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Sample records for arsenic promotes progressive

  1. Low level arsenic promotes progressive inflammatory angiogenesis and liver blood vessel remodeling in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Adam C.; Stolz, Donna B.; Vin, Harina; Ross, Mark A.; Soucy, Nicole V.; Klei, Linda R.; Barchowsky, Aaron

    2007-08-01

    The vascular effects of arsenic in drinking water are global health concerns contributing to human disease worldwide. Arsenic targets the endothelial cells lining blood vessels, and endothelial cell activation or dysfunction may underlie the pathogenesis of both arsenic-induced vascular diseases and arsenic-enhanced tumorigenesis. The purpose of the current studies was to demonstrate that exposing mice to drinking water containing environmentally relevant levels of arsenic promoted endothelial cell dysfunction and pathologic vascular remodeling. Increased angiogenesis, neovascularization, and inflammatory cell infiltration were observed in Matrigel plugs implanted in C57BL/6 mice following 5-week exposures to 5-500 ppb arsenic [Soucy, N.V., Mayka, D., Klei, L.R., Nemec, A.A., Bauer, J.A., Barchowsky, A., 2005. Neovascularization and angiogenic gene expression following chronic arsenic exposure in mice. Cardiovasc.Toxicol 5, 29-42]. Therefore, functional in vivo effects of arsenic on endothelial cell function and vessel remodeling in an endogenous vascular bed were investigated in the liver. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) became progressively defenestrated and underwent capillarization to decrease vessel porosity following exposure to 250 ppb arsenic for 2 weeks. Sinusoidal expression of PECAM-1 and laminin-1 proteins, a hallmark of capillarization, was also increased by 2 weeks of exposure. LSEC caveolin-1 protein and caveolae expression were induced after 2 weeks of exposure indicating a compensatory change. Likewise, CD45/CD68-positive inflammatory cells did not accumulate in the livers until after LSEC porosity was decreased, indicating that inflammation is a consequence and not a cause of the arsenic-induced LSEC phenotype. The data demonstrate that the liver vasculature is an early target of pathogenic arsenic effects and that the mouse liver vasculature is a sensitive model for investigating vascular health effects of arsenic.

  2. Environmentally relevant concentration of arsenic trioxide and humic acid promoted tumor progression of human cervical cancer cells: In vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Min-Ling; Yen, Cheng-Chieh; Lu, Fung-Jou; Ting, Hung-Chih; Chang, Horng-Rong

    2016-09-01

    In a previous study, treatment at higher concentrations of arsenic trioxide or co-exposure to arsenic trioxide and humic acid was found to be inhibited cell growth of cervical cancer cells (SiHa cells) by reactive oxygen species generation. However, treatment at lower concentrations slightly increased cell viability. Here, we investigate the enhancement of progression effects of environmentally relevant concentration of humic acid and arsenic trioxide in SiHa cell lines in vitro and in vivo by measuring cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and the carcinogenesis-related protein (MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF-A) expressions. SiHa cells treated with low concentrations of humic acid and arsenic trioxide alone or in co-exposure significantly increased reactive oxygen species, glutathione levels, cell proliferation, scratch wound-healing activities, migration abilities, and MMP-2 expression as compared to the untreated control. In vivo the tumor volume of either single drug (humic acid or arsenic trioxide) or combined drug-treated group was significantly larger than that of the control for an additional 45 days after tumor cell injection on the back of NOD/SCID mice. Levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF-A, also significantly increased compared to the control. Histopathologic effects of all tumor cells appeared round in cell shape with high mitosis, focal hyperkeratosis and epidermal hyperplasia in the skin, and some tumor growth in the muscle were observed. Our results may indicate that exposure to low concentrations of arsenic trioxide and humic acid is associated with the progression of cervical cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1121-1132, 2016. PMID:25728215

  3. Arsenic

    MedlinePlus

    Arsenic is a natural element found in soil and minerals. Arsenic compounds are used to preserve wood, as pesticides, and in some industries. Arsenic can get into air, water, and the ground from wind- ...

  4. Arsenic

    MedlinePlus

    ... and minerals. Arsenic compounds are used to preserve wood, as pesticides, and in some industries. Arsenic can ... Breathing sawdust or burning smoke from arsenic-treated wood Living in an area with high levels of ...

  5. ARSENIC AND HUMAN HEALTH: EPIDEMIOLOGIC PROGRESS AND PUBLIC HEALTH IMPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Argos, Maria; Ahsan, Habibul; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2014-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of arsenic in groundwater pose a public health threat to millions of people worldwide, including severely affected populations in South and Southeast Asia. While arsenic is an established human carcinogen and has been associated with a multitude of health outcomes in epidemiologic studies, a mode of action has yet to be determined for some aspects of arsenic toxicity. Herein, we emphasize the role of recent genetic and molecular epidemiologic investigations of arsenic toxicity. Additionally, we discuss considerations for the public health impacts of arsenic exposure through drinking water with respect to primary and secondary prevention efforts. PMID:22962196

  6. Low doses of arsenic, via perturbing p53, promotes tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Suthakar; Li, Ping; Fagman, Johan; Yu, Tianqi; Lafontant, Jean; Zhang, Guojun; Chen, Changyan

    2016-09-01

    In drinking water and in workplace or living environments, low doses of arsenic can exist and operate as a potent carcinogen. Due to insufficient understanding and information on the pervasiveness of environmental exposures to arsenic, there is an urgent need to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of arsenic regarding its carcinogenic effect on human health. In this study, we demonstrate that low doses of arsenic exposure mitigate or mask p53 function and further perturb intracellular redox state, which triggers persistent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activates UPR (unfolded protein response), leading to transformation or tumorigenesis. Thus, the results suggest that low doses of arsenic exposure, through attenuating p53-regulated tumor suppressive function, change the state of intracellular redox and create a microenvironment for tumorigenesis. Our study also provides the information for designing more effective strategies to prevent or treat human cancers initiated by arsenic exposure. PMID:27425828

  7. Arsenicals produce stable progressive changes in DNA methylation patterns that are linked to malignant transformation of immortalized urothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Taylor J.; Novak, Petr; Wnek, Shawn M.; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2009-12-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation participates in carcinogenesis and is a molecular hallmark of a tumor cell. Tumor cells generally exhibit a redistribution of DNA methylation resulting in global hypomethylation with regional hypermethylation; however, the speed in which these changes emerge has not been fully elucidated and may depend on the temporal location of the cell in the path from normal, finite lifespan to malignant transformation. We used a model of arsenical-induced malignant transformation of immortalized human urothelial cells and DNA methylation microarrays to examine the extent and temporal nature of changes in DNA methylation that occur during the transition from immortal to malignantly transformed. Our data presented herein suggest that during arsenical-induced malignant transformation, aberrant DNA methylation occurs non-randomly, progresses gradually at hundreds of gene promoters, and alters expression of the associated gene, and these changes are coincident with the acquisition of malignant properties, such as anchorage independent growth and tumor formation in immunocompromised mice. The DNA methylation changes appear stable, since malignantly transformed cells removed from the transforming arsenical exhibited no reversion in DNA methylation levels, associated gene expression, or malignant phenotype. These data suggest that arsenicals act as epimutagens and directly link their ability to induce malignant transformation to their actions on the epigenome.

  8. Arsenic

    MedlinePlus

    ... mainly found in its less toxic organic form. Industrial processes Arsenic is used industrially as an alloying ... are also required to reduce occupational exposure from industrial processes. Education and community engagement are key factors ...

  9. Arsenic induces structural and compositional colonic microbiome change and promotes host nitrogen and amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dheer, Rishu; Patterson, Jena; Dudash, Mark; Stachler, Elyse N; Bibby, Kyle J; Stolz, Donna B; Shiva, Sruti; Wang, Zeneng; Hazen, Stanley L; Barchowsky, Aaron; Stolz, John F

    2015-12-15

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water causes cancer and non-cancer diseases. However, mechanisms for chronic arsenic-induced pathogenesis, especially in response to lower exposure levels, are unclear. In addition, the importance of health impacts from xeniobiotic-promoted microbiome changes is just being realized and effects of arsenic on the microbiome with relation to disease promotion are unknown. To investigate impact of arsenic exposure on both microbiome and host metabolism, the stucture and composition of colonic microbiota, their metabolic phenotype, and host tissue and plasma metabolite levels were compared in mice exposed for 2, 5, or 10weeks to 0, 10 (low) or 250 (high) ppb arsenite (As(III)). Genotyping of colonic bacteria revealed time and arsenic concentration dependent shifts in community composition, particularly the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, relative to those seen in the time-matched controls. Arsenic-induced erosion of bacterial biofilms adjacent to the mucosal lining and changes in the diversity and abundance of morphologically distinct species indicated changes in microbial community structure. Bacterical spores increased in abundance and intracellular inclusions decreased with high dose arsenic. Interestingly, expression of arsenate reductase (arsA) and the As(III) exporter arsB, remained unchanged, while the dissimilatory nitrite reductase (nrfA) gene expression increased. In keeping with the change in nitrogen metabolism, colonic and liver nitrite and nitrate levels and ratios changed with time. In addition, there was a concomitant increase in pathogenic arginine metabolites in the mouse circulation. These data suggest that arsenic exposure impacts the microbiome and microbiome/host nitrogen metabolism to support disease enhancing pathogenic phenotypes. PMID:26529668

  10. Stimulatory Effects of Arsenic-Tolerant Soil Fungi on Plant Growth Promotion and Soil Properties

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Pankaj Kumar; Shenoy, Belle Damodara; Gupta, Manjul; Vaish, Aradhana; Mannan, Shivee; Singh, Nandita; Tewari, Shri Krishna; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2012-01-01

    Fifteen fungi were obtained from arsenic-contaminated agricultural fields in West Bengal, India and examined for their arsenic tolerance and removal ability in our previous study. Of these, the four best arsenic-remediating isolates were tested for plant growth promotion effects on rice and pea in the present study. A greenhouse-based pot experiment was conducted using soil inocula of individual fungi. The results indicated a significant (P<0.05) increase in plant growth and improvement of soil properties in inoculated soils compared to the control. A significant increase in plant growth was recorded in treated soils and varied from 16–293%. Soil chemical and enzymatic properties varied from 20–222% and 34–760%, respectively, in inoculated soil. Plants inoculated with inocula of Westerdykella and Trichoderma showed better stimulatory effects on plant growth and soil nutrient availability than Rhizopus and Lasiodiplodia. These fungi improved soil nutrient content and enhanced plant growth. These fungi may be used as bioinoculants for plant growth promotion and improved soil properties in arsenic-contaminated agricultural soils. PMID:23047145

  11. Arsenic promotes angiogenesis in vitro via a heme oxygenase-1-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Dan; Wang Xin; Chang Qingshan; Hitron, Andrew; Zhang Zhuo; Xu Mei; Chen Gang; Luo Jia; Jiang Binghua; Fang Jing; Shi Xianglin

    2010-05-01

    Angiogenesis and vessel remodeling are fundamental to the pathogenesis of a number of diseases caused by environmental arsenic exposure, including tumorigenesis and cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic (AsIII) has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis and vascular remodeling in vivo. However, the exact molecular mechanisms accounting for arsenic-induced angiogenesis are not clear. The present study investigates the role of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in sodium arsenite-mediated angiogenesis in vitro. Transwell assay, three-dimensional Matrigel assay, RT-PCR, ELISA and immunoblotting were used to determine cell migration, vascular tube formation, mRNA and protein expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assay were applied to examine the DNA binding with protein and HO-1 transcriptional activity. Here, we report that low concentrations of arsenite (0.1-1 muM) stimulated cell migration and vascular tube formation in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC). Arsenite induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. Knock down of HO-1 expression decreased arsenite-induced VEGF expression, cell migration, and tube formation. We showed that arsenite promoted dissociation of Bach1 (a transcriptional repressor) from the HO-1 enhancers and increased Nrf2 binding to these elements. Site directed mutagenesis assay identified that Bach1 cysteine residues 557 and 574 were essential for the induction of HO-1 gene in response to arsenite. These findings demonstrate a role for HO-1 in arsenite-mediated angiogenesis in vitro.

  12. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-{alpha}-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-{alpha} and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction.

  13. HOXB13 promotes ovarian cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Jiangyong; Wang, Zuncai; Provencher, Heather; Muir, Beth; Dahiya, Sonika; Carney, Erin; Leong, Chee-Onn; Sgroi, Dennis C.; Orsulic, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    Deregulated expression of HOXB13 in a subset of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen monotherapy is associated with an aggressive clinical course and poor outcome. Because the ovary is another hormone-responsive organ, we investigated whether HOXB13 plays a role in ovarian cancer progression. We show that HOXB13 is expressed in multiple human ovarian cancer cell lines and tumors and that knockdown of endogenous HOXB13 by RNA interference in human ovarian cancer cell lines is associated with reduced cell proliferation. Ectopic expression of HOXB13 is capable of transforming p53−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts and promotes cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in mouse ovarian cancer cell lines that contain genetic alterations in p53, myc, and ras. In this genetically defined cell line model of ovarian cancer, we demonstrate that HOXB13 collaborates with activated ras to markedly promote tumor growth in vivo and that HOXB13 confers resistance to tamoxifen-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, our results support a pro-proliferative and pro-survival role for HOXB13 in ovarian cancer. PMID:17942676

  14. Arsenic-tolerant plant-growth-promoting bacteria isolated from arsenic-polluted soils in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Shagol, Charlotte C; Krishnamoorthy, Ramasamy; Kim, Kiyoon; Sundaram, Subbiah; Sa, Tongmin

    2014-01-01

    The Janghang smelter in Chungnam, South Korea started in 1936 was subsequently shutdown in 1989 due to heavy metal (loid) pollution concerns in the vicinity. Thus, there is a need for the soil in the area to be remediated to make it usable again especially for agricultural purposes. The present study was conducted to exploit the potential of arsenic (As)-tolerant bacteria thriving in the vicinity of the smelter-polluted soils to enhance phytoremediation of hazardous As. We studied the genetic and taxonomic diversity of 21 As-tolerant bacteria isolated from soils nearer to and away from the smelter. These isolates belonging to the genera Brevibacterium, Pseudomonas, Microbacterium, Rhodococcus, Rahnella, and Paenibacillus, could tolerate high concentrations of arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)) with the minimum inhibitory concentration ranging from 3 to >20 mM for NaAsO2 and 140 to 310 mM NaH2AsO4 · 7H2O, respectively. All isolates exhibited As(V) reduction except Pseudomonas koreensis JS123, which exhibited both oxidation and reduction of As. Moreover, all the 21 isolates produced indole acetic acid (IAA), 13 isolates exhibited 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase activity, 12 produced siderophore, 17 solubilized phosphate, and 13 were putative nitrogen fixers under in vitro conditions. Particularly, Rhodococcus aetherivorans JS2210, P. koreensis JS2214, and Pseudomonas sp. JS238 consistently increased root length of maize in the presence of 100 and 200 μM As(V). Possible utilization of these As-tolerant plant-growth-promoting bacteria can be a potential strategy in increasing the efficiency of phytoremediation in As-polluted soils. PMID:24737020

  15. Brevundimonas diminuta mediated alleviation of arsenic toxicity and plant growth promotion in Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Marwa, Naina; Mishra, Shashank K; Mishra, Jyoti; Verma, Praveen C; Rathaur, Sushma; Singh, Nandita

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic (As), a toxic metalloid adversely affects plant growth in polluted areas. In the present study, we investigated the possibility of improving phytostablization of arsenic through application of new isolated strain Brevundimonas diminuta (NBRI012) in rice plant [Oryza sativa (L.) Var. Sarju 52] at two different concentrations [10ppm (low toxic) and 50ppm (high toxic)] of As. The plant growth promoting traits of bacterial strains revealed the inherent ability of siderophores, phosphate solubilisation, indole acetic acid (IAA), 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase production which may be associated with increased biomass, chlorophyll and MDA content of rice and thereby promoting plant growth. The study also revealed the As accumulation property of NBRI012 strain which could play an important role in As removal from contaminated soil. Furthermore, NBRI012 inoculation significantly restored the hampered root epidermal and cortical cell growth of rice plant and root hair elimination. Altogether our study highlights the multifarious role of B. diminuta in mediating stress tolerance and modulating translocation of As in edible part of rice plant. PMID:26650422

  16. A Phytoremediation Strategy for Arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2005-06-01

    A Phytoremediation Strategy for Arsenic Progress Report May, 2005 Richard B. Meagher Principal Investigator Arsenic pollution affects the health of several hundred millions of people world wide, and an estimated 10 million Americans have unsafe levels of arsenic in their drinking water. However, few environmentally sound remedies for cleaning up arsenic contaminated soil and water have been proposed. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to extract and sequester environmental pollutants, is one new technology that offers an ecologically sound solution to a devastating problem. We propose that it is less disruptive to the environment to harvest and dispose of several thousand pounds per acre of contaminated aboveground plant material, than to excavate and dispose of 1 to 5 million pounds of contaminated soil per acre (assumes contamination runs 3 ft deep). Our objective is to develop a genetics-based phytoremediation strategy for arsenic removal that can be used in any plant species. This strategy requires the enhanced expression of several transgenes from diverse sources. Our working hypothesis is that organ-specific expression of several genes controlling the transport, electrochemical state, and binding of arsenic will result in the efficient extraction and hyperaccumulation of arsenic into aboveground plant tissues. This hypothesis is supported by theoretical arguments and strong preliminary data. We proposed six Specific Aims focused on testing and developing this arsenic phytoremediation strategy. During the first 18 months of the grant we made significant progress on five Specific Aims and began work on the sixth as summarized below. Specific Aim 1: Enhance plant arsenic resistance and greatly expand sinks for arsenite by expressing elevated levels of thiol-rich, arsenic-binding peptides. Hyperaccumulation of arsenic depends upon making plants that are both highly tolerant to arsenic and that have the capacity to store large amounts of arsenic aboveground

  17. Arsenic Mobilization from Contaminated Sediments: A Full-scale Experiment in Progress

    SciTech Connect

    O'Day, P A; Campbell, K; Dixit, S; Hering, J G

    2004-02-03

    The mobilization of arsenic was examined in a system where the deposition of iron and arsenic have been substantially modified by large-scale manipulations. This engineering practice was designed to decrease arsenic concentrations in water supplied to the City of Los Angeles. Accomplishing this objective, however, has resulted in significant accumulation of arsenic and iron in the sediments of a reservoir on the Los Angeles Aqueduct. Arsenic and iron are released into the porewater at depth in the sediment, consistent with reductive dissolution of iron(III) oxyhydroxides. Factors influencing the possible re-sorption of arsenic onto residual iron(III) oxyhydroxides solids have been examined. Reduction of As(V) to As(III) alone cannot account for arsenic mobilization since arsenic occurs in the solid phase as As(III) well above the depth at which it is released into the porewater. Competition from other porewater constituents could suppress re-sorption of arsenic released by reductive dissolution.

  18. Evidence of arsenic release promoted by disinfection by-products within drinking-water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Andra, Syam S; Makris, Konstantinos C; Botsaris, George; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Kalyvas, Harris; Costa, Costas N

    2014-02-15

    Changes in disinfectant type could trigger a cascade of reactions releasing pipe-anchored metals/metalloids into finished water. However, the effect of pre-formed disinfection by-products on the release of sorbed contaminants (arsenic-As in particular) from drinking water distribution system pipe scales remains unexplored. A bench-scale study using a factorial experimental design was performed to evaluate the independent and interaction effects of trihalomethanes (TTHM) and haloacetic acids (HAA) on arsenic (As) release from either scales-only or scale-biofilm conglomerates (SBC) both anchored on asbestos/cement pipe coupons. A model biofilm (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was allowed to grow on select pipe coupons prior experimentation. Either TTHM or HAA individual dosing did not promote As release from either scales only or SBC, detecting <6 μg AsL(-1) in finished water. In the case of scales-only coupons, the combination of the highest spike level of TTHM and HAA significantly (p<0.001) increased dissolved and total As concentrations to levels up to 16 and 95 μg L(-1), respectively. Similar treatments in the presence of biofilm (SBC) resulted in significant (p<0.001) increase in dissolved and total recoverable As up to 20 and 47 μg L(-1), respectively, exceeding the regulatory As limit. Whether or not, our laboratory-based results truly represent mechanisms operating in disinfected finished water in pipe networks remains to be investigated in the field. PMID:24365518

  19. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition in arsenic-transformed cells promotes angiogenesis through activating β-catenin–vascular endothelial growth factor pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhishan; Humphries, Brock; Xiao, Hua; Jiang, Yiguo; Yang, Chengfeng

    2013-08-15

    Arsenic exposure represents a major health concern increasing cancer risks, yet the mechanism of arsenic carcinogenesis has not been elucidated. We and others recently reported that cell malignant transformation by arsenic is accompanied by epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the role of EMT in arsenic carcinogenesis is not well understood. Although previous studies showed that short term exposure of endothelial cells to arsenic stimulated angiogenesis, it remains to be determined whether cells that were malignantly transformed by long term arsenic exposure have a pro-angiogenic effect. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of arsenic-transformed human bronchial epithelial cells that underwent EMT on angiogenesis and the underlying mechanism. It was found that the conditioned medium from arsenic-transformed cells strongly stimulated tube formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Moreover, enhanced angiogenesis was detected in mouse xenograft tumor tissues resulting from inoculation of arsenic-transformed cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that β-catenin was activated in arsenic-transformed cells up-regulating its target gene expression including angiogenic-stimulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Stably expressing microRNA-200b in arsenic-transformed cells that reversed EMT inhibited β-catenin activation, decreased VEGF expression and reduced tube formation by HUVECs. SiRNA knockdown β-catenin decreased VEGF expression. Adding a VEGF neutralizing antibody into the conditioned medium from arsenic-transformed cells impaired tube formation by HUVECs. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that the mRNA levels of canonical Wnt ligands were not increased in arsenic-transformed cells. These findings suggest that EMT in arsenic-transformed cells promotes angiogenesis through activating β-catenin–VEGF pathway. - Highlights: • Arsenic-transformed cells that underwent EMT displayed a pro

  20. Sustainable engineered processes to mitigate the global arsenic crisis in drinking water: challenges and progress.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sudipta; Greenleaf, John E; Gupta, Anirban; Uy, Davin; Sengupta, Arup K

    2012-01-01

    Millions of people around the world are currently living under the threat of developing serious health problems owing to ingestion of dangerous concentrations of arsenic through their drinking water. In many places, treatment of arsenic-contaminated water is an urgent necessity owing to a lack of safe alternative sources. Sustainable production of arsenic-safe water from an arsenic-contaminated raw water source is currently a challenge. Despite the successful development in the laboratory of technologies for arsenic remediation, few have been successful in the field. A sustainable arsenic-remediation technology should be robust, composed of local resources, and user-friendly as well as must attach special consideration to the social, economic, cultural, traditional, and environmental aspects of the target community. One such technology is in operation on the Indian subcontinent. Wide-scale replication of this technology with adequate improvisation can solve the arsenic crisis prevalent in the developing world. PMID:22541048

  1. Environmental Health Promotion: Progress and Future Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Shobha; Dearry, Allen

    2004-01-01

    Health promotion seeks to provide practitioners of medicine and public health as well as members of the public with the information, resources, and tools that they can use to improve health and well-being. This goal is consonant with that of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), namely, to improve public health outcomes via research,…

  2. Arsenic in private well water part 2 of 3: Who benefits the most from traditional testing promotion?

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Sara V; Spayd, Steven E; Procopio, Nicholas A; Chillrud, Steven N; Ross, James; Braman, Stuart; Zheng, Yan

    2016-08-15

    Arsenic, a toxic element naturally found in groundwater, is a public health concern for households drinking from wells. Private well water is not regulated to meet the federal drinking water arsenic Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 10μg/L, or the more protective 5μg/L New Jersey (NJ) state MCL. In the absence of consistent private well regulation, public health efforts have relied on promoting testing in affected communities to various degrees of success. Few interventions publish results, and more often focus on the outcome of tested wells rather than who completed a test, and more importantly, who did not. Through our survey of randomly selected addresses (n=670) in 17 NJ towns we find higher rates of arsenic testing in areas with a history of testing promotion. However, we also see a stronger correlation of testing behavior with income and education in high promotion areas, suggesting that community engagement activities may be exacerbating socioeconomic status (SES) testing disparities. Well owners with a bachelor's degree had ten times greater odds of participating in our direct mail testing intervention than those with less education when tests cost $40. After all households (n=255) were offered free tests to overcome many of the usual testing barriers - awareness, convenience, and cost - only 47% participated and those who chose to return water samples were of higher income and education than those who did not. Our findings highlight that while efforts to promote and provide arsenic testing succeed in testing more wells, community testing interventions risk increasing SES disparities if those with more education and resources are more likely to take advantage of testing programs. Therefore, testing interventions can benefit by better targeting socially vulnerable populations in an effort to overcome SES-patterned self-selection when individuals are left alone with the responsibility of managing their drinking water quality. PMID:27142115

  3. CXCL5 Promotes Prostate Cancer Progression1

    PubMed Central

    Begley, Lesa A; Kasina, Sathish; Mehra, Rohit; Adsule, Shreelekha; Admon, Andrew J; Lonigro, Robert J; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Macoska, Jill A

    2008-01-01

    CXCL5 is a proangiogenic CXC-type chemokine that is an inflammatory mediator and a powerful attractant for granulocytic immune cells. Unlike many other chemokines, CXCL5 is secreted by both immune (neutrophil, monocyte, and macrophage) and nonimmune (epithelial, endothelial, and fibroblastic) cell types. The current study was intended to determine which of these cell types express CXCL5 in normal and malignant human prostatic tissues, whether expression levels correlated with malignancy and whether CXCL5 stimulated biologic effects consistent with a benign or malignant prostate epithelial phenotype. The results of these studies show that CXCL5 protein expression levels are concordant with prostate tumor progression, are highly associated with inflammatory infiltrate, and are frequently detected in the lumens of both benign and malignant prostate glands. Exogenous administration of CXCL5 stimulates cellular proliferation and gene transcription in both nontransformed and transformed prostate epithelial cells and induces highly aggressive prostate cancer cells to invade through synthetic basement membrane in vitro. These findings suggest that the inflammatory mediator, CXCL5, may play multiple roles in the etiology of both benign and malignant proliferative diseases in the prostate. PMID:18320069

  4. Promotion of well-switching to mitigate the current arsenic crisis in Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Van Geen, Alexander; Ahsan, Habibul; Horneman, Allan H.; Dhar, Ratan K.; Zheng, Yan; Hussain, Iftikhhar; Ahmed, Kazi Matin; Gelman, Andrew; Stute, Martin; Simpson, H. James; Wallace, Sean; Small, Christopher; Parvez, Faruque; Slavkovich, Vesna; Loiacono, Nancy J.; Becker, Marck; Cheng, Zhongqi; Momotaj, Hassina; Shahnewaz, Mohammad; Seddique, Ashraf Ali; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To survey tube wells and households in Araihazar upazila, Bangladesh, to set the stage for a long-term epidemiological study of the consequences of chronic arsenic exposure. METHODS: Water samples and household data were collected over a period of 4 months in 2000 from 4997 contiguous tube wells serving a population of 55000, the position of each well being determined to within +/- 30 m using Global Positioning System receivers. Arsenic concentrations were determined by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry. In addition, groundwater samples collected every 2 weeks for an entire year from six tube wells were analysed for arsenic by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. FINDINGS: Half of the wells surveyed in Araihazar had been installed in the previous 5 years; 94% were privately owned. Only about 48% of the surveyed wells supplied water with an arsenic content below 50 micro g/l, the current Bangladesh standard for drinking-water. Similar to other regions of Bangladesh and West Bengal, India, the distribution of arsenic in Araihazar is spatially highly variable (range: 5-860 micro g/l) and therefore difficult to predict. Because of this variability, however, close to 90% of the inhabitants live within 100 m of a safe well. Monitoring of six tube wells currently meeting the 50 micro g/l standard showed no indication of a seasonal cycle in arsenic concentrations coupled to the hydrological cycle. This suggests that well-switching is a viable option in Araihazar, at least for the short term. CONCLUSIONS: Well-switching should be more systematically encouraged in Araihazar and many other parts of Bangladesh and West Bengal, India. Social barriers to well-switching need to be better understood and, if possible, overcome. PMID:12378292

  5. Screening of plant growth-promoting traits in arsenic-resistant bacteria isolated from agricultural soil and their potential implication for arsenic bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Das, Suvendu; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Kar, Sandeep; Chou, Mon-Lin; Chen, Chien-Yen

    2014-05-15

    Twelve arsenic (As)-resistant bacteria (minimum inhibitory concentration ranging from 10 to 30mM and 150 to 320mM for As(III) and As(V), respectively) were isolated from the agricultural soil of the Chianan Plain in southwestern Taiwan using enrichment techniques. Eight isolates capable of oxidizing As(III) (rate of oxidation from 0.029 to 0.059μMh(-1) 10(-9) cell) and exhibiting As(III)-oxidase enzyme activity belong to Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Klebsiella and Comamonas genera, whereas four isolates that did not show As(III)-oxidizing activity belong to Geobacillus, Bacillus, Paenibacillus, and Enterobacter genera. Assessment of the parameters of plant growth promotion revealed that Pseudomonas sp. ASR1, ASR2 and ASR3, Geobacillus sp. ASR4, Bacillus sp. ASR5, Paenibacillus sp. ASR6, Enterobacter sp. ASR10 and Comamonas sp. ASR11, and ASR12 possessed some or all of the studied plant growth-promoting traits, including phosphate-solubilization, siderophore, IAA-like molecules and ACC deaminase production. In addition, the ability of As-resistant isolates to grow over wide ranges of pH and temperatures signify their potential application for sustainable bioremediation of As in the environment. PMID:24685527

  6. An evolutionary model for initiation, promotion, and progression in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vincent, T L; Gatenby, R A

    2008-04-01

    Human carcinogenesis is a multistep process in which epithelial cells progress through a series of premalignant phenotypes until an invasive cancer emerges. Extensive experimental observations in carcinogenesis have demonstrated this process can be divided into three general eras: initiation, promotion, and progression. However, this empirically derived, tissue-level explanation of carcinogenesis has not been reconciled with the step-wise genotypic and phenotypic changes encompassed in evolutionary paradigms such as the Feoron-Vogelstein diagram. Here, we analyze an evolutionary model of cellular dynamics that defines mutual interactions of cellular and subcellular events and tissue level changes in tumor growth and morphology. Results are expressed using an adaptive landscape that illustrates the evolutionary potential of cells that allow them to adapt to specific microenvironmental selection forces. It is shown that normal epithelial cells have a novel adaptive landscape that permits coexistence of normal cellular populations but also allows invasion by mutant phenotypes. Subsequent cancer evolution is possible due to a relaxation of tissue growth constraints (as mediated by cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions) and adaptations in response to perturbations in microenvironmental substrate concentrations (due to separation of evolving tumor cells from their blood supply by an intact basement membrane). Simulations, based on the dynamic model, produce three distinct stages of carcinogenesis that are consistent with the initiation, promotion, and progression stages observed experimentally. The simulations provide insight into the underlying cellular and microenvironmental dynamics that govern these empirical observations and suggest novel prevention strategies that may be tested experimentally. PMID:18360700

  7. Morphine Promotes Tumor Angiogenesis and Increases Breast Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bimonte, Sabrina; Barbieri, Antonio; Palma, Giuseppe; Luciano, Antonio; Cuomo, Arturo; Arra, Claudio; Izzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Morphine is considered a highly potent analgesic agent used to relieve suffering of patients with cancer. Several in vitro and in vivo studies showed that morphine also modulates angiogenesis and regulates tumour cell growth. Unfortunately, the results obtained by these studies are still contradictory. In order to better dissect the role of morphine in cancer cell growth and angiogenesis we performed in vitro studies on ER-negative human breast carcinoma cells, MDA.MB231 and in vivo studies on heterotopic mouse model of human triple negative breast cancer, TNBC. We demonstrated that morphine in vitro enhanced the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of MDA.MB231 cells. In vivo studies performed on xenograft mouse model of TNBC revealed that tumours of mice treated with morphine were larger than those observed in other groups. Moreover, morphine was able to enhance the neoangiogenesis. Our data showed that morphine at clinical relevant doses promotes angiogenesis and increases breast cancer progression. PMID:26064880

  8. Cyr61 promotes breast tumorigenesis and cancer progression

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Bogart, Daphne F.; Castaneda, Jessica M.; Li, Patricia; Lupu, Ruth

    2002-01-16

    Cyr61, a member of the CCN family of genes, is an angiogenic factor. We have shown that it is overexpressed in invasive and metastatic human breast cancer cells and tissues. Here, we investigated whether Cyr61 is necessary and/or sufficient to bypass the ''normal'' estrogen (E2) requirements for breast cancer cell growth. Our results demonstrate that under E2-depleted condition, Cyr61 is sufficient to induce MCF-7 cells grow in the absence of E2. MCF-7 cells transfected with Cyr61 (MCF-7/Cyr61) became E2-independent but still E2-responsive. On the other hand, MCF-7/vector cells remain E2-dependent. MCF-7/Cyr61 cells acquire an antiestrogen-resistant phenotype, one of the most common clinical occurrences during breast cancer progression. MCF-7/Cyr61 cells are anchorage-independent and capable of forming Matrigel outgrowth patterns in the absence of E2. ERa expression in MCF-7/Cyr61 cells is decreased although still functional. Additionally, MCF-7/Cyr61 cells are tumorigenic in ovariectomized athymic nude mice. The tumors resemble human invasive carcinomas with increased vascularization and overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our results demonstrate that Cyr61 is a tumor-promoting factor and a key regulator of breast cancer progression. This study provides evidence that Cyr61 is sufficient to induce E2-independence and anti-E2 resistance, and to promote invasiveness in vitro, and to induce tumorigenesis in vivo, all of which are characteristics of an aggressive breast cancer phenotype.

  9. SPINK1 promotes colorectal cancer progression by downregulating Metallothioneins expression

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, R; Pandey, S K; Goel, S; Bhatia, V; Shukla, S; Jing, X; Dhanasekaran, S M; Ateeq, B

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in the world, and second leading cause of cancer deaths in the US. Although, anti-EGFR therapy is commonly prescribed for CRC, patients harboring mutations in KRAS or BRAF show poor treatment response, indicating an ardent demand for new therapeutic targets discovery. SPINK1 (serine peptidase inhibitor, Kazal type 1) overexpression has been identified in many cancers including the colon, lung, breast and prostate. Our study demonstrates the functional significance of SPINK1 in CRC progression and metastases. Stable knockdown of SPINK1 significantly decreases cell proliferation, invasion and soft agar colony formation in the colon adenocarcinoma WiDr cells. Conversely, an increase in these oncogenic phenotypes was observed on stimulation with SPINK1-enriched conditioned media (CM) in multiple benign models such as murine colonic epithelial cell lines, MSIE and YAMC (SPINK3-negative). Mechanistically, SPINK1 promotes tumorigenic phenotype by activating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/AKT) and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathways, and the SPINK1-positive WiDr cells are sensitive to AKT and MEK inhibitors. Importantly, SPINK1 silencing mediated upregulation of various Metallothionein isoforms, considered as tumor suppressors in CRC, confer sensitivity to doxorubicin, which strengthens the rationale for using the combinatorial treatment approach for the SPINK1-positive CRC patients. Furthermore, in vivo studies using chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay, murine xenograft studies and metastasis models further suggest a pivotal role of SPINK1 in CRC progression and metastasis. Taken together, our study demonstrates an important role for the overexpressed SPINK1 in CRC disease progression, a phenomenon that needs careful evaluation towards effective therapeutic target development. PMID:26258891

  10. Arsenic trioxide disrupts glioma stem cells via promoting PML degradation to inhibit tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenchao; Cheng, Lin; Shi, Yu; Ke, Susan Q.; Huang, Zhi; Fang, Xiaoguang; Chu, Cheng-wei; Xie, Qi; Bian, Xiu-wu; Rich, Jeremy N.; Bao, Shideng

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal brain tumor. Tumor relapse in GBM is inevitable despite maximal therapeutic interventions. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) have been found to be critical players in therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Therapeutic drugs targeting GSCs may significantly improve GBM treatment. In this study, we demonstrated that arsenic trioxide (As2O3) effectively disrupted GSCs and inhibited tumor growth in the GSC-derived orthotopic xenografts by targeting the promyelocytic leukaemia (PML). As2O3 treatment induced rapid degradation of PML protein along with severe apoptosis in GSCs. Disruption of the endogenous PML recapitulated the inhibitory effects of As2O3 treatment on GSCs both in vitro and in orthotopic tumors. Importantly, As2O3 treatment dramatically reduced GSC population in the intracranial GBM xenografts and increased the survival of mice bearing the tumors. In addition, As2O3 treatment preferentially inhibited cell growth of GSCs but not matched non-stem tumor cells (NSTCs). Furthermore, As2O3 treatment or PML disruption potently diminished c-Myc protein levels through increased poly-ubiquitination and proteasome degradation of c-Myc. Our study indicated a potential implication of As2O3 in GBM treatment and highlighted the important role of PML/c-Myc axis in the maintenance of GSCs. PMID:26510911

  11. RESEARCH TOWARD THE DEVELOPMENT OF A BIOLOGICALLY BASED DOSE RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR INORGANIC ARSENIC CARCINOGENICITY: A PROGRESS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer risk assessments for inorganic arsenic have been based on human epidemiological data, assuming a linear dose-response below the range of observation of tumors. Part of the reason for the continued use of the linear approach in arsenic risk assessments is the lack of an ad...

  12. Effect of arsenic on tolerance mechanisms of two plant growth-promoting bacteria used as biological inoculants.

    PubMed

    Armendariz, Ana L; Talano, Melina A; Wevar Oller, Ana L; Medina, María I; Agostini, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial ability to colonize the rhizosphere of plants in arsenic (As) contaminated soils is highly important for symbiotic and free-living plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) used as inoculants, since they can contribute to enhance plant As tolerance and limit metalloid uptake by plants. The aim of this work was to study the effect of As on growth, exopolysaccharide (EPS) production, biofilm formation and motility of two strains used as soybean inoculants, Bradyrhizobium japonicum E109 and Azospirillum brasilense Az39. The metabolism of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) and their removal and/or possible accumulation were also evaluated. The behavior of both bacteria under As treatment was compared and discussed in relation to their potential for colonizing plant rhizosphere with high content of the metalloid. B. japonicum E109 growth was reduced with As(III) concentration from 10 μM while A. brasilense Az39 showed a reduction of growth with As(III) from 500 μM. EPS and biofilm production increased significantly under 25 μM As(III) for both strains. Moreover, this was more notorious for Azospirillum under 500 μM As(III), where motility was seriously affected. Both bacterial strains showed a similar ability to reduce As(V). However, Azospirillum was able to oxidize more As(III) (around 53%) than Bradyrhizobium (17%). In addition, both strains accumulated As in cell biomass. The behavior of Azospirillum under As treatments suggests that this strain would be able to colonize efficiently As contaminated soils. In this way, inoculation with A. brasilense Az39 would positively contribute to promoting growth of different plant species under As treatment. PMID:26141894

  13. Arsenic-induced promoter hypomethylation and over-expression of ERCC2 reduces DNA repair capacity in humans by non-disjunction of the ERCC2-Cdk7 complex.

    PubMed

    Paul, Somnath; Banerjee, Nilanjana; Chatterjee, Aditi; Sau, Tanmoy J; Das, Jayanta K; Mishra, Prafulla K; Chakrabarti, Partha; Bandyopadhyay, Arun; Giri, Ashok K

    2014-04-01

    Arsenic in drinking water is of critical concern in West Bengal, India, as it results in several physiological symptoms including dermatological lesions and cancers. Impairment of the DNA repair mechanism has been associated with arsenic-induced genetic damage as well as with several cancers. ERCC2 (Excision Repair Cross-Complementing rodent repair, complementation group 2), mediates DNA-repair by interacting with Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex, which helps in DNA proof-reading during transcription. Arsenic metabolism alters epigenetic regulation; we tried to elucidate the regulation of ERCC2 in arsenic-exposed humans. Water, urine, nails, hair and blood samples from one hundred and fifty seven exposed and eighty eight unexposed individuals were collected. Dose dependent validation was done in vitro using HepG2 and HEK-293. Arsenic content in the biological samples was higher in the exposed individuals compared with the content in unexposed individuals (p < 0.001). Bisulfite-modified methylation specific PCR showed a significant (p < 0.0001) hypomethylation of the ERCC2 promoter in the arsenic-exposed individuals. Densitometric analysis of immunoblots showed a nearly two-fold increase in expression of ERCC2 in exposed individuals, but there was an enhanced genotoxic insult as measured by micronuclei frequency. Immuno-precipitation and western blotting revealed an increased (p < 0.001) association of Cdk7 with ERCC2 in highly arsenic exposed individuals. The decrease in CAK activity was determined by observing the intensity of Ser(392) phosphorylation in p53, in vitro, which decreased with an increase in arsenic dose. Thus we infer that arsenic biotransformation leads to promoter hypomethylation of ERCC2, which in turn inhibits the normal functioning of the CAK-complex, thus affecting DNA-repair; this effect was highest among the arsenic exposed individuals with dermatological lesions. PMID:24473091

  14. Promotion of arsenic phytoextraction efficiency in the fern Pteris vittata by the inoculation of As-resistant bacteria: a soil bioremediation perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lampis, Silvia; Santi, Chiara; Ciurli, Adriana; Andreolli, Marco; Vallini, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was carried out to evaluate the efficiency of arsenic phytoextraction by the fern Pteris vittata growing in arsenic-contaminated soil, with or without the addition of selected rhizobacteria isolated from the polluted site. The bacterial strains were selected for arsenic resistance, the ability to reduce arsenate to arsenite, and the ability to promote plant growth. P. vittata plants were cultivated for 4 months in a contaminated substrate consisting of arsenopyrite cinders and mature compost. Four different experimental conditions were tested: (i) non-inoculated plants; (ii) plants inoculated with the siderophore-producing and arsenate-reducing bacteria Pseudomonas sp. P1III2 and Delftia sp. P2III5 (A); (iii) plants inoculated with the siderophore and indoleacetic acid-producing bacteria Bacillus sp. MPV12, Variovorax sp. P4III4, and Pseudoxanthomonas sp. P4V6 (B), and (iv) plants inoculated with all five bacterial strains (AB). The presence of growth-promoting rhizobacteria increased plant biomass by up to 45% and increased As removal efficiency from 13% without bacteria to 35% in the presence of the mixed inoculum. Molecular analysis confirmed the persistence of the introduced bacterial strains in the soil and resulted in a significant impact on the structure of the bacterial community. PMID:25741356

  15. Promotion of arsenic phytoextraction efficiency in the fern Pteris vittata by the inoculation of As-resistant bacteria: a soil bioremediation perspective.

    PubMed

    Lampis, Silvia; Santi, Chiara; Ciurli, Adriana; Andreolli, Marco; Vallini, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was carried out to evaluate the efficiency of arsenic phytoextraction by the fern Pteris vittata growing in arsenic-contaminated soil, with or without the addition of selected rhizobacteria isolated from the polluted site. The bacterial strains were selected for arsenic resistance, the ability to reduce arsenate to arsenite, and the ability to promote plant growth. P. vittata plants were cultivated for 4 months in a contaminated substrate consisting of arsenopyrite cinders and mature compost. Four different experimental conditions were tested: (i) non-inoculated plants; (ii) plants inoculated with the siderophore-producing and arsenate-reducing bacteria Pseudomonas sp. P1III2 and Delftia sp. P2III5 (A); (iii) plants inoculated with the siderophore and indoleacetic acid-producing bacteria Bacillus sp. MPV12, Variovorax sp. P4III4, and Pseudoxanthomonas sp. P4V6 (B), and (iv) plants inoculated with all five bacterial strains (AB). The presence of growth-promoting rhizobacteria increased plant biomass by up to 45% and increased As removal efficiency from 13% without bacteria to 35% in the presence of the mixed inoculum. Molecular analysis confirmed the persistence of the introduced bacterial strains in the soil and resulted in a significant impact on the structure of the bacterial community. PMID:25741356

  16. GT-repeat polymorphism in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter is associated with cardiovascular mortality risk in an arsenic-exposed population in northeastern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meei-Maan; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chi-Ling; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Lien, Li-Ming; Lee, Te-Chang; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2010-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic has been associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease and mortality in humans. A functional GT-repeat polymorphism in the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene promoter is inversely correlated with the development of coronary artery disease and restenosis after clinical angioplasty. The relationship of HO-1 genotype with arsenic-associated cardiovascular disease has not been studied. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between the HO-1 GT-repeat polymorphism and cardiovascular mortality in an arsenic-exposed population. A total of 504 study participants were followed up for a median of 10.7 years for occurrence of cardiovascular deaths (coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease). Cardiovascular risk factors and DNA samples for determination of HO-1 GT repeats were obtained at recruitment. GT repeats variants were grouped into the S (< 27 repeats) or L allele ({>=} 27 repeats). Relative mortality risk was estimated using Cox regression analysis, adjusted for competing risk of cancer and other causes. For the L/L, L/S, and S/S genotype groups, the crude mortalities for cardiovascular disease were 8.42, 3.10, and 2.85 cases/1000 person-years, respectively. After adjusting for conventional cardiovascular risk factors and competing risk of cancer and other causes, carriers with class S allele (L/S or S/S genotypes) had a significantly reduced risk of cardiovascular mortality compared to non-carriers (L/L genotype) [OR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.16-0.90]. In contrast, no significant association was observed between HO-1 genotype and cancer mortality or mortality from other causes. Shorter (GT)n repeats in the HO-1 gene promoter may confer protective effects against cardiovascular mortality related to arsenic exposure.

  17. Technology transfer: Promoting irrigation progress and best management practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Educational efforts promoting irrigation best management practices are designed to increase adoption of these practices and increase public understanding of the importance of irrigation. They increase visibility and the impact of the Ogallala Aquifer Program and promote affiliated research and exten...

  18. Arsenic trioxide-mediated growth inhibition in gallbladder carcinoma cells via down-regulation of Cyclin D1 transcription mediated by Sp1 transcription factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Zhilong; Lu, Weiqi; Ton, Saixiong; Liu, Houbao; Sou, Tao; Shen, Zhenbin; Qin, Xinyu . E-mail: smc_jjh@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-08-31

    Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC), an aggressive and mostly lethal malignancy, is known to be resistant to a number of drug stimuli. Here, we demonstrated that arsenic trioxide inhibited the proliferation of gallbladder carcinoma in vivo and in vitro as well as the transcription of cell cycle-related protein Cyclin D1. And, Cyclin D1 overexpression inhibited the negative role of arsenic trioxide in cell cycle progression. We further explored the mechanisms by which arsenic trioxide affected Cyclin D1 transcription and found that the Sp1 transcription factor was down-regulated by arsenic trioxide, with a corresponding decrease in Cyclin D1 promoter activity. Taken together, these results suggested that arsenic trioxide inhibited gallbladder carcinoma cell proliferation via down-regulation of Cyclin D1 transcription in a Sp1-dependent manner, which provided a new mechanism of arsenic trioxide-involved cell proliferation and may have important therapeutic implications in gallbladder carcinoma patients.

