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Sample records for arrows signals

  1. Safety effects of traffic signing for left turn flashing yellow arrow signals.

    PubMed

    Schattler, Kerrie L; Gulla, Cody J; Wallenfang, Travis J; Burdett, Beau A; Lund, Jessica A

    2015-02-01

    In 2010, the left turn flashing yellow arrow (FYA) signal displays were installed at signalized intersections on state routes in the Peoria, Illinois, area. Supplemental traffic signs with text "Left Turn Yield on Flashing Yellow Arrow" were mounted on the mast arm adjacent to the left turn signal at over half of the FYA installations. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the effectiveness evaluation of the FYA supplemental sign on safety. Analyses are presented on the effects of the FYA supplemental sign for all drivers and a subset of drivers age 65 and older. A crash-based comparison of 164 FYA approaches including 90 approaches with the sign and 74 approaches without the sign showed greater crash reductions when the supplemental FYA sign was present. The results also showed that crashes involving drivers age 65 and older did not experience the same magnitudes of crash reductions as compared to all drivers. The findings of this research indicate that supplemental FYA signs may help in improving safety for left-turning vehicles during the permissive interval. Thus, it is recommended that supplemental signs be used when initially implementing the FYA, and that effort to educate the driving public on new traffic control be made to further improve safety at signalized intersections. PMID:25528438

  2. Cellerator: extending a computer algebra system to include biochemical arrows for signal transduction simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Bruce E.; Levchenko, Andre; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.; Wold, Barbara J.; Mjolsness, Eric D.

    2003-01-01

    Cellerator describes single and multi-cellular signal transduction networks (STN) with a compact, optionally palette-driven, arrow-based notation to represent biochemical reactions and transcriptional activation. Multi-compartment systems are represented as graphs with STNs embedded in each node. Interactions include mass-action, enzymatic, allosteric and connectionist models. Reactions are translated into differential equations and can be solved numerically to generate predictive time courses or output as systems of equations that can be read by other programs. Cellerator simulations are fully extensible and portable to any operating system that supports Mathematica, and can be indefinitely nested within larger data structures to produce highly scaleable models.

  3. Loss of Tc-arrow and canonical Wnt signaling alters posterior morphology and pair-rule gene expression in the short-germ insect, Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, Renata; Fischer, Tamara D; Brown, Susan J

    2009-07-01

    Wnt signaling has been implicated in posterior patterning in short-germ insects, including the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (Bolognesi et al. Curr Biol 18:1624-1629, 2008b; Angelini and Kaufman Dev Biol 283:409-423, 2005; Miyawaki et al. Mech Dev 121:119-130, 2004). Specifically, depletion of Wnt ligands Tc-Wnt1 and Tc-WntD/8 produces Tribolium embryos lacking abdominal segments. Similar phenotypes are produced by depletion of Tc-porcupine (Tc-porc) or Tc-pangolin (Tc-pan), indicating that the signal is transmitted through the canonical Wnt pathway (Bolognesi et al. Curr Biol 18:1624-1629, 2008b). Here we show that RNAi for the receptor Tc-arrow produced similar truncated phenotypes, providing additional evidence supporting canonical signal transduction. Furthermore, since in Tribolium segments are defined sequentially by a pair-rule gene circuit that, when interrupted, produces truncated phenotypes (Choe et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103:6560-6564, 2006), we investigated the relationship between loss of Wnt signaling and this pair-rule gene circuit. After depletion of the receptor Tc-arrow, expression of Tc-Wnt1 was noticeably absent from the growth zone, while Tc-WntD/8 was restricted to a single spot of expression in what remained of the posterior growth zone. The primary pair-rule genes Tc-runt (Tc-run) and Tc-even-skipped (Tc-eve) were expressed normally in the anterior segments, but were reduced to a single spot in the remnants of the posterior growth zone. Thus, expression of pair-rule genes and Tc-WntD/8 are similarly affected by depletion of Wnt signal and disruption of the posterior growth zone. PMID:19705150

  4. Time's Arrows Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savitt, Steven F.

    1997-06-01

    Introduction; Part I. Cosmology and Time's Arrow: 1. Time, gravity, and quantum mechanics W. Unruh; 2. Cosmology, time's arrow, and that old double standard H. Price; Part II. Quantum Theory and Time's Arrow: 3. Time's arrow and the quantum measurement problem A. Leggett; 4. Time, decoherence, and 'reversible' measurements P. Stamp; 5. Time flows, non-locality, and measurement in quantum mechanics S. McCall; 6. Stochastically branching spacetime topology R. Douglas; Part III. Thermodynamics and Time's Arrow: 7. The elusive object of desire: in pursuit of the kinetic equations and the second law L. Sklar; 8. Time in experience and in theoretical description of the world L. Sklar; 9. When and why does entropy increase? M. Barrett and E. Sober; Part IV. Time Travel and Time's Arrow: 10. Closed causal chains P Horwich; 11. Recent work on time travel J. Earman.

  5. A Computer's Arrow of Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, L. S.

    2005-12-01

    Some researchers believe that the psychological or consciousness arrow of time is a consequence of the thermodynamic arrow. Some don't. As for many issues in this area, the disagreement revolves about fundamental and undebatable assumptions. As a contribution to this standoff I consider the extent to which a computer---presumably governed by nothing more than the thermodynamic arrow---can be said to possess a psychological arrow. My contention is that the parallels are sufficiently strong as to leave little room for an independent psychological arrow. Reservations are nevertheless expressed on the complete objectivity of the thermodynamic arrow.

  6. Arrows: A Special Case of Graphic Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Pris

    The purpose of this paper is to examine arrow design in relation to the type of pointing, connecting, or processing involved. Three possible approaches to the investigation of arrows as graphic communication include research: by arrow function, relating message structure to arrow design, and linking user expectations to arrow design. The following…

  7. The Length of Time's Arrow

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Edward H.; Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-08-21

    An unresolved problem in physics is how the thermodynamic arrow of time arises from an underlying time reversible dynamics. We contribute to this issue by developing a measure of time-symmetry breaking, and by using the work fluctuation relations, we determine the time asymmetry of recent single molecule RNA unfolding experiments. We define time asymmetry as the Jensen-Shannon divergencebetween trajectory probability distributions of an experiment and its time-reversed conjugate. Among other interesting properties, the length of time's arrow bounds the average dissipation and determines the difficulty of accurately estimating free energy differences in nonequilibrium experiments.

  8. A subquantum arrow of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.

    2014-04-01

    The outcome of a single quantum experiment is unpredictable, except in a pure-state limit. The definite process that takes place in the apparatus may either be intrinsically random or be explainable from a deeper theory. While the first scenario is the standard lore, the latter implies that quantum mechanics is emergent. In that case, it is likely that one has to reconsider radiation by accelerated charges as a physical effect, which thus must be compensated by an energy input. Stochastic electrodynamics, for example, asserts that the vacuum energy arises from classical fluctuations with energy 1/2hslashω per mode. In such theories the stability of the hydrogen ground state will arise from energy input from fluctuations and output by radiation, hence due to an energy throughput. That flux of energy constitutes an arrow of time, which we call the "subquantum arrow of time". It is related to the stability of matter and it is more fundamental than, e.g., the thermodynamic and cosmological arrows.

  9. Arrows in Comprehending and Producing Mechanical Diagrams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiser, Julie; Tversky, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical systems have structural organizations--parts, and their relations--and functional organizations--temporal, dynamic, and causal processes--which can be explained using text or diagrams. Two experiments illustrate the role of arrows in diagrams of mechanical systems. In Experiment 1, people described diagrams with or without arrows,…

  10. Arrow injuries in North East Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Madziga, A G

    2003-06-01

    Arrow injuries are an extinct form of injury in most parts of the developed world but constitute 0.1% of emergency admissions in the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital annually. This is a retrospective study of arrow injuries carried out over a ten-year period (1989-1999) in order to study the reasons for its continued incidence the presentation and the experiences in the management of these injuries. There were 73 cases of arrow injuries and were all males with a peak age incidence of 31-40 years of age. Majority were farmers, cattle herdsmen and traders from the northeast region of Nigeria and the neighbouring republic of Cameroon, Chad and Niger. The various reasons for the injuries were armed robbery in 41%, communal clashes 20.5%, dispute between farmers and cattle herdsmen 13%, and cattle theft 8%. Majority were clinically stable on presentation with arrows in the head, neck, chest and abdomen this resulted in various surgical procedures in order to remove the arrows and repair damaged viscera. Unstable presentations resulted in mortalities (4.1%) preoperatively. Wound infection was the most common complication in patients who presented late. Improvements in the socio-economic conditions in the region and legislation on the use of these weapons would reduce the incidence of these injuries. PMID:14529215

  11. Decision Making in the Arrow of Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, Édgar; Neri, Izaak; Dörpinghaus, Meik; Meyr, Heinrich; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-12-01

    We show that the steady-state entropy production rate of a stochastic process is inversely proportional to the minimal time needed to decide on the direction of the arrow of time. Here we apply Wald's sequential probability ratio test to optimally decide on the direction of time's arrow in stationary Markov processes. Furthermore, the steady-state entropy production rate can be estimated using mean first-passage times of suitable physical variables. We derive a first-passage time fluctuation theorem which implies that the decision time distributions for correct and wrong decisions are equal. Our results are illustrated by numerical simulations of two simple examples of nonequilibrium processes.

  12. Arrow 227: Air transport system design simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bontempi, Michael; Bose, Dave; Brophy, Georgeann; Cashin, Timothy; Kanarios, Michael; Ryan, Steve; Peterson, Timothy

    1992-01-01

    The Arrow 227 is a student-designed commercial transport for use in a overnight package delivery network. The major goal of the concept was to provide the delivery service with the greatest potential return on investment. The design objectives of the Arrow 227 were based on three parameters; production cost, payload weight, and aerodynamic efficiency. Low production cost helps to reduce initial investment. Increased payload weight allows for a decrease in flight cycles and, therefore, less fuel consumption than an aircraft carrying less payload weight and requiring more flight cycles. In addition, fewer flight cycles will allow a fleet to last longer. Finally, increased aerodynamic efficiency in the form of high L/D will decrease fuel consumption.

  13. Inhibitory cueing effects following manual and saccadic responses to arrow cues.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yun; He, Tao; Satel, Jason; Wang, Zhiguo

    2016-05-01

    With two cueing tasks, in the present study we examined output-based inhibitory cueing effects (ICEs) with manual responses to arrow targets following manual or saccadic responses to arrow cues. In all experiments, ICEs were observed when manual localization responses were required to both the cues and targets, but only when the cue-target onset asynchrony (CTOA) was 2,000 ms or longer. In contrast, when saccadic responses were made in response to the cues, ICEs were only observed with CTOAs of 2,000 ms or less-and only when an auditory cue-back signal was used. The present study also showed that the magnitude of ICEs following saccadic responses to arrow cues decreased with time, much like traditional inhibition-of-return effects. The magnitude of ICEs following manual responses to arrow cues, however, appeared later in time and had no sign of decreasing even 3 s after cue onset. These findings suggest that ICEs linked to skeletomotor activation do exist and that the ICEs evoked by oculomotor activation can carry over to the skeletomotor system. PMID:26956560

  14. t {r_arrow} cWW and WW {r_arrow} {anti t}c + t{anti c} in extended models

    SciTech Connect

    David Atwood; Marc Sher

    1997-07-01

    Jenkins has pointed out that the process t {r_arrow} cW{sup +}W{sup {minus}}is GIM suppressed in the standard model. In this note, the authors calculate the branching ratio for a wide range of models, in which the decay occurs at tree level through exchange of a scalar, fermion or vector. In the case of scalar exchange, a scalar mass between 2m{sub W} and 200 GeV leads to a resonant enhancement, giving a branching ratio as high as a few tenths of a percent. They then note that all of these models will also allow W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} {anti t}c + t{anti c}, and they calculate the single-top/single-charm production rate at the LHC. The rates aren't negligibly small, but the background from single-top/single-bottom production will probably swamp the signal.

  15. Arrow poisons in south Asia. Part 1. Arrow poisons in ancient India.

    PubMed

    Bisset, N G; Mazars, G

    1984-10-01

    The use of arrow poisons in ancient India is discussed. While it is possible that Mesolithic hunting communities may have applied poison to their arrows, passages in the Rg Veda and Atharva Veda indicate its use in warfare. The meaning of the word -ala, used in the Rg Veda to denote the poison smeared on the arrowheads, is examined; but the available evidence, while almost certainly excluding a mineral (arsenical) source, does not allow a conclusion to be drawn between an animal and/or plant origin. Certain hymns in the Atharva Veda point to aconite tubers as one source. Later Sanskrit (and Buddhist) literature shows that poisoned arrows continued to be used and that a second source of poison was (putrefying) snakes--a source confirmed by an account in the classical literature of Alexander the Great's campaign in western India. Detailed descriptions of the symptoms and methods of treatment of wounds caused by poisoned arrows are to be found in the Sanskrit medical literature. PMID:6394907

  16. GreenArrow version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-03-29

    GreenArrow is a visualization program for displaying directed graphs that can use text in place of lines to represent the edges between nodes. This text can be animated to show the link direction, and allow for more text to be displayed then would normally be allowed. The text is also tapered and arced to show direction. The node labels can be wrapped around the node to avoid label crossing as well. The program is interactive,more » and allows the user to zoom, pan and rotate a graph, as well as manipulate the individual nodes.« less

  17. Arrow of time in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Brett

    2007-10-01

    Inflation allows the problem of the arrow of time to be understood as a question about the structure of spacetime: why was the intrinsic curvature of the earliest spatial sections so much better behaved than it might have been? This is really just the complement of a more familiar problem: what mechanism prevents the extrinsic curvature of the earliest spatial sections from diverging, as classical general relativity suggests? We argue that the stringy version of “creation from nothing”, sketched by Ooguri, Vafa, and Verlinde, solves both of these problems at once. The argument, while very simple, hinges on some of the deepest theorems in global differential geometry. These results imply that when a spatially toral spacetime is created from nothing, the earliest spatial sections are forced to be [quasi-classically] exactly locally isotropic. This local isotropy, in turn, forces the inflaton into its minimal-entropy state. The theory explains why the arrow does not reverse in black holes or in a cosmic contraction, if any.

  18. Arrows as anchors: Conceptual blending and student use of electric field vector arrows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gire, Elizabeth; Price, Edward

    2013-01-01

    We use the theory of conceptual blending with material anchors to describe how people make meaning of the vector arrows representation of electric fields. We describe this representation as a conceptual blend of a spatial (coordinate) input space and an electric-field-as-arrows space (which itself is a blend of electric field concept with arrows). This representation possesses material features including the use of spatial extent (e.g., distance on paper) to represent the coordinate space and to represent the magnitude of electric field vectors. As a result, this representation supports a geometric interpretation of the electric field, breaking the field into components, and the addition of two fields at a point. The material features also emphasize the spatial relationships between the source(s) and points where the field is represented. However, the material features also necessitate sampling and do not generally support the rapid superposition of two fields at all points. We illustrate this analysis with examples from clinical problem-solving interviews with upper-division physics majors, and interpret students' errors in using this representation as resulting from conflict between the input spaces in the blend.

  19. Avatars and arrows in the brain.

    PubMed

    Catmur, Caroline; Santiesteban, Idalmis; Conway, Jane R; Heyes, Cecilia; Bird, Geoffrey

    2016-05-15

    In this Commentary article we critically assess the claims made by Schurz, Kronbichler, Weissengrubler, Surtees, Samson and Perner (2015) relating to the neural processes underlying theory of mind and visual perspective taking. They attempt to integrate research findings in these two areas of social neuroscience using a perspective taking task contrasting mentalistic agents ('avatars'), with non-mentalistic control stimuli ('arrows'), during functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. We support this endeavour whole-heartedly, agreeing that the integration of findings in these areas has been neglected in research on the social brain. However, we cannot find among the behavioural or neuroimaging data presented by Schurz et al. evidence supporting their claim of 'implicit mentalizing'-the automatic ascription of mental states to another representing what they can see. Indeed, we suggest that neuroimaging methods may be ill-suited to address the existence of implicit mentalizing, and suggest that approaches utilizing neurostimulation methods are likely to be more successful. PMID:26883064

  20. Adding and subtracting vectors: The problem with the arrow representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckler, Andrew F.; Scaife, Thomas M.

    2015-06-01

    A small number of studies have investigated student understanding of vector addition and subtraction in generic or introductory physics contexts, but in almost all cases the questions posed were in the vector arrow representation. In a series of experiments involving over 1000 students and several semesters, we investigated student understanding of vector addition and subtraction in both the arrow and algebraic notation (using i ^, j ^, k ^) in generic mathematical and physics contexts. First, we replicated a number of previous findings of student difficulties in the arrow format and discovered several additional difficulties, including the finding that different relative arrow orientations can prompt different solution paths and different kinds of mistakes, which suggests that students need to practice with a variety of relative orientations. Most importantly, we found that average performance in the i j k format was typically excellent and often much better than performance in the arrow format in either the generic or physics contexts. Further, while we find that the arrow format tends to prompt students to a more physically intuitive solution path, we also find that, when prompted, student solutions in the i j k format also display significant physical insights into the problem. We also find a hierarchy in correct answering between the two formats, with correct answering in the i j k format being more fundamental than for the arrow format. Overall, the results suggest that many student difficulties with these simple vector problems lie with the arrow representation itself. For instruction, these results imply that introducing the i j k notation (or some equivalent) with the arrow notation concurrently may be a very useful way to improve student performance as well as help students to learn physics concepts involving vector addition and subtraction.

  1. Learning about Locomotion Patterns: Effective Use of Multiple Pictures and Motion-Indicating Arrows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imhof, Birgit; Scheiter, Katharina; Edelmann, Jorg; Gerjets, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated how enriching visualizations with arrows indicating the motion of objects may help in conveying dynamic information: Multiple static-simultaneous visualizations with motion-indicating arrows were compared with either multiple visualizations without arrows or a single visualization with arrows. Seventy-one students were…

  2. Visuospatial Attention Is Guided by Both the Symbolic Value and the Spatial Proximity of Selected Arrows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Jay; Radulescu, Petre; Guo, Ruo Mu; Hommel, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that overlearned symbols, especially arrows, can orient attention to peripheral locations. In 2003, Pratt and Hommel showed that when 1 arrow is selected from a set of arrows, based on an attentional control setting for a specific target color, the selected arrow determines the orientation of attention. Recently,…

  3. Relation between the psychological and thermodynamic arrows of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlodinow, Leonard; Brun, Todd A.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we lay out an argument that generically the psychological arrow of time should align with the thermodynamic arrow of time where that arrow is well defined. This argument applies to any physical system that can act as a memory, in the sense of preserving a record of the state of some other system. This result follows from two principles: the robustness of the thermodynamic arrow of time to small perturbations in the state, and the principle that a memory should not have to be fine-tuned to match the state of the system being recorded. This argument applies even if the memory system itself is completely reversible and nondissipative. We make the argument with a paradigmatic system, and then formulate it more broadly for any system that can be considered a memory. We illustrate these principles for a few other example systems and compare our criteria to earlier treatments of this problem.

  4. ARROW (Version 2) Commercial Software Validation and Configuration Control

    SciTech Connect

    HEARD, F.J.

    2000-02-10

    ARROW (Version 2), a compressible flow piping network modeling and analysis computer program from Applied Flow Technology, was installed for use at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

  5. Charming penguin contributions to B{r_arrow}K{pi}

    SciTech Connect

    Isola, C.; Ladisa, M.; Nardulli, G.; Pham, T. N.; Santorelli, P.

    2001-07-01

    We present calculations of the charming-penguin long-distance contributions to B{r_arrow}K{pi} decays due to intermediate charmed meson states. Our calculation is based on the chiral effective Lagrangian for light and heavy mesons, corrected for the hard pion and kaon momenta. We find that the charming-penguin contributions increase significantly the B{r_arrow}K{pi} decay rates in comparison with the short-distance contributions, giving results in better agreement with experimental data.

  6. Identification of a Gravitational Arrow of Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Julian; Koslowski, Tim; Mercati, Flavio

    2014-10-01

    It is widely believed that special initial conditions must be imposed on any time-symmetric law if its solutions are to exhibit behavior of any kind that defines an "arrow of time." We show that this is not so. The simplest nontrivial time-symmetric law that can be used to model a dynamically closed universe is the Newtonian N -body problem with vanishing total energy and angular momentum. Because of special properties of this system (likely to be shared by any law of the Universe), its typical solutions all divide at a uniquely defined point into two halves. In each, a well-defined measure of shape complexity fluctuates but grows irreversibly between rising bounds from that point. Structures that store dynamical information are created as the complexity grows and act as "records." Each solution can be viewed as having a single past and two distinct futures emerging from it. Any internal observer must be in one half of the solution and will only be aware of the records of one branch and deduce a unique past and future direction from inspection of the available records.

  7. Identification of a gravitational arrow of time.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Julian; Koslowski, Tim; Mercati, Flavio

    2014-10-31

    It is widely believed that special initial conditions must be imposed on any time-symmetric law if its solutions are to exhibit behavior of any kind that defines an "arrow of time." We show that this is not so. The simplest nontrivial time-symmetric law that can be used to model a dynamically closed universe is the Newtonian N-body problem with vanishing total energy and angular momentum. Because of special properties of this system (likely to be shared by any law of the Universe), its typical solutions all divide at a uniquely defined point into two halves. In each, a well-defined measure of shape complexity fluctuates but grows irreversibly between rising bounds from that point. Structures that store dynamical information are created as the complexity grows and act as "records." Each solution can be viewed as having a single past and two distinct futures emerging from it. Any internal observer must be in one half of the solution and will only be aware of the records of one branch and deduce a unique past and future direction from inspection of the available records. PMID:25396357

  8. Time asymmetry of probabilities versus relativistic causal structure: an arrow of time.

    PubMed

    Coecke, Bob; Lal, Raymond

    2012-05-18

    There is an incompatibility between the symmetries of causal structure in relativity theory and the signaling abilities of probabilistic devices with inputs and outputs: while time reversal in relativity will not introduce the ability to signal between spacelike separated regions, this is not the case for probabilistic devices with spacelike separated input-output pairs. We explicitly describe a nonsignaling device which becomes a perfect signaling device under time reversal, where time reversal can be conceptualized as playing backwards a videotape of an agent manipulating the device. This leads to an arrow of time that is identifiable when studying the correlations of events for spacelike separated regions. Somewhat surprisingly, although the time reversal of Popescu-Rohrlich boxes also allows agents to signal, it does not yield a perfect signaling device. Finally, we realize time reversal using postselection, which could to lead experimental implementation. PMID:23003129

  9. Maxwell's Demons Everywhere: Evolving Design as the Arrow of Time

    PubMed Central

    Bejan, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Science holds that the arrow of time in nature is imprinted on one-way (irreversible) phenomena, and is accounted for by the second law of thermodynamics. Here I show that the arrow of time is painted much more visibly on another self-standing phenomenon: the occurrence and change (evolution in time) of flow organization throughout nature, animate and inanimate. This other time arrow has been present in science but not recognized as such since the birth of thermodynamics. It is Maxwell's demon. Translated in macroscopic terms, this is the physics of the phenomenon of design, which is the universal natural tendency of flow systems to evolve into configurations that provide progressively greater access over time, and is summarized as the constructal law of design and evolution in nature. Knowledge is the ability to effect design changes that facilitate human flows on the landscape. Knowledge too flows. PMID:24510201

  10. Time's arrows today. Recent physical and philosophical work on the direction of time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savitt, S. F.

    Most of the work in this volume, the paperback version of the 1995 edition, was presented at a conference, Vancouver, B.C. (Canada), Jun 1992. The eleven contributions are arranged under the following subject headings: 1. Cosmology and time's arrow (W. Unruh, H. Price). 2. Quantum theory and time's arrow (A. Leggett, P. Stamp, S. McCall, R. Douglas). 3. Thermodynamics and time's arrow (L. Sklar, M. Barrett, E. Sober). 4. Time travel and time's arrow (P. Horwich, J. Earman).

  11. Symbol-and-Arrow Diagrams in Teaching Pharmacokinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayton, William L.

    1990-01-01

    Symbol-and-arrow diagrams are helpful adjuncts to equations derived from pharmacokinetic models. Both show relationships among dependent and independent variables. Diagrams show only qualitative relationships, but clearly show which variables are dependent and which are independent, helping students understand complex but important functional…

  12. Elliptical Orbit [arrow right] 1/r[superscript 2] Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentis, Jeffrey; Fulton, Bryan; Hesse, Carol; Mazzino, Laura

    2007-01-01

    Newton's proof of the connection between elliptical orbits and inverse-square forces ranks among the "top ten" calculations in the history of science. This time-honored calculation is a highlight in an upper-level mechanics course. It would be worthwhile if students in introductory physics could prove the relation "elliptical orbit" [arrow right]…

  13. Adding and Subtracting Vectors: The Problem with the Arrow Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckler, Andrew F.; Scaife, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    A small number of studies have investigated student understanding of vector addition and subtraction in generic or introductory physics contexts, but in almost all cases the questions posed were in the vector arrow representation. In a series of experiments involving over 1000 students and several semesters, we investigated student understanding…

  14. Arrow Lakes Reservoir Fertilization Experiment, Technical Report 1999-2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, E.

    2007-02-01

    The Arrow Lakes food web has been influenced by several anthropogenic stressors during the past 45 years. These include the introduction of mysid shrimp (Mysis relicta) in 1968 and 1974 and the construction of large hydroelectric impoundments in 1969, 1973 and 1983. The construction of the impoundments affected the fish stocks in Upper and Lower Arrow lakes in several ways. The construction of Hugh Keenleyside Dam (1969) resulted in flooding that eliminated an estimated 30% of the available kokanee spawning habitat in Lower Arrow tributaries and at least 20% of spawning habitat in Upper Arrow tributaries. The Mica Dam (1973) contributed to water level fluctuations and blocked upstream migration of all fish species including kokanee. The Revelstoke Dam (1983) flooded 150 km of the mainstem Columbia River and 80 km of tributary streams which were used by kokanee, bull trout, rainbow trout and other species. The construction of upstream dams also resulted in nutrient retention which ultimately reduced reservoir productivity. In Arrow Lakes Reservoir (ALR), nutrients settled out in the Revelstoke and Mica reservoirs, resulting in decreased productivity, a process known as oligotrophication. Kokanee are typically the first species to respond to oligotrophication resulting from aging impoundments. To address the ultra-oligotrophic status of ALR, a bottom-up approach was taken with the addition of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus in the form of liquid fertilizer from 1999 to 2004). Two of the main objectives of the experiment were to replace lost nutrients as a result of upstream impoundments and restore productivity in Upper Arrow and to restore kokanee and other sport fish abundance in the reservoir. The bottom-up approach to restoring kokanee in ALR has been successful by replacing nutrients lost as a result of upstream impoundments and has successfully restored the productivity of Upper Arrow. Primary production rates increased, the phytoplankton community responded

  15. Arrows as anchors: An analysis of the material features of electric field vector arrows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gire, Elizabeth; Price, Edward

    2014-12-01

    Representations in physics possess both physical and conceptual aspects that are fundamentally intertwined and can interact to support or hinder sense making and computation. We use distributed cognition and the theory of conceptual blending with material anchors to interpret the roles of conceptual and material features of representations in students' use of representations for computation. We focus on the vector-arrows representation of electric fields and describe this representation as a conceptual blend of electric field concepts, physical space, and the material features of the representation (i.e., the physical writing and the surface upon which it is drawn). In this representation, spatial extent (e.g., distance on paper) is used to represent both distances in coordinate space and magnitudes of electric field vectors. In conceptual blending theory, this conflation is described as a clash between the input spaces in the blend. We explore the benefits and drawbacks of this clash, as well as other features of this representation. This analysis is illustrated with examples from clinical problem-solving interviews with upper-division physics majors. We see that while these intermediate physics students make a variety of errors using this representation, they also use the geometric features of the representation to add electric field contributions and to organize the problem situation productively.

  16. Overview of the Cranked-Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project International

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obara, Clifford J.; Lamar, John E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a brief history of the F-16XL-1 aircraft, its role in the High Speed Research program and how it was morphed into the Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project. Various flight, wind-tunnel and Computational Fluid Dynamics data sets were generated as part of the project. These unique and open flight datasets for surface pressures, boundary-layer profiles and skin-friction distributions, along with surface flow data, are described and sample data comparisons given. This is followed by a description of how the project became internationalized to be known as Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project International and is concluded by an introduction to the results of a four year computational predictive study of data collected at flight conditions by participating researchers.

  17. Parity Violation in Exclusive B arrow γ Kππ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornheim, Adolf

    2003-04-01

    We present a study of radiative B meson decays into Kππγ using 13.4 fb-1 of e^+e^- data taken with the CLEO detector near the Υ(4S) resonance. By constructing a parity odd observable from the Kππ we are able to study the polarization of the photon from the radiative B decay. According to the standard model the photon from b arrow sγ (barb arrow barsγ) decays should have left-handed (right-handed) polarization, a prediction untested to date. We employ a maximum likelihood fit method to search for all possible charge combinations of the Kππγ final state in charged and neutral B meson decays and to investigate the photon polarization.

  18. 32. Lighted arrows installed on the handrails, one on the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Lighted arrows installed on the handrails, one on the south span and one on the north span, used by the bridge operator to visually tell when the both of the spans are down. The walkways are on the western side of the bridge, view is facing southwest. - Henry Ford Bridge, Spanning Cerritos Channel, Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. Transfer entropy in physical systems and the arrow of time.

    PubMed

    Spinney, Richard E; Lizier, Joseph T; Prokopenko, Mikhail

    2016-08-01

    Recent developments have cemented the realization that many concepts and quantities in thermodynamics and information theory are shared. In this paper, we consider a highly relevant quantity in information theory and complex systems, the transfer entropy, and explore its thermodynamic role by considering the implications of time reversal upon it. By doing so we highlight the role of information dynamics on the nuanced question of observer perspective within thermodynamics by relating the temporal irreversibility in the information dynamics to the configurational (or spatial) resolution of the thermodynamics. We then highlight its role in perhaps the most enduring paradox in modern physics, the manifestation of a (thermodynamic) arrow of time. We find that for systems that process information such as those undergoing feedback, a robust arrow of time can be formulated by considering both the apparent physical behavior which leads to conventional entropy production and the information dynamics which leads to a quantity we call the information theoretic arrow of time. We also offer an interpretation in terms of optimal encoding of observed physical behavior. PMID:27627274

  20. Battling Arrow's Paradox to Discover Robust Water Management Alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzyk, J. R.; Reed, P. M.; Hadka, D.

    2013-12-01

    This study explores whether or not Arrow's Impossibility Theorem, a theory of social choice, affects the formulation of water resources systems planning problems. The theorem discusses creating an aggregation function for voters choosing from more than three alternatives for society. The Impossibility Theorem is also called Arrow's Paradox, because when trying to add more voters, a single individual's preference will dictate the optimal group decision. In the context of water resources planning, our study is motivated by recent theoretical work that has generalized the insights for Arrow's Paradox to the design of complex engineered systems. In this framing of the paradox, states of society are equivalent to water planning or design alternatives, and the voters are equivalent to multiple planning objectives (e.g. minimizing cost or maximizing performance). Seen from this point of view, multi-objective water planning problems are functionally equivalent to the social choice problem described above. Traditional solutions to such multi-objective problems aggregate multiple performance measures into a single mathematical objective. The Theorem implies that a subset of performance concerns will inadvertently dictate the overall design evaluations in unpredictable ways using such an aggregation. We suggest that instead of aggregation, an explicit many-objective approach to water planning can help overcome the challenges posed by Arrow's Paradox. Many-objective planning explicitly disaggregates measures of performance while supporting the discovery of the planning tradeoffs, employing multiobjective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs) to find solutions. Using MOEA-based search to address Arrow's Paradox requires that the MOEAs perform robustly with increasing problem complexity, such as adding additional objectives and/or decisions. This study uses comprehensive diagnostic evaluation of MOEA search performance across multiple problem formulations (both aggregated and many

  1. [Forensic medical assessment of injuries to the human body and clothes caused by a crossbow arrow].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the data published in the special literature revealed the lack of information for the objective comprehensive forensic medical evaluation of injuries to the human body and clothes caused by the arrows from different models of crossbows. Morphological characteristics of injuries were shown to strongly depend on the design features of the arrows. This fact can be used to differentiate between injuries inflicted by crossbow arrows and other types of missile weapons. PMID:21866845

  2. Of arrows and flows. Causality, determination, and specificity in the Central Dogma of molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Bernardino

    2006-01-01

    From its first proposal, the Central Dogma had a graphical form, complete with arrows of different types, and this form quickly became its standard presentation. In different scientific contexts, arrows have different meanings and in this particular case the arrows indicated the flow of information among different macromolecules. A deeper analysis illustrates that the arrows also imply a causal statement, directly connected to the causal role of genetic information. The author suggests a distinction between two different kinds of causal links, defined as 'physical causality' and 'biological determination', both implied in the production of biological specificity. PMID:18351053

  3. SCAR arrow-wing active flutter suppression system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, C. K.; Visor, O. E.

    1977-01-01

    The potential performance and direct operating cost benefits of an active flutter suppression system (FSS) for the NASA arrow-wing supersonic cruise configuration were determined. A FSS designed to increase the flutter speed of the baseline airplane 20 percent. A comparison was made of the performance and direct operating cost between the FSS equipped aircraft and a previously defined configuration with structural modifications to provide the same flutter speed. Control system synthesis and evaluation indicated that a FSS could provide the increase in flutter speed without degrading airplane reliability, safety, handling qualities, or ride quality, and without increasing repeated loads or hydraulic and electrical power capacity requirements.

  4. Time arrow is influenced by the dark energy.

    PubMed

    Allahverdyan, A E; Gurzadyan, V G

    2016-05-01

    The arrow of time and the accelerated expansion are two fundamental empirical facts of the universe. We advance the viewpoint that the dark energy (positive cosmological constant) accelerating the expansion of the universe also supports the time asymmetry. It is related to the decay of metastable states under generic perturbations, as we show on example of a microcanonical ensemble. These states will not be metastable without dark energy. The latter also ensures a hyperbolic motion leading to dynamic entropy production with the rate determined by the cosmological constant. PMID:27300848

  5. Fundamental Aerodynamic Investigations for Development of Arrow-Stabilized Projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurzweg, Hermann

    1947-01-01

    The numerous patent applications on arrow-stabilized projectiles indicate that the idea of projectiles without spin is not new, but has appeared in various proposals throughout the last decades. As far as projectiles for subsonic speeds are concerned, suitable shapes have been developed for sometime, for example, numerous grenades. Most of the patent applications, though, are not practicable particularly for projectiles with supersonic speed. This is because the inventor usually does not have any knowledge of aerodynamic flow around the projectile nor any particular understanding of the practical solution. The lack of wind tunnels for the development of projectiles made it necessary to use firing tests for development. These are obviously extremely tedious or expensive and lead almost always to failures. The often expressed opinion that arrow-stabilized projectiles cannot fly supersonically can be traced to this condition. That this is not the case has been shown for the first time by Roechling on long projectiles with foldable fins. Since no aerodynamic investigations were made for the development of these projectiles, only tedious series of firing tests with systematic variation of the fins could lead to satisfactory results. These particular projectiles though have a disadvantage which lies in the nature cf foldable fins. They occasionally do not open uniformly in flight, thus causing unsymmetry in flow and greater scatter. The junctions of fins and body are very bad aerodynamically and increase the drag. It must be possible to develop high-performance arrow-stabilized projectiles based on the aerodynamic research conducted during the last few years at Peenemuende and new construction ideas. Thus the final shape, ready for operational use, could be developed in the wind tunnel without loss of expensive time in firing tests. The principle of arrow-stabilized performance has been applied to a large number of caliburs which were stabilized by various means Most

  6. Measurement of the ratio fracl B(Υ(4S)arrow B^+B^-)l B(Υ(4S)arrow B^0 barB^0)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadavand, Haleh

    2003-04-01

    The ratio R^+/0=fracl B(Υ(4S) arrow B^+B^-)l B(Υ(4S) arrow B^0 barB^0) is measured with fully reconstructed candidates for B^± arrow J/ψ K^± and B^0 arrow J/ψ K^0S decays. Results are based on a data sample collected with the BaBar detector from 1999 to 2002.

  7. Measurement of the B^+/ B^0 Production Ratio from the Υ(4S) Meson using B^± arrow J/ψ K^± and B^0 arrow J/ψ K^0S decays.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadavand, Haleh

    2004-05-01

    The ratio R^+/0=fracl B(Υ(4S) arrow B^+ B^-)l B(Υ(4S) arrow B^0 barB^0) is measured with fully reconstructed candidates for B^± arrow J/ψ K^± and B^0 arrow J/ψ K^0S decays. Results are based on a data sample collected with the BaBar detector from 1999 to 2002.

  8. Monosomy 9p24{r_arrow}pter and trisomy 5q31{r_arrow}qter: Case report and review of two cases

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmenti, L.A.; Steinberger, J.; Mammel, M.C.

    1995-05-22

    Partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 9 (p24{r_arrow}pter) and partial duplication of the long arm of chromosome 5 (q32{r_arrow}qter) were observed in an abnormal boy who died at age 8 weeks of a complex cyanotic cardiac defect. He also had minor anomalies, sagittal craniosynostosis, triphalangeal thumbs, hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum. Two other infants with similar cytogenetic abnormalities were described previously. These patients had severe congenital heart defect, genitourinary anomalies, broad nasal bridge, low hairline, apparently low-set ears, short neck, and triphalangeal thumbs, in common with our patient. We suggest that combined monosomy 9q23,24{r_arrow}pter and trisomy 5q31,32{r_arrow}qter may constitute a clinically recognizable syndrome. 13 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Search for the flavor changing neutral current B-meson decays B^+arrow μ^+ μ^- K^+ and B^0arrow μ^+ μ^-K^*0 at CDF.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Wolfram; Speer, Thomas

    1997-04-01

    We present a search for rare B-meson decays B^+arrow μ^+ μ^- K^+ and B^0arrow μ^+ μ^-K^*0 using data from pbarp collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV recorded with CDF during the 1994 to 95 running period. We set upper limits on BR(B^+arrow μ^+ μ^- K^+) and BR(B^0arrow μ^+ μ^-K^*0). ^ Supported by U.S. DOE DE-AC02-76CH03000. ^*We thank the Fermilab staff and the technical staffs of the participating institutions for their vital contributions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation; the Italian Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan; the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; the National Science Council of the Republic of China; and the A. P. Sloan Foundation.

  10. Qualitative Differences Between Conscious and Nonconscious Processing? On Inverse Priming Induced by Masked Arrows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verleger, Rolf; Jaskowski, Piotr; Aydemir, Aytac; van der Lubbe, Rob H. J.; Groen, Margriet

    2004-01-01

    In general, both consciously and unconsciously perceived stimuli facilitate responses to following similar stimuli. However, masked arrows delay responses to following arrows. This inverse priming has been ascribed to inhibition of premature motor activation, more recently even to special processing of nonconsciously perceived material. Here,…

  11. New Bouncing Curved Arrow Technique for the Depiction of Organic Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straumanis, Andrei R.; Ruder, Suzanne M.

    2009-01-01

    Many students fail to develop a conceptual understanding of organic chemistry. Evidence suggests this failure goes hand-in-hand with a failure to grasp the techniques, meaning, and usefulness of curved arrow notation. Use of curved arrow notation to illustrate electrophilic addition appears to be a critical juncture in student understanding.…

  12. Atypical Visual Orienting to Gaze- and Arrow-Cues in Adults with High Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlamings, Petra H. J. M.; Stauder, Johannes E. A.; van Son, Ilona A. M.; Mottron, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigates visual orienting to directional cues (arrow or eyes) in adults with high functioning autism (n = 19) and age matched controls (n = 19). A choice reaction time paradigm is used in which eye-or arrow direction correctly (congruent) or incorrectly (incongruent) cues target location. In typically developing participants,…

  13. Avatars and arrows: implicit mentalizing or domain-general processing?

    PubMed

    Santiesteban, Idalmis; Catmur, Caroline; Hopkins, Senan Coughlan; Bird, Geoffrey; Heyes, Cecilia

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies using the dot perspective task have shown that adults are slower to verify the number of dots they can see in a picture when a human figure in the picture, an avatar, can see a different number of dots. This "self-consistency effect," which occurs even when the avatar's perspective is formally task-irrelevant, has been interpreted as evidence of implicit mentalizing; that humans can think about the mental states of others via dedicated, automatic processes. We tested this interpretation by giving participants 2 versions of the dot perspective task. In some trials, the avatar was presented as in previous experiments, and in other trials the avatar was replaced by an arrow with similar low-level features. We found self-consistency effects of comparable size in the avatar and arrow conditions, suggesting that self-consistency effects in the dot perspective task are due to domain-general processes such as those that mediate automatic attentional orienting. PMID:24377486

  14. Bell's theorem and the causal arrow of time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argaman, Nathan

    2010-10-01

    Einstein held that the formalism of quantum mechanics involves "spooky actions at a distance." In the 1960s, Bell amplified this by showing that the predictions of quantum mechanics disagree with the results of any locally causal description. It should be appreciated that accepting nonlocal descriptions while retaining causality leads to a clash with relativity. Furthermore, the causal arrow of time by definition contradicts time-reversal symmetry. For these reasons, Wheeler and Feynman, Costa de Beauregard, Cramer, Price, and others have advocated abandoning microscopic causality. In this paper, a simplistic but concrete example of this line of thought is presented, in the form of a retro-causal toy model that is stochastic and provides an appealing description of the quantum correlations discussed by Bell. It is concluded that Einstein's "spooky actions" may occur "in the past" rather than "at a distance," resolving the tension between quantum mechanics and relativity and opening unexplored possibilities for future reformulations of quantum mechanics.

  15. Time's arrow in nephrology: the discovery of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J Stewart

    2005-01-01

    Time is a unique dimension of the universe, along with perhaps 10 dimensions of space, according to superstring theory. Our brain and its associated consciousness perceive time as a continuous unidirectional stream. Even though we appear to be able to move freely in three dimensions of space; time's arrow for us points only one way, the present eroding into the future to leave the past behind. For two millennia, time has been likened to a stream or river. In the West, for the past two centuries, time and change have been equated almost automatically with the idea of progress. However, change always brings with it loss as well as gain, and progress is far from inevitable. This remains true in the history of medicine. The history of any subject is full of blind alleys, which, although important at the time, generally become edited out in retrospect. PMID:16180549

  16. Arrow physicians: are economics and medicine philosophically incompatible?

    PubMed

    Tsang, Sandro

    2015-06-01

    Economics is en route to its further expansion in medicine, but many in the medical community remain unconvinced that its impact will be positive. Thus, a philosophical enquiry into the compatibility of economics and medicine is necessary to resolve the disagreements. The fundamental mission of medicine obliges physicians to practise science and compassion to serve the patient's best interests. Conventional (neoclassical) economics assumes that individuals are self-interested and that competitive markets will emerge optimal states. Economics is seemingly incompatible with the emphasis of putting patients' interests first. This idea is refuted by Professor Kenneth Arrow's health economics seminal paper. Arrow emphasizes that medical practice involves agency, knowledge, trust and professionalism, and physician-patient relation critically affects care quality. The term Arrow Physician is used to mean a humanistic carer who has a concern for the patient and acts on the best available evidence with health equity in mind. To make this practice sustainable, implementing appropriate motivations, constitutions and institutions to enable altruistic agency is critical. There is substantial evidence that polycentric governance can encourage building trust and reciprocity, so as to avoid depletion of communal resources. This paper proposes building trusting institutions through granting altruistic physicians adequate autonomy to direct resources based on patients' technical needs. It also summarizes the philosophy bases of medicine and economics. It, therefore, contributes to developing a shared language to facilitate intellectual dialogues, and will encourage trans-disciplinary research into medical practice. This should lead to medicine being reoriented to care for whole persons again. PMID:25850973

  17. The politics of attention contextualized: gaze but not arrow cuing of attention is moderated by political temperament.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Luciana; Dalmaso, Mario; Castelli, Luigi; Galfano, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    It is known that an averted gaze can trigger shifts of attention in an observer, a phenomenon known as gaze-cuing effect. Recently, Dodd et al. (Atten Percept Psychophys 73:24-29, 2011) have reported a reliable gaze-cuing effect for liberals but not for conservatives. The present study tested whether this result is gaze-specific or extends over nonsocial spatial signals. Conservatives and liberals took part in a spatial-cuing task in which centrally placed gaze and arrow cues, pointing rightward or leftward, were followed by a peripheral onset target requiring a simple detection response. Whereas a reliable cuing effect was present for both gaze and arrow cues in the case of liberals, conservatives showed a reduced cuing response only for gaze cues. These results provide further support for the pattern reported by Dodd et al. (2011) and are consistent with the view that conservatives are less susceptible to the influence of spatial cues provided by other individuals. PMID:26055660

  18. Prospects for observing Higgs in ZH (r-arrow) (nu nubar, l(superscript +)l(superscript -)) b bbar channel at TeV33

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, W.-M.

    1996-10-01

    We report the feasibility study of observing associated production of Higgs and {ital Z{sup 0}} bosons with {ital H} {r_arrow} {ital b{anti b}} and {ital Z{sup 0}} {r_arrow} {ital {nu}{anti {nu}}, l{sup +}l{sup -}} at {radical}{ital s} = 2 TeV high luminosity Tevatron (TeV33). The signature of such decay is a resonance of two {ital b} tagged jets, plus wither large missing {ital E{sub T}} (E{sub T} > 35 GeV) or dilepton pair mass near the {ital Z{sup 0}} mass. The signal and backgrounds are estimated using the CDF II detector configuration and the numbers are cross checked against the existing CDF Run I E{sub T} data. It may be possible to detect a Standard Model Higgs boson mass up to 120 GeV with 30 {ital fb{sup -1}} of integrated luminosity by combining a result with {ital W{sup {+-}}H} {r_arrow} {ital l{sup {+-}} {nu}b{anti b}} channel.

  19. Arrow Lakes Reservoir Fertilization Experiment; Years 4 and 5, Technical Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, E.

    2007-02-01

    This report presents the fourth and fifth year (2002 and 2003, respectively) of a five-year fertilization experiment on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The goal of the experiment was to increase kokanee populations impacted from hydroelectric development on the Arrow Lakes Reservoir. The impacts resulted in declining stocks of kokanee, a native land-locked sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), a key species of the ecosystem. Arrow Lakes Reservoir, located in southeastern British Columbia, has undergone experimental fertilization since 1999. It is modeled after the successful Kootenay Lake fertilization experiment. The amount of fertilizer added in 2002 and 2003 was similar to the previous three years. Phosphorus loading from fertilizer was 52.8 metric tons and nitrogen loading from fertilizer was 268 metric tons. As in previous years, fertilizer additions occurred between the end of April and the beginning of September. Surface temperatures were generally warmer in 2003 than in 2002 in the Arrow Lakes Reservoir from May to September. Local tributary flows to Arrow Lakes Reservoir in 2002 and 2003 were generally less than average, however not as low as had occurred in 2001. Water chemistry parameters in select rivers and streams were similar to previous years results, except for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations which were significantly less in 2001, 2002 and 2003. The reduced snow pack in 2001 and 2003 would explain the lower concentrations of DIN. The natural load of DIN to the Arrow system ranged from 7200 tonnes in 1997 to 4500 tonnes in 2003; these results coincide with the decrease in DIN measurements from water samples taken in the reservoir during this period. Water chemistry parameters in the reservoir were similar to previous years of study except for a few exceptions. Seasonal averages of total phosphorus ranged from 2.11 to 7.42 {micro}g/L from 1997 through 2003 in the entire reservoir which were indicative of oligo-mesotrophic conditions

  20. Characterization of two exon-skipping mutations (3120G{r_arrow}A, 3600G{r_arrow}A) in the CFTR gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zielendki, J.; Markiewicz, D.; Ainsworth, P.J.

    1994-09-01

    Many different types of mutations have been identified in the CFTR gene in patients with cystic fibrosis. Due to the large size of the gene (230 kb), CF mutations have been primarily detected by genomic DNA analysis. While some of the sequence alterations, such as nonsense and frameshift mutations, provide immediate clues to possible molecular consequence, others such as missense mutations are less apparent in their involvement in the disease. In our systematic scanning of the entire coding regions of the CFTR gene for a group of CF patients carrying unknown mutations, two different G to A substitutions located at the last nucleotide position of an exon were identified in two patients. The first one, 3120G{r_arrow}A, is located in exon 16 and the other one, 3600G{r_arrow}A, in exon 18 of the CFTR gene. Both of them are also located at the third position of the corresponding amino acid codon (CAG and TTC, respectively). As a result, the changes would not affect the encoded amino acids (Glu and Leu, respectively). To demonstrate that these are in fact pathologic mutations, we have investigated the CFTR transcripts in these two patients. The results of RT-PCR analysis revealed that aberrant splicing occurred in both cases: transcripts missing exon 16 and 18 were present in the 2 patients, respectively. No normal product was detectable from the 3120G{r_arrow}A and 3600G{r_arrow}A alleles, suggesting that the normal-sized products were exclusively derived from the {triangle}F508 mutant alleles in both of these patients. Hence, we conclude that both 3120G{r_arrow}A and 3600G{r_arrow}A mutations cause exon-skipping leading to premature termination and truncation of CFTR and that the altered G residue in each of these exons is probably part of the splice donor sequence important for efficient mRNA splicing.

  1. Rare decay {eta}{r_arrow}{pi}{pi}{gamma}{gamma} in chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Knoechlein, G.; Scherer, S.; Drechsel, D.

    1996-04-01

    We investigate the rare radiative {eta} decay modes {eta}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{gamma}{gamma} and {eta}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}{gamma} within the framework of chiral perturbation theory at {ital O}({ital p}{sup 4}). We present photon spectra and partial decay rates for both processes as well as a Dalitz contour plot for the charged decay. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Arrows of time in the bouncing universes of the no-boundary quantum state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartle, James; Hertog, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    We derive the arrows of time of our universe that follow from the no-boundary theory of its quantum state (NBWF) in a minisuperspace model. Arrows of time are viewed four-dimensionally as properties of the four-dimensional Lorentzian histories of the universe. Probabilities for these histories are predicted by the NBWF. For histories with a regular “bounce” at a minimum radius fluctuations are small at the bounce and grow in the direction of expansion on either side. For recollapsing classical histories with big bang and big crunch singularities the fluctuations are small near one singularity and grow through the expansion and recontraction to the other singularity. The arrow of time defined by the growth in fluctuations thus points in one direction over the whole of a recollapsing spacetime but is bidirectional in a bouncing spacetime. We argue that the electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and psychological arrows of time are aligned with the fluctuation arrow. The implications of a bidirectional arrow of time for causality are discussed.

  3. Application of HQET to B {r_arrow} K{sup *} transitions

    SciTech Connect

    W. Roberts; F. Ledroit

    1995-10-01

    The authors examine the measured rates for the decays D {r_arrow} K{sup *}l{nu}, B {r_arrow} K{sup *}{psi}{prime} and B {r_arrow} K{sup *}{gamma} in a number of scenarios, in the framework of the heavy quark effective theory. They attempt to find a scenario in which all of these decays are described by a single set of form factors. Once such a scenario is found, they make predictions for the rare decays B {r_arrow} K{sup *}l{sup +}l{sup {minus}}. While they find that many scenarios can provide adequate descriptions of all the data, somewhat surprisingly, they observe that two popular choices of form factors, namely monopolar forms and exponential forms, exhibit some shortcomings, especially when confronted with polarization observables. They predict Br({anti B}{sup 0} {r_arrow} {anti K}{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}) = 6.4 {+-} 1.0 x 10{sup {minus}7} and Br({anti B}{sup 0} {r_arrow} {anti K}{sup *0}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}) = 3.8 {+-} 1.3 x 10{sup {minus}6}. They also make predictions for polarization observables in these decays.

  4. DNA → RNA: What Do Students Think the Arrow Means?

    PubMed Central

    Fisk, J. Nick; Newman, Dina L.

    2014-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology, a model that has remained intact for decades, describes the transfer of genetic information from DNA to protein though an RNA intermediate. While recent work has illustrated many exceptions to the central dogma, it is still a common model used to describe and study the relationship between genes and protein products. We investigated understanding of central dogma concepts and found that students are not primed to think about information when presented with the canonical figure of the central dogma. We also uncovered conceptual errors in student interpretation of the meaning of the transcription arrow in the central dogma representation; 36% of students (n = 128; all undergraduate levels) described transcription as a chemical conversion of DNA into RNA or suggested that RNA existed before the process of transcription began. Interviews confirm that students with weak conceptual understanding of information flow find inappropriate meaning in the canonical representation of central dogma. Therefore, we suggest that use of this representation during instruction can be counterproductive unless educators are explicit about the underlying meaning. PMID:26086664

  5. High-resolution {upsilon}{sub OH} = 3{l_arrow}0 and {upsilon}{sub OH} = 4{l_arrow}0 overtone spectroscopy of HOD

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, J.R.; Votava, O.; Nesbitt, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    High-resolution (0.005 cm{sup -1}) IR overtone excitation with an injection seeded optical parametric oscillator (OPO) is used to investigate the spectroscopy of HOD in the {upsilon}{sub OH} = 3{l_arrow}0 region via room temperature photoacoustic detection methods. Comparison of the photoacoustic spectra from an H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O/HOD mixture and from pure H{sub 2}O determines the lines corresponding to {upsilon}{sub OH} = 3{l_arrow}0 absorptions in HOD. A prediction of the HOD spectrum in this region is generated from an extrapolation of {upsilon}{sub OH} = 0 and 1 rotational constants and from the {upsilon}{sub OH} = 3{l_arrow}0 band origin calculated by Tennyson and coworkers [private communication]. This predicted spectrum enables the HOD {upsilon}{sub OH} = 3{l_arrow}0 photoacoustic spectrum to be assigned; a fit of the experimental data produces the low-order rotational constants for this transition as well as a Birge-Sponer analysis of the overtone series. The vibrational dependence of the HOD rotational constants is demonstrated to be quite linear in {upsilon}{sub OH}, permitting reliable extrapolation to the {upsilon}{sub OH} = 4 manifold. As a result, the {upsilon}{sub OH} = 0, 1 and 3 constants can be used to predict the spectrum of HOD {upsilon}{sub OH} = 4{l_arrow}0, which now enables the assignment of the vibrationally mediated photodissociation spectrum measured by Crim and coworkers. The overtone spectroscopic data for HOD is further confirmed in double resonance IR and UV photolysis of HOD and HOD-containing clusters in slit supersonic expansions.

  6. Spectrum of the elimination of loops and multiple arrows in coupled cell networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, A. P. S.; Moreira, C. S.

