followed by photosynthates, the pivotal role of the plasmodesmata at the bundle sheath-vascular parenchyma cell interface, and the role of the vascular parenchyma cells in phloem loading. PMID:12239395

  1. Quiescence in Artemia franciscana embryos: reversible arrest of metabolism and gene expression at low oxygen levels.

    PubMed

    Hand, S C

    1998-04-01

    Depression of the production and consumption of cellular energy appears to be a prerequisite for the survival of prolonged bouts of anoxia. A correlation exists between the degree of metabolic depression under anoxia and the duration of anoxia tolerance. In the case of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) embryos, oxygen deprivation induces a reversible quiescent state that can be tolerated for several years with substantial survivorship. A global arrest of cytoplasmic translation accompanies the transition into anoxia, and rates of protein synthesis in mitochondria from these embryos appears to be markedly reduced in response to anoxia. Previous evidence suggests that the acute acidification of intracellular pH (pHi) by over 1.0 unit during the transition into anoxia contributes to the depression of biosynthesis, but message limitation does not appear to play a role in the down-regulation in either cellular compartment. The ontogenetic increase in mRNA levels for a mitochondrial-encoded subunit of cytochrome c oxidase (COX I) and for nuclear-encoded actin is blocked by anoxia and aerobic acidosis (artificial quiescence imposed by intracellular acidification under aerobic conditions). Further, the levels of COX I and actin mRNA do not decline appreciably during 6 h bouts of quiescence, even though protein synthesis is acutely arrested across this same period. Thus, the constancy of mRNA levels during quiescence indicates that reduced protein synthesis is not caused by message limitation but, instead, is probably controlled at the translational level. This apparent stabilization of mRNA under anoxia is mirrored in an extension of protein half-life. The ubiquitin-dependent pathway for protein degradation is depressed under anoxia and aerobic acidosis, as judged by the acute drop in levels of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins. Mitochondrial protein synthesis is responsive to both acidification of pHi and removal of oxygen per se. Matrix pH declines in parallel with pHi, and

  2. Effects of Intraosseous Tibial vs. Intravenous Vasopressin in a Hypovolemic Cardiac Arrest Model

    PubMed Central

    Fulkerson, Justin; Lowe, Robert; Anderson, Tristan; Moore, Heather; Craig, William; Johnson, Don

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study compared the effects of vasopressin via tibial intraosseous (IO) and intravenous (IV) routes on maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), the time to maximum concentration (Tmax), return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and time to ROSC in a hypovolemic cardiac arrest model. Methods This study was a randomized prospective, between-subjects experimental design. A computer program randomly assigned 28 Yorkshire swine to one of four groups: IV (n=7), IO tibia (n=7), cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) + defibrillation (n=7), and a control group that received just CPR (n=7). Ventricular fibrillation was induced, and subjects remained in arrest for two minutes. CPR was initiated and 40 units of vasopressin were administered via IO or IV routes. Blood samples were collected at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, and 4 minutes. CPR and defibrillation were initiated for 20 minutes or until ROSC was achieved. We measured vasopressin concentrations using high-performance liquid chromatography. Results There was no significant difference between the IO and IV groups relative to achieving ROSC (p=1.0) but a significant difference between the IV compared to the CPR+ defibrillation group (p=0.031) and IV compared to the CPR-only group (p=0.001). There was a significant difference between the IO group compared to the CPR+ defibrillation group (p=0.031) and IO compared to the CPR-only group (p=0.001). There was no significant difference between the CPR + defibrillation group and the CPR group (p=0.127). There was no significant difference in Cmax between the IO and IV groups (p=0.079). The mean ± standard deviation of Cmax of the IO group was 58,709±25, 463pg/mL compared to the IV group, which was 106,198±62, 135pg/mL. There was no significant difference in mean Tmax between the groups (p=0.084). There were no significant differences in odds of ROSC between the tibial IO and IV groups. Conclusion Prompt access to the vascular system using the IO route can circumvent

  3. Arrest of Avalanche Propagation by Discontinuities on Snow Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigo, B.; Chiaia, B.

    2009-04-01

    Considering the spatial variability of the snow cover, the paper analyses, in the framework of Fracture Mechanics, the Mode II fracture propagation on snow cover that leads to large dry slab avalanches. Under the hypothesis of a perfectly brittle phenomenon, avalanche triggering is usually investigated numerically by means of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (McClung, 1979; Chiaia et al., 2008). Since, however, the real phenomenon is intrinsically dynamical, another aspect to investigate is represented by dynamic fracture propagation. In this paper, we model dynamic crack propagation into a dry snow slab, to assess the possibility of crack arrest due to the presence of weak zones distributed along the snow slope. As a consequence of the first triggering mechanism (the Mode II fracture propagation on the weak plane), the secondary Mode I crack propagation in the crown is studied by means of numerical simulations based on Dynamic Elastic Fracture Mechanics and on the theory of crack arresters. By taking into account kinetic energy and using the FEM software FRANC 2D (Wawrzynek and Ingraffea, 1993), several paths of crown fracture propagation and their stability have been investigated. The snowpack is considered as a linear-elastic plate (2D problem), whose physical and mechanical parameters are chosen according to classical literature values. To investigate the possible arrest of crown fracture, we apply the theory of crack arresters, usually adopted for pipelines and perforated steel sheets fracture problems. To study crack arrest, different crack paths are simulated, in discontinuous (equipped with different shapes and geometries of artificial voids) snowpacks. The simulations show the effectiveness of these weak zones, to reduce substantially the crack driving force of the propagating fracture. This means that, increasing spatial variability tends to stabilize the snow slope, eventually splitting a major avalanche event into smaller, independent avalanches. Our

  4. Oxidative Damage to Rhesus Macaque Spermatozoa Results in Mitotic Arrest and Transcript Abundance Changes in Early Embryos1

    PubMed Central

    Burruel, Victoria; Klooster, Katie L.; Chitwood, James; Ross, Pablo J.; Meyers, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Our objective was to determine whether oxidative damage of rhesus macaque sperm induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro would affect embryo development following intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) of metaphase II (MII) oocytes. Fresh rhesus macaque spermatozoa were treated with ROS as follows: 1 mM xanthine and 0.1 U/ml xanthine oxidase (XXO) at 37°C and 5% CO2 in air for 2.25 h. Sperm were then assessed for motility, viability, and lipid peroxidation. Motile ROS-treated and control sperm were used for ICSI of MII oocytes. Embryo culture was evaluated for 3 days for development to the eight-cell stage. Embryos were fixed and stained for signs of cytoplasmic and nuclear abnormalities. Gene expression was analyzed by RNA-Seq in two-cell embryos from control and treated groups. Exposure of sperm to XXO resulted in increased lipid peroxidation and decreased sperm motility. ICSI of MII oocytes with motile sperm induced similar rates of fertilization and cleavage between treatments. Development to four- and eight-cell stage was significantly lower for embryos generated with ROS-treated sperm than for controls. All embryos produced from ROS-treated sperm demonstrated permanent embryonic arrest and varying degrees of degeneration and nuclear fragmentation, changes that are suggestive of prolonged senescence or apoptotic cell death. RNA-Seq analysis of two-cell embryos showed changes in transcript abundance resulting from sperm treatment with ROS. Differentially expressed genes were enriched for processes associated with cytoskeletal organization, cell adhesion, and protein phosphorylation. ROS-induced damage to sperm adversely affects embryo development by contributing to mitotic arrest after ICSI of MII rhesus oocytes. Changes in transcript abundance in embryos destined for mitotic arrest is evident at the two-cell stage of development. PMID:23904511

  5. Unprecedented inhibition of tubulin polymerization directed by gold nanoparticles inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Diptiman; Xavier, Paulrajpillai Lourdu; Chaudhari, Kamalesh; John, Robin; Dasgupta, Anjan Kumar; Pradeep, Thalappil; Chakrabarti, Gopal

    2013-05-01

    The effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the polymerization of tubulin has not been examined till now. We report that interaction of weakly protected AuNPs with microtubules (MTs) could cause inhibition of polymerization and aggregation in the cell free system. We estimate that single citrate capped AuNPs could cause aggregation of ~105 tubulin heterodimers. Investigation of the nature of inhibition of polymerization and aggregation by Raman and Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies indicated partial conformational changes of tubulin and microtubules, thus revealing that AuNP-induced conformational change is the driving force behind the observed phenomenon. Cell culture experiments were carried out to check whether this can happen inside a cell. Dark field microscopy (DFM) combined with hyperspectral imaging (HSI) along with flow cytometric (FC) and confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) analyses suggested that AuNPs entered the cell, caused aggregation of the MTs of A549 cells, leading to cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and concomitant apoptosis. Further, Western blot analysis indicated the upregulation of mitochondrial apoptosis proteins such as Bax and p53, down regulation of Bcl-2 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) confirming mitochondrial apoptosis. Western blot run after cold-depolymerization revealed an increase in the aggregated insoluble intracellular tubulin while the control and actin did not aggregate, suggesting microtubule damage induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The observed polymerization inhibition and cytotoxic effects were dependent on the size and concentration of the AuNPs used and also on the incubation time. As microtubules are important cellular structures and target for anti-cancer drugs, this first observation of nanoparticles-induced protein's conformational change-based aggregation of the tubulin-MT system is of high importance, and would be useful in the understanding of cancer therapeutics