  19. TLR5 signaling, commensal microbiota and systemic tumor promoting inflammation: the three parcae of malignant progression

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowski, Melanie R; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R

    2015-01-01

    We have reported that TLR5-mediated recognition of commensal microbiota modulates systemic tumor-promoting inflammation and malignant progression of tumors at distal locations. Approximately 7–10% of the general population harbors a deleterious single nucleotide polymorphism in TLR5, implicating a novel role for genetic variation during the initiation and progression of cancer. PMID:26405577

  20. Somatic LKB1 Mutations Promote Cervical Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Wingo, Shana N.; Gallardo, Teresa D.; Akbay, Esra A.; Liang, Mei-Chi; Contreras, Cristina M.; Boren, Todd; Shimamura, Takeshi; Miller, David S.; Sharpless, Norman E.; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Schorge, John O.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Castrillon, Diego H.

    2009-01-01

    Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is the etiologic agent for cervical cancer. Yet, infection with HPV is not sufficient to cause cervical cancer, because most infected women develop transient epithelial dysplasias that spontaneously regress. Progression to invasive cancer has been attributed to diverse host factors such as immune or hormonal status, as no recurrent genetic alterations have been identified in cervical cancers. Thus, the pressing question as to the biological basis of cervical cancer progression has remained unresolved, hampering the development of novel therapies and prognostic tests. Here we show that at least 20% of cervical cancers harbor somatically-acquired mutations in the LKB1 tumor suppressor. Approximately one-half of tumors with mutations harbored single nucleotide substitutions or microdeletions identifiable by exon sequencing, while the other half harbored larger monoallelic or biallelic deletions detectable by multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA). Biallelic mutations were identified in most cervical cancer cell lines; HeLa, the first human cell line, harbors a homozygous 25 kb deletion that occurred in vivo. LKB1 inactivation in primary tumors was associated with accelerated disease progression. Median survival was only 13 months for patients with LKB1-deficient tumors, but >100 months for patients with LKB1-wild type tumors (P = 0.015, log rank test; hazard ratio = 0.25, 95% CI = 0.083 to 0.77). LKB1 is thus a major cervical tumor suppressor, demonstrating that acquired genetic alterations drive progression of HPV-induced dysplasias to invasive, lethal cancers. Furthermore, LKB1 status can be exploited clinically to predict disease recurrence. PMID:19340305

  1. Recent Progress in Promoting Gender Equality for Japanese Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Setsuko; Nishitani-Gamo, Mikka

    2009-04-01

    The last three years have been an epoch-making period in promoting gender equality in the Japanese science community. Motivated by recommendations we made on the basis of a large-scale survey, the Japanese government started several projects in 2006 for supporting women scientists and attracting girls to science and technology. In spite of these efforts, we see only very slow increase in the number of women researchers in professional positions.

  2. Does monitoring goal progress promote goal attainment? A meta-analysis of the experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Harkin, Benjamin; Webb, Thomas L; Chang, Betty P I; Prestwich, Andrew; Conner, Mark; Kellar, Ian; Benn, Yael; Sheeran, Paschal

    2016-02-01

    Control theory and other frameworks for understanding self-regulation suggest that monitoring goal progress is a crucial process that intervenes between setting and attaining a goal, and helps to ensure that goals are translated into action. However, the impact of progress monitoring interventions on rates of behavioral performance and goal attainment has yet to be quantified. A systematic literature search identified 138 studies (N = 19,951) that randomly allocated participants to an intervention designed to promote monitoring of goal progress versus a control condition. All studies reported the effects of the treatment on (a) the frequency of progress monitoring and (b) subsequent goal attainment. A random effects model revealed that, on average, interventions were successful at increasing the frequency of monitoring goal progress (d+ = 1.98, 95% CI [1.71, 2.24]) and promoted goal attainment (d+ = 0.40, 95% CI [0.32, 0.48]). Furthermore, changes in the frequency of progress monitoring mediated the effect of the interventions on goal attainment. Moderation tests revealed that progress monitoring had larger effects on goal attainment when the outcomes were reported or made public, and when the information was physically recorded. Taken together, the findings suggest that monitoring goal progress is an effective self-regulation strategy, and that interventions that increase the frequency of progress monitoring are likely to promote behavior change. PMID:26479070

  3. Arsenic Methyltransferase

    EPA Science Inventory

    The metalloid arsenic enters the environment by natural processes (volcanic activity, weathering of rocks) and by human activity (mining, smelting, herbicides and pesticides). Although arsenic has been exploited for homicidal and suicidal purposes since antiquity, its significan...

  4. ARSENIC REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation covered five topics; arsenic chemistry, best available technology (BAT), surface water technology, ground water technology and case studies of arsenic removal. The discussion on arsenic chemistry focused on the need and method of speciation for AsIII and AsV. BAT me...

  5. Neuropilin-2 promotes melanoma growth and progression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, Whei F; Kim, Edward; Gerber, Stephanie A; Hammers, Hans; Alani, Rhoda M

    2016-08-01

    Tumor cell interactions with their microenvironment, and neighboring endothelial cells in particular, are critical for tumor cell survival and the metastatic process. Within the spectrum of tumors, melanomas are notorious for their ability to metastasize at a relatively early stage of development; however, little is known about the molecular pathways mediating this process. We recently performed a screen to assess critical mediators of melanoma metastasis by evaluating melanoma-endothelial cell communication. Neuropilin-2 (NRP2), a cell surface receptor involved in angiogenesis and axonal guidance, was found to be an important mediator of melanoma-endothelial cell cross-talk in these studies. Here we seek to further define the role of NRP2 in melanoma growth and progression. We use stable gene silencing of NRP2 in melanomas from varying stages of tumor progression to define the role of NRP2 in melanoma growth, migration, invasion, and metastasis. We found that NRP2 gene silencing in metastatic melanoma cell lines inhibited tumor cell growth in vitro; furthermore, knockdown of NRP2 expression in the metastatic melanoma cell line 1205Lu significantly inhibited in-vivo tumor growth and metastasis. We conclude that NRP2 plays an important role in mediating melanoma growth and metastasis and suggest that targeting this cell surface molecule may represent a significant therapeutic strategy for patients diagnosed with aggressive forms of melanoma. PMID:26881875

  6. EGF Induced Centrosome Separation Promotes Mitotic Progression and Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Mardin, Balca R.; Isokane, Mayumi; Cosenza, Marco R.; Krämer, Alwin; Ellenberg, Jan; Fry, Andrew M.; Schiebel, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Summary Timely and accurate assembly of the mitotic spindle is critical for the faithful segregation of chromosomes and centrosome separation is a key step in this process. The timing of centrosome separation varies dramatically between cell types; however, the mechanisms responsible for these differences and its significance are unclear. Here, we show that activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling determines the timing of centrosome separation. Premature separation of centrosomes decreases the requirement for the major mitotic kinesin Eg5 for spindle assembly, accelerates mitosis and decreases the rate of chromosome missegregation. Importantly, EGF stimulation impacts upon centrosome separation and mitotic progression to different degrees in different cell lines. Cells with high EGFR levels fail to arrest in mitosis upon Eg5 inhibition. This has important implications for cancer therapy since cells with high centrosomal response to EGF are more susceptible to combinatorial inhibition of EGFR and Eg5. PMID:23643362

  7. FYN promotes breast cancer progression through epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ye-Gong; Yu, Yue; Hou, Li-Kun; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Bin; Cao, Xu-Chen

    2016-08-01

    FYN, one of the members of the Src family of kinases (SFKs), has been reported to be overexpressed in various types of cancers and correlated with cell motility and proliferation. However, the mechanism is still unclear. In the present study, we found that FYN was overexpressed in breast cancer and overexpression of FYN promoted cell proliferation, migration and invasion in the MCF10A cells, whereas depletion of FYN suppressed cell proliferation, migration and invasion in the MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, FYN upregulated the expression of mesenchymal markers and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related transcription factors, and downregulated the expression of epithelial markers, suggesting that FYN induces EMT in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, FYN was transcriptionally regulated by FOXO1 and mediated FGF2-induced EMT through both the PI3K/AKT and ERK/MAPK pathways. PMID:27349276

  8. Leukemia inhibitory factor promotes nasopharyngeal carcinoma progression and radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu-Chen; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Chiang, Wen-Che; Chang, Kai-Ping; Hsueh, Chuen; Liang, Ying; Juang, Jyh-Lyh; Chow, Kai-Ping N.; Chang, Yu-Sun

    2013-01-01

    Radioresistance of EBV-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is associated with poor prognosis for patients with this form of cancer. Here, we found that NPC patients had increased serum levels of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and that higher LIF levels correlated with local tumor recurrence. Furthermore, in vitro studies with NPC cells and in vivo xenograft mouse studies demonstrated that LIF critically contributes to NPC tumor growth and radioresistance. Using these model systems, we found that LIF treatment activated the mTORC1/p70S6K signaling pathway, enhanced tumor growth, inhibited DNA damage responses, and enhanced radioresistance. Treatment with either soluble LIF receptor (sLIFR), a LIF antagonist, or the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reversed LIF-mediated effects, resulting in growth arrest and increased sensitivity to γ irradiation. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses of human NPC biopsies revealed that LIF and LIFR were overexpressed in tumor cells and that LIF expression correlated with the presence of the activated p-p70S6K. Finally, we found that the EBV-encoded protein latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) enhances LIF production. Together, our findings indicate that LIF promotes NPC tumorigenesis and suggest that serum LIF levels may predict local recurrence and radiosensitivity in NPC patients. PMID:24270418

  9. DCA promotes progression of neuroblastoma tumors in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Feuerecker, Benedikt; Seidl, Christof; Pirsig, Sabine; Bruchelt, Gernot; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard

    2015-01-01

    Even in the presence of oxygen most cancer cells convert glucose to lactate via pyruvate instead of performing oxidative phosphorylation (aerobic glycolysis-Warburg effect). Thus, it has been considered to shift pyruvate - the metabolite of aerobic glycolysis - to acetylCoA by activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). AcetylCoA will then be metabolized by oxidative phosphorylation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to shift tumor cells from aerobic glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation using dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of PDH-kinase. The effects of DCA were assayed in vitro in Neuro-2a (murine neuroblastoma), Kelly and SK-N-SH (human neuroblastoma) as well as SkBr3 (human breast carcinoma) cell lines. The effects of DCA on tumor development were investigated in vivo using NMRI nu/nu mice bearing subcutaneous Neuro-2a xenografts. For that purpose animals were treated continuously with DCA in the drinking water. Tumor volumes were monitored using caliper measurements and via [18F]-FDG-positron emission tomography. DCA treatment increased viability/proliferation in Neuro-2a and SkBr3 cells, but did not cause significant alterations of PDH activity. However, no significant effects of DCA could be observed in Kelly and SK-N-SH cells. Accordingly, in mice bearing Neuro-2a xenografts, DCA significantly increased tumor proliferation compared to mock-treated mice. Thus, we could demonstrate that DCA - an indicated inhibitor of tumor growth - efficiently promotes tumor growth in Neuro-2a cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25973318

  10. Arsenic-mediated nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Robles-Osorio, Ma Ludivina; Sabath-Silva, Elizabeth; Sabath, Ernesto

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important global health problem that affects 8-15% of the population according to epidemiological studies done in different countries. Essential to prevention is the knowledge of the environmental factors associated with this disease, and heavy metals such as lead and cadmium are clearly associated with kidney injury and CKD progression. Arsenic is one of the most abundant contaminants in water and soil, and many epidemiological studies have found an association between arsenic and type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension and cancer; however, there is a scarcity of epidemiological studies about its association with kidney disease, and the evidence linking urinary arsenic excretion with CKD, higher urinary excretion of low molecular proteins, albuminuria or other markers of renal in injury is still limited, and more studies are necessary to characterize the role of arsenic on renal injury and CKD progression. Global efforts to reduce arsenic exposure remain important and research is also needed to determine whether specific therapies are beneficial in susceptible populations. PMID:25703706

  11. Speciation and detection of arsenic in aqueous samples: a review of recent progress in non-atomic spectrometric methods.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Sengupta, Mrinal K; Yuan, Dongxing; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2014-06-11

    Inorganic arsenic (As) displays extreme toxicity and is a class A human carcinogen. It is of interest to both analytical chemists and environmental scientists. Facile and sensitive determination of As and knowledge of the speciation of forms of As in aqueous samples are vitally important. Nearly every nation has relevant official regulations on permissible limits of drinking water As content. The size of the literature on As is therefore formidable. The heart of this review consists of two tables: one is a compilation of principal official documents and major review articles, including the toxicology and chemistry of As. This includes comprehensive official compendia on As speciation, sample treatment, recommended procedures for the determination of As in specific sample matrices with specific analytical instrument(s), procedures for multi-element (including As) speciation and analysis, and prior comprehensive reviews on arsenic analysis. The second table focuses on the recent literature (2005-2013, the coverage for 2013 is incomplete) on As measurement in aqueous matrices. Recent As speciation and analysis methods based on spectrometric and electrochemical methods, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, neutron activation analysis and biosensors are summarized. We have deliberately excluded atomic optical spectrometric techniques (atomic absorption, atomic fluorescence, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry) not because they are not important (in fact the majority of arsenic determinations are possibly carried out by one of these techniques) but because these methods are sufficiently mature and little meaningful innovation has been made beyond what is in the officially prescribed compendia (which are included) and recent reviews are available. PMID:24861967

  12. Upregulated SMYD3 promotes bladder cancer progression by targeting BCLAF1 and activating autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bing; Tan, Mingyue; Mu, Xinyu; Qin, Yan; Zhang, Fang; Liu, Yong; Fan, Yu

    2016-06-01

    The recent discovery of a large number of histone methyltransferases reveals important roles of these enzymes in regulating tumor development and progression. SMYD3, a histone methyltransferase, is associated with poor prognosis of patients with prostate and gastric cancer. In the study, we attempted to investigate its putative oncogenic role on bladder cancer. Here, we report that SMYD3 frequently amplified in bladder cancer is correlated with bladder cancer progression and poor prognosis. Overexpression of SMYD3 promotes bladder cancer cell proliferation and invasion, whereas SMYD3 knockdown inhibits cancer cell growth and invasion. Mechanically, SMYD3 positively regulates the expression of BCL2-associated transcription factor 1 (BCLAF1). SMYD3 physically interacts with the promoter of BCLAF1 and upregulates its expression by accumulating di- and trimethylation of H3K4 at the BCLAF1 locus. We further show that SMYD3 overexpression in bladder cancer cells promotes autophagy activation, whereas BCLAF1 depletion inhibits SMYD3-induced autophagy. Finally, we demonstrate that SMYD3 promotes bladder cancer progression, at least in part by increasing BCLAF1 expression and activating autophagy. Our results establish a function for SMYD3 in autophagy activation and bladder cancer progression and suggest its candidacy as a new prognostic biomarker and target for clinical management of bladder cancer. PMID:26676636

  13. Hippo transducer TAZ promotes epithelial mesenchymal transition and supports pancreatic cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Dacheng; Cui, Jiujie; Xia, Tian; Jia, Zhiliang; Wang, Liang; Wei, Wenfei; Zhu, Anna; Gao, Yong; Xie, Keping; Quan, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional co-activator with PDZ binding motif (TAZ) is a transducer of the Hippo pathway and promotes cancer development and progression. In the present study, we sought to determine the roles and underlying mechanisms of elevated expression and activation of TAZ in pancreatic cancer development and progression. The mechanistic role of TAZ and Hippo signaling in promotion of pancreatic cancer development and progression was examined using cell culture, molecular biology, and mouse models. The relevance of our experimental and mechanistic findings was validated using human pancreatic tumor specimens. We found that TAZ expression was markedly higher in pancreatic tumors than in normal pancreatic tissue. Further analysis of the correlation of TAZ expression with tissue microarray clinicopathologic parameters revealed that this expression was positively associated with tumor differentiation. Also, TAZ expression was higher in pancreatic cancer cell lines than in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. TAZ activation in pancreatic cancer cells promoted their proliferation, migration, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that aberrant expression and activation of TAZ in pancreatic cancer cells resulted from suppression of the expression of Merlin, a positive regulator upstream of the Hippo pathway, and that the oncogenic function of TAZ in pancreatic cancer cells was mediated by TEA/ATTS domain transcription factors. Therefore, TAZ functioned as an oncogene and promoted pancreatic cancer epithelial-mesenchymal transition and progression. TAZ thus may be a target for effective therapeutic strategies for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26416426

  14. Linking Microbial Activity with Arsenic Fate during Cow Dung Disposal of Arsenic-Bearing Wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, T. M.; Reddy, R.; Tan, J.; Hayes, K. F.; Raskin, L.

    2014-12-01

    To address widespread arsenic contamination of drinking water sources numerous technologies have been developed to remove arsenic. All technologies result in the production of an arsenic-bearing waste that must be evaluated and disposed in a manner to limit the potential for environmental release and human exposure. One disposal option that is commonly recommended for areas without access to landfills is the mixing of arsenic-bearing wastes with cow dung. These recommendations are made based on the ability of microorganisms to create volatile arsenic species (including mono-, di-, and tri-methylarsine gases) to be diluted in the atmosphere. However, most studies of environmental microbial communities have found only a small fraction (<0.1 %) of the total arsenic present in soils or rice paddies is released via volatilization. Additionally, past studies often have not monitored arsenic release in the aqueous phase. Two main pathways for microbial arsenic volatilization are known and include methylation of arsenic during methanogenesis and methylation by arsenite S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase. In this study, we compare the roles of these two pathways in arsenic volatilization and aqueous mobilization through mesocosm experiments with cow dung and arsenic-bearing wastes produced during drinking water treatment in West Bengal, India. Arsenic in gaseous, aqueous, and solid phases was measured. Consistent with previous reports, less than 0.02% of the total arsenic present was volatilized. A much higher amount (~5%) of the total arsenic was mobilized into the liquid phase. Through the application of molecular tools, including 16S rRNA sequencing and quantification of gene transcripts involved in methanogenesis, this study links microbial community activity with arsenic fate in potential disposal environments. These results illustrate that disposal of arsenic-bearing wastes by mixing with cow dung does not achieve its end goal of promoting arsenic volatilization

  15. Applying carbon dioxide, plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium and EDTA can enhance the phytoremediation efficiency of ryegrass in a soil polluted with zinc, arsenic, cadmium and lead.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junkang; Feng, Renwei; Ding, Yongzhen; Wang, Ruigang

    2014-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the use of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2), plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Burkholderia sp. D54 (PGPR) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) to enhance the phytoextraction efficiency of ryegrass in response to multiple heavy metal (or metalloid)-polluted soil containing zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb). All of the single or combined CO2, PGPR and EDTA treatments promoted ryegrass growth. The stimulation of ryegrass growth by CO2 and PGPR could primarily be attributed to the regulation of photosynthesis rather than decreased levels of Zn, As and Cd in the shoots. Most treatments seemed to reduce the Zn, As and Cd contents in the shoots, which might be associated with enhanced shoot biomass, thus causing a "dilution effect" regarding their levels. The combined treatments seemed to perform better than single treatments in removing Zn, As, Cd and Pb from soil, judging from the larger biomass and relatively higher total amounts (TAs) of Zn, As, Cd and Pb in both the shoots and roots. Therefore, we suggest that the CO2 plus PGPR treatment will be suitable for removing Zn, As, Cd and Pb from heavy metal (or metalloid)-polluted soils using ryegrass as a phytoremediation material. PMID:24762567

  16. In pursuit of progress: promotion motivation and risk preference in the domain of gains.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xi; Scholer, Abigail A; Higgins, E Tory

    2014-02-01

    This article examines the role of promotion motivation in decision making in the domain of gains. Using a stock investment paradigm in which individuals believed that they were making decisions that were real and consequential, we found that promotion motivation, and not prevention motivation, predicted the likelihood of switching between risky and conservative choices in the domain of gains. Promotion-focused participants chose a relatively risky option when their stock portfolio remained unchanged (stuck at 0, the status quo) but switched to a relatively conservative option when they had just experienced a large gain (Studies 1-4), both when regulatory focus was measured (Study 1) and manipulated (Studies 2-4). Studies in which progress was manipulated (Study 3) and measured (Study 4) provided evidence that it is perceptions of progress that underlie this tactical switch in risk preferences within the promotion system. We discuss the implications of these findings for decision making and the role of progress in self-regulation. PMID:24467419

  17. Biochemical markers associated with the stages of promotion and progression during hepatocarcinogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Pitot, H C; Dragan, Y; Sargent, L; Xu, Y H

    1991-01-01

    Specific biochemical changes occurring during hepatocarcinogenesis have been sought by many investigators. The development of multistage models for hepatocarcinogenesis in the rodent has renewed interest in such marker alterations in preneoplastic as well as neoplastic hepatocytes. Preneoplastic altered hepatic foci (AHF) exhibit specific histomorphologic changes as viewed with tinctorial stains and show a variety of biochemical changes as evidenced by enzyme and immunohistochemistry and by other histochemical markers. During the reversible stage of promotion when AHF are scored by multiple markers, the distribution of markers within these lesions differs with the use of different promoting agents. One interpretation of this finding is that each promoting agent stimulates the replication of a set of initiated cells exhibiting the phenotypic characteristics of a specific programmed phenotype. The same markers score AHF during the stage of progression, but many AHF in this stage are phenotypically heterogeneous, exhibiting in tissue sections a "focus-in-focus" pattern of marker alteration. These latter changes can be correlated with the appearance of karyotypic alterations in preneoplastic hepatocytes. On the other hand, it has been difficult to demonstrate the activation, either mutational or transcriptional, of proto-oncogenes until this stage of progression in rat hepatocarcinogenesis. Thus, a study of biochemical and molecular markers during the stages of hepatocarcinogenesis may lead to a better understanding of potential mechanisms involved in the development of neoplasia through the stages of initiation, promotion, and progression. PMID:1723043

  18. Variants on the promoter region of PTEN affect breast cancer progression and patient survival

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The PTEN gene, a regulator of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt oncogenic pathway, is mutated in various cancers and its expression has been associated with tumor progression in a dose-dependent fashion. We investigated the effect of germline variation in the promoter region of the PTEN gene on clinical characteristics and survival in breast cancer. Methods We screened the promoter region of the PTEN gene for germline variation in 330 familial breast cancer cases and further determined the genotypes of three detected PTEN promoter polymorphisms -903GA, -975GC, and -1026CA in a total of 2,412 breast cancer patients to evaluate the effects of the variants on tumor characteristics and disease outcome. We compared the gene expression profiles in breast cancers of 10 variant carriers and 10 matched non-carriers and performed further survival analyses based on the differentially expressed genes. Results All three promoter variants associated with worse prognosis. The Cox's regression hazard ratio for 10-year breast cancer specific survival in multivariate analysis was 2.01 (95% CI 1.17 to 3.46) P = 0.0119, and for 5-year breast cancer death or distant metastasis free survival 1.79 (95% CI 1.03 to 3.11) P = 0.0381 for the variant carriers, indicating PTEN promoter variants as an independent prognostic factor. The breast tumors from the promoter variant carriers exhibited a similar gene expression signature of 160 differentially expressed genes compared to matched non-carrier tumors. The signature further stratified patients into two groups with different recurrence free survival in independent breast cancer gene expression data sets. Conclusions Inherited variation in the PTEN promoter region affects the tumor progression and gene expression profile in breast cancer. Further studies are warranted to establish PTEN promoter variants as clinical markers for prognosis in breast cancer. PMID:22171747

  19. SKAP2 Promotes Podosome Formation to Facilitate Tumor-Associated Macrophage Infiltration and Metastatic Progression.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masamitsu; Shimamura, Shintaro; Kuriyama, Sei; Maeda, Daichi; Goto, Akiteru; Aiba, Namiko

    2016-01-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) play complex and pivotal roles during cancer progression. A subset of metastasis-associated macrophages accumulates within metastatic sites to promote the invasion and growth of tumor cells. Src kinase-associated phosphoprotein 2 (SKAP2), a substrate of Src family kinases, is highly expressed in macrophages from various tumors, but its contribution to the tumor-promoting behavior of TAMs is unknown. Here, we report that SKAP2 regulates podosome formation in macrophages to promote tumor invasion and metastasis. SKAP2 physically interacted with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) and localized to podosomes, which were rarely observed in SKAP2-null macrophages. The invasion of peritoneal macrophages derived from SKAP2-null mice was significantly reduced compared with wild-type macrophages, but could be rescued by the restoration of functional SKAP2 containing an intact tyrosine phosphorylation site and the ability to interact with WASP. Furthermore, SKAP2-null mice inoculated with lung cancer cells exhibited markedly decreased lung metastases characterized by reduced macrophage infiltration compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, intravenously injected SKAP2-null macrophages failed to efficiently infiltrate established tumors and promote their growth. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel mechanism by which macrophages assemble the appropriate motile machinery to infiltrate tumors and promote disease progression, and implicate SKAP2 as an attractive candidate for therapeutically targeting TAMs. PMID:26577701

  20. HIG2 promotes colorectal cancer progression via hypoxia-dependent and independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Hee; Wang, Dingzhi; Park, Yun-Yong; Katoh, Hiroshi; Margalit, Ofer; Sheffer, Michal; Wu, Hong; Holla, Vijaykumar R; Lee, Ju-Seog; DuBois, Raymond N

    2013-12-01

    HIG2 (hypoxia-inducible gene 2) is a biomarker of hypoxia and elevated in several cancers. Here, we show that HIG2 also upregulated HIF-1α expression under hypoxic conditions and enhanced AP-1 expression under normoxic conditions, which affects colorectal cancer cell survival. Importantly, over-expression of HIG2 promoted tumor growth by suppressing apoptosis in a mouse orthotopic model. These results are likely relevant to human disease since we found that the expression of HIG2 is gradually elevated as tumors progress. Collectively, these findings suggest that HIG2 plays an important role in promoting colorectal cancer growth in hypoxia-dependent and independent manners. PMID:23916472

  1. Arsenic trioxide promotes mitochondrial DNA mutation and cell apoptosis in primary APL cells and NB4 cell line.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ran; Zhou, Jin; Sui, Meng; Li, ZhiYong; Feng, GuoSheng; Yang, BaoFeng

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) on the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells. The NB4 cell line was treated with 2.0 micromol/L As(2)O(3) in vitro, and the primary APL cells were treated with 2.0 micromol/L As(2)O(3) in vitro and 0.16 mg kg(-1) d(-1) As(2)O(3) in vivo. The mitochondrial DNA of all the cells above was amplified by PCR, directly sequenced and analyzed by Sequence Navigatore and Factura software. The apoptosis rates were assayed by flow cytometry. Mitochondrial DNA mutation in the D-loop region was found in NB4 and APL cells before As(2)O(3) use, but the mutation spots were remarkably increased after As(2)O(3) treatment, which was positively correlated to the rates of cellular apoptosis, the correlation coefficient: r (NB4-As2O3)=0.973818, and r (APL-As2O3)=0.934703. The mutation types include transition, transversion, codon insertion or deletion, and the mutation spots in all samples were not constant and regular. It is revealed that As(2)O(3) aggravates mtDNA mutation in the D-loop region of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells both in vitro and in vivo. Mitochondrial DNA might be one of the targets of As(2)O(3) in APL treatment. PMID:20596959

  2. Arsenic Trioxide Activate Transcription of Heme Oxygenase-1 by Promoting Nuclear Translocation of NFE2L2

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Zhen; Zhong, Lingzhi; Mou, Yan; Wang, Xiaotong; Zhang, Haiying; Wang, Yang; Xia, Jianxin; Li, Ronggui; Wang, Zonggui

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that induced expression of Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is responsible for the resistance of human osteosarcoma MG63 cells to the chemotherapeutic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO). The present study was aimed at investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of HO-1 that occurs after exposure of MG63 cells to ATO. First, using RT-QPCT and Western-blot, we found that ATO strongly induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in these human osteosarcoma cells. Then by analyzing HO-1 mRNA of MG63 cells exposed to ATO in the presence and absence of a transcription inhibitor Actinomycin-D (Act-D), we demonstrated that ATO activates HO-1 expression in MG63 cells by regulating the transcription of the gene. Finally, through the analysis of the NFE2L2 protein levels among the total cellular and nuclear proteins by Western-blot and Immunocytochemical staning, we determined that ATO enhanced the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NFE2L2), also known as Nrf2. From these results we have concluded that transcription activation of HO-1 resulting from the nuclear translocation of NFE2L2 is the underlying molecular mechanism for its high induction, which, in turn, is responsible for the resistance of human osteosarcoma cells to ATO treatment. PMID:26283888

  3. Exogenous fatty acid binding protein 4 promotes human prostate cancer cell progression.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Hisanori; Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Oha, Mina; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Izumi, Keisuke

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies have found that obesity is associated with malignant grade and mortality in prostate cancer. Several adipokines have been implicated as putative mediating factors between obesity and prostate cancer. Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), a member of the cytoplasmic fatty acid binding protein multigene family, was recently identified as a novel adipokine. Although FABP4 is released from adipocytes and mean circulating concentrations of FABP4 are linked with obesity, effects of exogenous FABP4 on prostate cancer progression are unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of exogenous FABP4 on human prostate cancer cell progression. FABP4 treatment promoted serum-induced prostate cancer cell invasion in vitro. Furthermore, oleic acid promoted prostate cancer cell invasion only if FABP4 was present in the medium. These promoting effects were reduced by FABP4 inhibitor, which inhibits FABP4 binding to fatty acids. Immunostaining for FABP4 showed that exogenous FABP4 was taken up into DU145 cells in three-dimensional culture. In mice, treatment with FABP4 inhibitor reduced the subcutaneous growth and lung metastasis of prostate cancer cells. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the number of apoptotic cells, positive for cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, was increased in subcutaneous tumors of FABP4 inhibitor-treated mice, as compared with control mice. These results suggest that exogenous FABP4 might promote human prostate cancer cell progression by binding with fatty acids. Additionally, exogenous FABP4 activated the PI3K/Akt pathway, independently of binding to fatty acids. Thus, FABP4 might be a key molecule to understand the mechanisms underlying the obesity-prostate cancer progression link. PMID:24740818

  4. Neural Cell Adhesion Protein CNTN1 Promotes the Metastatic Progression of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Judy; Ojo, Diane; Kapoor, Anil; Lin, Xiaozeng; Pinthus, Jehonathan H; Aziz, Tariq; Bismar, Tarek A; Wei, Fengxiang; Wong, Nicholas; De Melo, Jason; Cutz, Jean-Claude; Major, Pierre; Wood, Geoffrey; Peng, Hao; Tang, Damu

    2016-03-15

    Prostate cancer metastasis is the main cause of disease-related mortality. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying prostate cancer metastasis is critical for effective therapeutic intervention. In this study, we performed gene-expression profiling of prostate cancer stem-like cells (PCSC) derived from DU145 human prostate cancer cells to identify factors involved in metastatic progression. Our studies revealed contactin 1 (CNTN1), a neural cell adhesion protein, to be a prostate cancer-promoting factor. CNTN1 knockdown reduced PCSC-mediated tumor initiation, whereas CNTN1 overexpression enhanced prostate cancer cell invasion in vitro and promoted xenograft tumor formation and lung metastasis in vivo. In addition, CNTN1 overexpression in DU145 cells and corresponding xenograft tumors resulted in elevated AKT activation and reduced E-cadherin (CDH1) expression. CNTN1 expression was not readily detected in normal prostate glands, but was clearly evident on prostate cancer cells in primary tumors and lymph node and bone metastases. Tumors from 637 patients expressing CNTN1 were associated with prostate cancer progression and worse biochemical recurrence-free survival following radical prostatectomy (P < 0.05). Collectively, our findings demonstrate that CNTN1 promotes prostate cancer progression and metastasis, prompting further investigation into the mechanisms that enable neural proteins to become aberrantly expressed in non-neural malignancies. PMID:26795349

  5. Tissue transglutaminase-2 promotes gastric cancer progression via the ERK1/2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Wu, Xiongyan; Chen, Xuehua; Li, Jianfang; Zhu, Zhenggang; Liu, Bingya; Su, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common tumors worldwide and involves extensive local tumor invasion, metastasis, and poor prognosis. Understanding mechanisms regulating progression of GC is necessary for developing effective therapeutic strategies. Tissue transglutaminase-2 (TG2), a multifunctional member of the transglutaminase family, has been shown to be critical for tumor initiation and progression. However, how TG2 promotes the progression of GC is unknown. We report that TG2 was highly expressed in GC tissues and positively associated with depth of tumor invasion and late TNM stage. With gain- and loss-of-function approaches, we observed that TG2 promoted GC cell proliferation, migration, invasion, as well as tumorigenesis and peritoneal metastasis in vivo. These events were associated with the ERK1/2 pathway activation and an ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126) inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion induced by overexpression of TG2. In summary, TG2 contributes to tumorigenesis and progression of GC by activating the ERK1/2 signaling pathway and is a potential therapeutic target of metastatic gastric cancer. PMID:26771235

  6. Myeloma cell–derived Runx2 promotes myeloma progression in bone

    PubMed Central

    Trotter, Timothy N.; Li, Mei; Pan, Qianying; Peker, Deniz; Rowan, Patrick D.; Li, Juan; Zhan, Fenghuang; Suva, Larry J.; Javed, Amjad

    2015-01-01

    The progression of multiple myeloma (MM) is governed by a network of molecular signals, the majority of which remain to be identified. Recent studies suggest that Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), a well-known bone-specific transcription factor, is also expressed in solid tumors, where expression promotes both bone metastasis and osteolysis. However, the function of Runx2 in MM remains unknown. The current study demonstrated that (1) Runx2 expression in primary human MM cells is significantly greater than in plasma cells from healthy donors and patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance; (2) high levels of Runx2 expression in MM cells are associated with a high-risk population of MM patients; and (3) overexpression of Runx2 in MM cells enhanced tumor growth and disease progression in vivo. Additional studies demonstrated that MM cell–derived Runx2 promotes tumor progression through a mechanism involving the upregulation of Akt/β-catenin/Survivin signaling and enhanced expression of multiple metastatic genes/proteins, as well as the induction of a bone-resident cell-like phenotype in MM cells. Thus, Runx2 expression supports the aggressive phenotype of MM and is correlated with poor prognosis. These data implicate Runx2 expression as a major regulator of MM progression in bone and myeloma bone disease. PMID:25862559

  7. Biochar in co-contaminated soil manipulates arsenic solubility and microbiological community structure, and promotes organochlorine degradation.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Samuel J; Anderson, Christopher W N; Camps-Arbestain, Marta; Biggs, Patrick J; Ganley, Austen R D; O'Sullivan, Justin M; McManus, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of biochar on the water-soluble arsenic (As) concentration and the extent of organochlorine degradation in a co-contaminated historic sheep-dip soil during a 180-d glasshouse incubation experiment. Soil microbial activity, bacterial community and structure diversity were also investigated. Biochar made from willow feedstock (Salix sp) was pyrolysed at 350 or 550°C and added to soil at rates of 10 g kg-1 and 20 g kg-1 (representing 30 t ha-1 and 60 t ha-1). The isomers of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) alpha-HCH and gamma-HCH (lindane), underwent 10-fold and 4-fold reductions in concentration as a function of biochar treatment. Biochar also resulted in a significant reduction in soil DDT levels (P < 0.01), and increased the DDE:DDT ratio. Soil microbial activity was significantly increased (P < 0.01) under all biochar treatments after 60 days of treatment compared to the control. 16S amplicon sequencing revealed that biochar-amended soil contained more members of the Chryseobacterium, Flavobacterium, Dyadobacter and Pseudomonadaceae which are known bioremediators of hydrocarbons. We hypothesise that a recorded short-term reduction in the soluble As concentration due to biochar amendment allowed native soil microbial communities to overcome As-related stress. We propose that increased microbiological activity (dehydrogenase activity) due to biochar amendment was responsible for enhanced degradation of organochlorines in the soil. Biochar therefore partially overcame the co-contaminant effect of As, allowing for enhanced natural attenuation of organochlorines in soil. PMID:25923541

  8. Biochar in Co-Contaminated Soil Manipulates Arsenic Solubility and Microbiological Community Structure, and Promotes Organochlorine Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Samuel J.; Anderson, Christopher W. N.; Camps-Arbestain, Marta; Biggs, Patrick J.; Ganley, Austen R. D.; O’Sullivan, Justin M.; McManus, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effect of biochar on the water-soluble arsenic (As) concentration and the extent of organochlorine degradation in a co-contaminated historic sheep-dip soil during a 180-d glasshouse incubation experiment. Soil microbial activity, bacterial community and structure diversity were also investigated. Biochar made from willow feedstock (Salix sp) was pyrolysed at 350 or 550°C and added to soil at rates of 10 g kg-1 and 20 g kg-1 (representing 30 t ha-1 and 60 t ha-1). The isomers of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) alpha-HCH and gamma-HCH (lindane), underwent 10-fold and 4-fold reductions in concentration as a function of biochar treatment. Biochar also resulted in a significant reduction in soil DDT levels (P < 0.01), and increased the DDE:DDT ratio. Soil microbial activity was significantly increased (P < 0.01) under all biochar treatments after 60 days of treatment compared to the control. 16S amplicon sequencing revealed that biochar-amended soil contained more members of the Chryseobacterium, Flavobacterium, Dyadobacter and Pseudomonadaceae which are known bioremediators of hydrocarbons. We hypothesise that a recorded short-term reduction in the soluble As concentration due to biochar amendment allowed native soil microbial communities to overcome As-related stress. We propose that increased microbiological activity (dehydrogenase activity) due to biochar amendment was responsible for enhanced degradation of organochlorines in the soil. Biochar therefore partially overcame the co-contaminant effect of As, allowing for enhanced natural attenuation of organochlorines in soil. PMID:25923541

  9. Arsenic Induced Phytate Exudation, and Promoted FeAsO4 Dissolution and Plant Growth in As-Hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue; Fu, Jing-Wei; Guan, Dong-Xing; Cao, Yue; Luo, Jun; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Chen, Yanshan; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (PV) is efficient in taking up As and nutrients from As-contaminated soils. We evaluated the mechanisms used by PV to mobilize As and Fe by examining the impacts of As and root exudates on FeAsO4 solubilization, and As and Fe uptake in four plants: As-hyperaccumulators PV and Pteris multifida (PM), nonhyperaccumulator Pteris ensiformis (PE), and angiosperm plant tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Phytate and oxalate were dominant in fern plants (>93%), which were 50-83, 15-42, and 0-32 mg kg(-1) phytate and 10-15, 7-26, and 4-12 mg kg(-1) oxalate for PV, PM, and PE respectively, with higher As inducing greater phytate exudation and no phytate being detected in tomato exudates. PV treated with phytate+FeAsO4 had higher As and Fe contents and larger biomass than phytate or FeAsO4 treatment, which were 340 vs 20 and 130 mg kg(-1) As in the fronds and 7900 vs 1600 and 4100 mg kg(-1) Fe in the roots. We hypothesized that As-induced phytate exudation helped PV to take up Fe and As from insoluble FeAsO4 and promoted PV growth. Our study suggests that phytate exudation may be special to fern plants, which may play an important role in enhancing As and nutrient uptake by plants, thereby increasing their efficiency in phytoremediation of As-contaminated soils. PMID:27483027

  10. Association Study between Promoter Polymorphism of TPH1 and Progression of Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Yablanski, Vasil; Nikolova, Svetla; Vlaev, Evgeni; Savov, Alexey; Kremensky, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    The concept of disease-modifier genes as an element of genetic heterogeneity has been widely accepted and reported. The aim of the current study is to investigate the association between the promoter polymorphism TPH1 (rs10488682) and progression of idiopathic scoliosis (IS) in Eastern European population sample. A total of 105 patients and 210 healthy gender-matched controls were enrolled in this study. The TPH1 promoter polymorphism was genotyped by amplification followed by restriction. The statistical analysis was performed by Fisher's Exact Test. The results indicated that the genotypes and alleles of TPH1 (rs10488682) are not correlated with curve severity, curve pattern, or bracing. Therefore, the examined polymorphic variant could not be considered as a genetic factor with modifying effect of IS. In conclusion, this case-control study revealed no statistically significant association between TPH1 (rs10488682) and progression of IS in Eastern European population sample. These preliminary results should be replicated in extended population studies including larger sample sizes. The identification of molecular markers for IS could be useful for a more accurate prognosis of the risk for a rapid progression of the curve. That would permit early stage treatment of the patient with the least invasive procedures. PMID:27293961

  11. Snail and serpinA1 promote tumor progression and predict prognosis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Hwa; Lee, Ja Rang; Kim, Hye Kyung; Jo, Hong-jae; Kim, Hyun Sung; Oh, Nahmgun; Song, Geun Am; Park, Do Youn

    2015-01-01

    The role of Snail and serpin peptidase inhibitor clade A member 1 (serpinA1) in tumorigenesis has been previously identified. However, the exact role and mechanism of these proteins in progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) are controversial. In this study, we investigated the role of Snail and serpinA1 in colorectal cancer (CRC) and examined the mechanisms through which these proteins mediate CRC progression. Immunohistochemical analysis of 528 samples from patients with CRC showed that elevated expression of Snail or serpinA1 was correlated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, and poor prognosis. Moreover, we detected a correlation between Snail and serpinA1 expression. Functional studies performed using the CRC cell lines DLD-1 and SW-480 showed that overexpression of Snail or serpinA1 significantly increased CRC cell invasion and migration. Conversely, knockdown of Snail or serpinA1 expression suppressed CRC cell invasion and migration. ChIP analysis revealed that Snail regulated serpinA1 by binding to its promoter. In addition, fibronectin mediated Snail and serpinA1 signaling was involved in CRC cell invasion and migration. Taken together, our data showed that Snail and serpinA1 promoted CRC progression through fibronectin. These findings suggested that Snail and serpinA1 were novel prognostic biomarkers and candidate therapeutic targets in CRC. PMID:26015410

  12. Heparanase promotes myeloma progression by inducing mesenchymal features and motility of myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Trotter, Timothy N.; Peker, Deniz; Regal, Kellie M.; Javed, Amjad; Suva, Larry J.; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Bone dissemination and bone disease occur in approximately 80% of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) and are a major cause of patient mortality. We previously demonstrated that MM cell-derived heparanase (HPSE) is a major driver of MM dissemination to and progression in new bone sites. However the mechanism(s) by which HPSE promotes MM progression remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of mesenchymal features in HPSE-promoted MM progression in bone. Using a combination of molecular, biochemical, cellular, and in vivo approaches, we demonstrated that (1) HPSE enhanced the expression of mesenchymal markers in both MM and vascular endothelial cells; (2) HPSE expression in patient myeloma cells positively correlated with the expression of the mesenchymal markers vimentin and fibronectin. Additional mechanistic studies revealed that the enhanced mesenchymal-like phenotype induced by HPSE in MM cells is due, at least in part, to the stimulation of the ERK signaling pathway. Finally, knockdown of vimentin in HPSE expressing MM cells resulted in significantly attenuated MM cell dissemination and tumor growth in vivo. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the mesenchymal features induced by HPSE in MM cells contribute to enhanced tumor cell motility and bone-dissemination. PMID:26849235

  13. Tumor-promoting functions of transforming growth factor-β in progression of cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) elicits both tumor-suppressive and tumor-promoting functions during cancer progression. Here, we describe the tumor-promoting functions of TGF-β and how these functions play a role in cancer progression. Normal epithelial cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through the action of TGF-β, while treatment with TGF-β and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 results in transdifferentiation into activated fibroblastic cells that are highly migratory, thereby facilitating cancer invasion and metastasis. TGF-β also induces EMT in tumor cells, which can be regulated by oncogenic and anti-oncogenic signals. In addition to EMT promotion, invasion and metastasis of cancer are facilitated by TGF-β through other mechanisms, such as regulation of cell survival, angiogenesis, and vascular integrity, and interaction with the tumor microenvironment. TGF-β also plays a critical role in regulating the cancer-initiating properties of certain types of cells, including glioma-initiating cells. These findings thus may be useful for establishing treatment strategies for advanced cancer by inhibiting TGF-β signaling. PMID:22111550

  14. CTCF cooperates with noncoding RNA MYCNOS to promote neuroblastoma progression through facilitating MYCN expression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Li, D; Pu, J; Mei, H; Yang, D; Xiang, X; Qu, H; Huang, K; Zheng, L; Tong, Q

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have indicated the important roles of MYCN in tumorigenesis and progression of neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extracranial solid tumor derived from neural crest in childhood. However, the regulatory mechanisms of MYCN expression in NB still remain largely unknown. In this study, through mining public microarray databases and analyzing the cis-regulatory elements and chromatin immunoprecipitation data sets, we identified CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) as a crucial transcription factor facilitating the MYCN expression in NB. RNA immunoprecipitation, RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay, RNA pull down and in vitro binding assay indicated the physical interaction between CTCF and MYCN opposite strand (MYCNOS), a natural noncoding RNA surrounding the MYNC promoter. Gain- and loss-of-function studies revealed that MYCNOS facilitated the recruitment of CTCF to its binding sites within the MYCN promoter to induce chromatin remodeling, resulting in enhanced MYCN levels and altered downstream gene expression, in cultured NB cell lines. CTCF cooperated with MYCNOS to suppress the differentiation and promote the growth, invasion and metastasis of NB cells in vitro and in vivo. In clinical NB tissues and cell lines, CTCF and MYCNOS were upregulated and positively correlated with MYCN expression. CTCF was an independent prognostic factor for unfavorable outcome of NB, and patients with high MYCNOS expression had lower survival probability. Taken together, these results demonstrate that CTCF cooperates with noncoding RNA MYCNOS to exhibit oncogenic activity that affects the aggressiveness and progression of NB through transcriptional upregulation of MYCN. PMID:26549029

  15. Arsenic transformation and plant growth promotion characteristics of As-resistant endophytic bacteria from As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia-Yi; Han, Yong-He; Chen, Yanshan; Zhu, Ling-Jia; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-02-01

    The ability of As-resistant endophytic bacteria in As transformation and plant growth promotion was determined. The endophytes were isolated from As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (PV) after growing for 60 d in a soil containing 200 mg kg(-1) arsenate (AsV). They were isolated in presence of 10 mM AsV from PV roots, stems, and leaflets, representing 4 phyla and 17 genera. All endophytes showed at least one plant growth promoting characteristics including IAA synthesis, siderophore production and P solubilization. The root endophytes had higher P solubilization ability than the leaflet (60.0 vs. 18.3 mg L(-1)). In presence of 10 mM AsV, 6 endophytes had greater growth than the control, suggesting As-stimulated growth. Furthermore, root endophytes were more resistant to AsV while the leaflet endophytes were more tolerant to arsenite (AsIII), which corresponded to the dominant As species in PV tissues. Bacterial As resistance was positively correlated to their ability in AsV reduction but not AsIII oxidation. The roles of those endophytes in promoting plant growth and As resistance in P. vittata warrant further investigation. PMID:26469935

  16. HEF1, a Novel Target of Wnt Signaling, Promotes Colonic Cell Migration and Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingchun; Bavarva, Jasmin H.; Wang, Zemin; Guo, Jianhui; Qian, Chiping; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Golemis, Erica A.; Liu, Wanguo

    2011-01-01

    Misregulation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway and aberrant activation of Wnt signaling target genes are common in colorectal cancer and contribute to cancer progression. Altered expression of HEF1 (Human Enhancer of Filamentation 1, also known as NEDD9 or Cas-L) has been implicated in progression of melanoma, breast, and colorectal cancer. However, the regulation of HEF1 and the role of HEF1 in colorectal cancer tumorigenesis are not fully understood. We here identify HEF1 as a novel Wnt signaling target. The expression of HEF1 was up-regulated by Wnt3a, β-catenin, and Dvl2 in a dose-dependent fashion, and was suppressed following β-catenin down-regulation by shRNA. In addition, elevated HEF1 mRNA and protein levels were observed in colorectal cancer cell lines and primary tumor tissues, as well as in the colon and adenoma polyps of Apcmin/+ mice. Moreover, HEF1 levels in human colorectal tumor tissues increased with the tumor grade. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and HEF1 promoter analyses revealed three functional TCF-binding sites in the promoter of HEF1 responsible for HEF1 induction by Wnt signaling. Ectopic expression of HEF1 increased cell proliferation and colony formation, while down-regulation of HEF1 in SW480 cells by shRNA had the opposite effects and inhibited the xenograft tumor growth. Furthermore, overexpression of HEF1 in SW480 cells promoted cell migration and invasion. Together, our results determined a novel role of HEF1 as a mediator of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway for cell proliferation, migration, and tumorigenesis, as well as an important player in colorectal tumorigenesis and progression. HEF1 may represent an attractive candidate for drug targeting in colorectal cancer. PMID:21317929

  17. Epithelial derived CTGF promotes breast tumor progression via inducing EMT and collagen I fibers deposition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Sheng, Jianting; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Jiyong; Cui, Kemi; Chang, Jenny; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Interactions among tumor cells, stromal cells, and extracellular matrix compositions are mediated through cytokines during tumor progression. Our analysis of 132 known cytokines and growth factors in published clinical breast cohorts and our 84 patient-derived xenograft models revealed that the elevated connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in tumor epithelial cells significantly correlated with poor clinical prognosis and outcomes. CTGF was able to induce tumor cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and promote stroma deposition of collagen I fibers to stimulate tumor growth and metastasis. This process was mediated through CTGF-tumor necrosis factor receptor I (TNFR1)-IκB autocrine signaling. Drug treatments targeting CTGF, TNFR1, and IκB signaling each prohibited the EMT and tumor progression. PMID:26318291

  18. Mutant TDP-43 in motor neurons promotes the onset and progression of ALS in rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cao; Tong, Jianbin; Bi, Fangfang; Zhou, Hongxia; Xia, Xu-Gang

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by progressive motor neuron degeneration, which ultimately leads to paralysis and death. Mutation of TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) has been linked to the development of an inherited form of ALS. Existing TDP-43 transgenic animals develop a limited loss of motor neurons and therefore do not faithfully reproduce the core phenotype of ALS. Here, we report the creation of multiple lines of transgenic rats in which expression of ALS-associated mutant human TDP-43 is restricted to either motor neurons or other types of neurons and skeletal muscle and can be switched on and off. All of these rats developed progressive paralysis reminiscent of ALS when the transgene was switched on. Rats expressing mutant TDP-43 in motor neurons alone lost more spinal motor neurons than rats expressing the disease gene in varying neurons and muscle cells, although these rats all developed remarkable denervation atrophy of skeletal muscles. Intriguingly, progression of the disease was halted after transgene expression was switched off; in rats with limited loss of motor neurons, we observed a dramatic recovery of motor function, but in rats with profound loss of motor neurons, we only observed a moderate recovery of motor function. Our finding suggests that mutant TDP-43 in motor neurons is sufficient to promote the onset and progression of ALS and that motor neuron degeneration is partially reversible, at least in mutant TDP-43 transgenic rats. PMID:22156203

  19. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 promotes angiogenesis and drives malignant progression in glioma.