    2012-11-01

    A uniform lift of a given network is a network with no loops and no multiple arrows that admits the first network as quotient. Given a regular network (in which all cells have the same type and receive the same number of inputs and all arrows have the same type) with loops or multiple arrows, we prove that it is always possible to construct a uniform lift whose adjacency matrix has only two possible eigenvalues, namely, 0 and -1, in addition to all eigenvalues of the initial network adjacency matrix. Moreover, this uniform lift has the minimal number of cells over all uniform lifts. We also prove that if a non-vanishing eigenvalue of the initial adjacency matrix is fixed then it is always possible to construct a uniform lift that preserves the number of eigenvalues with the same real part of that eigenvalue. Finally, for the eigenvalue zero we show that such a construction is not always possible proving that there are networks with multiple arrows whose uniform lifts all have the eigenvalue 0, in addition to all eigenvalues of the initial network adjacency matrix. Using the concept of ODE-equivalence, we prove then that it is always possible to study a degenerate bifurcation arising in a system whose regular network has multiple arrows as a bifurcation of a bigger system associated with a regular uniform network.

  7. Expression pattern of the Brachyury gene in the arrow worm paraspadella gotoi (chaetognatha).

    PubMed

    Takada, Norio; Goto, Taichiro; Satoh, Nori

    2002-03-01

    Arrow worms (the phylum Chaetognatha), which are among the major marine planktonic animals, are direct developers and exhibit features characteristic of both deuterostomes and protostomes. In particular, the embryonic development of arrow worms appears to be of the deuterostome type. Brachyury functions critically in the formation of the notochord in chordates, whereas the gene is expressed in both the blastopore and stomodeum invagination regions in embryos of hemichordates and echinoderms. Here we analyzed the expression of Brachyury (Pg-Bra) in the arrow worm Paraspadella gotoi and showed that Pg-Bra is expressed in the blastopore region and the stomodeum region in the embryo and then around the mouth opening region at the time of hatching. The expression of Pg-Bra in the embryo resembles that of Brachyury in embryos of hemichordates and echinoderms, whereas that in the mouth opening region in the hatchling appears to be novel. PMID:11892013

  8. Electrophysiological responses to violations of expectation from eye gaze and arrow cues.

    PubMed

    Tipples, Jason; Johnston, Pat; Mayes, Angela

    2013-06-01

    Isolating processes within the brain that are specific to human behavior is a key goal for social neuroscience. The current research was an attempt to test whether recent findings of enhanced negative ERPs in response to unexpected human gaze are unique to eye gaze stimuli by comparing the effects of gaze cues with the effects of an arrow cue. ERPs were recorded while participants (N = 30) observed a virtual actor or an arrow that gazed (or pointed) either toward (object congruent) or away from (object incongruent) a flashing checkerboard. An enhanced negative ERP (N300) in response to object incongruent compared to object congruent trials was recorded for both eye gaze and arrow stimuli. The findings are interpreted as reflecting a domain general mechanism for detecting unexpected events. PMID:22345367

  9. Arrow-Elicited Cueing Effects at Short Intervals: Rapid Attentional Orienting or Cue-Target Stimulus Conflict?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jessica J.; Woldorff, Marty G.

    2012-01-01

    The observation of cueing effects (faster responses for cued than uncued targets) rapidly following centrally-presented arrows has led to the suggestion that arrows trigger rapid automatic shifts of spatial attention. However, these effects have primarily been observed during easy target-detection tasks when both cue and target remain on the…

  10. Parametric flutter studies of an arrow-wing configuration: Some early results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Michael H.; Cole, Stanley R.; Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Keller, Donald F.; Parker, Ellen C.; Wilkie, W. Keats

    1988-01-01

    Some early experimental results from a combined experimental and analytical study being conducted at NASA-Langley of the transonic flutter characterisitics of a generic arrow wing configuration are presented. The planned study includes the parametric variation of a variety of structural and geometric characteristics. Presented here are flutter results of the basic arrow wing, for the basic wing with the addition of two simulated lower-surface-mounted engine nacelles, and for the basic wing with the addition of both the fin and the engine nacelles.

  11. Evidence for the Decay K{sup +}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar v}

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, S.; Atiya, M.S.; Chiang, I.; Diwan, M.V.; Frank, J.S.; Haggerty, J.S.; Kettell, S.H.; Kycia, T.F.; Li, K.K.; Littenberg, L.S.; Ng, C.; Sambamurti, A.; Stevens, A.; Strand, R.C.; Witzig, C.; Komatsubara, T.K.; Kuriki, M.; Muramatsu, N.; Sugimoto, S.; Inagaki, T.; Kabe, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Kuno, Y.; Sato, T.; Shinkawa, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kishi, Y.; Nakano, T.; Ardebili, M.; Bazarko, A.O.; Convery, M.R.; Ito, M.M.; Marlow, D.R.; McPherson, R.A.; Meyers, P.D.; Shoemaker, F.C.; Smith, A.J.; Stone, J.R.; Aoki, M.; Blackmore, E.W.; Bergbusch, P.C.; Bryman, D.A.; Konaka, A.; Macdonald, J.A.; Mildenberger, J.; Numao, T.; Padley, P.; Poutissou, J.; Poutissou, R.; Redlinger, G.; Roy, J.; Turcot, A.S.; Kitching, P.; Soluk, R.

    1997-09-01

    An event consistent with the signature expected for the rare kaon decay K{sup +}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}} has been observed. In the pion momentum region examined, 211{lt}P{lt}230 MeV/c , the backgrounds are estimated to contribute 0.08{plus_minus}0.03 events. If the event is due to K{sup +}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}} , the branching ratio is 4.2{sup +9.7}{sub {minus}3.5}{times}10{sup {minus}10} . {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Penetrating neck injury by an arrow: a paradigm of age old assault.

    PubMed

    Nepal, A; Joshi, R R; Bhandary, S; Mathur, N N; Roka, Y B; Yadav, R

    2010-03-01

    Penetrating neck injuries by traditional weapons are rare entity in the modern era of sophisticated weapons. We report an unusual case of penetrating neck injury by a metallic arrow entering anterior neck in zone II and its tip coming out of neck posteriorly causing difficulty for patient to lie down as well as posing challenge to intubate. Arrows are low velocity projectile and from a close proximity they can cause penetrating trauma similar to a low powered handgun. Management of the case was discussed. PMID:20677615

  13. Hollywood Addresses Postwar Assimilation: Indian/White Attitudes in "Broken Arrow."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aleiss, Angela

    1987-01-01

    Examines Western films in context of post-World War II attitudes regarding racial equality. Film "Broken Arrow" and Eliott Arnold's novel "Blood Brother," both recounting story of Apache chief Cochise, examined as benchmark works in national racial attitudes. Films generally seen as supporting Indian assimilation into White culture. (TES)

  14. How Do Selected Arrows Guide Visuospatial Attention? Dissociating Symbolic Value and Spatial Proximity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leblanc, Emilie; Jolicoeur, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on the control of visuospatial attention showed that overlearned symbols like arrows have the potential to induce involuntary shifts of attention. Following work on the role of attentional control settings and of the content of working memory in the involuntary deployment of visuospatial attention, Pratt and Hommel (2003) found…

  15. Making Sense of the Arrow-Pushing Formalism among Chemistry Majors Enrolled in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Robert; Bodner, George M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports results of a qualitative study of sixteen students enrolled in a second year organic chemistry course for chemistry and chemical engineering majors. The focus of the study was student use of the arrow-pushing formalism that plays a central role in both the teaching and practice of organic chemistry. The goal of the study was to…

  16. The Effect of Arrow Diagrams on Achievement in Applying the Chain Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uygur, Tangul; Ozdas, Aynur

    2007-01-01

    In this study the effectiveness of an arrow diagram which can help students apply the Chain Rule was investigated. Different variations of this diagram were used as mnemonic devices for applying the Chain Rule. For the investigation two instruments were developed, diagnostic test and post-test. The diagnostic test was developed to determine the…

  17. Six Impossible Mechanisms before Breakfast: Arrow Pushing as an Instructional Device in Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Steffen; Ghosh, Abhik

    2013-01-01

    In a recent article by the authors, the suggestion was made that arrow pushing, a widely used tool in organic chemistry, could also be profitably employed in the teaching of introductory inorganic chemistry. A number of relatively simple reactions were used to illustrate this thesis, raising the question whether the same approach might rationalize…

  18. Decorating with Arrows: Toward the Development of Representational Competence in Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Nathaniel P.; Cooper, Melanie M.; Rush, Kelli M.

    2012-01-01

    Much effort has been expended in developing improved methods for presenting mechanistic thinking and the curved-arrow notation to organic chemistry students; however, most of these techniques are not research-based. The little research that has been conducted has mainly focused on understanding the meaning that students associate with the…

  19. Reflexive Orienting in Response to Eye Gaze and an Arrow in Children with and without Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senju, Atsushi; Tojo, Yoshikuni; Dairoku, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2004-01-01

    Background: This study investigated whether another person's social attention, specifically the direction of their eye gaze, and a non-social directional cue, an arrow, triggered reflexive orienting in children with and without autism in an experimental situation. Methods: Children with autism and typically developed children participated in one…

  20. A Couple of "Lim (h[right arrow]0)-Is-Missing" Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Ko Hin

    2007-01-01

    Since most students "hate" the concept of limit, in order to make them "happier," this article suggests a couple of naive "lim (h[right arrow]0)-is-missing" problems for them to try for fun. Indeed, differential functional equations that are related to difference quotients in calculus are studied in this paper. In particular, two interesting…

  1. Design, fabrication, and characterization of Si-based ARROW photonic crystal bend waveguides and power splitters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Hua; Huang, Yang-Tung; Yang, Yu-Lin; Lu, Ming-Feng; Shieh, Jia-Min

    2012-08-20

    Silicon-based (Si-based) photonic crystal waveguide based on antiresonant reflecting optical waveguide (ARROW PCW) structures consisting of 60° bends and Y-branch power splitters were designed and first efficiently fabricated and characterized. The ARROW structure has a relatively large core size suitable for efficient coupling with a single-mode fiber. Simple capsule-shaped topography defects at 60° photonic crystal (PC) bend corners and Y-branch PC power splitters were used for increasing the broadband light transmission. In the preliminary measurements, the propagation losses of the ARROW PC straight waveguides lower than 2 dB/mm with a long length of 1500 μm were achieved. The average bend loss of 60° PC bend waveguides was lower than 3 dB/bend. For the Y-branch PC power splitters, the average power imbalance was lower than 0.6 dB. The results show that our fabricated Si-based ARROW PCWs with 60° bends and Y-branch structures can provide good light transmission and power-splitting ability. PMID:22907016

  2. Ballistic parameters and trauma potential of carbon dioxide-actuated arrow pistols.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tien Thanh; Grossjohann, Rico; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Bockholdt, Britta; Frank, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    Medical literature abounds with reports of injuries and fatalities caused by arrows and crossbow bolts. Crossbows are of particular forensic and traumatological interest, because their mode of construction allows for temporary mechanical storage of energy. A newly developed type of pistol (Arcus Arrowstar), which belongs to the category of air and carbon dioxide weapons, discharges arrow-shaped bolts actuated by carbon dioxide cylinders. As, to the best of the authors' knowledge, literature contains no information on this uncommon subclass of weapons it is the aim of this work to provide the experimental data and to assess the trauma potential of these projectiles based on the ascertained physical parameters. Basic kinetic parameters of these carbon dioxide-actuated bolts (velocity v = 39 m/s, energy E = 7.2 J, energy density E' = 0.26 J/mm(2)) are similar to bolts discharged by pistol crossbows. Subsequent firing resulted in a continuous and fast decrease in kinetic energy of the arrows. Test shots into ballistic soap blocks reveal a high penetration capacity, especially when compared to conventional projectiles of equal kinetic energy values (like, e.g., airgun pellets). To conclude, these data demonstrate the high efficiency of arrow-shaped projectiles, which are also characterized by a high cross-sectional density (ratio of mass to cross-sectional area of a projectile). PMID:25246008

  3. Eye Gaze versus Arrows as Spatial Cues: Two Qualitatively Different Modes of Attentional Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marotta, Andrea; Lupianez, Juan; Martella, Diana; Casagrande, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the type of attentional selection (location- and/or object-based) triggered by two different types of central noninformative cues: eye gaze and arrows. Two rectangular objects were presented in the visual field, and subjects' attention was directed to the end of a rectangle via the observation of noninformative…

  4. Review of Cranked-Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project: Its International Aeronautical Community Role

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Obara, Clifford J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a brief history of the F-16XL-1 aircraft, its role in the High Speed Research (HSR) program and how it was morphed into the Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project (CAWAP). Various flight, wind-tunnel and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) data sets were generated during the CAWAP. These unique and open flight datasets for surface pressures, boundary-layer profiles and skinfriction distributions, along with surface flow data, are described and sample data comparisons given. This is followed by a description of how the project became internationalized to be known as Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project International (CAWAPI) and is concluded by an introduction to the results of a 4 year CFD predictive study of data collected at flight conditions by participating researchers.

  5. From the Dynamics of Coupled Map Lattices to the Psychological Arrow of Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmanspacher, Harald; Filk, Thomas; Scheingraber, Herbert

    2006-10-01

    Stable neuronal assemblies are generally regarded as neural correlates of mental representations. Their temporal sequence corresponds to the experience of a direction of time, sometimes called the psychological time arrow. We show that the stability of particular, biophysically motivated models of neuronal assemblies, called coupled map lattices, is supported by causal interactions among neurons and obstructed by non-causal or anti-causal interactions among neurons. This surprising relation between causality and stability suggests that those neuronal assemblies that are stable due to causal neuronal interactions, and thus correlated with mental representations, generate a psychological time arrow. Yet this impact of causal interactions among neurons on the directed sequence of mental representations does not rule out the possibility of mentally less efficacious non-causal or anti-causal interactions among neurons.

  6. The Significance of Causally Coupled, Stable Neuronal Assemblies for the Psychological Time Arrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmanspacher, Harald; Filk, Thomas; Scheingraber, Herbert

    2005-10-01

    Stable neuronal assemblies are generally regarded as neural correlates of mental representations. Their temporal sequence corresponds to the experience of a direction of time, sometimes called the psychological time arrow. We show that the stability of particular, biophysically motivated models of neuronal assemblies, called coupled map lattices, is supported by causal interactions among neurons and obstructed by non-causal or anti-causal interactions among neurons. This surprising relation between causality and stability suggests that those neuronal assemblies that are stable due to causal neuronal interactions, and thus correlated with mental representations, generate a psychological time arrow. Yet this impact of causal interactions among neurons on the directed sequence of mental representations does not rule out the possibility of mentally less efficacious non-causal or anti-causal interactions among neurons.

  7. Poor vigilance affects attentional orienting triggered by central uninformative gaze and arrow cues.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Andrea; Martella, Diana; Maccari, Lisa; Sebastiani, Mara; Casagrande, Maria

    2014-11-01

    Behaviour and neuroimaging studies have shown that poor vigilance (PV) due to sleep deprivation (SD) negatively affects exogenously cued selective attention. In the current study, we assessed the impact of PV due to both partial SD and night-time hours on reflexive attentional orienting triggered by central un-informative eye-gaze and arrow cues. Subjective mood and interference performance in emotional Stroop task were also investigated. Twenty healthy participants performed spatial cueing tasks using central directional arrow and eye-gaze as a cue to orient attention. The target was a word written in different coloured inks. The participant's task was to identify the colour of the ink while ignoring the semantic content of the word (with negative or neutral emotional valence). The experiment took place on 2 days. On the first day, each participant performed a 10-min training session of the spatial cueing task. On the second day, half of participants performed the task once at 4:30 p.m. (BSL) and once at 6:30 a.m. (PV), whereas the other half performed the task in the reversed order. Results showed that mean reaction times on the spatial cueing tasks were worsened by PV, although gaze paradigm was more resistant to this effect as compared to the arrow paradigm. Moreover, PV negatively affects attentional orienting triggered by both central un-informative gaze and arrow cues. Finally, prolonged wakefulness affects self-reported mood but does not influence interference control in emotional Stroop task. PMID:24718933

  8. Effects of vortex flaps on the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of an arrow wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, L. P.; Murri, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley 12-foot low-speed wind-tunnel to determine the longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic effects of plain and tabbed vortex flaps on a flat-plate, highly swept arrow-wing model. Flow-visualization studies were made using a helium-bubble technique. Static forces and moments were measured over an angle-of-attack range from 0 deg to 50deg for sideslip angles of 0 deg and + or - 4 deg.

  9. Attentional orienting induced by arrows and eye-gaze compared with an endogenous cue.

    PubMed

    Brignani, D; Guzzon, D; Marzi, C A; Miniussi, C

    2009-01-01

    Exogenous orienting has been widely studied by using peripheral cues whereas endogenous orienting has been studied with directional central cues. However, recent evidence has shown that centrally presented eye-gaze and arrows may produce an automatic rather than voluntary orienting of attention. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the behavioural and electrophysiological (event-related potentials-ERP) correlates of the attentional shift induced by arrows and eye-gaze. In order to have a control condition, we compared arrows and eye-gaze with a purely endogenous cue, i.e., a texture arbitrarily coding one direction. We analyzed the ERP components (P1, N1, P2a, P2p, P3) elicited by the cue stimuli and the early lateralised attentional effect (early directing attention negativity-EDAN). In addition, in order to investigate the topography of the neural mechanisms underlying the cortical activity in each cueing condition, we applied a temporal segmentation procedure. The results showed that the three cueing conditions induced a different strength of activation within the same cortical network. Occipito-parietal regions were involved in the early processing of visual information, followed by an involvement of frontal areas, likely implicated in learning associations. These data confirm the assumption that, in contrast to purely endogenous cues, arrows and eye-gaze induce a very fast attentional shift. However, the similarity of the ERP components and of the topographical cortical maps among conditions suggest that this early orienting of attention is more likely related to an overlearned association mechanism rather than to a real exogenous attentional process. PMID:18926835

  10. Sociopolitical complexity and the bow and arrow in the American Southwest.

    PubMed

    VanPool, Todd L; O'Brien, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of sociopolitical complexity, including heightened relations of cooperation and competition among large nonkin groups, has long been a central focus of anthropological research. Anthropologists suggest any number of variables that affect the waxing and waning of complexity and define the precise trajectories that groups take, including population density, subsistence strategies, warfare, the distribution of resources, and trade relationships. Changes in weaponry, here the introduction of the bow and arrow, can have profound implications for population aggregation and density, subsistence and settlement strategies, and access to resources, trade, and warfare.Bingham and Souza provide a general conceptual model for the relationship between complexity and the bow and arrow, arguing that this compound weapon system, whereby smaller projectiles travel at higher speed and are capable of hitting targets more accurately and at greater distances than hand-thrown darts, fundamentally favors the formation of larger groups because it allows for cost-effective means of dealing with conflicts of interest through social coercion, thereby dramatically transforming kin-based social relations. Here we consider the impacts the introduction of the bow and arrow had on sociopolitical complexity in the North American Southwest. PMID:23776047

  11. Expression of actin genes in the arrow worm Paraspadella gotoi (Chaetognatha).

    PubMed

    Yasuda, E; Goto, T; Makabe, K W; Satoh, N

    1997-12-01

    Arrow worms (the phylum Chaetognatha), one of the major marine planktonic animals, exhibit features characteristic to both deuterostomes and protostomes, and their ancestry therefore remains unknown. As the first step to elucidate the molecular bases of arrow worm phylogeny, physiology and embryology, we isolated cDNA clones for three different actin genes (PgAct1, PgAct2 and PgAct3) from the benthic species Paraspadella gotoi, and examined their expression patterns in adults and juveniles. The amino acid sequences of the three actins resembled each other, with identities ranging from 86% to 92%. However, the patterns of the spatial expression of the genes were independent. The PgAct1 gene might encode a cytoplasmic actin and was expressed in oogenic cells, spermatogenic cells, and cells in the ventral ganglion. The PgAct2 and PgAct3 genes encoded actins of divergent types. The former was expressed in well-developed muscle of the head (gnathic) region and trunk muscle cells, whereas the latter was expressed in muscle of the trunk and tail regions and oogenic cells. These results suggest that, similarly to other metazoans, the chaetognath contains multiple forms of actins, which are expressed in various manners in the adult and juvenile arrow worm. PMID:9520638

  12. Biostratigraphy and paleoenvironment of Morrowan (Zone 2) brachiopoda, Bird Spring Group, Arrow Canyon, Clark County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Vaiden, R.C.; Langenheim, R.L.

    1985-02-01

    Comprehensive study of the Morrowan brachiopod faunas of the Bird Spring Group at Arrow Canyon, Clark County, Nevada, is important because the section has been suggested as a stratotype for the base and top of the Pennsylvanian Subsystem and for the Atoka Series. Twenty-three species of brachiopods belonging to 17 genera occur in zone 20 at Arrow Canyon. Many of these also occur in described Morrowan faunas in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico; but similarities with the Mid-Continent and Appalachian assemblages are less. However, no striking regional differences are evident, and it appears that the North American Morrowan fauna is more or less homogeneous. In contrast to the exotic South American and Arctic elements known from Atokan, Missourian, and Virgilian rocks at Arrow Canyon, no foreign taxa have been noted in zone 20. Microfacies and faunal association indicate four distinct brachiopod-bearing environments; (1) relatively deep water below turbulence with few brachiopods on a soft substrate; (2) somewhat shallower, more turbulent water with many species, of which only a few are represented by large populations, living on a more firm substrate; (3) environments just below the zone of turbulence in which many species of brachiopods are represented by substantial populations on a calcarenitic substrate; and (4) crinoidal bars in the zone of turbulence with a few species represented by relatively few individuals.

  13. Evidence for K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}}

    SciTech Connect

    KETTELL,S.

    1998-12-18

    The first observation of the decay K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} has been reported. The E787 experiment presented evidence for the K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} decay, based on the observation of a single clean event from data collected during the 1995 run of the AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory). The branching ratio indicated by this observation, B(K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}}) = 4.2{sub {minus}3.5}{sup +9.7} x 10{sup {minus}10}, is consistent with the Standard Model expectation although the central experimental value is four times larger. The final E787 data sample, from the 1995--98 runs, should reach a sensitivity of about five times that of the 1995 run alone. A new experiment, E949, has been given scientific approval and should start data collection in 2001. It is expected to achieve a sensitivity of more than an order of magnitude below the prediction of the Standard Model.

  14. Evidence for {Kappa}{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{anti {nu}}

    SciTech Connect

    Kettell, S.

    1998-12-31

    The first observation of the decay {Kappa}{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{anti {nu}} has been reported. The E787 experiment presented evidence for the {Kappa}{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{anti {nu}} decay, based on the observation of a single clean event from data collected during the 1995 run of the AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory). The branching ratio indicated by this observation, {Beta}({Kappa}{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{anti {nu}}) = 4.2{sub {minus}3.5}{sup +9.7} {times} 10{sup {minus}10}, is consistent with the Standard Model expectation although the central experimental value is four times larger. The final E787 data sample, from the 1995--98 runs, should reach a sensitivity of about five times that of the 1995 run alone. A new experiment, E949, has been given scientific approval and should start data collection in 2001. It is expected to achieve a sensitivity of more than an order of magnitude below the prediction of the Standard Model.

  15. Evidence for K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{anti {nu}}

    SciTech Connect

    Kettell, S.; E787 Collaboration; E949 Collaboration

    1998-12-31

    The decay K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{anti {nu}} has been observed for the first time. The E787 experiment has presented evidence for the K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{anti {nu}} decay, based on the observation of a single clean event from data collected during the 1995 run of the AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory). The branching ratio indicated by this observation, B(K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{anti {nu}}) = 4.2{sub {minus}3.5}{sup +9.7} {times} 10{sup {minus}10}, is consistent with the Standard Model expectation although the central experimental value is four times larger. The final E787 data sample, from the 1995--99 runs, should reach a sensitivity of about eight times that of the 1995 run alone. A new experiment, E949, has been approved to run, starting in the year 2000, and is expected to achieve a sensitivity of more than an order of magnitude below the prediction of the Standard Model.

  16. CP violation in the exclusive decays B{r_arrow}{pi}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and B{r_arrow}{rho}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, F.; Sehgal, L.M.

    1997-11-01

    As a sequel to the calculation of the CP-violating asymmetry in the decay rates of b{r_arrow}dl{sup +}l{sup {minus}} and {bar b}{r_arrow}{bar d}l{sup +}l{sup {minus}}, we address in this paper the asymmetry in exclusive channels {bar B}{r_arrow}{pi}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} and {bar B}{r_arrow}{rho}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, using form factors from two different models. In the invariant mass region 1GeV{lt}{radical} (s) {lt}M{sub J/{psi}}, the partial width asymmetry in the channel {bar B}{r_arrow}{pi} is {minus}6{percent} ({minus}2{percent}), and that in the channel {bar B}{r_arrow}{rho}, for one choice of form factors, is {minus}5{percent} ({minus}2{percent}), assuming Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa parameters {eta}=0.34, {rho}=0.3 ({minus}0.3). We also calculate the forward-backward asymmetry A{sub FB} of the e{sup {minus}} in the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} center-of-mass system, and find average values {l_angle}A{sub FB}{r_angle}{sub {bar B}{r_arrow}{pi}}{equivalent_to}0, {l_angle}A{sub FB}{r_angle}{sub {bar B}{r_arrow}{rho}}={minus}17{percent}, to be compared with the inclusive result {l_angle}A{sub FB}{r_angle}{sub b{r_arrow}d}={minus}9{percent}. There is a CP-violating difference between A{sub FB} and the corresponding asymmetry in the antiparticle channel {bar A}{sub FB}. Formulas are given that are applicable to any flavor-changing neutral current channel {bar B}{r_arrow}P{sub q}(V{sub q})l{sup +}l{sup {minus}}, q=s,d, with m{sub l}{ne}0, including lepton spin effects. An approximate procedure is used to incorporate the {rho}, {omega}, and J/{psi} resonances. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Form factors of the transitions {gamma}{sup *}{pi}{sup 0} {r_arrow} {gamma} and {gamma}{sup *}{eta}{r_arrow}{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasev, A.

    1994-04-01

    The author discusses possibilities to study {gamma}*{pi}{sup 0} and {gamma}*{eta} {r_arrow} {gamma} transition form factors at CEBAF energies. The author shows that for 4 GeV electron beam, these form factors can be measured at CEBAF for the 4-momentum transfers Q{sup 2} {le} 2.5 (GeV/c){sup 2} using virtual Compton scattering on the proton and nuclear target in the kinematic regime of low momentum transfers to the target. These measurements can be extended to Q{sup 2} {le} 4.0 (GeV/c){sup 2} using the electron beam with the energy 6 GeV.

  18. Complete leading order analysis in Chiral Perturbation Theory of the decays K{sub L}{r_arrow}{gamma}{gamma} and K{sub L}{r_arrow}l{sub +}l{sub {minus}}{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Goity; Longzhe Zhang

    1997-02-01

    The decays K{sub L}{r_arrow}{gamma}{gamma} and K{sub L}{r_arrow}l{sup +}l{sup {minus}}{gamma} are studied at the leading order p{sup 6} in Chiral Perturbation Theory. One-loop contributions stemming from the odd intrinsic parity {vert_bar}{Delta}S{vert_bar}=1 effective Lagrangian of order p{sup 4} are included and shown to be of possible relevance. They affect the decay K{sub L}{r_arrow}{gamma}{gamma} adding to the usual pole terms a piece free of counterterm uncertainties. In the case of the K{sub L}{r_arrow}l{sup +}l{sup {minus}}{gamma} decays the dependence of the form factor on the dilepton invariant mass requires a counterterm. The form factor may receive a sizeable contribution from chiral logarithms. Including considerations from the K{sub L}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{gamma} direct emission amplitude, the authors obtain two consistent scenarios. In one scenario the long distance contributions from the one-loop terms are important, while in the other they are marginal. In both cases the counterterm is shown to be significant.

  19. A 170 J electron beam pumped XeF(C{r_arrow}A) laser

    SciTech Connect

    Litzenberger, L.N.; Smith, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    A pulse output energy of 170 J has been achieved from an XeF (C{r_arrow}A) laser system, pumped by a pair of counterpropagating, three-meter-long electron beams. This represents a record for all types of pumping, for this excimer system. Energy was extracted from a volume of {approximately}100 L, using a free-running stable oscillator. No evidence of laser oscillations on the competing XeF(B{r_arrow}X) transition was observed. Within the extraction volume the laser gas was pumped at a rate of 140 kW/cm{sup 3} (time average value), for a period of 1.7 {mu}s. The optical cavity was folded, giving a gain length of 6 m. The optical pulse duration was 0.8 {mu}s (full width at half maximum), and the observed flux buildup time of {approximately}1 {mu}s was consistent with modeling and a measurement of the net gain. The specific output energy was 1.7 J/L which is comparable to that achieved in previous, small scale experiments at somewhat higher pump rate. The results confirm the volumetric scalability of the electron beam pumped XeF(C{r_arrow}A) laser system to high output energy per pulse, and the feasibility of operating this system at a low electron beam pump rate which relaxes constraints on the design of the electron gun and pulse power subsystems in a high output energy device. Means for extending the laser pulse duration and increasing the output energy of the specific test device are discussed. An output energy of {approximately}1,000 J is projected for an optimized gas cell width, for full size resonator mirrors, and with injection.

  20. Analysis of trace elements in the giant panda and arrow bamboo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nengming; Chen, Suqing; Chen, Jianxuan; Zhang, Dazhong; Feng, Wenhe

    1987-04-01

    Trace elements from the giant panda including hair, liver, kidney, ovary and testis, were determined by PIXE. Comparative studies of the elemental contents in hair, liver and kidney from epileptic and normal giant pandas were performed respectively. The differences in the elemental contents of leaf, stalk, and bamboo shoots from normal and withered arrows were determined. For this research work a Van de Graaff electrostatic accelerator and a Si(Li) semiconductor spectrometer at the Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology of Sichuan University were employed.

  1. Target asymmetry measurements of {gamma} p{r_arrow}{pi} {sup +}n with Phoenics at ELSA

    SciTech Connect

    Althoff, K.; Anton, G.; Arends, J.; Beulertz, W.; Bock, A.; Breuer, M.; Detemple, P.; Dutz, H.; Gehring, R.; Gemander, M.; Goertz, S.; Helbing, K.; Hey, J.; Kraemer, D.; Meyer, W.; Noeldeke, G.; Reicherz, G.; Thomas, A.; Zucht, B.

    1995-05-10

    The target asymmetry T of the reaction {gamma} p{r_arrow}{pi} {sup +}n has been measured with the Phoenics detector in combination with the Bonn frozen spin target at ELSA. For the first time the polarization observable T has been determined simultaneously over a large photon energy range (E{sub {gamma}}=220--800 MeV) and pion angles ({Theta}{sub {pi}}{sup m}=35{degree}--135{degree}) with a tagged photon facility. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  2. Arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft structural design concepts evaluation. Volume 1: Sections 1 through 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Davis, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The structural approach best suited for the design of a Mach 2.7 arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft was investigated. Results, procedures, and principal justification of results are presented. Detailed substantiation data are given. In general, each major analysis is presented sequentially in separate sections to provide continuity in the flow of the design concepts analysis effort. In addition to the design concepts evaluation and the detailed engineering design analyses, supporting tasks encompassing: (1) the controls system development; (2) the propulsion-airframe integration study; and (3) the advanced technology assessment are presented.

  3. Advanced structures technology applied to a supersonic cruise arrow-wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Davis, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    The application of advanced technology to a promising aerodynamic configuration was explored to investigate the improved payload range characteristics over the configuration postulated during the National SST Program. The results of an analytical study performed to determine the best structural approach for design of a Mach number 2.7 arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft are highlighted. The data conducted under the auspices of the Structures Directorate of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Langley Research Center, established firm technical bases from which further trend studies were conducted to quantitatively assess the benefits and feasibility of using advanced structures technology to arrive at a viable advanced supersonic cruise aircraft.

  4. Arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft structural design concepts evaluation. Volume 3: Sections 12 through 14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Davis, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The design of an economically viable supersonic cruise aircraft requires the lowest attainable structural-mass fraction commensurate with the selected near-term structural material technology. To achieve this goal of minimum structural-mass fraction, various combinations of promising wing and fuselage primary structure were analyzed for the load-temperature environment applicable to the arrow wing configuration. This analysis was conducted in accordance with the design criteria specified and included extensive use of computer-aided analytical methods to screen the candidate concepts and select the most promising concepts for the in-depth structural analysis.

  5. Transonic pressure measurements and comparison of theory to experiment for three arrow-wing configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manro, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of arrow-wing body configurations consisting of flat, twisted, and cambered twisted wings, as well as a variety of leading and trailing edge control surface deflections, were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.05 to provide an experimental pressure data base for comparison with theoretical methods. Theory to experiment comparisons of detailed pressure distributions were made using state of the art attached flow methods. Conditions under which these theories are valid for these wings are presented.

  6. Arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft structural design concepts evaluation. Volume 4: Sections 15 through 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Davis, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    The analyses performed to provide structural mass estimates for the arrow wing supersonic cruise aircraft are presented. To realize the full potential for structural mass reduction, a spectrum of approaches for the wing and fuselage primary structure design were investigated. The objective was: (1) to assess the relative merits of various structural arrangements, concepts, and materials; (2) to select the structural approach best suited for the Mach 2.7 environment; and (3) to provide construction details and structural mass estimates based on in-depth structural design studies. Production costs, propulsion-airframe integration, and advanced technology assessment are included.

  7. Irreversibility and the Arrow of Time in a Quenched Quantum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalhão, T. B.; Souza, A. M.; Sarthour, R. S.; Oliveira, I. S.; Paternostro, M.; Lutz, E.; Serra, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    Irreversibility is one of the most intriguing concepts in physics. While microscopic physical laws are perfectly reversible, macroscopic average behavior has a preferred direction of time. According to the second law of thermodynamics, this arrow of time is associated with a positive mean entropy production. Using a nuclear magnetic resonance setup, we measure the nonequilibrium entropy produced in an isolated spin-1 /2 system following fast quenches of an external magnetic field. We experimentally demonstrate that it is equal to the entropic distance, expressed by the Kullback-Leibler divergence, between a microscopic process and its time reversal. Our result addresses the concept of irreversibility from a microscopic quantum standpoint.

  8. Irreversibility and the Arrow of Time in a Quenched Quantum System.

    PubMed

    Batalhão, T B; Souza, A M; Sarthour, R S; Oliveira, I S; Paternostro, M; Lutz, E; Serra, R M

    2015-11-01

    Irreversibility is one of the most intriguing concepts in physics. While microscopic physical laws are perfectly reversible, macroscopic average behavior has a preferred direction of time. According to the second law of thermodynamics, this arrow of time is associated with a positive mean entropy production. Using a nuclear magnetic resonance setup, we measure the nonequilibrium entropy produced in an isolated spin-1/2 system following fast quenches of an external magnetic field. We experimentally demonstrate that it is equal to the entropic distance, expressed by the Kullback-Leibler divergence, between a microscopic process and its time reversal. Our result addresses the concept of irreversibility from a microscopic quantum standpoint. PMID:26588367

  9. Supersonic pressure measurements and comparison of theory to experiment for an arrow-wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manro, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of an arrow-wing-body configuration consisting of flat and twisted wings, as well as leading- and trailing-edge control surface deflections, was conducted at Mach numbers from 1.54 to 2.50 to provide an experimental pressure data base for comparison with theoretical methods. Theory-to-experiment comparisons of detailed pressure distributions were made using a state-of-the-art inviscid flow, constant-pressure-panel method. Emphasis was on conditions under which this theory is valid for both flat and twisted wings.

  10. Search for the Rare Decay barB^0 arrow D^*0γ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Johannes

    2003-04-01

    We report on the search for the rare decay barB^0 arrow D^*0γ, which is dominated by a W-exchange and has not yet been observed. This analysis is based on a data sample comprised of 88.9× 10^6 B\\overline B pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC. ^* Work supported by U.S. Dept. of Energy grant DE-FG05-91ER40622.

  11. Spatially resolved X-ray diffraction phase mapping and {alpha} {r_arrow} {beta} {r_arrow} {alpha} transformation kinetics in the heat-affected zone of commercially pure titanium arc welds

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J.W.; Wong, J.; Ressler, T.

    1998-11-01

    Spatially resolved X-ray diffraction (SRXRD) is used to map the {alpha} {r_arrow} {beta} {r_arrow} {alpha} phase transformation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of commercially pure titanium gas tungsten arc welds. In situ SRXRD experiments were conducted using a 180-{micro}m-diameter X-ray beam at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) (Stanford, CA) to probe the phases present in the HAZ of a 1.9 kW weld moving at 1.1 mm/s. Results of sequential linear X-ray diffraction scans made perpendicular to the weld direction were combined to construct a phase transformation map around the liquid weld pool. This map identifies six HAZ microstructural regions between the liquid weld pool and the base metal: (1) {alpha}-Ti that is undergoing annealing and recrystallization; (2) completely recrystallized {alpha}-Ti; (3) partially transformed {alpha}-Ti, where {alpha}-Ti and {beta}-Ti coexist; (4) single-phase {beta}-Ti; (5) back-transformed {alpha}Ti; and (6) recrystallized {alpha}-Ti plus back-transformed {alpha}-Ti. Although the microstructure consisted predominantly of {alpha}-Ti, both prior to and after the weld, the crystallographically textured starting material was altered during welding to produce different {alpha}-Ti textures within the resulting HAZ. Based on the travel speed of the weld, the {alpha} {r_arrow} {beta} transformation was measured to take 1.83 seconds during heat, while the {beta} {r_arrow} {alpha} transformation was measured to take 0.91 seconds during cooling. The {alpha} {r_arrow} {beta} transformation was characterized to be dominated by long-range diffusion growth on the leading (heating) side of the weld, while the {beta} {r_arrow} {alpha} transformation was characterized to be predominantly massive on the trailing (cooling) side of the weld, with a massive growth rate on the order of 100 {micro}m/s.

  12. A Comparison Study of the Exclusive Decays barB^0 arrow D^*+ l^- barνl and B^- arrow D^*0 l^- barνl Using Partial Reconstruction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godang, Romulus; Kinoshita, Kay

    2000-04-01

    Using 2.81 fb-1 of Υ(4S) data collected with the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we compare the exclusive decays barB^0 arrow D^*+ l^- barνl and B^- arrow D^*0 l^- barν_l. We use a partial reconstruction method, where only a lepton and soft pion are detected and the D is not reconstructed. The method yields sufficient statistics to allow a reasonable comparison as a function of pion momentum. A preliminary result of the charged to neutral B production ratio at the Υ(4S) will be presented.

  13. Mid-term clinical results of medial meniscus repair with the meniscus arrow in the unstable knee.

    PubMed

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos; Papastergiou, Stergios; Kazakos, Konstantinos; Poulios, Georgios; Parisis, Konstantinos

    2007-02-01

    The medial meniscus is a secondary stabilizer to anterior tibial translation and provides significant stability, especially in an ACL-deficient knee. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical outcome of medial meniscus repair in the unstable knee. Between 1997 and 2002, 11 patients, with a mean age of 25.8 years (range 15-39 years), underwent all-inside medial meniscus repair, using the Meniscus Arrow, for unstable medial meniscus tear in ACL-deficient knees. For various reasons none of these patients underwent ACL reconstruction. The average follow-up was 73 months (range 52-91 months). There were three failures (27.3%) defined as the need for reoperation and partial meniscectomy. The mean Tegner activity score decreased from 6.75 (pretrauma) to 4.5 (postoperatively). The average Lysholm and subjective IKDC scores were 83 and 77.4, respectively. Two patients were graded as B (nearly normal) and six as C (abnormal), according to the IKDC knee evaluation form. KT-2000 arthrometry demonstrated that sagittal knee laxity was more than 5 mm in all knees (side to side difference). MRI demonstrated grade three signal alterations at the repair site of meniscus in three patients and signs of cartilage damage in two patients. All patients were asymptomatic during daily activities but seven out of eight reported pain or effusion after sports. Medial meniscus repair in the ACL-deficient knee is not contraindicated. The need of reducing the level of physical activity is essential. PMID:16967201

  14. Determination of the {ital b}{r_arrow}{ital c} handedness using nonleptonic {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, B.; Koerner, J.G.; Kraemer, M.

    1994-03-01

    We consider possibilities to determine the handedness of {ital b}{r_arrow}{ital c} current transitions using semileptonic baryonic {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}{sub {ital c}} transitions. We propose to analyze the longitudinal polarization of the daughter baryon {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} by using momentum-spin correlation measurements in the form of forward-backward (FB) asymmetry measures involving its nonleptonic decay products. We use an explicit form factor model to determine the longitudinal polarization of {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} in the semileptonic decay {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}{sub {ital c}}+{ital l}{sup {minus}}+{bar {nu}}{sub {ital l}}. The mean longitudinal polarization of {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} is negative (positive) for left-chiral (right-chiral) {ital b}{r_arrow}{ital c} current transitions. The frame-dependent longitudinal polarization of {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} is large ({congruent}80%) in the {Lambda}{sub {ital b}} rest frame and somewhat smaller (30%--40%) in the lab frame when the {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}`s are produced on the {ital Z}{sup 0} peak. We suggest to use nonleptonic decay modes of {Lambda}{sub {ital c}} to analyze its polarization and thereby to determine the chirality of the {ital b}{r_arrow}{ital c} transition. Since {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}`s produced on the {ital Z}{sup 0} are expected to be polarized we discuss issues of the polarization transfer in {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}{sub {ital c}} transitions. We also investigate the {ital p}{sub {perpendicular}}- and {ital p}-cut sensitivity of our predictions for the polarization of {Lambda}{sub {ital c}}.

  15. Bose-Einstein correlations in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} at a linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Chekanov, S. V.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E. A.

    2000-03-03

    The authors show that the most popular method to simulate Bose-Einstein (BE) interference effects predicts negligible correlations between identical pions originating from the hadronic decay of different W's produced in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} 4 jets at typical linear collider energies.

  16. Detailed study of the T = 0, NN interaction via N-italic-arrow-rightP- scattering at 68 MEV

    SciTech Connect

    Henneck, R.; Campbell, J.; Gysin, C.; Hammans, M.; Lorenzon, W.; Pickar, M.A.; Sick, I.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S.; Van den Brandt, B.; and others

    1988-11-20

    We report on first results for a measurement of the spin correlation parameter A/sub z//sub z/ in n-italic-arrow-rightp-arrow-right scattering at 68 MeV, which is highly sensitive to the mixing parameter epsilon/sub 1/. A phase shift analysis of these data, together with forthcoming results of our measurements of /sup d//sup sigma//sub d//sub ..cap omega../ and A/sub y/ at the same energy is expected to allow a determination of epsilon/sub 1/ to within /similar to/ +- 0.3/sup 0/.

  17. Integration and characterization of SiN nanopores for single-molecule detection in liquid-core ARROW waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, M. I.; Yin, D.; Holmes, M.; Hawkins, A. R.; Schmidt, H.

    2007-02-01

    We demonstrate a method for integrating silicon nitride nanopores in liquid core Anti Resonant Reflecting Optical Waveguides (ARROW) for single molecule electrical detection and control. We use a two-step integration process when a micropore is fabricated first, paving the way for subsequent nanopore integration in the first silicon nitride layer of the ARROW structure. Nanopores with dimensions as small as 11 nm were fabricated using a Focused Ion Beam shrinking process commensurate with single particle gating of viruses, proteins, ribosomes and other biomolecules.

  18. The Pitch Imagery Arrow Task: effects of musical training, vividness, and mental control.

    PubMed

    Gelding, Rebecca W; Thompson, William Forde; Johnson, Blake W

    2015-01-01

    Musical imagery is a relatively unexplored area, partly because of deficiencies in existing experimental paradigms, which are often difficult, unreliable, or do not provide objective measures of performance. Here we describe a novel protocol, the Pitch Imagery Arrow Task (PIAT), which induces and trains pitch imagery in both musicians and non-musicians. Given a tonal context and an initial pitch sequence, arrows are displayed to elicit a scale-step sequence of imagined pitches, and participants indicate whether the final imagined tone matches an audible probe. It is a staircase design that accommodates individual differences in musical experience and imagery ability. This new protocol was used to investigate the roles that musical expertise, self-reported auditory vividness and mental control play in imagery performance. Performance on the task was significantly better for participants who employed a musical imagery strategy compared to participants who used an alternative cognitive strategy and positively correlated with scores on the Control subscale from the Bucknell Auditory Imagery Scale (BAIS). Multiple regression analysis revealed that Imagery performance accuracy was best predicted by a combination of strategy use and scores on the Vividness subscale of BAIS. These results confirm that competent performance on the PIAT requires active musical imagery and is very difficult to achieve using alternative cognitive strategies. Auditory vividness and mental control were more important than musical experience in the ability to perform manipulation of pitch imagery. PMID:25807078

  19. Radiative Recombination in the Terrestrial Nightglow: e + O^+ arrow O + hν

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanger, T. G.; Cosby, P. C.; Sharpee, B. D.; Huestis, D. L.

    2003-10-01

    Large aperture telescopes have been equipped with superbly calibrated high-resolution spectrographs with performance comparable with the best laboratory instrumentation. From analysis of spectra of the ``empty sky" (really the Earth's atmosphere) we have made the first experimental determination of the relative strengths of 25 emission lines between 390 and 930 nm from Rydberg excited states following the reaction e + O^+ arrow O + hν in the terrestrial ionosphere. We observe ns,np,nd arrow 3s,3p orbital transitions, around the O^+(^4S) core, for n=3-11 and for triplet and quintet overall spin. Two modern calculations of cross sections for radiative recombination are in use by atmospheric scientists [1] and astronomers [2]. In general, the observed relative intensities agree rather well with theory, especially for the quintet states. Modeling the triplets is complicated by optical trapping. Supported by the NSF and NASA. [1] V. Escalante and G. A. Victor, Planet. Space Sci. 40, 1705 (1992). [2] D. Pequignot, P. Petitjean, and C. Boisson, Astron. Astrophys. 251, 680 (1991).

  20. The Pitch Imagery Arrow Task: Effects of Musical Training, Vividness, and Mental Control

    PubMed Central

    Gelding, Rebecca W.; Thompson, William Forde; Johnson, Blake W.

    2015-01-01

    Musical imagery is a relatively unexplored area, partly because of deficiencies in existing experimental paradigms, which are often difficult, unreliable, or do not provide objective measures of performance. Here we describe a novel protocol, the Pitch Imagery Arrow Task (PIAT), which induces and trains pitch imagery in both musicians and non-musicians. Given a tonal context and an initial pitch sequence, arrows are displayed to elicit a scale-step sequence of imagined pitches, and participants indicate whether the final imagined tone matches an audible probe. It is a staircase design that accommodates individual differences in musical experience and imagery ability. This new protocol was used to investigate the roles that musical expertise, self-reported auditory vividness and mental control play in imagery performance. Performance on the task was significantly better for participants who employed a musical imagery strategy compared to participants who used an alternative cognitive strategy and positively correlated with scores on the Control subscale from the Bucknell Auditory Imagery Scale (BAIS). Multiple regression analysis revealed that Imagery performance accuracy was best predicted by a combination of strategy use and scores on the Vividness subscale of BAIS. These results confirm that competent performance on the PIAT requires active musical imagery and is very difficult to achieve using alternative cognitive strategies. Auditory vividness and mental control were more important than musical experience in the ability to perform manipulation of pitch imagery. PMID:25807078

  1. Bioaccumulation and food-chain analysis for evaluating ecological risks in terrestrial and wetland habitats: Availability-transfer factors (ATFs) in soil {r_arrow} soil macroinvertebrate {r_arrow} amphibian food chains

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, G.; Bollman, M.; Callahan, C.; Gillette, C.; Nebeker, A.; Wilborn, D.

    1998-12-31

    As part of the ecological risk assessment process for terrestrial and wetland habitats, the evaluation of bioaccumulative chemicals of concern (BCCs) is frequently pursued through food-chain analysis with a subsequent comparison of daily doses to benchmark toxicity reference values, when available. Food-chain analysis has frequently been applied to the analysis of exposure to BCCs identified as chemicals of potential ecological concern (COPECs) in the ecological risk assessment process. Here, designed studies focused on wetland food-chains such as hydric soil {r_arrow} soil macroinvertebrate {r_arrow} amphibian and terrestrial food-chains such as soil {r_arrow} plant {r_arrow} small mammal illustrate an approach for the derivation and validation of trophic transfer factors for metals considered as COPECs such as cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc. The results clearly indicate that the transfer of chemicals between trophic levels is critical in the bioaccumulation process in wetland and terrestrial food-chains and is influenced by numerous interacting abiotic and biotic factors, including physicochemical properties of soil, and the role, if any, that the metal has in the receptor as a required trace element.

  2. New result on K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} from BNL E787

    SciTech Connect

    REDLINGER,G.

    1999-06-21

    E787 at BNL has reported evidence for the rare decay K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, based on the observation of one candidate event. In this paper, we present the result of analyzing a new dataset of comparable sensitivity to the published result.

  3. Comparison of gunshot wounds and field-tipped arrow wounds using morphological criteria and chemical spot tests.

    PubMed

    Randall, B; Newby, P

    1989-05-01

    Arrow wounds represent an unusual class of wounds rarely seen by most death investigators. Although the edged, broadhead-tipped arrow produces a wound usually characteristic of archery/crossbow weapons, the plain, field-tipped arrow wound can be confused with gunshot injuries in those cases in which powder residue or firearm projectiles or fragments or both are not recovered. We present a case of a deer carcass with a wound of uncertain firearm or archery origin which initiated a comparison of firearm wounds and archery wounds on fresh road-killed deer. We found the following features to be valuable in the differentiation of gunshot wounds and field-tipped archery wounds: First, the majority of the gunshot wounds (but none of the arrow wounds) had identifiable, macroscopic, wipe-off material and chemically identifiable wipe-off residue by spot test. Second, the archery wound defects had very inconspicuous abrasion rings as compared to the often prominent abrasion rings of gunshot wounds. Third, the actual central defect in the archery wounds was more likely to be oblong or slit-like compared to the gunshot wound defects, which were more likely to be round. PMID:2738561

  4. Clinical results of meniscus repair with the meniscus arrow: a 4- to 8-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos; Papastergiou, Stergios; Kazakos, Konstantinos; Poulios, Georgios; Parisis, Konstantinos

    2007-02-01

    The short-term clinical results of meniscus repair with the meniscus arrow were promising. Unfavorable outcomes were reported in two studies, with longer follow-up, raising concerns about the efficacy of this device. We retrospectively reviewed 62 patients (mean age 23.7 years; range 14-37 years) that underwent all-inside meniscus repair, using the meniscus arrow. Seventeen patients had an isolated meniscus tear (ACL intact group) and 45 patients concomitant ACL rupture that was reconstructed at the same time with the meniscus repair (ACL reconstructed group). All patients followed a non-aggressive rehabilitation protocol. Follow-up was assessed by clinical examination, Lysholm and Tegner score, IKDC knee examination form and KT-2000 arthrometry for the anteroposterior laxity of the reconstructed knees. At an average follow-up of 73 months (range 49-96 months) there were three failures (4.8%), one from the ACL intact group and two from the ACL reconstructed group. One patient developed arthrofibrosis (ACL reconstructed group) that resolved conservatively. Soft tissue irritation at the repair site was noted in three patients. In two patients the symptoms were transient. In the third patient the arrow tip was cut off under local anaesthesia due to saphenous infrapatellar branch irritation and the symptoms resolved (inappropriate arrow size). KT-2000 arthrometry showed that sagittal knee laxity was less than 3 mm in all reconstructed knees. The mean Tegner activity score decreased from 6.7 (pretrauma) to 6.2 (postoperatively). The average Lysholm score was 96, with normal or nearly normal function of all success knees, according to the IKDC knee examination form. Our results show a high clinical success rate of meniscus repair with the meniscus arrow. We found this device both safe and effective. PMID:16858563

  5. Effect of a simulated engine jet blowing above an arrow wing at Mach 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrout, B. L.; Hayes, C.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of a gas jet simulating a turbojet engine exhaust blowing above a cambered and twisted arrow wing were investigated. Tests were conducted in the Langley 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at a Mach number of 2.0. Nozzle pressure ratios from 1 to 64 were tested with both helium and air used as jet gases. The tests were conducted at angles of attack from -2 deg to 8 deg at a Reynolds number of 9,840,000 per meter. Only the forces and moments on the wing were measured. Results of the investigation indicated that the jet blowing over the wing caused reductions in maximum lift-drag ratio of about 4 percent for helium and 6 percent for air at their respective design nozzle pressure ratios, relative to jet-off data. Moderate changes in the longitudinal, vertical, or angular positions of the jet relative to the wing had little effect on the wing aerodynamic characteristics.

  6. Study of advanced composite structural design concepts for an arrow wing supersonic cruise configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. J.; Grande, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Based on estimated graphite and boron fiber properties, allowable stresses and strains were established for advanced composite materials. Stiffened panel and conventional sandwich panel concepts were designed and analyzed, using graphite/polyimide and boron/polyimide materials. The conventional sandwich panel was elected as the structural concept for the modified wing structure. Upper and lower surface panels of the arrow wing structure were then redesigned, using high strength graphite/polyimide sandwich panels, retaining the titanium spars and ribs from the prior study. The ATLAS integrated analysis and design system was used for stress analysis and automated resizing of surface panels. Flutter analysis of the hybrid structure showed a significant decrease in flutter speed relative to the titanium wing design. The flutter speed was increased to that of the titanium design by selective increase in laminate thickness and by using graphite fibers with properties intermediate between high strength and high modulus values.

  7. Evaluation of structural design concepts for an arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Davis, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical study was performed to determine the best structural approach for design of primary wing and fuselage structure of a Mach 2.7 arrow wing supersonic cruise aircraft. Concepts were evaluated considering near term start of design. Emphasis was placed on the complex interactions between thermal stress, static aeroelasticity, flutter, fatigue and fail safe design, static and dynamic loads, and the effects of variations in structural arrangements, concepts and materials on these interactions. Results indicate that a hybrid wing structure incorporating low profile convex beaded and honeycomb sandwich surface panels of titanium alloy 6Al-4V were the most efficient. The substructure includes titanium alloy spar caps reinforced with boron polyimide composites. The fuselage shell consists of hat stiffened skin and frame construction of titanium alloy 6Al-4V. A summary of the study effort is presented, and a discussion of the overall logic, design philosophy and interaction between the analytical methods for supersonic cruise aircraft design are included.

  8. Scan path entropy and arrow plots: capturing scanning behavior of multiple observers.

    PubMed

    Hooge, Ignace; Camps, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Designers of visual communication material want their material to attract and retain attention. In marketing research, heat maps, dwell time, and time to AOI first hit are often used as evaluation parameters. Here we present two additional measures (1) "scan path entropy" to quantify gaze guidance and (2) the "arrow plot" to visualize the average scan path. Both are based on string representations of scan paths. The latter also incorporates transition matrices and time required for 50% of the observers to first hit AOIs (T50). The new measures were tested in an eye tracking study (48 observers, 39 advertisements). Scan path entropy is a sensible measure for gaze guidance and the new visualization method reveals aspects of the average scan path and gives a better indication in what order global scanning takes place. PMID:24399993

  9. Titanium and advanced composite structures for a supersonic cruise arrow wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. J.; Hoy, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Structural design studies were made, based on current technology and on an estimate of technology to be available in the mid 1980's, to assess the relative merits of structural concepts and materials for an advanced arrow wing configuration cruising at Mach 2.7. Preliminary studies were made to insure compliance of the configuration with general design criteria, integrate the propulsion system with the airframe, and define an efficient structural arrangement. Material and concept selection, detailed structural analysis, structural design and airplane mass analysis were completed based on current technology. Based on estimated future technology, structural sizing for strength and a preliminary assessment of the flutter of a strength designed composite structure were completed. An advanced computerized structural design system was used, in conjunction with a relatively complex finite element model, for detailed analysis and sizing of structural members.