  6. Conformational aberrance of the sendai virus F0 protein in thapsigargin-treated cells allowing exit from the endoplasmic reticulum but causing arrest at the Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    Ono, A; Kawakita, M

    1995-12-01

    Thapsigargin and ionomycin inhibited the intracellular transport of the Sendai virus F0 protein. Depletion of Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+ store(s) is critical for the inhibition, since ionomycin was more effective in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ than in its presence. Transport of F0 was arrested between the trans-Golgi complex and the plasma membrane [Ono, A. and Kawakita, M. (1994) J. Biochem. 116, 649-656], but only when thapsigargin was added before the synthesis of F0. This implies that F0 was committed to later arrest in the endoplasmic reticulum. Non-reducing SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a conformational abnormality of F0 immediately after pulse-labeling in thapsigargin-treated cells. The abnormality did not affect the exit of F0 from the endoplasmic reticulum, but paralleled its later arrest at the trans-Golgi stage. Pulse-labeled and 1-h-chased F0 was endoglycosidase H-resistant even in thapsigargin-treated cells, but was not recognized by mAb f-49, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the corresponding F0 intermediate in uninhibited cells. The misfolded F0 may escape from recognition by means of the quality control system of the endoplasmic reticulum, but another system in the Golgi complex may complement the former. The arrested F0 was rapidly degraded. PMID:8720142

  7. ‘Stand still … , and move on’, a new early intervention service for cardiac arrest survivors and their caregivers: rationale and description of the intervention

    PubMed Central

    Moulaert, Véronique RMP; Verbunt, Jeanine A; Bakx, Wilbert GM; Gorgels, Anton PM; de Krom, Marc CFTM; Heuts, Peter HTG; Wade, Derick T; van Heugten, Caroline M

    2011-01-01

    This series of articles for rehabilitation in practice aims to cover a knowledge element of the rehabilitation medicine curriculum. Nevertheless they are intended to be of interest to a multidisciplinary audience. The competency addressed in this article is ‘The trainee demonstrates a knowledge of diagnostic approaches for specific impairments including cognitive dysfunction as a result of cardiac arrest.’ Abstract Objective: To describe a new early intervention service for survivors of cardiac arrest and their caregivers, and to explain the evidence and rationale behind it. Rationale: A cardiac arrest may cause hypoxic–ischaemic brain injury, which often results in cognitive impairments. Survivors of cardiac arrest can also encounter emotional problems, limitations in daily life, reduced participation in society and a decreased quality of life. A new early intervention service was designed based on literature study, expert opinion and patient experiences. Description of the intervention: The early intervention service is an individualized programme, consisting of one to six consultations by a specialized nurse for the patient and their caregiver. The intervention starts soon after discharge from the hospital and can last up to three months. The intervention consists of screening for cognitive and emotional problems, provision of information and support, promotion of self-management strategies and can include referral to further specialized care if indicated. Discussion: This intervention is assumed to reduce future problems related to hypoxic–ischaemic brain injury in the patient and caregiver, and its effectiveness is currently being investigated in a randomized controlled multicentre trial. PMID:21565869

  8. Disrupting Cyclin Dependent Kinase 1 in Spermatocytes Causes Late Meiotic Arrest and Infertility in Mice.

    PubMed

    Clement, Tracy M; Inselman, Amy L; Goulding, Eugenia H; Willis, William D; Eddy, Edward M

    2015-12-01

    While cyclin dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) has a critical role in controlling resumption of meiosis in oocytes, its role has not been investigated directly in spermatocytes. Unique aspects of male meiosis led us to hypothesize that its role is different in male meiosis than in female meiosis. We generated a conditional knockout (cKO) of the Cdk1 gene in mouse spermatocytes to test this hypothesis. We found that CDK1-null spermatocytes undergo synapsis, chiasmata formation, and desynapsis as is seen in oocytes. Additionally, CDK1-null spermatocytes relocalize SYCP3 to centromeric foci, express H3pSer10, and initiate chromosome condensation. However, CDK1-null spermatocytes fail to form condensed bivalent chromosomes in prophase of meiosis I and instead are arrested at prometaphase. Thus, CDK1 has an essential role in male meiosis that is consistent with what is known about the role of CDK1 in female meiosis, where it is required for formation of condensed bivalent metaphase chromosomes and progression to the first meiotic division. We found that cKO spermatocytes formed fully condensed bivalent chromosomes in the presence of okadaic acid, suggesting that cKO chromosomes are competent to condense, although they do not do so in vivo. Additionally, arrested cKO spermatocytes exhibited irregular cell shape, irregular large nuclei, and large distinctive nucleoli. These cells persist in the seminiferous epithelium through the next seminiferous epithelial cycle with a lack of stage XII checkpoint-associated cell death. This indicates that CDK1 is required upstream of a checkpoint-associated cell death as well as meiotic metaphase progression in mouse spermatocytes. PMID:26490841

  9. Carrageenan Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells in Vitro1–3

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Borthakur, Alip; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies in animal models have shown that the commonly used food additive carrageenan (CGN) induces inflammation and intestinal neoplasia. We performed the first studies to determine the effects of CGN exposure on human intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) in tissue culture and tested the effect of very low concentrations (1–10 mg/L) of undegraded, high-molecular weight CGN. These concentrations of CGN are less than the anticipated exposure of the human colon to CGN from the average Western diet. In the human colonic epithelial cell line NCM460 and in primary human colonic epithelial cells that were exposed to CGN for 1–8 d, we found increased cell death, reduced cell proliferation, and cell cycle arrest compared with unexposed control cells. After 6–8 d of CGN exposure, the percentage of cells reentering G0–G1 significantly decreased and the percentages of cells in S and G2-M phases significantly increased. Increases in activated p53, p21, and p15 followed CGN exposure, consistent with CGN-induced cell cycle arrest. Additional data, including DNA ladder, poly ADP ribose polymerase Western blot, nuclear DNA staining, and activities of caspases 3 and 7, indicated no evidence of increased apoptosis following CGN exposure and were consistent with CGN-induced necrotic cell death. These data document for the first time, to our knowledge, marked adverse effects of low concentrations of CGN on survival of normal human IEC and suggest that CGN exposure may have a role in development of human intestinal pathology. PMID:18287351

  10. Remote Ischemic Preconditioning Reduces Cerebral Oxidative Stress Following Hypothermic Circulatory Arrest in a Porcine Model.

    PubMed

    Arvola, Oiva; Haapanen, Henri; Herajärvi, Johanna; Anttila, Tuomas; Puistola, Ulla; Karihtala, Peeter; Tuominen, Hannu; Anttila, Vesa; Juvonen, Tatu

    2016-01-01

    Remote ischemic precondition has become prominent as one of the most promising methods to mitigate neurological damage following ischemic insult. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the effects of remote ischemic preconditioning can be seen in the markers of oxidative stress or in redox-regulating enzymes in a porcine model. A total of 12 female piglets were randomly assigned to 2 groups. The study group underwent an intervention of 4 cycles of 5-minute ischemic preconditioning on the right hind leg. All piglets underwent 60-minute hypothermic circulatory arrest. Oxidative stress marker 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was measured from blood samples with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After 7 days of follow-up, samples from the brain, heart, kidney, and ovary were harvested for histopathologic examination. The immunohistochemical stainings of hypoxia marker hypoxia-inducible factor-1-α, oxidative stress marker 8-OHdG, DNA repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine glycosylase, and antioxidant response regulators nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and protein deglycase were analyzed. The level of 8-OHdG referred to baseline was decreased in the sagittal sinus׳ blood samples in the study group after a prolonged deep hypothermic circulatory arrest at 360 minutes after reperfusion. Total histopathologic score was 3.8 (1.8-6.0) in the study group and was 4.4 (2.5-6.5) in the control group (P = 0.72), demonstrating no statistically significant difference in cerebral injury. Our findings demonstrate that the positive effects of remote ischemic preconditioning can be seen in cellular oxidative balance regulators in an animal model after 7 days of preconditioned ischemic insult. PMID:27568144

  11. Mental Disorders, Comorbidity, and Postrunaway Arrests among Homeless and Runaway Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xiaojin; Thrane, Lisa; Whitbeck, Les B.; Johnson, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the associations between lifetime mental disorder, comorbidity, and self-reported postrunaway arrests among 428 (187 males, 241 females) homeless and runaway youth. The analysis examined the pattern of arrests across five lifetime mental disorders (alcohol abuse, drug abuse, conduct disorder, major depressive episode, and…

  12. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  13. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  14. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  15. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  16. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  17. 30 CFR 75.521 - Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed... Electrical Equipment-General § 75.521 Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires. Each ungrounded, exposed power conductor and each ungrounded, exposed telephone wire...

  18. 30 CFR 75.521 - Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed... Electrical Equipment-General § 75.521 Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires. Each ungrounded, exposed power conductor and each ungrounded, exposed telephone wire...

  19. 30 CFR 75.521 - Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed... Electrical Equipment-General § 75.521 Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires. Each ungrounded, exposed power conductor and each ungrounded, exposed telephone wire...

  20. 30 CFR 75.521 - Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed... Electrical Equipment-General § 75.521 Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires. Each ungrounded, exposed power conductor and each ungrounded, exposed telephone wire...