    PubMed

    Doucette, Tiffany A; Kong, Ling-Yuan; Yang, Yuhui; Ferguson, Sherise D; Yang, Jinbo; Wei, Jun; Qiao, Wei; Fuller, Gregory N; Bhat, Krishna P; Aldape, Kenneth; Priebe, Waldemar; Bögler, Oliver; Heimberger, Amy B; Rao, Ganesh

    2012-09-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 has been described as a "master regulator" of signaling pathways involved in the transition from low-grade glioma (LGG) to high-grade glioma (HGG). Although STAT3 is overexpressed in HGGs, it remains unclear whether its overexpression is sufficient to induce or promote the malignant progression of glioma. To characterize the effect of STAT3 expression on tumor progression in vivo, we expressed the STAT3 gene in glioneuronal progenitor cells in mice. STAT3 was expressed alone or concurrently with platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB), a well-described initiator of LGG. STAT3 alone was insufficient to induce tumor formation; however, coexpression of STAT3 with PDGFB in mice resulted in a significantly higher incidence of HGGs than PDGFB alone. The median symptomatic tumor latency in mice coexpressing STAT3 and PDGFB was significantly shorter, and mice that developed symptomatic tumors demonstrated significantly higher expression of phosphorylated STAT3 intratumorally. In HGGs, expression of STAT3 was associated with suppression of apoptosis and an increase in tumor cell proliferation. HGGs induced by STAT3 and PDGFB also displayed frequent foci of necrosis and microvascular proliferation. The expression of CD31 (a marker of endothelial proliferation) was significantly higher in tumors induced by coexpression of STAT3 and PDGFB. When mice injected with PDGFB and STAT3 were treated with a STAT3 inhibitor, median survival increased and the incidence of HGG and CD31 expression decreased significantly. These results demonstrate that STAT3 promotes the malignant progression of glioma. Inhibiting STAT3 expression mitigates tumor progression and improves survival, validating it as a therapeutic target. PMID:22753228

  20. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 promotes angiogenesis and drives malignant progression in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Doucette, Tiffany A.; Kong, Ling-Yuan; Yang, Yuhui; Ferguson, Sherise D.; Yang, Jinbo; Wei, Jun; Qiao, Wei; Fuller, Gregory N.; Bhat, Krishna P.; Aldape, Kenneth; Priebe, Waldemar; Bögler, Oliver; Heimberger, Amy B.; Rao, Ganesh

    2012-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 has been described as a “master regulator” of signaling pathways involved in the transition from low-grade glioma (LGG) to high-grade glioma (HGG). Although STAT3 is overexpressed in HGGs, it remains unclear whether its overexpression is sufficient to induce or promote the malignant progression of glioma. To characterize the effect of STAT3 expression on tumor progression in vivo, we expressed the STAT3 gene in glioneuronal progenitor cells in mice. STAT3 was expressed alone or concurrently with platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB), a well-described initiator of LGG. STAT3 alone was insufficient to induce tumor formation; however, coexpression of STAT3 with PDGFB in mice resulted in a significantly higher incidence of HGGs than PDGFB alone. The median symptomatic tumor latency in mice coexpressing STAT3 and PDGFB was significantly shorter, and mice that developed symptomatic tumors demonstrated significantly higher expression of phosphorylated STAT3 intratumorally. In HGGs, expression of STAT3 was associated with suppression of apoptosis and an increase in tumor cell proliferation. HGGs induced by STAT3 and PDGFB also displayed frequent foci of necrosis and microvascular proliferation. The expression of CD31 (a marker of endothelial proliferation) was significantly higher in tumors induced by coexpression of STAT3 and PDGFB. When mice injected with PDGFB and STAT3 were treated with a STAT3 inhibitor, median survival increased and the incidence of HGG and CD31 expression decreased significantly. These results demonstrate that STAT3 promotes the malignant progression of glioma. Inhibiting STAT3 expression mitigates tumor progression and improves survival, validating it as a therapeutic target. PMID:22753228

  1. [Initiation, promotion, initiation experiments with radon and cigarette smoke: Lung tumors in rats]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Moolgavkar, S.H.

    1994-10-01

    During the past several years, the authors have made considerable progress in modeling carcinogenesis in general, and in modeling radiation carcinogenesis, in particular. They present an overview of their progress in developing stochastic carcinogenesis models and applying them to experimental and epidemiologic data sets. Traditionally, cancer models have been used for the analysis of incidence (or prevalence) data in epidemiology and time to tumor data in experimental studies. The relevant quantities for the analysis of these data are the hazard function and the probability of tumor. The derivation of these quantities is briefly described here. More recently, the authors began to use these models for the analysis of data on intermediate lesions on the pathway to cancer. Such data are available in experimental carcinogenesis studies, in particular in initiation and promotion studies on the mouse skin and the rat liver. If however, quantitative information on intermediate lesions on the pathway to lung cancer were to be come available at some future date, the methods that they have developed for the analysis of initiation-promotion experiments could easily be applied to the analysis of these lesions. The mathematical derivations here are couched in terms of a particular two-mutation model of carcinogenesis. Extension to models postulating more than two mutations is not always straightforward.

  2. Nuclear localization of TEF3-1 promotes cell cycle progression and angiogenesis in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Men, Qiuxu; Lei, Tao; Di, Da; Liu, Ting; Li, Wenhua; Liu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    TEF3-1 (transcriptional enhancer factor 3 isoform 1), also known as TEAD4 (TEA domain family member 4), was recently revealed as an oncogenic character in cancer development. However, the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms remain undefined. In this paper, we investigated nuclear TEF3-1 could promote G1/S transition in HUVECs, and the expression levels of cyclins and CDKs were upregulated. Additionally, if TEF3-1 was knocked down, the expression of cyclins and CDKs was downregulated while the expression of P21, a negative regulator of the cell cycle, was upregulated. A microarray analysis also confirmed that TEF3-1 overexpression upregulates genes that are related to cell cycle progression and the promotion of angiogenesis. Moreover, we observed that nuclear TEF3-1 was highly expressed during the formation of vascular structures in gastric cancer (GC). Finally, tumor xenograft experiments indicated that, when TEF3-1 was knocked down, tumor growth and angiogenesis were also suppressed. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that TEF3-1 localization to the nucleus stimulates the cell cycle progression in HUVECs and specifically contributes to tumor angiogenesis. Nuclear TEF3-1 in HUVECs may serve as an oncogenic biomarker, and the suppression of TEF3-1 may be a potential target in anti-tumor therapy. PMID:26885617

  3. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Promote the Development and Progression of Liver Metastases after Surgical Stress.

    PubMed

    Tohme, Samer; Yazdani, Hamza O; Al-Khafaji, Ahmed B; Chidi, Alexis P; Loughran, Patricia; Mowen, Kerri; Wang, Yanming; Simmons, Richard L; Huang, Hai; Tsung, Allan

    2016-03-15

    Risks of tumor recurrence after surgical resection have been known for decades, but the mechanisms underlying treatment failures remain poorly understood. Neutrophils, first-line responders after surgical stress, may play an important role in linking inflammation to cancer progression. In response to stress, neutrophils can expel their protein-studded chromatin to form local snares known as neutrophil extracellular traps (NET). In this study, we asked whether, as a result of its ability to ensnare moving cells, NET formation might promote metastasis after surgical stress. Consistent with this hypothesis, in a cohort of patients undergoing attempted curative liver resection for metastatic colorectal cancer, we observed that increased postoperative NET formation was associated with a >4-fold reduction in disease-free survival. In like manner, in a murine model of surgical stress employing liver ischemia-reperfusion, we observed an increase in NET formation that correlated with an accelerated development and progression of metastatic disease. These effects were abrogated by inhibiting NET formation in mice through either local treatment with DNAse or inhibition of the enzyme peptidylarginine deaminase, which is essential for NET formation. In growing metastatic tumors, we found that intratumoral hypoxia accentuated NET formation. Mechanistic investigations in vitro indicated that mouse neutrophil-derived NET triggered HMGB1 release and activated TLR9-dependent pathways in cancer cells to promote their adhesion, proliferation, migration, and invasion. Taken together, our findings implicate NET in the development of liver metastases after surgical stress, suggesting that their elimination may reduce risks of tumor relapse. PMID:26759232

  4. Nuclear localization of TEF3-1 promotes cell cycle progression and angiogenesis in cancer.

    PubMed

    Teng, Kaixuan; Deng, Cuilan; Xu, Jie; Men, Qiuxu; Lei, Tao; Di, Da; Liu, Ting; Li, Wenhua; Liu, Xin

    2016-03-22

    TEF3-1 (transcriptional enhancer factor 3 isoform 1), also known as TEAD4 (TEA domain family member 4), was recently revealed as an oncogenic character in cancer development. However, the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms remain undefined. In this paper, we investigated nuclear TEF3-1 could promote G1/S transition in HUVECs, and the expression levels of cyclins and CDKs were upregulated. Additionally, if TEF3-1 was knocked down, the expression of cyclins and CDKs was downregulated while the expression of P21, a negative regulator of the cell cycle, was upregulated. A microarray analysis also confirmed that TEF3-1 overexpression upregulates genes that are related to cell cycle progression and the promotion of angiogenesis. Moreover, we observed that nuclear TEF3-1 was highly expressed during the formation of vascular structures in gastric cancer (GC). Finally, tumor xenograft experiments indicated that, when TEF3-1 was knocked down, tumor growth and angiogenesis were also suppressed. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that TEF3-1 localization to the nucleus stimulates the cell cycle progression in HUVECs and specifically contributes to tumor angiogenesis. Nuclear TEF3-1 in HUVECs may serve as an oncogenic biomarker, and the suppression of TEF3-1 may be a potential target in anti-tumor therapy. PMID:26885617

  5. GSK-3β Governs Inflammation-Induced NFATc2 Signaling Hubs to Promote Pancreatic Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Sandra; Chen, Nai-Ming; Zhang, Jin-San; Billadeau, Daniel D; Gaisina, Irina N; Kozikowski, Alan P; Singh, Shiv K; Fink, Daniel; Ströbel, Philipp; Klindt, Caroline; Zhang, Lizhi; Bamlet, William R; Koenig, Alexander; Hessmann, Elisabeth; Gress, Thomas M; Ellenrieder, Volker; Neesse, Albrecht

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the mechanistic, functional, and therapeutic role of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) in the regulation and activation of the proinflammatory oncogenic transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc2) in pancreatic cancer. IHC, qPCR, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, and proliferation assays were used to analyze mouse and human tissues and cell lines. Protein-protein interactions and promoter regulation were analyzed by coimmunoprecipitation, DNA pulldown, reporter, and ChIP assays. Preclinical assays were performed using a variety of pancreatic cancer cells lines, xenografts, and a genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM). GSK-3β-dependent SP2 phosphorylation mediates NFATc2 protein stability in the nucleus of pancreatic cancer cells stimulating pancreatic cancer growth. In addition to protein stabilization, GSK-3β also maintains NFATc2 activation through a distinct mechanism involving stabilization of NFATc2-STAT3 complexes independent of SP2 phosphorylation. For NFATc2-STAT3 complex formation, GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation of STAT3 at Y705 is required to stimulate euchromatin formation of NFAT target promoters, such as cyclin-dependent kinase-6, which promotes tumor growth. Finally, preclinical experiments suggest that targeting the NFATc2-STAT3-GSK-3β module inhibits proliferation and tumor growth and interferes with inflammation-induced pancreatic cancer progression in Kras(G12D) mice. In conclusion, we describe a novel mechanism by which GSK-3β fine-tunes NFATc2 and STAT3 transcriptional networks to integrate upstream signaling events that govern pancreatic cancer progression and growth. Furthermore, the therapeutic potential of GSK-3β is demonstrated for the first time in a relevant Kras and inflammation-induced GEMM for pancreatic cancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(3); 491-502. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26823495

  6. Enhanced IMP3 Expression Activates NF-кB Pathway and Promotes Renal Cell Carcinoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Xuelian; Li, Muhan; Zhan, Jun; Yu, Yu; Wei, Xiaofan; Guan, Lizhao; Aydin, Hakan; Elson, Paul; Zhou, Ming; He, Huiying; Zhang, Hongquan

    2015-01-01

    Background Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 3 (IMP3) is expressed in metastatic and a subset of primary renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, the role of IMP3 in RCC progression was poorly understood. We aim to uncover the mechanism of IMP3 in regulating clear cell RCC (CCRCC) progression and validate the prognostic significance of IMP3 in localized CCRCC. Methods Caki-1 cells stably overexpressing IMP3 and Achn cells with knockdown of IMP3 were analyzed for cell migration and invasion by Transwell assay. RNA-seq was used to profile gene expression in IMP3-expressing Caki-1 cells. A cohort of 469 localized CCRCC patients were examined for IMP3 expression by immunohistochemistry using tumor tissue array. Results IMP3 promoted Caki-1 cell migration and invasion, whereas knockdown of IMP3 by RNAi inhibited Achn cell migration and invasion. Enhanced IMP3 expression activated NF-кB pathway and through which, it functioned in promoting the RCC cell migration. IMP3 expression in localized CCRCC was found to be associated with higher nuclear grade, higher T stage, necrosis and sarcomatoid differentiation (p< 0.001). Enhanced IMP3 expression was correlated with shorter recurrence-free and overall survivals. Multivariable analysis validated IMP3 as an independent prognostic factor for localized CCRCC patients. Conclusion IMP3 promotes RCC cell migration and invasion by activation of NF-кB pathway. IMP3 is validated to be an independent prognostic marker for localized CCRCC. PMID:25919292

  7. LKB1 loss promotes endometrial cancer progression via CCL2-dependent macrophage recruitment.

    PubMed

    Peña, Christopher G; Nakada, Yuji; Saatcioglu, Hatice D; Aloisio, Gina M; Cuevas, Ileana; Zhang, Song; Miller, David S; Lea, Jayanthi S; Wong, Kwok-Kin; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Amelio, Antonio L; Brekken, Rolf A; Castrillon, Diego H

    2015-11-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy and the fourth most common malignancy in women. For most patients in whom the disease is confined to the uterus, treatment results in successful remission; however, there are no curative treatments for tumors that have progressed beyond the uterus. The serine/threonine kinase LKB1 has been identified as a potent suppressor of uterine cancer, but the biological modes of action of LKB1 in this context remain incompletely understood. Here, we have shown that LKB1 suppresses tumor progression by altering gene expression in the tumor microenvironment. We determined that LKB1 inactivation results in abnormal, cell-autonomous production of the inflammatory cytokine chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) within tumors, which leads to increased recruitment of macrophages with prominent tumor-promoting activities. Inactivation of Ccl2 in an Lkb1-driven mouse model of endometrial cancer slowed tumor progression and increased survival. In human primary endometrial cancers, loss of LKB1 protein was strongly associated with increased CCL2 expression by tumor cells as well as increased macrophage density in the tumor microenvironment. These data demonstrate that CCL2 is a potent effector of LKB1 loss in endometrial cancer, creating potential avenues for therapeutic opportunities. PMID:26413869

  8. Magnetic Shielding Accelerates the Proliferation of Human Neuroblastoma Cell by Promoting G1-Phase Progression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F.; He, Rong-qiao

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have been exposed to the geomagnetic field (GMF) throughout evolutionary history. Exposure to the hypomagnetic field (HMF) by deep magnetic shielding has recently been suggested to have a negative effect on the structure and function of the central nervous system, particularly during early development. Although changes in cell growth and differentiation have been observed in the HMF, the effects of the HMF on cell cycle progression still remain unclear. Here we show that continuous HMF exposure significantly increases the proliferation of human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells. The acceleration of proliferation results from a forward shift of the cell cycle in G1-phase. The G2/M-phase progression is not affected in the HMF. Our data is the first to demonstrate that the HMF can stimulate the proliferation of SH-SY5Y cells by promoting cell cycle progression in the G1-phase. This provides a novel way to study the mechanism of cells in response to changes of environmental magnetic field including the GMF. PMID:23355897

  9. LKB1 loss promotes endometrial cancer progression via CCL2-dependent macrophage recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Christopher G.; Nakada, Yuji; Saatcioglu, Hatice D.; Aloisio, Gina M.; Cuevas, Ileana; Zhang, Song; Miller, David S.; Lea, Jayanthi S.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Amelio, Antonio L.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Castrillon, Diego H.

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy and the fourth most common malignancy in women. For most patients in whom the disease is confined to the uterus, treatment results in successful remission; however, there are no curative treatments for tumors that have progressed beyond the uterus. The serine/threonine kinase LKB1 has been identified as a potent suppressor of uterine cancer, but the biological modes of action of LKB1 in this context remain incompletely understood. Here, we have shown that LKB1 suppresses tumor progression by altering gene expression in the tumor microenvironment. We determined that LKB1 inactivation results in abnormal, cell-autonomous production of the inflammatory cytokine chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) within tumors, which leads to increased recruitment of macrophages with prominent tumor-promoting activities. Inactivation of Ccl2 in an Lkb1-driven mouse model of endometrial cancer slowed tumor progression and increased survival. In human primary endometrial cancers, loss of LKB1 protein was strongly associated with increased CCL2 expression by tumor cells as well as increased macrophage density in the tumor microenvironment. These data demonstrate that CCL2 is a potent effector of LKB1 loss in endometrial cancer, creating potential avenues for therapeutic opportunities. PMID:26413869

  10. Beyond a tumor suppressor: Soluble E-cadherin promotes the progression of cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qi-Ping; Kuang, Jing-Ya; Yang, Qing-Kai; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Yu, Shi-Cang

    2016-06-15

    E-cadherin (E-cad) plays important roles in tumorigenesis as well as in tumor progression, invasion and metastasis. This protein exists in two forms: a membrane-tethered form and a soluble form. Full-length E-cad is membrane tethered. As a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, E-cad mainly mediates adherens junctions between cells and is involved in maintaining the normal structure of epithelial tissues. Soluble E-cad (sE-cad) is the extracellular fragment of the protein that is cleaved from the membrane after proteolysis of full-length E-cad. The production of sE-cad undermines adherens junctions, causing a reduction in cell aggregation capacity; furthermore, sE-cad can diffuse into the extracellular environment and the blood. As a paracrine/autocrine signaling molecule, sE-cad activates or inhibits multiple signaling pathways and participates in the progression of various types of cancer, such as breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and lung cancer, by promoting invasion and metastasis. This article briefly reviews the role of sE-cad in tumorigenesis and tumor progression and its significance in clinical therapeutics. PMID:26704932

  11. DNAJC6 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma progression through induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tao; Li, Xiao-Na; Li, Xing-Guang; Li, Ming; Gao, Peng-Zhi

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • DNAJC6 is up-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues. • DNAJC6 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and invasion. • DNAJC6 induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition by activating transforming growth factor β signaling. - Abstract: Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental program, which is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development and progression. DNAJC6 (DNA/HSP40 homolog subfamily C member 6) encodes auxilin, which is responsible for juvenile Parkinsonism with phenotypic variability. However, the role of DNAJC6 in HCC development and progression is limited. Here, we report that DNAJC6 is up-regulated in HCC tissues and up-regulation of DNAJC6 expression predicts poor outcome in patients with HCC. Furthermore, overexpression of DNAJC6 enhances the ability for acquisition of mesenchymal traits, enhanced cell proliferation and invasion. DNAJC6 positively regulated expression of EMT-related transcription factor, also activating transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) pathway to contribute to EMT. Our findings demonstrated an important function of DNAJC6 in the progression of HCC by induction of EMT, and they implicate DNAJC6 as a marker of poor outcome in HCC.

  12. Magnetic shielding accelerates the proliferation of human neuroblastoma cell by promoting G1-phase progression.

    PubMed

    Mo, Wei-chuan; Zhang, Zi-jian; Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F; He, Rong-qiao

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have been exposed to the geomagnetic field (GMF) throughout evolutionary history. Exposure to the hypomagnetic field (HMF) by deep magnetic shielding has recently been suggested to have a negative effect on the structure and function of the central nervous system, particularly during early development. Although changes in cell growth and differentiation have been observed in the HMF, the effects of the HMF on cell cycle progression still remain unclear. Here we show that continuous HMF exposure significantly increases the proliferation of human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells. The acceleration of proliferation results from a forward shift of the cell cycle in G1-phase. The G2/M-phase progression is not affected in the HMF. Our data is the first to demonstrate that the HMF can stimulate the proliferation of SH-SY5Y cells by promoting cell cycle progression in the G1-phase. This provides a novel way to study the mechanism of cells in response to changes of environmental magnetic field including the GMF. PMID:23355897

  13. Arsenic, inorganic

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Arsenic , inorganic ; CASRN 7440 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  14. MIEN1 promotes oral cancer progression and implicates poor overall survival

    PubMed Central

    Rajendiran, Smrithi; Kpetemey, Marilyne; Maji, Sayantan; Gibbs, Lee D; Dasgupta, Subhamoy; Mantsch, Rebecca; Hare, Richard J; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is a highly malignant tumor with the potential to invade local and distant sites and promote lymph node metastasis. Major players underlying the molecular mechanisms behind tumor progression are yet to be fully explored. Migration and invasion enhancer 1 (MIEN1), a novel protein overexpressed in various cancers, facilitates cell migration and invasion. In the present study we investigated the expression and role of MIEN1 in oral cancer progression using an in vitro model, patient derived oral tissues and existing TCGA data. Expression analysis using immortalized normal and cancer cells demonstrated increased expression of MIEN1 in cancer. Assays performed after MIEN1 knockdown in OSC-2 cells showed decreased migration, invasion and filopodia formation; while MIEN1 overexpression in DOK cells increased these characteristics and also up-regulated some Akt/NF-κB effectors, thereby suggesting an important role for MIEN1 in oral cancer progression. Immunohistochemical staining and analyses of oral tissue specimens, collected from patients over multiple visits, revealed significantly more staining in severe dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma compared to mildly dysplastic or hyperplastic tissues. Finally, this was corroborated with the TCGA dataset, where MIEN1 expression was not only higher in intermediate and high grade cancer with significantly lower survival but also correlated with smoking. In summary, we demonstrate that MIEN1 expression not only positively correlates with oral cancer progression but also seems to be a critical molecular determinant in migration and invasion of oral cancer cells, thereby, playing a possible role in their metastatic dissemination. PMID:25996585

  15. Overexpression of CD157 Contributes to Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Progression by Promoting Mesenchymal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Morone, Simona; Lo-Buono, Nicola; Parrotta, Rossella; Giacomino, Alice; Nacci, Giulia; Brusco, Alfredo; Larionov, Alexey; Ostano, Paola; Mello-Grand, Maurizia; Chiorino, Giovanna; Ortolan, Erika; Funaro, Ada

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) is an aggressive tumor often diagnosed at an advanced stage, when there is little or no prospect of cure. Despite advances in surgical and chemotherapeutic strategies, only marginal improvements in patient outcome have been obtained. Hence, unraveling the biological mechanisms underpinning EOC progression is critical for improving patients’ survival. Recently, we reported that CD157 (an ectoenzyme regulating leukocyte diapedesis) is expressed in EOC and that high expression of the molecule is negatively correlated with the disease outcome in patients. Here, we demonstrate that forced overexpression of CD157 in OVCAR-3, TOV-21G, A2780 and OV-90 ovarian cancer cell lines promotes morphological and phenotypic changes characterized by disruption of intercellular junctions, downregulation of epithelial markers and upregulation of mesenchymal ones. These changes in cell shape and phenotype bring to reduced sensitivity to anoikis, increased anchorage-independent growth, cell motility and mesothelial invasion. Conversely, knockdown of CD157 in OV-90 and OC314 cells reverts the mesenchymal phenotype and reduces the cells’ migratory potential. Transcriptome profiling analysis highlighted 378 significantly differentially expressed genes, representing the signature of CD157-overexpressing OVCAR-3 and OV-90 cells. The modulation of selected genes translates into alteration of protein expression that give cells a highly malignant phenotype. The overall picture deduced from the analysis of the modulated transcripts is that high expression of CD157 strengthens a number of biological processes favoring tumor progression (including development and cell motility), and weakens several biological processes hindering tumor progression (such as apoptosis, cell death and response to stress). Together, these findings implicate CD157 in the progression of EOC to metastatic disease and suggest that CD157 may represent a valuable therapeutic target. PMID

  16. Upregulation of the EP1 receptor for prostaglandin E2 promotes skin tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Surh, Inok; Rundhaug, Joyce; Pavone, Amy; Mikulec, Carol; Abel, Erika; Fischer, Susan M

    2011-06-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2) ) has been shown to promote the development of murine skin tumors. EP1 is 1 of the 4 PGE(2) G-protein-coupled membrane receptors expressed by murine keratinocytes. EP1 mRNA levels were increased ∼2-fold after topical treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light, as well as increased ∼3- to 12-fold in tumors induced by 7,12-dimethyl-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA) initiation/TPA promotion or by UV exposure. To determine the effect of EP1 levels on tumor development, we generated BK5.EP1 transgenic mice that overexpress EP1 in the basal layer of the epidermis. Skins of these mice were histologically indistinguishable from wild type (WT) mice and had similar levels of proliferation after TPA treatment. Using a DMBA/TPA carcinogenesis protocol, BK5.EP1 mice had a reduced tumor multiplicity compared to WT mice, likely due to the observed down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC). However, the BK5.EP1 mice had an ∼8-fold higher papilloma to carcinoma conversion rate. When DMBA/anthralin was used, BK5.EP1 mice produced more tumors than WT mice, as well as a ninefold increase in carcinomas, indicating that the tumor response is dependent on the type of tumor promoter agent used. Additionally, although almost undetectable in WT mice, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was expressed in the untreated epidermis of BK5.EP1 mice. While TPA highly induced COX-2 in WT mice, COX-2 expression in the BK5.EP1 mice did not change after TPA treatment; PGE(2) levels were likewise affected. These data indicate that EP1 is more important in tumor progression than in tumor promotion and that it indirectly regulates COX-2 expression. PMID:21268127

  17. Wnt/β-catenin signaling regulated SATB1 promotes colorectal cancer tumorigenesis and progression.

    PubMed

    Mir, R; Pradhan, S J; Patil, P; Mulherkar, R; Galande, S

    2016-03-31

    The chromatin organizer SATB1 has been implicated in the development and progression of multiple cancers including breast and colorectal cancers. However, the regulation and role of SATB1 in colorectal cancers is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that expression of SATB1 is induced upon hyperactivation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and repressed upon depletion of TCF7L2 (TCF4) and β-catenin. Using several colorectal cancer cell line models and the APC min mutant zebrafish in vivo model, we established that SATB1 is a novel target of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We show that direct binding of TCF7L2/β-catenin complex on Satb1 promoter is required for the regulation of SATB1. Moreover, SATB1 is sufficient to regulate the expression of β-catenin, members of TCF family, multiple downstream effectors and mediators of Wnt pathway. SATB1 potentiates the cellular changes and expression of key cancer-associated genes in non-aggressive colorectal cells, promotes their aggressive phenotype and tumorigenesis in vivo. Conversely, depletion of SATB1 from aggressive cells reprograms the expression of cancer-associated genes, reverses their cancer phenotype and reduces the potential of these cells to develop tumors in vivo. We also show that SATB1 and β-catenin bind to the promoters of TCF7L2 and the downstream targets of Wnt signaling and regulate their expression. Our findings suggest that SATB1 shares a feedback regulatory network with TCF7L2/β-catenin signaling and is required for Wnt signaling-dependent regulation of β-catenin. Collectively, these results provide unequivocal evidence to establish that SATB1 reprograms the expression of tumor growth- and metastasis-associated genes to promote tumorigenesis and functionally overlaps with Wnt signaling critical for colorectal cancer tumorigenesis. PMID:26165840

  18. Developing and testing theory-based and evidence-based interventions to promote switching to arsenic-safe wells in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Inauen, Jennifer; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2014-12-01

    Millions of people in Bangladesh drink arsenic-contaminated water despite increased awareness of consequences to health. Theory-based and evidence-based interventions are likely to have greater impact on people switching to existing arsenic-safe wells than providing information alone. To test this assumption, we first developed interventions based on an empirical test of the Risk, Attitudes, Norms, Abilities and Self-regulation (RANAS) model of behaviour change. In the second part of this study, a cluster-randomised controlled trial revealed that in accordance with our hypotheses, information alone showed smaller increases in switching to arsenic-safe wells than information with reminders or information with reminders and implementation intentions. PMID:23864069

  19. Arsenic-mediated activation of the Nrf2-Keap1 antioxidant pathway.

    PubMed

    Lau, Alexandria; Whitman, Samantha A; Jaramillo, Melba C; Zhang, Donna D

    2013-02-01

    Arsenic is present in the environment and has become a worldwide health concern due to its toxicity and carcinogenicity. However, the specific mechanism(s) by which arsenic elicits its toxic effects has yet to be fully elucidated. The transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) has been recognized as the master regulator of a cellular defense mechanism against toxic insults. This review highlights studies demonstrating that arsenic activates the Nrf2-Keap1 antioxidant pathway by a distinct mechanism from that of natural compounds such as sulforaphane (SF) found in broccoli sprouts or tert-butylhyrdoquinone (tBHQ), a natural antioxidant commonly used as a food preservative. Evidence also suggests that arsenic prolongs Nrf2 activation and may mimic constitutive activation of Nrf2, which has been found in several human cancers due to disruption of the Nrf2-Keap1 axis. The current literature strongly suggests that activation of Nrf2 by arsenic potentially contributes to, rather than protects against, arsenic toxicity and carcinogenicity. The mechanism(s) by which known Nrf2 activators, such as the natural chemopreventive compounds SF and lipoic acid, protect against the deleterious effects caused by arsenic will also be discussed. These findings will provide insight to further understand how arsenic promotes a prolonged Nrf2 response, which will lead to the identification of novel molecular markers and development of rational therapies for the prevention or intervention of arsenic-induced diseases. The National Institute of Environmental Health Science (NIEHS) Outstanding New Environmental Scientist (ONES) award has provided the opportunity to review the progress both in the fields of arsenic toxicology and Nrf2 biology. Much of the funding has led to (1) the novel discovery that arsenic activates the Nrf2 pathway by a mechanism different to that of other Nrf2 activators, such as sulforaphane and tert-butylhydroquinone, (2) activation of Nrf

  20. FGF19 Contributes to Tumor Progression in Gastric Cancer by Promoting Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Zhao, Daqi; Tian, Ruihua; Shi, Hailong; Chen, Xiangming; Liu, Wenzhi; Wei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Since patients are often diagnosed at a late stage, very few effective therapies are left in the arsenal. FGF19, as a hormone, has been reported to promote tumor growth in various types of cancer; however, its function in gastric cancer remains unknown. In the current study, we showed that FGF19 is overexpressed in gastric cancer and is associated with depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, and TNM stage. In addition, in vitro experiments demonstrated that FGF19 is able to enhance migration and invasion abilities of gastric cancer cells. Given its great potency in gastric cancer progression, FGF19 may be an effective target of treatment for advanced gastric cancer patients. PMID:27053348

  1. Activation of mesenchymal stem cells by macrophages promotes tumor progression through immune suppressive effects

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiao-hua; Feng, Guo-wei; Wang, Zhong-liang; Du, Yang; Shen, Chen; Hui, Hui; Peng, Dong; Li, Zong-jin; Kong, De-ling; Tian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Cancer development and progression is linked to tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Distinct TAMs subsets perform either protective or pathogenic effects in cancer. A protective role in carcinogenesis has been described for M1 macrophages, which activate antitumor mechanisms. By comparison, TAMs isolated from solid and metastatic tumors have a suppressive M2-like phenotype, which could support multiple aspects of tumor progression. Currently, it has not been clearly understood how macrophages in tumor-associated stroma could be hijacked to support tumor growth. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) actively interact with components of the innate immune system and display both anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory effects. Here, we tested whether MSCs could favor the tumor to escape from immunologic surveillance in the presence of M1 macrophages. We found that MSCs educated by M1 condition medium (cMSCs) possessed a greatly enhanced ability in promoting tumor growth in vivo. Examination of cytokines/chemokines showed that the cMSCs acquired a regulatory profile, which expressed high levels of iNOS and MCP1. Consistent with an elevated MCP1 expression in cMSCs, the tumor-promoting effect of the cMSCs depended on MCP1 mediated macrophage recruitment to tumor sites. Furthermore, IL-6 secreted by the cMSCs could polarize infiltrated TAMs into M2-like macrophages. Therefore, when macrophages changed into M1 pro-inflammation type in tumor microenvironment, the MSCs would act as poor sensors and switchers to accelerate tumor growth. PMID:26988913

  2. E3 ubiquitin ligases promote progression of differentiation during C. elegans embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhuo; He, Fei; Yu, Zidong; Bowerman, Bruce; Bao, Zhirong

    2015-02-15

    Regulated choice between cell fate maintenance and differentiation provides decision points in development to progress toward more restricted cell fates or to maintain the current one. Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis follows an invariant cell lineage where cell fate is generally more restricted upon each cell division. EMS is a progenitor cell in the four-cell embryo that gives rise to the endomesoderm. We recently found that when ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is compromised, the anterior daughter of EMS, namely MS, reiterates the EMS fate. This observation demonstrates an essential function of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation in driving the progression of EMS-to-MS differentiation. Here we report a genome-wide screen of the ubiquitin pathway and extensive lineage analyses. The results suggest a broad role of E3 ligases in driving differentiation progression. First, we identified three substrate-binding proteins for two Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase (CRL) E3 complexes that promote the progression from the EMS fate to MS, namely LIN-23/β-TrCP and FBXB-3 for the CRL1/SCF complex and ZYG-11/ZYG-11B for the CRL2 complex. Genetic analyses suggest these E3 ligases function through a multifunctional protein OMA-1 and the endomesoderm lineage specifier SKN-1 to drive differentiation. Second, we found that depletion of components of the CRL1/SCF complex induces fate reiteration in all major founder cell lineages. These data suggest that regulated choice between self-renewal and differentiation is widespread during C. elegans embryogenesis as in organisms with regulative development, and ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation drives the choice towards differentiation. Finally, bioinformatic analysis of time series gene expression data showed that expression of E3 genes is transiently enriched during time windows of developmental stage transitions. Transcription factors show similar enrichment, but not other classes of regulatory genes. Based on these

  3. E3 ubiquitin ligases promote progression of differentiation during C. elegans embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhuo; He, Fei; Yu, Zidong; Bowerman, Bruce; Bao, Zhirong

    2014-01-01

    Regulated choice between cell fate maintenance and differentiation provides decision points in development to progress toward more restricted cell fates or to maintain the current one. C. elegans embryogenesis follows an invariant cell lineage where cell fate is generally more restricted upon each cell division. EMS is a progenitor cell in the four-cell embryo that gives rise to the endomesoderm. We recently found that when ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is compromised, the anterior daughter of EMS, namely MS, reiterates the EMS fate. This observation demonstrates an essential function of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation in driving the progression of EMS-to-MS differentiation. Here we report a genome-wide screen of the ubiquitin pathway and extensive lineage analyses. The results suggest a broad role of E3 ligases in driving differentiation progression. First, we identified three substrate-binding proteins for two CRL (Cullin-RING ubiquitin Ligase) E3 complexes that promote the progression from the EMS fate to MS, namely LIN-23/β-TrCP and FBXB-3 for the CRL1/SCF complex and ZYG-11/ZYG-11B for the CRL2 complex. Genetic analyses suggest these E3 ligases function through a multifunctional protein OMA-1 and the endomesoderm lineage specifier SKN-1 to drive differentiation. Second, we found that depletion of components of the CRL1/SCF complex induces fate reiteration in all major founder cell lineages. These data suggest that regulated choice between self-renewal and differentiation is widespread during C. elegans embryogenesis as in organisms with regulative development, and ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation drives the choice towards differentiation. Finally, bioinformatic analysis of time series gene expression data showed that expression of E3 genes is transiently enriched during time windows of developmental stage transitions. Transcription factors show similar enrichment, but not other classes of regulatory genes. Based on these findings we

  4. Matrix Hyaluronan Promotes Specific MicroRNA Upregulation Leading to Drug Resistance and Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bourguignon, Lilly Y. W.