  10. The f0 Mesons in Processes pi][pi [right arrow] [pi][pi], KK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surovtsev, Yu. S.; Krupa, D.; Nagy, M.

    2002-06-01

    Combined analysis the experimental data on the processes pi][pi [right arrow] pi][pi, KK in the channel with IGJPC = 0+0++ in a model-independent approach leads to the following results: 1) The f0(665) state with properties of the sigma-meson is proved to exist; 2) It is shown that the f0(980) and especially f0(1370) (if exists) have a dominant ss component; 3) Indications for the glueball nature of the f0(1500) and for the considerable ss component in the f0(1710) are obtained; 4) Conclusion on the linear realization of chiral symmetry (chiS) is drawn.

  11. Scan path entropy and arrow plots: capturing scanning behavior of multiple observers

    PubMed Central

    Hooge, Ignace; Camps, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Designers of visual communication material want their material to attract and retain attention. In marketing research, heat maps, dwell time, and time to AOI first hit are often used as evaluation parameters. Here we present two additional measures (1) “scan path entropy” to quantify gaze guidance and (2) the “arrow plot” to visualize the average scan path. Both are based on string representations of scan paths. The latter also incorporates transition matrices and time required for 50% of the observers to first hit AOIs (T50). The new measures were tested in an eye tracking study (48 observers, 39 advertisements). Scan path entropy is a sensible measure for gaze guidance and the new visualization method reveals aspects of the average scan path and gives a better indication in what order global scanning takes place. PMID:24399993

  12. Low-speed wind tunnel investigation of an advanced supersonic cruise arrow-wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, P. L., Jr.; Smith, P. M.; Parlett, L. P.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of possible means for improving the low speed aerodynamic characteristics of advanced supersonic cruise arrow wing configurations and to extend the existing data base of such configurations has been made. Principle configuration variables included wing-leading and trailing-edge flap deflection, fuselage nose strakes, and engine exhaust nozzle deflection. Results showed that deflecting the wing leading edge apex flaps downward provided improved longitudinal stability but resulted in reduced directional stability. The model exhibited relatively low values of directional stability over the operational angle of attack range and experienced large asymmetric yawing moments at high angles of attack. The use of nose strakes was found to be effective in increasing the directional stability and eliminating the asymmetric yawing moment.

  13. Nonstandard. gamma. gamma. r arrow l sup + l minus processes in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, L.D.; Natale, A.A.; Novaes, S.F. ); Eboli, O.J.P. )

    1991-07-01

    We study lepton pair production in heavy-ion collisions with emphasis on nonstandard contributions to the QED subprocess {gamma}{gamma}{r arrow}{ital l}{sup +}{ital l{minus}}. The existence of compositeness of fermions and/or bosons can be tested in this reaction up to the TeV mass scale. We show that for some processes the capabilities of relativistic heavy-ion colliders to disclose new physics surpass the possibilities of {ital e}{sup +}{ital e{minus}} or {ital p{bar p}} machines. In particular, spin-zero composite particles which couple predominantly to two photons, predicted in composite models, can be studied in a broad range of masses.

  14. The emergence of time's arrows and special science laws from physics

    PubMed Central

    Loewer, Barry

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I will argue that there is an important connection between two questions concerning how certain features of the macro world emerge from the laws and processes of fundamental microphysics and suggest an approach to answering these questions. The approach involves a kind of emergence but quite different from ‘top-down’ emergence discussed at the conference, for which an earlier version of this paper was written. The two questions are (i) How do ‘the arrows of time’ emerge from microphysics? (ii) How do macroscopic special science laws and causation emerge from microphysics? Answering these questions is especially urgent for those, who like myself, think that a certain version of physicalism, which I call ‘micro-physical completeness’ (MC), is true. According to MC, there are fundamental dynamical laws that completely govern (deterministically or probabilistically), the evolution of all micro-physical events and there are no additional ontologically independent dynamical or causal special science laws. In other words, there is no ontologically independent ‘top-down’ causation. Of course, MC does not imply that physicists now or ever will know or propose the complete laws of physics. Or even if the complete laws were known we would know how special science properties and laws reduce to laws and properties of fundamental physics. Rather, MC is a contingent metaphysical claim about the laws of our world. After a discussion of the two questions, I will argue the key to showing how it is possible for the arrows of time and the special science laws to emerge from microphysics and a certain account of how thermodynamics is related to fundamental dynamical laws. PMID:23386956

  15. Time's Arrow and Archimedes' Point - New Directions for the Physics of Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Huw

    1997-12-01

    Why is the future so different from the past? Why does the past affect the future and not the other way around? What does quantum mechanics really tell us about the world? In this important and accessible book, Huw Price throws fascinating new light these great mysteries of modern physics, and connects them in a wholly original way. Price begins with the mystery of the arrow of time. Price shows that, for over a century, most physicists have thought about problems of time in the wrong way. Misled by the human perspective from within time, which distorts and exaggerates the differences between past and future, they have fallen victim to what Price calls the "double standard fallacy": proposed explanations of the difference between the past and the future turn out to rely on a difference which has been slipped in at the beginning, when the physicists themselves treat the past and future in different ways. To avoid this fallacy, Price argues, we need to overcome our natural tendency to think about the past and the future differently. We need to imagine a point outside time--an Archimedean "view from nowhen"--from which to observe time in an unbiased way. Time's Arrow and Archimedes'Point presents an innovative and controversial view of time and contemporary physics. In this exciting book, Price urges physicists, philosophers, and anyone who has ever pondered the mysteries of time to look at the world from the fresh perspective of Archimedes' Point and gain a deeper understanding of ourselves, the universe around us, and our own place in time.

  16. Measurement of Br({Kappa}{sub L} {r_arrow} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}}): New results from BNL E791

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A.

    1991-12-31

    Using a sample of 349 {Kappa}{sub L} {r_arrow} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} candidates collected during the 1990 data run, the author measures a branching fraction Br({Kappa}{sub L} {r_arrow} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}) = (6.96 {+-} 0.40 {+-} 0.22) {times} 10{sup {minus}9}. The sample used is the largest to date of {Kappa}{sub L} {r_arrow} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} events. The result is close to the unitarity bound 6.83 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} coming from an absorptive 2-{gamma} intermediate state.

  17. Signal and backgrounds for the single production of scalar and vector leptoquarks at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Cieza Montalvo, J.E.; Eboli, O.J.; Eboli, O.J.; Magro, M.B.; Mercadante, P.G.

    1998-11-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the potentiality of the CERN Large Hadron Collider to study the single production of leptoquarks via pp{r_arrow}e{sup {plus_minus}}q{r_arrow} leptoquark {r_arrow}e{sup {plus_minus}}q, with e{sup {plus_minus}} generated by the splitting of photons radiated by the protons. Working with the most general SU(2){sub L}{circle_times}U(1){sub Y} invariant effective Lagrangian for scalar and vector leptoquarks, we analyze in detail the leptoquark signals and backgrounds that lead to a final state containing an e{sup {plus_minus}} and a hard jet with approximately balanced transverse momenta. Our results indicate that the LHC will be able to discover leptoquarks with masses up to 2{endash}3 TeV, depending on their type, for Yukawa couplings of the order of the electromagnetic one. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Chromosomal localization of the genes encoding the kinetochore proteins CENPE and DENPF to human chromosomes 4q24{r_arrow}q25 and 1q32{r_arrow}q41, respectively, by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, J.R.; Zhou, J.Y.; Bell, D.W.; Yen, T.J.

    1994-10-01

    CENPE and CENPF are human kinetochore proteins of 312 and {approximately}400 kDa, respectively. As part of an effort to characterize the functions of these two proteins, we have used their respective cDNAs to map their human chromosomal locations by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The gene that encodes CENPE, a kinetochore-associated motor protein that is postulated to segregate chromosomes during mitosis, maps to chromosome 4q24{r_arrow}q25. The CENPF gene, which encodes a structural protein of the kinetochore, maps to chromosome 1q32{r_arrow}q41 within close proximity to the genetic locus that is linked to Van der Woude syndrome. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Trisomy 1q42{r_arrow}qter in a sister and brother: Further delineation of the {open_quotes}trisomy 1q42{r_arrow}qter syndrome{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Verschuuren-Bemelmans, C.C.; Leegte, B.; Hodenius, T.M.J.

    1995-07-31

    We report on a 22-year-old woman and her 21-year-old brother with mild mental retardation, long face, prominent forehead, retrognathia, and (relative) macrocephaly. At birth they were small for date, their length is now below the 10th centile. Chromosome analysis demonstrated a nearly pure trisomy 1q42{r_arrow}qter in both patients due to unbalanced segregation of a paternal reciprocal balanced translocation 46,XY,t(1;15) (q42;p11). This is the second report of a nearly pure trisomy 1q42{r_arrow}qter. When comparing the manifestations of our patients with those of other reported cases we conclude that the most characteristic clinical manifestations of this syndrome are macrocephaly, prominent forehead, micro/retrognathia, large fontanelle, intrauterine growth retardation, postnatal growth retardation, and mental retardation. 56 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Prospects for measuring K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} and K{sub L}{sup 0} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup 0} {nu}{bar {nu}} at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Bryman, D.A.; Littenberg, L.

    2000-09-18

    Rare kaon decay experiments underway or planned for the BNL AGS will yield new and independent determinations of V*{sub ts}V{sub td}. A measurement of B(K{sub L}{sup 0} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup 0} {nu}{bar {nu}}) allows a determination of the imaginary part of this quantity, which is the fundamental CP-violating parameter of the Standard Model, in a uniquely clean manner. Since the measurement of B(K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}}) determines {vert_bar}V*{sub ts}V{sub td}, a complete derivation of the unitarity triangle is facilitated. These results can be compared to high precision data expected to come from the B sector in a number of ways, allowing for unique tests of new physics.

  1. Coherent diffraction reactions p + C {r_arrow} ({Epsilon}(1385){sup O}K{sup +}) + C and p + C {r_arrow} ({Epsilon}{sup O}K{sup +}) + C: The search for exotic baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Vavilov, D.V.; Viktorov, V.A.; Golovkin, S.V.

    1995-08-01

    The coherent diffractive reactions p + C {r_arrow} ({Epsilon}(1385){sup O}K{sup +}) + C and p + C {r_arrow} ({Epsilon}{sup O}K{sup +}) + C are investigated in experiments with the SPHINX detector irradiated by 70-GeV protons. A structure X(2050) with M = 2052 {plus_minus} 6 MeV and {Gamma} = 91 {plus_minus} 17MeV in the {Epsilon}{sup O}K{sup +} mass spectrum are observed in the former and latter processes, respectively. The small decay widths of these states and the anomalously large branching ratios of their decays that involve the emission of strange particles make them serious candidates for cryptoexotic varyons with hidden strangeness. 18 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. The mechanism of synthesis of a mixed-linkage (1{r{underscore}arrow}3), (1{r{underscore}arrow}4) {beta}-D-glucan in maize. Evidence for multiple sites of glucosyl transfer in the synthase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Buckeridge, M.S.; Vergara, C.E.; Carpita, N.C.

    1999-08-01

    The authors examined the mechanism of synthesis in vitro of (1{r{underscore}arrow}3), (1{r{underscore}arrow}4){Beta}-D-glucan ({Beta}-glucan), a growth-specific cell wall polysaccharide round in grasses and cereals. {beta}-Glucan is composed primarily of cellotriosyl and cellotetraosyl units linked by single (1{r{underscore}arrow}3){beta}-linkages. The ratio of cellotriosyl and cellotetraosyl units in the native polymer is strictly controlled at between 2 and 3 in all grasses, whereas the ratios of these units in {Beta}-glucan formed in vitro vary from 1.5 with 5 {micro}M UDP-glucose (GLc) to over 11 with 30 nM substrate. These results support a model in which three sites of glycosyl transfer occur within the synthase complex to produce the cellobiosyl-(1{r{underscore}arrow}3)-D-glucosyl units. The authors propose that failure to fill one of the sites results in the iterative addition of one or more cellobiosyl units to produce the longer cellodextrin units in the polymer. Variations in the UDP-Glc concentration in excised maize (Zea mays) coleoptiles did not result in wide variations in the ratios of cellotriosyl and cellotetraosyl units in {beta}-glucan synthesized in vivo, indicating that other factors control delivery of UDP-Glc to the synthase. In maize sucrose synthase is enriched in Golgi membranes and plasma membranes and may be involved in the control of substrate delivery to {beta}-glucan synthase and cellulose synthase.

  3. Beetle and plant arrow poisons of the Ju|’hoan and Hai||om San peoples of Namibia (Insecta, Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae; Plantae, Anacardiaceae, Apocynaceae, Burseraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Chaboo, Caroline S.; Biesele, Megan; Hitchcock, Robert K.; Weeks, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of archery to hunt appears relatively late in human history. It is poorly understood but the application of poisons to arrows to increase lethality must have occurred shortly after developing bow hunting methods; these early multi-stage transitions represent cognitive shifts in human evolution. This paper is a synthesis of widely-scattered literature in anthropology, entomology, and chemistry, dealing with San (“Bushmen”) arrow poisons. The term San (or Khoisan) covers many indigenous groups using so-called ‘click languages’ in southern Africa. Beetles are used for arrow poison by at least eight San groups and one non-San group. Fieldwork and interviews with Ju|’hoan and Hai||om hunters in Namibia revealed major differences in the nature and preparation of arrow poisons, bow and arrow construction, and poison antidote. Ju|’hoan hunters use leaf-beetle larvae of Diamphidia Gerstaecker and Polyclada Chevrolat (Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini) collected from soil around the host plants Commiphora africana (A. Rich.) Engl. and Commiphora angolensis Engl. (Burseracaeae). In the Nyae Nyae area of Namibia, Ju|’hoan hunters use larvae of Diamphidia nigroornata Ståhl. Larvae and adults live above-ground on the plants and eat leaves, but the San collect the underground cocoons to extract the mature larvae. Larval hemolymph is mixed with saliva and applied to arrows. Hai||om hunters boil the milky plant sap of Adenium bohemianum Schinz (Apocynaceae) to reduce it to a thick paste that is applied to their arrows. The socio-cultural, historical, and ecological contexts of the various San groups may determine differences in the sources and preparation of poisons, bow and arrow technology, hunting behaviors, poison potency, and perhaps antidotes. PMID:27006594

  4. Beetle and plant arrow poisons of the Ju|'hoan and Hai||om San peoples of Namibia (Insecta, Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae; Plantae, Anacardiaceae, Apocynaceae, Burseraceae).

    PubMed

    Chaboo, Caroline S; Biesele, Megan; Hitchcock, Robert K; Weeks, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The use of archery to hunt appears relatively late in human history. It is poorly understood but the application of poisons to arrows to increase lethality must have occurred shortly after developing bow hunting methods; these early multi-stage transitions represent cognitive shifts in human evolution. This paper is a synthesis of widely-scattered literature in anthropology, entomology, and chemistry, dealing with San ("Bushmen") arrow poisons. The term San (or Khoisan) covers many indigenous groups using so-called 'click languages' in southern Africa. Beetles are used for arrow poison by at least eight San groups and one non-San group. Fieldwork and interviews with Ju|'hoan and Hai||om hunters in Namibia revealed major differences in the nature and preparation of arrow poisons, bow and arrow construction, and poison antidote. Ju|'hoan hunters use leaf-beetle larvae of Diamphidia Gerstaecker and Polyclada Chevrolat (Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini) collected from soil around the host plants Commiphora africana (A. Rich.) Engl. and Commiphora angolensis Engl. (Burseracaeae). In the Nyae Nyae area of Namibia, Ju|'hoan hunters use larvae of Diamphidia nigroornata Ståhl. Larvae and adults live above-ground on the plants and eat leaves, but the San collect the underground cocoons to extract the mature larvae. Larval hemolymph is mixed with saliva and applied to arrows. Hai||om hunters boil the milky plant sap of Adenium bohemianum Schinz (Apocynaceae) to reduce it to a thick paste that is applied to their arrows. The socio-cultural, historical, and ecological contexts of the various San groups may determine differences in the sources and preparation of poisons, bow and arrow technology, hunting behaviors, poison potency, and perhaps antidotes. PMID:27006594

  5. The Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project (CAWAP) and its Extension to the International Community as CAWAPI: Objectives and Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Obara, Clifford J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a brief history of the F-16XL-1 aircraft, its role in the High Speed Research (HSR) program and how it was morphed into the Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project (CAWAP). Various flight, wind-tunnel and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) data sets were generated during the CAWAP. These unique and open flight datasets for surface pressures, boundary-layer profiles and skin-friction distributions, along with surface flow data, are described and sample data comparisons given. This is followed by a description of how the project became internationalized to be known as Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project International (CAWAPI) and is concluded by an introduction to the results of a 5-year CFD predictive study of data.

  6. Terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 3 [46,XX,del(3)(q27{r_arrow}qter)

    SciTech Connect

    Chitayat, D.; Babul, R.; Silver, M.M.

    1996-01-02

    We report on a terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 3[46,XX,del(3)(q27{r_arrow}qter)] in a female newborn infant who died 45 hours after delivery and had multiple congenital abnormalities including bilateral anophthalmia, congenital heart disease, and abnormal genitalia. The findings are compared to those of four previously reported cases with terminal de (3q). 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. PAL SPME Arrow--evaluation of a novel solid-phase microextraction device for freely dissolved PAHs in water.

    PubMed

    Kremser, Andreas; Jochmann, Maik A; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2016-01-01

    After more than 25 years, solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has gained widespread acceptance as a well-automatable and flexible microextraction technique, while its instrumental basis remained mostly unchanged. The novel PAL (Prep And Load solution) SPME Arrow combines the advantages of SPME with the benefits of extraction techniques providing larger sorption phase volumes such as stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE). It thereby avoids the inherent drawbacks of both techniques such as limitations in method automation in the case of SBSE, as well as the small sorption phase volumes and the lacking fiber robustness of classical SPME fibers. This new design is based on a robust stainless steel backbone, carrying, the screw connection to the PAL sampler, the enlarged sorption phase, and an arrow-shaped tip for conservative penetration of septa (hence the name). An outer capillary encloses this phase apart from enrichment and desorption processes and rests against the tip during transfer and penetrations, resulting in a homogeneously closed device. Here, we present an evaluation and a comparison of the novel PAL SPME Arrow with classical SPME fibers, extracting polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as model analytes, from the freely dissolved fraction in lab water and groundwater via direct immersion using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as common sorption phase material. Limits of detection, repeatabilities, and extraction yields were determined for the PAL SPME Arrow and compared to data of classical SPME fibers and SBSE bars. Results indicate a significant benefit in extraction efficiency due to the larger sorption phase volume. It is accompanied by faultless mechanical robustness and thus better reliability, especially in case of prolonged, unattended, and automated operation. As an exemplary application, the water-soluble fraction of PAHs and derivatives in a roofing felt sample was quantified. PMID:26677018

  8. Clinical evaluation of meniscus repair with a bioabsorbable arrow: a 2- to 3-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Ellermann, A; Siebold, R; Buelow, J U; Sobau, C

    2002-09-01

    In a clinical study with the bioabsorbable Bionx Meniscus Arrow we prospectively evaluated 113 consecutive patients (113 menisci) after all-inside meniscus repair. Repairs were performed in either the medial (80.5%) or lateral (19.5%) posterior horn in the red-red or red-white meniscal zone; 66% of patients underwent concomitant ACL reconstruction. Assessment was based on history, clinical examination, and Lysholm [37] and Cincinnati Knee Scores. After a mean follow-up was 33 months (range 24-43; n=105) 21 (20%) patients showed signs and symptoms consistent with a meniscus tear (16 medial, 5 lateral) and underwent partial meniscectomy. In 11 (52%) of the revised patients concomitant ACL reconstruction was performed; 4 (19%) of revised patients were older than 35 years. In the nonrevised the average Lysholm Score was 92.5 and the average Cincinnati Score 90.4. Two patients showed a distinct femoral cartilage damage. Patient's age did not significantly affect the revision rate. Meniscus repair with the bioabsorbable arrow leads to clinical results comparable to those of traditional suture techniques. When stabilized, patients with concomitant ACL reconstruction showed comparable results to patients without ACL rupture. The simple and time saving all-inside insertion obviates the need for additional incisions and avoids knot tying. A proper tear selection and arrow positioning is necessary and should avoid cartilage damage. PMID:12355303

  9. Contributions to the Dart versus Arrow Debate: New Data from Holocene Projectile Points from Southeastern and Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Mercedes; Araujo, Astolfo G M

    2015-01-01

    Lithic bifacial points are very common in the southern and southeastern regions of the Brazilian territory. Dated from Early to Late Holocene, these artifacts have not been studied in terms of their propulsion system. Given the characteristics of the bow and arrow compared to the atlatl and dart, there are important differences in the size and weight of arrowheads and dart points. Applying the techniques proposed by Shott (1997), Bradbury (1997), Fenenga (1953), Hughes (1998), and Hildebrandt and King (2012) to specimens recovered from eight sites dating from the early to the late Holocene, this work aims to present preliminary results to better understand the potential presence of darts and arrows in southeastern and southern Brazil. There was a variation in the results according to the application of different techniques. At least one set of points, dated from the Early Holocene, presented quite a high proportion of specimens classified as arrows, indicating the presence of points that could be used as arrowheads. PMID:26648546

  10. Study of advanced composite structural design concepts for an arrow wing supersonic cruise configuration, task 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A structural design study was conducted to assess the relative merits of structural concepts using advanced composite materials for an advanced supersonic aircraft cruising at Mach 2.7. The configuration and structural arrangement developed during Task I and II of the study, was used as the baseline configuration. Allowable stresses and strains were established for boron and advanced graphite fibers based on projected fiber properties available in the next decade. Structural concepts were designed and analyzed using graphite polyimide and boron polyimide, applied to stiffened panels and conventional sandwich panels. The conventional sandwich panels were selected as the structural concept to be used on the wing structure. The upper and lower surface panels of the Task I arrow wing were redesigned using high-strength graphite polyimide sandwich panels over the titanium spars and ribs. The ATLAS computer system was used as the basis for stress analysis and resizing the surface panels using the loads from the Task II study, without adjustment for change in aeroelastic deformation. The flutter analysis indicated a decrease in the flutter speed compared to the baseline titanium wing design. The flutter analysis indicated a decrease in the flutter speed compared to the baseline titanium wing design. The flutter speed was increased to that of the titanium wing, with a weight penalty less than that of the metallic airplane.

  11. Phase Space Approach for S2 arrow S0 internal conversion in the benzene molecule.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallush, Shimshon; Segev, Bilha; Sergeev, Alexei; Heller, Eric J.

    2000-06-01

    The theoretical problem of finding propensity rules for the partition of energy between competing vibrations in a radiationless vibronic relaxation transition, is converted by the phase-space method of [1,2] to the simple mathematical problem of finding a maximum for a simple function under a constraint. The function is the Wigner function of the initial state and the constraint is energy conservation, defining an accepting energy surface in phase space. We apply this phase space method for finding propensity rules for vibronic transitions when the Frack-Condon factors are exponentially small to the classical example of the benzene molecule. We extend the method to forbidden transitions and include in the analysis non-harmonic force-field effects. Using the phase space analysis, we explain the non-classical behavior of the S_2arrow S0 relaxation of the benzene. Given the energy gap, reasonable displacements and recently calculated force fields [3] we show that almost all the energy must go to C-H stretching. Non-harmonic effects increase in this case the transition rate but do not change the partition of energy between the accepting vibrational modes. [1] E.J. Heller and D. Beck, Chem. Phys. Lett. 202, 350 (1993). [2] B. Segev and E.J. Heller, Journal of Chemical Physics, 112, 4004-4013 (2000). [3] A. Miani, E. Cane, P. Palmieri, A. Trombetti,N.C. Handy, J. Chem. Phys., 112, 248-259 (2000).

  12. Supersonic Aerodynamic Design Improvements of an Arrow-Wing HSCT Configuration Using Nonlinear Point Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unger, Eric R.; Hager, James O.; Agrawal, Shreekant

    1999-01-01

    This paper is a discussion of the supersonic nonlinear point design optimization efforts at McDonnell Douglas Aerospace under the High-Speed Research (HSR) program. The baseline for these optimization efforts has been the M2.4-7A configuration which represents an arrow-wing technology for the High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Optimization work on this configuration began in early 1994 and continued into 1996. Initial work focused on optimization of the wing camber and twist on a wing/body configuration and reductions of 3.5 drag counts (Euler) were realized. The next phase of the optimization effort included fuselage camber along with the wing and a drag reduction of 5.0 counts was achieved. Including the effects of the nacelles and diverters into the optimization problem became the next focus where a reduction of 6.6 counts (Euler W/B/N/D) was eventually realized. The final two phases of the effort included a large set of constraints designed to make the final optimized configuration more realistic and they were successful albeit with a loss of performance.

  13. ARGX-87: Accident Response Group Exercise, 1987: A Broken Arrow mini exercise. [Training

    SciTech Connect

    Schuld, E.P.; Cruff, D.F.

    1987-07-01

    A Broken Arrow mini exercise dubbed ''Accident Response Group Exercise - 1987'' (ARGX-87) was conducted on June 1, 1987 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNLL). The exercise started at 0445 PDT with a call from the Department of Energy (DOE) - EOC in Washington, DC, to the Albuquerque Operations (AL - ) - EOC. AL, in turn, called the Laboratory off-hour emergency number (Fire Dispatcher), who called the Laboratory Emergency Duty Officer (LEDO). The LEDO then contacted the Accident Response Group (ARG) Senior Scientific Advisor. Calls were placed to assemble appropriate members of the ARG in the ALERT Center. No phone number for SNLL was available at the Albuquerque Operations EOC, so a controller injected a message to SNLL to get them involved in the exercise. The messages received at the Laboratory identified the Air Force line item weapon system involved in the accident and the accident location. As people arrived at the ALERT Center they began discussing the details of the accident. They also started working the deployment logistics and other issues. Travel arrangements for the HOT SPOT equipment and ARG personnel were made for immediate deployment to the accident site in North Dakota. The exercise was terminated at 0840 as planned. While certain procedural deficiencies were noted, the exercise was considered a valuable learning experience. The results and observations from this experience will be used to refine the operating procedures and the training program.

  14. Threshold responses of Blackside Dace (Chrosomus cumberlandensis) and Kentucky Arrow Darter (Etheostoma spilotum) to stream conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Floyd, Michael; Compton, Michael; McDonald, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Chrosomus cumberlandensis (Blackside Dace [BSD]) and Etheostoma spilotum (Kentucky Arrow Darter [KAD]) are fish species of conservation concern due to their fragmented distributions, their low population sizes, and threats from anthropogenic stressors in the southeastern United States. We evaluated the relationship between fish abundance and stream conductivity, an index of environmental quality and potential physiological stressor. We modeled occurrence and abundance of KAD in the upper Kentucky River basin (208 samples) and BSD in the upper Cumberland River basin (294 samples) for sites sampled between 2003 and 2013. Segmented regression indicated a conductivity change-point for BSD abundance at 343 μS/cm (95% CI: 123–563 μS/cm) and for KAD abundance at 261 μS/cm (95% CI: 151–370 μS/cm). In both cases, abundances were negligible above estimated conductivity change-points. Post-hoc randomizations accounted for variance in estimated change points due to unequal sample sizes across the conductivity gradients. Boosted regression-tree analysis indicated stronger effects of conductivity than other natural and anthropogenic factors known to influence stream fishes. Boosted regression trees further indicated threshold responses of BSD and KAD occurrence to conductivity gradients in support of segmented regression results. We suggest that the observed conductivity relationship may indicate energetic limitations for insectivorous fishes due to changes in benthic macroinvertebrate community composition.

  15. Design study of structural concepts for an arrow-wing supersonic-cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.; Davis, G. W.; Robinson, J. C.; Yates, E. C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical study was performed to determine the best structural approach for design of primary wing and fuselage structure of a Mach number 2.7 arrow-wing supersonic cruise aircraft. Concepts were evaluated considering near-term start-of-design. Emphasis was placed on the complex interactions between thermal stress, static aeroelasticity, flutter, fatigue and fail-safe design, static and dynamic loads, and the effects of variations in structural arrangements, concepts and materials on these interactions. Results indicate that a hybrid wing structure incorporating low-profile convex-beaded and honeycomb sandwich surface panels of titanium alloy 6Al-4V were the most efficient. The substructure includes titanium alloy spar caps reinforced with Boron-polyimide composites. The fuselage shell is a closed-hat stiffened skin and frame construction of titanium alloy 6Al-4V. This paper presents an executive summary of the study effort, and includes a discussion of the overall study logic, design philosophy and interaction between the analytical methods for supersonic cruise aircraft design.

  16. Two-photon excitation of the 4[ital f][sup 1][r arrow]5[ital d][sup 1] transitions of Ce[sup 3+] in LuPO[sub 4] and YPO[sub 4

    SciTech Connect

    Sytsma, J.; Piehler, D.; Edelstein, N.M. ); Boatner, L.A.; Abraham, M.M. )

    1993-06-01

    Two-photon excitation (TPE) spectra of the 4[ital f][sup 1][r arrow]5[ital d][sup 1] transitions of Ce[sup 3+] in LuPO[sub 4] and YPO[sub 4] have been investigated. For Ce[sup 3+] in LuPO[sub 4], transitions to four out of the five 5[ital d][sup 1] levels are observed as zero-phonon lines. The symmetry properties of the levels were obtained from the polarization dependence of the TPE signals. Measurements on Ce[sup 3+] in YPO[sub 4] support the given assignments. Although a crystal-field fit yields a satisfactory rms energy deviation, an unrealistic value of the spin-orbit coupling parameter, [zeta][sub 5[ital d

  17. Evidence of K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{anti {nu}}: The BNL E787 1995 result (How did we get here)

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, I.H.; E787 Collaboration

    1998-02-01

    The kaon was studied very thoroughly since its discovery some 50 years ago. In the study of charged kaon branching ratios, it was noticed that K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup 0}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e} is allowed while K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{anti {nu}} is not. The latter was then empirically classified as a forbidden decay, leading to the so called strangeness changing current rule. The decay K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup 0}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e} is mediated by the strangeness changing charged current and its branching ratio is 4.8%. By contrast K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{anti {nu}} is a strangeness changing neutral current, which is forbidden. In 1970, the GIM model was introduced to explain this effect and in 1974, Gaillard and Lee calculated the K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{anti {nu}} branching ratio to be on the order of 10{sup {minus}10}. In the current theory, the K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{anti {nu}} is mediated by a Flavor Changing Neutral Current (FCNC) in which the cancellation of the three quark generations should be complete down to second order except for the difference in the quark masses. The top quark is much heavier than the charm and up quarks, so that the cancellation is not complete. In other words, this decay is more dependent on the top sector. The measurement of K{sup +} {r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{anti {nu}} branching ratio measures the modulus of the V{sub td} element of the CKM Matrix. The 1995 results of E787 were published in 1997. This report is focused on how the author achieved the goal of detecting events with such as small branching ratio.

  18. Experimental Investigation of a Point Design Optimized Arrow Wing HSCT Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narducci, Robert P.; Sundaram, P.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Cheung, S.; Arslan, A. E.; Martin, G. L.

    1999-01-01

    The M2.4-7A Arrow Wing HSCT configuration was optimized for straight and level cruise at a Mach number of 2.4 and a lift coefficient of 0.10. A quasi-Newton optimization scheme maximized the lift-to-drag ratio (by minimizing drag-to-lift) using Euler solutions from FL067 to estimate the lift and drag forces. A 1.675% wind-tunnel model of the Opt5 HSCT configuration was built to validate the design methodology. Experimental data gathered at the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) section #2 facility verified CFL3D Euler and Navier-Stokes predictions of the Opt5 performance at the design point. In turn, CFL3D confirmed the improvement in the lift-to-drag ratio obtained during the optimization, thus validating the design procedure. A data base at off-design conditions was obtained during three wind-tunnel tests. The entry into NASA Langley UPWT section #2 obtained data at a free stream Mach number, M(sub infinity), of 2.55 as well as the design Mach number, M(sub infinity)=2.4. Data from a Mach number range of 1.8 to 2.4 was taken at UPWT section #1. Transonic and low supersonic Mach numbers, M(sub infinity)=0.6 to 1.2, was gathered at the NASA Langley 16 ft. Transonic Wind Tunnel (TWT). In addition to good agreement between CFD and experimental data, highlights from the wind-tunnel tests include a trip dot study suggesting a linear relationship between trip dot drag and Mach number, an aeroelastic study that measured the outboard wing deflection and twist, and a flap scheduling study that identifies the possibility of only one leading-edge and trailing-edge flap setting for transonic cruise and another for low supersonic acceleration.

  19. [Fatal head injury caused by a crossbow arrow with unusually preserved posttraumatic volitional activity - case report].

    PubMed

    Řehulka, Hynek; Čechová, Eva; Mottlová, Jitka; Valenta, Martin; Mareška, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    The authors deal with a case of suicidal attempt resulting in a fatal head injury. A young man shot himself with a serially produced mechanical sports crossbow. The young man with a critical intracranial injury, a penetration, was nevertheless capable of basic locomotive activity, as well as of coherent communication with another people present at the scene. The critically injured patient was transported from the scene directly to medical centre where he subsequently underwent a neurologic surgery. On the eight day after the incident he died in the hospital as a result of sustained wounds. During the autopsy, a penetrating arrow-shot wound head injury was certified, occurring in the right and left temple area. Signs of a complex decompressive craniectomy were established too. The shooting channel was generally horizontally oriented, extending from the right to the left side, from behind in a 10 up to 15 degrees angle to the frontal plane, penetrating the brain from the right temple lobe and the frontal lobe, thereby pervading also frontal horns of lateral ventricles, and from the left afflicting the frontal lobe on the left side of the brain. In the course of the shooting channel, brain contusion occurred, accompanied by intraventricular haemorrhage. In addition, a heavy cerebral oedema, multiple secondary malacias, Durett haemorrhages and extensive thrombosis of cerebral sinuses were stated. In the course of police investigation, based mainly on the information given by the wounded man right after he had been found at the scene, it was revealed that another person might have been involved. The forensic autopsy, the investigation of the Police and the subsequent criminalist-ballistics expert investigation, supported by a series of experimental substitutive target shots, didnt, however, decidedly prove that any other culprit had been involved. PMID:27108656

  20. Box-and-arrow explanations need not be more abstract than neuroscientific mechanism descriptions

    PubMed Central

    Datteri, Edoardo; Laudisa, Federico

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the relationship between box-and-arrow (BA) explanations and neuroscientific mechanism descriptions (NMDs) is a key foundational issue for cognitive science. In this article we attempt to identify the nature of the constraints imposed by BA explanations on the formulation of NMDs. On the basis of a case study about motor control, we argue that BA explanations and NMDs both identify regularities that hold in the system, and that these regularities place constraints on the formulation of NMDs from BA analyses, and vice versa. The regularities identified in the two kinds of explanation play a crucial role in reasoning about the relationship between them, and in justifying the use of neuroscientific experimental techniques for the empirical testing of BA analyses of behavior. In addition, we make claims concerning the similarities and differences between BA analyses and NMDs. First, we argue that both types of explanation describe mechanisms. Second, we propose that they differ in terms of the theoretical vocabulary used to denote the entities and properties involved in the mechanism and engaging in regular, mutual interactions. On the contrary, the notion of abstractness, defined as omission of detail, does not help to distinguish BA analyses from NMDs: there is a sense in which BA analyses are more detailed than NMDs. In relation to this, we also focus on the nature of the extra detail included in NMDs and missing from BA analyses, arguing that such detail does not always concern how the system works. Finally, we propose reasons for doubting that BA analyses, unlike NMDs, may be considered “mechanism sketches.” We have developed these views by critically analyzing recent claims in the philosophical literature regarding the foundations of cognitive science. PMID:24904480

  1. Search for anomalous WW/WZ {r_arrow} e{nu}jj production at D0; Busqueda de produccion anomala WW/WZ {r_arrow}e{nu}jj en D-Zero

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, A.S.

    1997-02-01

    A search for anomalous WW and WZ production in p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV using the D0 detector at Fermilab is presented. With a data sample of p{anti p} {r_arrow} e{nu}jjX events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 76.5 {+-} 4.1pb{sup {minus}1}. 399 candidate events were identified, from which 387.1 {+-} 39.8 events were estimated to be background. No deviations from the Standard Model were seen, which predicts 16.2 {+-} 2.7 events. The 95% CL limit on the cross section {sigma}(p{anti p} {r_arrow} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}X) was calculated to be 93.8 pb. Limits on the CP-conserving anomalous WW{sub {gamma}} and WWZ coupling parameters were obtained from a binned likelihood fit to the transverse momentum spectrum of the W boson. Assuming that the WW{sub {gamma}} and WWZ coupling parameters are equal, the 95% CL limits on the CP-conserving couplings are {minus}0.56 < {Delta}{kappa} < 0.75 (with {lambda} = 0) and {minus}0.42 < {lambda} < 0.44 (with {Delta}{kappa} = 0), for a form factor scale {Lambda}{sub FF} = 1.5 TeV. Limits on other assumptions are also reported. These results were combined with the previous D0 WW, WZ {r_arrow} e{nu}jj published results (13.7 {+-} 0.7 pb{sup {minus}1}), and the limits on the anomalous coupling parameters were set to {minus}0.44 < {Delta}{kappa} < 0.60 (with {lambda} = 0) and {minus}0.34 < {lambda} 0.37 (with {Delta}{kappa} = 0), for a form factor scale {Lambda}{sub FF} = 2.0 TeV.

  2. Histochemical demonstration of a rhodopsin-like substance in the eye of the arrow-worm, Spadella schizoptera (Chaetognatha).

    PubMed

    Goto, T; Yoshida, M

    1988-01-01

    The presumed photoreceptive region of the arrow-worms of the species Sagitta crassa and Spadella schizoptera consists of perforated lamellae which are unique as the photoreceptive structure. The existence of a visual pigment in this region was demonstrated by a histofluorescent technique using Spadella schizoptera, whose presumed photoreceptive region was much larger than in Sagitta crassa. A specific fluorescence, indicative of the presence of retinal-based proteins, appeared only in the perforated lamellar region. The result suggests that the perforated lamellae contain a rhodopsin-like substance and could be the primary photoreceptive site. PMID:3268423

  3. CHARGE association in a child with de novo inverted duplication (14) (q22{r_arrow}q24.3)

    SciTech Connect

    North, K.N.; Wu, Bai Lin; Cao, B.N.

    1995-07-17

    We report on a 4-{1/2} year old girl with apparent CHARGE association who had a de novo inverted duplication (14) (q22{r_arrow}24.3), iris colobomas, ventricular septal defect, soft tissue choanal atresia, intellectual impairment, growth retardation, sensorineural deafness, apparently low set ears, and upslanting palpebral fissures. Family history was unremarkable and parental chromosomes were normal. Similarities between this and previously reported cases of 14q duplication suggest that a locus for a gene or genes causing some of the anomalies of CHARGE association may reside in the region 14q22 to 24.3. 26 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. The 5 f r arrow 6 d absorption spectrum of Pa sup 4+ /Cs sub 2 ZrCl sub 6

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, N.; Kot, W.K. ); Krupa, J. )

    1992-01-01

    The 5{ital f}{sup 1}{r arrow}6{ital d}{sup 1} absorption spectrum of {sup 231}Pa{sup 4+} diluted in a single crystal of Cs{sub 2}ZrCl{sub 6} has been measured at 4.2 K. Three bands corresponding to the 6{ital d}({Gamma}{sub 8{ital g}}, {Gamma}{sub 7{ital g}}, and {Gamma}{sup {prime}}{sub 8{ital g}} ) levels are assigned. Extensive vibronic structure has been observed for the lowest 5{ital f}{r arrow}6{ital d} transition and this structure is compared to that recently reported for the 6{ital d}{sup 1}{r arrow}5{ital f}{sup 1} emission spectra in the same system.

  5. Non-intentional but not automatic: reduction of word- and arrow-based compatibility effects by sound distractors in the same categorical domain.

    PubMed

    Miles, James D; Proctor, Robert W

    2009-10-01

    In the current study, we show that the non-intentional processing of visually presented words and symbols can be attenuated by sounds. Importantly, this attenuation is dependent on the similarity in categorical domain between the sounds and words or symbols. Participants performed a task in which left or right responses were made contingent on the color of a centrally presented target that was either a location word (LEFT or RIGHT) or a left or right arrow. Responses were faster when they were on the side congruent with the word or arrow. This bias was reduced for location words by a neutral spoken word and for arrows by a tone series, but not vice versa. We suggest that words and symbols are processed with minimal attentional requirements until they are categorized into specific knowledge domains, but then become sensitive to other information within the same domain regardless of the similarity between modalities. PMID:19688202

  6. Development, integration, testing, and evaluation of the U.S. Army Buckeye System to the NAVAIR Arrow UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Robert L.; Kennedy, Brian G.; Jones, Mitchell; Walker, Jeffrey; Muresan, Darian; Baxter, Gregory; Flood, Mark; Follmer, Brian; Sun, Xiuhong; Chen, William; Ruby, Jeffrey G.

    2008-04-01

    The Buckeye high-resolution geospatial collection system is currently supporting operations within both Iraq and Afghanistan. The Buckeye system, originally developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC), provides timely tactical high resolution geospatial information to field commanders. The Buckeye system is applicable in the following arenas: intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR), mapping, change detection, mission rehearsal, simulation, and battlefield visualization. Three distinct Buckeye systems hosted on multiple air platforms have provided continuous geospatial data delivery to U.S. Forces since November 2004. Further capability is to be provided by integrating next generation Buckeye components to an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The UAV selected for this effort is the experimental Arrow Unmanned Aerial System (UAS). This paper describes the physical and systems integration of the Buckeye Electro-Optical (EO) and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) components to the Arrow platform. Engineering solutions for mass balancing, thermal dispersion, and component calibration are presented. The distributed on-board architecture which performs instrument control, image compression, and data downlink, is described and discussed. Finally theoretical, laboratory and flight testing results are presented with a discussion on implementation and data dissemination within a tactical environment.

  7. Barcoding of arrow worms (Phylum Chaetognatha) from three oceans: genetic diversity and evolution within an enigmatic phylum.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Robert M; Bucklin, Ann; Pierrot-Bults, Annelies

    2010-01-01

    Arrow worms (Phylum Chaetognatha) are abundant planktonic organisms and important predators in many food webs; yet, the classification and evolutionary relationships among chaetognath species remain poorly understood. A seemingly simple body plan is underlain by subtle variation in morphological details, obscuring the affinities of species within the phylum. Many species achieve near global distributions, spanning the same latitudinal bands in all ocean basins, while others present disjunct ranges, in some cases with the same species apparently found at both poles. To better understand how these complex evolutionary and geographic variables are reflected in the species makeup of chaetognaths, we analyze DNA barcodes of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (COI) gene, from 52 specimens of 14 species of chaetognaths collected mainly from the Atlantic Ocean. Barcoding analysis was highly successful at discriminating described species of chaetognaths across the phylum, and revealed little geographical structure. This barcode analysis reveals hitherto unseen genetic variation among species of arrow worms, and provides insight into some species relationships of this enigmatic group. PMID:20376348

  8. Boom Softening and Nacelle Integration on an Arrow-Wing High-Speed Civil Transport Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    point of view, this concept was unacceptable from several practical and structural considerations. Preliminary wind-tunnel pressure signature data from the LB-16 wind-tunnel model, which had the engine nacelles mounted under the wings (the usual location), indicated that the application of the Langley nacelle-integration method had been only partially successful in the reduction of the nacelle-volume with nacelle-wing interference-lift pressure disturbances. So, "boom softening" had to also address the task of successful integration of the engine nacelles, with the engines in the required under-the-wing location. Unless this problem was solved, low-sonic-boom and low-drag modifications to the wing planform, the airfoil shape, and the fuselage longitudinal area distribution could be nullified if the nacelle disturbances added increments to the nose-shock strengths that were removed through component tailoring. In this paper, an arrow-wing boom-softened HSC7 concept which incorporated modifications to a baseline McDonnell Douglas concept is discussed. The analysis of the concept's characteristics will include estimates of weight, center of gravity, takeoff field length, mission range, and predictions of its ground-level sonic-boom pressure signature. Additional modifications which enhanced the softened-boom performance of this concept are also described as well as estimates of the performance penalties induced by these modifications.

  9. 78 FR 21345 - In the Matter of: Liem Duc Huynh, a/k/a Duc Huynh, 2905 South Elm, Broken Arrow, OK 74012; Order...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security In the Matter of: Liem Duc Huynh, a/k/a Duc Huynh, 2905 South Elm, Broken... last known address at: 2905 South Elm, Broken Arrow, OK 74012, and when acting for or on behalf...

  10. A Method for Writing Open-Ended Curved Arrow Notation Questions for Multiple-Choice Exams and Electronic-Response Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruder, Suzanne M.; Straumanis, Andrei R.

    2009-01-01

    A critical stage in the process of developing a conceptual understanding of organic chemistry is learning to use curved arrow notation. From this stems the ability to predict reaction products and mechanisms beyond the realm of memorization. Since evaluation (i.e., testing) is known to be a key driver of student learning, it follows that a new…

  11. Role of tensor meson pole and {Delta} exchange diagrams in {ital p{bar p}}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y.; Tegen, R.

    1996-09-01

    The {bar {ital N}}{ital N}{r_arrow}{pi}{pi} annihilation reaction is investigated in a model with both baryon-exchange diagrams and meson-pole diagrams. The main features of the observed differential cross sections for {bar {ital p}}{ital p}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} from 360 to 1190 MeV/{ital c} are well understood in this model. The backward enhancement of the differential cross section is mainly due to the {ital N}{Delta}{pi} tensor coupling while the process {bar {ital p}}{ital p}{r_arrow}{ital f}{sub 2}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} contributes to the bump structure around 100{degree} developing for {ital P}{sub lab}{approx_gt}680 MeV/{ital c}. This hints at nontrivial quark spin contributions beyond the {sup 3}{ital P}{sub 0} model (which favored {ital S} and {ital P} waves) and hints at a large gluonic component in tensor mesons with masses between 1.27 and 2.2 GeV. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. CSMP Mathematics for the Intermediate Grades Part IV, Teacher's Guide. The Languages of Strings and Arrows. Geometry and Measurement. Probability and Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CEMREL, Inc., St. Ann, MO.

    This guide represents the final experimental version of a pilot project which was conducted in the United States between 1973 and 1976. The ideas and the manner of presentation are based on the works of Georges and Frederique Papy. They are recognized for having introduced colored arrow drawings ("papygrams") and models of our numeration system…

  13. CSMP Mathematics for the Upper Primary Grades Part I, Teacher's Guide. The Languages of Strings and Arrows. Geometry and Measurement. Workbooks. Final Experimental Version.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CEMREL, Inc., St. Ann, MO.

    This guide represents the final experimental version of a pilot project conducted in the Unites States between 1973 and 1976. The ideas and manner of presentation are based on the works of Georges and Frederique Papy. They are recognized as having introduced colored arrow drawings ("papygrams") and models of our numeration system (the Papy…

  14. Implementing Quality Criteria in Designing and Conducting a Sequential Quan [right arrow] Qual Mixed Methods Study of Student Engagement with Learning Applied Research Methods Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivankova, Nataliya V.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of recent methodological developments related to quality assurance in mixed methods research, practical examples of how to implement quality criteria in designing and conducting sequential QUAN [right arrow] QUAL mixed methods studies to ensure the process is systematic and rigorous remain scarce. This article discusses a three-step…

  15. Evidence for a founder effect for the IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T mutation in the Fanconi anemia gene FACC in a Jewish population

    SciTech Connect

    Verlander, P.C.; Kaporis, A.G.; Qian, L.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder defined by hypersensitivity of cells to DNA cross-linking agents; a gene for complementation group C(FACC) has been cloned. Two common mutations, IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T and 322delG, and several rare mutations have recently been reported in affected individuals. We now report the development of amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) assays for rapid, non-radioactive detection of these known mutations in FACC. Primer pairs specific for variant sequences were designed, with the 3{prime} terminal base of one primer matching the variant base. PCR products are separated by electrophoresis on 2.5% agarose gels; mutations are indicated by the presence of a band of a specific size. These ARMS assays can be multiplexed to allow screening for all known mutations in two PCR reactions. We have used these assays for detection of FACC mutations in affected individuals in the International Fanconi Anemia Registry (IFAR), and for carrier detection FACC families. IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T is the only FACC mutation found in Jewish FA patients and their families, of both Ashkenazi and Sephardic ancestry. This mutation was not found in any affected individual of non-Jewish origin. In addition, DNA samples from 1596 healthy Jewish individuals primarily of Ashkenazi ancestry were supplied to us by Dor Yeshorim. These samples, ascertained for carrier screening for Tay Sachs, cystic fibrosis, and other genetic diseases with a high frequency in the religious Jewish community served by this organization, were tested for both IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T and 322delG mutations; seventeen IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T are of Sephardic Jewish ancestry. We hypothesize that IVS4 +4 A{r_arrow}T is a very old mutation, predating the divergence of the Ashkenazi and Sephardic populations. Haplotype analysis with microsatellite markers is in progress.

  16. Percutaneous Venous Thrombectomy Using the Arrow-Trerotola Percutaneous Thrombolytic Device (PTD) with Temporary Caval Filtration: In Vitro Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Wildberger, Joachim Ernst Haage, Patrick; Bovelander, Jan; Pfeffer, Joachim; Weiss, Claudia; Vorwerk, Dierk; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Guenther, Rolf W.

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the size and quantity of downstream emboli after thrombectomy using the Arrow-Trerotola Percutaneous Thrombolytic Device (PTD) with or without temporary filtration for extensive iliofemoral and iliocaval thrombi in an in vitro flow model. Methods. Iliocaval thrombi were simulated by clotted bovine blood in a flow model (semilucent silicone tubings, diameter 12-16 mm). Five experimental set-ups were performed 10 times each; thrombus particles and distribution were measured in the effluent. First, after retrograde insertion, mechanical thrombectomy was performed using the PTD alone. Then a modified self-expanding tulip-shaped temporary vena cava stent filter was inserted additionally at the beginning of each declotting procedure and removed immediately after the intervention without any manipulation within or at the filter itself. In a third step, the filter was filled with thrombus only. Here, two experiments were performed: Careful closure within the flow circuit without any additional fragmentation procedure and running the PTD within the filter lumen, respectively. In the final set-up, mechanical thrombectomy was performed within the thrombus-filled tubing as well as in the filter lumen. The latter was closed at the end of the procedure and both devices were removed from the flow circuit. Results. Running the PTD in the flow circuit without filter protection led to a fragmentation of 67.9% ({+-}7.14%) of the clot into particles {<=}500 {mu}m; restoration of flow was established in all cases. Additional placement of the filter safely allowed maceration of 82.9% ({+-}5.59%) of the thrombus. Controlled closure of the thrombus-filled filter within the flow circuit without additional mechanical treatment broke up 75.2% ({+-}10.49%), while additional mechanical thrombectomy by running the PTD within the occluded filter led to dissolution of 90.4% ({+-}3.99%) of the initial clot. In the final set-up, an overall fragmentation rate of 99.6% ({+-}0

  17. Atomic sulfur: Frequency measurement of the J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition at 56.3 microns by laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John M.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Zink, Lyndon R.

    1994-01-01

    The J = 0 left arrow 1 fine-structure transition in atomic sulfur (S I) in its ground (3)P state has been detected in the laboratory by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance. The fine-structure interval has been measured accurately as 5,322,492.9 +/- 2.8 MHz which corresponds to a wavelength of 56.325572 +/- 0.000030 micrometers.

  18. The decay. tau. sup minus r arrow K sup minus K sup +. pi. sup minus. nu. sub. tau. and the. nu. sub. tau. mass

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Cadenas, J.J. ); Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C.; Pich, A. Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Valencia, Burjasot )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper, we present a model based on the effective chiral Lagrangian to describe the decay {tau}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{ital K}{sup {minus}}{ital K}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{nu}{sub {tau}}. Using our model we study the possible limits on the {nu}{sub {tau}} mass that can be achieved by a high-statistics, high-precision experiment taking data close to the {tau}-pair production threshold.

  19. Study of the f{sub 0}(1500)/f{sub 2}(1565) production in the exclusive annihilation {bar n}p{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} in flight

    SciTech Connect

    The OBELIX Collaboration

    1998-01-01

    The spin-parity analysis of the {bar n}p{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} exclusive reaction in flight is presented. The main aim is to study the ({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}) invariant mass spectrum in the region around 1500 MeV. The analysis was performed with a Breit-Wigner parametrization for all the resonant states and, for the scalar sector in the mass region below 1.2 GeV, by means of a K-matrix-like treatment. It clearly shows the need for two states, a scalar one (0{sup ++}) with mass and width (1522{plus_minus}25) MeV and (108{plus_minus}33) MeV, and a tensorial one (2{sup ++}) with mass (1575{plus_minus}18) MeV and width (119{plus_minus}24) MeV, respectively. In addition, the analysis requires the presence of a scalar state at (1280{plus_minus}55) MeV, (323{plus_minus}13) MeV broad, and of a second vectorial one, in addition to the {rho}{sup 0}(770) signal, with mass and width (1348{plus_minus}33) MeV and (275{plus_minus}10) MeV, respectively. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. The asymptotics of the transition form factor {gamma}{gamma}{sup *} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup 0}

    SciTech Connect

    A.V. Radyushkin; R. Ruskov

    1997-05-01

    In this paper the authors present the result of a direct QCD sum rule calculation of the transition form factor {gamma}{gamma}{sup *} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup 0} in the region of moderately large invariant momentum Q{sup 2} > 1GeV{sup 2} of the virtual photon. In contrast to pQCD, they make no assumptions about the shape of the pion distribution amplitude {var_phi}{sub {pi}}(x). Their results agree with the Brodsky-Lepage proposal that the Q{sup 2}-dependence of this form factor is given by an interpolation between its Q{sup 2}=0 value fixed by the axial anomaly and 1/Q{sup 2} pQCD behavior for large Q{sup 2}, with normalization corresponding to the asymptotic form {var_phi}{sub pi}{sup as}(x)=6 f{sub {pi}}x(1{minus}x) of the pion distribution amplitude. Their prediction for the from factor F{sub {gamma}}{sup *}{gamma}{sup *}{pi}{sup 0}(q{sub 1}{sup 2} = 0,q{sub 2}{sup 2} = {minus}Q{sup 2}) is in good agreement with new CLEO data.

  1. Lessons from two-dimensional QCD ({ital N}{r_arrow}{infinity}): Vacuum structure, asymptotic series, instantons, and all that

    SciTech Connect

    Zhitnitsky, A.R.