  1. 30 CFR 75.521 - Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed... Electrical Equipment-General § 75.521 Lightning arresters; ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires. Each ungrounded, exposed power conductor and each ungrounded, exposed telephone wire...

  2. Family Check up Effects on Adolescent Arrest Trajectories: Variation by Developmental Subtype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Arin M.; Klostermann, Susan; Dishion, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effect of the Family Check Up (FCU) intervention on the probability of arrests from age 12 to 17 years for youth following heterogeneous developmental trajectories of antisocial behavior. Latent Growth Mixture Modeling results supported the presence of three developmental trajectories of arrests, including a large group of…

  3. 28 CFR 50.5 - Notification of Consular Officers upon the arrest of foreign nationals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... demand or request of the arrested foreign national. On the other hand, some of the treaties require... nationals of foreign countries are arrested by officers of this Department on charges of criminal violations... is a treaty provision in effect which requires notification of consul, without reference to a...

  4. 28 CFR 50.5 - Notification of Consular Officers upon the arrest of foreign nationals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... demand or request of the arrested foreign national. On the other hand, some of the treaties require... nationals of foreign countries are arrested by officers of this Department on charges of criminal violations... is a treaty provision in effect which requires notification of consul, without reference to a...

  5. 28 CFR 50.5 - Notification of Consular Officers upon the arrest of foreign nationals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... demand or request of the arrested foreign national. On the other hand, some of the treaties require... nationals of foreign countries are arrested by officers of this Department on charges of criminal violations... is a treaty provision in effect which requires notification of consul, without reference to a...

  6. 28 CFR 50.5 - Notification of Consular Officers upon the arrest of foreign nationals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... demand or request of the arrested foreign national. On the other hand, some of the treaties require... nationals of foreign countries are arrested by officers of this Department on charges of criminal violations... is a treaty provision in effect which requires notification of consul, without reference to a...

  7. 28 CFR 50.5 - Notification of Consular Officers upon the arrest of foreign nationals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... demand or request of the arrested foreign national. On the other hand, some of the treaties require... nationals of foreign countries are arrested by officers of this Department on charges of criminal violations... is a treaty provision in effect which requires notification of consul, without reference to a...

  8. 14 CFR 1203b.104 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1203b.104 Section 1203b.104 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SECURITY PROGRAMS; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.104...

  9. 14 CFR 1203b.104 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1203b.104 Section 1203b.104 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SECURITY PROGRAMS; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.104...

  10. 14 CFR 1203b.104 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1203b.104 Section 1203b.104 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SECURITY PROGRAMS; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.104...

  11. 14 CFR 1203b.104 - Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exercise of arrest authority-general guidelines. 1203b.104 Section 1203b.104 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SECURITY PROGRAMS; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.104...

  12. Programmed cell cycle arrest is required for infection of corn plants by the fungus Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Castanheira, Sónia; Mielnichuk, Natalia; Pérez-Martín, José

    2014-12-01

    Ustilago maydis is a plant pathogen that requires a specific structure called infective filament to penetrate the plant tissue. Although able to grow, this filament is cell cycle arrested on the plant surface. This cell cycle arrest is released once the filament penetrates the plant tissue. The reasons and mechanisms for this cell cycle arrest are unknown. Here, we have tried to address these questions. We reached three conclusions from our studies. First, the observed cell cycle arrest is the result of the cooperation of at least two distinct mechanisms: one involving the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) cascade; and the other relying on the transcriptional downregulation of Hsl1, a kinase that modulates the G2/M transition. Second, a sustained cell cycle arrest during the infective filament step is necessary for the virulence in U. maydis, as a strain unable to arrest the cell cycle was severely impaired in its ability to infect corn plants. Third, production of the appressorium, a structure required for plant penetration, is incompatible with an active cell cycle. The inability to infect plants by strains defective in cell cycle arrest seems to be caused by their failure to induce the appressorium formation process. In summary, our findings uncover genetic circuits to arrest the cell cycle during the growth of this fungus on the plant surface, thus allowing the penetration into plant tissue. PMID:25411209

  13. 30 CFR 77.508 - Lightning arresters, ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lightning arresters, ungrounded and exposed... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.508 Lightning... conductors and telephone wires shall be equipped with suitable lightning arresters which are...

  14. 30 CFR 77.508 - Lightning arresters, ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lightning arresters, ungrounded and exposed... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.508 Lightning... conductors and telephone wires shall be equipped with suitable lightning arresters which are...

  15. 30 CFR 77.508 - Lightning arresters, ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lightning arresters, ungrounded and exposed... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.508 Lightning... conductors and telephone wires shall be equipped with suitable lightning arresters which are...

  16. The science of reperfusion injury post cardiac arrest--Implications for emergency nurses.

    PubMed

    Baker, Edward; Lee, Geraldine

    2016-01-01

    Survival following cardiac arrest in the developed world remains below 10%. In those who survive the initial cardiac arrest, prognosis remains poor due to the onset of multi-organ failure with both significant cardiac and neurological dysfunction. Nurses have demonstrated good understanding of cardiac arrest/post arrest guidelines and have good technical skills but deficits remain in their understanding of pathophysiological processes involved in post cardiac arrest syndromes. This article aims to provide an overview of these pathophysiological processes involved in the post cardiac arrest phase, potential treatment options and the nursing interventions that may be required within the emergency department setting. This article will focus emergency nurses to become more involved in patient management at this critical phase of treatment and highlight potential early signs of deterioration. Although return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) is crucial in the process of recovery from cardiac arrest, it is only the first of many complex stages. Given the complexity of post cardiac arrest syndrome and its impact on the patient, healthcare professionals need to understand the cellular changes associated with reperfusion injuries in order to improve outcomes. It is only through effective nursing care and medical management that improved outcomes will become more common in the future. PMID:26385262

  17. [Thoracic lavage and open cardiac massage as treatment of hypothermic cardiac arrest--case report].

    PubMed

    Koponen, Timo; Vänni, Ville; Kettunen, Minna; Reinikainen, Matti; Hakala, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass is the treatment of choice for a severely hypothermic patient with cardiac arrest. However, the treatment is not always available. We describe a successful three-and-a-half hour resuscitation of a hypothermic cardiac arrest patient with manual chest compressions followed by open cardiac massage and rewarming with thoracic lavage. PMID:27188092

  18. 30 CFR 77.508 - Lightning arresters, ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lightning arresters, ungrounded and exposed... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.508 Lightning... conductors and telephone wires shall be equipped with suitable lightning arresters which are...

  19. 30 CFR 77.508 - Lightning arresters, ungrounded and exposed power conductors and telephone wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lightning arresters, ungrounded and exposed... AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 77.508 Lightning... conductors and telephone wires shall be equipped with suitable lightning arresters which are...

  20. Postdicting Arrests for Proactive and Reactive Aggression with the PICTS Proactive and Reactive Composite Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Glenn D.; Frederick, Alice A.; Schlauch, Charles

    2007-01-01

    The criminal arrest histories of 262 medium-security male inmates were correlated with the Proactive (P) and Reactive (R) composite scales of the Psychological Inventory of Criminal Thinking Styles (PICTS). As predicted, only scores on the P scale correlated significantly with prior arrests for proactive aggression (robbery, burglary) and only…

  1. Program Completion and Re-Arrest in a Batterer Intervention System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Larry W.; Stoops, Charles; Call, Christine; Flett, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors examine the effects of batterer intervention program (BIP) completion on domestic violence re-arrest in an urban system of 30 BIPs with a common set of state standards, common program completion criteria, and centralized criminal justice supervision. Method: 899 men arrested for domestic violence were assessed and completed…

  2. 46 CFR 30.10-63 - Spark arrester-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spark arrester-TB/ALL. 30.10-63 Section 30.10-63...-63 Spark arrester—TB/ALL. The term spark arrester means any device, assembly, or method of a... sparks in exhaust pipes from internal combustion engines....

  3. A Summary and Analysis of Warrantless Arrest Statutes for Domestic Violence in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeoli, April M.; Norris, Alexis; Brenner, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have enacted statutes that allow police officers to make warrantless arrests for domestic violence given probable cause; however, state laws differ from one another in multiple, important ways. Research on domestic violence warrantless arrest laws rarely describe them as anything…

  4. History of Juvenile Arrests and Vocational Career Outcomes for At-Risk Young Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiesner, Margit; Kim, Hyoun K.; Capaldi, Deborah M.

    2010-01-01

    This study uses longitudinal data from the Oregon Youth Study (OYS) to examine prospective effects of juvenile arrests and of early versus late onset of juvenile offending on two labor market outcomes by age 29 or 30 years. It was expected that those with more juvenile arrests and those with an early onset of offending would show poorer outcomes…

  5. 14 CFR 1203b.105 - Use of non-deadly physical force when making an arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of non-deadly physical force when... ADMINISTRATION SECURITY PROGRAMS; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.105 Use of non-deadly physical force when making an arrest. When a security force officer has the right...

  6. 14 CFR 1203b.105 - Use of non-deadly physical force when making an arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Use of non-deadly physical force when making... ADMINISTRATION SECURITY PROGRAMS; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.105 Use of non-deadly physical force when making an arrest. When a security force officer has the right...

  7. 10 CFR 1047.6 - Use of physical force when making an arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Use of physical force when making an arrest. 1047.6 Section 1047.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.6 Use of physical force when making an...