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumor invasion, metastasis and therapeutic drug resistance are the common causes for serious morbidity and cancer recurrence in patients. A number of research studies have searched for malignancy-related biomarkers and drug targets that are closely linked to tumor cell properties. One of the candidates is matrix hyaluronan (HA), which is known as one of the major extracellular matrix (ECM) components. HA serves as a physiological ligand for surface CD44 molecule and also functions as a bio-regulator. The binding of HA to CD44 has been shown to stimulate concomitant activation of a number of oncogenic pathways and abnormal cellular processes in cancer cells and cancer stem cells (CSCs). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) belong to a class of small RNAs containing ~20–25 nucleotides and are known to promote aberrant cellular functions in cancer cells. In this article, I have focused on the role of HA interaction with CD44 and several important signaling molecules in the regulation of unique miRNAs (e.g., miR-21, miR-302 and miR-10b) and their downstream targets leading to multiple tumor cell-specific functions (e.g., tumor cell growth, drug resistance and metastasis) and cancer progression. This new knowledge could provide the groundwork necessary for establishing new tumor markers and developing important, novel drugs targeted against HA/CD44-associated tumor progression, which can be utilized in the therapeutic treatment of metastatic cancer patients. PMID:27070574

  5. Lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched alternative exon promotes glioblastoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Ferrarese, Roberto; Harsh, Griffith R.; Yadav, Ajay K.; Bug, Eva; Maticzka, Daniel; Reichardt, Wilfried; Dombrowski, Stephen M.; Miller, Tyler E.; Masilamani, Anie P.; Dai, Fangping; Kim, Hyunsoo; Hadler, Michael; Scholtens, Denise M.; Yu, Irene L.Y.; Beck, Jürgen; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Costa, Fabrizio; Baxan, Nicoleta; Pfeifer, Dietmar; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Backofen, Rolf; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Duarte, Christine W.; He, Xiaolin; Prinz, Marco; Chandler, James P.; Vogel, Hannes; Chakravarti, Arnab; Rich, Jeremy N.; Carro, Maria S.; Bredel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing is critical for the emergence of tissue identity during development, yet the role of this process in malignant transformation is undefined. Tissue-specific splicing involves evolutionarily conserved, alternative exons that represent only a minority of the total alternative exons identified. Many of these conserved exons have functional features that influence signaling pathways to profound biological effect. Here, we determined that lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched cassette exon in the membrane-binding tumor suppressor annexin A7 (ANXA7) diminishes endosomal targeting of the EGFR oncoprotein, consequently enhancing EGFR signaling during brain tumor progression. ANXA7 exon splicing was mediated by the ribonucleoprotein PTBP1, which is normally repressed during neuronal development. PTBP1 was highly expressed in glioblastomas due to loss of a brain-enriched microRNA (miR-124) and to PTBP1 amplification. The alternative ANXA7 splicing trait was present in precursor cells, suggesting that glioblastoma cells inherit the trait from a potential tumor-initiating ancestor and that these cells exploit this trait through accumulation of mutations that enhance EGFR signaling. Our data illustrate that lineage-specific splicing of a tissue-regulated alternative exon in a constituent of an oncogenic pathway eliminates tumor suppressor functions and promotes glioblastoma progression. This paradigm may offer a general model as to how tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms can reprogram normal developmental processes into oncogenic ones. PMID:24865424

  6. Lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched alternative exon promotes glioblastoma progression.

    PubMed

    Ferrarese, Roberto; Harsh, Griffith R; Yadav, Ajay K; Bug, Eva; Maticzka, Daniel; Reichardt, Wilfried; Dombrowski, Stephen M; Miller, Tyler E; Masilamani, Anie P; Dai, Fangping; Kim, Hyunsoo; Hadler, Michael; Scholtens, Denise M; Yu, Irene L Y; Beck, Jürgen; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Costa, Fabrizio; Baxan, Nicoleta; Pfeifer, Dietmar; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Backofen, Rolf; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Duarte, Christine W; He, Xiaolin; Prinz, Marco; Chandler, James P; Vogel, Hannes; Chakravarti, Arnab; Rich, Jeremy N; Carro, Maria S; Bredel, Markus

    2014-07-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing is critical for the emergence of tissue identity during development, yet the role of this process in malignant transformation is undefined. Tissue-specific splicing involves evolutionarily conserved, alternative exons that represent only a minority of the total alternative exons identified. Many of these conserved exons have functional features that influence signaling pathways to profound biological effect. Here, we determined that lineage-specific splicing of a brain-enriched cassette exon in the membrane-binding tumor suppressor annexin A7 (ANXA7) diminishes endosomal targeting of the EGFR oncoprotein, consequently enhancing EGFR signaling during brain tumor progression. ANXA7 exon splicing was mediated by the ribonucleoprotein PTBP1, which is normally repressed during neuronal development. PTBP1 was highly expressed in glioblastomas due to loss of a brain-enriched microRNA (miR-124) and to PTBP1 amplification. The alternative ANXA7 splicing trait was present in precursor cells, suggesting that glioblastoma cells inherit the trait from a potential tumor-initiating ancestor and that these cells exploit this trait through accumulation of mutations that enhance EGFR signaling. Our data illustrate that lineage-specific splicing of a tissue-regulated alternative exon in a constituent of an oncogenic pathway eliminates tumor suppressor functions and promotes glioblastoma progression. This paradigm may offer a general model as to how tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms can reprogram normal developmental processes into oncogenic ones. PMID:24865424

  7. Challenges and opportunities for promoting booster seat use: progressive dissemination of a high-threat message.

    PubMed

    Will, Kelli England; Dunaway, Krystall E; Kokorelis, Diane A; Sabo, Cynthia Shier; Lorek, Edward J

    2012-11-01

    Motivating parents to take certain safety precautions when traveling with their children remains challenging for advocates. Caregivers of booster-aged children are particularly difficult to reach because they do not consider their children to be of "safety-seat" age and have inherently low perceptions of vulnerability to crash injury. Unfortunately, most booster seat programs fail to adequately motivate their intended population because they are primarily informational in nature and rely on caregivers to seek out and attend to the information. In this article, interventions using threat appeal tactics and progressive dissemination methods are recommended to effectively target participation and perceptions of vulnerability among this population. Recent research on risk communication indicates that threat appeals are supported when they contain high threat and high efficacy components. Threat appeal tactics are particularly desirable when perception of vulnerability is low, as is the case with parents of booster-aged children. In addition to theoretical arguments for more aggressive intervention approaches, a case example is presented wherein such techniques were used to promote booster seat use. The intervention resulted in significant increases in knowledge, risk-reduction attitudes, sense of efficacy, and observed booster seat use. Through use of progressive dissemination methods, the intervention has reached an audience of 431,600 people and counting. PMID:22090153

  8. TLE4 promotes colorectal cancer progression through activation of JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Dan-Ling; Cai, Juan-Juan; Xiao, Zhi-Yuan; He, Liu-Qing; Jiao, Hong-Li; Ye, Ya-Ping; Yang, Run-Wei; Li, Ting-Ting; Liang, Li; Liao, Wen-Ting; Ding, Yan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The Groucho transcriptional co-repressor TLE4 protein has been shown to be a tumor suppressor in a subset of acute myeloid leukemia. However, little is known about its role in development and progression of solid tumor. In this study, we found that the expression of TLE4 in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues was significantly higher than that in their matched adjacent intestine epithelial tissues. In addition, high expression of TLE4 was significantly correlated with advanced Dukes stage, lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis of CRC. Moreover, enforced expression of TLE4 in CRC cell lines significantly enhanced proliferation, invasion and tumor growth. On the contrary, knock down of TLE4 repressed cell proliferation, invasion and tumor growth. Furthermore, our study exhibited that the TLE4 promoted cell proliferation and invasion partially via activation of JNK-c-Jun pathway and subsequently increased cyclinD1 and decreased P27Kip1 expression. In conclusion, these results suggested that TLE4, a potential prognostic biomarker for CRC, plays an important role in the development and progression of human CRC. PMID:26701208

  9. miR-146a promotes the initiation and progression of melanoma by activating Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Forloni, Matteo; Dogra, Shaillay Kumar; Dong, Yuying; Conte, Darryl; Ou, Jianhong; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Deng, April; Mahalingam, Meera; Green, Michael R; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in BRAF and NRAS occur in 70% of melanomas. In this study, we identify a microRNA, miR-146a, that is highly upregulated by oncogenic BRAF and NRAS. Expression of miR-146a increases the ability of human melanoma cells to proliferate in culture and form tumors in mice, whereas knockdown of miR-146a has the opposite effects. We show these oncogenic activities are due to miR-146a targeting the NUMB mRNA, a repressor of Notch signaling. Previous studies have shown that pre-miR-146a contains a single nucleotide polymorphism (C>G rs2910164). We find that the ability of pre-miR-146a/G to activate Notch signaling and promote oncogenesis is substantially higher than that of pre-miR-146a/C. Analysis of melanoma cell lines and matched patient samples indicates that during melanoma progression pre-miR-146a/G is enriched relative to pre-miR-146a/C, resulting from a C-to-G somatic mutation in pre-miR-146a/C. Collectively, our results reveal a central role for miR-146a in the initiation and progression of melanoma. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01460.001 PMID:24550252

  10. Antiphospholipid antibodies promote tissue factor-dependent angiogenic switch and tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuan-Yuan; V Nguyen, Andrew; Wu, Xiao-Xuan; Loh, Mingyu; Vu, Michelle; Zou, Yiyu; Liu, Qiang; Guo, Peng; Wang, Yanhua; Montgomery, Leslie L; Orlofsky, Amos; Rand, Jacob H; Lin, Elaine Y

    2014-12-01

    Progression to an angiogenic state is a critical event in tumor development, yet few patient characteristics have been identified that can be mechanistically linked to this transition. Antiphospholipid autoantibodies (aPLs) are prevalent in many human cancers and can elicit proangiogenic expression in several cell types, but their role in tumor biology is unknown. Herein, we observed that the elevation of circulating aPLs among breast cancer patients is specifically associated with invasive-stage tumors. By using multiple in vivo models of breast cancer, we demonstrated that aPL-positive IgG from patients with autoimmune disease rapidly accelerates tumor angiogenesis and consequent tumor progression, particularly in slow-growing avascular tumors. The action of aPLs was local to the tumor site and elicited leukocytic infiltration and tumor invasion. Tumor cells treated with aPL-positive IgG expressed multiple proangiogenic genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor, tissue factor (TF), and colony-stimulating factor 1. Knockdown and neutralization studies demonstrated that the effects of aPLs on tumor angiogenesis and growth were dependent on tumor cell-derived TF. Tumor-derived TF was essential for the development of pericyte coverage of tumor microvessels and aPL-induced tumor cell expression of chemokine ligand 2, a mediator of pericyte recruitment. These findings identify antiphospholipid autoantibodies as a potential patient-specific host factor promoting the transition of indolent tumors to an angiogenic malignant state through a TF-mediated pathogenic mechanism. PMID:25451155

  11. Oral health information systems--towards measuring progress in oral health promotion and disease prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Bratthall, Douglas; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the essential components of oral health information systems for the analysis of trends in oral disease and the evaluation of oral health programmes at the country, regional and global levels. Standard methodology for the collection of epidemiological data on oral health has been designed by WHO and used by countries worldwide for the surveillance of oral disease and health. Global, regional and national oral health databanks have highlighted the changing patterns of oral disease which primarily reflect changing risk profiles and the implementation of oral health programmes oriented towards disease prevention and health promotion. The WHO Oral Health Country/Area Profile Programme (CAPP) provides data on oral health from countries, as well as programme experiences and ideas targeted to oral health professionals, policy-makers, health planners, researchers and the general public. WHO has developed global and regional oral health databanks for surveillance, and international projects have designed oral health indicators for use in oral health information systems for assessing the quality of oral health care and surveillance systems. Modern oral health information systems are being developed within the framework of the WHO STEPwise approach to surveillance of noncommunicable, chronic disease, and data stored in the WHO Global InfoBase may allow advanced health systems research. Sound knowledge about progress made in prevention of oral and chronic disease and in health promotion may assist countries to implement effective public health programmes to the benefit of the poor and disadvantaged population groups worldwide. PMID:16211160

  12. STIM1 overexpression promotes colorectal cancer progression, cell motility and COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-Y; Sun, J; Huang, M-Y; Wang, Y-S; Hou, M-F; Sun, Y; He, H; Krishna, N; Chiu, S-J; Lin, S; Yang, S; Chang, W-C

    2015-08-13

    Tumor metastasis is the major cause of death among cancer patients, with >90% of cancer-related death attributable to the spreading of metastatic cells to secondary organs. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is the predominant Ca(2+) entry mechanism in most cancer cells, and stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) sensor for store-operated channels. Here we reported that the STIM1 was overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. STIM1 overexpression in CRC was significantly associated with tumor size, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis status and serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen. Furthermore, ectopic expression of STIM1 promoted CRC cell motility, while depletion of STIM1 with short hairpin RNA inhibited CRC cell migration. Our data further suggested that STIM1 promoted CRC cell migration through increasing the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Importantly, ectopically expressed COX-2 or exogenous PGE2 were able to rescue migration defect in STIM1 knockdown CRC cells, and inhibition of COX-2 with ibuprofen and indomethacin abrogated STIM1-mediated CRC cell motility. In short, our data provided clinicopathological significance for STIM1 and SOCE in CRC progression, and implicated a role for COX-2 in STIM1-mediated CRC metastasis. Our studies also suggested a new approach to inhibit STIM1-mediated metastasis with COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:25381814

  13. Spontaneous initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer in the novel A/J Min/+ mouse.

    PubMed

    Sødring, Marianne; Gunnes, Gjermund; Paulsen, Jan Erik

    2016-04-15

    The C57BL/6J multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min/+) mouse is a widely used murine model for familial adenomatous polyposis, a hereditary form of human colorectal cancer. However, it is a questionable model partly because the vast majority of tumors arise in the small intestine, and partly because the fraction of tumors that progress to invasive carcinomas is minuscule. A/J mice are typically more susceptible to carcinogen-induced colorectal cancer than C57BL/6J mice. To investigate whether the novel Min/+ mouse on the A/J genetic background could be a better model for colorectal cancer, we examined the spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in 81 A/J Min/+ mice ranging in age from 4 to 60 weeks. The A/J Min/+ mouse exhibited a dramatic increase in number of colonic lesions when compared to what has been reported for the conventional Min/+ mouse; however, an increase in small intestinal lesions did not occur. In addition, this novel mouse model displayed a continual development of colonic lesions highlighted by the transition from early lesions (flat ACF) to tumors over time. In mice older than 40 weeks, 13 colonic (95% CI: 8.7-16.3) and 21 small intestinal (95% CI: 18.6-24.3) tumors were recorded. Notably, a considerable proportion of those lesions progressed to carcinomas in both the colon (21%) and small intestine (51%). These findings more closely reflect aspects of human colorectal carcinogenesis. In conclusion, the novel A/J Min/+ mouse may be a relevant model for initiation, promotion and progression of colorectal cancer. PMID:26566853

  14. Periostin promotes fibrosis and predicts progression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Payal K.; Bozyk, Paul D.; Bentley, J. Kelley; Popova, Antonia P.; Birch, Carolyn M.; Wilke, Carol A.; Fry, Christopher D.; White, Eric S.; Sisson, Thomas H.; Tayob, Nabihah; Carnemolla, Barbara; Orecchia, Paola; Flaherty, Kevin R.; Hershenson, Marc B.; Murray, Susan; Martinez, Fernando J.

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive fibrotic lung disease without effective therapeutics. Periostin has been reported to be elevated in IPF patients relative to controls, but its sources and mechanisms of action remain unclear. We confirm excess periostin in lungs of IPF patients and show that IPF fibroblasts produce periostin. Blood was obtained from 54 IPF patients (all but 1 with 48 wk of follow-up). We show that periostin levels predict clinical progression at 48 wk (hazard ratio = 1.47, 95% confidence interval = 1.03–2.10, P < 0.05). Monocytes and fibrocytes are sources of periostin in circulation in IPF patients. Previous studies suggest that periostin may regulate the inflammatory phase of bleomycin-induced lung injury, but periostin effects during the fibroproliferative phase of the disease are unknown. Wild-type and periostin-deficient (periostin−/−) mice were anesthetized and challenged with bleomycin. Wild-type mice were injected with bleomycin and then treated with OC-20 Ab (which blocks periostin and integrin interactions) or control Ab during the fibroproliferative phase of disease, and fibrosis and survival were assessed. Periostin expression was upregulated quickly after treatment with bleomycin and remained elevated. Periostin−/− mice were protected from bleomycin-induced fibrosis. Instillation of OC-20 during the fibroproliferative phase improved survival and limited collagen deposition. Chimeric mouse studies suggest that hematopoietic and structural sources of periostin contribute to lung fibrogenesis. Periostin was upregulated by transforming growth factor-β in lung mesenchymal cells, and periostin promoted extracellular matrix deposition, mesenchymal cell proliferation, and wound closure. Thus periostin plays a vital role in late stages of pulmonary fibrosis and is a potential biomarker for disease progression and a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23043074

  15. Galectin-1 Upregulates CXCR4 to Promote Tumor Progression and Poor Outcome in Kidney Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chang-Shuo; Tang, Shye-Jye; Chung, Ling-Yen; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Ho, Jar-Yi; Cha, Tai-Lung; Hsieh, Chii-Cheng; Wang, Hsiao-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Galectin-1, a β-galactoside–binding lectin, is involved in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including cell adhesion, differentiation, angiogenesis, and tumor progression. However, the role of galectin-1 in kidney cancer remains elusive. This study evaluated the role of galectin-1 in the progression and clinical prognosis of renal cell carcinoma. We found significant overexpression of galectin-1 in both kidney cancer cell lines and metastatic tissue specimens from patients with renal cell carcinoma. Knockdown of galectin-1 gene expression in renal cancer cell lines reduced cell invasion, clonogenic ability, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in vitro; reduced tumor outgrowth in vivo; and inhibited the angiogenesis-inducing activity of these cells in vitro and in vivo. Galectin-1 knockdown decreased CXCR4 expression levels in kidney cancer cells, and restoration of CXCR4 expression in galectin-1–silenced cells rescued cell motility and clonogenic ability. Additional studies suggested that galectin-1 induced CXCR4 expression through activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Analysis of patient specimens confirmed the clinical significance and positive correlation between galectin-1 and CXCR4 expression levels and revealed concomitant overexpression of galectin-1 and CXCR4 associated adversely with overall and disease-free survival. Our findings suggest that galectin-1 promotes tumor progression through upregulation of CXCR4 via NF-κB. The coordinated upregulation of galectin-1 and CXCR4 may be a novel prognostic factor for survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma and the galectin-1-CXCR4 axis may serve as a therapeutic target in this disease. PMID:24511119

  16. The WIP1 Oncogene Promotes Progression and Invasion of Aggressive Medulloblastoma Variants

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Meghan C.; Remke, Marc; Lee, Juhyun; Gandhi, Khanjan; Schniederjan, Matthew J.; Kool, Marcel; Northcott, Paul A.; Pfister, Stefan M.; Taylor, Michael D.; Castellino, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood, is comprised of four disease variants. The WIP1 oncogene is overexpressed in Group 3 and 4 tumors, which contain medulloblastomas with the most aggressive clinical behavior. Our data demonstrate increased WIP1 expression in metastatic medulloblastomas, and inferior progression-free and overall survival of patients with WIP1 high-expressing medulloblastoma. Microarray analysis identified up-regulation of genes involved in tumor metastasis, including the G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4, in medulloblastoma cells with high WIP1 expression. Stimulation with the CXCR4 ligand SDF1ααactivated PI-3 kinase signaling, and promoted growth and invasion of WIP1 high-expressing medulloblastoma cells in a p53-dependent manner. When xenografted into the cerebellum of immunodeficient mice, medulloblastoma cells with stable or endogenous high WIP1 expression exhibited strong expression of CXCR4 and activated AKT in primary and invasive tumor cells. WIP1 or CXCR4 knock-down inhibited medulloblastoma growth and invasion. WIP1 knock-down also improved the survival of mice xenografted with WIP1 high-expressing medulloblastoma cells. WIP1 knock-down inhibited cell surface localization of CXCR4 by suppressing expression of the G protein receptor kinase 5, GRK5. Restoration of wild-type GRK5 promoted Ser339 phosphorylation of CXCR4 and inhibited the growth of WIP1-stable medulloblastoma cells. Conversely, GRK5 knock-down inhibited Ser339 phosphorylation of CXCR4, increased cell surface localization of CXCR4, and promoted the growth of medulloblastoma cells with low WIP1 expression. These results demonstrate cross-talk among WIP1, CXCR4, and GRK5, which may be important for the aggressive phenotype of a subclass of medulloblastomas in children. PMID:24632620

  17. α-Catulin downregulates E-cadherin and promotes melanoma progression and invasion.

    PubMed

    Kreiseder, Birgit; Orel, Lukas; Bujnow, Constantin; Buschek, Stefan; Pflueger, Maren; Schuett, Wolfgang; Hundsberger, Harald; de Martin, Rainer; Wiesner, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    Metastasis is associated with poor prognosis for melanoma responsible for about 90% of skin cancer-related mortality. To metastasize, melanoma cells must escape keratinocyte control, invade across the basement membrane and survive in the dermis by resisting apoptosis before they can intravasate into the circulation. α-Catulin (CTNNAL1) is a cytoplasmic molecule that integrates the crosstalk between nuclear factor-kappa B and Rho signaling pathways, binds to β-catenin and increases the level of both α-catenin and β-catenin and therefore has potential effects on inflammation, apoptosis and cytoskeletal reorganization. Here, we show that α-catulin is highly expressed in melanoma cells. Expression of α-catulin promoted melanoma progression and occurred concomitantly with the downregulation of E-cadherin and the upregulation of expression of mesenchymal genes such as N-cadherin, Snail/Slug and the matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. Knockdown of α-catulin promoted adhesion to and inhibited migration away from keratinocytes in an E-cadherin-dependent manner and decreased the transmigration through a keratinocyte monolayer, as well as in Transwell assays using collagens, laminin and fibronectin coating. Moreover, knockdown promoted homotypic spheroid formation and concomitantly increased E-cadherin expression along with downregulation of transcription factors implicated in its repression (Snail/Slug, Twist and ZEB). Consistent with the molecular changes, α-catulin provoked invasion of melanoma cells in a three-dimensional culture assay by the upregulation of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 and the activation of ROCK/Rho. As such, α-catulin may represent a key driver of the metastatic process, implicating potential for therapeutic interference. PMID:22733455

  18. Arsenic surveillance program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background information about arsenic is presented including forms, common sources, and clinical symptoms of arsenic exposure. The purpose of the Arsenic Surveillance Program and LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Arsenic Exposure at LeRC are discussed.

  19. Earth Abides Arsenic Biotransformations

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic element and causes health problems throughout the world. The toxicity, mobility, and fate of arsenic in the environment are largely determined by its speciation, and arsenic speciation changes are driven, at least to some extent, by biological processes. In this article, biotransformation of arsenic is reviewed from the perspective of the formation of Earth and the evolution of life, and the connection between arsenic geochemistry and biology is described. The article provides a comprehensive overview of molecular mechanisms of arsenic redox and methylation cycles as well as other arsenic biotransformations. It also discusses the implications of arsenic biotransformation in environmental remediation and food safety, with particular emphasis on groundwater arsenic contamination and arsenic accumulation in rice. PMID:26778863

  20. Earth Abides Arsenic Biotransformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-05-01

    Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic element and causes health problems throughout the world. The toxicity, mobility, and fate of arsenic in the environment are largely determined by its speciation, and arsenic speciation changes are driven, at least to some extent, by biological processes. In this article, biotransformation of arsenic is reviewed from the perspective of the formation of Earth and the evolution of life, and the connection between arsenic geochemistry and biology is described. The article provides a comprehensive overview of molecular mechanisms of arsenic redox and methylation cycles as well as other arsenic biotransformations. It also discusses the implications of arsenic biotransformation in environmental remediation and food safety, with particular emphasis on groundwater arsenic contamination and arsenic accumulation in rice.

  1. Factor VII promotes hepatocellular carcinoma progression through ERK-TSC signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, M-C; Chen, K-D; Wang, C-C; Huang, K-T; Wu, C-H; Kuo, I-Y; Chen, L-Y; Hu, T-H; Goto, S; Nakano, T; Dorling, A; McVey, J H; Chen, C-L; Lin, C-C

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated PAR2 starts upstreamed with tissue factor (TF) and factor VII (FVII), inhibited autophagy via mTOR signaling in HCC. However, the mechanism underlying for merging functions of PAR2 with the coagulation system in HCC progression remained unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the role of TF, FVII and PAR2 in tumor progression of HCC. The expressions of TF, FVII and PAR2 from HCC specimens were evaluated by immunohistochemical stains and western blotting. We found that the expression of FVII, but not TF and PAR2, directly related to the vascular invasion and the clinical staging. Importantly, a lower level of FVII expression was significantly associated with the longer disease-free survival. The addition of FVII but not TF induced the expression of PAR2 and phosphorylation of ERK1/2, whereas knockdown of FVII decreased PAR2 expression and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in HCC cell lines. Furthermore, levels of phosphor-TSC2 (Ser664) were increased after treatment with FVII and PAR2 agonist whereas these were significantly abolished in the presence of a potent and specific MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126. Moreover, mTOR knockdown highly reduced Hep3B migration, which could be reverted by FVII but not TF and PAR2. These results indicated that FVII/PAR2 signaling through MEK/ERK and TSC2 axis for mTOR activation has potent effects on the migration of HCC cells. In addition, FVII/PAR2 signaling elicits an mTOR-independent signaling, which promotes hepatoma cell migration in consistent with the clinical observations. Our study indicates that levels of FVII, but not TF, are associated with tumor migration and invasiveness in HCC, and provides clues that evaluation of FVII expression in HCC may be useful as a prognostic indicator in patients with HCC and may form an alternative target for further therapy.

  2. SOX4 Promotes Progression in OLP-Associated Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Cui, Li; Huang, Junwei; Ji, Eoon Hye; Chen, Wei; Messadi, Diana; Hu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a multistep process that involves in both genetic alterations and epigenetic modifications. Previous studies suggest SOX4 might function as an oncogene or a tumor suppressor in different types of cancers. However, whether SOX4 involves in promoting the progression of oral precancer to cancer is unknown. Methods: Liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to identify the proteins that may be differentially expressed between oral lichen planus (OLP) and OLP-associated OSCC (OLP-OSCC) formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting were performed to evaluate SOX4 expression between OLP and OLP-OSCC tissues and among oral cancer cell lines and normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOKs). SOX4 siRNA was used to knock down the expression of SOX4 in UM1 oral cancer cells. MTT, cell counting, migration and Matrigel invasion assays were utilized to examine the effect of SOX4 down-regulation on proliferation, migration and invasion capacity of UM1 cells. Results: LC-MS/MS analysis showed that 88 proteins including SOX4 were only identified in OLP-OSCC FFPE tissues when compared to OLP FFPE tissues. IHC confirmed that SOX4 expression was significantly higher in OLP-OSCC than OLP and Western blot analysis indicated that SOX4 was over-expressed in UM1/UM2 cells when compared to NHOKs. Knockdown of SOX4 significantly inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of UM1 cells (P<0.01). Conclusions: Our study indicated that SOX4 is significantly upregulated in OLP-OSCC versus OLP tissues. In addition, down-regulation of SOX4 led to significantly reduced proliferation, migration and invasion capability of oral cancer cells. These findings suggest that SOX4 might be actively involved in the progression of OLP to OSCC. PMID:27471569

  3. Far upstream element-binding protein 1 is a prognostic biomarker and promotes nasopharyngeal carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Z-H; Hu, J-L; Liang, J-Z; Zhou, A-J; Li, M-Z; Yan, S-M; Zhang, X; Gao, S; Chen, L; Zhong, Q; Zeng, M-S

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a malignant epithelial tumor with tremendous invasion and metastasis capacities, and it has a high incidence in southeast Asia and southern China. Previous studies identified that far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FBP1), a transcriptional regulator of c-Myc that is one of the most frequently aberrantly expressed oncogenes in various human cancers, including NPC, is an important biomarker for many cancers. Our study aimed to investigate the expression and function of FBP1 in human NPC. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), western blot and immunohistochemical staining (IHC) were performed in NPC cells and biopsies. Furthermore, the effect of FBP1 knockdown on cell proliferation, colony formation, side population tests and tumorigenesis in nude mice were measured by MTT, clonogenicity analysis, flow cytometry and a xenograft model, respectively. The results showed that the mRNA and protein levels of FBP1, which are positively correlated with c-Myc expression, were substantially higher in NPC than that in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. IHC revealed that the patients with high FBP1 expression had a significantly poorer prognosis compared with the patients with low expression (P=0.020). In univariate analysis, high FBP1 and c-Myc expression predicted poorer overall survival (OS) and poorer progression-free survival. Multivariate analysis indicated that high FBP1 and c-Myc expression were independent prognostic markers. Knockdown of FBP1 reduced cell proliferation, clonogenicity and the ratio of side populations, as well as tumorigenesis in nude mice. These data indicate that FBP1 expression, which is closely correlated with c-Myc expression, is an independent prognostic factor and promotes NPC progression. Our results suggest that FBP1 can not only serve as a useful prognostic biomarker for NPC but also as a potential therapeutic target for NPC patients. PMID:26469968

  4. miR-215 promotes malignant progression of gastric cancer by targeting RUNX1

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jian-Ling; Li, Zhong-Wu; Tian, Tian-Tian; Dong, Bin; Liu, Xi-Juan; Ge, Sai; Zhu, Yan; Gao, Jing; Shen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Objective miR-215 was reported to be downregulated and functioned as a tumor suppressor in several cancers. In contrast, miR-215 was preferentially upregulated in gastric cancer (GC) according to our data. Thus, we studied the potential biological function of miR-215 in GC. Methods miR-215 expression was measured in 77 paired GC tissues and adjacent non-tumor tissues. Biological functions of miR-215 were analyzed using cell viability, colony formation, migration, invasion, cell cycle, apoptosis and luciferase assays as well as via tumorigenicity and metastasis analysis. Results miR-215 was significantly upregulated in 7 GC cell lines and 77 GC tissues compared to adjacent non-tumor tissues (P < 0.05), and miR-215 expression was greater in advanced GC (stage III/IV; P < 0.05). Ectopic expression of miR-215 in GES-1 and HGC-27 cells (low miR-215 expression) promoted cell growth, migration, invasion, and metastasis, and these were reversed in NCI-N87 cells (high miR-215 expression) after miR-215 downregulation. Potential target genes of miR-215 were predicted and RUNX1, a transcription factor and a tumor suppressor, was confirmed to be potential target according to luciferase studies. RUNX1 was downregulated in GC tissues compared to adjacent non-tumor tissues (P < 0.05), and RUNX1 reversed partial function of miR-215 in vitro. Conclusion miR-215 promotes malignant progression of GC by targeting RUNX1, and RUNX1 can partially reverse miR-215 effects. PMID:26716895

  5. Transplacental arsenic carcinogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Waalkes, Michael P. Liu, Jie; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.

    2007-08-01

    Our work has focused on the carcinogenic effects of in utero arsenic exposure in mice. Our data show that a short period of maternal exposure to inorganic arsenic in the drinking water is an effective, multi-tissue carcinogen in the adult offspring. These studies have been reproduced in three temporally separate studies using two different mouse strains. In these studies pregnant mice were treated with drinking water containing sodium arsenite at up to 85 ppm arsenic from days 8 to 18 of gestation, and the offspring were observed for up to 2 years. The doses used in all these studies were well tolerated by both the dam and offspring. In C3H mice, two separate studies show male offspring exposed to arsenic in utero developed liver carcinoma and adrenal cortical adenoma in a dose-related fashion during adulthood. Prenatally exposed female C3H offspring show dose-related increases in ovarian tumors and lung carcinoma and in proliferative lesions (tumors plus preneoplastic hyperplasia) of the uterus and oviduct. In addition, prenatal arsenic plus postnatal exposure to the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in C3H mice produces excess lung tumors in both sexes and liver tumors in females. Male CD1 mice treated with arsenic in utero develop tumors of the liver and adrenal and renal hyperplasia while females develop tumors of urogenital system, ovary, uterus and adrenal and hyperplasia of the oviduct. Additional postnatal treatment with diethylstilbestrol or tamoxifen after prenatal arsenic in CD1 mice induces urinary bladder transitional cell proliferative lesions, including carcinoma and papilloma, and enhances the carcinogenic response in the liver of both sexes. Overall this model has provided convincing evidence that arsenic is a transplacental carcinogen in mice with the ability to target tissues of potential human relevance, such as the urinary bladder, lung and liver. Transplacental carcinogenesis clearly occurs with other agents in humans

  6. Preliminary report: genetic variation in the human stromelysin promoter is associated with progression of coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, S.; Watts, G. F.; Mandalia, S.; Humphries, S. E.; Henney, A. M.

    1995-01-01

    Stromelysin is a member of the family of metalloproteinases that degrade extracellular matrix. In situ hybridisation and histopathological studies suggest that stromelysin activity may be important in the connective tissue remodelling processes associated with atherogenesis and plaque rupture. Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis identified a common polymorphism in the stromelysin gene promoter located 1171 bp upstream from the start of transcription in which one allele has a run of six adenosines (6A) and another has five adenosines (5A). 72 men with coronary heart disease, were genotyped. They were participants in the St Thomas' Atherosclerosis Regression Study who were randomised to receive usual care (UC), dietary intervention (D), or diet plus cholestyramine (DC), with angiography at baseline and at 39 months. In these patients the frequency of the 5A allele was 0.49 (95% CI from 0.41 to 0.57) and was not significantly different from that in a sample of 354 healthy UK men. In the UC group, patients who were homozygous for the 6A allele showed greater progression of angiographic disease than those with other genotypes: the minimum absolute width of coronary segments decreased by 0.04 (SEM 0.10) mm for 5A5A, 0.20 (0.07) mm for 5A6A, and 0.67 (0.19) mm for 6A6A (P < 0.01). The findings were similar but slightly less significant for the change in mean absolute width of coronary segments (P < 0.05). No significant associations were seen in patients in the D or DC groups. In data pooled from the three treatment groups, the 6A6A genotype was significantly associated with greater progression of coronary atherosclerosis than other genotypes in patients with baseline percentage diameter stenosis less than 20% (P < 0.05), but not in those with baseline percentage diameter stenosis greater than or equal to 20%. These results provide the first evidence of a link between genetic variation in stromelysin and progression of coronary atherosclerosis and support the

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells promote colorectal cancer progression through AMPK/mTOR-mediated NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao-Bing; Liu, Yang; Wang, Gui-Hua; Xu, Xiao; Cai, Yang; Wang, Hong-Yi; Li, Yan-Qi; Meng, Hong-Fang; Dai, Fu; Jin, Ji-De

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exert a tumor-promoting effect in a variety of human cancers. This study was designed to identify the molecular mechanisms related to the tumor-promoting effect of MSCs in colorectal cancer. In vitro analysis of colorectal cancer cell lines cultured in MSC conditioned media (MSC-CM) showed that MSC-CM significantly promoted the progression of the cancer cells by enhancing cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. The tumorigenic effect of MSC-CM was attributed to altered expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and inhibition of apoptosis. Furthermore, MSC-CM induced high level expression of a number of pluripotency factors in the cancer cells. ELISAs revealed MSC-CM contained higher levels of IL-6 and IL-8, which are associated with the progression of cancer. Moreover, MSC-CM downregulated AMPK mRNA and protein phosphorylation, but upregulated mTOR mRNA and protein phosphorylation. The NF-κB pathway was activated after addition of MSC-CM. An in vivo model in Balb/C mice confirmed the ability of MSC-CM to promote the invasion and proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. This study indicates that MSCs promote the progression of colorectal cancer via AMPK/mTOR-mediated NF-κB activation. PMID:26892992

  8. Interleukin-17 Could Promote Breast Cancer Progression at Several Stages of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Welte, Thomas; Zhang, Xiang H.-F.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic disease accounts for more than 90% of deaths from breast cancer. Yet the factors that trigger metastasis, often years after primary tumor removal, are not understood well. Recently the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin- (IL-) 17 family has been associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. Here we review current literature on the pathogenic mechanisms driven by IL-17 during breast cancer progression and connect these findings to metastasis. These include (1) direct effects of IL-17 on tumor cells promoting tumor cell survival and invasiveness, (2) regulation of tumor angiogenesis, and (3) interaction with myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) to inhibit antitumor immune response and collaborate at the distant metastatic site. Furthermore, IL-17 might also be a culprit in bone destruction caused by late stage bone metastasis. Interestingly, in addition to these potential prometastasis functions, there is also evidence for an opposite, antitumor role of IL-17 during cancer therapies. We hypothesize that these contradictory roles may be due to chronic, imbalanced versus acute transient nature of the immune reactions, as well as differences in the cells that interact with IL-17+ cells under different circumstances. PMID:26783383

  9. Small Interfering RNA Targeted to ASPP2 Promotes Progression of Experimental Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yu-Jing; Huang, Lv-Zhen; Li, Xiao-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is vital in proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) development. Apoptosis-stimulating proteins of p53 (ASPP2) have recently been reported to participate in EMT. However, the role of ASPP2 in PVR pathogenesis has not been identified. Methods. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the expression of ASPP2 in epiretinal membranes of PVR patients. ARPE-19 cells were transfected with ASPP2-siRNA, followed with measurement of cell cytotoxicity, proliferation, and migration ability. EMT markers and related inflammatory and fibrosis cytokines were measured by western blot or flow cytometry. Additionally, PVR rat models were induced by intravitreal injection of ARPE-19 cells transfected with ASPP2-siRNA and evaluated accordingly. Results. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed less intense expression of ASPP2 in PVR membranes. ASPP2 knockdown facilitated the proliferation and migration of RPE cells and enhanced the expression of mesenchymal markers such as alpha smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, and ZEB1. Meanwhile, ASPP2-siRNA increased EMT-related and inflammatory cytokines, including TGF-β, CTGF, VEGF, TNF-α, and interleukins. PVR severities were more pronounced in the rat models with ASPP2-siRNA treatment. Conclusions. ASPP2 knockdown promoted EMT of ARPE-19 cells in vitro and exacerbated the progression of experimental PVR in vivo, possibly via inflammatory and fibrosis cytokines. PMID:27378826

  10. FoxD3 deficiency promotes breast cancer progression by induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Tian-Li; Zhao, Hong-Meng; Li, Yue; Chen, Ao-Xiang; Sun, Xuan; Ge, Jie

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • FOXD3 is down-regulated in breast cancer tissues. • FOXD3 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion. • FoxD3 deficiency induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition. - Abstract: The transcription factor forkhead box D3 (FOXD3) plays an important role in the development of neural crest and gastric cancer cells. However, the function and mechanisms of FOXD3 in the breast tumorigenesis and progression is still limited. Here, we report that FOXD3 is a tumor suppressor of breast cancer tumorigenicity and aggressiveness. We found that FOXD3 is down-regulated in breast cancer tissues. Patients with low FOXD3 expression have a poor outcome. Depletion of FOXD3 expression promotes breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro, whereas overexpression of FOXD3 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, depletion of FOXD3 is linked to epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like phenotype. Our results indicate FOXD3 exhibits tumor suppressive activity and may be useful for breast therapy.

  11. Overexpressed HDAC4 is associated with poor survival and promotes tumor progression in esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Shi-Juan; Wang, Meng-He; Zhang, Mei-Yin; Zheng, X.F. Steven; Wang, Hui-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) mediate histone deacetylation, leading to transcriptional repression, which is involved in many diseases, including age-related tissue degeneration, heart failure and cancer. In this study, we were aimed to investigate the expression, clinical significance and biological function of HDAC4 in esophageal carcinoma (EC). We found that HDAC4 mRNA and protein are overexpressed in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues and cell lines. HDAC4 overexpression is associated with higher tumor grade, advanced clinical stage and poor survival. Mechanistically, HDAC4 promotes proliferation and G1/S cell cycle progression in EC cells by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21 and p27 and up-regulating CDK2/4 and CDK-dependent Rb phosphorylation. HDAC4 also enhances ESCC cell migration. Furthermore, HDAC4 positively regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by increasing the expression of Vimentin and decreasing the expression of E-Cadherin/α-Catenin. Together, our study shows that HDAC4 overexpression is important for the oncogenesis of EC, which may serve as a useful prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for this malignancy. PMID:27295551

  12. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) silencing promotes neuroblastoma progression through a MYCN independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mandriota, Stefano J.; Valentijn, Linda J.; Lesne, Laurence; Betts, David R.; Marino, Denis; Boudal-Khoshbeen, Mary; London, Wendy B.; Rougemont, Anne-Laure; Attiyeh, Edward F.; Maris, John M.; Hogarty, Michael D.; Koster, Jan; Molenaar, Jan J.; Versteeg, Rogier

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a childhood cancer with highly heterogeneous biology and clinical behavior, is characterized by genomic aberrations including amplification of MYCN. Hemizygous deletion of chromosome 11q is a well-established, independent marker of poor prognosis. While 11q22-q23 is the most frequently deleted region, the neuroblastoma tumor suppressor in this region remains to be identified. Chromosome bands 11q22-q23 contain ATM, a cell cycle checkpoint kinase and tumor suppressor playing a pivotal role in the DNA damage response. Here, we report that haploinsufficiency of ATM in neuroblastoma correlates with lower ATM expression, event-free survival, and overall survival. ATM loss occurs in high stage neuroblastoma without MYCN amplification. In SK-N-SH, CLB-Ga and GI-ME-N human neuroblastoma cells, stable ATM silencing promotes neuroblastoma progression in soft agar assays, and in subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. This effect is dependent on the extent of ATM silencing and does not appear to involve MYCN. Our findings identify ATM as a potential haploinsufficient neuroblastoma tumor suppressor, whose inactivation mirrors the increased aggressiveness associated with 11q deletion in neuroblastoma. PMID:26053094

  13. Radiation promotes malignant progression of glioma cells through HIF-1alpha stabilization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Heon; Yoo, Ki-Chun; Cui, Yan-Hong; Uddin, Nizam; Lim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Min-Jung; Nam, Seon-Young; Kim, In-Gyu; Suh, Yongjoon; Lee, Su-Jae

    2014-11-01

    Given its contribution to malignant phenotypes of cancer, tumor hypoxia has been considered as a potential therapeutic problem. In the stressful microenvironment condition, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF1) is well known to mediate the transcriptional adaptation of cells to hypoxia and acts as a central player for the process of hypoxia-driven malignant cancer progression. Here, we found that irradiation causes the HIF1α protein to stabilize, even in normoxia condition through activation of p38 MAPK, thereby promoting angiogenesis in tumor microenvironment and infiltrative property of glioma cells. Notably, irradiation reduced hydroxylation of HIF1α through destabilization of prolyl hydroxylases (PHD)-2. Moreover, radiation also decreased the half-life of protein von Hippel-Lindau (pVHL), which is a specific E3 ligase for HIF1α. Of note, inhibition of p38 MAPK attenuated radiation-induced stabilization of HIF1α through destabilization of PHD-2 and pVHL. In agreement with these results, targeting of either p38 MAPK, HIF1α, pVHL or PHD-2 effectively mitigated the radiation-induced tube formation of human brain-derived micro-vessel endothelial cells (HB-MEC) and infiltration of glioma cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that targeting HIF1α in combination with ionizing radiation might increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for glioma treatment. PMID:25109450

  14. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) silencing promotes neuroblastoma progression through a MYCN independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mandriota, Stefano J; Valentijn, Linda J; Lesne, Laurence; Betts, David R; Marino, Denis; Boudal-Khoshbeen, Mary; London, Wendy B; Rougemont, Anne-Laure; Attiyeh, Edward F; Maris, John M; Hogarty, Michael D; Koster, Jan; Molenaar, Jan J; Versteeg, Rogier; Ansari, Marc; Gumy-Pause, Fabienne

    2015-07-30

    Neuroblastoma, a childhood cancer with highly heterogeneous biology and clinical behavior, is characterized by genomic aberrations including amplification of MYCN. Hemizygous deletion of chromosome 11q is a well-established, independent marker of poor prognosis. While 11q22-q23 is the most frequently deleted region, the neuroblastoma tumor suppressor in this region remains to be identified. Chromosome bands 11q22-q23 contain ATM, a cell cycle checkpoint kinase and tumor suppressor playing a pivotal role in the DNA damage response. Here, we report that haploinsufficiency of ATM in neuroblastoma correlates with lower ATM expression, event-free survival, and overall survival. ATM loss occurs in high stage neuroblastoma without MYCN amplification. In SK-N-SH, CLB-Ga and GI-ME-N human neuroblastoma cells, stable ATM silencing promotes neuroblastoma progression in soft agar assays, and in subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. This effect is dependent on the extent of ATM silencing and does not appear to involve MYCN. Our findings identify ATM as a potential haploinsufficient neuroblastoma tumor suppressor, whose inactivation mirrors the increased aggressiveness associated with 11q deletion in neuroblastoma. PMID:26053094

  15. Killing Is Not Enough: How Apoptosis Hijacks Tumor-Associated Macrophages to Promote Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Weigert, Andreas; Mora, Javier; Sekar, Divya; Syed, Shahzad; Brüne, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are a group of heterogeneous cells of the innate immune system that are crucial to the initiation, progression, and resolution of inflammation. Moreover, they control tissue homeostasis in healthy tissue and command a broad sensory arsenal to detect disturbances in tissue integrity. Macrophages possess a remarkable functional plasticity to respond to irregularities and to initiate programs that allow overcoming them in order to return back to normal. Thus, macrophages kill malignant or transformed cells, rearrange extracellular matrix, take up and recycle cellular as well as molecular debris, initiate cellular growth cascades, and favor directed migration of cells. As an example, apoptotic death of bystander cells is sensed by macrophages, initiating functional responses that support all hallmarks of cancer. In this chapter, we describe how tumor cell apoptosis hijacks tumor-associated macrophages to promote tumor growth. We propose that tumor therapy should not only kill malignant cells but also target the interaction of the host with apoptotic cancer cells, as this might be efficient to limit the protumor action of apoptotic cells and boost the antitumor potential of macrophages. Leaving the apoptotic cell/macrophage interaction untouched might also limit the benefit of conventional tumor cell apoptosis-focused therapy since surviving tumor cells might receive overwhelming support by the wound healing response that apoptotic tumor cells will trigger in local macrophages, thereby enhancing tumor recurrence. PMID:27558823

  16. Crosstalk between ATF4 and MTA1/HDAC1 promotes osteosarcoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiang; Ren, Ye; Li, Mi; Li, Hao; Cai, Zhuo; Chu, Qian; Yang, Caihong

    2016-01-01

    The stress response gene activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is involved in metastatic behavior and cellular protection. Here we show that ATF4 is upregulated in osteosarcoma (OS) cell lines and patient clinical samples as compared to matched non-tumor tissue. Overexpression of ATF4 in OS cells promoted cell proliferation, migration and lung metastasis. Furthermore, the expression of ATF4 was markedly reduced in metastasis associated protein (MTA1) or histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) knockdown OS cells, but MTA1 overexpression increased the stability and activity of ATF4 protein via ATF4 deacetylation by HDAC1. ATF4 in turn enhanced the expression of MTA1 and HDAC1 at the transcription level, suggesting a positive feedback loop between ATF4 and MTA1/HDAC1. Clinically, the level of ATF4 was positively correlated with that of MTA1 in OS. Mice injected with ATF4-overexpressing cells exhibited a higher rate of tumor growth, and the average weight of these tumors was ×90% greater than the controls. Taken together, these data establish a direct correlation between ATF4-induced OS progression and MTA1/HDAC1-associated metastasis, and support the potential therapeutic value of targeting ATF4 in the treatment of OS. PMID:26797758

  17. CUL4A facilitates hepatocarcinogenesis by promoting cell cycle progression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yingfang; Wang, Bo; Yang, Xiaoyun; Bai, Fuxiang; Xu, Qun; Li, Xueen; Gao, Lifen; Ma, Chunhong; Liang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    CUL4A, a member of the CULLIN family, functions as a scaffold protein for an E3 ubiquitin ligase. It was reported that the CUL4A gene showed amplification in some human primary hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). However, the exact role of CUL4A in HCC remains unknown. Here, we aimed to investigate the expression and function of CUL4A in HCC development. Through immunohistochemistry study, we showed increased CUL4A expression in HCC tissues. Statistical analysis disclosed an inverse correlation between CUL4A expression and tumor differentiation grade, and patient survival, but a positive correlation with hepatocyte proliferation as well as lymphatic and venous invasion. CUL4A expression in HCC tissues was associated with HBeAg status in patients and upregulated by HBV in HCC cell lines. Further functional assay showed that CUL4A overexpression significantly promoted growth of H22 tumor homografts in BALB/c mice. Consistently, CUL4A knockdown inhibited the proliferation of established HCC cells, accompanied by S-phase reduction and Cyclin A and Cyclin B1 repression. Furthermore, CUL4A siRNA ameliorated the motility of HCC cell lines with altered expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated molecules. Taken together, our findings indicate that CUL4A plays a pivotal role in HCC progression and may serve as a potential marker for clinical diagnosis and target for therapy. PMID:26593394

  18. THE CELLUAR METABOLISM OF ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the methylation of arsenic produces intermediates and terminal products that exceed inorganic arsenic in potency as enzyme inhibitors, cytotoxins, and genotoxins, the methylation of arsenic is properly regarded as an activation process. The methylation of arsenic is an e...

  19. Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Hasan B.

    2013-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the promotion process in an academic medical center. A description of different promotional tracks, tenure and endowed chairs, and the process of submitting an application is provided. Finally, some practical advice about developing skills and attributes that can help with academic growth and promotion is dispensed. PMID:24436683

  20. Chem I Supplement: Arsenic and Old Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarquis, Mickey

    1979-01-01

    Describes the history of arsenic, the properties of arsenic, production and uses of arsenicals, arsenic in the environment; toxic levels of arsenic, arsenic in the human body, and the Marsh Test. (BT)

  1. Massive acute arsenic poisonings.

    PubMed

    Lech, Teresa; Trela, Franciszek

    2005-07-16

    Arsenic poisonings are still important in the field of toxicology, though they are not as frequent as about 20-30 years ago. In this paper, the arsenic concentrations in ante- and post-mortem materials, and also forensic and anatomo-pathological aspects in three cases of massive acute poisoning with arsenic(III) oxide (two of them with unexplained criminalistic background, in which arsenic was taken for amphetamine and one suicide), are presented. Ante-mortem blood and urine arsenic concentrations ranged from 2.3 to 6.7 microg/ml, respectively. Post-mortem tissue total arsenic concentrations were also detected in large concentrations. In case 3, the contents of the duodenum contained as much as 30.1% arsenic(III) oxide. The high concentrations of arsenic detected in blood and tissues in all presented cases are particularly noteworthy in that they are very rarely detected at these concentrations in fatal arsenic poisonings. PMID:15939162

  2. Autophagy Inhibition by Sustained Over-production of IL-6 Contributes to Arsenic Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yuanlin; Zhang, Mingfang; Li, Hui; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Dai, Lu; Liu, Huijuan; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Chi; Chen, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation has been implicated as an etiological factor in cancer, whereas autophagy may help preserve cancer cell survival but exert anti-inflammatory effects. How these phenomena interact during carcinogenesis remains unclear. We explored this question in a human bronchial epithelial cell-based model of lung carcinogenesis that is mediated by sub-chronic exposure to arsenic. We found that sustained overexpression of the pro-inflammatory interleukin IL-6 promoted arsenic-induced cell transformation by inhibiting autophagy. Conversely, strategies to enhance autophagy counteracted the effect of IL-6 in the model. These findings were confirmed and extended in a mouse model of arsenic-induced lung cancer. Mechanistic investigations suggested that mTOR inhibition contributed to the activation of autophagy, whereas IL-6 overexpression was sufficient to block autophagy by supporting Beclin-1/Mcl-1 interaction. Overall, our findings argued that chronic inflammatory states driven by IL-6 could antagonize autophagic states that may help preserve cancer cell survival and promote malignant progression, suggesting a need to uncouple inflammation and autophagy controls to enable tumor progression. PMID:24830721

  3. The Arsenic Removal From Molten Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, JianJun; Luo, Lingen; Kong, Hui; Zhou, Li

    2011-04-01

    Arsenic removal from molten steel by the calcium iron alloy and rare earth alloy (48% Ce, mass percentage) has been exploringly studied at 1853 K. It is found that the addition of rare earth alloy makes the arsenic removal more effective. This phenomenon may originate from the facts that the addition of Ce lowers the activity coefficient of sulfur, and the low activity of sulfur restrains the reaction of calcium iron alloy and sulfur, which promotes the arsenic removal reaction. Thus more rare earth alloy addition results in the higher arsenic removal ratio. However, due to the high cost of rare earth alloy, increasing the quantity of calcium iron alloy may be a choice to improve the arsenic removal effect in molten steel. It is found that when the weight ratio of rare earth alloy/steel is fixed at 5%, the arsenic removal ratio increases with the calcium iron alloy amount increasing. When the weight ratio of calcium iron alloy/steel is 18 %, the arsenic removal ratio is 50 %. This result may be acceptable for the industrial purpose.