    1996-05-01

    We discuss two-dimensional QCD ({ital N}{sub {ital c}}{r_arrow}{infinity}) with fermions in the fundamental as well as adjoint representation. We find factorial growth {approximately}({ital g}{sup 2}{ital N}{sub {ital c}}{pi}){sup 2{ital k}}(2{ital k})!({minus}1){sup {ital k}{minus}1}/(2{pi}){sup 2{ital k}} in the coefficients of the large order perturbative expansion. We argue that this behavior is related to classical solutions of the theory, instantons; thus it has nonperturbative origin. Phenomenologically such a growth is related to highly excited states in the spectrum. We also analyze the heavy-light quark system {ital Q{bar q}} within the operator product expansion (which turns out to be an asymptotic series). Some vacuum condensates {l_angle}{bar {ital q}}({ital x}{sub {mu}}{ital D}{sub {mu}}){sup 2{ital n}}{ital q}{r_angle}{approximately}({ital x}{sup 2}){sup {ital nn}}! which are responsible for this factorial growth are also discussed. We formulate some general puzzles which are not specific for two-dimensional physics, but are inevitable features of any asymptotic expansion. We resolve these apparent puzzles within two-dimensional QCD and we speculate that analogous puzzles might occur in real four-dimensional QCD as well. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. New redox-related arrows in the arsenal of cardiac disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Jonathan A; Paolocci, Nazareno

    2014-11-10

    While great strides have been made to improve the poor prognosis with cardiac disease, heart failure in particular, cardiac affections still remain the most prevalent, difficult-to-treat, and costly human pathologies in the western world. At rest, the heart produces a significant oxidative environment inside diverse cell compartments, due to its high-energy demand. Cardiac cells have an exquisite control system to deal with this constant redox stress. However, persistent hemodynamic alterations can compromise these mechanisms, fueling further myocardial redox imbalance and dysfunction. Still, this would be a one-sided and incomplete view, because the physiological role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) should be considered as well. Indeed, ROS are multipurpose agents, serving signaling and cell defense tasks too, and, similar to antioxidants, these functions can be highly compartmentalized within the cell. The present Forum was designed to collect cutting-edge research concerning when and how to effectively counter excessive oxidative burden to preserve cardiac structure and/or to improve function, under conditions of ordinary or extraordinary stress. Another major objective was to unravel old and new intersections between different myocardial processes by which ROS may act as "on" or "off" switches, and in doing so, dictating function, always with an eye on possible, immediate therapeutic applications, as suggested by the title of the Forum itself, that is, Cardiac Therapeutics. PMID:25211226

  3. Signal voter

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, Roy L.

    1981-01-01

    A voter for providing a single accurate output signal that is derived from the closest two signal levels of three input signals, each of which signals represents a measurement of the same phenomena. By means of the voting circuit, the signals are first sorted by level of amplitude and then ranked as highest, middle or lowest. The highest or lowest signal that is furthest from the middle signal is rejected, while the other highest or lowest signal is selected for processing. The selected high or low signal is then averaged with the middle signal to provide the output signal.

  4. Heterogeneous reaction HOCl + HBr {r_arrow} BrCl + H{sub 2}O on ice films

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, L.; Chu, L.T.

    1999-02-11

    Heterogeneous reactions on the surface of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are critical to an understanding of the annual appearance of the Antarctic ozone hole. The heterogeneous reaction HOCl + HBr(s) {r_arrow} BrCl + H{sub 2}O(s) on the ice surface at 189 and 220 K has been investigated in a flow reactor interfaced with a differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer. Pseudo first-order decay of HOCl over the HBr-treated ice surfaces has been determined under the condition of P{sub HOCl} < P{sub HBr}. For the HBr partial pressure in the range of 1.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} to 6.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} Torr, the reaction probability ({gamma}{sub g}) was determined in the range of 0.06 to 0.38 at 189 K. The reaction probability is in the range of 0.01 to 0.07 at 220 K for HBr partial pressure from 7.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} to 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} Torr. The reaction probability was found to be strongly dependent on the ice surface temperature. The reaction probability is higher at the lower temperature than that at the warmer temperature and a mechanistic explanation is provided. The true reaction probabilities ({gamma}{sub t}) of the reaction were calculated using a pore diffusion model. The kinetic analysis indicates that the heterogeneous reaction of HOCl + HBr may follow the Eley-Rideal type of mechanism. Also, the heat of uptake of HOCl on ice was determined to be about {minus}8.5 {+-} 2 kcal/mol.

  5. Penguin operators in nonresonant B{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}M{bar M}{pi}{sup {minus}}(M={pi}{sup {minus}},K{sup {minus}},K{sup 0}) decays

    SciTech Connect

    Fajfer, S. |; Oakes, R.J.; Pham, T.N.

    1999-09-01

    We investigate the contributions coming from the penguin operators in the nonresonant B{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}M{bar M}{pi}{sup {minus}}(M={pi}{sup {minus}},K{sup {minus}},K{sup 0}) decays. The effective Wilson coefficients of the strong penguin operators O{sub 4} and O{sub 6} are found to be relatively larger than those for other penguin operators. We calculate the contributions arising from the O{sub 4} and O{sub 6} operators in the nonresonant decays B{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}M{bar M}{pi}{sup {minus}}(M={pi}{sup {minus}},K{sup {minus}},{bar K}{sup 0}) using a model combining heavy quark symmetry and the chiral symmetry, developed previously. We find that the CKM-forbidden nonresonant B{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}K{sup 0}{bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup {minus}} decay occurs through the strong penguin operators. These penguin contributions affect the branching ratios for B{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}M{bar M}{pi}{sup {minus}}(M={pi}{sup {minus}},K{sup {minus}}) by only a few percent. The branching ratio for B{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}K{sup 0}{bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup {minus}} is estimated to be of the order 10{sup {minus}6}. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Doubly charged Higgsino contribution to the decays {mu}{r_arrow}e{gamma} and {mu}{r_arrow}3e and to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon {Delta}a{sub {mu}} within the left-right supersymmetric model

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, G.; Koenig, H.; Frank, M.; Koenig, H.

    1997-10-01

    We present a detailed and complete calculation of the doubly charged Higgsino contribution to the decays {mu}{r_arrow}e{gamma} and {mu}{r_arrow}3e and to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon {Delta}a{sub {mu}} within the left-right supersymmetric model. We include the mixing of the scalar partners of the left- and right-handed leptons, and show that it leads to a strong enhancement of the decay modes in certain scenarios. We find that the contribution of the doubly charged Higgsino can be close to the known experimental values and is reachable by future experiments. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Investigation at Mach Numbers of 0.20 to 3.50 of Blended Wing-Body Combinations of Sonic Design with Diamond, Delta, and Arrow Plan Forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdaway, George H.; Mellenthin, Jack A.

    1960-01-01

    The models had aspect-ratio-2 diamond, delta, and arrow wings with the leading edges swept 45.00 deg, 59.04 deg, and 70.82 deg, respectively. The wing sections were computed by varying the section shape along with the body radii (blending process) to match the prescribed area distribution and wing plan form. The wing sections had an average value of maximum thickness ratio of about 4 percent of the local chords in a streamwise direction. The models were tested with transition fixed at Reynolds numbers of about 4,000,000 to 9,000,0000, based on the mean aerodynamic chord of the wings. The effect of varying Reynolds number was checked at both subsonic and supersonic speeds. The diamond model was superior to the other plan forms at transonic speeds ((L/D)max = 11.00 to 9.52) because of its higher lift-curve slope and near optimum wave drag due to the blending process. For the wing thickness tested with the diamond model, the marked body and wing contouring required for transonic conditions resulted in a large wave-drag penalty at the higher supersonic Mach numbers where the leading and trailing edges of the wing were supersonic. Because of the low sweep of the trailing edge of the delta model, this configuration was less adaptable to the blending process. Removing a body bump prescribed by the Mach number 1.00 design resulted in a good supersonic design. This delta model with 10 percent less volume was superior to the other plan forms at Mach numbers of 1.55 to 2.35 ((L/D)max = 8.65 to 7.24), but it and the arrow model were equally good at Mach numbers of 2.50 to 3.50 ((L/D)max - 6.85 to O.39). At transonic speeds the arrow model was inferior because of the reduced lift-curve slope associated with its increased sweep and also because of the wing base drag. The wing base-drag coefficients of the arrow model based on the wing planform area decreased from a peak value of 0.0029 at Mach number 1.55 to 0.0003 at Mach number 3.50. Linear supersonic theory was satisfactory

  8. Simulator study of the low-speed handling qualities of a supersonic cruise arrow-wing transport configuration during approach and landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, W. D.; Nguyen, L. T.; Neubauer, M. J., Jr.; Smith, P. M.

    1976-01-01

    A fixed-based simulator study was conducted to determine the low-speed flight characteristics of an advanced supersonic cruise transport having an arrow wing, a horizontal tail, and four dry turbojets with variable geometry turbines. The primary piloting task was the approach and landing. The statically unstable (longitudinally) subject configuration has unacceptable low-speed handling qualities with no augmentation. Therefore, a hardened stability augmentation system is required to achieve acceptable handling qualities, should the normal operational stability and control augmentation system fail. In order to achieve satisfactory handling qualities, considerable augmentation was required.

  9. Exact results on e{sup +}e{sup -} {r_arrow}e{sup +}e{sup -} + 2{gamma} at SLC/LEP energies

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, S.A.; Jadach, S.; Ward, B.F.L.

    1993-04-01

    The authors use the spinor methods of the CALKUL collaboration, as realized by Xu, Zhang and Chang, to calculate the differential cross section for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} + 2{gamma} for c.m.s. energies in the SLC/LEP regime. An explicit complete formula for the respective cross section is obtained. The leading log approximation is used to check the formula. Applications of the formula to high precision luminosity calculations at SLC/LEP are discussed.

  10. Quantum dynamics with real wave packets, including application to three-dimensional (J=0)D+H{sub 2}{r_arrow}HD+H reactive scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, S.K.; Balint-Kurti, G.G.

    1998-01-01

    We show how to extract {bold S} matrix elements for reactive scattering from just the real part of an evolving wave packet. A three-term recursion scheme allows the real part of a wave packet to be propagated without reference to its imaginary part, so {bold S} matrix elements can be calculated efficiently. Our approach can be applied not only to the usual time-dependent Schr{umlt o}dinger equation, but to a modified form with the Hamiltonian operator {cflx H} replaced by f({cflx H}), where f is chosen for convenience. One particular choice for f, a cos{sup {minus}1} mapping, yields the Chebyshev iteration that has proved to be useful in several other recent studies. We show how reactive scattering can be studied by following time-dependent wave packets generated by this mapping. These ideas are illustrated through calculation of collinear H+H{sub 2}{r_arrow}H{sub 2}+H and three-dimensional (J=0)D+H{sub 2}{r_arrow}HD+D reactive scattering probabilities on the Liu{endash}Siegbahn{endash}Truhlar{endash}Horowitz (LSTH) potential energy surface. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. High power n of m{sub b} in b-flavored widths and n={bold 5{r_arrow}{infinity}} limit

    SciTech Connect

    Bigi, I.; Uraltsev, N.; Shifman, M.; Uraltsev, N.; Vainshtein, A.; Uraltsev, N.; Uraltsev, N.; Vainshtein, A.

    1997-10-01

    The leading term in the semileptonic width of heavy flavor hadrons depends on the fifth power of the heavy quark mass. We present an analysis where this power can be self-consistently treated as a free parameter n and the width can be studied in the limit n{r_arrow}{infinity}. The resulting expansion elucidates why the small velmcity (SV) treatment is relevant for the inclusive semileptonic b{r_arrow}c transition. The extended SV limit (ESV limit) is introduced. The leading terms in the perturbative {alpha}{sub s} expansion enhanced by powers of n are automatically resummed by using the low-scale Euclidean mass. The large-n treatment explains why the scales of order m{sub b}/n are appropriate. On the other hand, the scale cannot be too small since the factorially divergent perturbative corrections associated with running of {alpha}{sub s} show up. Both requirements are met if we use the short-distance mass normalized at a scale around m{sub b}/n{approximately}1GeV. A convenient definition of such low-scale operator-product-expansion-compatible masses is briefly discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Chiral perturbation theory for K{sup +}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} decay in the continuum and on the lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Golterman, M.F.; Leung, K.C.

    1997-09-01

    In this paper we use one-loop chiral perturbation theory in order to compare lattice computations of the K{sup +}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} decay amplitude with the experimental value. This makes it possible to investigate three systematic effects that plague lattice computations: quenching, finite-volume effects, and the fact that lattice computations have been done at unphysical values of the quark masses and pion external momenta (only this latter effect shows up at the tree level). We apply our results to the most recent lattice computation and find that all three effects are substantial. We conclude that one-loop corrections in chiral perturbation theory help in explaining the discrepancy between lattice results and the real-world value. We also reexamine B{sub K}, which is closely related to the K{sup +}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} decay amplitude by chiral symmetry. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. A six dimensional quantum study for atom{endash}triatom reactions: The H+H{sub 2}O{r_arrow}H{sub 2}+OH reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.H.; Light, J.C.

    1996-03-01

    A time-dependent wave packet method has been developed to study atom{endash}triatom ABC+D{r_arrow}AB+CD reactions in full six dimensions (6D). The approach employs a body-fixed coupled angular momentum basis for three angular coordinates, and three 1D bases for three radial coordinates. It permits the calculation of diatom AB vibrational state resolved total reaction probability for an initial rovibrational state of the triatom ABC. The approach is applied to study the H+H{sub 2}O{r_arrow}H{sub 2}+OH reaction on the modified Schatz{endash}Elgersman potential energy surface. Initial state-selected total reaction probabilities are presented for initial ground and several vibrationally excited states of H{sub 2}O for total angular momentum {ital J}=0, along with the final OH vibrational state distributions. We also report the cross sections for reaction from the initial ground vibrational and the first bending excited states of H{sub 2}O. Comparisons are made between our results and those from other theoretical calculations and experiments. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Elevated total plasma homocysteine and 667C{r_arrow}T mutation of the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene in thrombotic vascular disease

    SciTech Connect

    De Franchis, R.; Sebastio, G.; Andria, G.

    1996-07-01

    Moderate elevation of total plasma homocysteine (tHcy) has been reported as an independent risk factor for thrombotic vascular disease, a well-known multifactorial disorder. Possible genetic causes of elevated tHcy include defects of the sulfur-containing amino acids metabolism due to deficiencies of cystathionine {Beta}-synthase, of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), and of the enzymes of cobalamin metabolism. An impaired activity of MTHFR due to a thermolabile form of the enzyme has been observed in {le}28% of hyperhomocysteinemic patients with premature vascular disease. More recently, the molecular basis of such enzymatic thermolability has been related to a common mutation of the MTHFR gene, causing a C-to-T substitution at nt 677 (677C{r_arrow}T). This mutation was found in 38% of unselected chromosomes from 57 French Canadian individuals. The homozygous state for the mutation was present in 12% of these subjects and correlated with significantly elevated tHcy. Preliminary evidence indicates that the frequency of homozygotes for the 677C{r_arrow}T mutation may vary significantly in populations from different geographic areas. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. Supercruiser Arrow HS-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Paul; Kao, Edward; Abobo, Joey B.; Collins, Todd A.; Ma, Leong; Murad, Adnan; Naran, Hitesh; Nguyen, Thuan P.; Nuon, Timithy I.; Thomas, Dimitri D.

    1992-01-01

    Technology in aeronautics has advanced dramatically since the last design of a production High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft. Newly projected requirements call for a new High Speed Civil Transport aircraft with a range of approximately 550 nm and at least 275 passenger capacity. The aircraft must be affordable and marketable. The new HSCT must be able to sustain long-duration flights and to absorb the abuse of daily operation. The new aircraft must be safe and simple to fly and require a minimum amount of maintenance. This aircraft must meet FAA certification criteria of FAR Part 25 and environmental constraints. Several design configurations were examined and two designs were selected for further investigation. The first design employs the delta planform wings and conventional empennage layout. The other design uses a swing wing layout and conventional empennage. Other engineering challenges, including materials and propulsion are also discussed. At a cruise flight speed between Mach 2.2 and Mach 3.0, no current generation of materials can endure the thermal loading of supersonic flight and satisfy the stringent weight requirements. A new generation of lightweight composite materials must be developed for the HSCT. With the enforcement of stage 3 noise restrictions, these new engines must be able to propel the aircraft and satisfy the noise limit. The engine with the most promise is the variable cycle engine. At low subsonic speeds the engine operates like a turbofan engine, providing the most efficient performance. At higher speeds the variable cycle engine operates as a turbojet power plant. The two large engine manufacturers, General Electric and Pratt & Whitney in the United States, are combining forces to make the variable cycle engine a reality.

  16. A C {r_arrow} T transition at nucleotide 592 accounts for the most frequent mutation of G6PD gene in Taiwanese aboriginal Ami tribe: detection by mutagenically separated PCR (MS-PCR)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.P.; Sun, W.; Chang, J.G.

    1994-09-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the commonest known enzymopathy in Taiwan. It is estimated to affect 3% of our population, and its molecular defects have been characterized recently. There are 9 point mutations identified with a C {r_arrow} T substitution at nucleotide (nt) 592 in exon VI, the least frequently seen (0.8%) of all mutations. To characterize mutations of the G6PD gene in the Ami people, the most populous of Taiwanese minorities, we studied 21 G6PD-deficient Ami infants and their family members. Natural and amplification-created restriction sites were generated by PCR technique with 10 pairs of primers applied for the screening. By studying the first 7 cases, we found an identical C {r_arrow} T transition at nt 592. MS-PCR was then designed to rapidly detect the nt 592 mutation. As a result, 17 infants are disclosed as having the C {r_arrow} T transition at nt 592, and 2 have a G {r_arrow} T substitution at nt 1376, which were finally verified to be derived from a Chinese Min-Nan ancestor. The genetic defect of the remaining 2 infants remains unidentified. This study has shown that MS-PCR is a feasible and highly sensitive technique for screening mutation carriers in pooled DNA samples. The homogeneity of the nt 592 mutation in the Ami people has proved to be a good indicator for anthropological research.

  17. Signal Words

    MedlinePlus

    ... Signal Words? Signal words are found on pesticide product labels, and they describe the acute (short-term) toxicity ... red letters on the front panel of the product label. 2,4 Acute Oral LD 50 Inhalation LC ...

  18. Low-speed wind-tunnel tests of a large scale blended arrow advanced supersonic transport model having variable cycle engines and vectoring exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlett, L. P.; Shivers, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    A low-speed wind-tunnel investigation was conducted in a full-scale tunnel to determine the performance and static stability and control characteristics of a large-scale model of a blended-arrow advanced supersonic transport configuration incorporating variable-cycle engines and vectoring exhaust nozzles. Configuration variables tested included: (1) engine mode (cruise or low-speed), (2) engine exit nozzle deflection, (3) leading-edge flap geometry, and (4) trailing-edge flap deflection. Test variables included values of C sub micron from 0 to 0.38, values of angle of attack from -10 degrees to 30 degrees, values of angle of sideslip, from -5 degrees to 5 degrees, and values of Reynolds number, from 3.5 million to 6.8 million.

  19. LASER INDUCED FLUORESCENCE OF TRAPPED MOLECULAR IONS: THE CH{sup +} A{sup 1}{Pi}{l_arrow}X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Grieman, Fred J.; Mahan, Bruce H.; O'Keefe, Anthony; Winn, John S.

    1980-09-01

    The CH{sup +} and CD{sup +} A{sup 1}{Pi}{l_arrow}X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +} absorption spectra have been obtained by laser excitation of these fragment ions. The ions are contained in a mass-selective quadrupole ion trap under collision free conditions. The spectra therefore reflect the nascent internal energy distributions of the ions, which were produced by electron impact on CH{sub 4} (CD{sub 4}) or C{sub 2}H{sub 2} (C{sub 2}D{sub 2}). Both parent gases gave virtually identical spectra; large rotational and vibrational excitation was observed. The equipment was also capable of measuring the radiative lifetime of CH{sup +} (CD{sup +}) A{sup 1}{Pi} (v=0), and the measured value, 815 nsec, is found to be in good agreement with theoretical calculations of this quantity.

  20. Reduced dimensionality diatom--diatom reactive scattering: Application to a model H sub 2 +A sub 2 r arrow H+HA sub 2 reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Q.; Bowman, J.M. )

    1990-01-15

    We apply a recently formulated quantum theory of diatom--diatom reactions (Q. Sun and J. M. Bowman, Int. J. Quant. Chem., Quant. Chem. Symp. {bold 23}, 9 (1989)) to a model collinear H{sub 2}+A{sub 2}{r arrow}H+HA{sub 2} reaction, where A has the mass of a hydrogen atom. The theory assumes one diatom bond is nonreactive, and the reactive scattering Hamiltonian is written in terms of hyperspherical and cylindrical coordinates. The potential-energy surface used is the PK2 H+H{sub 2} surface augmented by a harmonic degree of freedom describing the nonreactive A{sub 2}. Details of the formulation and solution of the coupled-channel equations are given, along with convergence tests, and a discussion of the new state-to-state transition probabilities. In particular, the partial quenching of the well-known collinear H+H{sub 2} resonances is noted.

  1. Low-speed wind-tunnel investigation of a large scale advanced arrow-wing supersonic transport configuration with engines mounted above wing for upper-surface blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivers, J. P.; Mclemore, H. C.; Coe, P. L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Tests have been conducted in a full scale tunnel to determine the low speed aerodynamic characteristics of a large scale advanced arrow wing supersonic transport configuration with engines mounted above the wing for upper surface blowing. Tests were made over an angle of attack range of -10 deg to 32 deg, sideslip angles of + or - 5 deg, and a Reynolds number range of 3,530,000 to 7,330,000. Configuration variables included trailing edge flap deflection, engine jet nozzle angle, engine thrust coefficient, engine out operation, and asymmetrical trailing edge boundary layer control for providing roll trim. Downwash measurements at the tail were obtained for different thrust coefficients, tail heights, and at two fuselage stations.

  2. Low-speed wind-tunnel study of the high-angle-of-attack stability and control characteristics of a cranked-arrow-wing fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grafton, S. B.

    1984-01-01

    The low-speed, high-angle-of-attack stability and control characteristics of a fighter configuration incorporating a cranked arrow wing were investigated in the Langley 30- by 60-foot tunnel as part of a NASA/General Dynamics cooperative research program to investigate the application of advanced wing designs to combat aircraft. Tests were conducted on a baseline configuration and on several modified configurations. The results show that the baseline configuration exhibited a high level of maximum lift but displayed undesirable longitudinal and lateral-directional stability characteristics at high angles of attack. Various wing modifications were made which improved the longitudinal and lateral-directional stability characteristics of the configuration at high angles of attack. However, most of the modifications were detrimental to maximum lift.

  3. Strong association between a splice mutation (IVS12+5G{r_arrow}A) and haplotype 6 in hereditary tyrosinemia type I

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, R.M.; St-Louis, M.; Gibson, K.

    1994-09-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HT I; McKusick 276700) is a severe inborn error of tyrosine catabolism pathway caused by a deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH). The highest frequency reported is the one in Saguenay-Lac St-Jean (Quebec, Canada) where 1:1,846 births are affected. The FAH gene has been cloned and several mutations have been described. Allele specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization was used to examine the frequency of a splice (IVS12-5G{r_arrow}A) mutation recently reported and RFLP analysis was done to identify haplotypes related to HT I. The splice mutation was found on 45/50 alleles (90%) in patients from SLSJ and 12/66 (18%) alleles from patients world-wide. All 25 patients from the SLSJ region were positive with 20 being homozygous, indicating that this mutation is the major cause of HT I in French Canada. Of these 25 patients, 96% were positive for one haplotype called no 6 which is these 25 patients, 96% were positive for one haplotype called no 6 which is identified by TaqI, RsaI, BglII, MspI and KpnI digestions. These data show a really strong association between the mutation (IVS12+5G{r_arrow}A) and haplotype 6. Among our patients from around the world, {approximately}52% were positive for haplotype 6 indicating its strong relation with HT I. These results provide the rationale for DNA-based carrier testing for HT I in the F-C population at risk as well as in HT I patients in general.

  4. Phosphoinositide signaling.

    PubMed

    Boss, Wendy F; Im, Yang Ju

    2012-01-01

    "All things flow and change…even in the stillest matter there is unseen flux and movement." Attributed to Heraclitus (530-470 BC), from The Story of Philosophy by Will Durant. Heraclitus, a Greek philosopher, was thinking on a much larger scale than molecular signaling; however, his visionary comments are an important reminder for those studying signaling today. Even in unstimulated cells, signaling pathways are in constant metabolic flux and provide basal signals that travel throughout the organism. In addition, negatively charged phospholipids, such as the polyphosphorylated inositol phospholipids, provide a circuit board of on/off switches for attracting or repelling proteins that define the membranes of the cell. This template of charged phospholipids is sensitive to discrete changes and metabolic fluxes-e.g., in pH and cations-which contribute to the oscillating signals in the cell. The inherent complexities of a constantly fluctuating system make understanding how plants integrate and process signals challenging. In this review we discuss one aspect of lipid signaling: the inositol family of negatively charged phospholipids and their functions as molecular sensors and regulators of metabolic flux in plants. PMID:22404474

  5. Curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms: from electron localization function (ELF) analysis to valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) inspired interpretation.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Juan; Berski, Sławomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Probing the electron density transfers during a chemical reaction can provide important insights, making possible to understand and control chemical reactions. This aim has required extensions of the relationships between the traditional chemical concepts and the quantum mechanical ones. The present work examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 100 years of work worldwide on G. N. Lewis's ground breaking paper on The Atom and the Molecule (Lewis, G. N. The Atom and the Molecule, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1916, 38, 762-785), with a focus on how the determination of reaction mechanisms can be reached applying the bonding evolution theory (BET), emphasizing how curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms and how the Lewis structure can be recovered. BET that combines the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool providing insight into molecular mechanisms of chemical rearrangements. In agreement with physical laws and quantum theoretical insights, BET can be considered as an appropriate tool to tackle chemical reactivity with a wide range of possible applications. Likewise, the present approach retrieves the classical curly arrows used to describe the rearrangements of chemical bonds for a given reaction mechanism, providing detailed physical grounds for this type of representation. The ideas underlying the valence-shell-electron pair-repulsion (VSEPR) model applied to non-equilibrium geometries provide simple chemical explanations of density transfers. For a given geometry around a central atom, the arrangement of the electronic domain may comply or not with the VSEPR rules according with the valence shell population of the considered atom. A deformation yields arrangements which are either VSEPR defective (at least a domain is missing to match the VSEPR arrangement corresponding to the geometry of the ligands), VSEPR compliant

  6. Hedgehog signalling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Raymond Teck Ho; Zhao, Zhonghua; Ingham, Philip W

    2016-02-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signalling pathway is one of the key regulators of metazoan development. Hh proteins have been shown to play roles in many developmental processes and have become paradigms for classical morphogens. Dysfunction of the Hh pathway underlies a number of human developmental abnormalities and diseases, making it an important therapeutic target. Interest in Hh signalling thus extends across many fields, from evo-devo to cancer research and regenerative medicine. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we provide an outline of the current understanding of Hh signalling mechanisms, highlighting the similarities and differences between species. PMID:26839340

  7. CDF Run II Discovery reach for neutral MSSM higgs bosons via p pbar {right arrow}b b-bar {phi}{right arrow}b b-bar b b-bar

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Valls

    1999-07-20

    In this paper we examine the CDF Run II discovery reach for neutral Higgs bosons via the process p{anti p} {yields} b {anti b} {phi} {yields} b {anti b}b {anti b}. The signature is a four jet final state with at least three b-tagged jets. Signal and background acceptances are estimated using the CDF Run I detector performance. b tagging efficiencies and fake tag rates are evaluated with new Run II increased detector geometrical acceptances. Total rates are estimated from present Run I data and from Monte Carlo. The results are interpreted within the framework of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) and generalized in terms of a model independent enhancement factor.

  8. The expanding clinical phenotype of the tRNA{sup Leu(UUR)} A{r_arrow}G mutation at np 3243 of mitochondrial DNA: Diabetic embryopathy associated with mitochondrial cytopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Feigenbaum, A.; Chitayat, D.; Robinson, B.; MacGregor, D.; Myint, T.

    1996-04-24

    We describe a family which demonstrates and expands the extreme clinical variability now known to be associated with the A{r_arrow}G transition at nucleotide position 3243 of the mitochondrial DNA. The propositus presented at birth with clinical manifestations consistent with diabetic embryopathy including anal atresia, caudal dysgenesis, and multicystic dysplastic kidneys. His co-twin was normal at birth, but at 3 months of life, presented with intractable seizures later associated with developmental delay. The twins` mother developed diabetes mellitus type I at the age of 20 years and gastrointestinal problems at 22 years. Since age 19 years, the maternal aunt has had recurrent strokes, seizures, mental deterioration and deafness, later diagnosed as MELAS syndrome due to the tRNA{sup Leu(UUR)} A{r_arrow}G mutation. A maternal uncle had diabetes mellitus type I, deafness, and normal intellect, and died at 35 years after recurrent strokes. This pedigree expands the known clinical phenotype associated with tRNA{sup Leu(UUR)} A{r_arrow}G mutation and raises the possibility that, in some cases, diabetic embryopathy may be due to a mitochondrial cytopathy that affects both the mother`s pancreas (and results in diabetes mellitus and the metabolic dysfunction associated with it) and the embryonic/fetal and placental tissues which make the embryo more vulnerable to this insult. 33 refs., 1 tab.

  9. De novo partial duplication 7(q11.2{r_arrow}q21.2) in a dysmorphic, developmentally retarded boy

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M.; Pinsky, L.; Teebi, A.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities involving chromosome 7q are rare; we report a case of partial duplication 7q. The propositus was born at 34 weeks by cesarian section, decided because of oligohydramnios, severe intrauterine growth retardation and fetal immobility. At birth, the baby was under the 5th percentile for height, weight and head circumference and had dysmorphic features, including slight asymmetry of the face, bilateral epicanthus, hypoplastic nasal bridge, short globular nose, asymmetrical dysplastic ears, fifth finger clinodactyly, short second and fifth toe. Ultrasound examination showed atrial and ventricular septal defects. At 18 months, the child had a fracture of the femur, secondary to a minor trauma; skeletal X-rays showed generalized osteoporosis and normal healing. The karyotype with GTG-banding showed a de novo partial duplication of the long arm of chromosome 7 (46,XX,dup(7)(q11.23{r_arrow}q21.2)). Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a painting probe specific for chromosome 7 confirmed the intra-chromosomal rearrangement. The patient`s phenotype and his chromosomal abnormality do not match the previously reported cases of partial trisomy 7q. This case confirms the importance of FISH for the delineation of the chromosomal inbalance in structural chromosomal aberrations.

  10. Assignment of human potassium channel gene KCNA4 (Kv1. 4, PCN2) to chromosome 11q13. 4 [r arrow] q14. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Philipson, L.H.; Bell, G.I. ); Eddy, R.L.; Shows, T.B. )

    1993-02-01

    Both electrically excitable and nonexcitable tissues express voltage-sensitive K[sup +] channels. Since the original isolation of the Drosophila Shaker gene encoding voltage-sensitive K[sub +] channels, five additional related gene families have been described: the Shal, Shab, and Shaw families and the K-eag and Slo genes. A seventh family of slowly activating K[sup +] channels, minK of IsK, is structurally unrelated to the others. Seven human genes related to the Shaker subfamily have been described. We recently described the cloning of a fast-inactivating human voltage-gated K[sup +] channel, PCN2. Here we report the mapping of the gene encoding PNC2, designated KNCA4, to chromosome 11 by analyzing its segregation in a panel of reduced human-mouse somatic cell hybrids. In situ hybridization to prometaphase chromoxomes localized KCNA4 to the long arm of chromosome 11 in the region of bands q13.4 [r arrow] q14.1.

  11. Quantum state-to-state reaction probabilities for the H+H{sub 2}O{r_arrow}H{sub 2}+OH reaction in six dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.H.; Light, J.C.

    1996-07-01

    A time-dependent wave packet method has been employed to calculate the state-to-state reaction probability for the H+H{sub 2}O(0,0,0){r_arrow}H{sub 2}({ital v}{sub 1},{ital j}{sub 1})+OH({ital v}{sub 2},{ital j}{sub 2}) reaction for {ital J}=0 and initial nonrotating H{sub 2}O on the modified Schatz{endash}Elgersman potential energy surface in full six dimensions (6D). Starting from a wave packet for an atom{endash}triatom asymptotic state in atom{endash}triatom Jacobi coordinates, we transfer the wave packet to diatom{endash}diatom Jacobi coordinates after the wave packet moves into the interaction region. Propagation is then carried out in the diatom{endash}diatom Jacobi coordinates until the reaction flux measured in the diatom{endash}diatom asymptotic region is converged. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. A new look at the ventral nerve centre of Sagitta: implications for the phylogenetic position of Chaetognatha (arrow worms) and the evolution of the bilaterian nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Harzsch, Steffen; Müller, Carsten HG

    2007-01-01

    Background The Chaetognatha (arrow worms) are a group of marine carnivores whose phylogenetic relationships are still vigorously debated. Molecular studies have as yet failed to come up with a stable hypothesis on their phylogenetic position. In a wide range of metazoans, the nervous system has proven to provide a wealth of characters for analysing phylogenetic relationships (neurophylogeny). Therefore, in the present study we explored the structure of the ventral nerve centre ("ventral ganglion") in Sagitta setosa with a set of histochemical and immunohistochemical markers. Results In specimens that were immunolabeled for acetylated-alpha tubulin the ventral nerve centre appeared to be a condensed continuation of the peripheral intraepidermal nerve plexus. Yet, synapsin immunolocalization showed that the ventral nerve centre is organized into a highly ordered array of ca. 80 serially arranged microcompartments. Immunohistochemistry against RFamide revealed a set of serially arranged individually identifiable neurons in the ventral nerve centre that we charted in detail. Conclusion The new information on the structure of the chaetognath nervous system is compared to previous descriptions of the ventral nerve centre which are critically evaluated. Our findings are discussed with regard to the debate on nervous system organisation in the last common bilaterian ancestor and with regard to the phylogenetic affinities of this Chaetognatha. We suggest to place the Chaetognatha within the Protostomia and argue against hypotheses which propose a deuterostome affinity of Chaetognatha or a sister-group relationship to all other Bilateria. PMID:17511857

  13. The prediction of pressure distributions on an arrow-wing configuration including the effect of camber, twist, and a wing fin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobbitt, P. J.; Manro, M. E.; Kulfan, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of an arrow wing body configuration consisting of flat, twisted, and cambered twisted wings were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.40 to 2.50 to provide an experimental data base for comparison with theoretical methods. A variety of leading and trailing edge control surface deflections were included in these tests, and in addition, the cambered twisted wing was tested with an outboard vertical fin to determine its effect on wing and control surface loads. Theory experiment comparisons show that current state of the art linear and nonlinear attached flow methods were adequate at small angles of attack typical of cruise conditions. The incremental effects of outboard fin, wing twist, and wing camber are most accurately predicted by the advanced panel method PANAIR. Results of the advanced panel separated flow method, obtained with an early version of the program, show promise that accurate detailed pressure predictions may soon be possible for an aeroelasticity deformed wing at high angles of attack.

  14. Search for B_c^± arrow J/ψ μ^± X Decays in pbarp Collisions at √s=1.8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Prem

    1997-04-01

    The B_c^± meson, a bound state of charm and bottom quarks, is expected to have several narrow mass states below the B--D open flavor threshold. We describe a search for the weak decays of the B_c^± produced in a 110 pb-1 sample of √s= 1.8 TeV proton-antiproton collisions in the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. A high branching ratio of B_c^± to J/ψ decays permits an effective trigger on these events. The search is conducted through the decay B_c^± arrow J/ψ μ^± X. Supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-FG02-91ER40646. We thank the Fermilab staff and the technical staffs of the participating institutions for their vital contributions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation; the Italian Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare; the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan; the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; the National Science Council of the Republic of China; and the A. P. Sloan Foundation.

  15. Meaurement of the target single-spin asymmetry in quasi-elastic region from the reaction {sup 3}He{up_arrow}(e,e')

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yawei

    2013-10-01

    A measurement of the inclusive target single-spin asymmetry has been performed using the quasi-elastic {sup 3}He{up_arrow}(e,e') reaction with a vertically polarized {sup 3}He target at Q{sup 2} values of 0.13, 0.46 and 0.97 GeV{sup 2}. This asymmetry vanishes under the one photon exchange assumption. But the interference between two-photon exchange and one-photon exchange gives rise to an imaginary amplitude, so that a non-zero A{sub y} is allowed. The experiment, conducted in Hall A of Jefferson Laboratory in 2009, used two independent spectrometers to simultaneously measure the target single-spin asymmetry. Using the effective polarization approximation, the neutron single-spin asymmetries were extracted from the measured {sup 3}He asymmetries. The measurement is to establish a non-vanishing A{sub y}. Non-zero asymmetries were observed at all Q{sup 2} points, and the overall precision is an order of magnitude improved over the existing proton data. The data provide new constraints on Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD) models and new information on the dynamics of the two-photon exchange process.

  16. Gibberellin signaling.

    PubMed

    Hartweck, Lynn M

    2008-12-01

    This review covers recent advances in gibberellin (GA) signaling. GA signaling is now understood to hinge on DELLA proteins. DELLAs negatively regulate GA response by activating the promoters of several genes including Xerico, which upregulates the abscisic acid pathway which is antagonistic to GA. DELLAs also promote transcription of the GA receptor, GIBBERELLIN INSENSITIVE DWARF 1 (GID1) and indirectly regulate GA biosynthesis genes enhancing GA responsiveness and feedback control. A structural analysis of GID1 provides a model for understanding GA signaling. GA binds within a pocket of GID1, changes GID1 conformation and increases the affinity of GID1 for DELLA proteins. GA/GID1/DELLA has increased affinity for an F-Box protein and DELLAs are subsequently degraded via the proteasome. Therefore, GA induces growth through degradation of the DELLAs. The binding of DELLA proteins to three of the PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF) proteins integrates light and GA signaling pathways. This binding prevents PIFs 3, 4, and 5 from functioning as positive transcriptional regulators of growth in the dark. Since PIFs are degraded in light, these PIFs can only function in the combined absence of light and presence of GA. New analyses suggest that GA signaling evolved at the same time or just after the plant vascular system and before plants acquired the capacity for seed reproduction. An analysis of sequences cloned from Physcomitrella suggests that GID1 and DELLAs were the first to evolve but did not initially interact. The more recently diverging spike moss Selaginella has all the genes required for GA biosynthesis and signaling, but the role of GA response in Selaginella physiology remains a mystery. PMID:18936962

  17. Kinetics of the transformation from {alpha}{r_arrow}{gamma} during continuous heating and cooling in a Ti-47.5 at.% Al alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Veeraraghavan, D.; Vasudevan, V.K.

    1995-12-31

    The {alpha}{r_arrow}{gamma} transformation in a Ti-47.5 At.% Al alloys was studied by a novel computer interfaced control-cum-data acquisition technique. In situ, real time, high speed simultaneous measurements of resistivity and temperature were made in the system designed and constructed for this purpose. The experiments were conducted in high vacuum. The samples were heated to the completely {alpha}-region by controlled direct resistance heating and cooled at various rates utilizing a varying helium gas jet quench. Temperature and resistivity changes were monitored during heating and cooling and correlated with corresponding phase/microstructural changes. The results have shown that the {gamma} phase is characterized by a low resistivity ({approximately}50 {micro}{Omega}-cm at room temperature), whereas both {alpha} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases have high and nearly constant resistivities ({approximately}190 to 200{micro}{Omega}-cm). Because of the large difference in resistivities of the {alpha} and {gamma} phases, large and measurable changes in resistivity can be observed when one of these phases transforms to the other. In the Ti-47.5 Al alloy, the lamellar {gamma} morphology was observed at slower cooling rates, the feathery/massive reaction at intermediate rates and a massive morphology at high cooling rates. Results of the transformation start and completion temperatures for the various reactions as a function of cooling rate are presented. The growth rate of the massive product was determined to vary from 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} to 6.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} m/s with increasing undercooling.

  18. A precision measurement of the Z{sup 0} lineshape parameters for the process Z{sup 0} {r_arrow} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}}

    SciTech Connect

    Lahmann, R.

    1996-12-31

    In this dissertation, a measurement of the partial decay width of the process Z{sup 0} {r_arrow} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} using data collected during 1993 and 1994 at the OPAL detector at CERN is described. The cross sections of this process at three center-of-mass energies near the Z{sup 0} resonance were determined, and from a fit to those cross sections, the mass of the Z{sup 0}, its total decay width and its partial decay width into {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} final states were determined as M{sub Z} = 91.183 {+-} 0.020 GeV, {Lambda}{sub tot} = 2.514 {+-} 0.018 GeV and {Lambda}{sub {tau}{tau}} = 84.54 {+-} 0.59 MeV. Using published results for M{sub Z}, and {Lambda}{sub tot} with higher accuracy, a value for the partial decay width of {Lambda}{sub {tau}{tau}} = 84.02 {+-} 0.20 MeV was obtained. Further using published results for the decay width of the Z{sup 0} into quark pair final states, the invisible decay width of the Z{sup 0} was determined as {Lambda}{sub inv} = 496.9 {+-} 4.1 MeV, and the number of neutrino generations was determined as N{sub {nu}} = 2.974 {+-} 0.025(exp) {+-} 0.007 (m{sub top}, M{sub Higgs}). All results were found to be in good agreement with the Standard Model predictions and were consistent with the assumption of lepton universality within the Standard Model framework.

  19. Predicting the intensity mapping signal for multi-J CO lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashian, Natalie; Sternberg, Amiel; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel approach to estimating the intensity mapping signal of any CO rotational line emitted during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). Our approach is based on large velocity gradient (LVG) modeling, a radiative transfer modeling technique that generates the full CO spectral line energy distribution (SLED) for a specified gas kinetic temperature, volume density, velocity gradient, molecular abundance, and column density. These parameters, which drive the physics of CO transitions and ultimately dictate the shape and amplitude of the CO SLED, can be linked to the global properties of the host galaxy, mainly the star formation rate (SFR) and the SFR surface density. By further employing an empirically derived SFR-M relation for high redshift galaxies, we can express the LVG parameters, and thus the specific intensity of any CO rotational transition, as functions of the host halo mass M and redshift z. Integrating over the range of halo masses expected to host CO-luminous galaxies, we predict a mean CO(1-0) brightness temperature ranging from ~ 0.6 μK at z = 6 to ~ 0.03 μK at z = 10 with brightness temperature fluctuations of ΔCO2 ~ 0.1 and 0.005 μK respectively, at k = 0.1 Mpc-1. In this model, the CO emission signal remains strong for higher rotational levels at z = 6, with langle TCO rangle ~ 0.3 and 0.05 μK for the CO J = 6arrow5 and CO J = 10arrow9 transitions respectively. Including the effects of CO photodissociation in these molecular clouds, especially at low metallicities, results in the overall reduction in the amplitude of the CO signal, with the low- and high-J lines weakening by 2-20% and 10-45%, respectively, over the redshift range 4 < z < 10.

  20. Rate constants for the reactions H+O sub 2 r arrow OH+O and D+O sub 2 r arrow OD+O over the temperature range 1085--2278 K by the laser photolysis--shock tube technique

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, K.S.; Michael, J.V. )

    1991-07-01

    Rate constants for the reactions (1) H+O{sub 2}{r arrow}OH+O and (2) D+O{sub 2}{r arrow}OD+O have been measured over the temperature ranges 1103--2055 K and 1085--2278 K, respectively. The experimental method that has been used is the laser-photolysis--shock-tube technique. This technique utilizes atomic resonance absorption spectrophotometry (ARAS) to monitor H- or D-atom depletion in the presence of a large excess of reactant, O{sub 2}. The results can be well represented by the Arrhenius expressions {ital k}{sub 1}({ital T})=(1.15{plus minus}0.16){times}10{sup {minus}10} exp({minus}6917{plus minus}193 K/{ital T}) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, and {ital k}{sub 2}({ital T})=(1.09{plus minus}0.20){times}10{sup {minus}10} exp({minus}6937{plus minus}247 K/{ital T}) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Over the experimental temperature range, the present results show that the isotope effect is unity within experimental uncertainty. The Arrhenius equations, {ital k}{sub {minus}1}({ital T})=(8.75{plus minus}1.24) {times}10{sup {minus}12} exp(1121{plus minus}193 K/{ital T}) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} and {ital k}{sub {minus}2} ({ital T})=(9.73{plus minus}1.79){times}10{sup {minus}12} exp(526{plus minus}247 K/{ital T}) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, for the rate constants of the reverse reactions were calculated from the experimentally measured forward rate constants and expressions for the equilibrium constants that have been derived from the JANAF thermochemical database. The theoretical implications of the present results are also discussed.

  1. Absolute Rovibrational Intensities, Self-Broadening and Self-Shift Coefficients for the X(sup 1) Sigma(+) V=3 (left arrow) V=0 Band (C-12)(O-16)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, Charles, Jr.; Freedman, R.; Giver, L. P.; Brown, L. R.

    2001-01-01

    The rotationless transition moment squared for the x(sup 1) sigma (sup +) v=3 (left arrow) v=0 band of CO is measured to be the absolute value of R (sub 3-0) squared = 1.7127(25)x 10(exp -7) Debye squared. This value is about 8.6 percent smaller than the value assumed for HITRAN 2000. The Herman-Wallis intensity factor of this band is F=1+0.01168(11)m+0.0001065(79)m squared. The determination of self-broadening coefficients is improved with the inclusion of line narrowing; self-shifts are also reported.

  2. Low-speed wind-tunnel tests of a 1/10-scale model of an advanced arrow-wing supersonic cruise configuration designed for cruise at Mach 2.2. [Langley Full Scale Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yip, L. P.

    1979-01-01

    The low-speed longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics of a scale model of an advanced arrow-wing supersonic cruise configuration were investigated in tests conducted at a Reynolds number of 4.19 x 10 to the 6th power based on the mean aerodynamic chord, with an angle of attack range from - 6 deg to 23 deg and sideslip angle range from -15 deg to 20 deg. The effects of segmented leading-edge flaps, slotted trailing-edge flaps, horizontal and vertical tails, and ailerons and spoilers were determined. Extensive pressure data and flow visualization pictures with non-intrusive fluorescent mini-tufts were obtained.

  3. Effect of leading-edge contour and vertical-tail configuration on the low-speed stability characteristics of a supersonic transport model having a highly-swept arrow wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, V. E.

    1978-01-01

    A low-speed investigation was made on a highly-swept arrow-wing model to determine the effect of wing leading-edge contour and vertical-tail configuration on the aerodynamic characteristics in pitch and sideslip. The investigation was made with the trailing-edge flaps deflected over a range of angles of attack from 8 deg to 32 deg. The tests were made at a Mach number of 0.13, which corresponds to a Reynolds number of about 3,000,000 based on the wing reference chord.

  4. Systemic silencing signal(s).

    PubMed

    Fagard, M; Vaucheret, H

    2000-06-01

    Grafting experiments have revealed that transgenic plants that undergo co-suppression of homologous transgenes and endogenous genes or PTGS of exogenous transgenes produce a sequence-specific systemic silencing signal that is able to propagate from cell to cell and at long distance. Similarly, infection of transgenic plants by viruses that carry (part of) a transgene sequence results in global silencing (VIGS) of the integrated transgenes although viral infection is localized. Systemic PTGS and VIGS strongly resemble recovery from virus infection in non-transgenic plants, leading to protection against secondary infection in newly emerging leaves and PTGS of transiently expressed homologous transgenes. The sequence-specific PTGS signal is probably a transgene product (for example, aberrant RNA) or a secondary product (for example, RNA molecules produced by an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase with transgene RNA as a matrix) that mimics the type of viral RNA that is targeted for degradation by cellular defence. Whether some particular cases of transgene TGS could also rely on the production of such a mobile molecule is discussed. PMID:10999411

  5. The language of the arrows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-10-01

    I think and hope that most experienced physics and astronomy teachers would agree that teaching is both a science and a creative art. There is a way to creatively introduce vectors into introductory astronomy that lets students learn some basic, but fundamental, physics and at the same time demonstrates that mathematics need not be a barrier in a science course. The approach is entirely graphical in that it is based on the geometric properties of vectors and is implemented by drawing diagrams. Despite the simplicity, it allows astronomy students to experience genuine physics reasoning at about the same level of a conceptual physics course (and possibly a higher level).

  6. The Unaimed Arrow Never Misses.

    PubMed

    Kopan, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    In this assay, Raphael Kopan argues that focused emphasis on disease and translation stifles innovation, and outline the reasons why, in my opinion, developmental biologists are more likely to produce new and important discoveries than their more "focused" colleagues. PMID:26970640

  7. Time's arrow and Boltzmann's entropy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebowitz, J. L.

    For the purpose of this article, the author's motion of time is essentially the Newtonian one - time is real and the basic laws of physics are time reversible, the connect the states of a physical system, possibly of the whole universe, at different instants of time. This of course does not take account of relativity, special or general, and is therefore certainly not the whole story. Still the author believes that the phenomenon they wish to explain, namely the time asymmetric behavior of macroscopic objects, would be for all practical purposes the same in a non-relativistic universe. He therefore focuses here on idealized versions of the problem, in the simplest context, and then sees how far the answers the author gets go towards its solutions.

  8. LED traffic lights: New technology signals major energy savings

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, D.

    1994-12-31

    Using light-emitting diode technology to replace incandescent lamps in traffic signals promises energy savings upwards of 60 percent for each of the estimated quarter of a million controlled intersections in the United States. LED units use only 9 to 25 watts instead of the 67 to 150 watts used by each incandescent lamp. Though their first cost is relatively high, energy savings result in paybacks of 1 to 5 years. LED retrofit kits are available for red signal disks and arrows, and installations in several states have proven successful, although minor improvements are addressing concerns about varying light output and controller circuitry. Retrofitting green lamps is not yet feasible, because color standards of the Institute of Traffic Engineers cannot be met with existing LED technology. Yellow lamps have such low duty factors (they`re on only 3 percent of the time) that retrofitting with LED signals is not cost-effective. LEDs last much longer than incandescents, allowing municipalities to not only reduce their electricity bills, but to save on maintenance costs as well. As further incentive, some utilities are beginning to implement rebate programs for LED traffic signal retrofits. Full approval of LED units is still awaited from the Institute of Traffic Engineers (ITE), the standard-setting body for traffic safety devices. Local and state governments ultimately decide what specifications to require for traffic lights, and the growing body of successful field experience with LEDs appears to be raising their comfort level with the technology. The California Department of Transportation is developing an LED traffic light specification, and two California utilities, Southern California Edison and Pacific Gas and Electric, have provided rebates for some pilot installations.

  9. Acquisition signal transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Morton L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An encoded information transmitter which transmits a radio frequency carrier that is amplitude modulated by a constant frequency waveform and thereafter amplitude modulated by a predetermined encoded waveform, the constant frequency waveform modulated carrier constituting an acquisition signal and the encoded waveform modulated carrier constituting an information bearing signal, the acquisition signal providing enhanced signal acquisition and interference rejection favoring the information bearing signal. One specific application for this transmitter is as a distress transmitter where a conventional, legislated audio tone modulated signal is transmitted followed first by the acquisition signal and then the information bearing signal, the information bearing signal being encoded with, among other things, vehicle identification data. The acquistion signal enables a receiver to acquire the information bearing signal where the received signal is low and/or where the received signal has a low signal-to-noise ratio in an environment where there are multiple signals in the same frequency band as the information bearing signal.

  10. Inhibitors of endocytosis prevent Wnt/Wingless signalling by reducing the level of basal β-catenin/Armadillo.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Maria; Hernandez, Ana; McGough, Ian J; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2014-11-15

    A key step in the canonical Wnt signalling pathway is the inhibition of GSK3β, which results in the accumulation of nuclear β-catenin (also known as CTNNB1), and hence regulation of target genes. Evidence suggests that endocytosis is required for signalling, yet its role and the molecular understanding remains unclear. A recent and controversial model suggests that endocytosis contributes to Wnt signalling by causing the sequestration of the ligand-receptor complex, including LRP6 and GSK3 to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), thus preventing GSK3β from accessing β-catenin. Here, we use specific inhibitors (Dynasore and Dyngo-4a) to confirm the essential role of endocytosis in Wnt/Wingless signalling in human and Drosophila cells. However, we find no evidence that, in Drosophila cells or wing imaginal discs, LRP6/Arrow traffics to MVBs or that MVBs are required for Wnt/Wingless signalling. Moreover, we show that activation of signalling through chemical blockade of GSK3β is prevented by endocytosis inhibitors, suggesting that endocytosis impacts on Wnt/Wingless signalling downstream of the ligand-receptor complex. We propose that, through an unknown mechanism, endocytosis boosts the resting pool of β-catenin upon which GSK3β normally acts. PMID:25236598

  11. Inhibitors of endocytosis prevent Wnt/Wingless signalling by reducing the level of basal β-catenin/Armadillo

    PubMed Central

    Gagliardi, Maria; Hernandez, Ana; McGough, Ian J.; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A key step in the canonical Wnt signalling pathway is the inhibition of GSK3β, which results in the accumulation of nuclear β-catenin (also known as CTNNB1), and hence regulation of target genes. Evidence suggests that endocytosis is required for signalling, yet its role and the molecular understanding remains unclear. A recent and controversial model suggests that endocytosis contributes to Wnt signalling by causing the sequestration of the ligand–receptor complex, including LRP6 and GSK3 to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), thus preventing GSK3β from accessing β-catenin. Here, we use specific inhibitors (Dynasore and Dyngo-4a) to confirm the essential role of endocytosis in Wnt/Wingless signalling in human and Drosophila cells. However, we find no evidence that, in Drosophila cells or wing imaginal discs, LRP6/Arrow traffics to MVBs or that MVBs are required for Wnt/Wingless signalling. Moreover, we show that activation of signalling through chemical blockade of GSK3β is prevented by endocytosis inhibitors, suggesting that endocytosis impacts on Wnt/Wingless signalling downstream of the ligand–receptor complex. We propose that, through an unknown mechanism, endocytosis boosts the resting pool of β-catenin upon which GSK3β normally acts. PMID:25236598

  12. Signal transfer within a cultured asymmetric cortical neuron circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Takuya; Shimba, Kenta; Takayama, Yuzo; Takeuchi, Akimasa; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Simplified neuronal circuits are required for investigating information representation in nervous systems and for validating theoretical neural network models. Here, we developed patterned neuronal circuits using micro fabricated devices, comprising a micro-well array bonded to a microelectrode-array substrate. Approach. The micro-well array consisted of micrometre-scale wells connected by tunnels, all contained within a silicone slab called a micro-chamber. The design of the micro-chamber confined somata to the wells and allowed axons to grow through the tunnels bidirectionally but with a designed, unidirectional bias. We guided axons into the point of the arrow structure where one of the two tunnel entrances is located, making that the preferred direction. Main results. When rat cortical neurons were cultured in the wells, their axons grew through the tunnels and connected to neurons in adjoining wells. Unidirectional burst transfers and other asymmetric signal-propagation phenomena were observed via the substrate-embedded electrodes. Seventy-nine percent of burst transfers were in the forward direction. We also observed rapid propagation of activity from sites of local electrical stimulation, and significant effects of inhibitory synapse blockade on bursting activity. Significance. These results suggest that this simple, substrate-controlled neuronal circuit can be applied to develop in vitro models of the function of cortical microcircuits or deep neural networks, better to elucidate the laws governing the dynamics of neuronal networks.