  8. 10 CFR 1047.6 - Use of physical force when making an arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of physical force when making an arrest. 1047.6 Section 1047.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.6 Use of physical force when making an...

  9. 10 CFR 1047.6 - Use of physical force when making an arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of physical force when making an arrest. 1047.6 Section 1047.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.6 Use of physical force when making an...

  10. 14 CFR 1203b.105 - Use of non-deadly physical force when making an arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of non-deadly physical force when... ADMINISTRATION SECURITY PROGRAMS; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.105 Use of non-deadly physical force when making an arrest. When a security force officer has the right...

  11. 10 CFR 1047.6 - Use of physical force when making an arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of physical force when making an arrest. 1047.6 Section 1047.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.6 Use of physical force when making an...

  12. 14 CFR 1203b.105 - Use of non-deadly physical force when making an arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of non-deadly physical force when... ADMINISTRATION SECURITY PROGRAMS; ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY NASA SECURITY FORCE PERSONNEL § 1203b.105 Use of non-deadly physical force when making an arrest. When a security force officer has the right...

  13. 10 CFR 1047.6 - Use of physical force when making an arrest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Use of physical force when making an arrest. 1047.6 Section 1047.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) LIMITED ARREST AUTHORITY AND USE OF FORCE BY PROTECTIVE FORCE OFFICERS General Provisions § 1047.6 Use of physical force when making an...

  14. Same-Sex and Race-Based Disparities in Statutory Rape Arrests.

    PubMed

    Chaffin, Mark; Chenoweth, Stephanie; Letourneau, Elizabeth J

    2016-01-01

    This study tests a liberation hypothesis for statutory rape incidents, specifically that there may be same-sex and race/ethnicity arrest disparities among statutory rape incidents and that these will be greater among statutory rape than among forcible sex crime incidents. 26,726 reported incidents of statutory rape as defined under state statutes and 96,474 forcible sex crime incidents were extracted from National Incident-Based Reporting System data sets. Arrest outcomes were tested using multilevel modeling. Same-sex statutory rape pairings were rare but had much higher arrest odds. A victim-offender romantic relationship amplified arrest odds for same-sex pairings, but damped arrest odds for male-on-female pairings. Same-sex disparities were larger among statutory than among forcible incidents. Female-on-male incidents had uniformly lower arrest odds. Race/ethnicity effects were smaller than gender effects and more complexly patterned. The findings support the liberation hypothesis for same-sex statutory rape arrest disparities, particularly among same-sex romantic pairings. Support for race/ethnicity-based arrest disparities was limited and mixed. PMID:25416040

  15. 39 CFR 233.1 - Arrest and investigative powers of Postal Inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Arrest and investigative powers of Postal Inspectors. 233.1 Section 233.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION INSPECTION SERVICE AUTHORITY § 233.1 Arrest and investigative powers of Postal Inspectors. (a)...

  16. 39 CFR 233.1 - Arrest and investigative powers of Postal Inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Arrest and investigative powers of Postal Inspectors. 233.1 Section 233.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION INSPECTION SERVICE AUTHORITY § 233.1 Arrest and investigative powers of Postal Inspectors. (a)...

  17. 39 CFR 233.1 - Arrest and investigative powers of Postal Inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Arrest and investigative powers of Postal Inspectors. 233.1 Section 233.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION INSPECTION SERVICE AUTHORITY § 233.1 Arrest and investigative powers of Postal Inspectors. (a)...

  18. 39 CFR 233.1 - Arrest and investigative powers of Postal Inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Arrest and investigative powers of Postal Inspectors. 233.1 Section 233.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION INSPECTION SERVICE AUTHORITY § 233.1 Arrest and investigative powers of Postal Inspectors. (a)...

  19. Gender Differences in Drug Use, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, and Risky Sexual Behavior among Arrested Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Belenko, Steven; Childs, Kristina; Greenbaum, Paul E.; Wareham, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Data was collected on arrested youths processed at a centralized intake facility, including youths released back to the community and those placed in secure detention. This article reports the results of a test of a structural model involving newly arrested male and female youths' sexually transmitted diseases (STD) test results, urine analysis…

  20. 46 CFR 30.10-23 - Flame arrester-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flame arrester-TB/ALL. 30.10-23 Section 30.10-23 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-23 Flame arrester—TB/ALL. The term flame arrester means any device or assembly of a cellular,...

  1. 46 CFR 30.10-63 - Spark arrester-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spark arrester-TB/ALL. 30.10-63 Section 30.10-63 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-63 Spark arrester—TB/ALL. The term spark arrester means any device, assembly, or method of...

  2. 46 CFR 32.20-10 - Flame arresters-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flame arresters-TB/ALL. 32.20-10 Section 32.20-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Equipment Installations § 32.20-10 Flame arresters—TB/ALL. Flame arresters must be of a type...

  3. 46 CFR 30.10-23 - Flame arrester-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flame arrester-TB/ALL. 30.10-23 Section 30.10-23 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-23 Flame arrester—TB/ALL. The term flame arrester means any device or assembly of a cellular,...

  4. 46 CFR 32.20-10 - Flame arresters-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flame arresters-TB/ALL. 32.20-10 Section 32.20-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Equipment Installations § 32.20-10 Flame arresters—TB/ALL. Flame arresters must be of a type...

  5. 39 CFR 233.1 - Arrest and investigative powers of Postal Inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arrest and investigative powers of Postal Inspectors. 233.1 Section 233.1 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION INSPECTION SERVICE AUTHORITY § 233.1 Arrest and investigative powers of Postal Inspectors. (a) Authorization. Postal Inspectors are authorized...

  6. Arrest and Conviction Histories before, during and after Participation in a Substance Abuse Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Elizabeth D.

    1978-01-01

    Arrest and conviction records were examined for clients who had participated in a methadone substance abuse program to determine the differences in criminal activity prior to entering the program, while in the program, and after program termination. Decreasing linear trends were found in amounts of misdemeanor convictions, felony arrests, and…

  7. Neuropsychological, Academic, and Adaptive Functioning in Children Who Survive In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Resuscitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Robin D.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study of 25 children, ages 2-15, who survived a cardiac arrest while hospitalized, found that a majority of subjects exhibited low-average to deficient levels of performance on neuropsychologic, achievement, and adaptive behavior measures. Duration of cardiac arrest and a medical risk score were significantly correlated with decreased…

  8. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and post-cardiac arrest brain injury].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    One of the most important topics in the field of resuscitation at present is the drafting of the 2015 version of the Consensus on Science and Treatment Recommendation (CoSTR) by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation. The Japan Resuscitation Council is preparing its 2015 Guideline based on this CoSTR and plans to release it in October 2015. A critical change in the upcoming CoSTR is the adoption of the GRADE system. The new Guideline incorporating the GRADE system will surely be more scientific than the previous Guideline issued in 2010. Meanwhile, an important finding appeared in a report from Nielsen et al.: hypothermia at a targeted temperature of 33 degrees C did not confer a benefit versus 36 degrees in unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause. PMID:26915250

  9. Dynamic arrest of nematic liquid-crystal colloid networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Lu; Hwang, Jeoung-Yeon; Kim, Chanjoong

    2013-10-01

    We report interesting self-assembly structures of nematic liquid-crystal colloid (NLCC) networks, which are arrested during cooling from the isotropic temperature to room temperature. The NLCC is composed of sterically stabilized colloidal particles and a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) with nematic-isotropic transition temperature (TNI) that is much higher than those of previously studied 4-Cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl and N-(4-Methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline. We find that the structure of NLCCs depends on TNI, cooling rates, and boundary conditions, varying from cellular network to hierarchical fern structures in different length scales. Our time-lapse study shows that the transition from the cellular network to the fern structure directly corresponds to the transition from a spinodal demixing to a nucleation-and-growth mechanism.

  10. A Unique Case of Cardiac Arrest following K2 Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Wannenburg, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) accounts for up to 450,000 deaths every year in the United States (Zipes et al. (2006)). Most cases of sudden cardiac death occur in subjects with no prior history of heart disease (Myerburg et al. (1998)). The incidence of sudden death in a general population has been shown to increase contemporaneously with substance abuse (Phillips et al. (1999)). The causative association of sudden death with cocaine, methadone, and volatile agents is well established (Adgey et al. (1995) and Isner et al. (1986)). We describe a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest temporally related to abuse of the synthetic cannabinoid street drug known as K2. To our knowledge, there are no previously documented cases of sudden cardiac death associated with synthetic cannabinoids although they have been linked to myocardial infarction in teenagers despite normal coronary angiography (Mir et al. (2011)). PMID:24963415

  11. A subcortical inhibitory signal for behavioral arrest in the thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Dugué, Guillaume P.; Bokor, Hajnalka; Rousseau, Charly V.; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Havas, László; Hangya, Balázs; Wildner, Hendrik; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Acsády, László