  4. MGMT promoter hypermethylation is a frequent, early, and consistent event in astrocytoma progression, and not correlated with TP53 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Groenendijk, Floris H.; Taal, Walter; Dubbink, Hendrikus J.; Haarloo, Cathleen R.; Kouwenhoven, Mathilde C.; van den Bent, Martin J.; Kros, Johan M.

    2010-01-01

    Hypermethylation of the MGMT gene promoter and mutation of the TP53 tumor-suppressor gene are frequently present in diffuse astrocytomas. However, there is only anecdotal information about MGMT methylation status and TP53 mutations during progression of low-grade diffuse astrocytoma (AII) to anaplastic astrocytoma (AIII) and secondary glioblastoma (sGB). In this study biopsy specimens from 51 patients with astrocytic tumors with radiologically proved progression from low to high-grade malignancy were investigated for the presence and consistency of MGMT promoter hypermethylation and TP53 mutations. For 27 patients biopsy samples both of primary tumors and their recurrences were available. For the other 24 patients histology of either the low-grade lesion or the high-grade recurrence was available. It was found that MGMT promoter hypermethylation and TP53 mutations are both frequent and early events in the progression of astrocytomas and that their status is consistent over time. No correlation was found between MGMT methylation status and the presence of TP53 mutations. In addition, no correlation was found between MGMT promoter hypermethylation and the type of TP53 mutations. These results argue against the putative TP53 G:C>A:T transition mutations suggested to occur preferentially in MGMT hypermethylated tumors. PMID:20593220

  5. Loss of CD73-mediated actin polymerization promotes endometrial tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Bowser, Jessica L.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Shipley, Gregory L.; Molina, Jose G.; Dunner, Kenneth; Broaddus, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    Ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) is central to the generation of extracellular adenosine. Previous studies have highlighted a detrimental role for extracellular adenosine in cancer, as it dampens T cell–mediated immune responses. Here, we determined that, in contrast to other cancers, CD73 is markedly downregulated in poorly differentiated and advanced-stage endometrial carcinoma compared with levels in normal endometrium and low-grade tumors. In murine models, CD73 deficiency led to a loss of endometrial epithelial barrier function, and pharmacological CD73 inhibition increased in vitro migration and invasion of endometrial carcinoma cells. Given that CD73-generated adenosine is central to regulating tissue protection and physiology in normal tissues, we hypothesized that CD73-generated adenosine in endometrial carcinoma induces an innate reflex to protect epithelial integrity. CD73 associated with cell-cell contacts, filopodia, and membrane zippers, indicative of involvement in cell-cell adhesion and actin polymerization–dependent processes. We determined that CD73-generated adenosine induces cortical actin polymerization via adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) induction of a Rho GTPase CDC42–dependent conformational change of the actin-related proteins 2 and 3 (ARP2/3) actin polymerization complex member N-WASP. Cortical F-actin elevation increased membrane E-cadherin, β-catenin, and Na+K+ ATPase. Together, these findings reveal that CD73-generated adenosine promotes epithelial integrity and suggest why loss of CD73 in endometrial cancer allows for tumor progression. Moreover, our data indicate that the role of CD73 in cancer is more complex than previously described. PMID:26642367

  6. Daily goal progress is facilitated by spousal support and promotes psychological, physical, and relational well-being throughout adulthood.

    PubMed

    Jakubiak, Brittany K; Feeney, Brooke C

    2016-09-01

    In 2 daily diary studies, we tested the consequences and precursors of daily goal progress throughout the adult life span. Attachment theory posits that exploration-including the pursuit of autonomous goals-promotes well-being across the life span and is facilitated by support from close others. For both young-adult newlyweds (Study 1) and married couples in late adulthood (Study 2), daily independent goal progress predicted same-day and next-day improvements in psychological, physical, and relational well-being. Specifically, when participants made more progress on their goals than usual on one day, they reported increases in positive affect, sleep quality, and relationship quality, and decreased physical symptoms, the following day (as well as concurrently). Additionally, spousal support (i.e., availability, encouragement, and noninterference) enabled same-day and next-day goal progress. Mediational analyses showed indirect links between spousal support and well-being through goal progress. Some effects were moderated by attachment orientation in the newlywed sample; individuals with greater insecure attachment benefited most from goal progress, and spousal support enabled goal progress most strongly for individuals with less anxious attachment. Overall, these results support and extend attachment theoretical propositions regarding the importance of the exploration system across the adult life span. They contribute to existing literature by demonstrating wide-ranging consequences of successful exploration for well-being and by providing evidence for the importance of both exploration and support for exploration into late adulthood. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27560610

  7. Postmenopausal obesity promotes tumor angiogenesis and breast cancer progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jian-Wei; Young, Emily; Patterson, Sharla G; Makey, Kristina L; Wells, Jeremy; Huang, Min; Tucker, Kevan B; Miele, Lucio

    2011-05-15

    Obese postmenopausal women have a 50% higher risk of breast cancer than non-obese women. There is not an animal model that mimics postmenopausal obesity related to breast cancer progression. Using age-relevant C57BL/6 mice, this study determined whether postmenopausal obesity increases VEGF expression, tumor angiogenesis, and breast tumor growth. Ovariectomy (OVX) was performed in 12 sixty week-old female mice, then followed by a low-fat (5%, LF, n=6) or a high-fat (60%, HF, n=6) diet for 12 weeks. In the eighth week of the dietary program, 10(6) E0771 (mouse breast cancer) cells were injected in the left fourth mammary gland. Tumor size was monitored for 4 weeks. Body weights were monitored weekly. At the end of the experiment, blood samples, visceral fat and tumors were collected for measuring VEGF expression using ELISA and intratumoral microvessel density (IMD) using CD31 immunochemistry. Body weight was significantly increased in OVX/HF mice, compared to OVX/LF group (55.3±1.7 vs. 41.5±1.5 g; p < 0.01). There was a two-fold increase in the ratio of visceral fat/BW in OVX/HF mice, compared to those in OVX/LF group (0.062±0.005 vs. 0.032±0.003; p < 0.01). Postmenopausal obesity significantly increased breast tumor weight over the control (4.62±0.63 vs. 1.98±0.27 g; p < 0.01) and IMD (173±3.7 vs. 139±4.3 IM#/mm^2; p < 0.01). Tumor VEGF levels were higher in OVX/HF mice, compared to OVX/LF group (73.3±3.8 vs. 49.5±4.3 pg/mg protein; p < 0.01). Plasma VEGF levels (69±7.1 vs. 48±3.5 pg/ml) and visceral fat VEGF levels (424.4±39.5 vs. 208.5±22.4 pg/mg protein) were significantly increased in OVX/HF mice, compared to OVX/LF group, respectively (n=6; p < 0.01). Interestingly, adipose tissue primary culture showed that subcutaneous fat released more VEGF, compared to visceral fat (6.77±1.14 vs. 0.94±0.16 pg/mg tissue; n=6; p < 0.01). These findings support the hypothesis that postmenopausal obesity promotes tumor angiogenesis and breast cancer

  8. Postmenopausal obesity promotes tumor angiogenesis and breast cancer progression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Young, Emily; Patterson, Sharla G; Makey, Kristina L; Wells, Jeremy; Huang, Min; Tucker, Kevan B; Miele, Lucio

    2011-01-01

    Obese postmenopausal women have a 50% higher risk of breast cancer than non-obese women. There is not an animal model that mimics postmenopausal obesity related to breast cancer progression. Using age-relevant C57BL/6 mice, this study determined whether postmenopausal obesity increases VEGF expression, tumor angiogenesis and breast tumor growth. Ovariectomy (OVX) was performed in 12 sixty week-old female mice, then followed by a low-fat (5%, LF, n = 6) or a high-fat (60%, HF, n = 6) diet for 12 weeks. In the eighth week of the dietary program, 106 E0771 (mouse breast cancer) cells were injected in the left fourth mammary gland. Tumor size was monitored for 4 weeks. Body weights were monitored weekly. At the end of the experiment, blood samples, visceral fat and tumors were collected for measuring VEGF expression using ELISA and intratumoral microvessel density (IMD) using CD31 immunochemistry. Body weight was significantly increased in OVX/HF mice, compared to OVX/LF group (55.3 ± 1.7 vs. 41.5 ± 1.5 g; p < 0.01). There was a two-fold increase in the ratio of visceral fat/BW in OVX/HF mice, compared to those in OVX/LF group (0.062 ± 0.005 vs. 0.032 ± 0.003; p < 0.01). Postmenopausal obesity significantly increased breast tumor weight over the control (4.62 ± 0.63 vs. 1.98 ± 0.27 g; p < 0.01) and IMD (173 ± 3.7 vs. 139 ± 4.3 IM#/mm2; p < 0.01). Tumor VEGF levels were higher in OVX/HF mice, compared to OVX/LF group (73.3 ± 3.8 vs. 49.5 ± 4.3 pg/mg protein; p < 0.01). Plasma VEGF levels (69 ± 7.1 vs. 48 ± 3.5 pg/ml) and visceral fat VEGF levels (424.4 ± 39.5 vs. 208.5 ± 22.4 pg/mg protein) were significantly increased in OVX/HF mice, compared to OVX/LF group, respectively (n = 6; p < 0.01). Interestingly, adipose tissue primary culture showed that subcutaneous fat released more VEGF, compared to visceral fat (6.77 ± 1.14 vs. 0.94 ± 0.16 pg/mg tissue; n = 6; p < 0.01). These findings support the hypothesis that postmenopausal obesity promotes tumor

  9. Arsenic Efflux from Microcystis aeruginosa under Different Phosphate Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Changzhou; Wang, Zhenhong; Luo, Zhuanxi

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplankton plays an important role in arsenic speciation, distribution, and cycling in freshwater environments. Little information, however, is available on arsenic efflux from the cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa under different phosphate regimes. This study investigated M. aeruginosa arsenic efflux and speciation by pre-exposing it to 10 µM arsenate or arsenite for 24 h during limited (12 h) and extended (13 d) depuration periods under phosphate enriched (+P) and phosphate depleted (−P) treatments. Arsenate was the predominant species detected in algal cells throughout the depuration period while arsenite only accounted for no greater than 45% of intracellular arsenic. During the limited depuration period, arsenic efflux occurred rapidly and only arsenate was detected in solutions. During the extended depuration period, however, arsenate and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) were found to be the two predominant arsenic species detected in solutions under −P treatments, but arsenate was the only species detected under +P treatments. Experimental results also suggest that phosphorus has a significant effect in accelerating arsenic efflux and promoting arsenite bio-oxidation in M. aeruginosa. Furthermore, phosphorus depletion can reduce arsenic efflux from algal cells as well as accelerate arsenic reduction and methylation. These findings can contribute to our understanding of arsenic biogeochemistry in aquatic environments and its potential environmental risks under different phosphorus levels. PMID:25549253

  10. Toxic Substances Portal- Arsenic

    MedlinePlus

    ... industrial applications. Organic arsenic compounds are used as pesticides, primarily on cotton fields and orchards. top What ... as copper or lead smelting, wood treating, or pesticide application. top How can arsenic affect my health? ...

  11. Arsenic Trioxide Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Arsenic trioxide is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL; a type of cancer in which there ... worsened following treatment with other types of chemotherapy. Arsenic trioxide is in a class of medications called ...

  12. MGMT promoter methylation is associated with temozolomide response and prolonged progression-free survival in disseminated cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Rainer; Jewell, Rosalyn; van den Oord, Joost J; Wolter, Pascal; Stierner, Ulrika; Lindholm, Christer; Hertzman Johansson, Carolina; Lindén, Diana; Johansson, Hemming; Frostvik Stolt, Marianne; Walker, Christy; Snowden, Helen; Newton-Bishop, Julia; Hansson, Johan; Egyházi Brage, Suzanne

    2015-06-15

    To investigate the predictive and prognostic value of O(6) -methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) inactivation by analyses of promoter methylation in pretreatment tumor biopsies from patients with cutaneous melanoma treated with dacarbazine (DTIC) or temozolomide (TMZ) were performed. The patient cohorts consisted of Belgian and Swedish disseminated melanoma patients. Patients were subdivided into those receiving single-agent treatment with DTIC/TMZ (cohort S, n = 74) and those treated with combination chemotherapy including DTIC/TMZ (cohort C, n = 79). Median follow-up was 248 and 336 days for cohort S and cohort C, respectively. MGMT promoter methylation was assessed by three methods. The methylation-related transcriptional silencing of MGMT mRNA expression was assessed by real-time RT-PCR. Response to chemotherapy and progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were correlated to MGMT promoter methylation status. MGMT promoter methylation was detected in tumor biopsies from 21.5 % of the patients. MGMT mRNA was found to be significantly lower in tumors positive for MGMT promoter methylation compared to tumors without methylation in both treatment cohorts (p < 0.005). DTIC/TMZ therapy response rate was found to be significantly associated with MGMT promoter methylation in cohort S (p = 0.0005), but did not reach significance in cohort C (p = 0.16). Significantly longer PFS was observed among patients with MGMT promoter-methylated tumors (p = 0.002). Multivariate Cox regression analysis identified presence of MGMT promoter methylation as an independent variable associated with longer PFS. Together, this implies that MGMT promoter methylation is associated with response to single-agent DTIC/TMZ and longer PFS in disseminated cutaneous melanoma. PMID:25400033

  13. miR-106b promotes cancer progression in hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Chia-Sheng; Su, Zhi-Ru; Lee, Yi-Ping; Liu, I-Ting; Yen, Chia-Jui

    2016-01-01

    = 0.75; miR-93 vs miR-25, r = 0.69; miR-106b vs miR-25, r = 0.33). The overall and disease-free survival curves showed that high-miR-106b expression was correlated with the poor prognosis of HBV-associated HCC. HCC differentiation was significantly correlated with miR-106b expression (P < 0.05). Lower miR-106b expression levels resulted in the well differentiation of HCC. Moreover, the expression of the miR106b-25 cluster and MCM7 was up-regulated in Huh7 and Hep 3B cells after transfection with the HBx expression plasmid. CONCLUSION: The data obtained in the present study suggests that HBx enhances miR-106b transcription to promote tumor progression in HBV-associated HCC. PMID:27298561

  14. RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Houcai; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Lixia; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuying; Xing, Haiyan; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Wei, Hui; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • RPS27a expression was up-regulated in advanced-phase CML and AL patients. • RPS27a knockdown changed biological property of K562 and K562/G01 cells. • RPS27a knockdown affected Raf/MEK/ERK, P21 and BCL-2 signaling pathways. • RPS27a knockdown may be applicable for new combination therapy in CML patients. - Abstract: Ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27a) could perform extra-ribosomal functions besides imparting a role in ribosome biogenesis and post-translational modifications of proteins. The high expression level of RPS27a was reported in solid tumors, and we found that the expression level of RPS27a was up-regulated in advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute leukemia (AL) patients. In this study, we explored the function of RPS27a in leukemia cells by using CML cell line K562 cells and its imatinib resistant cell line K562/G01 cells. It was observed that the expression level of RPS27a was high in K562 cells and even higher in K562/G01 cells. Further analysis revealed that RPS27a knockdown by shRNA in both K562 and K562G01 cells inhibited the cell viability, induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and increased cell apoptosis induced by imatinib. Combination of shRNA with imatinib treatment could lead to more cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression in RPS27a knockdown cells. Further, it was found that phospho-ERK(p-ERK) and BCL-2 were down-regulated and P21 up-regulated in RPS27a knockdown cells. In conclusion, RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells. It appears that drugs targeting RPS27a combining with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) might represent a novel therapy strategy in TKI resistant CML patients.

  15. The carcinogenicity of arsenic.

    PubMed Central

    Pershagen, G

    1981-01-01

    A carcinogenic role of inorganic arsenic has been suspected for nearly a century. Exposure to inorganic arsenic compounds occurs in some occupational groups, e.g., among smelter workers and workers engaged in the production and use of arsenic containing pesticides. Substantial exposure can also result from drinking water in certain areas and the use of some drugs. Tobacco and wine have had high As concentrations due to the use of arsenic containing pesticides. Inorganic arsenic compounds interfere with DNA repair mechanisms and an increased frequency of chromosomal aberrations have been observed among exposed workers and patients. Epidemiological data show that inorganic arsenic exposure can cause cancer of the lung and skin. The evidence of an etiologic role of arsenic for angiosarcoma of the liver is highly suggestive; however, the association between arsenic and cancer of other sites needs further investigation. No epidemiological data are available on exposure to organic arsenic compounds and cancer. Animal carcinogenicity studies involving exposure to various inorganic and organic arsenic compounds by different routes have been negative, with the possible exception of some preliminary data regarding lung cancer and leukemia. Some studies have indicated an increased mortality from lung cancer in populations living near point emission sources of arsenic into the air. The role of arsenic cannot be evaluated due to lack of exposure data. Epidemiological data suggest that the present WHO standard for drinking water (50 micrograms As/l.) provides only a small safety margin with regard to skin cancer. PMID:7023936

  16. Arsenic in Food

    MedlinePlus

    ... inorganic forms. The FDA has been measuring total arsenic concentrations in foods, including rice and juices, through its Total Diet Study program ... readily take up much arsenic from the ground, rice is different because it takes ... has high levels of less toxic organic arsenic. Do organic foods ...

  17. NEVADA ARSENIC STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of exposure to arsenic in U.S. drinking water at low levels are difficult to assess. In particular, studies of sufficient sample size on US populations exposed to arsenic in drinking water are few. Churchill County, NV (population 25000) has arsenic levels in drinki...

  18. ARSENIC REMOVAL TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the state-of-art technology for removal of arsenic from drinking water. Presentation includes results of several EPA field studies on removal of arsenic from existing arsenic removal plants and key results from several EPA sponsored research studies. T...

  19. ARSENIC SOURCES AND ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent research has identified a number of potential and current links between environmental arsenic releases and the management of operational and abandoned landfills. Many landfills will receive an increasing arsenic load due to the disposal of arsenic-bearing solid residuals ...

  20. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O'Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5-treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing. PMID:27382602

  1. Polymorphisms in the CCR5 promoter region influence disease progression in perinatally human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected children.

    PubMed

    Ometto, L; Bertorelle, R; Mainardi, M; Zanchetta, M; Tognazzo, S; Rampon, O; Ruga, E; Chieco-Bianchi, L; De Rossi, A

    2001-03-01

    The effect of CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) promoter polymorphisms on the natural history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease was studied in 73 HIV-1-infected children. The CCR5(59338-59537) promoter haplotype, CCR5-59029A/G polymorphism, and CCR5Delta32 and CCR2-64I alterations were investigated. After exclusion of carriers of CCR5Delta32 or CCR2-64I, Kaplan-Meier analysis disclosed that children with the P1/P1(59353C,59356C,59402A) genotype progressed faster to disease than did children with other haplotypes (P=.016). When CCR2-64I carriers were included, this effect had borderline significance (P=.065) and was lost when CCR5Delta32 carriers were also considered (P=.387). The P1/P1 effect was strongest early after infection, when progression to disease was mainly associated with CCR5 coreceptor-using viruses. These results indicate that the P1/P1 genotype is predictive of rapid progression in HIV-1-infected children lacking CCR5Delta32 or CCR5-64I alleles. The observation of a linkage disequilibrium between P1 and 59029A might explain the previously reported association between 59029A homozygosity and rapid disease progression. PMID:11181160

  2. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O’Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T.; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5–treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing. PMID:27382602

  3. Overexpression of FGF9 in prostate epithelial cells augments reactive stroma formation and promotes prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanqing; Jin, Chengliu; Hamana, Tomoaki; Liu, Junchen; Wang, Cong; An, Lei; McKeehan, Wallace L; Wang, Fen

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality of prostate cancer (PCa). Fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) has been reported to promote PCa bone metastasis. However, the mechanism by which overexpression of FGF9 promotes PCa progression and metastasis is still unknown. Herein, we report that transgenic mice forced to express FGF9 in prostate epithelial cells (F9TG) developed high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in an expression level- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, FGF9/TRAMP bigenic mice (F9TRAMP) grew advanced PCa earlier and had higher frequencies of metastasis than TRAMP littermates. We observed tumor microenvironmental changes including hypercellularity and hyperproliferation in the stromal compartment of F9TG and F9TRAMP mice. Expression of TGFβ1, a key signaling molecule overexpressed in reactive stroma, was increased in F9TG and F9TRAMP prostates. Both in vivo and in vitro data indicated that FGF9 promoted TGFβ1 expression via increasing cJun-mediated signaling. Moreover, in silico analyses showed that the expression level of FGF9 was positively associated with expression of TGFβ1 and its downstream signaling molecules in human prostate cancers. Collectively, our data demonstrated that overexpressing FGF9 in PCa cells augmented the formation of reactive stroma and promoted PCa initiation and progression. PMID:26157349

  4. Arsenic pollution sources.

    PubMed

    Garelick, Hemda; Jones, Huw; Dybowska, Agnieszka; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic is a widely dispersed element in the Earth's crust and exists at an average concentration of approximately 5 mg/kg. There are many possible routes of human exposure to arsenic from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Arsenic occurs as a constituent in more than 200 minerals, although it primarily exists as arsenopyrite and as a constituent in several other sulfide minerals. The introduction of arsenic into drinking water can occur as a result of its natural geological presence in local bedrock. Arsenic-containing bedrock formations of this sort are known in Bangladesh, West Bengal (India), and regions of China, and many cases of endemic contamination by arsenic with serious consequences to human health are known from these areas. Significant natural contamination of surface waters and soil can arise when arsenic-rich geothermal fluids come into contact with surface waters. When humans are implicated in causing or exacerbating arsenic pollution, the cause can almost always be traced to mining or mining-related activities. Arsenic exists in many oxidation states, with arsenic (III) and (V) being the most common forms. Similar to many metalloids, the prevalence of particular species of arsenic depends greatly on the pH and redox conditions of the matrix in which it exists. Speciation is also important in determining the toxicity of arsenic. Arsenic minerals exist in the environment principally as sulfides, oxides, and phosphates. In igneous rocks, only those of volcanic origin are implicated in high aqueous arsenic concentrations. Sedimentary rocks tend not to bear high arsenic loads, and common matrices such as sands and sandstones contain lower concentrations owing to the dominance of quartz and feldspars. Groundwater contamination by arsenic arises from sources of arsenopyrite, base metal sulfides, realgar and orpiment, arsenic-rich pyrite, and iron oxyhydroxide. Mechanisms by which arsenic is released from minerals are varied and are accounted for by

  5. ARSENIC MINERALS AS INDICATORS OF CONDITIONS OF GOLD DEPOSITION IN CARLIN-TYPE GOLD DEPOSITS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, James J.

    1984-01-01

    Arsenic minerals commonly occurring in Carlin-type gold deposits include orpiment and realgar and, more rarely, native arsenic and arsenopyrite. Other arsenic-bearing phases present include arsenian pyrite and stibnite and a number of thallium and mercury sulfides. Under conditions of constant temperature and pressure, the relative stability of arsenic minerals is a function of sulfur activity. At high sulfur activity, orpiment is the stable phase. As sulfur activity is decreased, more sulfur-deficient arsenic phases become stable with the progressive formation of realgar, native arsenic, arsenopyrite, and finally, loellingite at very low sulfur activity. Three univariant equilibrium assemblages: orpiment plus realgar, realgar plus native arsenic and native arsenic plus arsenopyrite are useful indicators of sulfur activity and commonly occur in the epithermal environment.

  6. OCT4 increases BIRC5 and CCND1 expression and promotes cancer progression in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background OCT4 and BIRC5 are preferentially expressed in human cancer cells and mediate cancer cell survival and tumor maintenance. However, the molecular mechanism that regulates OCT4 and BIRC5 expression is not well characterized. Methods By manipulating OCT4 and BIRC5 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines, the regulatory mechanism of OCT4 on BIRC5 and CCND1 were investigated. Results Increasing or decreasing OCT4 expression could enhance or suppress BIRC5 expression, respectively, by regulating the activity of BIRC5 promoter. Because there is no binding site for OCT4 within BIRC5 promoter, the effect of OCT4 on BIRC5 promoter is indirect. An octamer motif for OCT4 in the CCND1 promoter has directly and partly participated in the regulation of CCND1 promoter activity, suggesting that OCT4 also could upregulated the expression of CCND1. Co-suppression of OCT4 and BIRC5 induced cancer cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, thereby efficiently inhibiting the proliferative activity of cancer cells and suppressing the growth of HCC xenogrfts in nude mice. Conclusion OCT4 can upregulate BIRC5 and CCND1 expression by increasing their promoter activity. These factors collusively promotes HCC cell proliferation, and co-suppression of OCT4 and BIRC5 is potentially beneficial for HCC treatment. PMID:23433354

  7. Promoting Lifelong Ocean Education-2 Years Later: Charting Progress and Adjusting Course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeson, Blanche; McDougall, Carrie; Simms, Eric; Walker, Sharon; Keener-Chavis, Paula

    2006-01-01

    Session participants will identify how their regional or national efforts contribute to the overall progress on the education recommendations in the USCOP and the work that remains. They will examine progress, identify shortcomings, and suggest course corrections in current and planned efforts. This session will build upon VADM Lautenbacher's keynote presentation on ocean education. Examples, such as ocean literacy efforts at regional and national levels, will be highlighted to stimulate discussion on progress, challenges, and solutions. Working in small groups, participants will consider actions that they, their organizations, or NMEA might take to further the ocean and aquatic education agenda.

  8. Th17 Cells in Protection from Tumor or Promotion of Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Young, M. Rita I.

    2016-01-01

    The roles of inflammation and inflammatory cells such as Th17 cells in the development and progression of cancer have been extensively studied. However, the results have been varied, with conflicting conclusions. Most studies have focused on changes in inflammatory phenotypes once cancers have developed and disease is progressing. Far fewer studies have looked at the immune phenotypic changes that occur during progression of premalignant lesions to cancer. The impact of inflammation and, in particular, Th17 cells on tumor biology is summarized in this review, with a focus on the differences in the outcomes of studies. Possible explanations for the contradictory conclusions are also suggested. PMID:27453801

  9. Over expression of hyaluronan promotes progression of HCC via CD44-mediated pyruvate kinase M2 nuclear translocation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Huan; Wang, Ying-Cong; Qin, Cheng-Dong; Yao, Rong-Rong; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yan; Xie, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Lan; Wang, Yan-Hong; Ren, Zheng-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronan is expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as HCC generally arises from a cirrhotic liver in which excessive production and accumulation of HA leads to developing cirrhosis. Though it has been suggested HA is involved in progression of HCC, the mechanisms underlying the connection between HA and HCC progression are unclear. Since increased aerobic glycolysis is a metabolic trait of malignant cells and HA-CD44 can modulate glucose metabolism, we aim to investigate the roles of PKM2, a key enzyme in glucose metabolism, in the HA-CD44 axis facilitated the progress of HCC. We shown PKM2 was required for HA-promoted HCC progression, which was not modulated by PKM2 kinase activity but by nuclear translocation of PKM2. PKM2 translocation was Erk (Thr202/Tyr204) phosphorylation dependent, which functioned at the downstream of HA-CD44 binding. Furthermore, elevated HA expression significantly correlated with PKM2 nuclear location and was an independent factors predicting poor HCC prognosis. In conclusions PKM2 nuclear translocation is required for mediating the described HA biological effects on HCC progression and our results imply that inhibition of HA may have therapeutic value in treating HCC. PMID:27186420

  10. Androgen receptor (AR) suppresses miRNA-145 to promote renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progression independent of VHL status

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan; Sun, Yin; Rao, Qun; Xu, Hua; Li, Lei; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of the VHL tumor suppressor plays key roles in the development of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and mutated VHL-mediated VEGF induction has become the main target for the current RCC therapy. Here we identified a signal pathway of VEGF induction by androgen receptor (AR)/miRNA-145 as a new target to suppress RCC progression. Mechanism dissection revealed that AR might function through binding to the androgen receptor element (ARE) located on the promoter region of miRNA-145 to suppress p53's ability to induce expression of miRNA-145 that normally suppresses expression of HIF2α/VEGF/MMP9/CCND1. Suppressing AR with AR-shRNA or introducing exogenous miRNA-145 mimic can attenuate RCC progression independent of VHL status. MiR-145 mimic in preclinical RCC orthotopic xenograft mouse model revealed its efficacy in suppression of RCC progression. These results together identified signals by AR-suppressed miRNA-145 as a key player in the RCC progression via regulating HIF2α/VEGF/MMP9/CCND1 expression levels. Blockade of the newly identified signal by AR inhibition or miRNA-145 mimics has promising therapeutic benefit to suppress RCC progression. PMID:26304926

  11. Arsenic removal from water

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2007-07-24

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  12. Arsenic: homicidal intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, E.W.; Wold, D.; Heyman, A.

    1984-07-01

    Arsenic-induced deaths have been known to occur from accidental poisoning, as a result of medical therapy, and from intentional poisonings in homicide and suicide. Twenty-eight arsenic deaths in North Carolina from 1972 to 1982 included 14 homicides and seven suicides. In addition, 56 hospitalized victims of arsenic poisoning were identified at Duke Medical Center from 1970 to 1980. Four case histories of arsenic poisoning in North Carolina are presented and clinical manifestations are discussed. In view of the continued widespread use of arsenic in industry and agriculture, and its ubiquity in the environment, arsenic poisoning will continue to occur. A need for knowledge of its toxicity and of the clinical manifestations of acute and chronic arsenic poisoning will also continue.

  13. Upregulated microRNA-301a in osteosarcoma promotes tumor progression by targeting CDC14A.

    PubMed

    Ni, Z; Shang, X F; Wang, Y F; Sun, Y J; Fu, D J

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are associated with tumor progression in various cancers, such as gastric and hepatic carcinomas, and lung cancer. miR-301a is overexpressed and displays oncogenic activity in cancers. We investigated the biological involvement of miR-301a in osteosarcoma (OS). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to analyze expression levels of miR-301a in 24 OS and matched adjacent non-tumor tissues. A miR-301a mimic was transferred into OS cell lines U-2 OS and MG-63 to upregulate miR-301a. The effects of miR-301a were investigated by examining cell proliferation, migration, and the cell cycle. The miR-301 target was predicted by TargetScan and confirmed by western blotting and qRT-PCR. The expression of miR-301a was significantly higher in OS tissues compared with the matched adjacent non-tumor tissues (0.959 ± 0.39 vs 3.9516 ± 1.18). Upregulated miR-301a significantly increased proliferation at 48 and 72 h compared to the negative control (U-2 OS: 2.11 ± 0.21 vs 2.88 ± 0.24; 2.70 ± 0.26 vs 3.71 ± 0.24; MG-63: 2.19 ± 0.20 vs 3.19 ± 0.22; 3.1 ± 0.25 vs 4.01 ± 0.27) and migration capability (U-2 OS: 100 ± 20.19 vs 150.68 ± 32.83; MG-63: 100 ± 17.20 vs 133.35 ± 26.26), and decreased apoptosis in both U-2 OS (10.87 ± 2.53 vs 4.01 ± 2.23) and MG-63 (15.26 ± 2.15 vs 8.25 ± 3.07). The cell cycle studies revealed that miR-301a caused an increase of the G2 population in U-2 OS (38.6 ± 6.58 vs 47.2 ± 7.27) and MG-63 (44.01 ± 5.28 vs 57.9 ± 4.25). Additional experiments indicated that CDC14A was upregulated by miR-301a (0.63 ± 0.06 vs 0.98 ± 0.06; 1.49 ± 0.25 vs 2.99 ± 0.14). Overexpressed miR-301a may increase CDC14A expression and promote cell proliferation and migration in OS cells. Therefore, miR- 301a may be useful for osteosarcoma diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27323075

  14. PUMA promotes apoptosis of hematopoietic progenitors driving leukemic progression in a mouse model of myelodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Guirguis, A A; Slape, C I; Failla, L M; Saw, J; Tremblay, C S; Powell, D R; Rossello, F; Wei, A; Strasser, A; Curtis, D J

    2016-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis with resultant cytopenias. Increased apoptosis and aberrantly functioning progenitors are thought to contribute to this phenotype. As is the case for other malignancies, overcoming apoptosis is believed to be important in progression toward acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using the NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13) transgenic mouse model of MDS, we previously reported that overexpression of the anti-apoptotic protein BCL2, blocked apoptosis and improved cytopenias, paradoxically, delaying leukemic progression. To further understand this surprising result, we examined the role of p53 and its pro-apoptotic effectors, PUMA and NOXA in NHD13 mice. The absence of p53 or PUMA but not NOXA reduced apoptosis and expanded the numbers of MDS-repopulating cells. Despite a similar effect on apoptosis and cell numbers, the absence of p53 and PUMA had diametrically opposed effects on progression to AML: absence of p53 accelerated leukemic progression, while absence of PUMA significantly delayed progression. This may be explained in part by differences in cellular responses to DNA damage. The absence of p53 led to higher levels of γ-H2AX (indicative of persistent DNA lesions) while PUMA-deficient NHD13 progenitors resolved DNA lesions in a manner comparable to wild-type cells. These results suggest that targeting PUMA may improve the cytopenias of MDS without a detrimental effect on leukemic progression thus warranting further investigation. PMID:26742432

  15. ARSENIC (+3 OXIDATION STATE) METHYLTRANSFERASE AND THE METHYLATION OF ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolic conversion of inorganic arsenic into methylated products is a multistep process that yields mono, di, and trimethylated arsenicals. In recent years, it has become apparent that formation of methylated metabolites of inorganic arsenic is not necessarily a detoxification...

  16. Long noncoding RNA PVT1 promotes cervical cancer progression through epigenetically silencing miR-200b.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaorong; Zhang, Guanli; Liu, Jingying

    2016-08-01

    Long noncoding RNA PVT1 has been reported to be dysregulated and play vital roles in a variety of cancers. However, the functions and molecular mechanisms of PVT1 in cervical cancer remain unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression, clinical significance, biological roles, and underlying functional mechanisms of PVT1 in cervical cancer. Our results revealed that PVT1 is upregulated in cervical cancer tissues. Enhanced expression of PVT1 is associated with larger tumor size, advanced International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, and poor prognosis of cervical cancer patients. Using gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches, we demonstrated that overexpression of PVT1 promotes cervical cancer cells proliferation, cell cycle progression and migration, and depletion of PVT1 inhibits cervical cancer cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and migration. Mechanistically, we verified that PVT1 binds to EZH2, recruits EZH2 to the miR-200b promoter, increases histone H3K27 trimethylation level on the miR-200b promoter, and inhibits miR-200b expression. Furthermore, the effects of PVT1 on cervical cell proliferation and migration depend upon silencing of miR-200b. Taken together, our findings confirmed that PVT1 functions as an oncogene in cervical cancer and indicated that PVT1 is not only an important prognostic marker, but also a potential therapy target for cervical cancer. PMID:27272214

  17. Upregulation of HOXB7 promotes the tumorigenesis and progression of gastric cancer and correlates with clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jia-Qin; Xu, Xiao-Wu; Mou, Yi-Ping; Chen, Ke; Pan, Yu; Wu, Di

    2016-02-01

    Several examples of aberrant homeobox gene expression have been found across a range of cancers, and it is also confirmed that homeobox genes play a critical roles in tumorigenesis and progression. Notwithstanding homeobox B7 (HOXB7) has been documented that its deregulation promotes carcinogenesis and development in gastrointestinal tract, its function in gastric cancer has not been investigated. In this study, HOXB7 expression was examined to be distinctly upregulated in gastric carcinoma GC cell lines and in the tumor relative to normal gastric tissue. High HOXB7 expression was correlated with tumor differentiation (P = 0.025) and TNM stage (P = 0.008). HOXB7 knockdown in BGC-823 and SGC-7901 resulted in decreased migration and invasion with alteration of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) proteins and influenced proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle. Furthermore, complementary DNA (cDNA) microarray, qPCR, and Western blotting were performed to explore potential downstream target genes of HOXB7. HOXB7 is generally overexpressed in GC, associated with patient clinical characteristics, and specifically promotes GC cell malignant biological properties through PIK3R3/AKT signaling pathways, indicating HOXB7 as a causal factor in promoting tumor progression. PMID:26307396

  18. A Salt-Induced Reno-Cerebral Reflex Activates Renin-Angiotensin Systems and Promotes CKD Progression.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Li, Aiqing; Wang, Liangliang; Zhou, Zhanmei; Su, Zhengxiu; Bin, Wei; Wilcox, Christopher S; Hou, Fan Fan

    2015-07-01

    Salt intake promotes progression of CKD by uncertain mechanisms. We hypothesized that a salt-induced reno-cerebral reflex activates a renin-angiotensin axis to promote CKD. Sham-operated and 5/6-nephrectomized rats received a normal-salt (0.4%), low-salt (0.02%), or high-salt (4%) diet for 2 weeks. High salt in 5/6-nephrectomized rats increased renal NADPH oxidase, inflammation, BP, and albuminuria. Furthermore, high salt activated the intrarenal and cerebral, but not the systemic, renin-angiotensin axes and increased the activity of renal sympathetic nerves and neurons in the forebrain of these rats. Renal fibrosis was increased 2.2-fold by high versus low salt, but intracerebroventricular tempol, losartan, or clonidine reduced this fibrosis by 65%, 69%, or 59%, respectively, and renal denervation or deafferentation reduced this fibrosis by 43% or 38%, respectively (all P<0.05). Salt-induced fibrosis persisted after normalization of BP with hydralazine. These data suggest that the renal and cerebral renin-angiotensin axes are interlinked by a reno-cerebral reflex that is activated by salt and promotes oxidative stress, fibrosis, and progression of CKD independent of BP. PMID:25635129

  19. Reduction and Coordination of Arsenic in Indian Mustard1

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Ingrid J.; Prince, Roger C.; George, Martin J.; Smith, Robert D.; George, Graham N.; Salt, David E.

    2000-01-01

    The bioaccumulation of arsenic by plants may provide a means of removing this element from contaminated soils and waters. However, to optimize this process it is important to understand the biological mechanisms involved. Using a combination of techniques, including x-ray absorption spectroscopy, we have established the biochemical fate of arsenic taken up by Indian mustard (Brassica juncea). After arsenate uptake by the roots, possibly via the phosphate transport mechanism, a small fraction is exported to the shoot via the xylem as the oxyanions arsenate and arsenite. Once in the shoot, the arsenic is stored as an AsIII-tris-thiolate complex. The majority of the arsenic remains in the roots as an AsIII-tris-thiolate complex, which is indistinguishable from that found in the shoots and from AsIII-tris-glutathione. The thiolate donors are thus probably either glutathione or phytochelatins. The addition of the dithiol arsenic chelator dimercaptosuccinate to the hydroponic culture medium caused a 5-fold-increased arsenic level in the leaves, although the total arsenic accumulation was only marginally increased. This suggests that the addition of dimercaptosuccinate to arsenic-contaminated soils may provide a way to promote arsenic bioaccumulation in plant shoots, a process that will be essential for the development of an efficient phytoremediation strategy for this element. PMID:10759512

  20. [Social participation and health promotion in Cotacachi: an experience in progress].

    PubMed

    Velasco, N

    1997-12-01

    Community participation in the origin, design, and application of health programs may be encouraged through health promotion. Health promotion is a political strategy in which the community becomes involved in processes of change through development of a broad-based consensus of the most important organizations to find solutions to health problems. Strategies of health promotion make individuals aware of their personal and community responsibilities for actions to reinforce healthy behaviors and modify unhealthy behaviors. The decision of political authorities to base their government on popular participation is one of the most important factors in community activation. Political will in the Ecuadorian community of Cotacachi allowed creation of mechanisms for achieving consensus that were consolidated into an intersectorial health committee. The committee carried out a participatory health diagnosis with community assistance to gain knowledge of the area and its problems. An IEC (information, education, and communication) program was created to promote health using the existing communication networks. Other organizations were gradually incorporated into the process of health promotion, with training sessions to convert members into a network for health communication. PMID:12178224

  1. Microbially driven TLR5-dependent signaling governs distal malignant progression through tumor-promoting inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Melanie R; Stephen, Tom L; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Allegrezza, Michael J; Tesone, Amelia J; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Brencicova, Eva; Escovar-Fadul, Ximena; Nguyen, Jenny M; Cadungog, Mark G; Zhang, Rugang; Salatino, Mariana; Tchou, Julia; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R

    2015-01-12

    The dominant TLR5(R392X) polymorphism abrogates flagellin responses in >7% of humans. We report that TLR5-dependent commensal bacteria drive malignant progression at extramucosal locations by increasing systemic IL-6, which drives mobilization of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Mechanistically, expanded granulocytic MDSCs cause γδ lymphocytes in TLR5-responsive tumors to secrete galectin-1, dampening antitumor immunity and accelerating malignant progression. In contrast, IL-17 is consistently upregulated in TLR5-unresponsive tumor-bearing mice but only accelerates malignant progression in IL-6-unresponsive tumors. Importantly, depletion of commensal bacteria abrogates TLR5-dependent differences in tumor growth. Contrasting differences in inflammatory cytokines and malignant evolution are recapitulated in TLR5-responsive/unresponsive ovarian and breast cancer patients. Therefore, inflammation, antitumor immunity, and the clinical outcome of cancer patients are influenced by a common TLR5 polymorphism. PMID:25533336

  2. MICROBIAL DRIVEN TLR5-DEPENDENT SIGNALING GOVERNS DISTAL MALIGNANT PROGRESSION THROUGH TUMOR-PROMOTING INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Stephen, Tom L.; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Allegrezza, Michael J.; Tesone, Amelia J.; Perales-Puchalt, Alfredo; Brencicova, Eva; Escovar-Fadul, Ximena; Nguyen, Jenny M.; Cadungog, Mark G.; Zhang, Rugang; Salatino, Mariana; Tchou, Julia; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2014-01-01

    The dominant TLR5R392X polymorphism abrogates flagellin responses in >7% of humans. We report that TLR5-dependent commensal bacteria drive malignant progression at extra-mucosal locations by increasing systemic IL-6, which drives mobilization of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Mechanistically, expanded granulocytic MDSCs cause γδ lymphocytes in TLR5-responsive tumors to secrete galectin-1, dampening anti-tumor immunity and accelerating malignant progression. In contrast, IL-17 is consistently up-regulated in TLR5-unresponsive tumor-bearing mice, but only accelerates malignant progression in IL-6-unresponsive tumors. Importantly, depletion of commensal bacteria abrogates TLR5-dependent differences in tumor growth. Contrasting differences in inflammatory cytokines and malignant evolution are recapitulated in TLR5-responsive/unresponsive ovarian and breast cancer patients. Therefore, inflammation, anti-tumor immunity and the clinical outcome of cancer patients are influenced by a common TLR5 polymorphism. PMID:25533336

  3. COMMONALITIES IN METABOLISM OF ARSENICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elucidating the pathway of inorganic arsenic metabolism shows that some of methylated arsenicals formed as intermediates and products are reactive and toxic species. Hence, methylated arsenicals likely mediate at least some of the toxic and carcinogenic effects associated with e...

  4. MicroRNA-135b Promotes Cancer Progression by Acting as a Downstream Effector of Oncogenic Pathways in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valeri, Nicola; Braconi, Chiara; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Murgia, Claudio; Lampis, Andrea; Paulus-Hock, Viola; Hart, Jonathan R.; Ueno, Lynn; Grivennikov, Sergei I.; Lovat, Francesca; Paone, Alessio; Cascione, Luciano; Sumani, Khlea M.; Veronese, Angelo; Fabbri, Muller; Carasi, Stefania; Alder, Hansjuerg; Lanza, Giovanni; Gafa’, Roberta; Moyer, Mary P.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Cordero, Julia; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Frankel, Wendy L.; Rugge, Massimo; Fassan, Matteo; Groden, Joanna; Vogt, Peter K.; Karin, Michael; Sansom, Owen J.; Croce, Carlo M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary MicroRNA deregulation is frequent in human colorectal cancers (CRCs), but little is known as to whether it represents a bystander event or actually drives tumor progression in vivo. We show that miR-135b overexpression is triggered in mice and humans by APC loss, PTEN/PI3K pathway deregulation, and SRC overexpression and promotes tumor transformation and progression. We show that miR-135b upregulation is common in sporadic and inflammatory bowel disease-associated human CRCs and correlates with tumor stage and poor clinical outcome. Inhibition of miR-135b in CRC mouse models reduces tumor growth by controlling genes involved in proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis. We identify miR-135b as a key downsteam effector of oncogenic pathways and a potential target for CRC treatment. PMID:24735923

  5. MicroRNA-135b promotes cancer progression by acting as a downstream effector of oncogenic pathways in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Valeri, Nicola; Braconi, Chiara; Gasparini, Pierluigi; Murgia, Claudio; Lampis, Andrea; Paulus-Hock, Viola; Hart, Jonathan R; Ueno, Lynn; Grivennikov, Sergei I; Lovat, Francesca; Paone, Alessio; Cascione, Luciano; Sumani, Khlea M; Veronese, Angelo; Fabbri, Muller; Carasi, Stefania; Alder, Hansjuerg; Lanza, Giovanni; Gafa', Roberta; Moyer, Mary P; Ridgway, Rachel A; Cordero, Julia; Nuovo, Gerard J; Frankel, Wendy L; Rugge, Massimo; Fassan, Matteo; Groden, Joanna; Vogt, Peter K; Karin, Michael; Sansom, Owen J; Croce, Carlo M

    2014-04-14

    MicroRNA deregulation is frequent in human colorectal cancers (CRCs), but little is known as to whether it represents a bystander event or actually drives tumor progression in vivo. We show that miR-135b overexpression is triggered in mice and humans by APC loss, PTEN/PI3K pathway deregulation, and SRC overexpression and promotes tumor transformation and progression. We show that miR-135b upregulation is common in sporadic and inflammatory bowel disease-associated human CRCs and correlates with tumor stage and poor clinical outcome. Inhibition of miR-135b in CRC mouse models reduces tumor growth by controlling genes involved in proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis. We identify miR-135b as a key downsteam effector of oncogenic pathways and a potential target for CRC treatment. PMID:24735923

  6. Cancer Stem-like Cells Act via Distinct Signaling Pathways in Promoting Late Stages of Malignant Progression.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Diz, Victoria; Simón-Extremera, Pilar; Bernat-Peguera, Adrià; de Sostoa, Jana; Urpí, Maria; Penín, Rosa M; Sidelnikova, Diana Pérez; Bermejo, Oriol; Viñals, Joan Maria; Rodolosse, Annie; González-Suárez, Eva; Moruno, Antonio Gómez; Pujana, Miguel Ángel; Esteller, Manel; Villanueva, Alberto; Viñals, Francesc; Muñoz, Purificación

    2016-03-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSC) play key roles in long-term tumor propagation and metastasis, but their dynamics during disease progression are not understood. Tumor relapse in patients with initially excised skin squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) is characterized by increased metastatic potential, and SCC progression is associated with an expansion of CSC. Here, we used genetically and chemically-induced mouse models of skin SCC to investigate the signaling pathways contributing to CSC function during disease progression. We found that CSC regulatory mechanisms change in advanced SCC, correlating with aggressive tumor growth and enhanced metastasis. β-Catenin and EGFR signaling, induced in early SCC CSC, were downregulated in advanced SCC. Instead, autocrine FGFR1 and PDGFRα signaling, which have not been previously associated with skin SCC CSC, were upregulated in late CSC and promoted tumor growth and metastasis, respectively. Finally, high-grade and recurrent human skin SCC recapitulated the signaling changes observed in advanced mouse SCC. Collectively, our findings suggest a stage-specific switch in CSC regulation during disease progression that could be therapeutically exploited by targeting the PDGFR and FGFR1 pathways to block relapse and metastasis of advanced human skin SCC. PMID:26719534

  7. Knockdown of TWIST1 enhances arsenic trioxide- and ionizing radiation-induced cell death in lung cancer cells by promoting mitochondrial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Sung-Keum; Kim, Jae-Hee; Choi, Ha-Na; Choe, Tae-Boo; Hong, Seok-Il; Yi, Jae-Youn; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Lee, Hyun-Gyu; Lee, Yun-Han; Park, In-Chul

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Knockdown of TWIST1 enhanced ATO- and IR-induced cell death in NSCLCs. • Intracellular ROS levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA. • TWIST1 siRNA induced MMP loss and mitochondrial fragmentation. • TWIST1 siRNA upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. - Abstract: TWIST1 is implicated in the process of epithelial mesenchymal transition, metastasis, stemness, and drug resistance in cancer cells, and therefore is a potential target for cancer therapy. In the present study, we found that knockdown of TWIST1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) enhanced arsenic trioxide (ATO)- and ionizing radiation (IR)-induced cell death in non-small-cell lung cancer cells. Interestingly, intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were increased in cells treated with TWIST1 siRNA and further increased by co-treatment with ATO or IR. Pretreatment of lung cancer cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine markedly suppressed the cell death induced by combined treatment with TWIST1 siRNA and ATO or IR. Moreover, treatment of cells with TWIST1 siRNA induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and significantly increased mitochondrial fragmentation (fission) and upregulated the fission-related proteins FIS1 and DRP1. Collectively, our results demonstrate that siRNA-mediated TWIST1 knockdown induces mitochondrial dysfunction and enhances IR- and ATO-induced cell death in lung cancer cells.