  13. Small Angle Neutron Scattering Studies of the Vortex Lattice in the UPt{sub 3} Mixed State: Direct Structural Evidence for the {ital B}{r_arrow}{ital C} Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Yaron, U.; Gammel, P.; Boebinger, G.; Aeppli, G.; Schiffer, P.; Bucher, E.; Bishop, D.; Broholm, C.; Mortensen, K.

    1997-04-01

    Small angle neutron scattering studies of the flux line lattice (FLL) in UPt{sub 3} for fields {bold H}{perpendicular}{bold c} provide direct microscopic evidence for the 5kOe B{r_arrow}C transition. We find a pronounced maximum in the longitudinal correlation length of the FLL at the transition and an abrupt change in the field dependence of the scattered intensity which can be interpreted as a 15{percent} decrease in the coherence length and a 9{percent} increase in the penetration depth, consistent with discontinuities in the critical fields. Finally, in the low field phase, the FLL distortion evolves roughly linearly with field, while in the high field phase it appears to be less field dependent. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Transonic pressure measurements and comparison of theory to experiment for an arrow-wing configuration. Volume 1: Experimental data report, base configuration and effects of wing twist and leading-edge configuration. [wind tunnel tests, aircraft models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manro, M. E.; Manning, K. J. R.; Hallstaff, T. H.; Rogers, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of an arrow-wing-body configuration consisting of flat and twisted wings, as well as a variety of leading- and trailing-edge control surface deflections, was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.1 to provide an experimental pressure data base for comparison with theoretical methods. Theory-to-experiment comparisons of detailed pressure distributions were made using current state-of-the-art attached and separated flow methods. The purpose of these comparisons was to delineate conditions under which these theories are valid for both flat and twisted wings and to explore the use of empirical methods to correct the theoretical methods where theory is deficient.

  15. Absolute cross sections for near-threshold electron-impact excitation of the 2s{sup 2}S{r_arrow}2p{sup 2}P transition in C{sup 3+}

    SciTech Connect

    Bannister, M.E.; Chung, Y.; Djuric, N.; Wallbank, B.; Woitke, O.; Zhou, S.; Dunn, G.H.; Smith, A.C.

    1998-01-01

    Absolute total cross sections for electron-impact excitation of the 2s{sup 2}S{r_arrow}2p{sup 2}P transition in C{sup 3+} were measured from 7.35 eV to 8.45 eV using the merged electron-ion-beams energy-loss technique. The results settle the discrepancy between two previous experiments using the crossed-beams fluorescence method, being in very good agreement with the older results [P. O. Taylor, D. Gregory, G. H. Dunn, R. A. Phaneuf, and D. H. Crandall, Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 39}, 1256 (1977)] but less so with the more recent ones [D. W. Savin, L. D. Gardner, D. B. Reisenfeld, A. R. Young, and J. L. Kohl, Phys. Rev. A {bold 51}, 2162 (1995)]. The present measurements are also in good agreement with unitarized Coulomb-Born and close-coupling calculations. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Identification and molecular confirmation of a small chromosome 10q duplication [dir dup(10)(q24.2 {r_arrow}q24.3)] inherited from a mother mosiac for the abnormality

    SciTech Connect

    Tonk, V.; Schneider, N.R.; Schultz, R.A.; Delgado, M.R.; Mao, Jen-i

    1996-01-02

    We describe a family in which two siblings exhibited developmental delay, reduced muscle tone and mild muscle weakness. Cytogenetic evaluation demonstrated that both children had a tandem duplication of a small portion of the long arm of chromosome 10 [46,XX or XY, dir dup(10)(q24.2{r_arrow}q24.3)], inherited from their clinically normal mother, who was found to be mosaic for the duplicated chromosome 10. Fluorescence in situ hybridization approaches, including total chromosome painting and the use of regional specific cosmid probes, were used to confirm the chromosome 10q origin of the duplicated material. This is the smallest confirmed duplication of this portion of chromosome 10 reported to date. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Low-speed wind-tunnel tests of a one-tenth-scale model of a blended-arrow advanced supersonic transport. [conducted in Langley full-scale tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemore, H. C.; Parett, L. P.

    1975-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the Langley full scale tunnel to determine the low-speed aerodynamic characteristics of a 1/10 scale model of a blended-arrow advanced supersonic transport. Tests were made for the clean configuration and a high-lift configuration with several combinations of leading- and trailing-edge flaps deflected for providing improved lift and longitudinal stability in the landing and takeoff modes. The tests were conducted for a range of angles of attack from about -6 deg to 30 deg, sideslip angles from -5 deg to 10 deg, and for Reynolds numbers from 6.78 x 1,000,000 to 13.85 x 1,000,000 corresponding to test velocities of 41 knots to 85 knots, respectively.

  18. Large tree-level {ital CP} violation in {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{ital t{bar t}H}{sup 0} in the two-Higgs-doublet model

    SciTech Connect

    Bar-Shalom, S.; Atwood, D.; Eilam, G.; Mendel, R.R.; Soni, A. ||

    1996-02-01

    We find a large {ital CP} violation effect within the two-Higgs-doublet model for the reaction {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{ital t}{bar {ital t}}{ital H}{sup 0} at future linear colliders. The {ital CP} asymmetry arises already at the tree level as a result of interference between diagrams with {ital H}{sup 0} emission from {ital t} (and {bar {ital t}}) and its emission from a {ital Z}{sup 0} and can be about 10{endash}20 {percent}. In the best case one needs a few hundred {ital t{bar t}H}{sup 0} events to observe {ital CP} violation at the 3{sigma} level. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Signal processor for processing ultrasonic receiver signals

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1980-01-01

    A signal processor is provided which uses an analog integrating circuit in conjunction with a set of digital counters controlled by a precision clock for sampling timing to provide an improved presentation of an ultrasonic transmitter/receiver signal. The signal is sampled relative to the transmitter trigger signal timing at precise times, the selected number of samples are integrated and the integrated samples are transferred and held for recording on a strip chart recorder or converted to digital form for storage. By integrating multiple samples taken at precisely the same time with respect to the trigger for the ultrasonic transmitter, random noise, which is contained in the ultrasonic receiver signal, is reduced relative to the desired useful signal.

  20. Wingless signaling and the control of cell shape in Drosophila wing imaginal discs.

    PubMed

    Widmann, Thomas J; Dahmann, Christian

    2009-10-01

    The control of cell morphology is important for shaping animals during development. Here we address the role of the Wnt/Wingless signal transduction pathway and two of its target genes, vestigial and shotgun (encoding E-cadherin), in controlling the columnar shape of Drosophila wing disc cells. We show that clones of cells mutant for arrow (encoding an essential component of the Wingless signal transduction pathway), vestigial or shotgun undergo profound cell shape changes and are extruded towards the basal side of the epithelium. Compartment-wide expression of a dominant-negative form of the Wingless transducer T-cell factor (TCF/Pangolin), or double-stranded RNA targeting vestigial or shotgun, leads to abnormally short cells throughout this region, indicating that these genes act cell autonomously to maintain normal columnar cell shape. Conversely, overexpression of Wingless, a constitutively-active form of the Wingless transducer beta-catenin/Armadillo, or Vestigial, results in precocious cell elongation. Co-expression of Vestigial partially suppresses the abnormal cell shape induced by dominant-negative TCF. We conclude that Wingless signal transduction plays a cell-autonomous role in promoting and maintaining the columnar shape of wing disc cells. Furthermore, our data suggest that Wingless controls cell shape, in part, through maintaining vestigial expression. PMID:19627985

  1. Signal verification can promote reliable signalling.

    PubMed

    Broom, Mark; Ruxton, Graeme D; Schaefer, H Martin

    2013-11-22

    The central question in communication theory is whether communication is reliable, and if so, which mechanisms select for reliability. The primary approach in the past has been to attribute reliability to strategic costs associated with signalling as predicted by the handicap principle. Yet, reliability can arise through other mechanisms, such as signal verification; but the theoretical understanding of such mechanisms has received relatively little attention. Here, we model whether verification can lead to reliability in repeated interactions that typically characterize mutualisms. Specifically, we model whether fruit consumers that discriminate among poor- and good-quality fruits within a population can select for reliable fruit signals. In our model, plants either signal or they do not; costs associated with signalling are fixed and independent of plant quality. We find parameter combinations where discriminating fruit consumers can select for signal reliability by abandoning unprofitable plants more quickly. This self-serving behaviour imposes costs upon plants as a by-product, rendering it unprofitable for unrewarding plants to signal. Thus, strategic costs to signalling are not a prerequisite for reliable communication. We expect verification to more generally explain signal reliability in repeated consumer-resource interactions that typify mutualisms but also in antagonistic interactions such as mimicry and aposematism. PMID:24068354

  2. Signal verification can promote reliable signalling

    PubMed Central

    Broom, Mark; Ruxton, Graeme D.; Schaefer, H. Martin

    2013-01-01

    The central question in communication theory is whether communication is reliable, and if so, which mechanisms select for reliability. The primary approach in the past has been to attribute reliability to strategic costs associated with signalling as predicted by the handicap principle. Yet, reliability can arise through other mechanisms, such as signal verification; but the theoretical understanding of such mechanisms has received relatively little attention. Here, we model whether verification can lead to reliability in repeated interactions that typically characterize mutualisms. Specifically, we model whether fruit consumers that discriminate among poor- and good-quality fruits within a population can select for reliable fruit signals. In our model, plants either signal or they do not; costs associated with signalling are fixed and independent of plant quality. We find parameter combinations where discriminating fruit consumers can select for signal reliability by abandoning unprofitable plants more quickly. This self-serving behaviour imposes costs upon plants as a by-product, rendering it unprofitable for unrewarding plants to signal. Thus, strategic costs to signalling are not a prerequisite for reliable communication. We expect verification to more generally explain signal reliability in repeated consumer–resource interactions that typify mutualisms but also in antagonistic interactions such as mimicry and aposematism. PMID:24068354

  3. Retroactive Signaling in Short Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sepulchre, Jacques-Alexandre; Merajver, Sofía D.; Ventura, Alejandra C.

    2012-01-01

    In biochemical signaling pathways without explicit feedback connections, the core signal transduction is usually described as a one-way communication, going from upstream to downstream in a feedforward chain or network of covalent modification cycles. In this paper we explore the possibility of a new type of signaling called retroactive signaling, offered by the recently demonstrated property of retroactivity in signaling cascades. The possibility of retroactive signaling is analysed in the simplest case of the stationary states of a bicyclic cascade of signaling cycles. In this case, we work out the conditions for which variables of the upstream cycle are affected by a change of the total amount of protein in the downstream cycle, or by a variation of the phosphatase deactivating the same protein. Particularly, we predict the characteristic ranges of the downstream protein, or of the downstream phosphatase, for which a retroactive effect can be observed on the upstream cycle variables. Next, we extend the possibility of retroactive signaling in short but nonlinear signaling pathways involving a few covalent modification cycles. PMID:22848403

  4. Multiplexing oscillatory biochemical signals.

    PubMed

    de Ronde, Wiet; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2014-04-01

    In recent years it has been increasingly recognized that biochemical signals are not necessarily constant in time and that the temporal dynamics of a signal can be the information carrier. Moreover, it is now well established that the protein signaling network of living cells has a bow-tie structure and that components are often shared between different signaling pathways. Here we show by mathematical modeling that living cells can multiplex a constant and an oscillatory signal: they can transmit these two signals simultaneously through a common signaling pathway, and yet respond to them specifically and reliably. We find that information transmission is reduced not only by noise arising from the intrinsic stochasticity of biochemical reactions, but also by crosstalk between the different channels. Yet, under biologically relevant conditions more than 2 bits of information can be transmitted per channel, even when the two signals are transmitted simultaneously. These observations suggest that oscillatory signals are ideal for multiplexing signals. PMID:24685537

  5. ERK Signals: Scaffolding Scaffolds?

    PubMed Central

    Casar, Berta; Crespo, Piero

    2016-01-01

    ERK1/2 MAP Kinases become activated in response to multiple intra- and extra-cellular stimuli through a signaling module composed of sequential tiers of cytoplasmic kinases. Scaffold proteins regulate ERK signals by connecting the different components of the module into a multi-enzymatic complex by which signal amplitude and duration are fine-tuned, and also provide signal fidelity by isolating this complex from external interferences. In addition, scaffold proteins play a central role as spatial regulators of ERKs signals. In this respect, depending on the subcellular localization from which the activating signals emanate, defined scaffolds specify which substrates are amenable to be phosphorylated. Recent evidence has unveiled direct interactions among different scaffold protein species. These scaffold-scaffold macro-complexes could constitute an additional level of regulation for ERK signals and may serve as nodes for the integration of incoming signals and the subsequent diversification of the outgoing signals with respect to substrate engagement. PMID:27303664

  6. Sending Signals Dynamically

    PubMed Central

    Smock, Robert G.; Gierasch, Lila M.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins mediate transmission of signals along intercellular and intracellular pathways and between the exterior and the interior of a cell. The dynamic properties of signaling proteins are crucial to their functions. We discuss emerging paradigms for the role of protein dynamics in signaling. A central tenet is that proteins fluctuate among many states on evolutionarily selected energy landscapes. Upstream signals remodel this landscape, causing signaling proteins to transmit information to downstream partners. New methods provide insight into the dynamic properties of signaling proteins at the atomic scale. The next stages in the signaling hierarchy—how multiple signals are integrated and how cellular signaling pathways are organized in space and time—present exciting challenges for the future, requiring bold multidisciplinary approaches. PMID:19359576

  7. Signal sciences workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.

    1997-05-01

    This meeting is aimed primarily at signal processing and controls. The technical program for the 1997 Workshop includes a variety of efforts in the Signal Sciences with applications in the Microtechnology Area a new program at LLNL and a future area of application for both Signal/Image Sciences. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Seismic and Optical Signal Processing as well as Micro-Impulse Radar Processing highlight the program, while the speakers at the Signal Processing Applications session discuss various applications of signal processing/control to real world problems. For the more theoretical, a session on Signal Processing Algorithms was organized as well as for the more pragmatic, featuring a session on Real-Time Signal Processing.

  8. Large {ital CP} asymmetries in {ital B}{sup {plus_minus}}{r_arrow}{eta}{sub {ital c}}({chi}{sub {ital c}0}){pi}{sup {plus_minus}} from the {eta}{sub {ital c}}({chi}{sub {ital c}0}) width

    SciTech Connect

    Eilam, G.; Gronau, M.; Mendel, R.R.

    1995-06-19

    We study {ital CP} asymmetries in {ital B}{sup {plus_minus}}{r_arrow}{ital h}{pi}{sup {plus_minus}} decays, where the hadronic states {ital h}={rho}{rho}, {ital K{bar K}}{pi}, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{ital K}{sup +}{ital K}{sup {minus}}, etc., and {ital h}={pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}, {ital K}{sup +}{ital K}{sup {minus}}, 2({pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}), etc., are taken on the resonances {eta}{sub {ital c}} and {chi}{sub {ital c}0}, respectively. The relatively large {eta}{sub {ital c}} and {chi}{sub {ital c}0} decay widths, of about 10--15 MeV, provide the necessary absorptive phase in the interference between the resonance (going through {ital b}{r_arrow}{ital c{bar c}d}) and the background (through {ital b}{r_arrow}{ital u{bar u}d}) contributions to the amplitude. Large asymmetries of order 10% or more are likely in some modes.

  9. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Lager, Darrell; Azevado, Stephen

    1986-06-01

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  10. Measurement of the angular distribution of the electron from W {r_arrow} e = {nu} decay, in p pbar at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV, as function of P{sub T}{sup W}

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The goal of this work is to study the behavior of the angular distribution of the electron from the decay of the W boson in a specific rest frame of the W, the Collins-Soper frame. More specifically, the parameter {alpha}{sub 2} from the expression d{sigma}/d(P{sub T}{sup W}){sup 2} d cos {theta}* = k(1 + {alpha}{sub 2} cos {theta}* + {alpha}{sup 2}(cos {theta}*){sup 2}), corresponding to the distribution of cos {theta}* in the Collins-Soper frame, was measured. The experimental value of {alpha}P{sub 2} was compared with the predictions made by E. Mirkes [11] who included the radiative QCD perturbations in the weak-interaction B{sub boson} {r_arrow} lepton + lepton. This experimental value was extracted for the first time using knowledge about how the radiative QCD perturbations will modify the predictions given by the Electro-Weak process only.

  11. Lift, Drag, and Pitching Moments of an Arrow Wing Having 80 Degree of Sweepback at Mach Numbers from 2.48 to 3.51 and Reynolds Numbers up to 11.0 Million

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Edward J.; Jillie, Don W.; Levin, Alan D.

    1959-01-01

    Measurements were made of the lift, drag, and pitching moments on an arrow wing (taper ratio of zero) having an aspect ratio of 1.4 and a leading-edge sweepback of 80 (degrees). The wing was designed to have a subsonic leading-edge and a Clark-Y airfoil with a thickness ratio of 12 percent of the chord perpendicular to the wing leading edge. The wing was tested both with and without the wing tips bent upward in an attempt to alleviate possible flow separation in the vicinity of the wing tips. Small jets of air were used to fix transition near the wing leading edge. Force results are presented for Mach numbers of 2.48, 2.75, 3.04, 3.28, and 3.51 at Reynolds numbers of 3.5 and 9.0 million and for a Mach number of 3.04 at a Reynolds number of 11.0 million. The measured aerodynamic characteristics are compared with those estimated by linear theory. The maximum lift-drag ratio measured was much less than that predicted. This difference is attributed to lack of full leading-edge thrust and to the experimental lift-curve slope being about 20 percent below the theoretical value.

  12. Reliable Signal Transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollman, Roy

    Stochasticity inherent to biochemical reactions (intrinsic noise) and variability in cellular states (extrinsic noise) degrade information transmitted through signaling networks. We analyzed the ability of temporal signal modulation - that is dynamics - to reduce noise-induced information loss. In the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), calcium (Ca(2 +)) , and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF- κB) pathways, response dynamics resulted in significantly greater information transmission capacities compared to nondynamic responses. Theoretical analysis demonstrated that signaling dynamics has a key role in overcoming extrinsic noise. Experimental measurements of information transmission in the ERK network under varying signal-to-noise levels confirmed our predictions and showed that signaling dynamics mitigate, and can potentially eliminate, extrinsic noise-induced information loss. By curbing the information-degrading effects of cell-to-cell variability, dynamic responses substantially increase the accuracy of biochemical signaling networks.

  13. Mitochondria and cell signalling

    PubMed Central

    Tait, Stephen W. G.; Green, Douglas R.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria have long been considered as crucial organelles, primarily for their roles in biosynthetic reactions such as ATP synthesis. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that mitochondria are intimately involved in cell signalling pathways. Mitochondria perform various signalling functions, serving as platforms to initiate cell signalling, as well as acting as transducers and effectors in multiple processes. Here, we discuss the active roles that mitochondria have in cell death signalling, innate immunity and autophagy. Common themes of mitochondrial regulation emerge from these diverse but interconnected processes. These include: the outer mitochondrial membrane serving as a major signalling platform, and regulation of cell signalling through mitochondrial dynamics and by mitochondrial metabolites, including ATP and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, defects in mitochondrial control of cell signalling and in the regulation of mitochondrial homeostasis might underpin many diseases, in particular age-related pathologies. PMID:22448037

  14. Telephone multiline signaling using common signal pair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodloe, R. R.; Toole, P. C.; Belt, J. L.; Leininger, D. B. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An operator can rapidly and automatically produce coded electrical signals by manipulating mechanical thumb wheel switches so as to instruct a service center to connect any number of telephone lines to the console thus enabling the operator to listen and/or talk over several lines simultaneously. The system includes an on-site console having several mechanically operated thumb wheel switches to which the desired lines to be connected can be dialed in. Electrical coded signals are fed to a number of banks of line AND gates representing units, tens and hundreds, a group of channel gates, and a command gate. These signals are gated out in a controlled manner to an encoder which generates tones that are transmitted over a single line to a communication service center.

  15. Measurand transient signal suppressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A transient signal suppressor for use in a controls system which is adapted to respond to a change in a physical parameter whenever it crosses a predetermined threshold value in a selected direction of increasing or decreasing values with respect to the threshold value and is sustained for a selected discrete time interval is presented. The suppressor includes a sensor transducer for sensing the physical parameter and generating an electrical input signal whenever the sensed physical parameter crosses the threshold level in the selected direction. A manually operated switch is provided for adapting the suppressor to produce an output drive signal whenever the physical parameter crosses the threshold value in the selected direction of increasing or decreasing values. A time delay circuit is selectively adjustable for suppressing the transducer input signal for a preselected one of a plurality of available discrete suppression time and producing an output signal only if the input signal is sustained for a time greater than the selected suppression time. An electronic gate is coupled to receive the transducer input signal and the timer output signal and produce an output drive signal for energizing a control relay whenever the transducer input is a non-transient signal which is sustained beyond the selected time interval.

  16. Requirements for security signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, L.G.; Tarman, T.D.

    1995-02-05

    There has been some interest lately in the need for ``authenticated signalling``, and the development of signalling specifications by the ATM Forum that support this need. The purpose of this contribution is to show that if authenticated signalling is required, then supporting signalling facilities for directory services (i.e. key management) are also required. Furthermore, this contribution identifies other security related mechanisms that may also benefit from ATM-level signalling accommodations. For each of these mechanisms outlined here, an overview of the signalling issues and a rough cut at the required fields for supporting Information Elements are provided. Finally, since each of these security mechanisms are specified by a number of different standards, issues pertaining to the selection of a particular security mechanism at connection setup time (i.e. specification of a required ``Security Quality of Service``) are also discussed.

  17. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1986-06-01

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible andmore » are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.« less

  18. Digital signal processing the Tevatron BPM signals

    SciTech Connect

    Cancelo, G.; James, E.; Wolbers, S.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The Beam Position Monitor (TeV BPM) readout system at Fermilab's Tevatron has been updated and is currently being commissioned. The new BPMs use new analog and digital hardware to achieve better beam position measurement resolution. The new system reads signals from both ends of the existing directional stripline pickups to provide simultaneous proton and antiproton measurements. The signals provided by the two ends of the BPM pickups are processed by analog band-pass filters and sampled by 14-bit ADCs at 74.3MHz. A crucial part of this work has been the design of digital filters that process the signal. This paper describes the digital processing and estimation techniques used to optimize the beam position measurement. The BPM electronics must operate in narrow-band and wide-band modes to enable measurements of closed-orbit and turn-by-turn positions. The filtering and timing conditions of the signals are tuned accordingly for the operational modes. The analysis and the optimized result for each mode are presented.

  19. Precision signal power measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkelstein, R.

    1972-01-01

    Accurate estimation of signal power is an important Deep Space Network (DSN) consideration. Ultimately, spacecraft power and weight is saved if no reserve transmitter power is needed to compensate for inaccurate measurements. Spectral measurement of the received signal has proved to be an effective method of estimating signal power over a wide dynamic range. Furthermore, on-line spectral measurements provide an important diagnostic tool for examining spacecraft anomalies. Prototype equipment installed at a 64-m-diameter antenna site has been successfully used to make measurements of carrier power and sideband symmetry of telemetry signals received from the Mariner Mars 1971 spacecraft.

  20. Slit-Robo signaling.

    PubMed

    Blockus, Heike; Chédotal, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Slits are secreted proteins that bind to Roundabout (Robo) receptors. Slit-Robo signaling is best known for mediating axon repulsion in the developing nervous system. However, in recent years the functional repertoire of Slits and Robo has expanded tremendously and Slit-Robo signaling has been linked to roles in neurogenesis, angiogenesis and cancer progression among other processes. Likewise, our mechanistic understanding of Slit-Robo signaling has progressed enormously. Here, we summarize new insights into Slit-Robo evolutionary and system-dependent diversity, receptor-ligand interactions, signaling crosstalk and receptor activation. PMID:27578174

  1. Micro-simulation of vehicle conflicts involving right-turn vehicles at signalized intersections based on cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Chai, C; Wong, Y D

    2014-02-01

    At intersection, vehicles coming from different directions conflict with each other. Improper geometric design and signal settings at signalized intersection will increase occurrence of conflicts between road users and results in a reduction of the safety level. This study established a cellular automata (CA) model to simulate vehicular interactions involving right-turn vehicles (as similar to left-turn vehicles in US). Through various simulation scenarios for four case cross-intersections, the relationships between conflict occurrences involving right-turn vehicles with traffic volume and right-turn movement control strategies are analyzed. Impacts of traffic volume, permissive right-turn compared to red-amber-green (RAG) arrow, shared straight-through and right-turn lane as well as signal setting are estimated from simulation results. The simulation model is found to be able to provide reasonable assessment of conflicts through comparison of existed simulation approach and observed accidents. Through the proposed approach, prediction models for occurrences and severity of vehicle conflicts can be developed for various geometric layouts and traffic control strategies. PMID:24275720

  2. Spectral Line Parameters Including Temperature Dependences of Self- and Air-Broadening in the 2 (left arrow) 0 Band of CO at 2.3 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Smith, M. A. H.; Mantz, A. W.; Sung, K.; Brown, L. R.; Predoi-Cross, A.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature dependences of pressure-broadened half-width and pressure-induced shift coefficients along with accurate positions and intensities have been determined for transitions in the 2<--0 band of C-12 O-16 from analyzing high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra recorded with two different Fourier transform spectrometers. A total of 28 spectra, 16 self-broadened and 12 air-broadened, recorded using high- purity (greater than or equal to 99.5% C-12-enriched) CO samples and CO diluted with dry air(research grade) at different temperatures and pressures, were analyzed simultaneously to maximize the accuracy of the retrieved parameters. The sample temperatures ranged from 150 to 298K and the total pressures varied between 5 and 700 Torr. A multispectrum nonlinear least squares spectrum fitting technique was used to adjust the rovibrational constants (G, B, D, etc.) and intensity parameters (including Herman-Wallis coefficients), rather than determining individual line positions and intensities. Self-and air-broadened Lorentz half-width coefficients, their temperature dependence exponents, self- and air-pressure-induced shift coefficients, their temperature dependences, self- and air-line mixing coefficients, their temperature dependences and speed dependence have been retrieved from the analysis. Speed-dependent line shapes with line mixing employing off-diagonal relaxation matrix element formalism were needed to minimize the fit residuals. This study presents a precise and complete set of spectral line parameters that consistently reproduce the spectrum of carbon monoxide over terrestrial atmospheric conditions.

  3. Meson-exchange enhancement of the first-forbidden sup 96 Y sup g (0 sup minus ) r arrow sup 96 Zr sup g (0 sup + ). beta. transition:. beta. decay of the low-spin isomer of sup 96 Y

    SciTech Connect

    Mach, H. ); Warburton, E.K. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg ); Gill, R.L.; Casten, R.F. ); Becker, J.A. ); Brown, B.A. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824); Winger, J.A. )

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the 0{sup {minus}} {sup 96}Y{sup {ital g}} {beta} decay to the levels of {sup 96}Zr. A detailed decay scheme comprised of 63 {gamma} rays and 44 energy levels has been obtained from {gamma} singles, {gamma} multispectral scaling, and {gamma}-{gamma} and {ital E}0-{gamma} coincidences. {ital Q}{sub {beta}} was measured using the {beta}-{gamma} coincidence technique, while absolute {ital E}0 and {gamma}-ray intensities were obtained from singles conversion electron and {gamma}-ray spectra measured at beam saturation. The high sensitivity of the study was aimed at investigating the {beta} feeding of levels with excitation enegy above 4 MeV. Although most of the new levels were found in this region, their total {beta} feeding was found to be below 0.6%. The first-forbidden {beta}-decay rate for 0{sup {minus}} {sup 96}Y{sup {ital g}}{r arrow}0{sup +} {sup 96}Zr{sup {ital g}} has been calculated within the framework of the spherical shell model using a model space of {pi}(0{ital f}{sub 7/2},0{ital f}{sub 5/2},1{ital p}{sub 3/2},1{ital p}{sub 1/2},0{ital g}{sub 9/2},1{ital p}{sub 1/2},0{ital g}{sub 9/2}){nu} (0g{sub 7/2},1{ital d}{sub 5/2},1{ital d}{sub 3/2},2{ital s}{sub 1/2}) with limitations on the orbit occupancies. Additional evidence for meson enhancement of the timelike component of the axial current is obtained; the meson-exchange enhancement factor was found to be 1.75{plus minus}0.30, where the uncertainty arises from the calculation.

  4. A G {r_arrow} A transition at position IVS-11 +1 of the HEX A {alpha}-chain gene in a non-Ashkenazic Mexican Tay-Sachs infant

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, S.R.P.; Gwon, S.; DeGasperi, R.

    1994-09-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is an autosomal recessive storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme, {beta}-N-acetylhexosaminidase A (Hex A), a heteropolymer composed of two polypeptides, {alpha} and {beta}. Mutations in the {alpha}-chain gene render the enzyme defective, resulting in the accumulation of g{sub m2} ganglioside in the nervous system. Deficiency of Hex A was detected in a non-Ashkenazic girl of Mexican origin indicating infantile onset of TSD. Molecular investigation of the {alpha}-chain gene excluded the typical Ashkenazic 4 bp insertion in the exon 11 and the intron 12 splice-junction mutations by Hae III and Dde I restriction analysis, respectively. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis showed a different pattern in the sample where exon 11 and flanking regions were amplified in the patient DNA as compared to the migration of control DNA. Sequencing of PCR amplified genomic DNA containing exon 11 and flanking intronic regions showed a single base substitution (G {r_arrow} A) at position IVS-11 +1. This mutation creates a recognition site for the restriction enzyme Mbo II. Digestion of exon 11 and flanking regions with Mbo II demonstrated homozygosity of the patient for this mutation and heterozygosity in the mother. mRNA from cultured fibroblasts obtained from a normal control and from the propositus was reverse transcribed. The cDNAs coding for Hex A {alpha}-chain were amplified in four overlapping fragments. In the patient sample it was not possible to amplify the fragment containing the exon 11/intron 11 junction, indicating that this mutation alters normal RNA processing of the Hex A pre-mRNA resulting in the deficiency of Hex A activity.

  5. A topos foundation for theories of physics: III. The representation of physical quantities with arrows δ̆[sup o](A):Σ&barbelow;→R[sup [succeeds, curly eq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, A.; Isham, C. J.

    2008-05-01

    This paper is the third in a series whose goal is to develop a fundamentally new way of viewing theories of physics. Our basic contention is that constructing a theory of physics is equivalent to finding a representation in a topos of a certain formal language that is attached to the system. In Paper II, we studied the topos representations of the propositional language PL(S ) for the case of quantum theory, and in the present paper we do the same thing for the, more extensive, local language L(S ). One of the main achievements is to find a topos representation for self-adjoint operators. This involves showing that, for any physical quantity A, there is an arrow δ̆o(A):Σ&barbelow;→R≽&barbelow;, whereR≽&barbelow; is the quantity-value object for this theory. The construction of δ̆o(Â) is an extension of the daseinisation of projection operators that was discussed in Paper II. The objectR≽&barbelow; is a monoid object only in the topos, τϕ=SetsV(H)op, of the theory, and to enhance the applicability of the formalism, we apply toR≽&barbelow; a topos analog of the Grothendieck extension of a monoid to a group. The resulting object, k(R ≽&barbelow;), is an abelian group object in τϕ. We also discuss another candidate,R↔&barbelow;, for the quantity-value object. In this presheaf, both inner and outer daseinisations are used in a symmetric way. Finally, there is a brief discussion of the role of unitary operators in the quantum topos scheme.

  6. Signaling by Gasotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Asif K.; Gadalla, Moataz M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide is well established as a major signaling molecule. Evidence is accumulating that carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide also are physiologic mediators in the cardiovascular, immune, and nervous systems. This Review focuses on mechanisms whereby they signal by binding to metal centers in metalloproteins, such as in guanylyl cyclase, or modifying sulfhydryl groups in protein targets. PMID:19401594

  7. Seismic signal of avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaresi, Damiano; Ravanat, Xavier; Thibert, Emmanuel

    2010-05-01

    The characterization of avalanches with seismic signals is an important task. For risk mitigation, estimating remotely avalanche activity by means of seismic signals is a good alternative to direct observations that are often limited by visual conditions and observer's availability. In seismology, the main challenge is to discriminate avalanche signals within the natural earth seismic activity and background noise. Some anthropogenic low frequency (infra-sound) sources like helicopters also generate seismic signals. In order to characterize an avalanche seismic signal, a 3-axis broad band seismometer (Guralp 3T) has been set-up on a real scale avalanche test site in Lautaret (France). The sensor is located in proximity of 2 avalanche paths where avalanches can be artificially released. Preliminary results of seismic records are presented, correlated with avalanche physical parameters (volume released, velocity, energy).

  8. Bioelectric Signal Measuring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadarrama-Santana, A.; Pólo-Parada, L.; García-Valenzuela, A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a low noise measuring system based on interdigitated electrodes for sensing bioelectrical signals. The system registers differential voltage measurements in order of microvolts. The base noise during measurements was in nanovolts and thus, the sensing signals presented a very good signal to noise ratio. An excitation voltage of 1Vrms with 10 KHz frequency was applied to an interdigitated capacitive sensor without a material under test and to a mirror device simultaneously. The output signals of both devices was then subtracted in order to obtain an initial reference value near cero volts and reduce parasitic capacitances due to the electronics, wiring and system hardware as well. The response of the measuring system was characterized by monitoring temporal bioelectrical signals in real time of biological materials such as embryo chicken heart cells and bovine suprarenal gland cells.

  9. Exosomes in developmental signalling.

    PubMed

    McGough, Ian John; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2016-07-15

    In order to achieve coordinated growth and patterning during development, cells must communicate with one another, sending and receiving signals that regulate their activities. Such developmental signals can be soluble, bound to the extracellular matrix, or tethered to the surface of adjacent cells. Cells can also signal by releasing exosomes - extracellular vesicles containing bioactive molecules such as RNA, DNA and enzymes. Recent work has suggested that exosomes can also carry signalling proteins, including ligands of the Notch receptor and secreted proteins of the Hedgehog and WNT families. Here, we describe the various types of exosomes and their biogenesis. We then survey the experimental strategies used so far to interfere with exosome formation and critically assess the role of exosomes in developmental signalling. PMID:27436038

  10. Biological signals as handicaps.

    PubMed

    Grafen, A

    1990-06-21

    An ESS model of Zahavi's handicap principle is constructed. This allows a formal exposition of how the handicap principle works, and shows that its essential elements are strategic. The handicap model is about signalling, and it is proved under fairly general conditions that if the handicap principle's conditions are met, then an evolutionarily stable signalling equilibrium exists in a biological signalling system, and that any signalling equilibrium satisfies the conditions of the handicap principle. Zahavi's major claims for the handicap principle are thus vindicated. The place of cheating is discussed in view of the honesty that follows from the handicap principle. Parallel signalling models in economics are discussed. Interpretations of the handicap principle are compared. The models are not fully explicit about how females use information about male quality, and, less seriously, have no genetics. A companion paper remedies both defects in a model of the handicap principle at work in sexual selection. PMID:2402153

  11. Mitochondrial emitted electromagnetic signals mediate retrograde signaling.

    PubMed

    Bagkos, Georgios; Koufopoulos, Kostas; Piperi, Christina

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidence shows that mitochondria regulate nuclear transcriptional activity both in normal and cell stress conditions, known as retrograde signaling. Under normal mitochondrial function, retrograde signaling is associated with mitochondrial biogenesis, normal cell phenotype and metabolic profile. In contrast, mitochondrial dysfunction leads to abnormal (oncogenic) cell phenotype and altered bio-energetic profile (nucleus reprogramming). Despite intense research efforts, a concrete mechanism through which mitochondria determine the group of genes expressed by the nucleus is still missing. The present paper proposes a novel hypothesis regarding retrograde signaling. More specifically, it reveals the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the accompanied strong electromagnetic field (EF) as key regulatory factors of nuclear activity. Mitochondrial emitted EFs extend in long distance and affect the function of nuclear membrane receptors. Depending on their frequencies, EFs can directly activate or deactivate different groups of nuclear receptors and so determine nuclear gene expression. One of the key features of the above hypothesis is that nuclear membrane receptors, besides their own endogenous or chemical ligands (hormones, lipids, etc.), can also be activated by electromagnetic signals. Moreover, normal MMP values (about -140 mV) are associated with the production of high ATP quantities and small levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) while the hyperpolarization observed in all cancer cell types leads to a dramatic fall in ATP production and an analogous increase in ROS. The diminished ATP and increased ROS production negatively affect the function of all cellular systems including nucleus. Restoration of mitochondrial function, which is characterized by the fluctuation of MMP and EF values within a certain (normal) range, is proposed as a necessary condition for normal nuclear function and cancer therapy. PMID:26474928

  12. Hedgehog signaling and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Finco, Isabella; LaPensee, Christopher R; Krill, Kenneth T; Hammer, Gary D

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery nearly 30 years ago, the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been shown to be pivotal in many developmental and pathophysiological processes in several steroidogenic tissues, including the testis, ovary, adrenal cortex, and placenta. New evidence links the evolutionarily conserved Hh pathway to the steroidogenic organs, demonstrating how Hh signaling can influence their development and homeostasis and can act in concert with steroids to mediate physiological functions. In this review, we highlight the role of the components of the Hh signaling pathway in steroidogenesis of endocrine tissues. PMID:25668018

  13. Plant Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Atienza, Juliana; Van Ingelgem, Carl; Roef, Luc

    2007-01-01

    The presence of the cyclic nucleotides 3′,5′-cyclic adenyl monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanyl monophosphate (cGMP) in plants is now generally accepted. In addition, cAMP and cGMP have been implicated in the regulation of important plant processes such as stomatal functioning, monovalent and divalent cation fluxes, chloroplast development, gibberellic acid signalling, pathogen response and gene transcription. However, very little is known regarding the components of cyclic nucleotide signalling in plants. In this addendum, the evidence for specific mechanisms of plant cyclic nucleotide signalling is evaluated and discussed. PMID:19704553

  14. Signal processing for microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymkowiak, A. E.; Kelley, R. L.; Moseley, S. H.; Stahle, C. K.

    1993-11-01

    Most of the power in the signals from microcalorimeters occurs at relatively low frequencies. At these frequencies, typical amplifiers will have significant amounts of 1/f noise. Our laboratory systems can also suffer from pickup at several harmonics of the AC power line, and from microphonic pickup at frequencies that vary with the configuration of the apparatus. We have developed some optimal signal processing techniques in order to construct the best possible estimates of our pulse heights in the presence of these non-ideal effects. In addition to a discussion of our laboratory systems, we present our plans for providing this kind of signal processing in flight experiments.

  15. Dark forces in the sky: signals from Z' and the dark Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Nicole F.; Cai, Yi; Leane, Rebecca K.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the indirect detection signals for a self-consistent hidden U(1) model containing a Majorana dark matter candidate, χ, a dark gauge boson, Z', and a dark Higgs, s. Compared with a model containing only a dark matter candidate and Z' mediator, the addition of the scalar provides a mass generation mechanism for the dark sector particles and is required in order to avoid unitarity violation at high energies. We find that the inclusion of the two mediators opens up a new two-body s-wave annihilation channel, χ χarrow sZ'. This new process, which is missed in the usual single-mediator simplified model approach, can be the dominant annihilation channel. This provides rich phenomenology for indirect detection searches, allows indirect searches to explore regions of parameter space not accessible with other commonly considered s-wave annihilation processes, and enables both the Z' and scalar couplings to be probed. We examine the phenomenology of the sector with a focus on this new process, and determine the limits on the model parameter space from Fermi data on dwarf spheriodal galaxies and other relevant experiments.

  16. Signal processing in SETI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullers, D. K.; Linscott, I. R.; Oliver, B. M.

    1985-01-01

    It is believed that the Galaxy might contain ten billion potential life sites. In view of the physical inaccessibility of extraterrestrial life on account of the vast distances involved, a logical first step in a search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) appears to be an attempt to detect signals already being radiated. The characteristics of the signals to be expected are discussed together with the search strategy of a NASA program. It is pointed out that all presently planned searches will use existing radio-astronomy antennas. If no extraterrestrial intelligence signals are discovered, society will have to decide whether SETI justifies a dedicated facility of much greater collecting area. Attention is given to a multichannel spectrum analyzer, CW signal detection, pulse detection, the pattern detector, and details of SETI system operation.

  17. GNSS Ocean Reflected Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeg, P.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean reflected signals from the GNSS satellites (received at low-Earth orbiting satellites, airplanes and fixed mountain locations) describe the ocean surface mean height, waves, roughness, spectral reflectivity and emissivity. The estimated accuracy of the average surface height is of the order of 10 cm for smooth conditions. Thus global observations could be an important new contribution to long-term variations of the ocean mean height as well as the monitoring of ocean mesoscale eddies, which result in sea-height changes much larger than the accuracy of the GNSS technique for reflected signals. The ocean reflected signals can be divided into two set of measurements, 1) high elevation measurements (equal to low incidence angles) and 2) low elevation grazing angle measurements. For the first type the ocean reflection cross-section has a limited extent. The reflected signal is coherent with smaller errors due to ocean waves, sampling rate and the internal processing method of the receiver. For low elevations, the signal reveals the incoherent scatter process at the reflection zone. To quantify the potential of the GNSS signals for determining spectral reflectivity at low elevations, we present ocean reflection GPS measurements from the Haleakala Summit on Maui, Hawaii, revealing the spectral characteristics of both the direct satellite signal and the ocean reflected signal for low elevation angles. The characteristics of the reflected signal depend on the scattering properties of the sea surface and the footprint of the reflection zone. While the footprint size and shape in turn depends on the signal incidence angle, the ocean mean tilt, and the relative velocities of transmitter and receiver to the reflection point. Thus the scattering properties of the sea surface are related to the sea surface roughness. We present the spectral properties of the signals as received by a high precision GPS instrument, simultaneously in both phase-locked mode and open-loop raw

  18. Signals and Receptors.

    PubMed

    Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Lu, Benson; Evans, Ron; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2016-04-01

    Communication between cells in a multicellular organism occurs by the production of ligands (proteins, peptides, fatty acids, steroids, gases, and other low-molecular-weight compounds) that are either secreted by cells or presented on their surface, and act on receptors on, or in, other target cells. Such signals control cell growth, migration, survival, and differentiation. Signaling receptors can be single-span plasma membrane receptors associated with tyrosine or serine/threonine kinase activities, proteins with seven transmembrane domains, or intracellular receptors. Ligand-activated receptors convey signals into the cell by activating signaling pathways that ultimately affect cytosolic machineries or nuclear transcriptional programs or by directly translocating to the nucleus to regulate transcription. PMID:27037414

  19. Audio signal processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, R. L.

    1970-01-01

    System provides automatic volume control for an audio amplifier or a voice communication system without introducing noise surges during pauses in the input, and without losing the initial signal when the input resumes.

  20. Signals from the Cosmos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Jeffrey M.

    1991-01-01

    Introduces the basics of radio astronomy and describes how to assemble several simple systems for receiving radio signals from the cosmos. Includes schematics, parts lists, working drawings, and contact information for radio astronomy suppliers. (11 references) (Author/JJK)

  1. IRAK signalling in cancer.

    PubMed

    Rhyasen, G W; Starczynowski, D T

    2015-01-20

    Innate immune signalling has an essential role in inflammation, and the dysregulation of signalling components of this pathway is increasingly being recognised as an important mediator in cancer initiation and progression. In some malignancies, dysregulation of inflammatory toll-like receptor (TLR) and interleukin-1 receptor (IL1R) signalling is typified by increased NF-κB activity, and it occurs through somatic mutations, chromosomal deletions, and/or transcriptional deregulation. Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK) family members are mediators of TLR/IL1R superfamily signalling, and mounting evidence implicates these kinases as viable cancer targets. Although there have been previous efforts aimed at the development of IRAK kinase inhibitors, this is currently an area of renewed interest for cancer drug development. PMID:25290089

  2. Quantifying Ubiquitin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ordureau, Alban; Münch, Christian; Harper, J. Wade

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin (UB)-driven signaling systems permeate biology, and are often integrated with other types of post-translational modifications (PTMs), most notably phosphorylation. Flux through such pathways is typically dictated by the fractional stoichiometry of distinct regulatory modifications and protein assemblies as well as the spatial organization of pathway components. Yet, we rarely understand the dynamics and stoichiometry of rate-limiting intermediates along a reaction trajectory. Here, we review how quantitative proteomic tools and enrichment strategies are being used to quantify UB-dependent signaling systems, and to integrate UB signaling with regulatory phosphorylation events. A key regulatory feature of ubiquitylation is that the identity of UB chain linkage types can control downstream processes. We also describe how proteomic and enzymological tools can be used to identify and quantify UB chain synthesis and linkage preferences. The emergence of sophisticated quantitative proteomic approaches will set a new standard for elucidating biochemical mechanisms of UB-driven signaling systems. PMID:26000850

  3. Advanced signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasey, D. J.

    1985-12-01

    A collection of papers on advanced signal processing in radar, sonar, and communications is presented. The topics addressed include: transmitter aerials, high-power amplifier design for active sonar, radar transmitters, receiver array technology for sonar, new underwater acoustic detectors, diversity techniques in communications receivers, GaAs IC amplifiers for radar and communication receivers, integrated optical techniques for acoustooptic receivers, logarithmic receivers, CCD processors for sonar, acoustooptic correlators, designing in silicon, very high performance integrated circuits, and digital filters. Also discussed are: display types, scan converters in sonar, display ergonomics, simulators, high throughput sonar processors, optical fiber systems for signal processing, satellite communications, VLSI array processor for image and signal processing, ADA, future of cryogenic devices for signal processing applications, advanced image understanding, and VLSI architectures for real-time image processing.

  4. Modularity in signaling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vecchio, Domitilla

    2012-08-01

    Modularity is a property by which the behavior of a system does not change upon interconnection. It is crucial for understanding the behavior of a complex system from the behavior of the composing subsystems. Whether modularity holds in biology is an intriguing and largely debated question. In this paper, we discuss this question taking a control system theory view and focusing on signaling systems. In particular, we argue that, despite signaling systems being constituted of structural modules, such as covalent modification cycles, modularity does not hold in general. As in any engineering system, impedance-like effects, called retroactivity, appear at interconnections and alter the behavior of connected modules. We further argue that while signaling systems have evolved sophisticated ways to counter-act retroactivity and enforce modularity, retroactivity may also be exploited to finely control the information processing of signaling pathways. Testable predictions and experimental evidence are discussed with their implications.

  5. Error-prone signalling.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, R A; Grafen, A

    1992-06-22

    The handicap principle of Zahavi is potentially of great importance to the study of biological communication. Existing models of the handicap principle, however, make the unrealistic assumption that communication is error free. It seems possible, therefore, that Zahavi's arguments do not apply to real signalling systems, in which some degree of error is inevitable. Here, we present a general evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) model of the handicap principle which incorporates perceptual error. We show that, for a wide range of error functions, error-prone signalling systems must be honest at equilibrium. Perceptual error is thus unlikely to threaten the validity of the handicap principle. Our model represents a step towards greater realism, and also opens up new possibilities for biological signalling theory. Concurrent displays, direct perception of quality, and the evolution of 'amplifiers' and 'attenuators' are all probable features of real signalling systems, yet handicap models based on the assumption of error-free communication cannot accommodate these possibilities. PMID:1354361

  6. Reviews Toy: Air swimmers Book: Their Arrows will Darken the Sun: The Evolution and Science of Ballistics Book: Physics Experiments for your Bag Book: Quantum Physics for Poets Equipment: SEP colour wheel kit Equipment: SEP colour mixing kit Software: USB DrDAQ App: iHandy Level Equipment: Photonics Explorer kit Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-01-01

    WE RECOMMEND Air swimmers Helium balloon swims like a fish Their Arrows will Darken the Sun: The Evolution and Science of Ballistics Ballistics book hits the spot Physics Experiments for your Bag Handy experiments for your lessons Quantum Physics for Poets Book shows the economic importance of physics SEP colour wheel kit Wheels investigate colour theory SEP colour mixing kit Cheap colour mixing kit uses red, green and blue LEDs iHandy Level iPhone app superbly measures angles Photonics Explorer kit Free optics kit given to schools WORTH A LOOK DrDAQ DrDAQ software gets an upgrade WEB WATCH Websites show range of physics

  7. Signal-light nomogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, J. I.; Edgerton, C. F.; Duntley, S. Q.

    1975-01-01

    A nomogram is presented for predicting the sighting range for white, steady-burning signal lights. The theoretical and experimental bases are explained and instructions are provided for its use for a variety of practical problems concerning the visibility of signal lights. The nomogram is appropriate for slant path as well as horizontal sightings, and the gain of range achieved by utilizing binoculars can be predicted by use of it.

  8. Wnt Signaling in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Takuo; Michigami, Toshimi; Ozono, Keiichi

    2010-01-01

    Wnt signaling is involved not only in embryonic development but also in maintenance of homeostasis in postnatal tissues. Multiple lines of evidence have increased understanding of the roles of Wnt signaling in bone since mutations in the LRP5 gene were identified in human bone diseases. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes mesenchymal progenitor cells to differentiate into osteoblasts. The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway possibly through Lrp6, a co-receptor for Wnts as well as Lrp5, in osteoblasts regulates bone resorption by increasing the OPG/RANKL ratio. However, endogenous inhibitors of Wnt signaling including sclerostin block bone formation. Regulation of sclerostin appears to be one of the mechanisms of PTH anabolic actions on bone. Since sclerostin is almost exclusively expressed in osteocytes, inhibition of sclerostin is the most promising design. Surprisingly, Lrp5 controls bone formation by inhibiting serotonin synthesis in the duodenum, but not by directly promoting bone formation. Pharmacological intervention may be considered in many components of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, although adverse effects and tumorigenicity to other tissues are important. More studies will be needed to fully understand how the Wnt signaling pathway actually influences bone metabolism and to assure the safety of new interventions. PMID:23926379

  9. Sucrose signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tognetti, Jorge A.; Pontis, Horacio G.; Martínez-Noël, Giselle M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The role of sucrose as a signaling molecule in plants was originally proposed several decades ago. However, recognition of sucrose as a true signal has been largely debated and only recently this role has been fully accepted. The best-studied cases of sucrose signaling involve metabolic processes, such as the induction of fructan or anthocyanin synthesis, but a large volume of scattered information suggests that sucrose signals may control a vast array of developmental processes along the whole life cycle of the plant. Also, wide gaps exist in our current understanding of the intracellular steps that mediate sucrose action. Sucrose concentration in plant tissues tends to be directly related to light intensity, and inversely related to temperature, and accordingly, exogenous sucrose supply often mimics the effect of high light and cold. However, many exceptions to this rule seem to occur due to interactions with other signaling pathways. In conclusion, the sucrose role as a signal molecule in plants is starting to be unveiled and much research is still needed to have a complete map of its significance in plant function. PMID:23333971

  10. Semaphorin signaling in bone.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, Lieve; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Verstuyf, Annemieke

    2016-09-01

    Semaphorin molecules regulate cell adhesion and motility in a wide variety of cell types and are therefore involved in numerous processes including axon guidance, angiogenesis, cardiogenesis, tumor growth, and immune response. Increasing evidence points to a role of transmembrane, membrane-associated and soluble semaphorins during bone development as well as in the control of normal bone homeostasis. Within bone, semaphorins are implicated in the communication between different cell types by relaying signals in an autocrine or paracrine way. Semaphorins are not only involved in bone resorption but also in bone formation. Therefore, targeting semaphorin-induced signaling in bone may constitute an interesting new therapeutic strategy in osteoporosis. However, all the pioneering research on semaphorins is performed in mice and it remains to be established to what extent semaphorin signaling pathways are conserved between mice and men. In addition, knowledge of semaphorin signaling in bone mostly arises from loss/gain of function studies of one single semaphorin and/or receptor. However, different semaphorin molecules are co-expressed in bone and their signaling pathways are likely to interact in a complex and coherent way that needs proper understanding before targeting semaphorin signaling can be therapeutically exploited. PMID:26365296

  11. Pulse code modulated signal synchronizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, H. S. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A bit synchronizer for a split phase PCM transmission is reported that includes three loop circuits which receive incoming phase coded PCM signals. In the first loop, called a Q-loop, a generated, phase coded, PCM signal is multiplied with the incoming signals, and the frequency and phase of the generated signal are nulled to that of the incoming subcarrier signal. In the second loop, called a B-loop, a circuit multiplies a generated signal with incoming signals to null the phase of the generated signal in a bit phase locked relationship to the incoming signal. In a third loop, called the I-loop, a phase coded PCM signal is multiplied with the incoming signals for decoding the bit information from the PCM signal. A counter means is used for timing of the generated signals and timing of sample intervals for each bit period.