    2016-01-01

    Organization of behavior requires rapid coordination of brainstem and forebrain activity. The exact mechanisms of effective communication between these regions are presently unclear. The intralaminar thalamus (IL) probably serves as a central hub in this circuit by connecting the critical brainstem and forebrain areas. Here we found that GABAergic/glycinergic fibers ascending from the pontine reticular formation (PRF) of the brainstem evoke fast and reliable inhibition in the IL thalamus via large, multisynaptic terminals. This inhibition was fine-tuned through heterogeneous GABAergic/glycinergic receptor ratios expressed at individual synapses. Optogenetic activation of PRF axons in the IL of freely moving mice led to behavioral arrest and transient interruption of awake cortical activity. An afferent system with comparable morphological features was also found in the human IL. These data reveal an evolutionarily conserved ascending system which gates forebrain activity through fast and powerful synaptic inhibition of the IL thalamus. PMID:25706472

  12. Anaphylactic shock and cardiac arrest caused by thiamine infusion.

    PubMed

    Juel, Jacob; Pareek, Manan; Langfrits, Christian Sigvald; Jensen, Svend Eggert

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral thiamine has a very high safety profile. The most common adverse effect is local irritation; however, anaphylactic or anaphylactoid reactions may occur, mostly related to intravenous administration. We describe a 44-year-old man, a chronic alcoholic, who was admitted with alcohol intoxication and developed cardiac arrest due to anaphylactic shock following intravenous thiamine infusion. The patient was successfully resuscitated after 15 min and repeated epinephrine administrations. He was discharged in good health after 14 days. This case report emphasises both the importance of recognising the symptoms of anaphylaxis and the fact that facilities for treating anaphylaxis and cardiopulmonary resuscitation should be available when thiamine or for that matter, any drug is given in-hospital. PMID:23853017

  13. Cardiopulmonary arrest induced by anaphylactoid reaction with contrast media.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Iwao; Hori, Shingo; Funabiki, Tomohiro; Sekine, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Fujishima, Seitaro; Aoki, Katsunori; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Aikawa, Naoki

    2002-05-01

    Anaphylactoid reactions to iodinated contrast media can cause life-threatening events and even death. A 44-year-old woman presented with cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) immediately following the administration of nonionic iodinated contrast media for an intravenous pyelography. Her cardiac rhythm during CPA was asystole. She was successfully resuscitated by the radiologists supported by paged emergency physicians using the prompt intravenous administration of 1 mg of epinephrine. Neither laryngeal edema nor bronchial spasm was observed during the course of treatment, and she was discharged on the 4th day without any complications. The patient did not have a history of allergy, but had experienced a myocardial infarction and aortitis. She had undergone 11 angiographies and had been taking a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist. Planned emergency medical backup is advisable to ensure resuscitation in the event of an anaphylactoid reaction to the use of contrast media in-hospital settings. PMID:12009227

  14. Dynamical Arrest, Structural Disorder, and Optimization of Organic Photovoltaic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Ian; Dmitry, Matyushov

    2014-09-11

    This project describes fundamental experimental and theoretical work that relates to charge separation and migration in the solid, heterogeneous or aggregated state. Marcus theory assumes a system in equilibrium with all possible solvent (dipolar) configurations, with rapid interconversion among these on the ET timescale. This project has addressed the more general situation where the medium is at least partially frozen on the ET timescale, i.e. under conditions of dynamical arrest. The approach combined theory and experiment and includes: (1) Computer simulations of model systems, (2) Development of analytical procedures consistent with computer experiment and (3) Experimental studies and testing of the formal theories on this data. Electron transfer processes are unique as a consequence of the close connection between kinetics, spectroscopy and theory, which is an essential component of this work.

  15. Sports Induced Cardiac Arrest: A Case of Missed Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Parshotam L; Nain, Prabhdeep Singh

    2015-01-01

    Exercise induced rhabdomyolysis although uncommon, is well known in strenuous and exhaustive sports like marathons, cycling and wrestlers. But it is not known in Kabaddi players. We report a case of nearly fatal rhabdomyolysis which was missed during early resuscitation in emergency room and lead to cardiac arrest due to catastrophic metabolic acidosis and severe -hyperkalemia. After high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation and return of spontaneous rhythm, emergency resuscitative exploratory laparotomy was performed for suspected bladder injury which was negative. He had remarkable recovery over 24 h following diagnosis and aggressive supportive management including peritoneal dialysis. Heat stroke and rhabdomyolysis should be suspected early in players playing strenuous sports in tropical countries even during winter. High degree of suspicion and early aggressive general support is the key to success for unusual clinical presentation of any such clinical entity. PMID:26500986

  16. Cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Fuse, Takashi; Nakada, Taka-aki; Taniguchi, Masashi; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic disease caused by a deficiency of functional C1 esterase inhibitor that causes swelling attacks in various body tissues. We hereby report a case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to airway obstruction in HAE. Cutaneous swelling and abdominal pain attacks caused by gastrointestinal wall swelling are common symptoms in HAE, whereas laryngeal swelling is rare. Emergency physicians may have few chances to experience cases of life-threatening laryngeal edema resulting in a delay from symptom onset to the diagnosis of HAE. Hereditary angioedema is diagnosed by performing complement blood tests. Because safe and effective treatment options are available for the life-threatening swellings in HAE, the diagnosis potentially reduces the risk of asphyxiation in patients and their blood relatives. PMID:25913082

  17. Developmental arrest in grass shrimp embryos exposed to selected toxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.E.H.

    1998-12-31

    Excised embryos of the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) were exposed to single pulse concentrations of selected pollutants for 4 days. The following toxicity endpoints were monitored: rate of embryonic development, embryo mortality, and types of embryo malformation. Each endpoint exhibited concentration--response relationships which were modified by the embryonic age at which exposure commenced. Developmental retardation of up to 3 days was effected by phenol at 0.01% (V/V) and complete developmental arrest occurred at 0.05% and 0.1% (V/V). Similarly for methylene chloride, developmental retardation of 1003 days were observed at 0.1% (V/V) depending on the age of the embryos at the start of the tests. The morphological abnormalities of the embryos are described. The ecological significance of these findings and implications for the development of short-term toxicity tests using grass shrimp embryos are discussed.

  18. Sports Induced Cardiac Arrest: A Case of Missed Rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Parshotam L; Luthra, Neeru; Nain, Prabhdeep Singh

    2015-09-01

    Exercise induced rhabdomyolysis although uncommon, is well known in strenuous and exhaustive sports like marathons, cycling and wrestlers. But it is not known in Kabaddi players. We report a case of nearly fatal rhabdomyolysis which was missed during early resuscitation in emergency room and lead to cardiac arrest due to catastrophic metabolic acidosis and severe -hyperkalemia. After high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation and return of spontaneous rhythm, emergency resuscitative exploratory laparotomy was performed for suspected bladder injury which was negative. He had remarkable recovery over 24 h following diagnosis and aggressive supportive management including peritoneal dialysis. Heat stroke and rhabdomyolysis should be suspected early in players playing strenuous sports in tropical countries even during winter. High degree of suspicion and early aggressive general support is the key to success for unusual clinical presentation of any such clinical entity. PMID:26500986

  19. Neonatal Cardio-pulmonary Arrest: Emergency Catheterization of Umbilical Vein

    PubMed Central

    Paes, Bosco A.; Blatz, Susan; Kraftcheck, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    In an emergency, the physician responsible for neonatal care must be skilled in umbilical catheterization. Several drugs can be given through an endotracheal tube, but some require intravenous administration. The umbilical vein is a better route of administration than peripheral veins because it is easily located and can be entered readily. It allows immediate access to the central circulation, enhancing drug distribution. The authors outline the procedure in a step-by-step description. This pictorial article can be used as a handy reference by physicians needing to administer fluids and drugs during cardio-pulmonary arrest in neonates. Imagesp1136-ap1136-bp1136-cp1136-dp1137-ap1137-bp1137-cp1137-dp1137-ep1138-ap1138-bp1138-cp1138-dp1139-ap1139-bp1139-cp1139-dp1140-ap1140-bp1140-cp1140-d PMID:21233982

  20. The UK Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Outcome (OHCAO) project

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Gavin D; Brace-McDonnell, Samantha J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Reducing premature death is a key priority for the UK National Health Service (NHS). NHS Ambulance services treat approximately 30 000 cases of suspected cardiac arrest each year but survival rates vary. The British Heart Foundation and Resuscitation Council (UK) have funded a structured research programme—the Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Outcomes (OHCAO) programme. The aim of the project is to establish the epidemiology and outcome of OHCA, explore sources of variation in outcome and establish the feasibility of setting up a national OHCA registry. Methods and analysis This is a prospective observational study set in UK NHS Ambulance Services. The target population will be adults and children sustaining an OHCA who are attended by an NHS ambulance emergency response and where resuscitation is attempted. The data collected will be characterised broadly as system characteristics, emergency medical services (EMS) dispatch characteristics, patient characteristics and EMS process variables. The main outcome variables of interest will be return of spontaneous circulation and medium—long-term survival (30 days to 10-year survival). Ethics and dissemination Ethics committee permissions were gained and the study also has received approval from the Confidentiality Advisory Group Ethics and Confidentiality committee which provides authorisation to lawfully hold identifiable data on patients without their consent. To identify the key characteristics contributing to better outcomes in some ambulance services, reliable and reproducible systems need to be established for collecting data on OHCA in the UK. Reports generated from the registry will focus on data completeness, timeliness and quality. Subsequent reports will summarise demographic, patient, process and outcome variables with aim of improving patient care through focus quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26428332