  8. Factors that Promote Progression in Schools Functioning as Professional Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leclerc, Martine; Moreau, Andre C.; Dumouchel, Catherine; Sallafranque-St-Louis, Francois

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to identify factors that influence the functioning of a school working as a Professional Learning Community (PLC) and to analyze the links between these factors and the school's progression. This research was developed within the context of an interpretative research paradigm. The primary data collection tool…

  9. Arsenic and chromium in drinking water promote tumorigenesis in a mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model and the potential mechanism is ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Mandal, Ardhendu K.; Saito, Hiroshi; Pulliam, Joseph F.; Lee, Eun Y.; Ke, Zun-Ji; Lu, Jian; Ding, Songze; Li, Li; Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas; Evers, B. Mark; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin

    2012-07-01

    Exposure to carcinogenic metals, such as trivalent arsenic [As(III)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], through drinking water is a major global public health problem and is associated with various cancers. However, the mechanism of their carcinogenicity remains unclear. In this study, we used azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS)-induced mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model to investigate their tumorigenesis. Our results demonstrate that exposure to As(III) or Cr(VI), alone or in combination, together with AOM/DSS pretreatment has a promotion effect, increasing the colorectal tumor incidence, multiplicity, size, and grade, as well as cell inflammatory response. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry revealed that As(III) or Cr(VI) treatment alone significantly changed the density of proteins. The expression of β-catenin and phospho-GSK was increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Concomitantly, the expression of NADPH oxidase1 (NOX1) and the level of 8-OHdG were also increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, were decreased. Similarly, in an in vitro system, exposure of CRL-1807 to carcinogenic metals increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, the expression of β-catenin, phospho-GSK, and NOX1. Inhibition of ROS generation by addition of SOD or catalase inhibited β-catenin expression and activity. Our study provides a new animal model to study the carcinogenicity of As(III) and Cr(VI) and suggests that As(III) and Cr(VI) promote colorectal cancer tumorigenesis, at least partly, through ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Carcinogenic metals in drinking water promote colorectal tumor formation in vivo. ► Carcinogenic metals induce β-catenin activation in vivo and in vitro. ► ROS generation induced by carcinogenic metals mediated β-catenin activation.

  10. DNMT3B7 Expression Promotes Tumor Progression to a More Aggressive Phenotype in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brambert, Patrick R.; Kelpsch, Daniel J.; Hameed, Rabia; Desai, Charmi V.; Calafiore, Gianfranco; Godley, Lucy A.; Raimondi, Stacey L.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation, have been shown to promote breast cancer progression. However, the mechanism by which cancer cells acquire and maintain abnormal DNA methylation is not well understood. We have previously identified an aberrant splice form of a DNA methyltransferase, DNMT3B7, expressed in virtually all cancer cell lines but at very low levels in normal cells. Furthermore, aggressive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells have been shown to express increased levels of DNMT3B7 compared to poorly invasive MCF-7 cells, indicating that DNMT3B7 may have a role in promoting a more invasive phenotype. Using data gathered from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we show that DNMT3B7 expression is increased in breast cancer patient tissues compared to normal tissue. To determine the mechanism by which DNMT3B7 was functioning in breast cancer cells, two poorly invasive breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and T-47D, were stably transfected with a DNMT3B7 expression construct. Expression of DNMT3B7 led to hypermethylation and down-regulation of E-cadherin, altered localization of β-catenin, as well as increased adhesion turnover, cell proliferation, and anchorage-independent growth. The novel results presented in this study suggest a role for DNMT3B7 in the progression of breast cancer to a more aggressive state and the potential for future development of novel therapeutics. PMID:25607950

  11. NMU signaling promotes endometrial cancer cell progression by modulating adhesion signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ting-Yu; Wu, Fang-Ju; Chang, Chia-Lin; Li, Zhongyou; Luo, Ching-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Neuromedin U (NMU) was originally named based on its strong uterine contractile activity, but little is known regarding its signaling/functions in utero. We identified that NMU and one of its receptors, NMUR2, are not only present in normal uterine endometrium but also co-expressed in endometrial cancer tissues, where the NMU level is correlated with the malignant grades and survival of patients. Cell-based assays further confirmed that NMU signaling can promote cell motility and proliferation of endometrial cancer cells derived from grade II tumors. Activation of NMU pathway in these endometrial cancer cells is required in order to sustain expression of various adhesion molecules, such as CD44 and integrin alpha1, as well as production of their corresponding extracellular matrix ligands, hyaluronan and collagen IV; it also increased the activity of SRC and its downstream proteins RHOA and RAC1. Thus, it is concluded that NMU pathway positively controls the adhesion signaling-SRC-Rho GTPase axis in the tested endometrial cancer cells and that changes in cell motility and proliferation can occur when there is manipulation of NMU signaling in these cells either in vitro or in vivo. Intriguingly, this novel mechanism also explains how NMU signaling promotes the EGFR-driven and TGFβ receptor-driven mesenchymal transitions. Through the above axis, NMU signaling not only can promote malignancy of the tested endometrial cancer cells directly, but also helps these cells to become more sensitive to niche growth factors in their microenvironment. PMID:26849234

  12. NMU signaling promotes endometrial cancer cell progression by modulating adhesion signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ting-Yu; Wu, Fang-Ju; Chang, Chia-Lin; Li, Zhongyou; Luo, Ching-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Neuromedin U (NMU) was originally named based on its strong uterine contractile activity, but little is known regarding its signaling/functions in utero. We identified that NMU and one of its receptors, NMUR2, are not only present in normal uterine endometrium but also co-expressed in endometrial cancer tissues, where the NMU level is correlated with the malignant grades and survival of patients. Cell-based assays further confirmed that NMU signaling can promote cell motility and proliferation of endometrial cancer cells derived from grade II tumors. Activation of NMU pathway in these endometrial cancer cells is required in order to sustain expression of various adhesion molecules, such as CD44 and integrin alpha1, as well as production of their corresponding extracellular matrix ligands, hyaluronan and collagen IV; it also increased the activity of SRC and its downstream proteins RHOA and RAC1. Thus, it is concluded that NMU pathway positively controls the adhesion signaling-SRC-Rho GTPase axis in the tested endometrial cancer cells and that changes in cell motility and proliferation can occur when there is manipulation of NMU signaling in these cells either in vitro or in vivo. Intriguingly, this novel mechanism also explains how NMU signaling promotes the EGFR-driven and TGFβ receptor-driven mesenchymal transitions. Through the above axis, NMU signaling not only can promote malignancy of the tested endometrial cancer cells directly, but also helps these cells to become more sensitive to niche growth factors in their microenvironment. PMID:26849234

  13. Arsenic removal from flowing irrigation water in bangladesh: impacts of channel properties.

    PubMed

    Lineberger, Ethan M; Badruzzaman, A Borhan M; Ali, M Ashraf; Polizzotto, Matthew L

    2013-11-01

    Across Bangladesh, dry-season irrigation with arsenic-contaminated well water is loading arsenic onto rice paddies, leading to increased arsenic concentrations in plants, diminished crop yields, and increased human health risks. As irrigation water flows through conveyance channels between wells and rice fields, arsenic concentrations change over space and time, indicating that channels may provide a location for removing arsenic from solution. However, few studies have systematically evaluated the processes controlling arsenic concentrations in irrigation channels, limiting the ability to manipulate these systems and enhance arsenic removal from solution. The central goal of this study was to quantify how channel design affected removal of dissolved arsenic from flowing irrigation water. Field experiments were conducted in Bangladesh using a chemically constant source of arsenic-contaminated irrigation water and an array of constructed channels with varying geometries. The resulting hydraulic conditions affected the quantity of arsenic removed from solution within the channels by promoting known hydrogeochemical processes. Channels three times the width of control channels removed ∼3 times the mass of arsenic over 32 min of flowing conditions, whereas negligible arsenic removal was observed in tarp-lined channels, which prevented soil-water contact. Arsenic removal from solution was ∼7 times higher in a winding, 200-m-long channel than in the straight, 45-m-long control channels. Arsenic concentrations were governed by oxidative iron-arsenic coprecipitation within the water column, sorption to soils, and phosphate competition. Collectively, these results suggest that better design and management of irrigation channels may play a part in arsenic mitigation strategies for rice fields in Southern Asia. PMID:25602413

  14. Dissolution of Arsenic Minerals Mediated by Dissimilatory Arsenate Reducing Bacteria: Estimation of the Physiological Potential for Arsenic Mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Lukasz, Drewniak; Liwia, Rajpert; Aleksandra, Mantur; Aleksandra, Sklodowska

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was characterization of the isolated dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the context of their potential for arsenic removal from primary arsenic minerals through reductive dissolution. Four strains, Shewanella sp. OM1, Pseudomonas sp. OM2, Aeromonas sp. OM4, and Serratia sp. OM17, capable of anaerobic growth with As (V) reduction, were isolated from microbial mats from an ancient gold mine. All of the isolated strains: (i) produced siderophores that promote dissolution of minerals, (ii) were resistant to dissolved arsenic compounds, (iii) were able to use the dissolved arsenates as the terminal electron acceptor, and (iii) were able to use copper minerals containing arsenic minerals (e.g., enargite) as a respiratory substrate. Based on the results obtained in this study, we postulate that arsenic can be released from some As-bearing polymetallic minerals (such as copper ore concentrates or middlings) under reductive conditions by dissimilatory arsenate reducers in indirect processes. PMID:24724102

  15. Dissolution of arsenic minerals mediated by dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria: estimation of the physiological potential for arsenic mobilization.

    PubMed

    Lukasz, Drewniak; Liwia, Rajpert; Aleksandra, Mantur; Aleksandra, Sklodowska

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was characterization of the isolated dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the context of their potential for arsenic removal from primary arsenic minerals through reductive dissolution. Four strains, Shewanella sp. OM1, Pseudomonas sp. OM2, Aeromonas sp. OM4, and Serratia sp. OM17, capable of anaerobic growth with As (V) reduction, were isolated from microbial mats from an ancient gold mine. All of the isolated strains: (i) produced siderophores that promote dissolution of minerals, (ii) were resistant to dissolved arsenic compounds, (iii) were able to use the dissolved arsenates as the terminal electron acceptor, and (iii) were able to use copper minerals containing arsenic minerals (e.g., enargite) as a respiratory substrate. Based on the results obtained in this study, we postulate that arsenic can be released from some As-bearing polymetallic minerals (such as copper ore concentrates or middlings) under reductive conditions by dissimilatory arsenate reducers in indirect processes. PMID:24724102

  16. Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression through suppressing E-cadherin expression.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yaqin; Wang, Nan; Liang, Hongwei; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    It is generally regarded that E-cadherin is downregulated during tumorigenesis via Snail/Slug-mediated E-cadherin transcriptional reduction. However, this transcriptional suppressive mechanism cannot explain the failure of producing E-cadherin protein in metastatic breast cancer cells after overexpressing E-cadherin mRNA. Here we reveal a novel mechanism that E-cadherin is post-transcriptionally regulated by Slug-promoted miR-221, which serves as an additional blocker for E-cadherin expression in metastatic tumor cells. Profiling the predicted E-cadherin-targeting miRNAs in breast cancer tissues and cells showed that miR-221 was abundantly expressed in breast tumor and metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and its level was significantly higher in breast tumor or MDA-MB-231 cells than in distal non-tumor tissue and low-metastatic MCF-7 cells, respectively. MiR-221, which level inversely correlated with E-cadherin level in breast cancer cells, targeted E-cadherin mRNA open reading frame (ORF) and suppressed E-cadherin protein expression. Depleting or increasing miR-221 level in breast cancer cells induced or decreased E-cadherin protein level, leading to suppressing or promoting tumor cell progression, respectively. Moreover, miR-221 was specifically upregulated by Slug but not Snail. TGF-β treatment enhanced Slug activity and thus increased miR-221 level in MCF-7 cells. In summary, our results provide the first evidence that Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression via reducing E-cadherin expression. PMID:27174021

  17. Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression through suppressing E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yaqin; Wang, Nan; Liang, Hongwei; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    It is generally regarded that E-cadherin is downregulated during tumorigenesis via Snail/Slug-mediated E-cadherin transcriptional reduction. However, this transcriptional suppressive mechanism cannot explain the failure of producing E-cadherin protein in metastatic breast cancer cells after overexpressing E-cadherin mRNA. Here we reveal a novel mechanism that E-cadherin is post-transcriptionally regulated by Slug-promoted miR-221, which serves as an additional blocker for E-cadherin expression in metastatic tumor cells. Profiling the predicted E-cadherin-targeting miRNAs in breast cancer tissues and cells showed that miR-221 was abundantly expressed in breast tumor and metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and its level was significantly higher in breast tumor or MDA-MB-231 cells than in distal non-tumor tissue and low-metastatic MCF-7 cells, respectively. MiR-221, which level inversely correlated with E-cadherin level in breast cancer cells, targeted E-cadherin mRNA open reading frame (ORF) and suppressed E-cadherin protein expression. Depleting or increasing miR-221 level in breast cancer cells induced or decreased E-cadherin protein level, leading to suppressing or promoting tumor cell progression, respectively. Moreover, miR-221 was specifically upregulated by Slug but not Snail. TGF-β treatment enhanced Slug activity and thus increased miR-221 level in MCF-7 cells. In summary, our results provide the first evidence that Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression via reducing E-cadherin expression. PMID:27174021

  18. Ubiquitin ligase UBE3C promotes melanoma progression by increasing epithelial-mesenchymal transition in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Li; Yi, Xue-Mei; Chen, Jia; Chen, Fu-Juan; Lou, Wei; Gao, Yun-Lu; Zhou, Jing; Su, Li-Na; Xu, Xin; Lu, Jia-Qing; Ma, Jun; Yu, Ning; Ding, Yang-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer, exhibiting extensive local invasion and early distant metastasis. Aberrant expression of ubiquitin-protein ligase E3C (UBE3C) plays a key role in tumor development and progression. In the present study, we analyzed UBE3C expression in samples of cancerous and normal skin tissue. Levels of UBE3C expression were much higher in primary and metastatic melanoma tissues than in normal skin, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma or basal cell carcinoma. Melanoma cells overexpressing UBE3C frequently exhibited a mesenchymal phenotype, including reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and expression of the mesenchymal marker vimentin. Knockdown of UBE3C expression in melanoma cells significantly suppressed melanoma growth and progression. Furthermore, silencing UBE3C led to increased E-cadherin expression and decreased vimentin and Snail1 expression. Thus UBE3C promotes melanoma progression, possibly by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition in melanoma cells. Inhibiting UBE3C activity may suppress melanoma invasion and metastasis and may represent a targeted therapeutic approach. PMID:26894856

  19. ELK1 is up-regulated by androgen in bladder cancer cells and promotes tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Aljarah, Ali Kadhim; Ide, Hiroki; Li, Yi; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Netto, George J.; Zheng, Yichun; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about biological significance of ELK1, a transcriptional factor that activates downstream targets including c-fos proto-oncogene, in bladder cancer. Recent preclinical evidence also suggests the involvement of androgen receptor (AR) signaling in bladder cancer progression. In this study, we aim to investigate the functions of ELK1 in bladder cancer growth and their regulation by AR signals. Immunohistochemistry in bladder tumor specimens showed that the levels of phospho-ELK1 (p-ELK1) expression were significantly elevated in urothelial neoplasms, compared with non-neoplastic urothelium tissues, and were also correlated with AR positivity. Patients with p-ELK1-positive non-muscle-invasive and muscle-invasive tumors had significantly higher risks for tumor recurrence and progression, respectively. In AR-positive bladder cancer cell lines, dihydrotestosterone treatment increased ELK1 expression (mRNA, protein) and its nuclear translocation, ELK1 transcriptional activity, and c-fos expression, which was restored by an anti-androgen hydroxyflutamide. ELK1 silencing via short hairpin RNA (shRNA) resulted in decreases in cell viability/colony formation, and cell migration/invasion as well as an increase in apoptosis. Importantly, ELK1 appears to require activated AR to regulate bladder cancer cell proliferation, but not cell migration. Androgen also failed to significantly induce AR transactivation in ELK1-knockdown cells. In accordance with our in vitro findings, ELK1-shRNA expression considerably retarded tumor formation as well as its growth in xenograft-bearing male mice. Our results suggest that ELK1 plays an important role in bladder tumorigenesis and cancer progression, which is further induced by AR activation. Accordingly, ELK1 inhibition, together with AR inactivation, has the potential of being a therapeutic approach for bladder cancer. PMID:26342199

  20. Circulating low IL-23: IL-35 cytokine ratio promotes progression associated with poor prognosisin breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanghui; Liang, Yanfang; Guan, Xin; Chen, Hui; Liu, Qiankun; Lin, Bihua; Chen, Can; Huang, Mingyuan; Chen, Jianan; Wu, Weiquan; Liang, Yi; Zhou, Keyuan; Zeng, Jincheng

    2016-01-01

    The interleukin (IL)-12 family, composed of heterodimeric cytokines including IL-12 (formed by IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 subunits), IL-23 (formed by IL-23p19 and IL-12p40 subunits), IL-27 (formed by IL-27p28 and EBI3 subunits) and IL-35 (formed by IL-12p35 and EBI3 subunits), establishes a link between innate and adaptive immunity that involves different immune effector cells and cytokines to tumors. However, the role of IL-12 family in breast cancer (BC) progression and prognosis remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated evidence indicating that EBI3, IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 but not IL-23p19 or IL-27p28 were highly expressed in BC tissues, suggested that tumor derived EBI3, IL-12p35 and IL-12p40 were associated with tumor progression. Circulating IL-12 and IL-23 low expressed, but IL-27 and IL-35 high expressed in BC patients, especially circulating IL-23 associated with IL-35 to mediate BC tumor resection. Ki-67, p53 and EGFR expression on BC tissues, as well as CA125, CA153 and CA199 levels on BC bloods increased when circulating IL-23: IL-35 ratio decreased. Together, for the first time, our data suggest that circulating IL-23: IL-35 ratio may be an important indicator association with BC progression and prognosis. However, further research should be carried out to assess the implications of circulating IL-23: IL-35 ratio in a larger sample size. PMID:27347332

  1. Architectural Transcription Factor HMGI(Y) Promotes Tumor Progression and Mesenchymal Transition of Human Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Raymond; Edberg, Dale D.; Li, Ying

    2001-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that overexpression or aberrant expression of the HMGI(Y) family of architectural transcription factors is frequently associated with both neoplastic transformation of cells and metastatic tumor progression. Little is known, however, about the molecular roles played by the HMGI(Y) proteins in these events. Here we report that human breast epithelial cells harboring tetracycline-regulated HMGI(Y) transgenes acquire the ability to form both primary and metastatic tumors in nude mice only when the transgenes are actively expressed. Unexpectedly, the HMG-Y, rather than the HMG-I, isoform of these proteins is the most effective elicitor of both neoplastic transformation and metastatic progression in vivo. Furthermore, expression of either antisense or dominant-negative HMGI(Y) constructs inhibits both the rate of proliferation of tumor cells and their ability to grow anchorage independently in soft agar. Array analysis of transcription profiles demonstrates that the HMG-I and HMG-Y isoform proteins each modulate the expression of distinctive constellations of genes known to be involved in signal transduction, cell proliferation, tumor initiation, invasion, migration, induction of angiogenesis, and colonization. Immunohistochemical analyses of tumors formed in nude mice indicate that many have undergone an epithelial-mesenchymal transition in vivo. Together, these findings demonstrate that overexpression of the HMGI(Y) proteins, more specifically, the HMG-Y isoform protein, is causally associated with both neoplastic transformation and metastatic progression and suggest that induction of integrins and their signaling pathways may play significant molecular roles in these biological events. PMID:11134344

  2. Architectural transcription factor HMGI(Y) promotes tumor progression and mesenchymal transition of human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Reeves, R; Edberg, D D; Li, Y

    2001-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that overexpression or aberrant expression of the HMGI(Y) family of architectural transcription factors is frequently associated with both neoplastic transformation of cells and metastatic tumor progression. Little is known, however, about the molecular roles played by the HMGI(Y) proteins in these events. Here we report that human breast epithelial cells harboring tetracycline-regulated HMGI(Y) transgenes acquire the ability to form both primary and metastatic tumors in nude mice only when the transgenes are actively expressed. Unexpectedly, the HMG-Y, rather than the HMG-I, isoform of these proteins is the most effective elicitor of both neoplastic transformation and metastatic progression in vivo. Furthermore, expression of either antisense or dominant-negative HMGI(Y) constructs inhibits both the rate of proliferation of tumor cells and their ability to grow anchorage independently in soft agar. Array analysis of transcription profiles demonstrates that the HMG-I and HMG-Y isoform proteins each modulate the expression of distinctive constellations of genes known to be involved in signal transduction, cell proliferation, tumor initiation, invasion, migration, induction of angiogenesis, and colonization. Immunohistochemical analyses of tumors formed in nude mice indicate that many have undergone an epithelial-mesenchymal transition in vivo. Together, these findings demonstrate that overexpression of the HMGI(Y) proteins, more specifically, the HMG-Y isoform protein, is causally associated with both neoplastic transformation and metastatic progression and suggest that induction of integrins and their signaling pathways may play significant molecular roles in these biological events. PMID:11134344

  3. SCF, Regulated by HIF-1α, Promotes Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Cell Progression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Ren, He; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Xiuchao; Lang, Mingxiao; Liu, Jingcheng; Gao, Song; Zhao, Xiao; Sheng, Jun; Yuan, Zhanna; Hao, Jihui

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) both have important functions in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). This study aims to analyze the expression and clinicopathological significance of SCF and HIF-1α in PDAC specimens and explore the molecular mechanism at PDAC cells in vitro and in vivo. We showed that the expression of SCF was significantly correlated with HIF-1α expression via Western blot, PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay, and luciferase assay analysis. The SCF level was also correlated with lymph node metastasis and the pathological tumor node metastasis (pTNM) stage in PDAC samples. The SCF higher-expression group had significantly lower survival rates than the SCF lower-expression group (p<0.05). Hypoxia up-regulated the expression of SCF through the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in PDAC cells at the protein and RNA levels. When HIF-1α was knocked down by RNA interference, the SCF level decreased significantly. Additionally, ChIP and luciferase results demonstrated that HIF-1α can directly bind to the hypoxia response element (HRE) region of the SCF promoter and activate the SCF transcription under hypoxia. The results of colony formation, cell scratch, and transwell migration assay showed that SCF promoted the proliferation and invasion of PANC-1 cells under hypoxia. Furthermore, the down-regulated ability of cell proliferation and invasion following HIF-1α knockdown was rescued by adding exogenous SCF under hypoxia in vitro. Finally, when the HIF-1α expression was inhibited by digoxin, the tumor volume and the SCF level decreased, thereby proving the relationship between HIF-1α and SCF in vivo. In conclusion, SCF is an important factor for the growth of PDAC. In our experiments, we proved that SCF, a downstream gene of HIF-1α, can promote the development of PDAC under hypoxia. Thus, SCF might be a potential therapeutic target for PDAC. PMID:25799412

  4. Nuclear vasohibin-2 promotes cell proliferation by inducing G0/G1 to S phase progression.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qianqian; Zhou, Jia; Tu, Min; Xue, Xiaofeng; Li, Zhanjun; Lu, Zipeng; Wei, Jishu; Song, Guoxin; Chen, Jianmin; Guo, Feng; Jiang, Kuirong; Miao, Yi; Gao, Wentao

    2015-09-01

    As a member of the vasohibin (VASH2) family, VASH2 is localized intracellularly as a nuclear and cytoplasmic type. Cytoplasmic VASH2 is associated with carcinoma angiogenesis and malignant transformation and promotes cancer growth. However, the function of nuclear VASH2 has yet to be investigated. The aim of the present study was to detect the nuclear VASH2 expression profile in human organs and tissues by protein microarray technique. To examine the function of nuclear VASH2, we analyzed the relationship between nuclear VASH2 and Ki-67, and stably constructed VASH2 overexpression and knockdown in LO2 and HepG2 cell lines, based on a previous study in hepatic cells. The study was conducted using bromodeoxyuridine, immunofluorescent staining, western blot analysis and flow cytometry. Nuclear VASH2 was highly expressed in actively dividing cells in normal and cancer tissues. There was a significant positive correlation between nuclear VASH2 and Ki-67, indicating that nuclear VASH2 positively correlated with cell proliferation in normal and cancer tissues. The bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) proliferation test showed that nuclear VASH2 increased the S-phase population and promoted cell proliferation, while VASH2 knockdown reduced BrdU absorbance. Cell cycle analysis revealed that nuclear VASH2 overexpression increased the S-phase population in LO2 and HepG2 cells, while nuclear VASH2 knockdown reduced the S-phase population and increased the G0/G1 population. The findings of this study challenge the classic view of VASH2, which was previously reported as an angiogenesis factor. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, these results are the first clinical data indicating that nuclear VASH2, but not cytoplasmic VASH2, promotes cell proliferation by driving the cell cycle from the G0/G1 to S phase. PMID:26177649

  5. S100A4 promotes endometrial cancer progress through epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulation.

    PubMed

    Hua, Teng; Liu, Shuangge; Xin, Xiaoyan; Cai, Liqiong; Shi, Rui; Chi, Shuqi; Feng, Dilu; Wang, Hongbo

    2016-06-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a major cause of endometrial cancer (EC) to initiate invasion and metastasis. S100A4, a calcium-binding protein, is implicated in multistage of tumorigenesis and tumor progression. The correlation between S100A4 and EMT in EC is still unclear. This study was aimed to clarify the role of S100A4 in EC and the relationship between S100A4 expression and EMT markers. S100A4, E-cadherin, and vimentin were detected in tissues of EC patients (n=50) by immunohistochemistry. The impact of S100A4 on EC cell proliferation, migration and invasion was investigated via RNA interference, and the correlation between S100A4 and EMT markers were also explored. The results showed that S100A4 was significantly increased in epithelial cells of EC compared with the normal endometrium (P<0.05), also S100A4 level was positively related to age (P=0.021), histological grade (P<0.001), and lymph node metastasis (P<0.001). Additionally, silencing of S100A4 remarkably attenuated EC cell migration and invasion. Significant morphological change accompanied with the downregulation of EMT markers, E-cadherin and vimentin were also observed. Aberrant S100A4 expression may predict EC progression and play an important role in regulating EC cell invasion through EMT regulation. Hence, S100A4 is a promising therapeutic target. PMID:27109209

  6. Radiation promotes colorectal cancer initiation and progression by inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, S B; Bozeman, R G; Kaisani, A; Kim, W; Zhang, L; Richardson, J A; Wright, W E; Shay, J W

    2016-06-30

    Proton radiotherapy is becoming more common as protons induce more precise DNA damage at the tumor site with reduced side effects to adjacent normal tissues. However, the long-term biological effects of proton irradiation in cancer initiation compared with conventional photon irradiation are poorly characterized. In this study, using a human familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome susceptible mouse model, we show that whole-body irradiation with protons are more effective in inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses (SIRs), which are involved in colon cancer initiation and progression. After proton irradiation, a subset of SIR genes (Troy, Sox17, Opg, Faim2, Lpo, Tlr2 and Ptges) and a gene known to be involved in invasiveness (Plat), along with the senescence-associated gene (P19Arf), are markedly increased. Following these changes, loss of Casein kinase Iα and induction of chronic DNA damage and TP53 mutations are increased compared with X-ray irradiation. Proton irradiation also increases the number of colonic polyps, carcinomas and invasive adenocarcinomas. Pretreatment with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, 2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid-ethyl amide (CDDO-EA), reduces proton irradiation-associated SIR and tumorigenesis. Thus exposure to proton irradiation elicits significant changes in colorectal cancer initiation and progression that can be mitigated using CDDO-EA. PMID:26477319

  7. Deficiency for the cysteine protease cathepsin L promotes tumor progression in mouse epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Dennemärker, J; Lohmüller, T; Mayerle, J; Tacke, M; Lerch, MM; Coussens, LM; Peters, C; Reinheckel, T

    2011-01-01

    To define a functional role for the endosomal/lysosomal cysteine protease cathepsin L (Ctsl) during squamous carcinogenesis, we generated mice harboring a constitutive Ctsl deficiency in addition to epithelial expression of the human papillomavirus type 16 oncogenes (human cytokeratin 14 (K14)–HPV16).We found enhanced tumor progression and metastasis in the absence of Ctsl. As tumor progression in K14–HPV16 mice is dependent on inflammation and angiogenesis, we examined immune cell infiltration and vascularization without finding any effect of the Ctsl genotype. In contrast, keratinocyte-specific transgenic expression of cathepsin V, the human orthologue of mouse Ctsl, in otherwise Ctsl-deficient K14–HPV16 mice restored the phenotype observed in the control HPV16 skin. To better understand this phenotype at the molecular level, we measured several oncogenic signal transduction pathways in primary keratinocytes on stimulation with keratinocyte-conditioned cell culture medium. We found increased activation of protein kinase B/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in protease-deficient cells, especially if treated with media conditioned by Ctsl-deficient keratinocytes. Similarly, the level of active GTP-Ras was increased in Ctsl-deficient epidermis. We conclude that Ctsl is critical for the termination of growth factor signaling in the endosomal/lysosomal compartment of keratinocytes and, therefore, functions as an anti-tumor protease. PMID:20023699

  8. Deletion of Interstitial Genes between TMPRSS2 and ERG Promotes Prostate Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Linn, Douglas E; Penney, Kathryn L; Bronson, Roderick T; Mucci, Lorelei A; Li, Zhe

    2016-04-01

    TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions that occur frequently in human prostate cancers can be generated either through insertional chromosomal rearrangement or by intrachromosomal deletion. Genetically, a key difference between these two mechanisms is that the latter results in deletion of a ∼3-Mb interstitial region containing genes with unexplored roles in prostate cancer. In this study, we characterized two mouse models recapitulating TMPRSS2-ERG insertion or deletion events in the background of prostate-specific PTEN deficiency. We found that only the mice that lacked the interstitial region developed prostate adenocarcinomas marked by poor differentiation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Mechanistic investigations identified several interstitial genes, including Ets2 and Bace2, whose reduced expression correlated in the gene homologs in human prostate cancer with biochemical relapse and lethal disease. Accordingly, PTEN-deficient mice with prostate-specific knockout of Ets2 exhibited marked progression of prostate adenocarcinomas that was partly attributed to activation of MAPK signaling. Collectively, our findings established that Ets2 is a tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer, and its loss along with other genes within the TMPRSS2-ERG interstitial region contributes to disease progression. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1869-81. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26880803

  9. Radiation Promotes Colorectal Cancer Initiation and Progression by Inducing Senescence-Associated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bum; Bozeman, Ronald; Kaisani, Aadil; Kim, Wanil; Zhang, Lu; Richardson, James A.; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy is becoming more common since protons induce more precise DNA damage at the tumor site with reduced side effects to adjacent normal tissues. However, the long-term biological effects of proton irradiation in cancer initiation compared to conventional photon irradiation are poorly characterized. In this study, using a human familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome susceptible mouse model, we show that whole body irradiation with protons are more effective in inducing senescence-associated inflammatory responses (SIR) which are involved in colon cancer initiation and progression. After proton irradiation, a subset of SIR genes (Troy, Sox17, Opg, Faim2, Lpo, Tlr2 and Ptges) and a gene known to be involved in invasiveness (Plat), along with the senescence associated gene (P19Arf) are markedly increased. Following these changes loss of Casein kinase Iα (CKIα) and induction of chronic DNA damage and TP53 mutations are increased compared to x-ray irradiation. Proton irradiation also increases the number of colonic polyps, carcinomas and invasive adenocarcinomas. Pretreatment with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, CDDO-EA, reduces proton irradiation associated SIR and tumorigenesis. Thus, exposure to proton irradiation elicits significant changes in colorectal cancer initiation and progression that can be mitigated using CDDO-EA. PMID:26477319

  10. Arsenic Concentrations and Speciation in Shellfishes from Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, C.; Yoon, H.

    2005-12-01

    Speciation of arsenic has received significant attention over the past 20 years in both mechanistic and exposure assessment research. Because the toxicity of arsenic is related to its oxidation state and its chemical forms, the determination of the total arsenic contents in a sample is not adequate to allow its impact on living organisms to be estimated. The inorganic arsenic species, arsenite (As3+) and arsenate (As5+), have been classified as carcinogenic and the methylated forms, monomethyl arsonic acid (MMA) and dimethyl arsinic acid (DMA) have recently been identified as cancer promoters. The highly methylated compounds like as arsenobetaine (AsB) and arsenocholine (AsC) are considered to be nontoxic. Although organisms in marine environment contain high amounts of total arsenic (ppm level), it is not usually present as inorganic arsenic or simple methylated forms well known as one of the toxic species. Arsenobetaine is the dominant species in marine animals and arsenosugars are most abundant in marine algae. This study aims to clarify those arsenic species present in the whole body of eleven different shellfishes from Korea. And those arsenic species were separated and measured by characterization using high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) coupled system. The separation of arsenic species was achieved on anion exchange column and cation exchange column using phosphate and pyridine eluent, respectively. The ultrasonic extraction was employed for extraction of arsenic from whole body of shellfishes. The method was validated by analyzing three certified reference materials (DORM-2, TORT-2, 1566b). Total arsenic concentrations ranged from 0.1 mg/kg dry mass to 21.7 mg/kg dry mass. Most marine shellfishes contained higher arsenobetaine and arsenocholine with the exception of two shellfishes living in river. The lower amounts of inorganic arsenic species were also found in the some sample extracts

  11. β-Arrestin1 promotes the progression of chronic myeloid leukaemia by regulating BCR/ABL H4 acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, R; Li, K; Qi, X; Zhou, X; Wang, L; Zhang, P; Zou, L

    2014-01-01

    Background: β-Arrestins are scaffold proteins that interact with various cellular signals. Although β-arrestin2 mediates the initiation and progression of myeloid leukaemia, the critical role of β-arrestin1 in the chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) is still unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the essential function of β-arrestin1 in CML. Methods: The expressions of β-arrestin1 and BCR/ABL in CML patients, animal models and K562 cells were measured by RT–PCR, immunofluorescence and western blotting. The effect of β-arrestin1 on CML animal models and K562 cells by colony formation, MTT and survival analysis were assessed. BCR/ABL H4 acetylation was analysed through the use of Chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) -on-chip and confirmed by ChIP respectively. Co-immunoprecipitation and confocal were examined for the binding of β-arrestin1 with enhancer of zeste homologue 2 (EZH2). Results: The higher expression of β-arrestin1 is positively correlated with clinical phases of CML patients. Depletion of β-arrestin1 decelerates progression of K562 and primary cells, and increases survival of CML mice. Importantly, silenced β-arrestin1 results in the decrease of BCR/ABL H4 acetylation level in K562 cells. Further data illustrate that nuclear β-arrestin1 binds to EZH2 to mediate BCR/ABL acetylation and thus regulates cell progression in K562 cells and the survival of CML mice. Conclusions: Our findings reveal a novel function of β-arrestin1 binding to EZH2 to promote CML progression by regulating BCR/ABL H4 acetylation. PMID:24937675

  12. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the methylation of arsenicals in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The biotransformation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) involves methylation by an arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT), yielding methyl arsenic (MA), dimethyl arsenic (DMA), and trimethylarsenic (TMA). To identify molecular mechanisms that coordinate arsenic biotra...

  13. Arsenic (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Natural Disasters Drinking Water Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses Water Cycle Water Treatment Arsenic The Basics Arsenic is an element that exists naturally in the Earth’s crust. Small amounts of arsenic are found in some rock, soil, water, and air. When arsenic combines with ...

  14. ARSENIC REMOVAL USING ADSORPTION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recently promulgated Arsenic Rule will require that many new drinking water systems treat their water to remove arsenic. Many groundwaters that have arsenic in their source water will likely consider adsorption technology as a reasonable approach to remove arsenic. Adsorptio...

  15. ADSORPTION TECHNOLOGIES FOR ARSENIC REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recently promulgated Arsenic Rule will require that many new drinking water systems treat their water to remove arsenic. Many groundwaters that have arsenic in their source water will likely consider adsorption technology as a reasonable approach to remove arsenic. Adsorptio...

  16. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Eddy L.

    1981-01-01

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5 Mev neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  17. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  18. ARSENIC AND OHIO UTILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information on arsenic removal drinking water treatment systems that are likely to be used in Ohio for arsenic removal. Because most Ohio ground water contain significant amounts of iron, iron removal processes will play a major role in treating Ohio gro...

  19. An update on arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Malachowski, M.E. )

    1990-09-01

    Arsenic poisoning is more than just a medical curiosity. Cases of acute and chronic intoxication continue to occur in the United States. Much is now known about the biochemical mechanisms of injury, which has led to a rational basis for therapy. Most importantly, however, the clinician must stay alert to correctly diagnose and treat cases of arsenic poisoning.23 references.

  20. Disruption of brain zinc homeostasis promotes the pathophysiological progress of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin-Bo; Wang, Zhan-You

    2016-06-01

    Zinc is abundant in the brain, where it plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and in learning; however, excessive zinc is toxic to neuronal cells, and dyshomeostasis of zinc in the brain is a contributing factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Deposition of zinc has been detected in senile plaques in the form of zinc-Aβ (β-amyloid) complexes. Recent studies have demonstrated that zinc exposure to the brain enhances β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression, amyloidogenic APP cleavage and plaque burden. Furthermore, alterations in zinc transporters, which are responsible for zinc homeostasis, occur in AD human brain and transgenic mouse models. These suggest that abnormal brain zinc homeostasis is involved in the pathophysiological progress of AD. PMID:26883958

  1. Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1997-12-31

    The goal of this research is to develop a methodology for analyzing the reactivity of cyclic olefins in situ in a high temperature and high pressure infrared cell. Cyclic olefins, such as 1,4,5,8-tetrahydronaphthalene (isotetralin) and 1,4,5,8,9,10-hexahydroanthracene (HHA), are highly reactive donor compounds that readily donate their hydrogen to coal and model acceptors when heated to temperatures of 200{degrees}C and above. These donors are active donors in the low severity liquefaction of coal at 350{degrees}C as shown in the research performed in this project. The infrared studies are being performed in a high temperature infrared cell that was obtained from AABSPEC. Modifications to that cell have been made and have been reported in previous progress reports.

  2. High level of BRD4 promotes non-small cell lung cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shu-Qiang; Jin, Chun; Xu, Jian-Jun; Ding, Jian-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Bromodomain containing protein 4 (BRD4), a member of the bromodomain and extra terminal domain (BET) protein family, has been shown to play important roles in tumor progression. However, its role in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still largely unknown. Here, we found that BRD4 expression was significantly upregulated in NSCLC tissues and NSCLC cell lines with higher invasion and metastasis potentials. Suppression of BRD4 expression in NSCLC cell lines impaired cell invasion, inhibited cell proliferation, and accelerated cell apoptosis. Clinically, we observed that the BRD4 level was significantly related to histological type, lymph node metastasis, tumor stage and differentiation. More importantly, high level of BRD4 was closely correlated with the poor prognosis of NSCLC patients. Therefore, our study suggests that BRD4 is one of the major contributors to the invasion-prone phenotype of NSCLC, and a potential therapeutic target of NSCLC. PMID:26840017

  3. Basement membrane proteins promote progression of intraepithelial neoplasia in 3-dimensional models of human stratified epithelium.

    PubMed

    Andriani, Frank; Garfield, Jackie; Fusenig, Norbert E; Garlick, Jonathan A

    2004-01-20

    We have developed novel 3-dimensional in vitro and in vivo tissue models that mimic premalignant disease of human stratified epithelium in order to analyze the stromal contribution of extracellular matrix and basement membrane proteins to the progression of intraepithelial neoplasia. Three-dimensional, organotypic cultures were grown either on a de-epidermalized human dermis with pre-existing basement membrane components on its surface (AlloDerm), on a Type I collagen gel that lacked basement membrane proteins or on polycarbonate membranes coated with purified extracellular matrix proteins. When tumor cells (HaCaT-II4) were mixed with normal keratinocytes (4:1/normals:HaCaT-II4), tumor cells selectively attached, persisted and proliferated at the dermal-epidermal interface in vitro and generated dysplastic tissues when transplanted to nude mice only when grown in the presence of the AlloDerm substrate. This stromal interface was permissive for tumor cell attachment due to the rapid assembly of structured basement membrane. When tumor cells were mixed with normal keratinocytes and grown on polycarbonate membranes coated with individual extracellular matrix or basement membrane components, selective attachment and significant intraepithelial expansion occurred only on laminin 1 and Type IV collagen-coated membranes. This preferential adhesion of tumor cells restricted the synthesis of laminin 5 to basal cells where it was deposited in a polarized distribution. Western blot analysis revealed that tumor cell attachment was not due to differences in the synthesis or processing of laminin 5. Thus, intraepithelial progression towards premalignant disease is dependent on the selective adhesion of cells with malignant potential to basement membrane proteins that provide a permissive template for their persistence and expansion. PMID:14648700

  4. Foxp3 promoter polymorphism (rs3761548) in breast cancer progression: a study from India.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Parveen; Ramachander, V R Vinish; Maruthi, G; Nalini, S; Latha, K Prasanna; Murthy, T S R

    2014-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most common female neoplasm that drives the transformation of normal mammary epithelial cells into highly malignant derivatives. Forkhead Box Protein3 (Foxp3), a tumor suppressor/immunomodulatory gene, which controls the function of Treg cells and oncogenes is down regulated in breast cancer. The main aim of the present study is to evaluate the potential influence of Foxp3-3279 C>A polymorphism (rs3761548) and -2383 C>T polymorphism (rs3761549) in 202 breast cancer patients and 130 normal healthy women of Indian origin. The genotypes were determined using ARMS-PCR for rs3761548 and PCR-RFLP method for rs3761549 using specific primers. The results revealed lack of association of these two polymorphisms with breast cancer susceptibility. However, with respect to AA genotype of rs3761548, we found highly significant association with the advanced stage (T3-4) of the tumor (OR = 3.90; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.56-9.70; p = 0.03). Stratified data also revealed an association of homozygous mutant genotype with advanced stage of tumor in premenopausal women (OR = 4.56; 95% CI = 1.07-19.38; p = 0.04) with disease duration of <6 months (OR =  .10; 95% CI = 1.80-20.50; p = 0.002) suggestive of modulating effect of rs3761548 in tumor progression. We conclude that Foxp3 rs37161548 has a potential to be a polymorphic marker for tumor progression in premenopausal breast cancer patients in Indian women. PMID:24338714

  5. Carcinoembryonic antigen promotes colorectal cancer progression by targeting adherens junction complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bajenova, Olga; Chaika, Nina; Tolkunova, Elena; Davydov-Sinitsyn, Alexander; Gapon, Svetlana; Thomas, Peter; O’Brien, Stephen

    2014-06-10

    Oncomarkers play important roles in the detection and management of human malignancies. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, CEACAM5) and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) are considered as independent tumor markers in monitoring metastatic colorectal cancer. They are both expressed by cancer cells and can be detected in the blood serum. We investigated the effect of CEA production by MIP101 colorectal carcinoma cell lines on E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) protein complexes. No direct interaction between E-cadherin and CEA was detected; however, the functional relationships between E-cadherin and its AJ partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins were impaired. We discovered a novel interaction between CEA and beta-catenin protein in the CEA producing cells. It is shown in the current study that CEA overexpression alters the splicing of p120 catenin and triggers the release of soluble E-cadherin. The influence of CEA production by colorectal cancer cells on the function of E-cadherin junction complexes may explain the link between the elevated levels of CEA and the increase in soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Elevated level of CEA increases the release of soluble E-cadherin during the progression of colorectal cancer. • CEA over-expression alters the binding preferences between E-cadherin and its partners: α-, β- and p120 catenins in adherens junction complexes. • CEA produced by colorectal cancer cells interacts with beta-catenin protein. • CEA over-expression triggers the increase in nuclear beta-catenin. • CEA over-expression alters the splicing of p120 catenin protein.