  12. Calcium signaling and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Kass, G E; Orrenius, S

    1999-01-01

    The divalent calcium cation Ca(2+) is used as a major signaling molecule during cell signal transduction to regulate energy output, cellular metabolism, and phenotype. The basis to the signaling role of Ca(2+) is an intricate network of cellular channels and transporters that allow a low resting concentration of Ca(2+) in the cytosol of the cell ([Ca(2+)]i) but that are also coupled to major dynamic and rapidly exchanging stores. This enables extracellular signals from hormones and growth factors to be transduced as [Ca(2+)]i spikes that are amplitude and frequency encoded. There is considerable evidence that a number of toxic environmental chemicals target these Ca(2+) signaling processes, alter them, and induce cell death by apoptosis. Two major pathways for apoptosis will be considered. The first one involves Ca(2+)-mediated expression of ligands that bind to and activate death receptors such as CD95 (Fas, APO-1). In the second pathway, Ca(2+) has a direct toxic effect and its primary targets include the mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Mitochondria may respond to an apoptotic Ca(2+) signal by the selective release of cytochrome c or through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and opening of an inner mitochondrial membrane pore. Toxic agents such as the environmental pollutant tributyltin or the natural plant product thapsigargin, which deplete the ER Ca(2+) stores, will induce as a direct result of this effect the opening of plasma membrane Ca(2+) channels and an ER stress response. In contrast, under some conditions, Ca(2+) signals may be cytoprotective and antagonize the apoptotic machinery. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10229704

  13. Segregation and manifestations of the mtDNA tRNA[sup Lys] A[r arrow]G[sup (8344)] mutation of myoclonus epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF) syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, N.G.; Tulinius, M.H.; Holme, E.; Oldfors, A.; Andersen, O.; Wahlstroem, J. ); Aasly, J. )

    1992-12-01

    The authors have studied the segregation and manifestations of the tRNA[sup Lys] A[r arrow]G[sup (8344)] mutation of mtDNA. Three unrelated patients with myoclonus epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF) syndrome were investigated, along with 30 of their maternal relatives. Mutated mtDNA was not always found in the offspring of women carrying the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation. Four women had 10%-33% of mutated mtDNA in lymphocytes, and no mutated mtDNA was found in 7 of their 14 investigated children. The presence of mutated mtDNA was excluded at a level of 3:1,000. Five women had a proportion of 43%-73% mutated mtDNA in lymphocytes, and mutated mtDNA was found in all their 12 investigated children. This suggests that the risk for transmission of mutated mtDNA to the offspring increases if high levels are present in the mother and that, above a threshold level of 35%-40%, it is very likely that transmission will occur to all children. The three patients with MERRF syndrone had, in muscle, both 94%-96% mutated mtDNA and biochemical and histochemical evidence of a respiratory-chain dysfunction. Four relatives had a proportion of 61%-92% mutated mtDNA in muscle, and biochemical measurements showed a normal respiratory-chain function in muscle in all cases. These findings suggest that >92% of mtDNA with the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation in muscle is required to cause a respiratory-chain dysfunction that can be detected by biochemical methods. There was a positive correlation between the levels of mtDNA with the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation in lymphocytes and the levels in muscle, in all nine investigated cases. The levels of mutated mtDNA were higher in muscle than in lymphocytes in all cases. 30 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Respiration signals from photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Lena M

    2013-10-01

    Pulse oximetry is based on the technique of photoplethysmography (PPG) wherein light transmitted through tissues is modulated by the pulse. In addition to variations in light modulation by the cardiac cycle, the PPG signal contains a respiratory modulation and variations associated with changing tissue blood volume of other origins. Cardiovascular, respiratory, and neural fluctuations in the PPG signal are of different frequencies and can all be characterized according to their sinusoidal components. PPG was described in 1937 to measure blood volume changes. The technique is today increasingly used, in part because of developments in semiconductor technology during recent decades that have resulted in considerable advances in PPG probe design. Artificial neural networks help to detect complex nonlinear relationships and are extensively used in electronic signal analysis, including PPG. Patient and/or probe-tissue movement artifacts are sources of signal interference. Physiologic variations such as vasoconstriction, a deep gasp, or yawn also affect the signal. Monitoring respiratory rates from PPG are often based on respiratory-induced intensity variations (RIIVs) contained in the baseline of the PPG signal. Qualitative RIIV signals may be used for monitoring purposes regardless of age, gender, anesthesia, and mode of ventilation. Detection of breaths in adult volunteers had a maximal error of 8%, and in infants the rates of overdetected and missed breaths using PPG were 1.5% and 2.7%, respectively. During central apnea, the rhythmic RIIV signals caused by variations in intrathoracic pressure disappear. PPG has been evaluated for detecting airway obstruction with a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 85%. The RIIV and the pulse synchronous PPG waveform are sensitive for detecting hypovolemia. The respiratory synchronous variation of the PPG pulse amplitude is an accurate predictor of fluid responsiveness. Pleth variability index is a continuous measure of the

  15. Sphingosine 1-phosphate signalling.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Karen; Evans, Todd; Hla, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a lipid mediator formed by the metabolism of sphingomyelin. In vertebrates, S1P is secreted into the extracellular environment and signals via G protein-coupled S1P receptors to regulate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion, and thereby influence cell migration, differentiation and survival. The expression and localization of S1P receptors is dynamically regulated and controls vascular development, vessel stability and immune cell trafficking. In addition, crucial events during embryogenesis, such as angiogenesis, cardiogenesis, limb development and neurogenesis, are regulated by S1P signalling. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we provide an overview of S1P signalling in development and in disease. PMID:24346695

  16. Signal peptide of cellulase.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shaomin; Wu, Guang

    2014-06-01

    Cellulase is an enzyme playing a crucial role in biotechnology industries ranging from textile to biofuel because of tremendous amount of cellulose produced in plant. In order to improve cellulase productivity, huge resource has been spent in search for good cellulases from microorganism in remote areas and in creation of ideal cellulase by engineering. However, not much attention is given to the secretion of cellulases from cell into extracellular space, where a cellulase plays its enzymatic role. In this minireview, the signal peptides, which lead secreted proteins to specific secretion systems and scatter in literature, are reviewed. The patterns of signal peptides are checked against 4,101 cellulases documented in UniProtKB, the largest protein database in the world, to determine how these cellulases are secreted. Simultaneous review on both literature and cellulases from the database not only provides updated knowledge on signal peptides but also indicates the gap in our research. PMID:24743986

  17. Telemetry Ranging: Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamkins, J.; Kinman, P.; Xie, H.; Vilnrotter, V.; Dolinar, S.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the details of the signal processing used in a telemetry ranging system in which timing information is extracted from the downlink telemetry signal in order to compute spacecraft range. A previous article describes telemetry ranging concepts and architecture, which are a slight variation of a scheme published earlier. As in that earlier work, the telemetry ranging concept eliminates the need for a dedicated downlink ranging signal to communicate the necessary timing information. The present article describes the operation and performance of the major receiver functions on the spacecraft and the ground --- many of which are standard tracking loops already in use in JPL's flight and ground radios --- and how they can be used to provide the relevant information for making a range measurement. It also describes the implementation of these functions in software, and performance of an end-to-end software simulation of the telemetry ranging system.

  18. Endocytosis, Signaling, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; von Zastrow, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The endocytic network comprises a vast and intricate system of membrane-delimited cell entry and cargo sorting routes running between biochemically and functionally distinct intracellular compartments. The endocytic network caters to the organization and redistribution of diverse subcellular components, and mediates appropriate shuttling and processing of materials acquired from neighboring cells or the extracellular milieu. Such trafficking logistics, despite their importance, represent only one facet of endocytic function. The endocytic network also plays a key role in organizing, mediating, and regulating cellular signal transduction events. Conversely, cellular signaling processes tightly control the endocytic pathway at different steps. The present article provides a perspective on the intimate relationships that exist between particular endocytic and cellular signaling processes in mammalian cells, within the context of understanding the impact of this nexus on integrated physiology. PMID:25085911

  19. Separation of Climate Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C; Fodor, I

    2002-11-13

    Understanding changes in global climate is a challenging scientific problem. Simulated and observed data include signals from many sources, and untangling their respective effects is difficult. In order to make meaningful comparisons between different models, and to understand human effects on global climate, we need to isolate the effects of different sources. Recent eruptions of the El Chichon and Mt. Pinatubo volcanoes coincided with large El Nino and Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events, which complicates the separation of their contributions on global temperatures. Current approaches for separating volcano and ENSO signals in global mean data involve parametric models and iterative techniques [3]. We investigate alternative methods based on principal component analysis (PCA) [2] and independent component analysis (ICA) [1]. Our goal is to determine if such techniques can automatically identify the signals corresponding to the different sources, without relying on parametric models.

  20. Honest signalling with costly gambles

    PubMed Central

    Meacham, Frazer; Perlmutter, Aaron; Bergstrom, Carl T.

    2013-01-01

    Costly signalling theory is commonly invoked as an explanation for how honest communication can be stable when interests conflict. However, the signal costs predicted by costly signalling models often turn out to be unrealistically high. These models generally assume that signal cost is determinate. Here, we consider the case where signal cost is instead stochastic. We examine both discrete and continuous signalling games and show that, under reasonable assumptions, stochasticity in signal costs can decrease the average cost at equilibrium for all individuals. This effect of stochasticity for decreasing signal costs is a fundamental mechanism that probably acts in a wide variety of circumstances. PMID:23904587

  1. PKD signaling and pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. Methods This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Results Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder. PMID:26879861

  2. Packaging signals in alphaviruses.

    PubMed

    Frolova, E; Frolov, I; Schlesinger, S

    1997-01-01

    Alphaviruses synthesize large amounts of both genomic and subgenomic RNA in infected cells, but usually only the genomic RNA is packaged. This implies the existence of an encapsidation or packaging signal which would be responsible for selectivity. Previously, we had identified a region of the Sindbis virus genome that interacts specifically with the viral capsid protein. This 132-nucleotide (nt) fragment lies within the coding region of the nsP1 gene (nt 945 to 1076). We proposed that the 132-mer is important for capsid recognition and initiates the formation of the viral nucleocapsid. To study the encapsidation of Sindbis virus RNAs in infected cells, we designed a new assay that uses the self-replicating Sindbis virus genomes (replicons) which lack the viral structural protein genes and contain heterologous sequences under the control of the subgenomic RNA promoter. These replicons can be packaged into viral particles by using defective helper RNAs that contain the structural protein genes (P. Bredenbeek, I. Frolov, C. M. Rice, and S. Schlesinger, J. Virol. 67:6439-6446, 1993). Insertion of the 132-mer into the subgenomic RNA significantly increased the packaging of this RNA into viral particles. We have used this assay and defective helpers that contain the structural protein genes of Ross River virus (RRV) to investigate the location of the encapsidation signal in the RRV genome. Our results show that there are several fragments that could act as packaging signals. They are all located in a different region of the genome than the signal for the Sindbis virus genome. For RRV, the strongest packaging signal lies between nt 2761 and 3062 in the nsP2 gene. This is the same region that was proposed to contain the packaging signal for Semliki Forest virus genomic RNA. PMID:8985344

  3. Multichannel signal enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Paul S.

    1990-01-01

    A mixed adaptive filter is formulated for the signal processing problem where desired a priori signal information is not available. The formulation generates a least squares problem which enables the filter output to be calculated directly from an input data matrix. In one embodiment, a folded processor array enables bidirectional data flow to solve the recursive problem by back substitution without global communications. In another embodiment, a balanced processor array solves the recursive problem by forward elimination through the array. In a particular application to magnetoencephalography, the mixed adaptive filter enables an evoked response to an auditory stimulus to be identified from only a single trial.

  4. Mechanisms of auxin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lavy, Meirav; Estelle, Mark

    2016-09-15

    The plant hormone auxin triggers complex growth and developmental processes. Its underlying molecular mechanism of action facilitates rapid switching between transcriptional repression and gene activation through the auxin-dependent degradation of transcriptional repressors. The nuclear auxin signaling pathway consists of a small number of core components. However, in most plants each component is represented by a large gene family. The modular construction of the pathway can thus produce diverse transcriptional outputs depending on the cellular and environmental context. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we outline the current model for TIR1/AFB-dependent auxin signaling with an emphasis on recent studies. PMID:27624827

  5. Array signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Haykin, S.; Justice, J.H.; Owsley, N.L.; Yen, J.L.; Kak, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    This is the first book to be devoted completely to array signal processing, a subject that has become increasingly important in recent years. The book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1, which is introductory, reviews some basic concepts in wave propagation. The remaining five chapters deal with the theory and applications of array signal processing in (a) exploration seismology, (b) passive sonar, (c) radar, (d) radio astronomy, and (e) tomographic imaging. The various chapters of the book are self-contained. The book is written by a team of five active researchers, who are specialists in the individual fields covered by the pertinent chapters.

  6. JNK Signaling in Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Dhanasekaran, Danny N.; Reddy, E. Premkumar

    2011-01-01

    Jun N-terminal kinases or JNKs play a critical role in death receptor-initiated extrinsic as well as mitochondrial intrinsic apoptotic pathways. JNKs activate apoptotic signaling by the upregulation pro-apoptotic genes via the transactivation of specific transcription factors or by directly modulating the activities of mitochondrial pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins through distinct phosphorylation events. This review analyzes our present understanding of the role of JNK in apoptotic signaling and the various mechanisms by which JNK promotes apoptosis PMID:18931691

  7. Noninvasive vital signal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zenan; Chee, Jonny; Chua, Kok Poo; Chen, ZhouDe

    2010-05-01

    Vital signals of patients, such as heart rate, temperature and movement are crucial to monitor patients in hospital. Current heart rate measurement is obtained by using Electrocardiograph, which normally applies electrodes to the patient's body. As electrodes are extremely uncomfortable to ware and hinder patient's movement, a non-invasive vital signal-monitoring device will be a better solution. Similar to Electrocardiograph, the device detects the voltage difference across the heart by using concept of capacitance, which can be obtained by two conductive fiber sewing on the bed sheet. Simultaneous temperature reading can also be detected by using surface mounted temperature sensor. This paper will mainly focus on the heart rate monitoring.

  8. Universal signal conditioning amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, William E.; Hallberg, Carl; Medelius, Pedro J.

    1994-01-01

    Engineers at NASA's Kennedy Space Center have designed a signal conditioning amplifier which automatically matches itself to almost any kind of transducer. The product, called Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA), uses state-of-the-art technologies to deliver high accuracy measurements. USCA's features which can be either programmable or automated include: voltage, current, or pulsed excitation, unlimited resolution gain, digital filtering and both analog and digital output. USCA will be used at Kennedy Space Center's launch pads for environmental measurements such as vibrations, strains, temperatures and overpressures. USCA is presently being commercialized through a co-funded agreement between NASA, the State of Florida, and Loral Test and Information Systems, Inc.

  9. 29 CFR 1926.1422 - Signals-hand signal chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Signals-hand signal chart. 1926.1422 Section 1926.1422 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Construction § 1926.1422 Signals—hand signal chart. Hand signal charts must be either posted on the...

  10. 29 CFR 1926.1422 - Signals-hand signal chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Signals-hand signal chart. 1926.1422 Section 1926.1422 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Construction § 1926.1422 Signals—hand signal chart. Hand signal charts must be either posted on the...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.1422 - Signals-hand signal chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Signals-hand signal chart. 1926.1422 Section 1926.1422 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Construction § 1926.1422 Signals—hand signal chart. Hand signal charts must be either posted on the...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1422 - Signals-hand signal chart.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Signals-hand signal chart. 1926.1422 Section 1926.1422 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Construction § 1926.1422 Signals—hand signal chart. Hand signal charts must be either posted on the...

  13. Episensitization: Defying Time’s Arrow

    PubMed Central

    Oronsky, Bryan T.; Oronsky, Arnold L.; Lybeck, Michelle; Oronsky, Neil C.; Scicinski, Jan J.; Carter, Corey; Day, Regina M.; Rodriguez Orengo, Jose F.; Rodriguez-Torres, Maribel; Fanger, Gary F.; Reid, Tony R.

    2015-01-01

    The development of cancer is driven by complex genetic and epigenetic changes that result in aberrant and uncontrolled cellular growth. Epigenetic changes, in particular, are implicated in the silencing or activation of key genes that control cellular growth and apoptosis and contribute to transformative potential. The purpose of this review is to define and assess the treatment strategy of “episensitization,” or the ability to sensitize cancer cells to subsequent therapy by resetting the epigenetic infrastructure of the tumor. One important facet is resensitization by epigenetic mechanisms, which goes against the norm, i.e., challenges the long-held doctrine in oncology that the reuse of previously tried and failed therapies is a clinically pointless endeavor. Thus, episensitization is a hybrid term, which covers recent clinically relevant observations and refers to the epigenomic mechanism of resensitization. Among the many formidable challenges in the treatment of cancer, the most inevitable is the development of acquired therapeutic resistance. Here, we present the basic principles behind episensitization and highlight the evidence suggesting that epigenetically mediated histone hypoacetylation and DNA hypermethylation events may reverse clinical drug resistance. The potential reversibility of epigenetic changes and the microenvironmental impact of epigenetic control on gene expression may mediate a return to a baseline state of treatment susceptibility. Episensitization is a novel and highly practical management strategy both to prevent the practice of permanent treatment discontinuation with the occurrence of resistance, which rapidly exhausts remaining options in the pharmaceutical armamentarium and to significantly extend patient survival. Accordingly, this review highlights several epigenetic agents including decitabine, vorinostat, entinostat, 5-azacitidine, oncolytic viruses, and RRx-001. PMID:26125013

  14. Complexity and the Arrow of Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lineweaver, Charles H.; Davies, Paul C. W.; Ruse, Michael

    2013-08-01

    1. What is complexity? Is it increasing? Charles H. Lineweaver, Paul C. W. Davies and Michael Ruse; 2. Directionality principles from cancer to cosmology Paul C. W. Davies; 3. A simple treatment of complexity: cosmological entropic boundary conditions on increasing complexity Charles H. Lineweaver; 4. Using complexity science to search for unity in the natural sciences Eric J. Chaisson; 5. On the spontaneous generation of complexity in the universe Seth Lloyd; 6. Emergent spatiotemporal complexity in field theory Marcelo Gleiser; 7. Life: the final frontier for complexity? Simon Conway Morris; 8. Evolution beyond Newton, Darwin, and entailing law: the origin of complexity in the evolving biosphere Stuart A. Kauffman; 9. Emergent order in processes: the interplay of complexity, robustness, correlation, and hierarchy in the biosphere D. Eric Smith; 10. The inferential evolution of biological complexity: forgetting nature by learning to nurture David C. Krakauer; 11. Information width: a way for the second law to increase complexity David Wolpert; 12. Wrestling with biological complexity: from Darwin to Dawkins Michael Ruse; 13. The role of generative entrenchment and robustness in the evolution of complexity William C. Wimsatt; 14. On the plurality of complexity-producing mechanisms Philip Clayton; Index.

  15. Hybrid ECG signal conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinard, G. A.; Steffen, D. A.; Sturm, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Circuit with high common-mode rejection has ability to filter and amplify accepted analog electrocardiogram (ECG) signals of varying amplitude, shape, and polarity. In addition, low power circuit develops standardized pulses that can be counted and averaged by heart/breath rate processor.

  16. Pulsed Terahertz Signal Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, J. R.; Swift, G. P.; Dai, DeChang; Chamberlain, J. M.; Upadhya, P. C.

    2007-12-01

    A procedure is outlined which can be used to determine the response of an experimental sample to a single, simple broadband frequency pulse in terahertz frequency time domain spectroscopy (TDS). The advantage that accrues from this approach is that oscillations and spurious signals (arising from a variety of sources in the TDS system or from ambient water vapor) can be suppressed. In consequence, small signals (arising from the interaction of the radiation with the sample) can be more readily observed in the presence of noise. Procedures for choosing key parameters and methods for eliminating further artifacts are described. In particular, the use of input functions which are based on the binomial distribution is described. These binomial functions are used to unscramble the sample response to a simple pulse: they have sufficient flexibility to allow for variations in the spectra of different terahertz sources, some of which have low frequency as well as high frequency cutoffs. The signal processing procedure is validated by simple reflection and transmission experiments using a gap between polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) plates to mimic a void within a larger material. It is shown that a resolution of 100μm is easily achievable in reflection geometry after signal processing.

  17. Signaling by Sensory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Julius, David; Nathans, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Sensory systems detect small molecules, mechanical perturbations, or radiation via the activation of receptor proteins and downstream signaling cascades in specialized sensory cells. In vertebrates, the two principal categories of sensory receptors are ion channels, which mediate mechanosensation, thermosensation, and acid and salt taste; and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which mediate vision, olfaction, and sweet, bitter, and umami tastes. GPCR-based signaling in rods and cones illustrates the fundamental principles of rapid activation and inactivation, signal amplification, and gain control. Channel-based sensory systems illustrate the integration of diverse modulatory signals at the receptor, as seen in the thermosensory/pain system, and the rapid response kinetics that are possible with direct mechanical gating of a channel. Comparisons of sensory receptor gene sequences reveal numerous examples in which gene duplication and sequence divergence have created novel sensory specificities. This is the evolutionary basis for the observed diversity in temperature- and ligand-dependent gating among thermosensory channels, spectral tuning among visual pigments, and odorant binding among olfactory receptors. The coding of complex external stimuli by a limited number of sensory receptor types has led to the evolution of modality-specific and species-specific patterns of retention or loss of sensory information, a filtering operation that selectively emphasizes features in the stimulus that enhance survival in a particular ecological niche. The many specialized anatomic structures, such as the eye and ear, that house primary sensory neurons further enhance the detection of relevant stimuli. PMID:22110046

  18. Intersection auxiliary signal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian

    1995-12-01

    Many intersection accidents are related to drivers' inappropriate responses to an amber signal light, due to their misjudgment on the traffic situation and/or their aggressive behavior. To reduce intersection accidents of this nature, this paper proposes the Intersection Auxiliary Signal System (IAS). IAS can be installed at selected intersections, where information regarding signal phasing, intersection geometry and speed limit is transmitted from an ultrasonic/infra-red transmitter. An on-vehicle device receivers and processes the information, the provides the driver with explicit suggestions on the correct action to take (continue to pass or decelerate to stop), or warnings against on-going incorrect actions. IAS is expected to be more effective in suburban intersections, which are usually characterized by greater dimension, longer amber phases, and higher vehicle speeds. Both the intersection transmitters and the on-vehicle processors are expected to have simple structures and low costs. Simulation results show that IAS has a significant effect on reducing red signal violation, especially when there is no significant dilemma zones.

  19. Communication Signals in Lizards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Charles C.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses mechanisms and functional intent of visual communication signals in iguanid/agamid lizards. Demonstrated that lizards communicate with each other by using pushups and head nods and that each species does this in its own way, conveying different types of information. (JN)

  20. Signal processing in SETI.

    PubMed

    Cullers, D K; Linscott, I R; Oliver, B M

    1985-11-01

    The development of a multi-channel spectrum analyzer (MCSA) for the SETI program is described. The spectrum analyzer is designed for both all-sky surveys and targeted searches. The mechanisms of the MCSA are explained and a diagram is provided. Detection of continuous wave signals, pulses, and patterns is examined. PMID:11542023

  1. Hedgehog signaling update.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M Michael

    2010-08-01

    In vertebrate hedgehog signaling, hedgehog ligands are processed to become bilipidated and then multimerize, which allows them to leave the signaling cell via Dispatched 1 and become transported via glypicans and megalin to the responding cells. Hedgehog then interacts with a complex of Patched 1 and Cdo/Boc, which activates endocytic Smoothened to the cilium. Patched 1 regulates the activity of Smoothened (1) via Vitamin D3, which inhibits Smoothened in the absence of hedgehog ligand or (2) via oxysterols, which activate Smoothened in the presence of hedgehog ligand. Hedgehog ligands also interact with Hip1, Patched 2, and Gas1, which regulate the range as well as the level of hedgehog signaling. In vertebrates, Smoothened is shortened at its C-terminal end and lacks most of the phosphorylation sites of importance in Drosophila. Cos2, also of importance in Drosophila, plays no role in mammalian transduction, nor do its homologs Kif7 and Kif27. The cilium may provide a function analogous to that of Cos2 by linking Smoothened to the modulation of Gli transcription factors. Disorders associated with the hedgehog signaling network follow, including nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, holoprosencephaly, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome, Pallister-Hall syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome. PMID:20635334

  2. Signals: Applying Academic Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Kimberly E.

    2010-01-01

    Academic analytics helps address the public's desire for institutional accountability with regard to student success, given the widespread concern over the cost of higher education and the difficult economic and budgetary conditions prevailing worldwide. Purdue University's Signals project applies the principles of analytics widely used in…

  3. Wnt signaling in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Carol H; Ji, Tao; Chen, Cheng-Fong; Hoang, Bang H

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary bone malignancy diagnosed in children and adolescents with a high propensity for local invasion and distant metastasis. Despite current multidisciplinary treatments, there has not been a drastic change in overall prognosis within the last two decades. With current treatments, 60-70 % of patients with localized disease survive. Given a propensity of Wnt signaling to control multiple cellular processes, including proliferation, cell fate determination, and differentiation, it is a critical pathway in OS disease progression. At the same time, this pathway is extremely complex with vast arrays of cross-talk. Even though decades of research have linked the role of Wnt to tumorigenesis, there are still outstanding areas that remain poorly understood and even controversial. The canonical Wnt pathway functions to regulate the levels of the transcriptional co-activator β-catenin, which ultimately controls key developmental gene expressions. Given the central role of this mediator, inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been investigated as a potential strategy for cancer control. In OS, several secreted protein families modulate the Wnt/β-catenin signaling, including secreted Frizzled-related proteins (sFRPs), Wnt inhibitory protein (WIF), Dickkopf proteins (DKK-1,2,3), sclerostin, and small molecules. This chapter focuses on our current understanding of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in OS, based on recent in vitro and in vivo data. Wnt activates noncanonical signaling pathways as well that are independent of β-catenin which will be discussed. In addition, stem cells and their association with Wnt/β-catenin are important factors to consider. Ultimately, the multiple canonical and noncanonical Wnt/β-catenin agonists and antagonists need to be further explored for potential targeted therapies. PMID:24924167

  4. Electronic signal generators: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Electronic signal generator data based on solid state concepts were simplified or refined to meet requirements, such as reliability, simplicity, fail-safe characteristics, and the capability of withstanding environmental extremes. Pulse generators, high voltage pulse generators, oscillators, analog signal generators, square wave signal generators, and special function signal generators are described.

  5. Analog and digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baher, H.

    The techniques of signal processing in both the analog and digital domains are addressed in a fashion suitable for undergraduate courses in modern electrical engineering. The topics considered include: spectral analysis of continuous and discrete signals, analysis of continuous and discrete systems and networks using transform methods, design of analog and digital filters, digitization of analog signals, power spectrum estimation of stochastic signals, FFT algorithms, finite word-length effects in digital signal processes, linear estimation, and adaptive filtering.

  6. Microglia Ontology and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    ElAli, Ayman; Rivest, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Microglia constitute the powerhouse of the innate immune system in the brain. It is now widely accepted that they are monocytic-derived cells that infiltrate the developing brain at the early embryonic stages, and acquire a resting phenotype characterized by the presence of dense branching processes, called ramifications. Microglia use these dynamic ramifications as sentinels to sense and detect any occurring alteration in brain homeostasis. Once a danger signal is detected, such as molecular factors associated to brain damage or infection, they get activated by acquiring a less ramified phenotype, and mount adequate responses that range from phagocyting cell debris to secreting inflammatory and trophic factors. Here, we review the origin of microglia and we summarize the main molecular signals involved in controlling their function under physiological conditions. In addition, their implication in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and stress is discussed. PMID:27446922

  7. General stress response signaling

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Yi-Xin; Rosenthal, Adam Z.; Gralla, Jay D.

    2008-01-01

    E. coli responds to stress by a combination of specific and general transcription signaling pathways. The general pathways typically require the master stress regulator sigma38 (rpoS). Here we show that the signaling from multiple stresses that relax DNA is processed by a non-conserved 8 amino acid tail of the sigma 38 C-terminal domain (CTD). By contrast, responses to stresses that accumulate potassium glutamate do not rely on this short tail, but still require the overall CTD. In vitro transcription and footprinting studies suggest that multiple stresses can target a poised RNA polymerase and activate it by unwrapping DNA from a nucleosome-like state, allowing the RNA polymerase to escape into productive mode. This transition can be accomplished by either the DNA relaxation or potassium glutamate accumulation that characterizes many stresses. PMID:18761624

  8. Digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, G.

    The theory, realization techniques, and applications of digital filtering are surveyed, with an emphasis on the development of software, in a handbook for advanced students of electrical and electronic engineering and practicing development engineers. The foundations of the theory of discrete signals and systems are introduced. The design of one-dimensional linear systems is discussed, and the techniques are expanded to the treatment of two-dimensional discrete and multidimensional analog systems. Numerical systems, quantification and limitation, and the characteristics of particular signal-processing devices are considered in a section on design realization. An appendix contains definitions of the basic mathematical concepts, derivations and proofs, and tables of integration and differentiation formulas.

  9. Tailpulse signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Baker, John; Archer, Daniel E.; Luke, Stanley John; Decman, Daniel J.; White, Gregory K.

    2009-06-23

    A tailpulse signal generating/simulating apparatus, system, and method designed to produce electronic pulses which simulate tailpulses produced by a gamma radiation detector, including the pileup effect caused by the characteristic exponential decay of the detector pulses, and the random Poisson distribution pulse timing for radioactive materials. A digital signal process (DSP) is programmed and configured to produce digital values corresponding to pseudo-randomly selected pulse amplitudes and pseudo-randomly selected Poisson timing intervals of the tailpulses. Pulse amplitude values are exponentially decayed while outputting the digital value to a digital to analog converter (DAC). And pulse amplitudes of new pulses are added to decaying pulses to simulate the pileup effect for enhanced realism in the simulation.

  10. Regulation of inflammasome signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rathinam, Vijay A K; Vanaja, Sivapriya Kailasan; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2012-01-01

    Innate immune responses have the ability to both combat infectious microbes and drive pathological inflammation. Inflammasome complexes are a central component of these processes through their regulation of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-18 and pyroptosis. Inflammasomes recognize microbial products or endogenous molecules released from damaged or dying cells both through direct binding of ligands and indirect mechanisms. The potential of the IL-1 family of cytokines to cause tissue damage and chronic inflammation emphasizes the importance of regulating inflammasomes. Many regulatory mechanisms have been identified that act as checkpoints for attenuating inflammasome signaling at multiple steps. Here we discuss the various regulatory mechanisms that have evolved to keep inflammasome signaling in check to maintain immunological balance. PMID:22430786

  11. RASSP signal processing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, Fred; Bassett, Bob; Letellier, J. P.

    1995-06-01

    The rapid prototyping of application specific signal processors (RASSP) program is an ARPA/tri-service effort to dramatically improve the process by which complex digital systems, particularly embedded signal processors, are specified, designed, documented, manufactured, and supported. The domain of embedded signal processing was chosen because it is important to a variety of military and commercial applications as well as for the challenge it presents in terms of complexity and performance demands. The principal effort is being performed by two major contractors, Lockheed Sanders (Nashua, NH) and Martin Marietta (Camden, NJ). For both, improvements in methodology are to be exercised and refined through the performance of individual 'Demonstration' efforts. The Lockheed Sanders' Demonstration effort is to develop an infrared search and track (IRST) processor. In addition, both contractors' results are being measured by a series of externally administered (by Lincoln Labs) six-month Benchmark programs that measure process improvement as a function of time. The first two Benchmark programs are designing and implementing a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processor. Our demonstration team is using commercially available VME modules from Mercury Computer to assemble a multiprocessor system scalable from one to hundreds of Intel i860 microprocessors. Custom modules for the sensor interface and display driver are also being developed. This system implements either proprietary or Navy owned algorithms to perform the compute-intensive IRST function in real time in an avionics environment. Our Benchmark team is designing custom modules using commercially available processor ship sets, communication submodules, and reconfigurable logic devices. One of the modules contains multiple vector processors optimized for fast Fourier transform processing. Another module is a fiberoptic interface that accepts high-rate input data from the sensors and provides video-rate output data to a

  12. Digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgera, Salvatore D.; Krishna, Hari

    Computationally efficient digital signal-processing algorithms over finite fields are developed analytically, and the relationship of these algorithms to algebraic error-correcting codes is explored. A multidisciplinary approach is employed, in an effort to make the results accessible to engineers, mathematicians, and computer scientists. Chapters are devoted to systems of bilinear forms, efficient finite-field algorithms, multidimensional methods, a new class of linear codes, and a new error-control scheme.

  13. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. PMID:26374891

  14. Phytosulfokine peptide signalling.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Margret

    2015-08-01

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) belongs to the group of plant peptide growth factors. It is a disulfated pentapeptide encoded by precursor genes that are ubiquitously present in higher plants, suggestive of universal functions. Processing of the preproprotein involves sulfonylation by a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase in the trans-golgi and proteolytic cleavage in the apoplast. The secreted peptide is perceived at the cell surface by a membrane-bound receptor kinase of the leucine-rich repeat family. The PSK receptor PSKR1 from Arabidopsis thaliana is an active kinase and has guanylate cyclase activity resulting in dual-signal outputs. Receptor activity is regulated by calmodulin. While PSK may be an autocrine growth factor, it also acts non-cell autonomously by promoting growth of cells that are receptor-deficient. In planta, PSK has multiple functions. It promotes cell growth, acts in the quiescent centre cells of the root apical meristem, contributes to funicular pollen tube guidance, and differentially alters immune responses depending on the pathogen. It has been suggested that PSK integrates growth and defence signals to balance the competing metabolic costs of these responses. This review summarizes our current understanding of PSK synthesis, signalling, and activity. PMID:25754406

  15. Integrin endosomal signalling suppresses anoikis.

    PubMed

    Alanko, Jonna; Mai, Anja; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Schauer, Kristine; Kaukonen, Riina; Saari, Markku; Goud, Bruno; Ivaska, Johanna

    2015-11-01

    Integrin-containing focal adhesions transmit extracellular signals across the plasma membrane to modulate cell adhesion, signalling and survival. Although integrins are known to undergo continuous endo/exocytic traffic, the potential impact of endocytic traffic on integrin-induced signals is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that integrin signalling is not restricted to cell-ECM adhesions and identify an endosomal signalling platform that supports integrin signalling away from the plasma membrane. We show that active focal adhesion kinase (FAK), an established marker of integrin-ECM downstream signalling, localizes with active integrins on endosomes. Integrin endocytosis positively regulates adhesion-induced FAK activation, which is early endosome antigen-1 and small GTPase Rab21 dependent. FAK binds directly to purified endosomes and becomes activated on them, suggesting a role for endocytosis in enhancing distinct integrin downstream signalling events. Finally, endosomal integrin signalling contributes to cancer-related processes such as anoikis resistance, anchorage independence and metastasis. PMID:26436690

  16. Interplant signalling through hyphal networks.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David; Gilbert, Lucy

    2015-03-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi can form common mycelial networks (CMNs) that interconnect plants. Here, we provide an insight into recent findings demonstrating that CMNs can be conduits for interplant signalling, influencing defence against insect herbivores and foliar necrotrophic fungi. A likely mechanism is direct transfer of signalling molecules within hyphae. However, electrical signals, which can be induced by wounding, may also enable signalling over relatively long distances, because the biophysical constraints imposed by liquid transport in hyphae and interaction with soil are relieved. We do not yet understand the ecological, evolutionary and agronomic implications of interplant signalling via CMNs. Identifying the mechanism of interplant signalling will help to address these gaps. PMID:25421970

  17. Digital processing of bandpass signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. C.; Matthewson, P.

    Modern radar and radio systems rely on digital signal processing to enhance the quality of received signals. Prior to such processing, these signals must be converted to digital form. The historical development of signal digitization is briefly discussed in this paper and leads to a description of some current work on digital mixing. A method of directly sampling a band-limited intermediate frequency (i.f.) signal is presented, using a pair of digital mixer channels to produce complex low-pass samples of the signal envelope. The method is found to produce well matched channel outputs. Finally, the applicability of the method to radar is discussed.

  18. Notch Signaling Components

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Yan; Wu, Tao; Li, Qing; Wang, Min-Cong; Jing, Li; Ruan, Zhi-Ping; Yao, Yu; Nan, Ke-Jun; Guo, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a lethal and aggressive malignancy. Currently, the identities of prognostic and predictive makers of NSCLC have not been fully established. Dysregulated Notch signaling has been implicated in many human malignancies, including NSCLC. However, the prognostic value of measuring Notch signaling and the utility of developing Notch-targeted therapies in NSCLC remain inconclusive. The present study investigated the association of individual Notch receptor and ligand levels with lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) prognosis using the Kaplan-Meier plotte database. This online database encompasses 2437 lung cancer samples. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. The results showed that higher Notch1, Notch2, JAG1, and DLL1 mRNA expression predicted better overall survival (OS) in lung ADC, but showed no significance in SCC patients. Elevated Notch3, JAG2, and DLL3 mRNA expression was associated with poor OS of ADC patients, but not in SCC patients. There was no association between Notch4 and OS in either lung ADC or SCC patients. In conclusion, the set of Notch1, Notch2, JAG1, DLL1 and that of Notch3, JAG2, DLL3 played opposing prognostic roles in lung ADC patients. Neither set of Notch receptors and ligands was indicative of lung SCC prognosis. Notch signaling could serve as promising marker to predict outcomes in lung ADC patients. The distinct features of lung cancer subtypes and Notch components should be considered when developing future Notch-targeted therapies. PMID:27196489

  19. Biphonation in voice signals

    SciTech Connect

    Herzel, H.; Reuter, R.

    1996-06-01

    Irregularities in voiced speech are often observed as a consequence of vocal fold lesions, paralyses, and other pathological conditions. Many of these instabilities are related to the intrinsic nonlinearities in the vibrations of the vocal folds. In this paper, a specific nonlinear phenomenon is discussed: The appearance of two independent fundamental frequencies termed biphonation. Several narrow-band spectrograms are presented showing biphonation in signals from voice patients, a newborn cry, a singer, and excised larynx experiments. Finally, possible physiological mechanisms of instabilities of the voice source are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Neural Membrane Signaling Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Throughout much of the history of biology, the cell membrane was functionally defined as a semi-permeable barrier separating aqueous compartments, and an anchoring site for proteins. Little attention was devoted to its possible regulatory role in intracellular molecular processes and neuron electrical signaling. This article reviews the history of membrane studies and the current state of the art. Emphasis is placed on natural and artificial membrane studies of electric field effects on molecular organization, especially as these may relate to impulse propagation in neurons. Implications of these studies for new designs in artificial intelligence are briefly examined. PMID:20640161

  1. Growth hormone signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Carter-Su, Christin; Schwartz, Jessica; Argetsinger, Lawrence S

    2016-06-01

    Over 20years ago, our laboratory showed that growth hormone (GH) signals through the GH receptor-associated tyrosine kinase JAK2. We showed that GH binding to its membrane-bound receptor enhances binding of JAK2 to the GHR, activates JAK2, and stimulates tyrosyl phosphorylation of both JAK2 and GHR. The activated JAK2/GHR complex recruits a variety of signaling proteins, thereby initiating multiple signaling pathways and cellular responses. These proteins and pathways include: 1) Stat transcription factors implicated in the expression of multiple genes, including the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor 1; 2) Shc adapter proteins that lead to activation of the grb2-SOS-Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1,2 pathway; 3) insulin receptor substrate proteins implicated in the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and Akt pathway; 4) signal regulatory protein α, a transmembrane scaffold protein that recruits proteins including the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2; and 5) SH2B1, a scaffold protein that can activate JAK2 and enhance GH regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Our recent work has focused on the function of SH2B1. We have shown that SH2B1β is recruited to and phosphorylated by JAK2 in response to GH. SH2B1 localizes to the plasma membrane, cytoplasm and focal adhesions; it also cycles through the nucleus. SH2B1 regulates the actin cytoskeleton and promotes GH-dependent motility of RAW264.7 macrophages. Mutations in SH2B1 have been found in humans exhibiting severe early-onset childhood obesity and insulin resistance. These mutations impair SH2B1 enhancement of GH-induced macrophage motility. As SH2B1 is expressed ubiquitously and is also recruited to a variety of receptor tyrosine kinases, our results raise the possibility that effects of SH2B1 on the actin cytoskeleton in various cell types, including neurons, may play a role in regulating body weight. PMID:26421979

  2. Sphingosine in apoptosis signaling.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier

    2002-12-30

    The sphingolipid metabolites ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate contribute to controlling cell proliferation and apoptosis. Ceramide and its catabolite sphingosine act as negative regulators of cell proliferation and promote apoptosis. Conversely, sphingosine 1-phosphate, formed by phosphorylation of sphingosine by a sphingosine kinase, has been involved in stimulating cell growth and inhibiting apoptosis. As the phosphorylation of sphingosine diminishes apoptosis, while dephosphorylation of sphingosine 1-phosphate potentiates it, the role of sphingosine as a messenger of apoptosis is of importance. Herein, the effects of sphingosine on diverse signaling pathways implicated in the apoptotic process are reviewed. PMID:12531549

  3. Signal quality of endovascular electroencephalography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bryan D.; Ebrahimi, Mosalam; Palafox, Leon; Srinivasan, Lakshminarayan

    2016-02-01

    Objective, Approach. A growing number of prototypes for diagnosing and treating neurological and psychiatric diseases are predicated on access to high-quality brain signals, which typically requires surgically opening the skull. Where endovascular navigation previously transformed the treatment of cerebral vascular malformations, we now show that it can provide access to brain signals with substantially higher signal quality than scalp recordings. Main results. While endovascular signals were known to be larger in amplitude than scalp signals, our analysis in rabbits borrows a standard technique from communication theory to show endovascular signals also have up to 100× better signal-to-noise ratio. Significance. With a viable minimally-invasive path to high-quality brain signals, patients with brain diseases could one day receive potent electroceuticals through the bloodstream, in the course of a brief outpatient procedure.

  4. Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search AAAAI Breadcrumb navigation Home ▸ Conditions & Treatments ▸ Library ▸ Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Library ▸ Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies Share | Recurrent Infections May Signal Immunodeficiencies This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, MD, FAAAAI ...

  5. Calcium Signaling in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Amaya, Maria Jimena; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) is a highly versatile second messenger that regulates a wide range of functions in every type of cell and tissue. To achieve this versatility, the Ca2+ signaling system operates in a variety of ways to regulate cellular processes that function over a wide dynamic range. This is particularly well exemplified for Ca2+ signals in the liver, which modulate diverse and specialized functions such as bile secretion, glucose metabolism, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. These Ca2+ signals are organized to control distinct cellular processes through tight spatial and temporal coordination of [Ca2+]i signals, both within and between cells. This article will review the machinery responsible for the formation of Ca2+ signals in the liver, the types of subcellular, cellular, and intercellular signals that occur, the physiological role of Ca2+ signaling in the liver, and the role of Ca2+ signaling in liver disease. PMID:23720295

  6. [Signal systems of plant immunity].

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, A P

    2002-01-01

    Plants can recognise the penetrating pathogen and respond to the attack with an array of defense reactions. Signal transduction from receptor in plasma membrane to genome is necessary to activate these reactions. Plant cell signaling systems which take part in signal transduction were discovered and identified recently. The obtained results suggest that plant cells have complex and well coordinated signal network which regulates their immune potential. PMID:12187855

  7. Signal processing in magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Vrba, J; Robinson, S E

    2001-10-01

    The subject of this article is detection of brain magnetic fields, or magnetoencephalography (MEG). The brain fields are many orders of magnitude smaller than the environmental magnetic noise and their measurement represent a significant metrological challenge. The only detectors capable of resolving such small fields and at the same time handling the large dynamic range of the environmental noise are superconducting quantum interference devices (or SQUIDs). The SQUIDs are coupled to the brain magnetic fields using combinations of superconducting coils called flux transformers (primary sensors). The environmental noise is attenuated by a combination of shielding, primary sensor geometry, and synthetic methods. One of the most successful synthetic methods for noise elimination is synthetic higher-order gradiometers. How the gradiometers can be synthesized is shown and examples of their noise cancellation effectiveness are given. The MEG signals measured on the scalp surface must be interpreted and converted into information about the distribution of currents within the brain. This task is complicated by the fact that such inversion is nonunique. Additional mathematical simplifications, constraints, or assumptions must be employed to obtain useful source images. Methods for the interpretation of the MEG signals include the popular point current dipole, minimum norm methods, spatial filtering, beamformers, MUSIC, and Bayesian techniques. The use of synthetic aperture magnetometry (a class of beamformers) is illustrated in examples of interictal epileptic spiking and voluntary hand-motor activity. PMID:11812209

  8. TGIF inhibits retinoid signaling.

    PubMed

    Bartholin, Laurent; Powers, Shannon E; Melhuish, Tiffany A; Lasse, Samuel; Weinstein, Michael; Wotton, David

    2006-02-01

    TGIF (TG-interacting factor) represses transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta)-activated gene expression and can repress transcription via a specific retinoid response element. Mutations in human TGIF are associated with holoprosencephaly, a severe defect of craniofacial development with both genetic and environmental causes. Both TGF-beta and retinoic acid signaling are implicated in craniofacial development. Here, we analyze the role of TGIF in regulating retinoid responsive gene expression. We demonstrate that TGIF interacts with the ligand binding domain of the RXRalpha retinoid receptor and represses transcription from retinoid response elements. TGIF recruits the general corepressor, CtBP, to RXRalpha, and this recruitment is required for full repression by TGIF. Interaction between TGIF and RXRalpha is reduced by the addition of retinoic acid, consistent with a role for TGIF as an RXRalpha transcriptional corepressor. We created a Tgif null mutation in mice and tested the sensitivity of mutant mice to increased levels of retinoic acid. Tgif mutant embryos are more sensitive to retinoic acid-induced teratogenesis, and retinoid target genes are expressed at a higher level in tissues from Tgif null mice. These results demonstrate an important role for TGIF as a transcriptional corepressor, which regulates developmental signaling by retinoic acid, and raises the possibility that TGIF may repress other RXR-dependent transcriptional responses. PMID:16428452

  9. Endocannabinoid Signaling in Autism.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Persico, Antonio; Battista, Natalia; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex behavioral condition with onset during early childhood and a lifelong course in the vast majority of cases. To date, no behavioral, genetic, brain imaging, or electrophysiological test can specifically validate a clinical diagnosis of ASD. However, these medical procedures are often implemented in order to screen for syndromic forms of the disorder (i.e., autism comorbid with known medical conditions). In the last 25 years a good deal of information has been accumulated on the main components of the "endocannabinoid (eCB) system", a rather complex ensemble of lipid signals ("endocannabinoids"), their target receptors, purported transporters, and metabolic enzymes. It has been clearly documented that eCB signaling plays a key role in many human health and disease conditions of the central nervous system, thus opening the avenue to the therapeutic exploitation of eCB-oriented drugs for the treatment of psychiatric, neurodegenerative, and neuroinflammatory disorders. Here we present a modern view of the eCB system, and alterations of its main components in human patients and animal models relevant to ASD. This review will thus provide a critical perspective necessary to explore the potential exploitation of distinct elements of eCB system as targets of innovative therapeutics against ASD. PMID:26216231

  10. Universal signal conditioning amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J.; Hallberg, Carl; Cecil, Jim

    1994-01-01

    A state-of-the-art instrumentation amplifier capable of being used with most types of transducers has been developed at the Kennedy Space Center. This Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA) can eliminate costly measurement setup item and troubleshooting, improve system reliability and provide more accurate data than conventional amplifiers. The USCA can configure itself for maximum resolution and accuracy based on information read from a RAM chip attached to each transducer. Excitation voltages or current are also automatically configured. The amplifier uses both analog and digital state-of-the-art technology with analog-to-digital conversion performed in the early stages in order to minimize errors introduced by offset and gain drifts in the analog components. A dynamic temperature compensation scheme has been designed to achieve and maintain 12-bit accuracy of the amplifier from 0 to 70 C. The digital signal processing section allows the implementation of digital filters up to 511th order. The amplifier can also perform real-time linearizations up to fourth order while processing data at a rate of 23.438 kS/s. Both digital and analog outputs are available from the amplifier.

  11. TLR-signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J.; Wang, H.; Hajishengallis, G.N.; Martin, M.

    2011-01-01

    Toll-like receptors play a critical role in innate immunity by detecting invading pathogens. The ability of TLRs to engage different intracellular signaling molecules and cross-talk with other regulatory pathways is an important factor in shaping the type, magnitude, and duration of the inflammatory response. The present review will cover the fundamental signaling pathways utilized by TLRs and how these pathways regulate the innate immune response to pathogens. Abbreviations: TLR, Toll-like receptor; PRR, pattern recognition receptor; PAMP, pathogen-associated molecular pattern; LPS, lipopolysaccharide; APC, antigen-presenting cell; IL, interleukin; TIR, Toll/IL-1R homology; MyD88, myeloid differentiation factor 88; IFN, interferon; TRIF, TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β; IRAK, IL-1R-associated kinase; TAK1, TGF-β-activated kinase; TAB1, TAK1-binding protein; NF-κB, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cells; MAPK, mitogen-activated protein kinase; NLR, NOD-like receptors; LRR, leucine-rich repeats; DC, dendritic cell; PI3K, phosphoinositide 3-kinases; GSK3, glycogen synthase kinase-3; mTOR, mammalian target of rapamycin; DAF, decay-accelerating factor; IKK, IκB kinase; IRF, interferon regulatory factors; TBK1, TANK-binding kinase 1; CARD, caspase activation and recruitment domain; PYD, pyrin N-terminal homology domain; ATF, activating transcription factor; and PTEN, phosphatase and tensin homolog. PMID:20940366

  12. Salicylic acid signaling inhibits apoplastic reactive oxygen species signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are used by plants as signaling molecules during stress and development. Given the amount of possible challenges a plant face from their environment, plants need to activate and prioritize between potentially conflicting defense signaling pathways. Until recently, most studies on signal interactions have focused on phytohormone interaction, such as the antagonistic relationship between salicylic acid (SA)-jasmonic acid and cytokinin-auxin. Results In this study, we report an antagonistic interaction between SA signaling and apoplastic ROS signaling. Treatment with ozone (O3) leads to a ROS burst in the apoplast and induces extensive changes in gene expression and elevation of defense hormones. However, Arabidopsis thaliana dnd1 (defense no death1) exhibited an attenuated response to O3. In addition, the dnd1 mutant displayed constitutive expression of defense genes and spontaneous cell death. To determine the exact process which blocks the apoplastic ROS signaling, double and triple mutants involved in various signaling pathway were generated in dnd1 background. Simultaneous elimination of SA-dependent and SA-independent signaling components from dnd1 restored its responsiveness to O3. Conversely, pre-treatment of plants with SA or using mutants that constitutively activate SA signaling led to an attenuation of changes in gene expression elicited by O3. Conclusions Based upon these findings, we conclude that plants are able to prioritize the response between ROS and SA via an antagonistic action of SA and SA signaling on apoplastic ROS signaling. PMID:24898702

  13. Signal and Image Processing Operations

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-05-10

    VIEW is a software system for processing arbitrary multidimensional signals. It provides facilities for numerical operations, signal displays, and signal databasing. The major emphasis of the system is on the processing of time-sequences and multidimensional images. The system is designed to be both portable and extensible. It runs currently on UNIX systems, primarily SUN workstations.

  14. Isolated transfer of analog signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezdek, T.

    1974-01-01

    Technique transfers analog signal levels across high isolation boundary without circuit performance being affected by magnetizing reactance or leakage inductance. Transfers of analog information across isolated boundary are made by interrupting signal flow, with switch, in such a manner as to produce alternating signal which is applied to transformer.

  15. Multiple source navigation signal generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojda, Petr

    2010-09-01

    The paper presents a FPGA based digital VOR/LOC signal generator. It provides the composite signal, which consists of the particular signals of several predefined navigation sources - VOR beacons. Design of the generator is implemented into the two different FPGA DSP platforms.

  16. SIG. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.; Lager, D.; Azevedo, S.

    1992-01-22

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time- and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time- and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments,commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  17. SIG. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.; Lager, D.; Azevedo, S.

    1992-01-22

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG; a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments, commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a `repeat` sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  18. SIG. Signal Processing, Analysis, & Display

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.; Lager, D.; Azevedo, S.

    1992-01-22

    SIG is a general-purpose signal processing, analysis, and display program. Its main purpose is to perform manipulations on time-and frequency-domain signals. However, it has been designed to ultimately accommodate other representations for data such as multiplexed signals and complex matrices. Two user interfaces are provided in SIG - a menu mode for the unfamiliar user and a command mode for more experienced users. In both modes errors are detected as early as possible and are indicated by friendly, meaningful messages. An on-line HELP package is also included. A variety of operations can be performed on time and frequency-domain signals including operations on the samples of a signal, operations on the entire signal, and operations on two or more signals. Signal processing operations that can be performed are digital filtering (median, Bessel, Butterworth, and Chebychev), ensemble average, resample, auto and cross spectral density, transfer function and impulse response, trend removal, convolution, Fourier transform and inverse window functions (Hamming, Kaiser-Bessel), simulation (ramp, sine, pulsetrain, random), and read/write signals. User definable signal processing algorithms are also featured. SIG has many options including multiple commands per line, command files with arguments, commenting lines, defining commands, and automatic execution for each item in a repeat sequence. Graphical operations on signals and spectra include: x-y plots of time signals; real, imaginary, magnitude, and phase plots of spectra; scaling of spectra for continuous or discrete domain; cursor zoom; families of curves; and multiple viewports.

  19. Asymmetry In Biphase Data Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien M.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents analysis of some effects of asymmetry in Manchester (biphase) binary data signal transmitted by phase modulation of sinusoidal carrier signal. Report extends analysis described in article, "Effects of Asymmetry of NRZ Data Signals on Performance" (NPO-18261), to include case where data biphase-modulated directly on residual carrier.

  20. Angle-resolved electron-energy-loss study of core-level electron excitation in molecules: Determination of the generalized oscillator strength for the carbon 1 s (2. sigma. sub g r arrow 2. pi. sub u ) excitation in CO sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Boechat Roberty, H.M.; Bielschowsky, C.E.; de Souza, G.G.B. )

    1991-08-01

    As part of a systematic, quantitative study of the angle dependence of core-level-electron excitation by electron impact, we have determined the generalized oscillator strength (GOS) for the carbon 1{ital s}(2{sigma}{sub {ital g}}{r arrow}2{pi}{sub {ital u}}) transition in CO{sub 2}. The experimental results were obtained at an impact energy of 1290 eV, in the angular range of 2{degree}--14{degree}, with an energy resolution of 0.9 eV. Theoretical values for the GOS were also obtained, using {ital ab} {ital initio} Hartree-Fock molecular wave functions and allowing for the relaxation of all the molecular orbitals in the determination of the excited-state wave function.

  1. Binary-Signal Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griebeler, Elmer L.

    2011-01-01

    Binary communication through long cables, opto-isolators, isolating transformers, or repeaters can become distorted in characteristic ways. The usual solution is to slow the communication rate, change to a different method, or improve the communication media. It would help if the characteristic distortions could be accommodated at the receiving end to ease the communication problem. The distortions come from loss of the high-frequency content, which adds slopes to the transitions from ones to zeroes and zeroes to ones. This weakens the definition of the ones and zeroes in the time domain. The other major distortion is the reduction of low frequency, which causes the voltage that defines the ones or zeroes to drift out of recognizable range. This development describes a method for recovering a binary data stream from a signal that has been subjected to a loss of both higher-frequency content and low-frequency content that is essential to define the difference between ones and zeroes. The method makes use of the frequency structure of the waveform created by the data stream, and then enhances the characteristics related to the data to reconstruct the binary switching pattern. A major issue is simplicity. The approach taken here is to take the first derivative of the signal and then feed it to a hysteresis switch. This is equivalent in practice to using a non-resonant band pass filter feeding a Schmitt trigger. Obviously, the derivative signal needs to be offset to halfway between the thresholds of the hysteresis switch, and amplified so that the derivatives reliably exceed the thresholds. A transition from a zero to a one is the most substantial, fastest plus movement of voltage, and therefore will create the largest plus first derivative pulse. Since the quiet state of the derivative is sitting between the hysteresis thresholds, the plus pulse exceeds the plus threshold, switching the hysteresis switch plus, which re-establishes the data zero to one transition

  2. Signaling Pathways in Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Nacksung

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells of hematopoietic origin that are responsible for the degradation of old bone matrix. Osteoclast differentiation and activity are controlled by two essential cytokines, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). M-CSF and RANKL bind to their respective receptors c-Fms and RANK to stimulate osteoclast differentiation through regulation of delicate signaling systems. Here, we summarize the critical or essential signaling pathways for osteoclast differentiation including M-CSF-c-Fms signaling, RANKL-RANK signaling, and costimulatory signaling for RANK. PMID:26865996

  3. Emerging Trends in Retrograde Signaling.

    PubMed

    Suvarna, Yashasvi; Maity, Nivedita; Shivamurthy, M C

    2016-05-01

    Retrograde signaling is defined as the signaling events leading from the plastids to the nucleus in plants and across the chemical synapse, from the postsynaptic neuron to the presynaptic neuron in animals. The discovery of various retrograde messengers has opened many avenues and clouds of thoughts as to the role of retrograde signaling. They have been implicated particularly in long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity. But the basic assumptions about retrograde signaling have not been studied upon for many years. This review focuses on established facts and hypothesis put forward in retrograde signaling. PMID:26081150

  4. Notch Signaling in Pancreatic Development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu-Yan; Zhai, Wen-Jun; Teng, Chun-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway plays a significant role in embryonic cell fate determination and adult tissue homeostasis. Various studies have demonstrated the deep involvement of Notch signaling in the development of the pancreas and the lateral inhibition of Notch signaling in pancreatic progenitor differentiation and maintenance. The targeted inactivation of the Notch pathway components promotes premature differentiation of the endocrine pancreas. However, there is still the contrary opinion that Notch signaling specifies the endocrine lineage. Here, we review the current knowledge of the Notch signaling pathway in pancreatic development and its crosstalk with the Wingless and INT-1 (Wnt) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) pathways. PMID:26729103

  5. Eph/ephrin signaling: networks

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, Dina; Davy, Alice

    2008-01-01

    Bidirectional signaling has emerged as an important signature by which Ephs and ephrins control biological functions. Eph/ephrin signaling participates in a wide spectrum of developmental processes, and cross-regulation with other communication pathways lies at the heart of the complexity underlying their function in vivo. Here, we review in vitro and in vivo data describing molecular, functional, and genetic interactions between Eph/ephrin and other cell surface signaling pathways. The complexity of Eph/ephrin function is discussed in terms of the pathways that regulate Eph/ephrin signaling and also the pathways that are regulated by Eph/ephrin signaling. PMID:18281458

  6. Interactive digital signal processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mish, W. H.; Wenger, R. M.; Behannon, K. W.; Byrnes, J. B.