  1. Arrest as a General Property of the Supercooled Liquid State.

    PubMed

    Sluyters, Jan H; Sluyters-Rehbach, Margaretha

    2016-04-21

    Owing to the universal presence of intermolecular interactions, it has to be expected that at some well-defined lower temperature a liquid loses its dynamic properties like fluidity and self-diffusion. As a sequel to two earlier papers on the discovery of such an arrest temperature T0 for supercooled water at 243 K, where also the coexisting vapor pressure was found to become zero, in this paper a further study is undertaken of the behavior of a selection of other liquids. At first, two simple equations of state (van der Waals and virial) are shown in principle to predict a zero vapor pressure at a finite temperature. The interaction parameters B (second virial coefficient) and μJT (Joule-Thomson coefficient) of the vapor are found to become virtually infinite at a temperature T0,B, with a value equal or close to the T0 derived from the liquid properties. Just as earlier found for water, the latter is obtained by extrapolation of several available dynamic and equilibrium data, which should produce an intersection with the temperature axis at the same T0 value. With the exception of molten salts and liquid pure metals, this condition appears to be fulfilled quite accurately. Thus, the temperature of arrest is a general phenomenon for supercooled liquids. As an illustration, it is shown how the PVT diagram of carbon dioxide can be extended into the supercooled temperature region. It is argued that T0 is the temperature below which the Boltzmann energy, kT, is lower than the minimal energy needed for a molecule to break the interactions with its surrounding molecules. We propose to name this minimal energy, kT0, the multimolecular potential of the liquid object. The relationship of the liquid multimolecular potential with the pair potential, ε, of the molecular species is established for various examples and appears to be a proportionality with ε ≈ 2kT0. PMID:27070201

  2. Dentifrices, mouthwashes, and remineralization/caries arrestment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zero, Domenick T

    2006-01-01

    While our knowledge of the dental caries process and its prevention has greatly advanced over the past fifty years, it is fair to state that the management of this disease at the level of the individual patient remains largely empirical. Recommendations for fluoride use by patients at different levels of caries risk are mainly based on the adage that more is better. There is a general understanding that the fluoride compound, concentration, frequency of use, duration of exposure, and method of delivery can influence fluoride efficacy. Two important factors are (1) the initial interaction of relatively high concentrations of fluoride with the tooth surface and plaque during application and (2) the retention of fluoride in oral fluids after application. Fluoride dentifrices remain the most widely used method of delivering topical fluoride. The efficacy of this approach in preventing dental caries is beyond dispute. However, the vast majority of currently marketed dentifrice products have not been clinically tested and have met only the minimal requirements of the FDA monograph using mainly laboratory testing and animal caries testing. Daily use of fluoride dental rinses as an adjunct to fluoride dentifrice has been shown to be clinically effective as has biweekly use of higher concentration fluoride rinses. The use of remineralizing agents (other than fluoride), directed at reversing or arresting non-cavitated lesions, remains a promising yet largely unproven strategy. High fluoride concentration compounds, e.g., AgF, Ag(NH3)2F, to arrest more advanced carious lesions with and without prior removal of carious tissue are being used in several countries as part of the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) approach. Most of the recent innovations in oral care products have been directed toward making cosmetic marketing claims. There continues to be a need for innovation and collaboration with other scientific disciplines to fully understand and prevent dental caries

  3. Standardized EEG interpretation accurately predicts prognosis after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Andrea O.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Wesenberg Kjaer, Troels; Horn, Janneke; Ullén, Susann; Friberg, Hans; Nielsen, Niklas; Rosén, Ingmar; Åneman, Anders; Erlinge, David; Gasche, Yvan; Hassager, Christian; Hovdenes, Jan; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Kuiper, Michael; Pellis, Tommaso; Stammet, Pascal; Wanscher, Michael; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wise, Matt P.; Cronberg, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify reliable predictors of outcome in comatose patients after cardiac arrest using a single routine EEG and standardized interpretation according to the terminology proposed by the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society. Methods: In this cohort study, 4 EEG specialists, blinded to outcome, evaluated prospectively recorded EEGs in the Target Temperature Management trial (TTM trial) that randomized patients to 33°C vs 36°C. Routine EEG was performed in patients still comatose after rewarming. EEGs were classified into highly malignant (suppression, suppression with periodic discharges, burst-suppression), malignant (periodic or rhythmic patterns, pathological or nonreactive background), and benign EEG (absence of malignant features). Poor outcome was defined as best Cerebral Performance Category score 3–5 until 180 days. Results: Eight TTM sites randomized 202 patients. EEGs were recorded in 103 patients at a median 77 hours after cardiac arrest; 37% had a highly malignant EEG and all had a poor outcome (specificity 100%, sensitivity 50%). Any malignant EEG feature had a low specificity to predict poor prognosis (48%) but if 2 malignant EEG features were present specificity increased to 96% (p < 0.001). Specificity and sensitivity were not significantly affected by targeted temperature or sedation. A benign EEG was found in 1% of the patients with a poor outcome. Conclusions: Highly malignant EEG after rewarming reliably predicted poor outcome in half of patients without false predictions. An isolated finding of a single malignant feature did not predict poor outcome whereas a benign EEG was highly predictive of a good outcome. PMID:26865516

  4. Improving neurological outcome after cardiac arrest: Therapeutic hypothermia the best treatment

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Suchitra; Dhama, Satyavir S.; Kumar, Mohinder; Jain, Gaurav

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest, irrespective of its etiology, has a high mortality. This event is often associated with brain anoxia which frequently causes severe neurological damage and persistent vegetative state. Only one out of every six patients survives to discharge following in-hospital cardiac arrest, whereas only 2-9% of patients who experience out of hospital cardiac arrest survive to go home. Functional outcomes of survival are variable, but poor quality survival is common, with only 3-7% able to return to their previous level of functioning. Therapeutic hypothermia is an important tool for the treatment of post-anoxic coma after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. It has been shown to reduce mortality and has improved neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. Nevertheless, hypothermia is underused in critical care units. This manuscript aims to review the mechanism of hypothermia in cardiac arrest survivors and to propose a simple protocol, feasible to be implemented in any critical care unit. PMID:25885714

  5. Gender differences and risk of arrest among offenders with serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Becker, Marion A; Andel, Ross; Boaz, Timothy; Constantine, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Despite the increasing number of men and women with serious mental illness (SMI) incarcerated in America's jails, little research exists on the role gender may play in arrest among persons with SMI. This study examined correlates of arrests among offenders with SMI, specifically the role of gender. County criminal justice records, as well as county and statewide social service archival databases, were used to identify jail inmates with SMI in a large urban county in Florida. Of the 3,769 inmates identified, 41% were female. This study identified three distinct classes of male and female offenders within which persons had similar trajectories of arrests over the 4-year study period representing those with minimal, low, and high arrest rates. Findings suggest some important differences between women and men in risk factors for re-arrests. Attention to these factors may improve the ability to prevent future recidivism among men and women with SMI. PMID:20480246

  6. Patterns and Prevalence of Arrest in a Statewide Cohort of Mental Health Care Consumers

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, William H.; Roy-Bujnowski, Kristen M.; Grudzinskas, Albert J.; Clayfield, Jonathan C.; Banks, Steven M.; Wolff, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Objective Although criminal justice involvement among persons with severe mental illness is a much discussed topic, few large-scale studies systematically describe the patterns and prevalence of arrest in this population. This study examined rates, patterns, offenses, and sociodemographic correlates of arrest in a large cohort of mental health service recipients. Methods The arrest records of 13,816 individuals receiving services from the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health from 1991 to 1992 were examined over roughly a ten-year period. Bivariate relationships between sociodemographic factors and arrest were also examined. Results About 28 percent of the cohort experienced at least one arrest. The most common charges were crimes against public order followed by serious violent offenses and minor property crime. The number of arrests per individual ranged from one to 71. Five percent of arrestees (roughly 1.5 percent of the cohort) accounted for roughly 17 percent of arrests. The proportion of men arrested was double that of women. Persons 18 to 25 years of age had a 50 percent chance of at least one arrest. This rate declined with age but did so unevenly across offense types. Conclusions The likelihood of arrest appeared substantial among persons with severe mental illness, but the bulk of offending appeared concentrated in a small group of persons and among persons with sociodemographic features similar to those of offenders in the general population. Data such as these could provide a platform for designing jail diversion and other services to reduce both initial and repeat offending among persons with serious mental illness. PMID:17085611

  7. Post-resuscitation care following out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Girotra, Saket; Chan, Paul S; Bradley, Steven M

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in developed countries. Although a majority of cardiac arrest patients die during the acute event, a substantial proportion of cardiac arrest deaths occur in patients following successful resuscitation and can be attributed to the development of post-cardiac arrest syndrome. There is growing recognition that integrated post-resuscitation care, which encompasses targeted temperature management (TTM), early coronary angiography and comprehensive critical care, can improve patient outcomes. TTM has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome in patients who remain comatose especially following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias. Early coronary angiography and revascularisation if needed may also be beneficial during the post-resuscitation phase, based on data from observational studies. In addition, resuscitated patients usually require intensive care, which includes mechanical ventilator, haemodynamic support and close monitoring of blood gases, glucose, electrolytes, seizures and other disease-specific intervention. Efforts should be taken to avoid premature withdrawal of life-supporting treatment, especially in patients treated with TTM. Given that resources and personnel needed to provide high-quality post-resuscitation care may not exist at all hospitals, professional societies have recommended regionalisation of post-resuscitation care in specialised 'cardiac arrest centres' as a strategy to improve cardiac arrest outcomes. Finally, evidence for post-resuscitation care following in-hospital cardiac arrest is largely extrapolated from studies in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Future studies need to examine the effectiveness of different post-resuscitation strategies, such as TTM, in patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest. PMID:26385451

  8. Nuclear import, virion incorporation, and cell cycle arrest/differentiation are mediated by distinct functional domains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr.