  6. ANGPTL4 deficiency in haematopoietic cells promotes monocyte expansion and atherosclerosis progression

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Binod; Rotllan, Noemi; Araldi, Elisa; Ramírez, Cristina M.; He, Shun; Chousterman, Benjamin G.; Fenn, Ashley M.; Wanschel, Amarylis; Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Warrier, Nikhil; Martín-Ventura, Jose L.; Swirski, Filip K.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Lipid accumulation in macrophages has profound effects on macrophage gene expression and contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we report that angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is the most highly upregulated gene in foamy macrophages and it's absence in haematopoietic cells results in larger atherosclerotic plaques, characterized by bigger necrotic core areas and increased macrophage apoptosis. Furthermore, hyperlipidemic mice deficient in haematopoietic ANGPTL4 have higher blood leukocyte counts, which is associated with an increase in the common myeloid progenitor (CMP) population. ANGPTL4-deficient CMPs have higher lipid raft content, are more proliferative and less apoptotic compared with the wild-type (WT) CMPs. Finally, we observe that ANGPTL4 deficiency in macrophages promotes foam cell formation by enhancing CD36 expression and reducing ABCA1 localization in the cell surface. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that haematopoietic ANGPTL4 deficiency increases atherogenesis through regulating myeloid progenitor cell expansion and differentiation, foam cell formation and vascular inflammation. PMID:27460411

  7. ANGPTL4 deficiency in haematopoietic cells promotes monocyte expansion and atherosclerosis progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Binod; Rotllan, Noemi; Araldi, Elisa; Ramírez, Cristina M.; He, Shun; Chousterman, Benjamin G.; Fenn, Ashley M.; Wanschel, Amarylis; Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Warrier, Nikhil; Martín-Ventura, Jose L.; Swirski, Filip K.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Lipid accumulation in macrophages has profound effects on macrophage gene expression and contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we report that angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is the most highly upregulated gene in foamy macrophages and it's absence in haematopoietic cells results in larger atherosclerotic plaques, characterized by bigger necrotic core areas and increased macrophage apoptosis. Furthermore, hyperlipidemic mice deficient in haematopoietic ANGPTL4 have higher blood leukocyte counts, which is associated with an increase in the common myeloid progenitor (CMP) population. ANGPTL4-deficient CMPs have higher lipid raft content, are more proliferative and less apoptotic compared with the wild-type (WT) CMPs. Finally, we observe that ANGPTL4 deficiency in macrophages promotes foam cell formation by enhancing CD36 expression and reducing ABCA1 localization in the cell surface. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that haematopoietic ANGPTL4 deficiency increases atherogenesis through regulating myeloid progenitor cell expansion and differentiation, foam cell formation and vascular inflammation.

  8. Protein N-arginine methyltransferase 5 promotes the tumor progression and radioresistance of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Daoke; Liang, Tiansong; Gu, Yue; Zhao, Yulin; Shi, Yonggang; Zuo, Xiaoxiao; Cao, Qinchen; Yang, Ya; Kan, Quancheng

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy resistance is the main cause of the the poor prognosis of some nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients. Yet, the exact mechanism is still elusive. In the present study, we explored the clinical and biological role of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) in NPC. Our results revealed that PRMT5 was overexpressed in NPC tissues when compared with that in adjacent non-tumor tissues by quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting. High expression of PRMT5 was correlated with adverse outcomes of NPC patients as determined by the scoring of a tissue microarray. Silencing of PRMT5 promoted the radiosensitivity of 5-8F and CNE2 cells as determined by cell proliferation and colony formation assays. Furthermore, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) was identified as one of the downstream targets of PRMT5, and the silencing of PRMT5 decreased the mRNA and protein levels of FGFR3 in the 5-8F and CNE2 cells. Silencing of FGFR3 induced similar phenotypes as the inhibition of PRMT5, and re-expression of FGFR3 in 5-8F/shPRMT5 and CNE2/shPRMT5 cells restored the proliferation and colony formation ability induced by irradiation exposure. Our results indicate that PRMT5 is a marker of poor prognosis in NPC patients. PRMT5 promoted the radioresistance of NPC cells via targeting FGFR3, at least partly if not totally. PRMT5 and its downstream effector FGFR3 may be potential targets for anticancer strategy. PMID:26708443

  9. SPOP promotes tumor progression via activation of β-catenin/TCF4 complex in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wencai; Zhou, Jiancheng; Deng, Zhuo; Gao, Yang; Cheng, Yongyi

    2016-09-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer, about one third of the cases are diagnosed at advanced stages with metastases and effective treatments for metastatic RCC are lacking. The molecular events supporting RCC progression remain poorly understood. SPOP, an E3 ubiquitin ligase component, was recently showed to sufficiently promote RCC tumorigenesis, however, other potential functions of SPOP in RCC have not been studied. In the present investigation, by assessing the immunohistochemical staining of SPOP in urological tumors, we found the protein was highly expressed in RCC, in particular, it was specifically expressed in clear cell RCC. cDNA microarray data showed that SPOP mRNA level was significantly increased in clear cell RCC compared to normal kidney tissues, which might be the result of the abnormal DNA copy number of this gene. More interestingly, SPOP was positive in tumors with local invasion or metastasis, and it was associated with tumor recurrence-free survival of clear cell RCC patients. Further in vitro assays demonstrated that SPOP drove RCC epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and promoted cell invasion. Mechanistically, SPOP enhanced β-catenin protein expression as well as its nuclear translocation, and elevated TCF4 expression. Both β-catenin and TCF4 upregulated the critical EMT-inducing transcription factor ZEB1, which functioned as an effector of β-catenin/TCF4 signaling in RCC invasion. These data identified SPOP as a new marker and prognostic factor for clear cell RCC, and its functions provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms of RCC progression, in which SPOP appears to be an EMT activator. PMID:27572476

  10. Constitutive activation of MET signaling impairs myogenic differentiation of rhabdomyosarcoma and promotes its development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Szewczyk, Barbara; Adamus, Tomasz; Lukasiewicz, Ewa; Miekus, Katarzyna; Majka, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a soft tissue sarcoma, which may originate from impaired differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Expression of MET receptor is elevated in alveolar RMS subtype (ARMS) which is associated with worse prognosis, compared to embryonal RMS (ERMS). Forced differentiation of ARMS cells diminishes MET level and, as shown previously, MET silencing induces differentiation of ARMS. In ERMS cells introduction of TPR-MET oncogene leads to an uncontrolled overstimulation of the MET receptor downstream signaling pathways. In vivo, tumors formed by those cells in NOD-SCID mice display inhibited differentiation, enhanced proliferation, diminished apoptosis and increased infiltration of neutrophils. Consequently, tumors grow significantly faster and they display enhanced ability to metastasize to lungs and to vascularize due to elevated VEGF, MMP9 and miR-378 expression. In vitro, TPR-MET ERMS cells display enhanced migration, chemotaxis and invasion toward HGF and SDF-1. Introduction of TPR-MET into MSC increases survival and may induce expression of early myogenic factors depending on the genetic background, and it blocks terminal differentiation of skeletal myoblasts. To conclude, our results suggest that activation of MET signaling may cause defects in myogenic differentiation leading to rhabdomyosarcoma development and progression. PMID:26384300

  11. Constitutive activation of MET signaling impairs myogenic differentiation of rhabdomyosarcoma and promotes its development and progression.

    PubMed

    Skrzypek, Klaudia; Kusienicka, Anna; Szewczyk, Barbara; Adamus, Tomasz; Lukasiewicz, Ewa; Miekus, Katarzyna; Majka, Marcin

    2015-10-13

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a soft tissue sarcoma, which may originate from impaired differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Expression of MET receptor is elevated in alveolar RMS subtype (ARMS) which is associated with worse prognosis, compared to embryonal RMS (ERMS). Forced differentiation of ARMS cells diminishes MET level and, as shown previously, MET silencing induces differentiation of ARMS. In ERMS cells introduction of TPR-MET oncogene leads to an uncontrolled overstimulation of the MET receptor downstream signaling pathways. In vivo, tumors formed by those cells in NOD-SCID mice display inhibited differentiation, enhanced proliferation, diminished apoptosis and increased infiltration of neutrophils. Consequently, tumors grow significantly faster and they display enhanced ability to metastasize to lungs and to vascularize due to elevated VEGF, MMP9 and miR-378 expression. In vitro, TPR-MET ERMS cells display enhanced migration, chemotaxis and invasion toward HGF and SDF-1. Introduction of TPR-MET into MSC increases survival and may induce expression of early myogenic factors depending on the genetic background, and it blocks terminal differentiation of skeletal myoblasts. To conclude, our results suggest that activation of MET signaling may cause defects in myogenic differentiation leading to rhabdomyosarcoma development and progression. PMID:26384300

  12. Loss of Snail2 favors skin tumor progression by promoting the recruitment of myeloid progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Villarejo, Ana; Molina-Ortiz, Patricia; Montenegro, Yenny; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Morales, Saleta; Santos, Vanesa; Gridley, Tom; Pérez-Moreno, Mirna A.; Peinado, Héctor; Portillo, Francisco; Calés, Carmela; Cano, Amparo

    2015-01-01

    Snail2 is a zinc finger transcription factor involved in driving epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Snail2 null mice are viable, but display defects in melanogenesis, gametogenesis and hematopoiesis, and are markedly radiosensitive. Here, using mouse genetics, we have studied the contributions of Snail2 to epidermal homeostasis and skin carcinogenesis. Snail2 −/− mice presented a defective epidermal terminal differentiation and, unexpectedly, an increase in number, size and malignancy of tumor lesions when subjected to the two-stage mouse skin chemical carcinogenesis protocol, compared with controls. Additionally, tumor lesions from Snail2 −/− mice presented a high inflammatory component with an elevated percentage of myeloid precursors in tumor lesions that was further increased in the presence of the anti-inflammatory agent dexamethasone. In vitro studies in Snail2 null keratinocytes showed that loss of Snail2 leads to a decrease in proliferation indicating a non-cell autonomous role for Snail2 in the skin carcinogenic response observed in vivo. Bone marrow (BM) cross-reconstitution assays between Snail2 wild-type and null mice showed that Snail2 absence in the hematopoietic system fully reproduces the tumor behavior of the Snail2 null mice and triggers the accumulation of myeloid precursors in the BM, blood and tumor lesions. These results indicate a new role for Snail2 in preventing myeloid precursors recruitment impairing skin chemical carcinogenesis progression. PMID:25784375

  13. β-Catenin Signaling Increases during Melanoma Progression and Promotes Tumor Cell Survival and Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Sinnberg, Tobias; Menzel, Moritz; Ewerth, Daniel; Sauer, Birgit; Schwarz, Michael; Schaller, Martin; Garbe, Claus; Schittek, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Beta-catenin plays an important role in embryogenesis and carcinogenesis by controlling either cadherin-mediated cell adhesion or transcriptional activation of target gene expression. In many types of cancers nuclear translocation of beta-catenin has been observed. Our data indicate that during melanoma progression an increased dependency on the transcriptional function of beta-catenin takes place. Blockade of beta-catenin in metastatic melanoma cell lines efficiently induces apoptosis, inhibits proliferation, migration and invasion in monolayer and 3-dimensional skin reconstructs and decreases chemoresistance. In addition, subcutaneous melanoma growth in SCID mice was almost completely inhibited by an inducible beta-catenin knockdown. In contrast, the survival of benign melanocytes and primary melanoma cell lines was less affected by beta-catenin depletion. However, enhanced expression of beta-catenin in primary melanoma cell lines increased invasive capacity in vitro and tumor growth in the SCID mouse model. These data suggest that beta-catenin is an essential survival factor for metastatic melanoma cells, whereas it is dispensable for the survival of benign melanocytes and primary, non-invasive melanoma cells. Furthermore, beta-catenin increases tumorigenicity of primary melanoma cell lines. The differential requirements for beta-catenin signaling in aggressive melanoma versus benign melanocytic cells make beta-catenin a possible new target in melanoma therapy. PMID:21858114

  14. Endothelial progenitor cells promote tumor growth and progression by enhancing new vessel formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin; Liu, Huan-Qiu; Li, Ji; Liu, Xiao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Tumor growth and progression require new blood vessel formation to deliver nutrients and oxygen for further cell proliferation and to create a neovascular network exit for tumor cell metastasis. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are a bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cell population that circulates in the peripheral circulation and homes to the tumor bed to participate in new blood vessel formation. In addition to structural support to nascent vessels, these cells can also regulate the angiogenic process by paracrine secretion of a number of proangiogenic growth factors and cytokines, thus playing a crucial role in tumor neovascularization and development. Inhibition of EPC-mediated new vessel formation may be a promising therapeutic strategy in tumor treatment. EPC-mediated neovascularization is a complex process that includes multiple steps and requires a series of cytokines and modulators, thus understanding the underlying mechanisms may provide anti-neovasculogenesis targets that may be blocked for the prevention of tumor development. The present review stresses the process and contribution of EPCs to the formation of new blood vessels in solid tumors, in an attempt to gain an improved understanding of the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms involved, and to provide a potential effective therapeutic target for cancer treatment. PMID:27446353

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 promotes tumor progression and metastasis of colorectal carcinoma cells by inhibiting antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Geom Seog; Jiang, Wen-Yi; Chi, Jin Hua; Jin, Hao; Park, Won-Chul; Sohn, Dong Hwan; Park, Pil-Hoon; Lee, Sung Hee

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is upregulated in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cells. However, the role of HO-1 in the metastatic potential of CRC remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the potential of HO-1 to control the antitumor immunity of CRC. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) plays an important role in the immune surveillance system. Hemin-induced HO-1 expression suppressed the expression of ICAM-1 in human CRC cells. HO-1 regulated ICAM-1 expression via tristetraprolin, an mRNA-binding protein, at the posttranscriptional level in CRC cells. The upregulated HO-1 expression in CRC cells markedly decreased the adhesion of peripheral blood mononuclear lymphocytes (PBMLs) to CRC cells and PBML-mediated cytotoxicity against CRC cells. Production of CXCL10, an effector T cell-recruiting chemokine, was significantly reduced by the increased HO-1 expression. The expression of the CXCL10 receptor, CXCR3, decreased significantly in PBMLs that adhered to CRC cells. HO-1 expression correlated negatively, although nonsignificantly, with ICAM-1 and CXCL10 expression in xenograft tumors. Taken together, our data suggest that HO-1 expression is functionally linked to the mediation of tumor progression and metastasis of CRC cells by inhibiting antitumor immunity. PMID:26087182

  16. KAP1 promotes proliferation and metastatic progression of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Addison, Joseph B.; Koontz, Colton; Fugett, James H.; Creighton, Chad J.; Chen, Dongquan; Farrugia, Mark K.; Padon, Renata R.; Voronkova, Maria A.; McLaughlin, Sarah L.; Livengood, Ryan H.; Lin, Chen-Chung; Ruppert, J. Michael; Pugacheva, Elena N.; Ivanov, Alexey V.

    2014-01-01

    KAP1 (TRIM28) is a transcriptional regulator in embryonic development that controls stem cell self-renewal, chromatin organization and the DNA damage response, acting as an essential co-repressor for KRAB family zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZNF). To gain insight into the function of this large gene family, we developed an antibody that recognizes the conserved zinc fingers linker region (ZnFL) in multiple KRAB-ZNF. Here we report that the expression of many KRAB-ZNF along with active SUMOlyated KAP1 is elevated widely in human breast cancers. KAP1 silencing in breast cancer cells reduced proliferation and inhibited the growth and metastasis of tumor xenografts. Conversely, KAP1 overexpression stimulated cell proliferation and tumor growth. In cells where KAP1 was silenced, we identified multiple downregulated genes linked to tumor progression and metastasis, including EREG/epiregulin, PTGS2/COX2, MMP1, MMP2 and CD44, along with downregulation of multiple KRAB-ZNF proteins. KAP1-dependent stabilization of KRAB-ZNF required direct interactions with KAP1. Together, our results show that KAP1-mediated stimulation of multiple KRAB-ZNF contributes to the growth and metastasis of breast cancer. PMID:25421577

  17. Loss of Snail2 favors skin tumor progression by promoting the recruitment of myeloid progenitors.

    PubMed

    Villarejo, Ana; Molina-Ortiz, Patricia; Montenegro, Yenny; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Morales, Saleta; Santos, Vanesa; Gridley, Tom; Pérez-Moreno, Mirna A; Peinado, Héctor; Portillo, Francisco; Calés, Carmela; Cano, Amparo

    2015-05-01

    Snail2 is a zinc finger transcription factor involved in driving epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Snail2 null mice are viable, but display defects in melanogenesis, gametogenesis and hematopoiesis, and are markedly radiosensitive. Here, using mouse genetics, we have studied the contributions of Snail2 to epidermal homeostasis and skin carcinogenesis. Snail2 (-/-) mice presented a defective epidermal terminal differentiation and, unexpectedly, an increase in number, size and malignancy of tumor lesions when subjected to the two-stage mouse skin chemical carcinogenesis protocol, compared with controls. Additionally, tumor lesions from Snail2 (-/-) mice presented a high inflammatory component with an elevated percentage of myeloid precursors in tumor lesions that was further increased in the presence of the anti-inflammatory agent dexamethasone. In vitro studies in Snail2 null keratinocytes showed that loss of Snail2 leads to a decrease in proliferation indicating a non-cell autonomous role for Snail2 in the skin carcinogenic response observed in vivo. Bone marrow (BM) cross-reconstitution assays between Snail2 wild-type and null mice showed that Snail2 absence in the hematopoietic system fully reproduces the tumor behavior of the Snail2 null mice and triggers the accumulation of myeloid precursors in the BM, blood and tumor lesions. These results indicate a new role for Snail2 in preventing myeloid precursors recruitment impairing skin chemical carcinogenesis progression. PMID:25784375

  18. LTPB2 acts as a prognostic factor and promotes progression of cervical adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yuan; Lu, Huan; Zhao, Danmei; Ou, Yangjun; Yu, Kang; Gu, Jiandong; Wang, Li; Jiang, Shuheng; Chen, Mo; Wang, Jinghao; Zhang, Rong; Xu, Congjian

    2015-01-01

    Latent transforming growth factor-beta-1 binding protein-2 (LTBP-2) is a member of the fibrillin/LTBP super family of extracellular matrix proteins, found to be overexpressed in certain malignant tumors. However, the clinical significance and biological role of LTBP-2 in cervical adenocarcinoma has remains unclear. We found that the expression of LTBP2 was higher in cervical adenocarcinoma than in normal cervical epithelial tissue as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Expression of LTBP2 is related to clinical stage, cervical tumor size, depth of cervical stromal invasion and lymph node metastasis. Knockdown of LTBP2 expression can inhibit the proliferation and migration of HeLa cells. Moreover, LTBP2 knockdown affected multiple tumor-related pathway genes including: the MAPK signaling pathway, the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway, receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and the P53 pathway. Taken together, this work suggests that LTBP2 may promote the development of cervical adenocarcinoma and serve as a prognostic factor in the clinical evaluation of patients with cervical adenocarcinoma. Our findings provide a new strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of cervical adenocarcinoma. PMID:26279753

  19. MiR-449a promotes breast cancer progression by targeting CRIP2

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei; Bruce, Jeff; Lee, Matthew; Yue, Shijun; Rowe, Matthew; Pintilie, Melania; Kogo, Ryunosuke; Bissey, Pierre-Antoine; Fyles, Anthony; Yip, Kenneth W.; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2016-01-01

    The identification of prognostic biomarkers and their underlying mechanisms of action remain of great interest in breast cancer biology. Using global miRNA profiling of 71 lymph node-negative invasive ductal breast cancers and 5 normal mammary epithelial tissues, we identified miR-449a to be highly overexpressed in the malignant breast tissue. Its expression was significantly associated with increased incidence of patient relapse, decreased overall survival, and decreased disease-free survival. In vitro, miR-449a promoted breast cancer cell proliferation, clonogenic survival, migration, and invasion. By utilizing a tri-modal in silico approach for target identification, Cysteine-Rich Protein 2 (CRIP2; a transcription factor) was identified as a direct target of miR-449a, corroborated using qRT-PCR, Western blot, and luciferase reporter assays. MDA-MB-231 cells stably transfected with CRIP2 demonstrated a significant reduction in cell viability, migration, and invasion, as well as decreased tumor growth and angiogenesis in mouse xenograft models. Our data revealed that overexpression of miR-449a suppresses CRIP2, which then affects the tumor vasculature, likely via NF-κB/p65 complex-mediated transcription of VEGF. These finding define an oncogenic function of miR-449a in human breast cancer, and highlight the importance of this pathway in driving aggressive behaviour. PMID:26934316

  20. Inflammatory monocytes promote progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and can be therapeutically targeted via CCR2

    PubMed Central

    Mojumdar, Kamalika; Liang, Feng; Giordano, Christian; Lemaire, Christian; Danialou, Gawiyou; Okazaki, Tatsuma; Bourdon, Johanne; Rafei, Moutih; Galipeau, Jacques; Divangahi, Maziar; Petrof, Basil J

    2014-01-01

    Myofiber necrosis and fibrosis are hallmarks of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), leading to lethal weakness of the diaphragm. Macrophages (MPs) are required for successful muscle regeneration, but the role of inflammatory monocyte (MO)-derived MPs in either promoting or mitigating DMD is unclear. We show that DMD (mdx) mouse diaphragms exhibit greatly increased expression of CCR2 and its chemokine ligands, along with inflammatory (Ly6Chigh) MO recruitment and accumulation of CD11bhigh MO-derived MPs. Loss-of-function of CCR2 preferentially reduced this CD11bhigh MP population by impeding the release of Ly6Chigh MOs from the bone marrow but not the splenic reservoir. CCR2 deficiency also helped restore the MP polarization balance by preventing excessive skewing of MPs toward a proinflammatory phenotype. These effects were linked to amelioration of histopathological features and increased muscle strength in the diaphragm. Chronic inhibition of CCR2 signaling by mutated CCL2 secreted from implanted mesenchymal stem cells resulted in similar improvements. These data uncover a previously unrecognized role of inflammatory MOs in DMD pathogenesis and indicate that CCR2 inhibition could offer a novel strategy for DMD management. PMID:25312642

  1. A health promotion logic model to review progress in HIV prevention in China.

    PubMed

    Nutbeam, Don; Padmadas, Sabu S; Maslovskaya, Olga; Wu, Zhiwei

    2015-06-01

    Using the theory and concepts of health promotion, this paper proposes a logic model for HIV/AIDS prevention and control which provides a structure for describing planned actions and predicted impacts/outcomes from comprehensive HIV prevention interventions. The potential usefulness of the model is examined by reviewing the evolution of HIV prevention and management in China, drawing on evidence from interventions reported from a mixture of study designs and formats. It reports that HIV interventions in China can be considered in two distinctive phases, before and after 2003 when China commenced its 'official' response to the HIV epidemic. The logic model was useful in comparing actions taken over these two periods highlighting the importance of political leadership in distinguishing between the two phases, and the continuing importance of systematic and broadly based public education and communication. We conclude that the logic model can not only be used as a planning model, but can also be applied retrospectively to assess successes and failures in national and local responses to HIV in complex social settings. PMID:23753059

  2. Structure and regulation of an archaebacterial promoter: An in vivo study. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, C.J.

    1993-12-31

    In the initial grant period the authors have devised an in vivo assay system for the analysis of gene expression in the halophilic archaea. This system has been used to analyzed the H. volcanii tRNALys promoter where it was found that the a 40 bp fragment carrying BoxA and BoxB sequences in sufficient for in vivo expression. Detailed analysis of the BoxA element indicates that the BoxA TA sequence is essential for efficient expression. Support for the hypothesis that all archaea share common transcriptional signals was obtained when a methanogen tRNAGln gene, with its associated BoxA sequence, was found to direct its own transcription in H. volcanii. In related experiments a eukaryotic RNA polymerase 3 terminator was found to act as a strong termination signal in H. volcanii. Sequence comparisons between this element and mapped RNA 3{prime} ends indicates that T-rich sequences may be important role in directing termination in vivo. Finally, in an attempt to establish a model system to study regulated gene expression, the authors have isolated a DNA fragment that encodes a heat shock inaudible transcript. This gene will not serve as a model for detailed studies of the mechanisms of gene expression in the archaea.

  3. The adhesion molecule NCAM promotes ovarian cancer progression via FGFR signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zecchini, Silvia; Bombardelli, Lorenzo; Decio, Alessandra; Bianchi, Marco; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Sanguineti, Fabio; Aletti, Giovanni; Maddaluno, Luigi; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth; Casadio, Chiara; Viale, Giuseppe; Colombo, Nicoletta; Giavazzi, Raffaella; Cavallaro, Ugo

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) is an aggressive neoplasm, which mainly disseminates to organs of the peritoneal cavity, an event mediated by molecular mechanisms that remain elusive. Here, we investigated the expression and functional role of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), a cell surface glycoprotein involved in brain development and plasticity, in EOC. NCAM is absent from normal ovarian epithelium but becomes highly expressed in a subset of human EOC, in which NCAM expression is associated with high tumour grade, suggesting a causal role in cancer aggressiveness. We demonstrate that NCAM stimulates EOC cell migration and invasion in vitro and promotes metastatic dissemination in mice. This pro-malignant function of NCAM is mediated by its interaction with fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). Indeed, not only FGFR signalling is required for NCAM-induced EOC cell motility, but targeting the NCAM/FGFR interplay with a monoclonal antibody abolishes the metastatic dissemination of EOC in mice. Our results point to NCAM-mediated stimulation of FGFR as a novel mechanism underlying EOC malignancy and indicate that this interplay may represent a valuable therapeutic target. PMID:21739604

  4. PIM1 regulates glycolysis and promotes tumor progression in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Leung, Carmen Oi-ning; Wong, Carmen Chak-lui; Fan, Dorothy Ngo-yin; Kai, Alan Ka-lun; Tung, Edmund Kwok-kwan; Xu, Iris Ming-jing; Ng, Irene Oi-lin; Lo, Regina Cheuk-lam

    2015-05-10

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is characteristically one of the most rapidly proliferating tumors which outgrows functional blood supply and results in regional oxygen deprivation. Overexpression of PIM1, a serine/threonine kinase, has been identified recently in human cancers. Knowledge on PIM1 in HCC is however, scarce. By immunohistochemical analysis on 56 human primary HCC samples, we observed overexpression of PIM1 in 39% of the cases. In two independent cohorts of paired primary and extra-hepatic metastatic HCC tissues, PIM1 expression was higher (p=0.002) in the extra-hepatic metastatic HCC tissues as compared with the corresponding primary HCCs. PIM1 was markedly up-regulated in multiple HCC cell lines in hypoxic condition (1% O2) versus normoxia (20% O2). Silencing of PIM1 suppressed HCC cell invasion in vitro as compared to non-target control, and decreased HCC cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth and metastatic potential in vivo. Knockdown of PIM1 significantly reduced glucose uptake by HCC cells and was associated with decreased levels of p-AKT and key molecules in the glycolytic pathway. Taken together, PIM1 is up-regulated by hypoxia in HCC and promotes tumor growth and metastasis through facilitating cancer cell glycolysis. Targeting PIM1 may have potential role in the management of HCC. PMID:25834102

  5. PFTK1 Promotes Gastric Cancer Progression by Regulating Proliferation, Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hua; Yang, Qichang; Cai, Jing; Wang, Qiuhong; Zhu, Junya; Shao, Mengting; Xiao, Jinzhang; Cao, Jie; Gu, Xiaodan; Zhang, Shusen; Wang, Yingying

    2015-01-01

    PFTK1, also known as PFTAIRE1, CDK14, is a novel member of Cdc2-related serine/threonine protein kinases. Recent studies show that PFTK1 is highly expressed in several malignant tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma, esophageal cancer, breast cancer, and involved in regulation of cell cycle, tumors proliferation, migration, and invasion that further influence the prognosis of tumors. However, the expression and physiological significance of PFTK1 in gastric cancer remain unclear. In this study, we analyzed the expression and clinical significance of PFTK1 by Western blot in 8 paired fresh gastric cancer tissues, nontumorous gastric mucosal tissues and immunohistochemistry on 161 paraffinembedded slices. High PFTK1 expression was correlated with the tumor grade, lymph node invasion as well as Ki-67. Through Cell Counting Kit (CCK)-8 assay, flow cytometry, colony formation, wound healing and transwell assays, the vitro studies demonstrated that PFTK1 overexpression promoted proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, while PFTK1 knockdown led to the opposite results. Our findings for the first time supported that PFTK1 might play an important role in the regulation of gastric cancer proliferation, migration and would provide a novel promising therapeutic strategy against human gastric cancer. PMID:26488471

  6. OTX1 promotes colorectal cancer progression through epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kun; Cai, Xin-Yi; Li, Qiang; Yang, Zhi-Bin; Xiong, Wei; Shen, Tao; Wang, Wei-Ya; Li, Yun-Feng

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • OTX1 is overexpression in colorectal cancer tissues. • Overexpression of OTX1 promotes colorectal cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. • Depletion of OTX1 inhibits colorectal cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. • Overexpression of OTX1 is linked to the EMT-like phenotype. - Abstract: Orthodenticle homeobox 1 (OTX1), a transcription factor containing a bicoid-like homeodomain, plays a role in brain and sensory organ development. In this study, we report that OTX1 is overexpressed in human colorectal cancer (CRC) and OTX1 overexpression is associated with higher stage. Functional analyses reveal that overexpression of OTX1 results in accumulation of CRC cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, whereas ablation of OTX1 expression significantly inhibits the proliferative and invasive capability of CRC cells in vitro. Together, our results indicate that OTX1 is involved in human colon carcinogenesis and may serve as a potential therapeutic target for human colorectal cancer.

  7. PFTK1 Promotes Gastric Cancer Progression by Regulating Proliferation, Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhu, Jia; Huang, Hua; Yang, Qichang; Cai, Jing; Wang, Qiuhong; Zhu, Junya; Shao, Mengting; Xiao, Jinzhang; Cao, Jie; Gu, Xiaodan; Zhang, Shusen; Wang, Yingying

    2015-01-01

    PFTK1, also known as PFTAIRE1, CDK14, is a novel member of Cdc2-related serine/threonine protein kinases. Recent studies show that PFTK1 is highly expressed in several malignant tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma, esophageal cancer, breast cancer, and involved in regulation of cell cycle, tumors proliferation, migration, and invasion that further influence the prognosis of tumors. However, the expression and physiological significance of PFTK1 in gastric cancer remain unclear. In this study, we analyzed the expression and clinical significance of PFTK1 by Western blot in 8 paired fresh gastric cancer tissues, nontumorous gastric mucosal tissues and immunohistochemistry on 161 paraffinembedded slices. High PFTK1 expression was correlated with the tumor grade, lymph node invasion as well as Ki-67. Through Cell Counting Kit (CCK)-8 assay, flow cytometry, colony formation, wound healing and transwell assays, the vitro studies demonstrated that PFTK1 overexpression promoted proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells, while PFTK1 knockdown led to the opposite results. Our findings for the first time supported that PFTK1 might play an important role in the regulation of gastric cancer proliferation, migration and would provide a novel promising therapeutic strategy against human gastric cancer. PMID:26488471

  8. Fcp1 phosphatase controls Greatwall kinase to promote PP2A-B55 activation and mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Della Monica, Rosa; Visconti, Roberta; Cervone, Nando; Serpico, Angela Flavia; Grieco, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    During cell division, progression through mitosis is driven by a protein phosphorylation wave. This wave namely depends on an activation-inactivation cycle of cyclin B-dependent kinase (Cdk) 1 while activities of major protein phosphatases, like PP1 and PP2A, appear directly or indirectly repressed by Cdk1. However, how Cdk1 inactivation is coordinated with reactivation of major phosphatases at mitosis exit still lacks substantial knowledge. We show here that activation of PP2A-B55, a major mitosis exit phosphatase, required the phosphatase Fcp1 downstream Cdk1 inactivation in human cells. During mitosis exit, Fcp1 bound Greatwall (Gwl), a Cdk1-stimulated kinase that phosphorylates Ensa/ARPP19 and converts these proteins into potent PP2A-B55 inhibitors during mitosis onset, and dephosphorylated it at Cdk1 phosphorylation sites. Fcp1-catalyzed dephosphorylation drastically reduced Gwl kinase activity towards Ensa/ARPP19 promoting PP2A-B55 activation. Thus, Fcp1 coordinates Cdk1 and Gwl inactivation to derepress PP2A-B55, generating a dephosphorylation switch that drives mitosis progression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10399.001 PMID:26653855

  9. Lysyl oxidase-like 2 represses Notch1 expression in the skin to promote squamous cell carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Martin, Alberto; Salvador, Fernando; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Floristán, Alfredo; Ruiz-Herguido, Cristina; Cuevas, Eva P; Morales, Saleta; Santos, Vanesa; Csiszar, Katalin; Dubus, Pierre; Haigh, Jody J; Bigas, Anna; Portillo, Francisco; Cano, Amparo

    2015-04-15

    Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) is involved in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes, including fibrosis and tumor progression, implicating intracellular and extracellular functions. To explore the specific in vivo role of LOXL2 in physiological and tumor contexts, we generated conditional gain- and loss-of-function mouse models. Germ-line deletion of Loxl2 promotes lethality in half of newborn mice mainly associated to congenital heart defects, while Loxl2 overexpression triggers male sterility due to epididymal dysfunction caused by epithelial disorganization, fibrosis and acute inflammation. Remarkably, when challenged to chemical skin carcinogenesis, Loxl2-overexpressing mice increased tumor burden and malignant progression, while Loxl2-deficient mice exhibit the opposite phenotypes. Loxl2 levels in premalignant tumors negatively correlate with expression of epidermal differentiation markers and components of the Notch1 pathway. We show that LOXL2 is a direct repressor of NOTCH1. Additionally, we identify an exclusive expression pattern between LOXL2 and members of the canonical NOTCH1 pathway in human HNSCC. Our data identify for the first time novel LOXL2 roles in tissue homeostasis and support it as a target for SCC therapy. PMID:25759215

  10. FBXO11 promotes ubiquitination of the Snail family of transcription factors in cancer progression and epidermal development.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yue; Shenoy, Anitha K; Doernberg, Samuel; Chen, Hao; Luo, Huacheng; Shen, Huangxuan; Lin, Tong; Tarrash, Miriam; Cai, Qingsong; Hu, Xin; Fiske, Ryan; Chen, Ting; Wu, Lizi; Mohammed, Kamal A; Rottiers, Veerle; Lee, Siu Sylvia; Lu, Jianrong

    2015-06-28

    The Snail family of transcription factors are core inducers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we show that the F-box protein FBXO11 recognizes and promotes ubiquitin-mediated degradation of multiple Snail family members including Scratch. The association between FBXO11 and Snai1 in vitro is independent of Snai1 phosphorylation. Overexpression of FBXO11 in mesenchymal cells reduces Snail protein abundance and cellular invasiveness. Conversely, depletion of endogenous FBXO11 in epithelial cancer cells causes Snail protein accumulation, EMT, and tumor invasion, as well as loss of estrogen receptor expression in breast cancer cells. Expression of FBXO11 is downregulated by EMT-inducing signals TGFβ and nickel. In human cancer, high FBXO11 levels correlate with expression of epithelial markers and favorable prognosis. The results suggest that FBXO11 sustains the epithelial state and inhibits cancer progression. Inactivation of FBXO11 in mice leads to neonatal lethality, epidermal thickening, and increased Snail protein levels in epidermis, validating that FBXO11 is a physiological ubiquitin ligase of Snail. Moreover, in C. elegans, the FBXO11 mutant phenotype is attributed to the Snail factors as it is suppressed by inactivation/depletion of Snail homologs. Collectively, these findings suggest that the FBXO11-Snail regulatory axis is evolutionarily conserved and critically governs carcinoma progression and mammalian epidermal development. PMID:25827072

  11. Pregnancy associated plasma protein-A links pregnancy and melanoma progression by promoting cellular migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Prithviraj, Prashanth; Anaka, Matthew; McKeown, Sonja J; Permezel, Michael; Walkiewicz, Marzena; Cebon, Jonathan; Behren, Andreas; Jayachandran, Aparna

    2015-06-30

    Melanoma is the most common cancer diagnosed in pregnant women and an aggressive course with poorer outcomes is commonly described during pregnancy or shortly after childbirth. The underlying mechanisms for this are not understood. Here, we report that melanoma migration, invasiveness and progression are promoted by Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein-A (PAPPA), a pregnancy-associated metalloproteinase produced by the placenta that increases the bioavailability of IGF1 by cleaving it from a circulating complex formed with IGFBP4. We show that PAPPA is widely expressed by metastatic melanoma tumors and is elevated in melanoma cells exhibiting mesenchymal, invasive and label-retaining phenotypes. Notably, inhibition of PAPPA significantly reduced invasion and migration of melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo within the embryonic chicken neural tube. PAPPA-enriched pregnancy serum treatment enhanced melanoma motility in vitro. Furthermore, we report that IGF1 can induce the phenotypic and functional effects of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in melanoma cells. In this study, we establish a clear relationship between a pregnancy-associated protein PAPPA, melanoma and functional effects mediated through IGF1 that provides a plausible mechanism for accelerated melanoma progression during pregnancy. This opens the possibility of targeting the PAPPA/IGF1 axis therapeutically. PMID:25940796

  12. FBXO11 promotes ubiquitination of the Snail family of transcription factors in cancer progression and epidermal development

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yue; Shenoy, Anitha K.; Doernberg, Samuel; Chen, Hao; Luo, Huacheng; Shen, Huangxuan; Lin, Tong; Tarrash, Miriam; Cai, Qingsong; Hu, Xin; Fiske, Ryan; Chen, Ting; Wu, Lizi; Mohammed, Kamal A.; Rottiers, Veerle; Lee, Siu Sylvia; Lu, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    The Snail family of transcription factors are core inducers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we show that the F-box protein FBXO11 recognizes and promotes ubiquitin-mediated degradation of multiple Snail family members including Scratch. The association between FBXO11 and Snai1 in vitro is independent of Snai1 phosphorylation. Overexpression of FBXO11 in mesenchymal cells reduces Snail protein abundance and cellular invasiveness. Conversely, depletion of endogenous FBXO11 in epithelial cancer cells causes Snail protein accumulation, EMT, and tumor invasion, as well as loss of estrogen receptor expression in breast cancer cells. Expression of FBXO11 is downregulated by EMT-inducing signals TGFβ and nickel. In human cancer, high FBXO11 levels correlate with expression of epithelial markers and favorable prognosis. The results suggest that FBXO11 sustains the epithelial state and inhibits cancer progression. Inactivation of FBXO11 in mice leads to neonatal lethality, epidermal thickening, and increased Snail protein levels in epidermis, validating that FBXO11 is a physiological ubiquitin ligase of Snail. Moreover, in C. elegans, the FBXO11 mutant phenotype is attributed to the Snail factors as it is suppressed by inactivation/depletion of Snail homologs. Collectively, these findings suggest that the FBXO11-Snail regulatory axis is evolutionarily conserved and critically governs carcinoma progression and mammalian epidermal development. PMID:25827072

  13. Lysyl oxidase-like 2 represses Notch1 expression in the skin to promote squamous cell carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Alberto; Salvador, Fernando; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Floristán, Alfredo; Ruiz-Herguido, Cristina; Cuevas, Eva P; Morales, Saleta; Santos, Vanesa; Csiszar, Katalin; Dubus, Pierre; Haigh, Jody J; Bigas, Anna; Portillo, Francisco; Cano, Amparo

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) is involved in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes, including fibrosis and tumor progression, implicating intracellular and extracellular functions. To explore the specific in vivo role of LOXL2 in physiological and tumor contexts, we generated conditional gain- and loss-of-function mouse models. Germ-line deletion of Loxl2 promotes lethality in half of newborn mice mainly associated to congenital heart defects, while Loxl2 overexpression triggers male sterility due to epididymal dysfunction caused by epithelial disorganization, fibrosis and acute inflammation. Remarkably, when challenged to chemical skin carcinogenesis, Loxl2-overexpressing mice increased tumor burden and malignant progression, while Loxl2-deficient mice exhibit the opposite phenotypes. Loxl2 levels in premalignant tumors negatively correlate with expression of epidermal differentiation markers and components of the Notch1 pathway. We show that LOXL2 is a direct repressor of NOTCH1. Additionally, we identify an exclusive expression pattern between LOXL2 and members of the canonical NOTCH1 pathway in human HNSCC. Our data identify for the first time novel LOXL2 roles in tissue homeostasis and support it as a target for SCC therapy. PMID:25759215

  14. Acute arsenic intoxication from environmental arsenic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Franzblau, A.; Lilis, R. )

    1989-11-01

    Reports of acute arsenic poisoning arising from environmental exposure are rare. Two cases of acute arsenic intoxication resulting from ingestion of contaminated well water are described. These patients experienced a variety of problems: acute gastrointestinal symptoms, central and peripheral neurotoxicity, bone marrow suppression, hepatic toxicity, and mild mucous membrane and cutaneous changes. Although located adjacent to an abandoned mine, the well water had been tested for microorganisms only and was found to be safe. Regulations for testing of water from private wells for fitness to drink are frequently nonexistent, or only mandate biologic tests for microorganisms. Well water, particularly in areas near mining activity, should be tested for metals.