    1982-01-01

    The Interactive Digital Signal Processor (IDSP) is examined. It consists of a set of time series analysis Operators each of which operates on an input file to produce an output file. The operators can be executed in any order that makes sense and recursively, if desired. The operators are the various algorithms used in digital time series analysis work. User written operators can be easily interfaced to the sysatem. The system can be operated both interactively and in batch mode. In IDSP a file can consist of up to n (currently n=8) simultaneous time series. IDSP currently includes over thirty standard operators that range from Fourier transform operations, design and application of digital filters, eigenvalue analysis, to operators that provide graphical output, allow batch operation, editing and display information.

  7. [Signal Processing Suite Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahr, John D.; Mir, Hasan; Morabito, Andrew; Grossman, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Our role in this project was to participate in the design of the signal processing suite to analyze plasma density measurements on board a small constellation (3 or 4) satellites in Low Earth Orbit. As we are new to space craft experiments, one of the challenges was to simply gain understanding of the quantity of data which would flow from the satellites, and possibly to interact with the design teams in generating optimal sampling patterns. For example, as the fleet of satellites were intended to fly through the same volume of space (displaced slightly in time and space), the bulk plasma structure should be common among the spacecraft. Therefore, an optimal, limited bandwidth data downlink would take advantage of this commonality. Also, motivated by techniques in ionospheric radar, we hoped to investigate the possibility of employing aperiodic sampling in order to gain access to a wider spatial spectrum without suffering aliasing in k-space.

  8. Collider Signal I :. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Tim M. P.

    2010-08-01

    These TASI lectures were part of the summer school in 2008 and cover the collider signal associated with resonances in models of physics beyond the Standard Model. I begin with a review of the Z boson, one of the best-studied resonances in particle physics, and review how the Breit-Wigner form of the propagator emerges in perturbation theory and discuss the narrow width approximation. I review how the LEP and SLAC experiments could use the kinematics of Z events to learn about fermion couplings to the Z. I then make a brief survey of models of physics beyond the Standard Model which predict resonances, and discuss some of the LHC observables which we can use to discover and identify the nature of the BSM physics. I finish up with a discussion of the linear moose that one can use for an effective theory description of a massive color octet vector particle.

  9. Signalling by tips.

    PubMed

    Feijó, José A; Costa, Sílvia S; Prado, Ana Margarida; Becker, Jörg D; Certal, Ana Catarina

    2004-10-01

    New molecules, including protein kinases, lipids and molecules that have neurotransmitter activities in animals have emerged as important players in tip-growing cells. Transcriptomics analysis reveals that the largest single class of genes expressed in pollen tubes encode signal transducers, reflecting the necessity to decode complex and diverse pathways that are associated with tip growth. Many of these pathways may use common intracellular second messengers, with ions and reactive oxygen species emerging as two major common denominators in many of the processes involved in tip growth. These second messengers might influence the actin cytoskeleton through known interactions with actin-binding proteins. In turn, changes in the dynamic properties of the cytoskeleton would define the basic polarity events needed to shape and modify tip-growing cells. PMID:15337103

  10. Olfactory receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Gabriela; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) superfamily represents the largest class of membrane protein in the human genome. More than a half of all GPCRs are dedicated to interact with odorants and are termed odorant-receptors (ORs). Linda Buck and Richard Axel, the Nobel Prize laureates in physiology or medicine in 2004, first cloned and characterized the gene family that encode ORs, establishing the foundations to the understanding of the molecular basis for odor recognition. In the last decades, a lot of progress has been done to unravel the functioning of the sense of smell. This chapter gives a general overview of the topic of olfactory receptor signaling and reviews recent advances in this field. PMID:26928542

  11. Signal conditioning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahzah, Mohamad (Inventor); Korkosz, Gregory J. (Inventor); Bohr, Gerald (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A current-driven signal conditioning system comprising a first terminal, a second terminal, a strain gauge, and an instrumentation amplifier is disclosed. The strain gauge is adapted to measure a deformation of a structure and to generate a resistance which corresponds to the measured deformation. The instrumentation amplifier is adapted to be connected between the first terminal and the second terminal. The instrumentation amplifier is further adapted to be connected to the strain gauge and to place an output current on the second terminal. The output current is proportional to the resistance generated by the strain gauge. An output resister is coupled between the strain gauge and the second terminal, and a capacitor is coupled between the resister and the first terminal. A zenor diode is coupled between the first terminal and the strain gauge, and a diode is also coupled between the first terminal and the strain gauge.

  12. Elementary signals in ptychography.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Julio Cesar; Menzel, Andreas

    2015-12-28

    Ptychographic imaging has gained popularity for its high resolving power and sensitivity as well as for its ability to map simultaneously the sample's complex-valued refractive index and the illumination. Yet, despite significant progress that allows for reliable practical implementation, some of the technique's fundamentals remain poorly understood, and oftentimes successful data acquisition is either overly conservative or relies more on experimenters experience than on rational data acquisition strategies. Here, we propose a theoretical framework of ptychography, which is based on Gabor's notion of decomposition into elementary signals and the concept of frames. We demonstrate how this framework can straightforwardly be used to derive sampling requirements or to provide arguments on how to optimize the ptychographic scan. More generally, our theoretical framework can serve as a bridge between the experimental technique and the rich and well established mathematical disciplines of wavelets decomposition and spectrogram analysis. PMID:26832042

  13. Epigenetic signaling in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ibi, Daisuke; González-Maeso, Javier

    2015-10-01

    Histone modifications and DNA methylation represent central dynamic and reversible processes that regulate gene expression and contribute to cellular phenotypes. These epigenetic marks have been shown to play fundamental roles in a diverse set of signaling and behavioral outcomes. Psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression are complex and heterogeneous diseases with multiple and independent factors that may contribute to their pathophysiology, making challenging to find a link between specific elements and the underlying mechanisms responsible for the disorder and its treatment. Growing evidences suggest that epigenetic modifications in certain brain regions and neural circuits represent a key mechanism through which environmental factors interact with individual's genetic constitution to affect risk of psychiatric conditions throughout life. This review focuses on recent advances that directly implicate epigenetic modifications in schizophrenia and antipsychotic drug action. PMID:26120009

  14. Quantitative measures for redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Ché S; Eagling, Beatrice D; Driscoll, Scott R E; Rohwer, Johann M

    2016-07-01

    Redox signaling is now recognized as an important regulatory mechanism for a number of cellular processes including the antioxidant response, phosphokinase signal transduction and redox metabolism. While there has been considerable progress in identifying the cellular machinery involved in redox signaling, quantitative measures of redox signals have been lacking, limiting efforts aimed at understanding and comparing redox signaling under normoxic and pathogenic conditions. Here we have outlined some of the accepted principles for redox signaling, including the description of hydrogen peroxide as a signaling molecule and the role of kinetics in conferring specificity to these signaling events. Based on these principles, we then develop a working definition for redox signaling and review a number of quantitative methods that have been employed to describe signaling in other systems. Using computational modeling and published data, we show how time- and concentration- dependent analyses, in particular, could be used to quantitatively describe redox signaling and therefore provide important insights into the functional organization of redox networks. Finally, we consider some of the key challenges with implementing these methods. PMID:27151506

  15. Signaling on the endocytic pathway.

    PubMed

    McPherson, P S; Kay, B K; Hussain, N K

    2001-06-01

    Ligand binding to receptor tyrosine kinases and G-protein-coupled receptors initiates signal transduction events and induces receptor endocytosis via clathrin-coated pits and vesicles. While receptor-mediated endocytosis has been traditionally considered an effective mechanism to attenuate ligand-activated responses, more recent studies demonstrate that signaling continues on the endocytic pathway. In fact, certain signaling events, such as the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases, appear to require endocytosis. Protein components of signal transduction cascades can assemble at clathrin coated pits and remain associated with endocytic vesicles following their dynamin-dependent release from the plasma membrane. Thus, endocytic vesicles can function as a signaling compartment distinct from the plasma membrane. These observations demonstrate that endocytosis plays an important role in the activation and propagation of signaling pathways. PMID:11389765

  16. EEG signal analysis: a survey.

    PubMed

    Subha, D Puthankattil; Joseph, Paul K; Acharya U, Rajendra; Lim, Choo Min

    2010-04-01

    The EEG (Electroencephalogram) signal indicates the electrical activity of the brain. They are highly random in nature and may contain useful information about the brain state. However, it is very difficult to get useful information from these signals directly in the time domain just by observing them. They are basically non-linear and nonstationary in nature. Hence, important features can be extracted for the diagnosis of different diseases using advanced signal processing techniques. In this paper the effect of different events on the EEG signal, and different signal processing methods used to extract the hidden information from the signal are discussed in detail. Linear, Frequency domain, time - frequency and non-linear techniques like correlation dimension (CD), largest Lyapunov exponent (LLE), Hurst exponent (H), different entropies, fractal dimension(FD), Higher Order Spectra (HOS), phase space plots and recurrence plots are discussed in detail using a typical normal EEG signal. PMID:20433058

  17. Integrin endosomal signalling suppresses anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Alanko, Jonna; Mai, Anja; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Schauer, Kristine; Kaukonen, Riina; Saari, Markku; Goud, Bruno; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Integrin containing focal adhesions (FAs) transmit extracellular signals across the plasma membrane to modulate cell adhesion, signalling and survival. Although integrins are known to undergo continuous endo/exocytic traffic, potential impact of endocytic traffic on integrin-induced signals is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that integrin signalling is not restricted to cell-ECM adhesions and identify an endosomal signalling platform that supports integrin signalling away from the plasma membrane. We show that active focal adhesion kinase (FAK), an established marker of integrin-ECM downstream signalling, localises with active integrins on endosomes. Integrin endocytosis positively regulates adhesion-induced FAK activation, which is early endosome antigen-1 (EEA1) and small GTPase Rab21 dependent. FAK binds directly to purified endosomes and becomes activated on them, suggesting a role for endocytosis in enhancing distinct integrin downstream signalling events. Finally, endosomal integrin signalling contributes to cancer-related processes such as anoikis resistance, anchorage-independence and metastasis. Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface adhesion receptors functioning as integrators of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) driven cues, the cellular cytoskeleton and the cellular signalling apparatus 1.Upon adhesion, integrins trigger the formation of plasma-membrane proximal large mechanosensing and signal-transmitting protein clusters depicted as “adhesomes” 2, 3. In addition, integrins undergo constant endocytic traffic to facilitate focal adhesion turnover, cell migration, invasion and cytokinesis 4. For other receptor systems it is well established that endocytic membrane traffic regulates bioavailability of cell-surface molecules and therefore the intensity and/or specificity of receptor-initiated signals 5, 6. Although active integrins and their ligands have been detected in endosomes 7–9 and increased integrin recycling to the plasma membrane contributes

  18. Efficient signal transmission by synchronization through compound chaotic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, K.; Lakshmanan, M.

    1997-07-01

    The idea of synchronization of chaotic systems is further extended to the case where all the drive system variables are combined suitably to obtain a compound chaotic signal. An appropriate feedback loop is constructed in the response system to achieve synchronization among the variables of the drive and response systems. We apply this approach to transmit both analog and digital data signals in which the quality of the recovered signal is higher and the encoding is more secure.

  19. The principle of conformational signaling.

    PubMed

    Tompa, Peter

    2016-07-25

    Signal transduction is the primary process by which cells respond to changes in their physical and chemical environments. Cellular response is initiated through a signaling protein (a receptor), which interacts with the "signal", most often a novel molecule outside or inside the cell. The mechanism of activation of the receptor is a conformational change and/or covalent modification, which then sets in motion a signaling pathway, i.e. a cascade of modification and binding events that relay and amplify the message to eventually alter the state of the cell. In reflection of this general perception, concepts such as the "second messenger" and the "phosphorylation cascade" dominate our views of signal transduction. The idea I advocate here is that the non-covalent change in protein conformation itself might serve as the initial or intermittent "signal" in the cascade, and it is often the primary event being recognized and interpreted by downstream receptor(s). This signaling principle is intertwined with many other cellular regulatory concepts, such as (pathway) allostery, conformational spread, induced folding/unfolding, conformational memory, the hierarchical assembly of complexes, and the action of regulatory chaperones and prions. By elaborating on many examples and also recent advances in experimental methodology, I show that conformational signaling, although thus far underappreciated, is a general and robust signaling principle that most of the time operates in close interplay with covalent signals in the cell. PMID:27242242

  20. Regulation of Hippo signalling by p38 signalling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dashun; Li, Xiaojiao; Sun, Li; Huang, Ping; Ying, Hao; Wang, Hui; Wu, Jiarui; Song, Haiyun

    2016-08-01

    The Hippo signalling pathway has a crucial role in growth control during development, and its dysregulation contributes to tumorigenesis. Recent studies uncover multiple upstream regulatory inputs into Hippo signalling, which affects phosphorylation of the transcriptional coactivator Yki/YAP/TAZ by Wts/Lats. Here we identify the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway as a new upstream branch of the Hippo pathway. In Drosophila, overexpression of MAPKK gene licorne (lic), or MAPKKK gene Mekk1, promotes Yki activity and induces Hippo target gene expression. Loss-of-function studies show that lic regulates Hippo signalling in ovary follicle cells and in the wing disc. Epistasis analysis indicates that Mekk1 and lic affect Hippo signalling via p38b and wts We further demonstrate that the Mekk1-Lic-p38b cascade inhibits Hippo signalling by promoting F-actin accumulation and Jub phosphorylation. In addition, p38 signalling modulates actin filaments and Hippo signalling in parallel to small GTPases Ras, Rac1, and Rho1. Lastly, we show that p38 signalling regulates Hippo signalling in mammalian cell lines. The Lic homologue MKK3 promotes nuclear localization of YAP via the actin cytoskeleton. Upregulation or downregulation of the p38 pathway regulates YAP-mediated transcription. Our work thus reveals a conserved crosstalk between the p38 MAPK pathway and the Hippo pathway in growth regulation. PMID:27402810

  1. Signaling during Kidney Development.

    PubMed

    Krause, Mirja; Rak-Raszewska, Aleksandra; Pietilä, Ilkka; Quaggin, Susan E; Vainio, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The kidney plays an essential role during excretion of metabolic waste products, maintenance of key homeostasis components such as ion concentrations and hormone levels. It influences the blood pressure, composition and volume. The kidney tubule system is composed of two distinct cell populations: the nephrons forming the filtering units and the collecting duct system derived from the ureteric bud. Nephrons are composed of glomeruli that filter the blood to the Bowman's capsule and tubular structures that reabsorb and concentrate primary urine. The collecting duct is a Wolffian duct-derived epithelial tube that concentrates and collects urine and transfers it via the renal pelvis into the bladder. The mammalian kidney function depends on the coordinated development of specific cell types within a precise architectural framework. Due to the availability of modern analysis techniques, the kidney has become a model organ defining the paradigm to study organogenesis. As kidney diseases are a problem worldwide, the understanding of mammalian kidney cells is of crucial importance to develop diagnostic tools and novel therapies. This review focuses on how the pattern of renal development is generated, how the inductive signals are regulated and what are their effects on proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis. PMID:25867084

  2. Angular signal radiography.

    PubMed

    Li, Panyun; Zhang, Kai; Bao, Yuan; Ren, Yuqi; Ju, Zaiqiang; Wang, Yan; He, Qili; Zhu, Zhongzhu; Huang, Wanxia; Yuan, Qingxi; Zhu, Peiping

    2016-03-21

    Microscopy techniques using visible photons, x-rays, neutrons, and electrons have made remarkable impact in many scientific disciplines. The microscopic data can often be expressed as the convolution of the spatial distribution of certain properties of the specimens and the inherent response function of the imaging system. The x-ray grating interferometer (XGI), which is sensitive to the deviation angle of the incoming x-rays, has attracted significant attention in the past years due to its capability in achieving x-ray phase contrast imaging with low brilliance source. However, the comprehensive and analytical theoretical framework is yet to be presented. Herein, we propose a theoretical framework termed angular signal radiography (ASR) to describe the imaging process of the XGI system in a classical, comprehensive and analytical manner. We demonstrated, by means of theoretical deduction and synchrotron based experiments, that the spatial distribution of specimens' physical properties, including absorption, refraction and scattering, can be extracted by ASR in XGI. Implementation of ASR in XGI offers advantages such as simplified phase retrieval algorithm, reduced overall radiation dose, and improved image acquisition speed. These advantages, as well as the limitations of the proposed method, are systematically investigated in this paper. PMID:27136780

  3. Purinergic signaling in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rassendren, François; Audinat, Etienne

    2016-09-01

    Until recently, analysis of the mechanisms underlying epilepsy was centered on neuron dysfunctions. Accordingly, most of the available pharmacological treatments aim at reducing neuronal excitation or at potentiating neuronal inhibition. These therapeutic options can lead to obvious secondary effects, and, moreover, seizures cannot be controlled by any known medication in one-third of the patients. A purely neurocentric view of brain functions and dysfunctions has been seriously questioned during the past 2 decades because of the accumulation of experimental data showing the functional importance of reciprocal interactions between glial cells and neurons. In the case of epilepsy, our current knowledge of the human disease and analysis of animal models clearly favor the involvement of astrocytes and microglial cells during the progression of the disease, including at very early stages, opening the way to the identification of new therapeutic targets. Purinergic signaling is a fundamental feature of neuron-glia interactions, and increasing evidence indicates that modifications of this pathway contribute to the functional remodeling of the epileptic brain. This Review discusses the recent experimental results indicating the roles of astrocytic and microglial P2X and P2Y receptors in epilepsy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27302739

  4. Signaling during Kidney Development

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Mirja; Rak-Raszewska, Aleksandra; Pietilä, Ilkka; Quaggin, Susan E.; Vainio, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The kidney plays an essential role during excretion of metabolic waste products, maintenance of key homeostasis components such as ion concentrations and hormone levels. It influences the blood pressure, composition and volume. The kidney tubule system is composed of two distinct cell populations: the nephrons forming the filtering units and the collecting duct system derived from the ureteric bud. Nephrons are composed of glomeruli that filter the blood to the Bowman’s capsule and tubular structures that reabsorb and concentrate primary urine. The collecting duct is a Wolffian duct-derived epithelial tube that concentrates and collects urine and transfers it via the renal pelvis into the bladder. The mammalian kidney function depends on the coordinated development of specific cell types within a precise architectural framework. Due to the availability of modern analysis techniques, the kidney has become a model organ defining the paradigm to study organogenesis. As kidney diseases are a problem worldwide, the understanding of mammalian kidney cells is of crucial importance to develop diagnostic tools and novel therapies. This review focuses on how the pattern of renal development is generated, how the inductive signals are regulated and what are their effects on proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis. PMID:25867084

  5. SUMO chains: polymeric signals.

    PubMed

    Vertegaal, Alfred C O

    2010-02-01

    Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins are conjugated to a wide variety of target proteins that play roles in all biological processes. Target proteins are conjugated to ubiquitin monomers or to ubiquitin polymers that form via all seven internal lysine residues of ubiquitin. The fate of these target proteins is controlled in a chain architecture-dependent manner. SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) shares the ability of ubiquitin to form chains via internal SUMOylation sites. Interestingly, a SUMO-binding site in Ubc9 is important for SUMO chain synthesis. Similar to ubiquitin-polymer cleavage by USPs (ubiquitin-specific proteases), SUMO chain formation is reversible. SUMO polymers are cleaved by the SUMO proteases SENP6 [SUMO/sentrin/SMT3 (suppressor of mif two 3)-specific peptidase 6], SENP7 and Ulp2 (ubiquitin-like protease 2). SUMO chain-binding proteins including ZIP1, SLX5/8 (synthetic lethal of unknown function 5/8), RNF4 (RING finger protein 4) and CENP-E (centromere-associated protein E) have been identified that interact non-covalently with SUMO chains, thereby regulating target proteins that are conjugated to SUMO multimers. SUMO chains play roles in replication, in the turnover of SUMO targets by the proteasome and during mitosis and meiosis. Thus signalling via polymers is an exciting feature of the SUMO family. PMID:20074033

  6. 77 FR 35082 - Arrow Investment Advisers, LLC and Arrow Investments Trust; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ...''); (b) secondary market transactions in Shares to occur at negotiated market prices; (c) certain series.... Applicants anticipate that a Creation Unit will consist of at least 25,000 Shares and that the price of a... price of Shares trading on the Stock Exchange will be based on a current bid/offer in the...

  7. Arrows as Anchors: An Analysis of the Material Features of Electric Field Vector Arrows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gire, Elizabeth; Price, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Representations in physics possess both physical and conceptual aspects that are fundamentally intertwined and can interact to support or hinder sense making and computation. We use distributed cognition and the theory of conceptual blending with material anchors to interpret the roles of conceptual and material features of representations in…

  8. Steganography in arrhythmic electrocardiogram signal.

    PubMed

    Edward Jero, S; Ramu, Palaniappan; Ramakrishnan, S

    2015-08-01

    Security and privacy of patient data is a vital requirement during exchange/storage of medical information over communication network. Steganography method hides patient data into a cover signal to prevent unauthenticated accesses during data transfer. This study evaluates the performance of ECG steganography to ensure secured transmission of patient data where an abnormal ECG signal is used as cover signal. The novelty of this work is to hide patient data into two dimensional matrix of an abnormal ECG signal using Discrete Wavelet Transform and Singular Value Decomposition based steganography method. A 2D ECG is constructed according to Tompkins QRS detection algorithm. The missed R peaks are computed using RR interval during 2D conversion. The abnormal ECG signals are obtained from the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. Metrics such as Peak Signal to Noise Ratio, Percentage Residual Difference, Kullback-Leibler distance and Bit Error Rate are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach. PMID:26736533

  9. Requirements for signaling channel authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Tarman, T.D.

    1995-12-11

    This contribution addresses requirements for ATM signaling channel authentication. Signaling channel authentication is an ATM security service that binds an ATM signaling message to its source. By creating this binding, the message recipient, and even a third party, can confidently verify that the message originated from its claimed source. This provides a useful mechanism to mitigate a number of threats. For example, a denial of service attack which attempts to tear-down an active connection by surreptitiously injecting RELEASE or DROP PARTY messages could be easily thwarted when authenticity assurances are in place for the signaling channel. Signaling channel authentication could also be used to provide the required auditing information for accurate billing which is impervious to repudiation. Finally, depending on the signaling channel authentication mechanism, end-to-end integrity of the message (or at least part of it) can be provided. None of these capabilities exist in the current specifications.

  10. Hedgehog signaling in skin cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengxin; Chi, Sumin; Xie, Jingwu

    2011-01-01

    An increasing progress on the role of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling for carcinogenesis has been achieved since the link of Hh pathway to human cancer was firstly established. In particular, the critical role of Hh signaling in the development of Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has been convincingly demonstrated by genetic mutation analyses, mouse models of BCCs, and successful clinical trials of BCCs using Hh signaling inhibitors. In addition, the Hh pathway activity is also reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC), melanoma and Merkel Cell Carcinoma. These findings have significant new paradigm on Hh signaling transduction, its mechanisms in skin cancer and even therapeutic approaches for BCC. In this review, we will summarize the major advances in the understanding of Hh signaling transduction, the roles of Hh signaling in skin cancer development, and the current implications of “mechanism-based” therapeutic strategies. PMID:21397013

  11. Algorithm evolution for signal understanding

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, A.

    1996-12-31

    Automated program evolution has existed in some form for over thirty years. Signal understanding (e.g., signal classification) has been a scientific concern for even longer than that. Interest in generating, through machine learning techniques, a general signal understanding system is a newer topic, but has recently attracted considerable attention. First, I have proposed to define and create a machine learning mechanism for generating signal understanding systems independent of the signal`s type and size. Second, I have proposed to do this through an evolutionary strategy that is an extension of genetic programming. Third, I have proposed to introduce a suite of sub-mechanisms that not only contribute to the power of the thesis mechanism, but are also contributions to the understanding of the learning technique developed.

  12. Calcium signalling remodelling and disease.

    PubMed

    Berridge, Michael J

    2012-04-01

    A wide range of Ca2+ signalling systems deliver the spatial and temporal Ca2+ signals necessary to control the specific functions of different cell types. Release of Ca2+ by InsP3 (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) plays a central role in many of these signalling systems. Ongoing transcriptional processes maintain the integrity and stability of these cell-specific signalling systems. However, these homoeostatic systems are highly plastic and can undergo a process of phenotypic remodelling, resulting in the Ca2+ signals being set either too high or too low. Such subtle dysregulation of Ca2+ signals have been linked to some of the major diseases in humans such as cardiac disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22435804

  13. Synchronous Photodiode-Signal Sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primus, Howard K.

    1988-01-01

    Synchronous sampling circuit increases signal-to-noise ratio of measurements of chopped signal of known phase and frequency in presence of low-frequency or dc background noise. Used with linear array of photoelectric sensors for locating edge of metal plate. Multiplexing circuit cycles through 16 light-emitting-diode/photodiode pairs, under computer control. Synchronized with multiplexer so edge detector makes one background-subtracted signal measurement per emitter/detector pair in turn.

  14. Protein modules and signalling networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawson, Tony

    1995-02-01

    Communication between cells assumes particular importance in multicellular organisms. The growth, migration and differentiation of cells in the embryo, and their organization into specific tissues, depend on signals transmitted from one cell to another. In the adult, cell signalling orchestrates normal cellular behaviour and responses to wounding and infection. The consequences of breakdowns in this signalling underlie cancer, diabetes and disorders of the immune and cardiovascular systems. Conserved protein domains that act as key regulatory participants in many of these different signalling pathways are highlighted.

  15. Chirp signal generator feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chomiki, M.; Genauzeau, F.

    1983-03-01

    The feasibility of a signal generator with 100 microsec temporal dispersion, and 330 MHz frequency dispersion, for the ERS-1 (ESA satellite) radar altimeter, with a solid state transmitter, is demonstrated. Two surface wave dispersive filters (20 and 80 microsec dispersion) are cascaded with a frequency multiplier to give a 900 MHz output signal. The first filter receives an impulse which ensures an output signal to noise ratio 20 dB. The chirp signal output level is 0 dBm; amplitude fluctuation 2 dBcc, phase error compared with theory 10 deg rms; short term jitter 100 psec. The generator model occupies 0.5 l, and consumes 7 W.

  16. Recognition of a signal peptide by the signal recognition particle

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Claudia Y.; Li, Jade; Oubridge, Chris; Hernández, Helena; Robinson, Carol V.; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Targeting of proteins to appropriate sub-cellular compartments is a crucial process in all living cells. Secretory and membrane proteins usually contain an N-terminal signal peptide, which is recognised by the signal recognition particle (SRP) when nascent polypeptide chains emerge from the ribosome. The SRP-ribosome nascent chain complex is then targeted through its GTP-dependent interaction with SRP-receptor to the protein-conducting channel on endoplasmic reticulum membrane in eukaryotes or plasma membrane in bacteria. A universally conserved component of SRP1, 2, SRP54 or its bacterial homolog, fifty-four homolog (Ffh), binds the signal peptides which have a highly divergent sequence divisible into a positively charged n-region, an h-region commonly containing 8-20 hydrophobic residues and a polar c-region 3-5. No structure has been reported that exemplified SRP54 binding of any signal sequence. We have produced a fusion protein between Sulfolobus solfataricus SRP54 and a signal peptide connected via a flexible linker. This fusion protein oligomerises in solution, through interaction between the SRP54 and signal peptide moieties belonging to different chains, and it is functional, able to bind SRP RNA and SRP-receptor FtsY. Here we present the crystal structure at 3.5 Å resolution of an SRP54-signal peptide complex in the dimer, which reveals how a signal sequence is recognised by SRP54. PMID:20364120

  17. Correlation theory-based signal processing method for CMF signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yan-lin; Tu, Ya-qing

    2016-06-01

    Signal processing precision of Coriolis mass flowmeter (CMF) signals affects measurement accuracy of Coriolis mass flowmeters directly. To improve the measurement accuracy of CMFs, a correlation theory-based signal processing method for CMF signals is proposed, which is comprised of the correlation theory-based frequency estimation method and phase difference estimation method. Theoretical analysis shows that the proposed method eliminates the effect of non-integral period sampling signals on frequency and phase difference estimation. The results of simulations and field experiments demonstrate that the proposed method improves the anti-interference performance of frequency and phase difference estimation and has better estimation performance than the adaptive notch filter, discrete Fourier transform and autocorrelation methods in terms of frequency estimation and the data extension-based correlation, Hilbert transform, quadrature delay estimator and discrete Fourier transform methods in terms of phase difference estimation, which contributes to improving the measurement accuracy of Coriolis mass flowmeters.

  18. Intracellular Signal Modulation by Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Salik; Garantziotis, Stavros; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Boland, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the interactions of nanomaterials with biological systems and the resulting activation of signal transduction pathways is essential for the development of safe and consumer friendly nanotechnology. Here we present an overview of signaling pathways induced by nanomaterial exposures and describe the possible correlation of their physicochemical characteristics with biological outcomes. In addition to the hierarchical oxidative stress model and a review of the intrinsic and cell-mediated mechanisms of reactive Oxygen species (ROS) generating capacities of nanomaterials, we also discuss other oxidative stress dependent and independent cellular signaling pathways. Induction of the inflammasome, calcium signaling, and endoplasmic reticulum stress are reviewed. Furthermore, the uptake mechanisms can crucially affect the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials and membrane-dependent signaling pathways can be responsible for cellular effects of nanomaterials. Epigenetic regulation by nanomaterials effects of nanoparticle-protein interactions on cell signaling pathways, and the induction of various cell death modalities by nanomaterials are described. We describe the common trigger mechanisms shared by various nanomaterials to induce cell death pathways and describe the interplay of different modalities in orchestrating the final outcome after nanomaterial exposures. A better understanding of signal modulations induced by nanomaterials is not only essential for the synthesis and design of safer nanomaterials but will also help to discover potential nanomedical applications of these materials. Several biomedical applications based on the different signaling pathways induced by nanomaterials are already proposed and will certainly gain a great deal of attraction in the near future. PMID:24683030

  19. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  20. Echolocation signals of wild dolphins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, W. W. L.

    2004-07-01

    Most of our understanding of dolphin echolocation has come from studies of captive dolphins performing various echolocation tasks. Recently, measurements of echolocation signals in the wild have expanded our understanding of the characteristics of these signals in a natural setting. Measuring undistorted dolphin echolocation signals with free swimming dolphins in the field can be a challenging task. A four hydrophone array arranged in a symmetrical star pattern was used to measure the echolocation signals of four species of dolphins in the wild. Echolocation signals of the following dolphins have been measured with the symmetrical star array: white-beaked dolphins in Iceland, Atlantic spotted dolphins in the Bahamas, killer whales in British Columbia, and dusky dolphins in New Zealand. There are many common features in the echolocation signals of the different species. Most of the signals had spectra that were bimodal: two peaks, one at low frequencies and another about an octave higher in frequency. The source level of the sonar transmission varies as a function of 20log R, suggesting a form of time-varying gain but on the transmitting end of the sonar process rather than the receiving end. The results of the field work call into question the issue of whether the signals used by captive dolphins may be shaped by the task they are required to perform rather than what they would do more naturally.

  1. Thermocouple-Signal-Conditioning Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    Thermocouple-signal-conditioning circuit acting in conjunction with thermocouple, exhibits electrical behavior of voltage in series with resistance. Combination part of input bridge circuit of controller. Circuit configured for either of two specific applications by selection of alternative resistances and supply voltages. Includes alarm circuit detecting open circuit in thermocouple and provides off-scale output to signal malfunctions.

  2. Hybrid respiration-signal conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinard, G. A.; Steffen, D. A.; Sturm, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Hybrid impedance-pneumograph and respiration-rate signal conditioner element of hand-held vital signs monitor measures changes in impedance of chest during breathing cycle and generates analog respiration signal as output along with synchronous square wave that can be monitored by breath-rate processor.

  3. Retrograde signaling: Organelles go networking.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Tatjana; Leister, Dario

    2016-08-01

    The term retrograde signaling refers to the fact that chloroplasts and mitochondria utilize specific signaling molecules to convey information on their developmental and physiological states to the nucleus and modulate the expression of nuclear genes accordingly. Signals emanating from plastids have been associated with two main networks: 'Biogenic control' is active during early stages of chloroplast development, while 'operational' control functions in response to environmental fluctuations. Early work focused on the former and its major players, the GUN proteins. However, our view of retrograde signaling has since been extended and revised. Elements of several 'operational' signaling circuits have come to light, including metabolites, signaling cascades in the cytosol and transcription factors. Here, we review recent advances in the identification and characterization of retrograde signaling components. We place particular emphasis on the strategies employed to define signaling components, spanning the entire spectrum of genetic screens, metabolite profiling and bioinformatics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26997501

  4. Bioelectric signal analysis and measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    Nonstationary time series techniques are used to analyze EEG signals for the estimation of alertness. A time varying order is extracted in sequential time series measurement of these data and strategies are devised for obtaining optimal representation of the EEG signal.

  5. Signaling equilibria in sensorimotor interactions.

    PubMed

    Leibfried, Felix; Grau-Moya, Jordi; Braun, Daniel A

    2015-08-01

    Although complex forms of communication like human language are often assumed to have evolved out of more simple forms of sensorimotor signaling, less attention has been devoted to investigate the latter. Here, we study communicative sensorimotor behavior of humans in a two-person joint motor task where each player controls one dimension of a planar motion. We designed this joint task as a game where one player (the sender) possesses private information about a hidden target the other player (the receiver) wants to know about, and where the sender's actions are costly signals that influence the receiver's control strategy. We developed a game-theoretic model within the framework of signaling games to investigate whether subjects' behavior could be adequately described by the corresponding equilibrium solutions. The model predicts both separating and pooling equilibria, in which signaling does and does not occur respectively. We observed both kinds of equilibria in subjects and found that, in line with model predictions, the propensity of signaling decreased with increasing signaling costs and decreasing uncertainty on the part of the receiver. Our study demonstrates that signaling games, which have previously been applied to economic decision-making and animal communication, provide a framework for human signaling behavior arising during sensorimotor interactions in continuous and dynamic environments. PMID:25935748

  6. Signals in Communication Engineering History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consonni, Denise; Silva, Magno T. M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a study of various electric signals, which have been employed throughout the history of communication engineering in its two main landmarks: the telegraph and the telephone. The signals are presented in their time and frequency domain representations. The historical order has been followed in the presentation: wired systems, spark…

  7. Perception and Signaling of Strigolactones

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs), a recently discovered class of phytohormones, are important regulators of plant growth and development. While the biosynthetic pathway of these molecules is well documented, until recently there was not much known about the molecular mechanisms underlying SL perception and signal transduction in plants. Certain aspects of their perception and signaling, including the hormone-mediated interaction between receptor and F-box protein, degradation of suppressor proteins and activation of transcription factors, are also found in other phytohormones. However, some of SL signaling features seem to be specific for the SL signaling pathway. These include the enzymatic activity of the SL receptor and its destabilization caused by SLs. This review summarizes the current knowledge about SL signaling pathway in plants. PMID:27602041

  8. Signal focusing through active transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The accuracy of molecular signaling in biological cells and novel diagnostic devices is ultimately limited by the counting noise floor imposed by the thermal diffusion. Motivated by the fact that messenger RNA and vesicle-engulfed signaling molecules transiently bind to molecular motors and are actively transported in biological cells, we show here that the random active delivery of signaling particles to within a typical diffusion distance to the receptor generically reduces the correlation time of the counting noise. Considering a variety of signaling particle sizes from mRNA to vesicles and cell sizes from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells, we show that the conditions for active focusing—faster and more precise signaling—are indeed compatible with observations in living cells. Our results improve the understanding of molecular cellular signaling and novel diagnostic devices.

  9. Protein Regulation in Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael J; Yaffe, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARYCells must respond to a diverse, complex, and ever-changing mix of signals, using a fairly limited set of parts. Changes in protein level, protein localization, protein activity, and protein-protein interactions are critical aspects of signal transduction, allowing cells to respond highly specifically to a nearly limitless set of cues and also to vary the sensitivity, duration, and dynamics of the response. Signal-dependent changes in levels of gene expression and protein synthesis play an important role in regulation of protein levels, whereas posttranslational modifications of proteins regulate their degradation, localization, and functional interactions. Protein ubiquitylation, for example, can direct proteins to the proteasome for degradation or provide a signal that regulates their interactions and/or location within the cell. Similarly, protein phosphorylation by specific kinases is a key mechanism for augmenting protein activity and relaying signals to other proteins that possess domains that recognize the phosphorylated residues. PMID:27252361

  10. Optimal investment in social signals.

    PubMed

    Dessalles, Jean-Louis

    2014-06-01

    This study is an attempt to determine how much individuals should invest in social communication, depending on the type of relationships they may form. Two simple models of social relationships are considered. In both models, individuals emit costly signals to advertise their "quality" as potential friends. Relationships are asymmetrical or symmetrical. In the asymmetrical condition (first model), we observe that low-quality individuals are discouraged from signaling. In the symmetrical condition (second model), all individuals invest in communication. In both models, high-quality individuals (elite) do not compete and signal uniformly. The level of this uniform signal and the size of the "elite" turn out to be controlled by the accuracy of signals. The two models may be relevant to several aspects of animal and human social communication. PMID:24495174

  11. A highly parallel signal processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigham, Jackson D., Jr.

    There is an increasing need for signal processors functional across a broad range of problems, from radar systems to E-O and ESM applications. To meet this challenge, a signal processing system capable of efficiently meeting the processing requirements over a broad range of avionics sensor systems has been developed. The CDC Parallel Modular Signal Processor (PMSP) is a complete MIL/E-5400-qualified digital signal processing system capable of computation rates greater than 600 MOPS (million operations per second). The signal processing element of the PMSP is the Micro-AFP. It is an all-VLSI processor capable of executing multiple simultaneous operations. Up to five Micro-AFPs and 12 MB of main store memory (MSM), along with associated control and I/O functions, are contained in the PMSP's standard ATR enclosure.

  12. Perception and Signaling of Strigolactones.

    PubMed

    Marzec, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs), a recently discovered class of phytohormones, are important regulators of plant growth and development. While the biosynthetic pathway of these molecules is well documented, until recently there was not much known about the molecular mechanisms underlying SL perception and signal transduction in plants. Certain aspects of their perception and signaling, including the hormone-mediated interaction between receptor and F-box protein, degradation of suppressor proteins and activation of transcription factors, are also found in other phytohormones. However, some of SL signaling features seem to be specific for the SL signaling pathway. These include the enzymatic activity of the SL receptor and its destabilization caused by SLs. This review summarizes the current knowledge about SL signaling pathway in plants. PMID:27602041

  13. Spatiotemporal signalling in plant development

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Erin; Wachsman, Guy; Benfey, Philip N.

    2013-01-01

    Plants, being sessile organisms, need to respond to changing environments, and as a result they have evolved unique signalling mechanisms that allow rapid communication between different parts of the plant. The signalling mechanisms that direct plant development include long-range effectors, such as phytohormones, and molecules with a local intra-organ range, such as peptides, transcription factors and some small RNAs. In this Review, we highlight recent advances in understanding plant signalling mechanisms and discuss how different classes of signalling networks can integrate with gene regulatory networks and contribute to plant development. In some cases, we also address the evolutionary context of mechanisms and discuss possible links between the lifestyle of plants and selection for different signalling mechanisms. PMID:23949543

  14. Evolution of Cytokine Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liongue, Clifford; Sertori, Robert; Ward, Alister C

    2016-07-01

    Cytokines represent essential mediators of cell-cell communication with particularly important roles within the immune system. These secreted factors are produced in response to developmental and/or environmental cues and act via cognate cytokine receptors on target cells, stimulating specific intracellular signaling pathways to facilitate appropriate cellular responses. This review describes the evolution of cytokine receptor signaling, focusing on the class I and class II receptor families and the downstream JAK-STAT pathway along with its key negative regulators. Individual components generated over a long evolutionary time frame coalesced to form an archetypal signaling pathway in bilateria that was expanded extensively during early vertebrate evolution to establish a substantial "core" signaling network, which has subsequently undergone limited diversification within discrete lineages. The evolution of cytokine receptor signaling parallels that of the immune system, particularly the emergence of adaptive immunity, which has likely been a major evolutionary driver. PMID:27317733

  15. Quorum Quenching Revisited—From Signal Decays to Signalling Confusion

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kar-Wai; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2012-01-01

    In a polymicrobial community, while some bacteria are communicating with neighboring cells (quorum sensing), others are interrupting the communication (quorum quenching), thus creating a constant arms race between intercellular communication. In the past decade, numerous quorum quenching enzymes have been found and initially thought to inactivate the signalling molecules. Though this is widely accepted, the actual roles of these quorum quenching enzymes are now being uncovered. Recent evidence extends the role of quorum quenching to detoxification or metabolism of signalling molecules as food and energy source; this includes “signalling confusion”, a term coined in this paper to refer to the phenomenon of non-destructive modification of signalling molecules. While quorum quenching has been explored as a novel anti-infective therapy targeting, quorum sensing evidence begins to show the development of resistance against quorum quenching. PMID:22666051

  16. Some dynamics of signaling games

    PubMed Central

    Huttegger, Simon; Skyrms, Brian; Tarrès, Pierre; Wagner, Elliott

    2014-01-01

    Information transfer is a basic feature of life that includes signaling within and between organisms. Owing to its interactive nature, signaling can be investigated by using game theory. Game theoretic models of signaling have a long tradition in biology, economics, and philosophy. For a long time the analyses of these games has mostly relied on using static equilibrium concepts such as Pareto optimal Nash equilibria or evolutionarily stable strategies. More recently signaling games of various types have been investigated with the help of game dynamics, which includes dynamical models of evolution and individual learning. A dynamical analysis leads to more nuanced conclusions as to the outcomes of signaling interactions. Here we explore different kinds of signaling games that range from interactions without conflicts of interest between the players to interactions where their interests are seriously misaligned. We consider these games within the context of evolutionary dynamics (both infinite and finite population models) and learning dynamics (reinforcement learning). Some results are specific features of a particular dynamical model, whereas others turn out to be quite robust across different models. This suggests that there are certain qualitative aspects that are common to many real-world signaling interactions. PMID:25024209

  17. Baird's beaked whale echolocation signals.

    PubMed

    Baumann-Pickering, Simone; Yack, Tina M; Barlow, Jay; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2013-06-01

    Echolocation signals from Baird's beaked whales were recorded during visual and acoustic shipboard surveys of cetaceans in the California Current ecosystem and with autonomous, long-term recorders in the Southern California Bight. The preliminary measurement of the visually validated Baird's beaked whale echolocation signals from towed array data were used as a basis for identifying Baird's signals in the autonomous recorder data. Two distinct signal types were found, one being a beaked whale-like frequency modulated (FM) pulse, the other being a dolphin-like broadband click. The median FM inter-pulse interval was 230 ms. Both signal types showed a consistent multi-peak structure in their spectra with peaks at ~9, 16, 25, and 40 kHz. Depending on signal type, as well as recording aspect and distance to the hydrophone, these peaks varied in relative amplitude. The description of Baird's echolocation signals will allow for studies of their distribution and abundance using towed array data without associated visual sightings and from autonomous seafloor hydrophones. PMID:23742381

  18. Some dynamics of signaling games.

    PubMed

    Huttegger, Simon; Skyrms, Brian; Tarrès, Pierre; Wagner, Elliott

    2014-07-22

    Information transfer is a basic feature of life that includes signaling within and between organisms. Owing to its interactive nature, signaling can be investigated by using game theory. Game theoretic models of signaling have a long tradition in biology, economics, and philosophy. For a long time the analyses of these games has mostly relied on using static equilibrium concepts such as Pareto optimal Nash equilibria or evolutionarily stable strategies. More recently signaling games of various types have been investigated with the help of game dynamics, which includes dynamical models of evolution and individual learning. A dynamical analysis leads to more nuanced conclusions as to the outcomes of signaling interactions. Here we explore different kinds of signaling games that range from interactions without conflicts of interest between the players to interactions where their interests are seriously misaligned. We consider these games within the context of evolutionary dynamics (both infinite and finite population models) and learning dynamics (reinforcement learning). Some results are specific features of a particular dynamical model, whereas others turn out to be quite robust across different models. This suggests that there are certain qualitative aspects that are common to many real-world signaling interactions. PMID:25024209

  19. VLSI systems design for digital signal processing. Volume 1 - Signal processing and signal processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, B. A.; Brown, W. R.

    This book is concerned with the design of digital signal processing systems which utilize VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) components. The presented material is intended for use by electrical engineers at the senior undergraduate or introductory graduate level. It is the purpose of this volume to present an overview of the important elements of background theory, processing techniques, and hardware evolution. Digital signals are considered along with linear systems and digital filters, taking into account the transform analysis of deterministic signals, a statistical signal model, time domain representations of discrete-time linear systems, and digital filter design techniques and implementation issues. Attention is given to aspects of detection and estimation, digital signal processing algorithms and techniques, issues which must be resolved in a processor design methodology, the fundamental concepts of high performance processing in terms of two early super computers, and the extension of these concepts to more recent processors.

  20. Signal conditioning, the next generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penharlow, David

    This paper describes recent advances in signal conditioning techiques used on flight test programs, which were achieved due to the availability to the electronic designer of new or improved analog and digital monolithic devices. These changes were driven by the design of new sensors, the architecture of the data acquisition systems, and by the vehicle type and design. The paper considers how each of these factors influenced the signal conditioning equipment and discusses new technology introduced, such as hybridized signal conditioners, amplifier-filter products, the self-balancing amplifier, and automatic gain ranging amplifiers.

  1. Lysophosphatidic acid signalling in development.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xiaoyan; Yung, Yun C; Chen, Allison; Chun, Jerold

    2015-04-15

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that is present in all tissues examined to date. LPA signals extracellularly via cognate G protein-coupled receptors to mediate cellular processes such as survival, proliferation, differentiation, migration, adhesion and morphology. These LPA-influenced processes impact many aspects of organismal development. In particular, LPA signalling has been shown to affect fertility and reproduction, formation of the nervous system, and development of the vasculature. Here and in the accompanying poster, we review the developmentally related features of LPA signalling. PMID:25852197

  2. GA signalling and cross-talk with other signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lor, Vai S; Olszewski, Neil E

    2015-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones that regulate growth and development. DELLA proteins repress GA responses. GA binding to its receptor triggers a series of events that culminate in the destruction of DELLA proteins by the 26S proteasome, which removes the repression of GA signalling. DELLA proteins are transcription co-activators that induce the expression of genes which encode products that inhibit GA responses. In addition to repressing GA responses, DELLA proteins influence the activity of other signalling pathways and serve as a central hub from which other pathways influence GA signalling. In this role, DELLA proteins bind to and inhibit proteins, including transcription factors that act in the signalling pathways of other hormones and light. The binding of these proteins to DELLA proteins also inhibits DELLA activity. GA signalling is subject to homoeostatic regulation through GA-induced repression of GA biosynthesis gene expression, and increased production of the GA receptor and enzymes that catabolize bioactive GAs. This review also discusses the nature of mutant DELLA alleles that are used to produce high-yielding 'Green Revolution' cereal varieties, and highlights important gaps in our knowledge of GA signalling. PMID:26374886

  3. BMP signaling in vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Pardali, Evangelia; Sánchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; ten Dijke, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family that signal via type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors and intracellular Smad transcription factors. BMPs are multifunctional regulators of development and tissue homeostasis and they were initially characterized as inducers of bone regeneration. Genetic studies in humans and mice showed that perturbations in BMP signaling lead to various diseases, such as skeletal diseases, vascular diseases and cancer. Mutations in BMP type II receptor and BMP type I receptor/activin receptor-like kinase 1 have been linked to pulmonary arterial hypertension and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, respectively. BMPs have also been implicated in promoting vascular calcification and tumor angiogenesis. In this review we discuss the role of BMP signaling in vascular diseases and the value of BMP signaling as a vascular disease marker or a therapeutic target. PMID:22710160

  4. Systolic processor for signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, G.A.; Greenawalt, E.M.; Kulkarni, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    A systolic array is a natural architecture for a high-performance signal processor, in part because of the extensive use of inner-product operations in signal processing. The modularity and simple interconnection of systolic arrays promise to simplify the development of cost-effective, high-performance, special-purpose processors. ESL incorporated has built a proof of concept model of a systolic processor. It is flexible enough to permit experimentation with a variety of algorithms and applications. ESL is exploring the application of systolic processors to image- and signal-processing problems. This paper describes this experimental system and some of its applications to signal processing. ESL is also pursuing new types of systolic architectures, including the VLSI implementation of systolic cells for solving systems of linear equations. These new systolic architectures allow the real-time design of adaptive filters. 14 references.

  5. Invariants of DNA genomic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, Paul Dan A.

    2005-02-01

    For large scale analysis purposes, the conversion of genomic sequences into digital signals opens the possibility to use powerful signal processing methods for handling genomic information. The study of complex genomic signals reveals large scale features, maintained over the scale of whole chromosomes, that would be difficult to find by using only the symbolic representation. Based on genomic signal methods and on statistical techniques, the paper defines parameters of DNA sequences which are invariant to transformations induced by SNPs, splicing or crossover. Re-orienting concatenated coding regions in the same direction, regularities shared by the genomic material in all exons are revealed, pointing towards the hypothesis of a regular ancestral structure from which the current chromosome structures have evolved. This property is not found in non-nuclear genomic material, e.g., plasmids.

  6. Mechanical Signaling in Reproductive Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Soledad; Chang, Sydney; Barzilai, Joshua J.; Leppert, Phyllis

    2014-01-01

    The organs of the female reproductive system are among the most dynamic tissues in the human body, undergoing repeated cycles of growth and involution from puberty through menopause. To achieve such impressive plasticity, reproductive tissues must respond not only to soluble signals (hormones, growth factors, and cytokines) but also to physical cues (mechanical forces and osmotic stress) as well. Here, we review the mechanisms underlying the process of mechanotransduction—how signals are conveyed from the extracellular matrix that surrounds the cells of reproductive tissues to the downstream molecules and signaling pathways that coordinate the cellular adaptive response to external forces. Our objective was to examine how mechanical forces contribute significantly to physiological functions and pathogenesis in reproductive tissues. We highlight how widespread diseases of the reproductive tract, from preterm labor to tumors of the uterus and breast, result from an impairment in mechanical signaling. PMID:25001021

  7. INTRACELLULAR SIGNALING AND DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A book chapter in ?Molecular Toxicology: Transcriptional Targets? reviewed the role of intracellular signaling in the developmental neurotoxicity of environmental chemicals. This chapter covered a number of aspects including the development of the nervous system, role of intrace...

  8. Stem Cells and Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Fernanda M.P.; Santos, Anderson K.; Gomes, Dawidson A.; da Silva, Saulo L.; Gomes, Katia N.; Ladeira, Luiz O.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing interest in stem cell research is linked to the promise of developing treatments for many lifethreatening, debilitating diseases, and for cell replacement therapies. However, performing these therapeutic innovations with safety will only be possible when an accurate knowledge about the molecular signals that promote the desired cell fate is reached. Among these signals are transient changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i. Acting as an intracellular messenger, Ca2+ has a key role in cell signaling pathways in various differentiation stages of stem cells. The aim of this chapter is to present a broad overview of various moments in which Ca2+-mediated signaling is essential for the maintenance of stem cells and for promoting their development and differentiation, also focusing on their therapeutic potential. PMID:22453975

  9. SIGNALING NETWORKS IN PALATE DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jamie; Kaartinen, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    Palatogenesis, the formation of the palate, is a dynamic process that is regulated by a complex series of context-dependent morphogenetic signaling events. Many genes involved in palatogenesis have been discovered through the use of genetically-manipulated mouse models as well as from human genetic studies, but the roles of these genes and their products in signaling networks regulating palatogenesis are still poorly known. In this review, we give a brief overview on palatogenesis and introduce key signaling cascades leading to formation of the intact palate. Moreover, we review conceptual differences between pathway biology and network biology and discuss how some of the recent technological advances in conjunction with mouse genetic models have contributed to our understanding of signaling networks regulating palate growth and fusion. PMID:24644145

  10. Extracellular modulators of Wnt signalling.

    PubMed

    Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E Yvonne

    2014-12-01

    Wnt morphogens are secreted signalling proteins that play leading roles in embryogenesis and tissue homeostasis throughout life. Wnt signalling is controlled by multiple mechanisms, including posttranslational modification of Wnts, antagonist binding (to Wnts or their receptors), and regulation of the availability of Wnt receptors. Recent crystallographic, structure-guided biophysical and cell-based studies have advanced our understanding of how Wnt signalling is regulated at the cell surface. Structures include Wnt in complex with the cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of Frizzled, extracellular fragments of Wnt co-receptor LRP6, LRP6-binding antagonists Dickkopf and Sclerostin, antagonists 5T4/WAIF1 and Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF-1), as well as Frizzled-ubiquitin ligases ZNRF3/RNF43 (in isolation and in complexes with Wnt signalling promoters R-spondins and LGR5). We review recent discoveries and remaining questions. PMID:25460271

  11. Acoustic emission and signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. K.

    1990-01-01

    A review is given of the acoustic emission (AE) phenomenon and its applications in NDE and geological rock mechanics. Typical instrumentation used in AE signal detection, data acquisition, processing, and analysis is discussed. The parameters used in AE signal analysis are outlined, and current methods of AE signal analysis procedures are discussed. A literature review is presented on the pattern classification of AE signals. A discussion then follows on the application of AE in aircraft component monitoring, with an experiment described which focuses on in-flight AE monitoring during fatigue crack growth in an aero engine mount. A pattern recognition approach is detailed for the classification of the experimental data. The approach subjects each of the data files to a cluster analysis by the threshold-k-means scheme. The technique is shown to classify the data successfully.

  12. 49 CFR 236.310 - Signal governing approach to home signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Signal governing approach to home signal. 236.310... Standards § 236.310 Signal governing approach to home signal. A signal shall be provided on main track to govern the approach with the current of traffic to any home signal except where the home signal is...