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, S; Ayyavoo, V; Patel, M; Kieber-Emmons, T; Weiner, D B

    1997-01-01

    The vpr gene product of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a virion-associated protein that is essential for efficient viral replication in monocytes/macrophages. Vpr is primarily localized in the nucleus when expressed in the absence of other viral proteins. Vpr is packaged efficiently into viral particles through interactions with the p6 domain of the Gag precursor polyprotein p55gag. We developed a panel of expression vectors encoding Vpr molecules mutated in the amino-terminal helical domain, leucine-isoleucine (LR) domain, and carboxy-terminal domain to map the different functional domains and to define the interrelationships between virion incorporation, nuclear localization, cell cycle arrest, and differentiation functions of Vpr. We observed that substitution mutations in the N-terminal domain of Vpr impaired both nuclear localization and virion packaging, suggesting that the helical structure may play a vital role in modulating both of these biological properties. The LR domain was found to be involved in the nuclear localization of Vpr. In contrast, cell cycle arrest appears to be largely controlled by the C-terminal domain of Vpr. The LR and C-terminal domains do not appear to be essential for virion incorporation of Vpr. Interestingly, we found that two Vpr mutants harboring single amino acid substitutions (A30L and G75A) retained the ability to translocate to the nucleus but were impaired in the cell cycle arrest function. In contrast, mutation of Leu68 to Ser resulted in a protein that localizes in the cytoplasm while retaining the ability to arrest host cell proliferation. We speculate that the nuclear localization and cell cycle arrest functions of Vpr are not interrelated and that these functions are mediated by separable putative functional domains of Vpr. PMID:9261351

  9. Crack arrestability of ship hull steel plate in accidental conditions: Application of high arrestability endowed ultra fine-grain surface layer steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tadashi; Hagiwara, Yukito; Oshita, Shigeru; Inoue, Takehiro; Hashimoto, Kunifumi; Kuroiwa, Takashi; Tada, Masuo; Yajima, Hiroshi

    1996-12-01

    A new type steel plate with ultra fine-grained surface layers (SUF steel) has been developed to improve crack arrestability. The application of this new type steel makes it possible to prevent catastrophic brittle fracture accidents of ship hull structures in emergency conditions, such as in serious collisions or groundings. It will reduce further the risk of casualties and environmental pollutions, caused by accidents of large crude oil carriers (VLCCs). The authors have investigated the validity for the application of the new type steel with ultra-high crack arrestability. Both computer simulations for collision of two VLCCs and large-scale fracture testings for crack arrestability have been carried out to study the accidental cases. The simulation results suggest that a collision generates a significant amount of plastic strain damage for the hull plate around a struck part. For example, the sheer strake plate near the struck part suffers 5 to 10% of plastic strain, before an inner-hull ruptures. Therefore, the effect of plastic strain (10% level) on crack arrestability of steel plates (the SUF plate and a conventional TMCP plate) was examined by standard ESSO tests, ultra wide-plate duplex ESSO tests, and sheer strake model tests. The test results are as follows: (1) Plastic strain deteriorates crack arrestability of steel plates. (2) Sufficient crack arrestability at 0 deg. C cannot be expected in the conventional TMCP steel plate plastically strained by about 10%. (3) The SUF plate maintains high crack arrestability even after introducing 10% plastic strain, at design temperature of 0 deg. C.

  10. Arrest Decisions as Precludes To? An Evaluation of Policy Related Research. Volume I: Administrative Summary and Training Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neithercutt, M. G.; And Others

    The document is the first part of a study conducted to evaluate policy-related research on police arrest discretion as an alternative solution to arrest. It presents the administrative summary of the Arrest Decisions as Preludes To? (ADAPT) project and contains scripts intended for use by police departments as a staff training device. The…

  11. Is extracorporeal rewarming indicated in avalanche victims with unwitnessed hypothermic cardiorespiratory arrest?

    PubMed

    Mair, Peter; Brugger, Hermann; Mair, Birgit; Moroder, Luca; Ruttmann, Elfriede

    2014-12-01

    International guidelines recommend using extracorporeal rewarming in all hypothermic avalanche victims with prolonged cardiac arrest if they have patent airways and a plasma potassium level≤12 mmol/L. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcome data to determine if available experience with extracorporeal rewarming of avalanche victims supports this recommendation. At Innsbruck Medical University Hospital, 28 patients with hypothermic cardiac arrest following an avalanche accident were resuscitated using extracorporeal circulation. Of these patients, 25 were extricated from the snow masses with no vital signs and did not survive to hospital discharge. Three patients had witnessed cardiac arrest after extrication and a core temperature of 21.7°C, 22°C, and 24.0°C, two of whom survived long-term with full neurological recovery. A search of the literature revealed only one asystolic avalanche victim with unwitnessed hypothermic cardiac arrest (core temperature 19°C) surviving long-term. All other avalanche victims in the medical literature surviving prolonged hypothermic cardiac arrest suffered witnessed arrest after extrication with a core temperature below 24°C. Our results suggest that prognosis of hypothermic avalanche victims with unwitnessed asystolic cardiac arrest and a core temperature>24°C is extremely poor. Available outcome data do not support the use of extracorporeal rewarming in these patients. PMID:25531463

  12. Histopathology of the pulp of primary molars with active and arrested dentinal caries.

    PubMed

    Di Nicolo, R; Guedes-Pinto, A C; Carvalho, Y R

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the histological appearance of the pulp of human primary molars with active and arrested lesions. The sample consisted of 36 primary molars (18 with active lesions and 18 with arrested lesions) extracted from 35 children between 5 to 9 years of age. The histological diagnosis was classified in normal pulp, transitional stage, partial pulpitis, total pulpitis and total necrosis, and then subdivided in three subgroups: treatable, untreatable and questionable. Results showed that normal pulp or transitional stage (treatable category) was diagnosed in 50% of teeth with arrested lesions, compared to 11.1% of teeth with active lesions. Partial pulpitis (questionable category) was present in 38.8% with arrested lesions compared to 22.2% with active lesions. Total pulpitis and total necrosis (untreatable category) was diagnosed in 11.2% with arrested lesions compared to 66.7% with active lesions. The observed frequencies of histological categories between both groups were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Histologically, pulp reaction under active and arrested lesions in primary molars revealed the formation of a basophilic calcio-traumatic line at the junction of the primary and reparative dentin, formation of reparative dentin and a regular odontoblastic layer in 60% of the cases. Results indicated that the type of lesion (active or arrested) is a good indicator of the histological status of the pulp. PMID:11314352

  13. Gender as a Moderator in Predicting Re-arrest Among Treated Drug-Involved Offenders

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y.; Knight, K.; Joe, G.W.; Rowan, G.A.; Lehman, W. E.K.; Flynn, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of the current study is to explore gender differences on the relationships of pre-treatment risk factors (i.e., substance use severity and criminal history) and psychosocial functioning (i.e., decision making, risk taking, self-esteem, social support, and peer support) with time to re-arrest following termination from prison. With gender as a moderator variable, survival analysis was used to model time to re-arrest in terms of pre-treatment risk factors and psychosocial functioning. The sample consisted of 697 participants (384 males and 313 females) who were admitted to four prison-based substance abuse treatment programs. Female inmates experienced a longer time to re-arrest than male inmates. Better decision making and more peer support were associated with lower levels of re-arrest for males. Males with higher self-esteem were more likely to be re-arrested than their counterparts. Females with more self-reported criminal involvements had a higher rate of re-arrest than those with less criminal involvement. In contrast to males, females with relatively high self-reported self-esteem had a lower rate of re-arrest than their counterparts. Clinical implications include the importance of enhancing decision-making ability and peer support for males and self-esteem for females. PMID:25216813

  14. G1/S Cell Cycle Arrest Provides Anoikis Resistance through Erk-Mediated Bim Suppression†

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Nicole L.; Reginato, Maurico J.; Paulus, Jessica K.; Sgroi, Dennis C.; LaBaer, Joshua; Brugge, Joan S.