  13. 49 CFR 236.310 - Signal governing approach to home signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Signal governing approach to home signal. 236.310... Standards § 236.310 Signal governing approach to home signal. A signal shall be provided on main track to govern the approach with the current of traffic to any home signal except where the home signal is...

  14. 49 CFR 236.310 - Signal governing approach to home signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Signal governing approach to home signal. 236.310... Standards § 236.310 Signal governing approach to home signal. A signal shall be provided on main track to govern the approach with the current of traffic to any home signal except where the home signal is...

  15. 49 CFR 236.310 - Signal governing approach to home signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signal governing approach to home signal. 236.310... Standards § 236.310 Signal governing approach to home signal. A signal shall be provided on main track to govern the approach with the current of traffic to any home signal except where the home signal is...

  16. 49 CFR 236.310 - Signal governing approach to home signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Signal governing approach to home signal. 236.310... Standards § 236.310 Signal governing approach to home signal. A signal shall be provided on main track to govern the approach with the current of traffic to any home signal except where the home signal is...

  17. Striation effect on HF signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, G. H.

    1985-06-01

    Methods are described for calculating the effects of forward scatter by ionospheric irregularities on high-frequency sky-wave radio signals. The approach combines the forward-scatter theory (developed to treat refracted-ray paths in the context of acoustic propagation in oceans) with the model of ionospheric irregularities developed by the Defense Nuclear Agency. Expressions are given for calculating signal decorrelation in time, space and frequency.

  18. Identification techniques for SARSAT signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Naga, S.; Carter, C. R.

    1987-03-01

    A process for the identification of emergency locator transmitter (ELT) signals related to search and rescue satellite-aided tracking (SARSAT) is presented. The ELT identification process is particularly important in order to increase the probability of detection and eliminate sources of interference from the data set. A set of ELT signal parameters is introduced and methods for estimating these parameters are developed. A theoretical analysis and performance evaluation of these methods is provided.

  19. Aberrant Wnt Signaling in Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Staal, Frank J T; Famili, Farbod; Garcia Perez, Laura; Pike-Overzet, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is essential in the development and homeostasis of blood and immune cells, but its exact role is still controversial and is the subject of intense research. The malignant counterpart of normal hematopoietic cells, leukemic (stem) cells, have hijacked the Wnt pathway for their self-renewal and proliferation. Here we review the multiple ways dysregulated Wnt signaling can contribute to leukemogenesis, both cell autonomously as well as by changes in the microenvironment. PMID:27571104

  20. Insulin Signaling and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Riehle, Christian; Abel, E Dale

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is associated with generalized insulin resistance. Moreover, insulin-resistant states such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity increases the risk of heart failure even after adjusting for traditional risk factors. Insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes mellitus alters the systemic and neurohumoral milieu, leading to changes in metabolism and signaling pathways in the heart that may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. In addition, changes in insulin signaling within cardiomyocytes develop in the failing heart. The changes range from activation of proximal insulin signaling pathways that may contribute to adverse left ventricular remodeling and mitochondrial dysfunction to repression of distal elements of insulin signaling pathways such as forkhead box O transcriptional signaling or glucose transport, which may also impair cardiac metabolism, structure, and function. This article will review the complexities of insulin signaling within the myocardium and ways in which these pathways are altered in heart failure or in conditions associated with generalized insulin resistance. The implications of these changes for therapeutic approaches to treating or preventing heart failure will be discussed. PMID:27034277

  1. Digital Filter Separates Signal From Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Variance of signal-estimation error minimized. Mathematical technique extracts best estimates of signal component from periodic digital samples of signal plus noise. Technique combines Kalman- and smoothingfilter algorithms to minimize mean-square estimation error based on past, present, and predicted samples of signal plus noise. Technique useful in image analysis and other applications involving processing of noisy signals.

  2. 46 CFR 109.503 - Emergency signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency signals. 109.503 Section 109.503 Shipping... Emergency Signals § 109.503 Emergency signals. (a) Emergency stations signals are established as follows: (1) The signal to man emergency stations is a rapid succession of short soundings of both the...

  3. SignalPlant: an open signal processing software platform.

    PubMed

    Plesinger, F; Jurco, J; Halamek, J; Jurak, P

    2016-07-01

    The growing technical standard of acquisition systems allows the acquisition of large records, often reaching gigabytes or more in size as is the case with whole-day electroencephalograph (EEG) recordings, for example. Although current 64-bit software for signal processing is able to process (e.g. filter, analyze, etc) such data, visual inspection and labeling will probably suffer from rather long latency during the rendering of large portions of recorded signals. For this reason, we have developed SignalPlant-a stand-alone application for signal inspection, labeling and processing. The main motivation was to supply investigators with a tool allowing fast and interactive work with large multichannel records produced by EEG, electrocardiograph and similar devices. The rendering latency was compared with EEGLAB and proves significantly faster when displaying an image from a large number of samples (e.g. 163-times faster for 75  ×  10(6) samples). The presented SignalPlant software is available free and does not depend on any other computation software. Furthermore, it can be extended with plugins by third parties ensuring its adaptability to future research tasks and new data formats. PMID:27243208

  4. Observation of a New J{sup PC} = 1{sup {minus}+} Exotic State in the Reaction {pi}{sup {minus}}p {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +} {pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup {minus}} p at 18 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, S.U.; Danyo, K.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Olchanski, C.; Ostrovidov, A.I.; Weygand, D.P.; Willutzki, H.J.; Bodyagin, V.A.; Kodolova, O.L.; Korotkikh, V.L.; Kostin, M.A.; Ostrovidov, A.I.; Sarycheva, L.I.; Sinev, N.B.; Vardanyan, I.N.; Yershov, A.A.; Bar-Yam, Z.; Cummings, J.P.; Dowd, J.P.; Eugenio, P.; Hayek, M.; Kern, W.; King, E.; Ostrovidov, A.I.; Shenhav, N.; Adams, G.S.; Cummings, J.P.; Kuhn, J.; Napolitano, J.; Nozar, M.; Smith, J.A.; White, D.; Witkowski, M.; Adams, T.; Bishop, J.M.; Cason, N.M.; Ivanov, E.I.; LoSecco, J.M.; Manak, J.J.; Sanjari, A.H.; Shephard, W.D.; Stienike, D.L.; Taegar, S.A.; Thompson, D.R.; Brabson, B.B.; Crittenden, R.R.; Dzierba, A.R.; Gunter, J.; Lindenbusch, R.; Rust, D.R.; Scott, E.; Smith, P.T.; Sulanke, T.; Teige, S.; Brown, D.S.; Pedlar, T.K.; Seth, K.K.; Wise, J.; Zhao, D.; Denisov, S.; Dorofeev, V.; Kachaev, I.; Lipaev, V.; Popov, A.; Ryabchikov, D.

    1998-12-01

    A partial-wave analysis of the reaction {pi}{sup {minus}}p{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus} }{pi}{sup {minus}}p at 18 GeV/c has been performed on a data sample of 250thinsp000 events obtained by Brookhaven experiment E852. The expected J{sup PC}=1{sup ++}a{sub 1}(1260) , 2{sup ++}a{sub 2}(1320) , and 2{sup {minus}+}{pi}{sub 2}(1670) resonant states are clearly observed. The exotic J{sup PC}=1{sup {minus}+} wave produced in the natural parity exchange processes shows distinct resonancelike phase motion at about 1.6 GeV/c{sup 2} in the {rho}{pi} channel. A mass-dependent fit results in a resonance mass of 1593{plus_minus}8{sup +29}{sub {minus}47} MeV /c{sup 2} and a width of 168{plus_minus}20{sup +150}{sub {minus}12} MeV /c{sup 2} . {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  5. Chemotactic signal integration in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, S; Spudich, J L; McCray, J A; Trentham, D R

    1995-01-01

    Chemotactic signaling in Escherichia coli involves transmission of both negative and positive signals. In order to examine mechanisms of signal processing, behavioral responses to dual inputs have been measured by using photoactivable "caged" compounds, computer video analysis, and chemoreceptor deletion mutants. Signaling from Tar and Tsr, two receptors that sense amino acids and pH, was studied. In a Tar deletion mutant the photoactivated release of protons, a Tsr repellent, and of serine, a Tsr attractant, in separate experiments at pH 7.0 resulted in tumbling (negative) or smooth-swimming (positive) responses in ca. 50 and 140 ms, respectively. Simultaneous photorelease of protons and serine resulted in a single tumbling or smooth-swimming response, depending on the relative amounts of the two effectors. In contrast, in wild-type E. coli, proton release at pH 7.0 resulted in a biphasic response that was attributed to Tsr-mediated tumbling followed by Tar-mediated smooth-swimming. In wild-type E. coli at more alkaline pH values the Tar-mediated signal was stronger than the Tsr signal, resulting in a strong smooth-swimming response preceded by a diminished tumbling response. These observations imply that (i) a single receptor time-averages the binding of different chemotactic ligands generating a single response; (ii) ligand binding to different receptors can result in a nonintegrated response with the tumbling response preceding the smooth-swimming response; (iii) however, chemotactic signals of different intensities derived from different receptors can also result in an apparently integrated response; and (iv) the different chemotactic responses to protons at neutral and alkaline pH may contribute to E. coli migration toward neutrality. Images Fig. 6 PMID:7568212

  6. Differential phase shift keyed signal resolver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, P. M.; Wallingford, W. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A differential phase shift keyed signal resolver resolves the differential phase shift in the incoming signal to determine the data content thereof overcoming phase uncertainty without requiring a transmitted reference signal.

  7. Microcontrollers Generate Timing Signals For CCD Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetter, Marilyn K.; Mccloskey, John C.; Reed, Kenneth V.

    1992-01-01

    Microcontrollers generate timing signals for charge-coupled-device array detectors in electronic system developed to test such detectors. With microcontroller, one changes timing signals via software, without changes in wiring. Approach more flexible, timing signals changed easier and quicker.

  8. EGFR Signaling in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Komposch, Karin; Sibilia, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by several ligands leading to the activation of diverse signaling pathways controlling mainly proliferation, differentiation, and survival. The EGFR signaling axis has been shown to play a key role during liver regeneration following acute and chronic liver damage, as well as in cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) highlighting the importance of the EGFR in the development of liver diseases. Despite the frequent overexpression of EGFR in human HCC, clinical studies with EGFR inhibitors have so far shown only modest results. Interestingly, a recent study has shown that in human HCC and in mouse HCC models the EGFR is upregulated in liver macrophages where it plays a tumor-promoting function. Thus, the role of EGFR in liver diseases appears to be more complex than what anticipated. Further studies are needed to improve the molecular understanding of the cell-specific signaling pathways that control disease development and progression to be able to develop better therapies targeting major components of the EGFR signaling network in selected cell types. In this review, we compiled the current knowledge of EGFR signaling in different models of liver damage and diseases, mainly derived from the analysis of HCC cell lines and genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs). PMID:26729094

  9. Polarization signals in mantis shrimps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Thomas W.; Chiou, Tsyr-Huei; Caldwell, Roy L.; Roberts, Nicholas; Marshall, Justin

    2009-08-01

    While color signals are well known as a form of animal communication, a number of animals communicate using signals based on patterns of polarized light reflected from specialized body parts or structures. Mantis shrimps, a group of marine crustaceans, have evolved a great diversity of such signals, several of which are based on photonic structures. These include resonant scattering devices, structures based on layered dichroic molecules, and structures that use birefringent layers to produce circular polarization. Such biological polarizers operate in different spectral regions ranging from the near-UV to medium wavelengths of visible light. In addition to the structures that are specialized for signal production, the eyes of many species of mantis shrimp are adapted to detect linearly polarized light in the ultraviolet and in the green, using specialized sets of photoreceptors with oriented, dichroic visual pigments. Finally, a few mantis shrimp species produce biophotonic retarders within their photoreceptors that permit the detection of circularly polarized light and are thus the only animals known to sense this form of polarization. Mantis shrimps use polarized light in species-specific signals related to mating and territorial defense, and their means of manipulating light's polarization can inspire designs for artificial polarizers and achromatic retarders.

  10. Signalling drought in guard cells.

    PubMed

    Luan, S.

    2002-02-01

    A number of environmental conditions including drought, low humidity, cold and salinity subject plants to osmotic stress. A rapid plant response to such stress conditions is stomatal closure to reduce water loss from plants. From an external stress signal to stomatal closure, many molecular components constitute a signal transduction network that couples the stimulus to the response. Numerous studies have been directed to resolving the framework and molecular details of stress signalling pathways in plants. In guard cells, studies focus on the regulation of ion channels by abscisic acid (ABA), a chemical messenger for osmotic stress. Calcium, protein kinases and phosphatases, and membrane trafficking components have been shown to play a role in ABA signalling process in guard cells. Studies also implicate ABA-independent regulation of ion channels by osmotic stress. In particular, a direct osmosensing pathway for ion channel regulation in guard cells has been identified. These pathways form a complex signalling web that monitors water status in the environment and initiates responses in stomatal movements. PMID:11841666

  11. Notch Signaling and the Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Stefano; Canalis, Ernesto

    2016-06-01

    Notch 1 to 4 receptors are important determinants of cell fate and function, and Notch signaling plays an important role in skeletal development and bone remodeling. After direct interactions with ligands of the Jagged and Delta-like families, a series of cleavages release the Notch intracellular domain (NICD), which translocates to the nucleus where it induces transcription of Notch target genes. Classic gene targets of Notch are hairy and enhancer of split (Hes) and Hes-related with YRPW motif (Hey). In cells of the osteoblastic lineage, Notch activation inhibits cell differentiation and causes cancellous bone osteopenia because of impaired bone formation. In osteocytes, Notch1 has distinct effects that result in an inhibition of bone resorption secondary to an induction of osteoprotegerin and suppression of sclerostin with a consequent enhancement of Wnt signaling. Notch1 inhibits, whereas Notch2 enhances, osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. Congenital disorders of loss- and gain-of-Notch function present with severe clinical manifestations, often affecting the skeleton. Enhanced Notch signaling is associated with osteosarcoma, and Notch can influence the invasive potential of carcinoma of the breast and prostate. Notch signaling can be controlled by the use of inhibitors of Notch activation, small peptides that interfere with the formation of a transcriptional complex, or antibodies to the extracellular domain of specific Notch receptors or to Notch ligands. In conclusion, Notch plays a critical role in skeletal development and homeostasis, and serious skeletal disorders can be attributed to alterations in Notch signaling. PMID:27074349

  12. Cancer stem cell signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Matsui, William H

    2016-09-01

    Tissue development and homeostasis are governed by the actions of stem cells. Multipotent cells are capable of self-renewal during the course of one's lifetime. The accurate and appropriate regulation of stem cell functions is absolutely critical for normal biological activity. Several key developmental or signaling pathways have been shown to play essential roles in this regulatory capacity. Specifically, the Janus-activated kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription, Hedgehog, Wnt, Notch, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/phosphatase and tensin homolog, and nuclear factor-κB signaling pathways have all been shown experimentally to mediate various stem cell properties, such as self-renewal, cell fate decisions, survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Unsurprisingly, many of these crucial signaling pathways are dysregulated in cancer. Growing evidence suggests that overactive or abnormal signaling within and among these pathways may contribute to the survival of cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are a relatively rare population of cancer cells capable of self-renewal, differentiation, and generation of serially transplantable heterogeneous tumors of several types of cancer. PMID:27611937

  13. Dialkylresorcinols as bacterial signaling molecules

    PubMed Central

    Brameyer, Sophie; Kresovic, Darko; Bode, Helge B.; Heermann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognized that bacteria communicate via small diffusible molecules, a process termed quorum sensing. The best understood quorum sensing systems are those that use acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) for communication. The prototype of those systems consists of a LuxI-like AHL synthase and a cognate LuxR receptor that detects the signal. However, many proteobacteria possess LuxR receptors, yet lack any LuxI-type synthase, and thus these receptors are referred to as LuxR orphans or solos. In addition to the well-known AHLs, little is known about the signaling molecules that are sensed by LuxR solos. Here, we describe a novel cell–cell communication system in the insect and human pathogen Photorhabdus asymbiotica. We identified the LuxR homolog PauR to sense dialkylresorcinols (DARs) and cyclohexanediones (CHDs) instead of AHLs as signals. The DarABC synthesis pathway produces the molecules, and the entire system emerged as important for virulence. Moreover, we have analyzed more than 90 different Photorhabdus strains by HPLC/MS and showed that these DARs and CHDs are specific to the human pathogen P. asymbiotica. On the basis of genomic evidence, 116 other bacterial species are putative DAR producers, among them many human pathogens. Therefore, we discuss the possibility of DARs as novel and widespread bacterial signaling molecules and show that bacterial cell–cell communication goes far beyond AHL signaling in nature. PMID:25550519

  14. Intracellular signalling during neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    Mócsai, Attila; Walzog, Barbara; Lowell, Clifford A

    2015-08-01

    Recruitment of leucocytes such as neutrophils to the extravascular space is a critical step of the inflammation process and plays a major role in the development of various diseases including several cardiovascular diseases. Neutrophils themselves play a very active role in that process by sensing their environment and responding to the extracellular cues by adhesion and de-adhesion, cellular shape changes, chemotactic migration, and other effector functions of cell activation. Those responses are co-ordinated by a number of cell surface receptors and their complex intracellular signal transduction pathways. Here, we review neutrophil signal transduction processes critical for recruitment to the site of inflammation. The two key requirements for neutrophil recruitment are the establishment of appropriate chemoattractant gradients and the intrinsic ability of the cells to migrate along those gradients. We will first discuss signalling steps required for sensing extracellular chemoattractants such as chemokines and lipid mediators and the processes (e.g. PI3-kinase pathways) leading to the translation of extracellular chemoattractant gradients to polarized cellular responses. We will then discuss signal transduction by leucocyte adhesion receptors (e.g. tyrosine kinase pathways) which are critical for adhesion to, and migration through the vessel wall. Finally, additional neutrophil signalling pathways with an indirect effect on the neutrophil recruitment process, e.g. through modulation of the inflammatory environment, will be discussed. Mechanistic understanding of these pathways provide better understanding of the inflammation process and may point to novel therapeutic strategies for controlling excessive inflammation during infection or tissue damage. PMID:25998986

  15. Mathematical model for classification of EEG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Victor H.; Tapia, Juan J.

    2015-09-01

    A mathematical model to filter and classify brain signals from a brain machine interface is developed. The mathematical model classifies the signals from the different lobes of the brain to differentiate the signals: alpha, beta, gamma and theta, besides the signals from vision, speech, and orientation. The model to develop further eliminates noise signals that occur in the process of signal acquisition. This mathematical model can be used on different platforms interfaces for rehabilitation of physically handicapped persons.

  16. TGFβ signaling and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Pardali, Evangelia; Ten Dijke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) family members are involved in a wide range of diverse functions and play key roles in embryogenesis, development and tissue homeostasis. Perturbation of TGFβ signaling may lead to vascular and other diseases. In vitro studies have provided evidence that TGFβ family members have a wide range of diverse effects on vascular cells, which are highly dependent on cellular context. Consistent with these observations genetic studies in mice and humans showed that TGFβ family members have ambiguous effects on the function of the cardiovascular system. In this review we discuss the recent advances on TGFβ signaling in (cardio)vascular diseases, and describe the value of TGFβ signaling as both a disease marker and therapeutic target for (cardio)vascular diseases. PMID:22253564

  17. Intelligent signal analysis and recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, Robert; Helman, Daniel; Oswalt, Edward

    1987-01-01

    Progress in the research and development of self-organizing database system that can support the identification and characterization of signals in an RF environment is described. As the radio frequency spectrum becomes more crowded, there are a number of situations that require a characterization of the RF environment. This database system is designed to be practical in applications where communications and other instruments encounter a time varying and complex RF environment. The primary application of this system is the guidance and control of NASA's SETI Microwave Observing Project. Other possible applications include selection of telemety bands for communication with spacecraft, and the scheduling of antenna for radio astronomy are two examples where characterization of the RF environment is required. In these applications, the RF environment is constantly changing, and even experienced operators cannot quickly identify the multitude of signals that can be encountered. Some of these signals are repetitive, others appear to occur sporadically.

  18. Multiscale Representation of Genomic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Knijnenburg, Theo A.; Ramsey, Stephen A.; Berman, Benjamin P.; Kennedy, Kathleen A.; Smit, Arian F.A.; Wessels, Lodewyk F.A.; Laird, Peter W.; Aderem, Alan; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Genomic information is encoded on a wide range of distance scales, ranging from tens of base pairs to megabases. We developed a multiscale framework to analyze and visualize the information content of genomic signals. Different types of signals, such as GC content or DNA methylation, are characterized by distinct patterns of signal enrichment or depletion across scales spanning several orders of magnitude. These patterns are associated with a variety of genomic annotations, including genes, nuclear lamina associated domains, and repeat elements. By integrating the information across all scales, as compared to using any single scale, we demonstrate improved prediction of gene expression from Polymerase II chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) measurements and we observed that gene expression differences in colorectal cancer are not most strongly related to gene body methylation, but rather to methylation patterns that extend beyond the single-gene scale. PMID:24727652

  19. Hedgehog Signaling in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Omenetti, Alessia; Choi, Steve; Michelotti, Gregory; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2010-01-01

    Reactivation of Hedgehog (Hh), a morphogenic signaling pathway that controls progenitor cell fate and tissue construction during embryogenesis occurs during many types of liver injury in adult. The net effects of activating the Hedgehog pathway include expansion of liver progenitor populations to promote liver regeneration, but also hepatic accumulation of inflammatory cells, liver fibrogenesis, and vascular remodeling. All of these latter responses are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of cirrhosis. In addition, Hh signaling may play a role in primary liver cancers, such as cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. Study of Hedgehog signaling in liver cells is in its infancy. Additional research in this area is justified given growing experimental and clinical data supporting a role for the pathway in regulating outcomes of liver injury. PMID:21093090

  20. Multichannel Coding of Applause Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotho, Gerard; van de Par, Steven; Breebaart, Jeroen

    2007-12-01

    We develop a parametric multichannel audio codec dedicated to coding signals consisting of a dense series of transient-type events. These signals of which applause is a typical example are known to be problematic for such audio codecs. The codec design is based on preservation of both timbre and transient-type event density. It combines a very low complexity and a low parameter bit rate (0.2 kbps). In a formal listening test, we compared the proposed codec to the recently standardised MPEG Surround multichannel codec, with an associated parameter bit rate of 9 kbps. We found the new codec to have a significantly higher audio quality than the MPEG Surround codec for the two multichannel applause signals under test. Though this seems promising, the technique presented is not fully mature, for example, because issues related to integration of the proposed codec in the MPEG Surround codec were not addressed.

  1. Signaling lansdscape of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, X; Aslam, A; Attar, R; Yaylim, I; Qureshi, M Z; Hasnain, S; Qadir, M I; Farooqi, A A

    2016-01-01

    Research over the decades has gradually and sequentially shown that both intratumor heterogeneity and multifocality make prostate cancer difficult to target. Different challenges associated with generation of risk-stratification tools that correlate genomic landscape with clinical outcomes severely influence clinical efficacy of therapeutic strategies. Androgen receptor mediated signaling has gained great appreciation and rewiring of AR induced signaling cascade in absence of androgen, structural variants of AR have provided near complete resolution of genomic landscape and underlying mechanisms of prostate cancer. In this review we have attempted to provide an overview of most recent advancements in our knowledge related to different signaling cascades including TGF, SHH, Notch, JAK-STAT in prostate cancer progression and development. PMID:26828986

  2. Signaling pathways mediating alcohol effects.

    PubMed

    Ron, Dorit; Messing, Robert O

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol's effects on intracellular signaling pathways contribute to acute effects of ethanol as well as to neuroadaptive responses to repeated ethanol exposure. In this chapter we review recent discoveries that demonstrate how ethanol alters signaling pathways involving several receptor tyrosine kinases and intracellular tyrosine and serine-threonine kinases, with consequences for regulation of cell surface receptor function, gene expression, protein translation, neuronal excitability and animal behavior. We also describe recent work that demonstrates a key role for ethanol in regulating the function of scaffolding proteins that organize signaling complexes into functional units. Finally, we review recent exciting studies demonstrating ethanol modulation of DNA and histone modification and the expression of microRNAs, indicating epigenetic mechanisms by which ethanol regulates neuronal gene expression and addictive behaviors. PMID:21877259

  3. The Yeast Sphingolipid Signaling Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Montefusco, David J.; Matmati, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are recognized as signaling mediators in a growing number of pathways, and represent potential targets to address many diseases. The study of sphingolipid signaling in yeast has created a number of breakthroughs in the field, and has the potential to lead future advances. The aim of this article is to provide an inclusive view of two major frontiers in yeast sphingolipid signaling. In the first section, several key studies in the field of sphingolipidomics are consolidated to create a yeast sphingolipidome that ranks nearly all known sphingolipid species by their level in a resting yeast cell. The second section presents an overview of most known phenotypes identified for sphingolipid gene mutants, presented with the intention of illuminating not yet discovered connections outside and inside of the field. PMID:24220500

  4. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Serotonin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Terrell; González-Maeso, Javier

    2015-07-15

    Histone modifications and DNA methylation represent central dynamic and reversible processes that regulate gene expression and contribute to cellular phenotypes. These epigenetic marks have been shown to play fundamental roles in a diverse set of signaling and behavioral outcomes. Serotonin is a monoamine that regulates numerous physiological responses including those in the central nervous system. The cardinal signal transduction mechanisms via serotonin and its receptors are well established, but fundamental questions regarding complex interactions between the serotonin system and heritable epigenetic modifications that exert control on gene function remain a topic of intense research and debate. This review focuses on recent advances and contributions to our understanding of epigenetic mechanisms of serotonin receptor-dependent signaling, with focus on psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. PMID:25734378

  5. Signaling from axon guidance receptors.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Greg J; Klein, Rüdiger

    2010-05-01

    Determining how axon guidance receptors transmit signals to allow precise pathfinding decisions is fundamental to our understanding of nervous system development and may suggest new strategies to promote axon regeneration after injury or disease. Signaling mechanisms that act downstream of four prominent families of axon guidance cues--netrins, semaphorins, ephrins, and slits--have been extensively studied in both invertebrate and vertebrate model systems. Although details of these signaling mechanisms are still fragmentary and there appears to be considerable diversity in how different guidance receptors regulate the motility of the axonal growth cone, a number of common themes have emerged. Here, we review recent insights into how specific receptors for each of these guidance cues engage downstream regulators of the growth cone cytoskeleton to control axon guidance. PMID:20452961

  6. Smoke signals and seed dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Mark T; Nelson, David C

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana F-box protein MAX2 has been discovered in four separate genetic screens, indicating that it has roles in leaf senescence, seedling photosensitivity, shoot outgrowth and seed germination. Both strigolactones and karrikins can regulate A. thaliana seed germination and seedling photomorphogenesis in a MAX2-dependent manner, but only strigolactones inhibit shoot branching. How MAX2 mediates specific responses to both classes of structurally-related signals, and the origin of its dual role remains unknown. The moss Physcomitrella patens utilizes strigolactones and MAX2 orthologs are present across the land plants, suggesting that this signaling system could have an ancient origin. The seed of parasitic Orobanchaceae species germinate preferentially in response to strigolactones over karrikins, and putative Orobanchaceae MAX2 orthologs form a sub-clade distinct from those of other dicots. These observations suggest that lineage-specific evolution of MAX2 may have given rise to specialized responses to these signaling molecules. PMID:22019642

  7. Sortilins in neurotrophic factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Glerup, S; Nykjaer, A; Vaegter, C B

    2014-01-01

    The sortilin family of Vps10p-domain receptors includes sortilin, SorLA, and SorCS1-3. These type-I transmembrane receptors predominate in distinct neuronal tissues, but expression is also present in certain specialized non-neuronal cell populations including hepatocytes and cells of the immune system. The biology of sortilins is complex as they participate in both cell signaling and in intracellular protein sorting. Sortilins function physiologically in signaling by pro- and mature neurotrophins in neuronal viability and functionality. Recent genome-wide association studies have linked members to neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and bipolar disorder and outside the nervous system to development of coronary artery disease and type-2 diabetes. Particularly well described are the receptor functions in neuronal signaling by pro- (proNT) and mature (NT) neurotrophins and in the processing/metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP). PMID:24668473

  8. The ins and outs of adrenergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Martin J

    2015-09-01

    Adrenergic signaling, in particular signaling in the sympathetic nervous system, is a prime example of the control of an essential physiological system. It has served as a model system both for the control of mediator release and for receptor signaling and regulation. This review covers the historical development of the field and then addresses issues that represent key fields of ongoing research: the mechanisms and kinetics of receptor activation, temporal patterns of downstream signaling and signal bias, receptor mobility and aggregation, and signal compartmentation and specificity. The available evidence suggests that adrenergic signaling may involve complex spatiotemporal patterns, which give texture to the signaling process and may contain additional biological information. PMID:26199112

  9. Digital signal processor and programming system for parallel signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bout, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    This thesis describes an integrated assault upon the problem of designing high-throughput, low-cost digital signal-processing systems. The dual prongs of this assault consist of: (1) the design of a digital signal processor (DSP) which efficiently executes signal-processing algorithms in either a uniprocessor or multiprocessor configuration, (2) the PaLS programming system which accepts an arbitrary algorithm, partitions it across a group of DSPs, synthesizes an optimal communication link topology for the DSPs, and schedules the partitioned algorithm upon the DSPs. The results of applying a new quasi-dynamic analysis technique to a set of high-level signal-processing algorithms were used to determine the uniprocessor features of the DSP design. For multiprocessing applications, the DSP contains an interprocessor communications port (IPC) which supports simple, flexible, dataflow communications while allowing the total communication bandwidth to be incrementally allocated to achieve the best link utilization. The net result is a DSP with a simple architecture that is easy to program for both uniprocessor and multi-processor modes of operation. The PaLS programming system simplifies the task of parallelizing an algorithm for execution upon a multiprocessor built with the DSP.

  10. Expected geoneutrino signal at JUNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strati, Virginia; Baldoncini, Marica; Callegari, Ivan; Mantovani, Fabio; McDonough, William F.; Ricci, Barbara; Xhixha, Gerti

    2015-12-01

    Constraints on the Earth's composition and on its radiogenic energy budget come from the detection of geoneutrinos. The Kamioka Liquid scintillator Antineutrino Detector (KamLAND) and Borexino experiments recently reported the geoneutrino flux, which reflects the amount and distribution of U and Th inside the Earth. The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) neutrino experiment, designed as a 20 kton liquid scintillator detector, will be built in an underground laboratory in South China about 53 km from the Yangjiang and Taishan nuclear power plants, each one having a planned thermal power of approximately 18 GW. Given the large detector mass and the intense reactor antineutrino flux, JUNO aims not only to collect high statistics antineutrino signals from reactors but also to address the challenge of discriminating the geoneutrino signal from the reactor background. The predicted geoneutrino signal at JUNO is terrestrial neutrino unit (TNU), based on the existing reference Earth model, with the dominant source of uncertainty coming from the modeling of the compositional variability in the local upper crust that surrounds (out to approximately 500 km) the detector. A special focus is dedicated to the 6° × 4° local crust surrounding the detector which is estimated to contribute for the 44% of the signal. On the basis of a worldwide reference model for reactor antineutrinos, the ratio between reactor antineutrino and geoneutrino signals in the geoneutrino energy window is estimated to be 0.7 considering reactors operating in year 2013 and reaches a value of 8.9 by adding the contribution of the future nuclear power plants. In order to extract useful information about the mantle's composition, a refinement of the abundance and distribution of U and Th in the local crust is required, with particular attention to the geochemical characterization of the accessible upper crust where 47% of the expected geoneutrino signal originates and this region contributes

  11. Acoustically-Induced Electrical Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    We have observed electrical signals excited by and moving along with an acoustic pulse propagating in a sandstone sample. Using resonance we are now studying the characteristics of this acousto-electric signal and determining its origin and the controlling physical parameters. Four rock samples with a range of porosities, permeabilities, and mineralogies were chosen: Berea, Boise, and Colton sandstones and Austin Chalk. Pore water salinity was varied from deionized water to sea water. Ag-AgCl electrodes were attached to the sample and were interfaced to a 4-wire electrical resistivity system. Under computer control, the acoustic signals were excited and the electrical response was recorded. We see strong acoustically-induced electrical signals in all samples, with the magnitude of the effect for each rock getting stronger as we move from the 1st to the 3rd harmonics in resonance. Given a particular fluid salinity, each rock has its own distinct sensitivity in the induced electrical effect. For example at the 2nd harmonic, Berea Sandstone produces the largest electrical signal per acoustic power input even though Austin Chalk and Boise Sandstone tend to resonate with much larger amplitudes at the same harmonic. Two effects are potentially responsible for this acoustically-induced electrical response: one the co-seismic seismo-electric effect and the other a strain-induced resistivity change known as the acousto-electric effect. We have designed experimental tests to separate these mechanisms. The tests show that the seismo-electric effect is dominant in our studies. We note that these experiments are in a fluid viscosity dominated seismo-electric regime, leading to a simple interpretation of the signals where the electric potential developed is proportional to the local acceleration of the rock. Toward a test of this theory we have measured the local time-varying acoustic strain in our samples using a laser vibrometer.

  12. Lipid signals and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongben; Klett, Eric L; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2013-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of metabolic derangements that include obesity, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia and hypertension, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance has been proposed to be the common feature that links obesity to the metabolic syndrome, but the mechanism remains obscure. Although the excess content of triacylglycerol in muscle and liver is highly associated with insulin resistance in these tissues, triacylglycerol itself is not causal but merely a marker. Thus, attention has turned to the accumulation of cellular lipids known to have signaling roles. This review will discuss recent progress in understanding how glycerolipids and related lipid intermediates may impair insulin signaling. PMID:24533033

  13. Phosphoinositide signaling in somatosensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-05-01

    Somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and trigeminal ganglia (TG) are responsible for detecting thermal and tactile stimuli. They are also the primary neurons mediating pain and itch. A large number of cell surface receptors in these neurons couple to phospholipase C (PLC) enzymes leading to the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and the generation of downstream signaling molecules. These neurons also express many different ion channels, several of which are regulated by phosphoinositides. This review will summarize the knowledge on phosphoinositide signaling in DRG neurons, with special focus on effects on sensory and other ion channels. PMID:26724974

  14. Pharmacology of intracellular signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Nahorski, Stefan R

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a brief and somewhat personalized review of the dramatic developments that have occurred over the last 45 years in our understanding of intracellular signalling pathways associated with G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Signalling via cyclic AMP, the phosphoinositides and Ca2+ is emphasized and these systems have already been revealed as new pharmacological targets. The therapeutic benefits of most of such targets are, however, yet to be realized, but it is certain that the discipline of pharmacology needs to widen its boundaries to meet these challenges in the future. PMID:16402119

  15. Genomic Signals of Reoriented ORFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan Cristea, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Complex representation of nucleotides is used to convert DNA sequences into complex digital genomic signals. The analysis of the cumulated phase and unwrapped phase of DNA genomic signals reveals large-scale features of eukaryote and prokaryote chromosomes that result from statistical regularities of base and base-pair distributions along DNA strands. By reorienting the chromosome coding regions, a "hidden" linear variation of the cumulated phase has been revealed, along with the conspicuous almost linear variation of the unwrapped phase. A model of chromosome longitudinal structure is inferred on these bases.

  16. Ubiquitin signaling in immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongbo; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination has emerged as a crucial mechanism that regulates signal transduction in diverse biological processes, including different aspects of immune functions. Ubiquitination regulates pattern-recognition receptor signaling that mediates both innate immune responses and dendritic cell maturation required for initiation of adaptive immune responses. Ubiquitination also regulates the development, activation, and differentiation of T cells, thereby maintaining efficient adaptive immune responses to pathogens and immunological tolerance to self-tissues. Like phosphorylation, ubiquitination is a reversible reaction tightly controlled by the opposing actions of ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases. Deregulated ubiquitination events are associated with immunological disorders, including autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:27012466

  17. Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Brassinosteroid Signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) regulate plant growth and development through a complex signal transduction pathway involving BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1), which is the BR receptor, and its co-receptor BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE 1 (BAK1). Both proteins are classified as Ser/Thr protein kinases. Recently,...

  18. VLSI mixed signal processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, A.; Premkumar, A. B.

    1993-01-01

    An economical and efficient VLSI implementation of a mixed signal processing system (MSP) is presented in this paper. The MSP concept is investigated and the functional blocks of the proposed MSP are described. The requirements of each of the blocks are discussed in detail. A sample application using active acoustic cancellation technique is described to demonstrate the power of the MSP approach.

  19. Velocimetry signal synthesis with fringen.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H., III

    2011-02-01

    An important part of velocimetry analysis is the recovery of a known velocity history from simulated data signals. The fringen program synthesizes VISAR and PDV signals, given a specified velocity history, using exact formulations for the optical signal. Time-dependent light conditions, non-ideal measurement conditions, and various diagnostic limitations (noise, etc.) may be incorporated into the simulated signals. This report describes the fringen program, which performs forward VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) and PDV (Photonic Doppler Velocimetry, also known as heterodyne velocimetry) analysis. Nearly all effects that might occur in VISAR/PDV measurement of a single velocity can be modeled by fringen. The program operates in MATLAB, either within a graphical interface or as a user-callable function. The current stable version of fringen is 0.3, which was released in October 2010. The following sections describe the operation and use of fringen. Section 2 gives a brief overview of VISAR and PDV synthesis. Section 3 illustrates the graphical and console interface of fringen. Section 4 presents several example uses of the program. Section 5 summarizes program capabilities and discusses potential future work.

  20. Focus issue: signaling across membranes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Nancy R

    2005-12-01

    This week's issues of Science and Science's STKE focus on movement of molecules and information across cellular membranes. Science highlights the mechanisms by which proteins, ions, and DNA cross the membranes of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. STKE addresses how information is transmitted across cell membranes to allow cells to communicate with each other and to respond to signals in their environments. PMID:16333016

  1. Multipactor theory for multicarrier signals

    SciTech Connect

    Anza, S.; Vicente, C.; Gil, J.; Raboso, D.; Boria, V. E.

    2011-03-15

    This work presents a new theory of multipactor under multicarrier signals for parallel-plate geometries, assuming a homogeneous electric field and one-dimensional electron motion. It is the generalization of the nonstationary multipactor theory for single-carrier signals [S. Anza et al.,Phys. Plasmas 17, 062110 (2010)]. It is valid for multicarrier signals with an arbitrary number of carriers with different amplitude, arbitrary frequency, and phase conditions and for any material coating. This new theory is able to model the real dynamics of the electrons during the multipactor discharge for both single and double surface interactions. Among other parameters of the discharge, it calculates the evolution in time of the charge growth, electron absorption, and creation rates as well as the instantaneous secondary emission yield and order. An extensive set of numerical tests with particle-in-cell software has been carried out in order to validate the theory under many different conditions. This theoretical development constitutes the first multipactor theory which completely characterizes the multipactor discharge for arbitrary multicarrier signals, setting the first step for further investigations in the field.

  2. Signal Prediction With Input Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Chen, Ya-Chin

    1999-01-01

    A novel coding technique is presented for signal prediction with applications including speech coding, system identification, and estimation of input excitation. The approach is based on the blind equalization method for speech signal processing in conjunction with the geometric subspace projection theory to formulate the basic prediction equation. The speech-coding problem is often divided into two parts, a linear prediction model and excitation input. The parameter coefficients of the linear predictor and the input excitation are solved simultaneously and recursively by a conventional recursive least-squares algorithm. The excitation input is computed by coding all possible outcomes into a binary codebook. The coefficients of the linear predictor and excitation, and the index of the codebook can then be used to represent the signal. In addition, a variable-frame concept is proposed to block the same excitation signal in sequence in order to reduce the storage size and increase the transmission rate. The results of this work can be easily extended to the problem of disturbance identification. The basic principles are outlined in this report and differences from other existing methods are discussed. Simulations are included to demonstrate the proposed method.

  3. Text Signals Influence Team Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.; Rysavy, Monica D.; Taricani, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory quasi-experimental investigation describes the influence of text signals on team visual map artifacts. In two course sections, four-member teams were given one of two print-based text passage versions on the course-related topic "Social influence in groups" downloaded from Wikipedia; this text had two paragraphs, each…

  4. Receiving signals of any polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlson, J. E.; Seidel, B. L.; Stelzried, C. H.

    1981-01-01

    Two-channel detection accomodates linear, circular, and elliptical polarization in one receiving unit. Receiver employs orthomode transducer which breaks any type signal into one left and one right circular component. These are processed in separate receiver channels with equal time-delay, and then recombined for data extraction. System eliminates losses due to polarization mismatch.

  5. Decomposition of indwelling EMG signals

    PubMed Central

    Nawab, S. Hamid; Wotiz, Robert P.; De Luca, Carlo J.

    2008-01-01

    Decomposition of indwelling electromyographic (EMG) signals is challenging in view of the complex and often unpredictable behaviors and interactions of the action potential trains of different motor units that constitute the indwelling EMG signal. These phenomena create a myriad of problem situations that a decomposition technique needs to address to attain completeness and accuracy levels required for various scientific and clinical applications. Starting with the maximum a posteriori probability classifier adapted from the original precision decomposition system (PD I) of LeFever and De Luca (25, 26), an artificial intelligence approach has been used to develop a multiclassifier system (PD II) for addressing some of the experimentally identified problem situations. On a database of indwelling EMG signals reflecting such conditions, the fully automatic PD II system is found to achieve a decomposition accuracy of 86.0% despite the fact that its results include low-amplitude action potential trains that are not decomposable at all via systems such as PD I. Accuracy was established by comparing the decompositions of indwelling EMG signals obtained from two sensors. At the end of the automatic PD II decomposition procedure, the accuracy may be enhanced to nearly 100% via an interactive editor, a particularly significant fact for the previously indecomposable trains. PMID:18483170

  6. Meeting Report: Teaching Signal Transduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, IJsbrand; Thomas, Geraint

    2006-01-01

    In July, 2005, the European Institute of Chemistry and Biology at the campus of the University of Bordeaux, France, hosted a focused week of seminars, workshops, and discussions around the theme of "teaching signal transduction." The purpose of the summer school was to offer both junior and senior university instructors a chance to reflect on the…

  7. Calcium signalling and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Berridge, Michael J

    2011-07-01

    New insights into how Ca(2+) regulates learning and memory have begun to provide clues as to how the amyloid-dependent remodelling of neuronal Ca(2+) signalling pathways can disrupt the mechanisms of learning and memory in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The calcium hypothesis of AD proposes that activation of the amyloidogenic pathway remodels the neuronal Ca(2+) signalling pathways responsible for cognition by enhancing the entry of Ca(2+) and/or the release of internal Ca(2+) by ryanodine receptors or InsP(3) receptors. The specific proposal is that Ca(2+) signalling remodelling results in a persistent elevation in the level of Ca(2+) that constantly erases newly acquired memories by enhancing the mechanism of long-term depression (LTD). Neurons can still form memories through the process of LTP, but this stored information is rapidly removed by the persistent activation of LTD. Further dysregulation in Ca(2+) signalling will then go on to induce the neurodegeneration that characterizes the later stages of dementia. PMID:21184278

  8. Deconstructing Signaling in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cells in vivo exist within the context of a multicellular tissue, where their behavior is governed by homo- and heterotypic cell–cell interactions, the material properties of the extracellular matrix, and the distribution of various soluble and physical factors. Most methods currently used to study and manipulate cellular behavior in vitro, however, sacrifice physiological relevance for experimental expediency. The fallacy of such approaches has been highlighted by the recent development and application of three-dimensional culture models to cell biology, which has revealed striking phenotypic differences in cell survival, migration, and differentiation in genetically identical cells simply by varying culture conditions. These perplexing findings beg the question of what constitutes a three-dimensional culture and why cells behave so differently in two- and three-dimensional culture formats. In the following review, we dissect the fundamental differences between two- and three-dimensional culture conditions. We begin by establishing a basic definition of what “three dimensions” means at different biological scales and discuss how dimensionality influences cell signaling across different length scales. We identify which three-dimensional features most potently influence intracellular signaling and distinguish between conserved biological principles that are maintained across culture conditions and cellular behaviors that are sensitive to microenvironmental context. Finally, we highlight state-of-the-art molecular tools amenable to the study of signaling in three dimensions under conditions that facilitate deconstruction of signaling in a more physiologically relevant manner. PMID:24649923

  9. Decoding Gαq signaling.

    PubMed

    Litosch, Irene

    2016-05-01

    Gαq signals with phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) to modify behavior in response to an agonist-bound GPCR. While the fundamental steps which prime Gαq to interact with PLC-β have been identified, questions remain concerning signal strength with PLC-β and other effectors. Gαq is generally viewed to function as a simple ON and OFF switch for its effector, dependent on the binding of GTP or GDP. However, Gαq does not have a single effector, Gαq has many different effectors. Furthermore, select effectors also regulate Gαq activity. PLC-β is a lipase and a GTPase activating protein (GAP) selective for Gαq. The contribution of G protein regulating activity to signal amplitude remains unclear. The unique PLC-β coiled-coil domain is essential for maximum Gαq response, both lipase and GAP. Nonetheless, coiled-coil domain associations necessary to maximum response have not been revealed by the structural approach. This review discusses progress towards understanding the basis for signal strength with PLC-β and other effectors. Shared and effector-specific interactions have been identified. Finally, the evidence for allosteric regulation of lipase stimulation by protein kinase C, the membrane, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylinositol-4, 5-bisphosphate and GPCR is explored. Endogenous allosteric regulators can suppress or enhance maximum lipase stimulation dependent on the PLC-β coiled-coil domain. A better understanding of allosteric modulation may therefore identify a wealth of new targets to regulate signal strength and behavior. PMID:27012764

  10. Phosphorylation in halobacterial signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, J; Tolliday, N; Schmitt, C; Schuster, S C; Oesterhelt, D

    1995-01-01

    Regulated phosphorylation of proteins has been shown to be a hallmark of signal transduction mechanisms in both Eubacteria and Eukarya. Here we demonstrate that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are also the underlying mechanism of chemo- and phototactic signal transduction in Archaea, the third branch of the living world. Cloning and sequencing of the region upstream of the cheA gene, known to be required for chemo- and phototaxis in Halobacterium salinarium, has identified cheY and cheB analogs which appear to form part of an operon which also includes cheA and the following open reading frame of 585 nucleotides. The CheY and CheB proteins have 31.3 and 37.5% sequence identity compared with the known signal transduction proteins CheY and CheB from Escherichia coli, respectively. The biochemical activities of both CheA and CheY were investigated following their expression in E.coli, isolation and renaturation. Wild-type CheA could be phosphorylated in a time-dependent manner in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP and Mg2+, whereas the mutant CheA(H44Q) remained unlabeled. Phosphorylated CheA was dephosphorylated rapidly by the addition of wild-type CheY. The mutant CheY(D53A) had no effect on phosphorylated CheA. The mechanism of chemo- and phototactic signal transduction in the Archaeon H.salinarium, therefore, is similar to the two-component signaling system known from chemotaxis in the eubacterium E.coli. Images PMID:7556066

  11. Mono-static GPR without transmitting anything for pavement damage inspection: interferometry by auto-correlation applied to mobile phone signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feld, R.; Slob, E. C.; Thorbecke, J.

    2015-12-01

    Creating virtual sources at locations where physical receivers have measured a response is known as seismic interferometry. A much appreciated benefit of interferometry is its independence of the actual source locations. The use of ambient noise as actual source is therefore not uncommon in this field. Ambient noise can be commercial noise, like for example mobile phone signals. For GPR this can be useful in cases where it is not possible to place a source, for instance when it is prohibited by laws and regulations. A mono-static GPR antenna can measure ambient noise. Interferometry by auto-correlation (AC) places a virtual source on this antenna's position, without actually transmitting anything. This can be used for pavement damage inspection. Earlier work showed very promising results with 2D numerical models of damaged pavement. 1D and 2D heterogeneities were compared, both modelled in a 2D pavement world. In a 1D heterogeneous model energy leaks away to the sides, whereas in a 2D heterogeneous model rays can reflect and therefore still add to the signal reconstruction (see illustration). In the first case the amount of stationary points is strictly limited, while in the other case the amount of stationary points is very large. We extend these models to a 3D world and optimise an experimental configuration. The illustration originates from the journal article under submission 'Non-destructive pavement damage inspection by mono-static GPR without transmitting anything' by R. Feld, E.C. Slob, and J.W. Thorbecke. (a) 2D heterogeneous pavement model with three irregular-shaped misalignments between the base and subbase layer (marked by arrows). Mono-antenna B-scan positions are shown schematically. (b) Ideal output: a real source at the receiver's position. The difference w.r.t. the trace found in the middle is shown. (c) AC output: a virtual source at the receiver's position. There is a clear overlap with the ideal output.

  12. BPSK Demodulation Using Digital Signal Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Thomas R.

    1996-01-01

    A digital communications signal is a sinusoidal waveform that is modified by a binary (digital) information signal. The sinusoidal waveform is called the carrier. The carrier may be modified in amplitude, frequency, phase, or a combination of these. In this project a binary phase shift keyed (BPSK) signal is the communication signal. In a BPSK signal the phase of the carrier is set to one of two states, 180 degrees apart, by a binary (i.e., 1 or 0) information signal. A digital signal is a sampled version of a "real world" time continuous signal. The digital signal is generated by sampling the continuous signal at discrete points in time. The rate at which the signal is sampled is called the sampling rate (f(s)). The device that performs this operation is called an analog-to-digital (A/D) converter or a digitizer. The digital signal is composed of the sequence of individual values of the sampled BPSK signal. Digital signal processing (DSP) is the modification of the digital signal by mathematical operations. A device that performs this processing is called a digital signal processor. After processing, the digital signal may then be converted back to an analog signal using a digital-to-analog (D/A) converter. The goal of this project is to develop a system that will recover the digital information from a BPSK signal using DSP techniques. The project is broken down into the following steps: (1) Development of the algorithms required to demodulate the BPSK signal; (2) Simulation of the system; and (3) Implementation a BPSK receiver using digital signal processing hardware.

  13. Blood pressure reprogramming adapter assists signal recording

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vick, H. A.

    1967-01-01

    Blood pressure reprogramming adapter separates the two components of a blood pressure signal, a dc pressure signal and an ac Korotkoff sounds signal, so that the Korotkoff sounds are recorded on one channel as received while the dc pressure signal is converted to FM and recorded on a second channel.

  14. 33 CFR 117.15 - Signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... used to request the opening of the draw and to acknowledge that request shall be sound signals, visual... described in this subpart sufficient to alert the party being signaled may be used. (b) Sound signals. (1) Sound signals shall be made by whistle, horn, megaphone, hailer, or other device capable of...

  15. Multifractal nature of unvoiced speech signals

    SciTech Connect

    Adeyemi, O.A.; Hartt, K.; Boudreaux-Bartels, G.F.

    1996-06-01

    A refinement is made in the nonlinear dynamic modeling of speech signals. Previous research successfully characterized speech signals as chaotic. Here, we analyze fricative speech signals using multifractal measures to determine various fractal regimes present in their chaotic attractors. Results support the hypothesis that speech signals have multifractal measures. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. On the Spectrum of Periodic Signals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Smadi, Adnan

    2004-01-01

    In theory, there are many methods for the representation of signals. In practice, however, Fourier analysis involving the resolution of signals into sinusoidal components is used widely. There are several methods for Fourier analysis available for representation of signals. If the signal is periodic, then the Fourier series is used to represent…

  17. Science Signaling Podcast for 7 June 2016: Modeling signal integration.

    PubMed

    Janes, Kevin A; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2016-01-01

    This Podcast features an interview with Kevin Janes, senior author of a Research Article that appears in the 7 June 2016 issue of Science Signaling, about a statistical modeling method that can extract useful information from complex data sets. Cells exist in very complex environments. They are constantly exposed to growth factors, hormones, nutrients, and many other factors that influence cellular behavior. When cells integrate information from multiple stimuli, the resulting output does not necessarily reflect a simple additive effect of the responses to each individual stimulus. Chitforoushzadeh et al employed a statistical modeling approach that maintained the multidimensional nature of the data to analyze the responses of colonic epithelial cells to various combinations of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF, the growth factor EGF, and insulin. As the model predicted, experiments confirmed that insulin suppressed TNF-induced proinflammatory signaling through a mechanism that involved the transcription factor GATA6.Listen to Podcast. PMID:27273095

  18. The Fog signaling pathway: insights into signaling in morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Manning, Alyssa J; Rogers, Stephen L

    2014-10-01

    Epithelia form the building blocks of many tissue and organ types. Epithelial cells often form a contiguous 2-dimensional sheet that is held together by strong adhesions. The mechanical properties conferred by these adhesions allow the cells to undergo dramatic three-dimensional morphogenetic movements while maintaining cell-cell contacts during embryogenesis and post-embryonic development. The Drosophila Folded gastrulation pathway triggers epithelial cell shape changes that drive gastrulation and tissue folding and is one of the most extensively studied examples of epithelial morphogenesis. This pathway has yielded key insights into the signaling mechanisms and cellular machinery involved in epithelial remodeling. In this review, we discuss principles of morphogenesis and signaling that have been discovered through genetic and cell biological examination of this pathway. We also consider various regulatory mechanisms and the system׳s relevance to mammalian development. We propose future directions that will continue to broaden our knowledge of morphogenesis across taxa. PMID:25127992

  19. Dynamic range control of audio signals by digital signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, N. H. C.

    It is often necessary to reduce the dynamic range of musical programs, particularly those comprising orchestral and choral music, for them to be received satisfactorily by listeners to conventional FM and AM broadcasts. With the arrival of DAB (Digital Audio Broadcasting) a much wider dynamic range will become available for radio broadcasting, although some listeners may prefer to have a signal with a reduced dynamic range. This report describes a digital processor developed by the BBC to control the dynamic range of musical programs in a manner similar to that of a trained Studio Manager. It may be used prior to transmission in conventional broadcasting, replacing limiters or other compression equipment. In DAB, it offers the possibility of providing a dynamic range control signal to be sent to the receiver via an ancillary data channel, simultaneously with the uncompressed audio, giving the listener the option of the full dynamic range or a reduced dynamic range.

  20. The Fog signaling pathway: Insights into signaling in morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Alyssa J.; Rogers, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelia form the building blocks of many tissue and organ types. Epithelial cells often form a contiguous 2-dimensional sheet that is held together by strong adhesions. The mechanical properties conferred by these adhesions allow the cells to undergo dramatic three-dimensional morphogenetic movements while maintaining cell–cell contacts during embryogenesis and post-embryonic development. The Drosophila Folded gastrulation pathway triggers epithelial cell shape changes that drive gastrulation and tissue folding and is one of the most extensively studied examples of epithelial morphogenesis. This pathway has yielded key insights into the signaling mechanisms and cellular machinery involved in epithelial remodeling. In this review, we discuss principles of morphogenesis and signaling that have been discovered through genetic and cell biological examination of this pathway. We also consider various regulatory mechanisms and the system's relevance to mammalian development. We propose future directions that will continue to broaden our knowledge of morphogenesis across taxa. PMID:25127992