    2005-01-01

    Proper attachment to the extracellular matrix is essential for cell survival. Detachment from the extracellular matrix results in an apoptotic process termed anoikis. Anoikis induction in MCF-10A mammary epithelial cells is due not only to loss of survival signals following integrin disengagement, but also to consequent downregulation of epidermal growth factor (EGFR) and loss of EGFR-induced survival signals. Here we demonstrate that G1/S arrest by overexpression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p16INK4a, p21Cip1, or p27Kip1 or by treatment with mimosine or aphidicolin confers anoikis resistance in MCF-10A cells. G1/S arrest-mediated anoikis resistance involves suppression of the BH3-only protein Bim. Furthermore, in G1/S-arrested cells, Erk phosphorylation is maintained in suspension and is necessary for Bim suppression. Following G1/S arrest, known proteins upstream of Erk, including Raf and Mek, are not activated. However, retained Erk activation under conditions in which Raf and Mek activation is lost is observed, suggesting that G1/S arrest acts at the level of Erk dephosphorylation. Thus, anoikis resistance by G1/S arrest is mediated by a mechanism involving Bim suppression through maintenance of Erk activation. These results provide a novel link between cell cycle arrest and survival, and this mechanism could contribute to the survival of nonreplicating, dormant tumor cells that avert apoptosis during early stages of metastasis. PMID:15923641

  15. Early Recognition of Foreign Body Aspiration as the Cause of Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Talib Hashmi, Hafiz Rizwan; Khaja, Misbahuddin

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body aspiration (FBA) is uncommon in the adult population but can be a life-threatening condition. Clinical manifestations vary according to the degree of airway obstruction, and, in some cases, making the correct diagnosis requires a high level of clinical suspicion combined with a detailed history and exam. Sudden cardiac arrest after FBA may occur secondary to asphyxiation. We present a 48-year-old male with no history of cardiac disease brought to the emergency department after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The patient was resuscitated after 15 minutes of cardiac arrest. He was initially managed with therapeutic hypothermia (TH). Subsequent history suggested FBA as a possible etiology of the cardiac arrest, and fiberoptic bronchoscopy demonstrated a piece of meat and bone lodged in the left main stem bronchus. The foreign body was removed with the bronchoscope and the patient clinically improved with full neurological recovery. Therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest due to asphyxia has been reported to have high mortality and poor neurological outcomes. This case highlights the importance of early identification of FBA causing cardiac arrest, and we report a positive neurological outcome for postresuscitation therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest due to asphyxia. PMID:27006837

  16. Hypothermic cardiac arrest: an 11 year review of ED management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; McVaney, K

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the emergency department (ED) management of hypothermic cardiac arrest and its outcome. The medical records of all patients with hypothermic cardiac arrest treated in the ED from January 1, 1988 to January 31, 1999 were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included initial body temperature, serum potassium, methods of rewarming, return of perfusing rhythm, and morbidity and mortality. Data were analyzed by descriptive methods. Eleven patients were treated in the ED resuscitation room for hypothermic cardiac arrest. Six patients were found in cardiac arrest in the field, one patient arrested during transport, and four patients arrested after ED arrival. The average initial temperature was 79.1 degrees F (range 69.0 degrees F to 86.7 degrees F). Seven patients received an ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and warm mediastinal irrigation. Four patients had airway management in the ED and then direct transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass rewarming. Three of the seven patients who received an ED thoracotomy subsequently went to intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming. Five of the seven (71.4%) patients who received an ED thoracotomy survived, versus none of the four patients (0%) who went directly to intraoperative cardiac bypass. A direct comparison of immediate ED thoracotomy versus intraoperative cardiac bypass without ED thoracotomy is cautiously made as this was an unmatched and nonrandomized study. Three of the surviving patients underwent intraoperative cardiac bypass rewarming after receiving an ED thoracotomy. In two of these patients a perfusing rhythm had been established after thoracotomy in the ED and before transport to the operating room for cardiac bypass. Only one of seven (14.3%) patients who arrested prehospital survived versus four of four (100%) who arrested in the ED. ED thoracotomy with internal cardiac massage and mediastinal irrigation rewarming is effective in the management

  17. Severity of injury and the decision to arrest in cases of intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    McLaughry, Charlotte; Chang, Brandon; Kirsten, Charlotte; Hirschel, David; Buzawa, Eve; Patavina, April; Doyle, Shevaun; Cullinane, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    From a victim's physical health perspective, at the centre of any case of intimate partner violence (IPV) is the degree of trauma imparted on that victim by the offender. Yet, the implementations of state-level 'Mandatory Arrest' and 'Preferred Arrest' laws encourage arrests decisions in cases of IPV typically without regard to the level of trauma severity found in each case. And, despite these well-meaning implementations and the gravity of their consequences, the importance of evaluating trauma severity in victims of IPV remains largely overlooked. The goal of this study was to correlate police arrest decisions in cases of IPV to a trauma severity score generated from established clinical protocols in the treatment of trauma. A Trauma Severity Quantification Table (TSQT) was created in order to quantify the major factors of an incident of IPV: anatomical location of attack, method of attack, facilitating weapon/object and resulting trauma. A total of 256 cases of IPV reported to six police departments in Idaho, a state with a discretionary arrest law in domestic violence cases, in the calendar year 2000 were processed using the TSQT. A statistically significant difference was found between arrests (mean 17.96, standard deviation [SD] 5.90) versus no arrest (mean 16.13, SD 5.67) outcomes (P = 0.03). It is suggested that trauma severity is a factor in police arrest decisions in a discretionary state sample, but that more attention needs to be brought to this method of analysis and its implications for future arrest decisions. PMID:22977197

  18. Loss of p53-mediated cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis promotes genomic instability and premature aging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tongyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Jiang, Le; Manfredi, James; Zha, Shan; Gu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Although p53-mediated cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis are well accepted as major tumor suppression mechanisms, the loss of these functions does not directly lead to tumorigenesis, suggesting that the precise roles of these canonical activities of p53 need to be redefined. Here, we report that the cells derived from the mutant mice expressing p533KR, an acetylation-defective mutant that fails to induce cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis, exhibit high levels of aneuploidy upon DNA damage. Moreover, the embryonic lethality caused by the deficiency of XRCC4, a key DNA double strand break repair factor, can be fully rescued in the p533KR/3KR background. Notably, despite high levels of genomic instability, p533KR/3KRXRCC4−/− mice, unlike p53−/− XRCC4−/− mice, are not succumbed to pro-B-cell lymphomas. Nevertheless, p533KR/3KR XRCC4−/− mice display aging-like phenotypes including testicular atrophy, kyphosis, and premature death. Further analyses demonstrate that SLC7A11 is downregulated and that p53-mediated ferroptosis is significantly induced in spleens and testis of p533KR/3KRXRCC4−/− mice. These results demonstrate that the direct role of p53-mediated cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis is to control genomic stability in vivo. Our study not only validates the importance of ferroptosis in p53-mediated tumor suppression in vivo but also reveals that the combination of genomic instability and activation of ferroptosis may promote aging-associated phenotypes. PMID:26943586

  19. Unexpected Arrest-Related Deaths in America: 12 Months of Open Source Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jeffrey D.; Heegaard, William G.; Dawes, Donald M.; Natarajan, Sridhar; Reardon, Robert F.; Miner, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Sudden, unexpected arrest-related death (ARD) has been associated with drug abuse, extreme delirium or certain police practices. There is insufficient surveillance and causation data available. We report 12 months of surveillance data using a novel data collection methodology. Methods: We used an open-source, prospective method to collect 12 consecutive months of data, including demographics, behavior, illicit substance use, control methods used, and time of collapse after law enforcement contact. Descriptive analysis and chi-square testing were applied. Results: There were 162 ARD events reported that met inclusion criteria. The majority were male with mean age 36 years, and involved bizarre, agitated behavior and reports of drug abuse just prior to death. Law enforcement control techniques included none (14%); empty-hand techniques (69%); intermediate weapons such as TASER® device, impact weapon or chemical irritant spray (52%); and deadly force (12%). Time from contact to subject collapse included instantaneous (13%), within the first hour (53%) and 1–48 hours (35%). Significant collapse time associations occurred with the use of certain intermediate weapons. Conclusion: This surveillance report can be a foundation for discussing ARD. These data support the premise that ARDs primarily occur in persons with a certain demographic and behavior profile that includes middle-aged males exhibiting agitated, bizarre behavior generally following illicit drug abuse. Collapse time associations were demonstrated with the use of TASER devices and impact weapons. We recommend further study in this area to validate our data collection method and findings. PMID:19561821

  20. Postmortem serum protein growth arrest-specific 6 levels in sepsis-related deaths.

    PubMed

    Palmiere, Cristian; Augsburger, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Growth arrest-specific 6 (Gas6) is widely expressed in leukocytes, platelets, endothelial cells, and monocytes. It regulates various processes including granulocyte adhesion to the endothelium, cell migration, thrombus stabilization, and cytokine release. In humans, increased plasma Gas6 levels have been described in patients with sepsis and septic shock. In this study, Gas6 concentrations were measured in postmortem serum from femoral blood in a series of sepsis-related fatalities and control cases. The aims were twofold: first, to determine whether Gas6 can be reliably determined in postmortem serum; and second, to assess its diagnostic potential in identifying sepsis-related deaths. Two study groups were prospectively formed, a sepsis-related fatalities group (24 cases) and a control group (24 cases) including cases of deep vein thrombosis and fatal pulmonary embolism, cases of systemic inflammatory response syndrome in severe trauma, cases of end-stage renal failure, and cases of hanging (non-septic, non-SIRS, non-end stage renal failure cases). The preliminary results of this study seem to indicate that Gas6 can be effectively measured in postmortem serum. However, Gas6 levels in sepsis-related fatalities do not appear to be clearly distinguishable from concentrations in pulmonary embolism, severe trauma, and end-stage renal failure cases. These findings tend to support previous reports that indicated that Gas6 behaves as an acute phase reactant and can be considered a general marker of inflammation rather than a specific biomarker of sepsis. PMID:26233610