  15. Dual Pten/Tp53 Suppression Promotes Sarcoma Progression by Activating Notch Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guijarro, Maria V.; Dahiya, Sonika; Danielson, Laura S.; Segura, Miguel F.; Vales-Lara, Frances M.; Menendez, Silvia; Popiolek, Dorota; Mittal, Khushbakhat; Wei, Jian Jun; Zavadil, Jiri; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Hernando, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors associated with poor clinical outcome. Although a subset of soft tissue sarcomas is characterized by simple karyotypes and recurrent chromosomal translocations, the mechanisms driving cytogenetically complex sarcomas are largely unknown. Clinical evidence led us to partially inactivate Pten and Tp53 in the smooth muscle lineage of mice, which developed high-grade undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas, leiomyosarcomas, and carcinosarcomas that widely recapitulate the human disease, including the aberrant karyotype and metastatic behavior. Pten was found haploinsufficient, whereas the wild-type allele of Tp53 invariably gained point mutations. Gene expression profiles showed up-regulated Notch signaling in PtenΔ/+Tp53Δ/+ tumors compared with Pten+/+Tp53Δ/+ tumors. Consistently, Pten silencing exacerbated the clonogenic and invasive potential of Tp53-deficient bone marrow–derived mouse mesenchymal stem cells and tumor cells and activated the Notch pathway. Moreover, the increased oncogenic behavior of PtenΔ/+Tp53Δ/+ and shPten-transduced Pten+/+Tp53Δ/+ tumor cells was counteracted by treatment with a γ-secretase inhibitor, suggesting that the aggressiveness of those tumors can be attributed, at least in part, to enhanced Notch signaling. This study demonstrates a cooperative role for Pten and Tp53 suppression in complex karyotype sarcomas while establishing Notch as an important functional player in the cross talk of these pathways during tumor progression. Our results highlight the importance of molecularly subclassifying patients with high-grade sarcoma for targeted treatments. PMID:23708211

  16. Minor Type IV Collagen α5 Chain Promotes Cancer Progression through Discoidin Domain Receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qian; Jiang, Yan; Liu, Qingbo; Yue, Jiao; Liu, Chunying; Zhao, Xiaotong; Qiao, Yuemei; Ji, Hongbin; Chen, Jianfeng; Ge, Gaoxiang

    2015-01-01

    Type IV collagens (Col IV), components of basement membrane, are essential in the maintenance of tissue integrity and proper function. Alteration of Col IV is related to developmental defects and diseases, including cancer. Col IV α chains form α1α1α2, α3α4α5 and α5α5α6 protomers that further form collagen networks. Despite knowledge on the functions of major Col IV (α1α1α2), little is known whether minor Col IV (α3α4α5 and α5α5α6) plays a role in cancer. It also remains to be elucidated whether major and minor Col IV are functionally redundant. We show that minor Col IV α5 chain is indispensable in cancer development by using α5(IV)-deficient mouse model. Ablation of α5(IV) significantly impeded the development of KrasG12D-driven lung cancer without affecting major Col IV expression. Epithelial α5(IV) supports cancer cell proliferation, while endothelial α5(IV) is essential for efficient tumor angiogenesis. α5(IV), but not α1(IV), ablation impaired expression of non-integrin collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor-1 (DDR1) and downstream ERK activation in lung cancer cells and endothelial cells. Knockdown of DDR1 in lung cancer cells and endothelial cells phenocopied the cells deficient of α5(IV). Constitutively active DDR1 or MEK1 rescued the defects of α5(IV)-ablated cells. Thus, minor Col IV α5(IV) chain supports lung cancer progression via DDR1-mediated cancer cell autonomous and non-autonomous mechanisms. Minor Col IV can not be functionally compensated by abundant major Col IV. PMID:25992553

  17. Cyclic AMP can promote APL progression and protect myeloid leukemia cells against anthracycline-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Gausdal, G; Wergeland, A; Skavland, J; Nguyen, E; Pendino, F; Rouhee, N; McCormack, E; Herfindal, L; Kleppe, R; Havemann, U; Schwede, F; Bruserud, Ø; Gjertsen, B T; Lanotte, M; Ségal-Bendirdjian, E; Døskeland, S O

    2013-01-01

    We show that cyclic AMP (cAMP) elevating agents protect blasts from patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) against death induced by first-line anti-leukemic anthracyclines like daunorubicin (DNR). The cAMP effect was reproduced in NB4 APL cells, and shown to depend on activation of the generally cytoplasmic cAMP-kinase type I (PKA-I) rather than the perinuclear PKA-II. The protection of both NB4 cells and APL blasts was associated with (inactivating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser118 of pro-apoptotic Bad and (activating) phosphorylation of PKA site Ser133 of the AML oncogene CREB. Either event would be expected to protect broadly against cell death, and we found cAMP elevation to protect also against 2-deoxyglucose, rotenone, proteasome inhibitor and a BH3-only mimetic. The in vitro findings were mirrored by the findings in NSG mice with orthotopic NB4 cell leukemia. The mice showed more rapid disease progression when given cAMP-increasing agents (prostaglandin E2 analog and theophylline), both with and without DNR chemotherapy. The all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced terminal APL cell differentiation is a cornerstone in current APL treatment and is enhanced by cAMP. We show also that ATRA-resistant APL cells, believed to be responsible for treatment failure with current ATRA-based treatment protocols, were protected by cAMP against death. This suggests that the beneficial pro-differentiating and non-beneficial pro-survival APL cell effects of cAMP should be weighed against each other. The results suggest also general awareness toward drugs that can affect bone marrow cAMP levels in leukemia patients. PMID:23449452

  18. The EP1 receptor for prostaglandin E2 promotes the development and progression of malignant murine skin tumors

    PubMed Central

    Surh, Inok; Rundhaug, Joyce E.; Pavone, Amy; Mikulec, Carol; Abel, Erika; Simper, Melissa; Fischer, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis resulting from the upregulation of COX-2 has been shown to be critical for the development of non-melanoma skin tumors. This effect of PGE2 is likely mediated by one or more of its 4 G-protein coupled membrane receptors, EP1–4. A previous study showed that BK5.EP1 transgenic mice produced more carcinomas than wild type (WT) mice using initiation/promotion protocols, although the tumor response was dependent on the type of tumor promoter used. In this study, a single topical application of either 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) or benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), alone, was found to elicit squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) in the BK5.EP1 transgenic mice, but not in WT mice. While the epidermis of both WT and transgenic mice was hyperplastic several days after DMBA, this effect regressed in the WT mice while proliferation continued in the transgenic mice. Several parameters associated with carcinogen initiation were measured and were found to be similar between genotypes, including CYP1B1 and aromatase expression, B[a]P adduct formation, Ras activity and keratinocyte stem cell numbers. However, EP1 transgene expression elevated COX-2 levels in the epidermis and SCC could be completely prevented in DMBA-treated BK5.EP1 mice either by feeding the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib in their diet or by crossing them onto a COX-2 null background. These data suggest that the tumor promoting/progressing effects of EP1 require the PGE2 synthesized by COX-2. PMID:21739481

  19. Selection, de-selection and progression in German football talent promotion.

    PubMed

    Güllich, Arne

    2014-01-01

    This study explored to which extent the development of German professional football players is based on early talent identification (TID) and long-term nurture in talent promotion (TP) programmes or on their emergence in the course of repeated procedures of player selection and de-selection in these programmes through childhood and youth. The annual turnover of squad members in national junior teams (2001-2013) and youth elite academies was calculated; national U-team members were followed up with regard to nominations through subsequent seasons and to their success level eventually achieved at senior age; and all current Bundesliga players were analysed retrospectively regarding their earlier involvement in TID/TP programmes. Analyses revealed that the mean annual turnover of squad members was 24.5% (youth academies) and 41.0% (national U-teams), respectively. At any age, the probability of persisting in the programme three years later was <50%. Among current Bundesliga players, the age of recruitment into the TID/TP programme was widely evenly distributed across childhood and youth, respectively. Accordingly, the number of (future) Bundesliga players who were involved in TID/TP was built up continuously through all age categories. The observations suggest that the collective of professional players emerged from repeated procedures of selection and de-selection through childhood and youth rather than from early selection and long-term continuous nurture in TID/TP programmes. The findings are discussed with regard to the uncertainty of TID and of interventions applied to the selected players, and they are related to the individualistic and collectivistic approach in TP. PMID:24245783

  20. B cells promote tumor progression in a mouse model of HPV-mediated cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Alexandre; Dadaglio, Gilles; Oberkampf, Marine; Di Carlo, Selene; Peduto, Lucie; Laubreton, Daphné; Desrues, Belinda; Sun, Cheng-Ming; Montagutelli, Xavier; Leclerc, Claude

    2016-09-15

    Enhancing anti-tumor immunity and preventing tumor escape are efficient strategies to increase the efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines. However, the treatment of advanced tumors remains difficult, mainly due to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells have been extensively studied, and their role in suppressing tumor immunity is now well established. In contrast, the role of B lymphocytes in tumor immunity remains unclear because B cells can promote tumor immunity or display regulatory functions to control excessive inflammation, mainly through IL-10 secretion. Here, in a mouse model of HPV-related cancer, we demonstrate that B cells accumulated in the draining lymph node of tumor-bearing mice, due to a prolonged survival, and showed a decreased expression of MHC class II and CD86 molecules and an increased expression of Ly6A/E, PD-L1 and CD39, suggesting potential immunoregulatory properties. However, B cells from tumor-bearing mice did not show an increased ability to secrete IL-10 and a deficiency in IL-10 production did not impair tumor growth. In contrast, in B cell-deficient μMT mice, tumor rejection occurred due to a strong T cell-dependent anti-tumor response. Genetic analysis based on single nucleotide polymorphisms identified genetic variants associated with tumor rejection in μMT mice, which could potentially affect reactive oxygen species production and NK cell activity. Our results demonstrate that B cells play a detrimental role in anti-tumor immunity and suggest that targeting B cells could enhance the anti-tumor response and improve the efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines. PMID:27130719

  1. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 promotes progression and correlates to poor prognosis in cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yun-Fei; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Lu, Xiao-Fei; Guo, Sen; Liu, Yi; Iqbal, Mohammad; Ning, Shang-Lei; Yang, Hui; Suo, Ning; Chen, Yu-Xin

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • FGFR4 is significantly related with N stage in IHCC, with T stage and TNM stage in PHCC. • FGFR4 is an independent prognostic factor in IHCC and PHCC. • FGFR4 promotes proliferation, invasion and EMT in cholangiocarinoma cell lines. • Inhibitor AP24354 can decrease proliferation, invasion and induce apoptosis of CCA. - Abstract: Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) is related to poor prognosis of several cancers, but the correlation between FGFR4 expression and cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) has not been well elucidated. We investigated the expression of FGFR4 in 83 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (IHCCs), 75 perihilar cholangiocarcinomas (PHCCs) and 41 distal cholangiocarcinomas (DCCs) by immunohistochemistry (IHC), and subsequently evaluated association of FGFR4 with clinicopathologic parameters and survival rate. The rate of FGFR4 higher expression was 61.4% (51/83) in IHCCs, 53.3% (40/75) in PHCCs and 56.1% (23/41) in DCCs. FGFR4 expression was significantly related to poor prognosis of IHCC (P = 0.002) and PHCC (P = 0.019) with univariate analysis, and also identified as an independent prognostic factor in IHCC (P = 0.045) and PHCC (P = 0.049) with multivariate analysis. Additionally, with functional assays in vitro, we found FGFR4 can induce proliferation, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) of CCA cell lines with FGF19 stimulation. Moreover, FGFR4 inhibitor AP24354 can suppress proliferation, invasion and induce apoptosis of CCA cells. In conclusion, FGFR4 expression can be identified as a significant independent prognostic biomarker of IHCC and PHCC. FGFR4 played a pivotal role in proliferation, invasion and EMT of CCA. FGFR4 inhibitor can suppress proliferation, invasion and induce apoptosis of CCA, indicating that FGFR4 may act as a potential therapeutic target.

  2. A novel biomarker ARMc8 promotes the malignant progression of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guiyang; Yang, Dalei; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Xiupeng; Xu, Hongtao; Miao, Yuan; Wang, Enhua; Zhang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy worldwide, and the survival rates have remained low in spite of medical advancements. More research is dedicated to the identification of novel biomarkers for this deadly disease. The association between ARMc8 and ovarian cancer remained unraveled. In this study, immunohistochemical staining was used to examine ARMc8 expression in 247 cases of ovarian cancer, 19 cases of borderline ovarian tumors, 41 cases of benign ovarian tumors, and 9 cases of normal ovarian tissues. It was shown that ARMc8 was predominantly located in the cytoplasm of tumor cells, and its expression was up-regulated in the ovarian cancer (61.9%) and the borderline ovarian tumor tissues (57.9%), in comparison with the benign ovarian tumors (12.2%; P < .05) and the normal ovarian tissues (11.1%; P < .05). In ovarian cancer, ARMc8 expression was closely related to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages (P = .002), histology grade (P < .001), lymph node metastasis (P = .008), and poor prognosis (P < .001). Univariate and multivariate Cox analyses revealed that ARMc8 expression was an independent prognostic factor for ovarian cancer (P = .039 and P = .005). In addition, ARMc8 could promote the invasion and migration of ovarian cancer cells. Overexpressing ARMc8 enhanced the invasion and metastasis capacity of ARMc8-low Cavo-3 cells (P < .001), whereas interfering ARMc8 significantly reduced cell invasion and metastasis in ARMc8-high SK-OV-3 cells (P < .001). Furthermore, ARMc8 could up-regulate matrix metalloproteinase-7 and snail and down-regulate α-catenin, p120ctn, and E-cadherin. Collectively, ARMc8 may enhance the invasion and metastasis of ovarian cancer cells and likely to become a potential therapeutic target for ovarian cancer. PMID:26232863

  3. Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey: Methodology and Estimated Arsenic Intake from Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Roberge, Jason; O’Rourke, Mary Kay; Meza-Montenegro, Maria Mercedes; Gutiérrez-Millán, Luis Enrique; Burgess, Jefferey L.; Harris, Robin B.

    2012-01-01

    The Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey (BAsES) was designed to evaluate probable arsenic exposures in selected areas of southern Arizona and northern Mexico, two regions with known elevated levels of arsenic in groundwater reserves. This paper describes the methodology of BAsES and the relationship between estimated arsenic intake from beverages and arsenic output in urine. Households from eight communities were selected for their varying groundwater arsenic concentrations in Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico. Adults responded to questionnaires and provided dietary information. A first morning urine void and water from all household drinking sources were collected. Associations between urinary arsenic concentration (total, organic, inorganic) and estimated level of arsenic consumed from water and other beverages were evaluated through crude associations and by random effects models. Median estimated total arsenic intake from beverages among participants from Arizona communities ranged from 1.7 to 14.1 µg/day compared to 0.6 to 3.4 µg/day among those from Mexico communities. In contrast, median urinary inorganic arsenic concentrations were greatest among participants from Hermosillo, Mexico (6.2 µg/L) whereas a high of 2.0 µg/L was found among participants from Ajo, Arizona. Estimated arsenic intake from drinking water was associated with urinary total arsenic concentration (p < 0.001), urinary inorganic arsenic concentration (p < 0.001), and urinary sum of species (p < 0.001). Urinary arsenic concentrations increased between 7% and 12% for each one percent increase in arsenic consumed from drinking water. Variability in arsenic intake from beverages and urinary arsenic output yielded counter intuitive results. Estimated intake of arsenic from all beverages was greatest among Arizonans yet participants in Mexico had higher urinary total and inorganic arsenic concentrations. Other contributors to urinary arsenic concentrations should be evaluated. PMID:22690182

  4. Arsenite-oxidizing bacteria exhibiting plant growth promoting traits isolated from the rhizosphere of Oryza sativa L.: Implications for mitigation of arsenic contamination in paddies.

    PubMed

    Das, Suvendu; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Chou, Mon-Lin; Rathod, Jagat; Liu, Chia-Chuan

    2016-01-25

    Arsenite-oxidizing bacteria exhibiting plant growth promoting (PGP) traits can have the advantages of reducing As-uptake by rice and promoting plant growth in As-stressed soil. A gram-positive bacterium Bacillus flexus ASO-6 resistant to high levels of As (32 and 280 mM for arsenite and arsenate, respectively) and exhibiting elevated rates of As(III) oxidation (Vmax=1.34 μM min(-1) 10(-7) cell) was isolated from rhizosphere of rice. The presence of aoxB gene and exhibition of As(III)-oxidase enzyme activity of this strain was observed. The ability of the strain to produce siderophore, IAA, ACC-deaminase and to solubilize phosphate was verified. The rice seed treated with the strain exhibited significantly improved seed germination and seedling vigor compared with the un-inoculated seeds. The bacterial inoculation significantly increased root biomass, straw yield, grain yield, chlorophyll and carotenoid in the rice plant. Moreover, As uptake from root to shoot and As accumulation in straw and grain decreased significantly as a result of the bacterial inoculation. Noteworthy, the inoculation effect is more prominent in non-flooded soil than it is in flooded soil. Owing to its wide action spectrum, this As(III)-oxidizing PGPB could serve as a potential bio-inoculant for mitigation of As in paddies and sustainable rice production in As-contaminated areas. PMID:26448489

  5. Environmental biochemistry of arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, S.; Frankenberger, W.T. Jr. )

    1992-01-01

    Microorganisms are involved in the redistribution and global cycling of arsenic. Arsenic can accumulate and can be subject to various biotransformations including reduction, oxidation, and methylation. Bacterial methylation of inorganic arsenic is coupled to the methane biosynthetic pathway in methanogenic bacteria under anaerobic conditions and may be a mechanism for arsenic detoxification. The pathway proceeds by reduction of arsenate to arsenite followed by methylation to dimethylarsine. Fungi are also able to transform inorganic and organic arsenic compounds into volatile methylarsines. The pathway proceeds aerobically by arsenate reduction to arsenite followed by several methylation steps producing trimethylarsine. Volatile arsine gases are very toxic to mammals because they destroy red blood cells (LD50 in rats; 3.0 mg kg-1). Further studies are needed on dimethylarsine and trimethylarsine toxicity tests through inhalation of target animals. Marine algae transform arsenate into non-volatile methylated arsenic compounds (methanearsonic and dimethylarsinic acids) in seawater. This is considered to be a beneficial step not only to the primary producers, but also to the higher trophic levels, since non-volatile methylated arsenic is much less toxic to marine invertebrates. Freshwater algae like marine algae synthesize lipid-soluble arsenic compounds and do not produce volatile methylarsines. Aquatic plants also synthesize similar lipid-soluble arsenic compounds. In terrestrial plants, arsenate is preferentially taken up 3 to 4 times the rate of arsenite. In the presence of phosphate, arsenate uptake is inhibited while in the presence of arsenate, phosphate uptake is only slightly inhibited. There is a competitive interaction between arsenate and phosphate for the same uptake system in terrestrial plants.

  6. Effect of iron redox transformations on arsenic solid-phase associations in an arsenic-rich, ferruginous hydrothermal sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, Kim M.; McBeth, Joyce M.; Charnock, John M.; Vaughan, David J.; Wincott, Paul L.; Polya, David A.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2013-02-01

    Well-constrained laboratory incubations of a ferruginous marine hydrothermal sediment from Santorini, Greece, were used to elucidate the effect of microbially induced redox transformations on arsenic speciation and mobility. Despite naturally high arsenic concentrations (˜400 mg/kg), the sediment has a low As:Fe ratio (1:1000 wt/wt). Acetate-amendment of sediment, extracted from the naturally-occurring suboxic-anoxic (Eh -60 to -138 mV) transition zone, promoted Fe(III) reduction, and increased the concentration of Fe(II) from ˜40% to ˜60% in the bulk sediment. Sulfate, which was present at lower concentrations, was also reduced. Phylogenetic 16S rRNA and dsr gene analysis suggested that Fe(III) and sulfate were reduced by bacteria related to Malonomonas rubra and Desulfosarcina variabilis, respectively. Arsenic remained predominantly as arsenic trioxide (As2O3) throughout the amendment experiment. However, the percentage of total arsenic present within poorly-crystalline iron oxides decreased from ˜69% to ˜32%, while the percentage incorporated within crystalline iron-containing minerals or sorbed to surfaces via inner-sphere complexes increased significantly (to 22% and 30%, respectively). Re-oxidation of the system with nitrate resulted in incomplete reduction of the nitrate pool, and partial re-association of arsenic with the poorly-crystalline iron fraction. Exposure to air led to virtually complete reversal of the arsenic partitioning, and oxidation of 71% As(III) to As(V). During aeration, oxidation of sediment-bound sulfur/sulfide occurred, alongside an observed ˜63% decrease in arsenic bound to this minor component. Analogous trends in arsenic-sediment associations were observed in the natural, unamended sediment depth-profile, whereby a greater proportion of arsenic (34% As(III), 66% As(V)) was bound within poorly-crystalline iron oxides at the sediment-water interface. Arsenic (96% As(III)) was increasingly incorporated within well

  7. Water hyacinth removes arsenic from arsenic-contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Misbahuddin, Mir; Fariduddin, Atm

    2002-01-01

    Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) removes arsenic from arsenic-contaminated drinking water. This effect depends on several factors, such as the amount of water hyacinth, amount of arsenic present in the water, duration of exposure, and presence of sunlight and air. On the basis of the present study, the authors suggest that water hyacinth is useful for making arsenic-contaminated drinking water totally arsenic free. Water hyacinth provides a natural means of removing arsenic from drinking water at the household level without monetary cost. PMID:12696647

  8. USEPA Arsenic Demonstration Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides background information on the USEPA arsenic removal program. The summary includes information on the history of the program, sites and technology selected, and a summary of the data collected from two completed projects.

  9. ENZYMOLOGY OF ARSENIC METHYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enzymology of Arsenic Methylation

    David J. Thomas, Pharmacokinetics Branch, Experimental Toxicology Division, National
    Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park...

  10. AKAP95 promotes cell cycle progression via interactions with cyclin E and low molecular weight cyclin E

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Deng-Cheng; Zhuang, Wen-Xin; Hua, Su-Hang; Dai, Yue; Yuan, Yang-Yang; Feng, Li-Li; Huang, Qian; Teng, Bo-Gang; Yu, Xiu-Yi; Liu, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Yong-Xing

    2016-01-01

    AKAP95 in lung cancer tissues showed higher expression than in paracancerous tissues. AKAP95 can bind with cyclin D and cyclin E during G1/S cell cycle transition, but its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. To identify the mechanism of AKAP95 in cell cycle progression, we performed AKAP95 transfection and silencing in A549 cells, examined AKAP95, cyclin E1 and cyclin E2 expression, and the interactions of AKAP95 with cyclins E1 and E2. Results showed that over-expression of AKAP95 promoted cell growth and AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and E2, low molecular weight cyclin E1 (LWM-E1) and LWM-E2. Additionally AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 in the nucleus during G1/S transition, bound LMW-E1 during G1, S and G2/M, and bound cyclin E2 mainly on the nuclear membrane during interphase. Cyclin E2 and LMW-E2 were also detected. AKAP95 over-expression increased cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 expression but decreased cyclin E2 levels. Unlike cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 that were nuclear located during the G1, S and G1/S phases, cyclin E2 and LMW-E1 were expressed in all cell cycle phases, with cyclin E2 present in the cytoplasm and nuclear membrane, with traces in the nucleus. LMW-E1 was present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. The 20 kDa form of LMW-E1 showed only cytoplasmic expression, while the 40 kDa form was nuclear expressed. The expression of AKAP95, cyclin E1, LMW-E1 and -E2, might be regulated by cAMP. We conclude that AKAP95 might promote cell cycle progression by interacting with cyclin E1 and LMW-E2. LMW-E2, but not cyclin E2, might be involved in G1/S transition. The binding of AKAP95 and LMW-E1 was found throughout cell cycle. PMID:27158371

  11. Fibroblast growth factor 8 increases breast cancer cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Emeli M.; Brokken, Leon J.S.; Haerkoenen, Pirkko L.

    2010-03-10

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancers, whereas its level in normal mammary gland epithelium is low. Previous studies have shown that FGF-8b stimulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. To explore the mechanisms by which FGF-8b promotes growth, we studied its effects on cell cycle regulatory proteins and signalling pathways in mouse S115 and human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We also studied the effect of FGF-8b on cell survival. FGF-8b induced cell cycle progression and up-regulated particularly cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in S115 cells. Silencing cyclin D1 with siRNA inhibited most but not all FGF-8b-induced proliferation. Inhibition of the FGF-8b-activated ERK/MAPK pathway decreased FGF-8b-stimulated proliferation. Blocking the constitutively active PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways also lowered FGF-8b-induced cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Corresponding results were obtained in MCF-7 cells. In S115 and MCF-7 mouse tumours, FGF-8b increased cyclin D1 and Ki67 levels. Moreover, FGF-8b opposed staurosporine-induced S115 cell death which effect was blocked by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that FGF-8b increases breast cancer cell growth both by stimulating cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death.

  12. OXIDATIVE STRESS AS A POSSIBLE MODE OF ACTION FOR ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Many modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesis have been proposed, but few theories have a substantial mass of supporting data. Three stronger theories of arsenic carcinogenesis are production of chromosomal abnormalities, promotion of carcinogenesis and oxidati...

  13. Specific histone modification responds to arsenic-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lu; Li, Jun; Zhan, Zhengbao; Chen, Liping; Li, Daochuan; Bai, Qing; Gao, Chen; Li, Jie; Zeng, Xiaowen; He, Zhini; Wang, Shan; Xiao, Yongmei; Chen, Wen; Zhang, Aihua

    2016-07-01

    To explore whether specific histone modifications are associated with arsenic-induced oxidative damage, we recruited 138 arsenic-exposed and arsenicosis subjects from Jiaole Village, Xinren County of Guizhou province, China where the residents were exposed to arsenic from indoor coal burning. 77 villagers from Shang Batian Village that were not exposed to high arsenic coal served as the control group. The concentrations of urine and hair arsenic in the arsenic-exposure group were 2.4-fold and 2.1-fold (all P<0.001) higher, respectively, than those of the control group. Global histone modifications in human peripheral lymphocytes (PBLCs) were examined by ELISA. The results showed that altered global levels of H3K18ac, H3K9me2, and H3K36me3 correlated with both urinary and hair-arsenic levels of the subjects. Notably, H3K36me3 and H3K18ac modifications were associated with urinary 8-OHdG (H3K36me3: β=0.16; P=0.042, H3K18ac: β=-0.24; P=0.001). We also found that the modifications of H3K18ac and H3K36me3 were enriched in the promoters of oxidative stress response (OSR) genes in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells and HaCaT cells, providing evidence that H3K18ac and H3K36me3 modifications mediate transcriptional regulation of OSR genes in response to NaAsO2 treatment. Particularly, we found that reduced H3K18ac modification correlated with suppressed expression of OSR genes in HEK cells with long term arsenic treatment and in PBLCs of all the subjects. Taken together, we reveal a critical role for specific histone modification in response to arsenic-induced oxidative damage. PMID:27068294

  14. Spectral reflectance as an indicator of foliar concentrations of arsenic in common sunflower (Helianthus annuus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandy, Yuridia Patricia Peralta De

    Studies were conducted to investigate the use of spectral reflectance by foliage of common sunflower as a potential indicator of arsenic contamination of soil. Germination method was developed for sunflower seeds, and cohorts of sunflower seedlings in hydroponic tanks were established. The cohorts were exposed to 0 ppm, 5 ppm, 7.5 ppm, and 10 ppm treatments of As (V) and reflectance measurements of foliage were collected using a spectroradiometer during two experiments. Results demonstrated the feasibility of using spectral reflectance by foliage of common sunflower as a potential indicator of arsenic contamination. In both experiments, arsenic concentrations in leaf tissues were directly proportional to arsenic concentrations in hydroponic solutions in which such plants were grown. Although the effect(s) of arsenic accumulation had minimal impact on reflectance of visible wavelengths, the effects on NIR reflectance were substantial and resulted in a progressive decrease in reflectance as arsenic concentrations in foliage increased.

  15. An Emerging Role for Epigenetic Dysregulation in Arsenic Toxicity and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xuefeng; McHale, Cliona M.; Skibola, Christine F.; Smith, Allan H.; Smith, Martyn T.; Zhang, Luoping

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposure to arsenic, an established human carcinogen, through consumption of highly contaminated drinking water is a worldwide public health concern. Several mechanisms by which arsenical compounds induce tumorigenesis have been proposed, including oxidative stress, genotoxic damage, and chromosomal abnormalities. Recent studies have suggested that epigenetic mechanisms may also mediate toxicity and carcinogenicity resulting from arsenic exposure. Objective We examined the evidence supporting the roles of the three major epigenetic mechanisms—DNA methylation, histone modification, and microRNA (miRNA) expression—in arsenic toxicity and, in particular, carcinogenicity. We also investigated future research directions necessary to clarify epigenetic and other mechanisms in humans. Data sources and synthesis We conducted a PubMed search of arsenic exposure and epigenetic modification through April 2010 and summarized the in vitro and in vivo research findings, from both our group and others, on arsenic-associated epigenetic alteration and its potential role in toxicity and carcinogenicity. Conclusions Arsenic exposure has been shown to alter methylation levels of both global DNA and gene promoters; histone acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation; and miRNA expression, in studies analyzing mainly a limited number of epigenetic end points. Systematic epigenomic studies in human populations exposed to arsenic or in patients with arsenic-associated cancer have not yet been performed. Such studies would help to elucidate the relationship between arsenic exposure, epigenetic dysregulation, and carcinogenesis and are becoming feasible because of recent technological advancements. PMID:20682481

  16. Effectiveness of progressive muscle relaxation therapy as a worksite health promotion program in the automobile assembly line.

    PubMed

    Sundram, Bala Murali; Dahlui, Maznah; Chinna, Karuthan

    2016-06-10

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) as part of a Worksite Health Promotion Program on self-perceived stress, anxiety and depression among male automotive assembly-line workers through a quasi-experimental trial. Two assembly plants were chosen with one receiving PMR therapy and the other Pamphlets. Intention-to-treat analysis was conducted to test the effectiveness of the relaxation therapy. Stress, Depression and Anxiety levels were measured using the shortened DASS-21 questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Chi-square, Independent sample t test and Repeated-measures analysis of variance to test the significance of the effects of intervention (time * group) for the measures of Stress, Depression and Anxiety. Significant favourable intervention effects on stress were found in the PMR group (Effect size=0.6) as compared to the Pamphlet group (Effect size=0.2). There was a significant group *time interaction effect (p<0.001) on Stress levels. Depression and Anxiety levels were minimal at baseline in both the groups with mild or no reduction in levels. The improvement in stress levels showed the potential of PMR therapy as a coping strategy at the workplace. Further research in this field is necessary to examine the beneficial effects of coping strategies in the workplace. PMID:26726829

  17. EGFRvIII/integrin β3 interaction in hypoxic and vitronectinenriching microenvironment promote GBM progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongsheng; Zhao, Manli; Xie, Hui; Ju, Huanyu; Wang, He; Zhao, Yu; Zheng, Qifan; Wang, Qixue; Su, Jun; Fang, Chuan; Fu, Songbin; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Jiaren; Li, Xia; Kang, Chunsheng; Ren, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most lethal brain tumors with a short survival time. EGFR amplification and mutation is the most significant genetic signature in GBM. About half of the GBMs with EGFR amplification express a constitutively autophosphorylated variant of EGFR, known as EGFRvIII. Our in vitro data demonstrated further enhanced EGFRvIII activity and tumor cell invasion in the tumor microenvironment of hypoxia plus extracellular matrix (ECM) vitronectin, in which EGFRvIII and integrin β3 tended to form complexes. The treatment with ITGB3 siRNA or the integrin antagonist cilengetide preferentially interrupted the EGFRvIII/integrin β3 complex, effectively reduced tumor cell invasion and activation of downstream signaling effectors. Cilengitide is recently failed in Phase III CENTRIC trial in unselected patients with GBM. However, we found that cilengitide demonstrated efficacious tumor regression via inhibition of tumor growth and angiogenesis in EGFRvIII orthotopic xenografts. Bioinformatics analysis emphasized key roles of integrin β3, hypoxia and vitronectin and their strong correlations with EGFRvIII expression in malignant glioma patient samples in vivo. In conclusion, we demonstrate that EGFRvIII/integrin β3 complexes promote GBM progression and metastasis in the environment of hypoxia and vitronectin-enrichment, and cilengitide may serve as a promising therapeutics for EGFRvIII-positive GBMs. PMID:26717039

  18. Gr-1+CD11b+ cells are responsible for tumor promoting effect of TGF-β in breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaoyang; Pang, Yanli; Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Achyut, B.R.; Heger, Christopher; Goldsmith, Paul K.; Lonning, Scott; Yang, Li

    2012-01-01

    One great challenge in our understanding of TGF-β cancer biology and the successful application of TGF-β targeted therapy is that TGF-β works as both a tumor suppressor and a tumor promoter. The underlying mechanisms for its functional change remain to be elucidated. Using 4T1 mammary tumor model that shares many characteristics with human breast cancer, particularly its ability to spontaneously metastasize to the lungs, we demonstrate that Gr-1+CD11b+ cells or myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are important mediators in TGF-β regulation of mammary tumor progression. Depletion of Gr-1+CD11b+ cells diminished the anti-tumor effect of TGF-β neutralization. Two mechanisms were involved: first, treatment with TGF-β neutralization antibody (1D11) significantly decreased the number of Gr-1+CD11b+ cells in tumor tissues and premetastatic lung. This is mediated through increased Gr-1+CD11b+ cell apoptosis. In addition, 1D11 treatment significantly decreased the expression of Th2 cytokines & Arginase 1. Interestingly, the number and property of Gr-1+CD11b+ cells in peripheral blood/draining lymph nodes correlated with tumor size and metastases in response to 1D11 treatment. Our data suggest that the efficacy of TGF-β neutralization depends on the presence of Gr-1+CD11b+ cells, and these cells could be good biomarkers for TGF-β targeted therapy. PMID:22487809

  19. EZH2 promotes progression of small cell lung cancer by suppressing the TGF-β-Smad-ASCL1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Fumihiko; Koinuma, Daizo; Shinozaki-Ushiku, Aya; Fukayama, Masashi; Miyaozono, Kohei; Ehata, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) induces apoptosis in many types of cancer cells and acts as a tumor suppressor. We performed a functional analysis of TGF-β signaling to identify a molecular mechanism that regulated survival in small cell lung cancer cells. Here, we found low expression of TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII) in most small cell lung cancer cells and tissues compared to normal lung epithelial cells and normal lung tissues, respectively. When wild-type TβRII was overexpressed in small cell lung cancer cells, TGF-β suppressed cell growth in vitro and tumor formation in vivo through induction of apoptosis. Components of polycomb repressive complex 2, including enhancer of zeste 2 (EZH2), were highly expressed in small cell lung cancer cells; this led to epigenetic silencing of TβRII expression and suppression of TGF-β-mediated apoptosis. Achaete-scute family bHLH transcription factor 1 (ASCL1; also known as ASH1), a Smad-dependent target of TGF-β, was found to induce survival in small cell lung cancer cells. Thus, EZH2 promoted small cell lung cancer progression by suppressing the TGF-β-Smad-ASCL1 pathway.

  20. IL17 Promotes Mammary Tumor Progression by Changing the Behavior of Tumor Cells and Eliciting Tumorigenic Neutrophils Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Benevides, Luciana; da Fonseca, Denise Morais; Donate, Paula Barbim; Tiezzi, Daniel Guimarães; De Carvalho, Daniel D; de Andrade, Jurandyr M; Martins, Gislaine A; Silva, João S

    2015-09-15

    The aggressiveness of invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast is associated with increased IL17 levels. Studying the role of IL17 in invasive breast tumor pathogenesis, we found that metastatic primary tumor-infiltrating T lymphocytes produced elevated levels of IL17, whereas IL17 neutralization inhibited tumor growth and prevented the migration of neutrophils and tumor cells to secondary disease sites. Tumorigenic neutrophils promote disease progression, producing CXCL1, MMP9, VEGF, and TNFα, and their depletion suppressed tumor growth. IL17A also induced IL6 and CCL20 production in metastatic tumor cells, favoring the recruitment and differentiation of Th17. In addition, IL17A changed the gene-expression profile and the behavior of nonmetastatic tumor cells, causing tumor growth in vivo, confirming the protumor role of IL17. Furthermore, high IL17 expression was associated with lower disease-free survival and worse prognosis in IDC patients. Thus, IL17 blockade represents an attractive approach for the control of invasive breast tumors. PMID:26208902

  1. Effectiveness of progressive muscle relaxation therapy as a worksite health promotion program in the automobile assembly line

    PubMed Central

    SUNDRAM, Bala Murali; DAHLUI, Maznah; CHINNA, Karuthan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) as part of a Worksite Health Promotion Program on self-perceived stress, anxiety and depression among male automotive assembly-line workers through a quasi-experimental trial. Two assembly plants were chosen with one receiving PMR therapy and the other Pamphlets. Intention-to-treat analysis was conducted to test the effectiveness of the relaxation therapy. Stress, Depression and Anxiety levels were measured using the shortened DASS-21 questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Chi-square, Independent sample t test and Repeated-measures analysis of variance to test the significance of the effects of intervention (time * group) for the measures of Stress, Depression and Anxiety. Significant favourable intervention effects on stress were found in the PMR group (Effect size=0.6) as compared to the Pamphlet group (Effect size=0.2). There was a significant group *time interaction effect (p<0.001) on Stress levels. Depression and Anxiety levels were minimal at baseline in both the groups with mild or no reduction in levels. The improvement in stress levels showed the potential of PMR therapy as a coping strategy at the workplace. Further research in this field is necessary to examine the beneficial effects of coping strategies in the workplace. PMID:26726829

  2. Airborne arsenic exposure and excretion of methylated arsenic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, T J; Crecelius, E A; Reading, J C

    1977-01-01

    First void urine samples were collected from copper smelter workers exposed to inorganic arsenic and from unexposed controls. Arsenic compounds (As (III), As (V), methylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid) in these samples were analyzed by selective volatilization as arsines with determination of arsenic by plasma excitation emission spectrometry. On the day preceding the urine sample collection a breathing zone measurement was made of respirable arsenic particulates for each subject. It was found that all of the subjects, including the controls excreted arsenic primarily as methylated species. Approximately 50% of the total arsenic was excreted as dimethylarsinic acid and 20% as methylarsonic acid. Slight differences in the proportion of various arsenic compounds were observed with varying levels of inorganic arsenic exposure. Amounts of arsenic species were all closely correlated with each other and with exposure. Irrespirable particulate exposures were measured on a subset of high exposure workers. Irrespirable arsenic was found to be more closely correlated with excretion of arsenic compounds than was respirable arsenic. PMID:908318

  3. Atherosclerosis induced by arsenic in drinking water in rats through altering lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Tain-Junn; Chuu, Jiunn-Jye; Chang, Chia-Yu; Tsai, Wan-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Jung; Guo, How-Ran

    2011-10-15

    Arsenic in drinking water is a global environmental health problem, and the exposure may increase cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases mortalities, most likely through causing atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism of atherosclerosis formation after arsenic exposure is still unclear. To study the mechanism of atherosclerosis formation after arsenic exposure and explore the role of high cholesterol diet (HCD) in this process, we fed spontaneous hypertensive rats and Wistar Kyoto rats with basal diet or HCD and provided with them drinking water containing arsenic at different ages and orders for 20 consecutive weeks. We measured high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol, triglycerides, heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70), and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) at predetermined intervals and determined expressions of cholesteryl ester transfer protein-1 (CETP-1) and liver X receptor {beta} (LXR{beta}) in the liver. Atherosclerosis was determined by examining the aorta with hematoxylin and eosin stain. After 20 weeks, we found arsenic, alone or combined with HCD, may promote atherosclerosis formation with transient increases in HSP 70 and hs-CRP. Early combination exposure decreased the HDL-C/LDL-C ratio without changing the levels of total cholesterol and triglyceride until 30 weeks old. Both CETP-1 and LXR{beta} activities were suppressed, most significantly in early combination exposure. In conclusion, arsenic exposure may induce atherosclerosis through modifying reverse cholesterol transport in cholesterol metabolism and suppressing LXR{beta} and CEPT-1 expressions. For decreasing atherosclerosis related mortality associated with arsenic, preventing exposure from environmental sources in early life is an important element. - Highlights: > Arsenic causes cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases through atherosclerosis. > Arsenic may promote atherosclerosis with transient increase in HSP

  4. ARSENIC URINARY METABOLITES: BIOMARKER STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A population of adults and children with ranges of 10 to 300 g/l of arsenic in their drinking water will have their urine analyzed for total and speciated arsenic. A sample of 30 families will be selected based on tap water analyses for arsenic. This sample will comprise 50% adul...

  5. PROPOSED CARCINOGENIC MECHANISMS FOR ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    PROPOSED CARCINOGENIC MECHANISMS FOR ARSENIC.

    Arsenic is a human carcinogen in skin, lung, liver, urinary bladder and kidney. In contrast,
    there is no accepted experimental animal model of inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis.
    Proposed mechanisms/modes of action for a...

  6. ADSORPTION MEDIA FOR ARSENIC REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the use of adsorptive media for the removal of arsenic from drinking water. Presentation is a fundamental discussion on the use of adsorptive media for arsenic removal and includes information from several EPA field studies on removal of arsenic from dr...

  7. Carcinogenic Effects of “Whole-Life” Exposure to Inorganic Arsenic in CD1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tokar, Erik J.; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Delker, Don A.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    In a previously developed mouse model, arsenic exposure in utero induces tumors at multiple sites in the offspring as adults, often duplicating human targets. However, human environmental inorganic arsenic exposure occurs during the entire life span, not just part of gestation. Thus, “whole-life” inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis in mice was studied. CD1 mice were exposed to 0, 6, 12, or 24 ppm arsenic in the drinking water 2 weeks prior to breeding, during pregnancy, lactation, and after weaning through adulthood. Tumors were assessed in offspring until 2 years of age. Arsenic induced dose-related increases in lung adenocarcinoma (both sexes), hepatocellular carcinoma (both sexes), gallbladder tumors (males), and uterine carcinomas. Arsenic induced dose-related increases in ovarian tumors (including carcinomas) starting with the lowest dose. Adrenal tumors increased at all doses (both sexes). Arsenic-induced lung and liver cancers were highly enriched for cancer stem cells, consistent with prior work with skin cancers stimulated by prenatal arsenic. Reproductive tract tumors overexpressed cyclooxygenase-2 and estrogen receptor-α. Arsenic target sites were remarkably similar to prior transplacental studies, although tumors from whole-life exposure were generally more aggressive and frequent. This may indicate that arsenic-induced events in utero dictate target site in some tissues, whereas other exposure periods of arsenic enhance incidence or progression, though other factors could be at play, like cumulative dose. Whole-life arsenic exposure induced tumors at dramatically lower external doses than in utero arsenic only while more realistically duplicating human exposure. PMID:20937726

  8. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the methylation of arsenicals in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotransformation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) involves methylation catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt), yielding mono- , di- , and trimethylated arsenicals. To investigate the evolution of molecular mechanisms that mediate arsenic biotransformation,...

  9. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  10. Promoting universal financial protection: evidence from seven low- and middle-income countries on factors facilitating or hindering progress

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    pervasive problem in LMICs. The case studies also highlighted the critical role of high-level political leadership in pursuing UHC policies and citizen support in sustaining these policies. This series demonstrates the value of promoting greater sharing of experiences on UHC reforms across LMICs. It also identifies key areas of future research on health care financing in LMICs that would support progress towards UHC. PMID:24228762

  11. Arsenic: The Silent Killer

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Andrea

    2006-02-28

    Andrea Foster uses x-rays to determine the forms of potentially toxic elements in environmentally-important matrices such as water, sediments, plants, and microorganisms. In this free public lecture, Foster will discuss her research on arsenic, which is called the silent killer because dissolved in water, it is colorless, odorless, and tasteless, yet consumption of relatively small doses of this element in its most toxic forms can cause rapid and violent death. Arsenic is a well-known poison, and has been used as such since ancient times. Less well known is the fact that much lower doses of the element, consumed over years, can lead to a variety of skin and internal cancers that can also be fatal. Currently, what has been called the largest mass poisoning in history is occurring in Bangladesh, where most people are by necessity drinking ground water that is contaminated with arsenic far in excess of the maximum amounts determined to be safe by the World Health Organization. This presentation will review the long and complicated history with arsenic, describe how x-rays have helped explain the high yet spatially variable arsenic concentrations in Bangladesh, discuss the ways in which land use in Bangladesh may be exacerbating the problem, and summarize the impact of this silent killer on drinking water systems worldwide.

  12. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Technical progress report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1994-10-01

    During the first year of the project two model mixing systems, which differed in size but were similar in design, were constructed and tested. The systems were equipped for measuring agitator speed and torque and for measuring the turbidity of coal particle suspensions undergoing agglomeration. Preliminary measurements of aqueous suspensions of coal particles showed that the Beer-Lambert law applies to such suspensions at least for low concentrations. Therefore, the measured turbidity can be used as an indicator of particle concentration and a means for monitoring the progress of oil agglomeration. However, the method is not applicable for large particle concentrations so a different technique was tested for monitoring the agglomeration of large concentrations. This technique involves measuring agitator torque and observing changes in torque while agitator speed is held constant. The results of preliminary tests of the technique were encouraging. In these tests significant changes in agitator torque were observed when particle agglomeration took place as long as solids concentration of 25 w/v % or more were utilized. A number of agglomeration tests were conducted using either one or the other of the two monitoring techniques. Both methods showed that even very small amounts of air can promote the oil agglomeration of coal particles suspended in water. Even the amount of air dissolved in water at room temperature and pressure can affect the process providing the air is displaced from the solution by a slightly soluble agglomerant such as heptane. The apparent rate of agglomeration was observed to increase as more air was introduced and also as agitator speed was increased.

  13. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 methylation changes promote the occurrence and progression of Kazakh ESCC

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jian Ming; Li, Ling; Chen, Yun Zhao; Liu, Chunxia; Cui, Xiaobin; Yin, Liang; Yang, Lan; Zou, Hong; Pang, Lijuan; Zhao, Jin; Qi, Yan; Cao, Yuwen; Jiang, Jinfang; Liang, Weihua; Li, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen II (HLA-II) plays an important role in host immune responses to cancer cells. Changes in gene methylation may result in aberrant expression of HLA-II, serving a key role in the pathogenesis of Kazakh esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We analyzed the expression level of HLA-II (HLA-DP, -DQ, and -DR) by immunohistochemistry, as well as the methylation status of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 by MassARRAY spectrometry in Xinjiang Kazakh ESCC. Expression of HLA-II in ESCC was significantly higher than that in cancer adjacent normal (ACN) samples (P < 0.05). Decreased HLA-II expression was closely associated with later clinical stages of ESCC (P < 0.05). Hypomethylation of HLA-DRB1 and hypermethylation of HLA-DQB1 was significantly correlated with occurrence of Kazakh ESCC (P < 0.01), and mainly manifested as hypomethylation of CpG9, CpG10-11, and CpG16 in HLA-DRB1 and hypermethylation of CpG6-7 and CpG16-17 in HLA-DQB1 (P < 0.01). Moreover, hypomethylation of HLA-DQB1 CpG6-7 correlated with poor differentiation in ESCCs, whereas hypermethylation of HLA-DRB1 CpG16 and hypomethylation of HLA-DQB1 CpG16-17 were significantly associated with later stages of ESCC (P < 0.05). A significant inverse association between HLA-DRB1 CpG9 methylation and HLA-II expression was found in ESCC (P < 0.05). These findings suggest aberrant HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 methylation contributes to the aberrant expression of HLA-II. These molecular changes may influence the immune response to specific tumor epitopes, promoting the occurrence and progression of Kazakh ESCC. PMID:25437052

  14. Th2 type inflammation promotes the gradual progression of HPV-infected cervical cells to cervical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qinghua; Wei, Huafeng; Morihara, Janice; Stern, Joshua; Yu, Mujun; Kiviat, Nancy; Hellstrom, Ingegerd; Hellstrom, Karl Erik

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the role of immunological parameters in tumorigenesis of cervical cancer in women infected with high risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV), and determine whether key findings with human material can be recapitulated in the mouse TC1 carcinoma model which expresses hr-HPV epitopes. Methods Epithelial and lymphoid cells in cervical tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and serum IL10 levels were determined by ELISA. Tumor draining lymph nodes were analyzed in the mouse TC1 model by flow cytometry. Results The mucosa was infiltrated by CD20+ and CD138+ cells already at cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 1 (CIN1) and infiltration increased in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 (CIN3)/carcinoma in situ (CIS) and invasive cervical cancer (ICC), where it strongly correlated with infiltration by CD32B+ and FoxP3+ lymphocytes. GATA3+ and T-bet+ lymphoid cells were increased in ICC compared to normal, and expression in epithelial cells of the Th2 inflammation-promoting cytokine TSLP and of IDO1 was higher in CIN3/CIS and ICC. As a corollary, serum levels of IL10 were higher in women with CIN3/CIS or ICC than in normals. Finally we demonstrated in the mouse TC1 carcinoma, which expresses hr-HPV epitopes, an increase of cells expressing B cell or plasma cell markers or Fc receptors in tumor-draining than distal lymph nodes or spleen. Conclusions hr-HPV initiates a local Th2 inflammation at an early stage, involving antibody forming cells, and fosters an immunosuppressive microenvironment that aids tumor progression. PMID:22828962

  15. Interleukin-34 promotes tumor progression and metastatic process in osteosarcoma through induction of angiogenesis and macrophage recruitment.

    PubMed

    Ségaliny, Aude I; Mohamadi, Amel; Dizier, Blandine; Lokajczyk, Anna; Brion, Régis; Lanel, Rachel; Amiaud, Jérôme; Charrier, Céline; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine; Heymann, Dominique

    2015-07-01

    Interleukin-34 (IL-34) was recently characterized as the M-CSF "twin" cytokine, regulating the proliferation/differentiation/survival of myeloid cells. The implication of M-CSF in oncology was initially suspected by the reduced metastatic dissemination in knock-out mice, due to angiogenesis impairment. Based on this observation, our work studied the involvement of IL-34 in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. The in vivo effects of IL-34 were assessed on tissue vasculature and macrophage infiltration in a murine preclinical model based on a paratibial inoculation of human osteosarcoma cells overexpressing or not IL-34 or M-CSF. In vitro investigations using endothelial cell precursors and mature HUVEC cells were performed to analyse the involvement of IL-34 in angiogenesis and myeloid cell adhesion. The data revealed that IL-34 overexpression was associated with the progression of osteosarcoma (tumor growth, lung metastases) and an increase of neo-angiogenesis. In vitro analyses demonstrated that IL-34 stimulated endothelial cell proliferation and vascular cord formation. Pre-treatment of endothelial cells by chondroitinases/heparinases reduced the formation of vascular tubes and abolished the associated cell signalling. In addition, IL-34 increased the in vivo recruitment of M2 tumor-associated macrophages into the tumor tissue. IL-34 increased in vitro monocyte/CD34(+) cell adhesion to activated HUVEC monolayers under physiological shear stress conditions. This work also demonstrates that IL-34 is expressed by osteosarcoma cells, is regulated by TNF-α, IL-1β, and contributes to osteosarcoma growth by increasing the neo-angiogenesis and the recruitment of M2 macrophages. By promoting new vessel formation and extravasation of immune cells, IL-34 may play a key role in tumor development and inflammatory diseases. PMID:25471534

  16. Ras and TGF-β signaling enhance cancer progression by promoting the ΔNp63 transcriptional program.

    PubMed

    Vasilaki, Eleftheria; Morikawa, Masato; Koinuma, Daizo; Mizutani, Anna; Hirano, Yudai; Ehata, Shogo; Sundqvist, Anders; Kawasaki, Natsumi; Cedervall, Jessica; Olsson, Anna-Karin; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Moustakas, Aristidis; Miyazono, Kohei; Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The p53 family of transcription factors includes p63, which is a master regulator of gene expression in epithelial cells. Determining whether p63 is tumor-suppressive or tumorigenic is complicated by isoform-specific and cellular context-dependent protein associations, as well as antagonism from mutant p53. ΔNp63 is an amino-terminal-truncated isoform, that is, the predominant isoform expressed in cancer cells of epithelial origin. In HaCaT keratinocytes, which have mutant p53 and ΔNp63, we found that mutant p53 antagonized ΔNp63 transcriptional activity but that activation of Ras or transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathways reduced the abundance of mutant p53 and strengthened target gene binding and activity of ΔNp63. Among the products of ΔNp63-induced genes was dual-specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6), which promoted the degradation of mutant p53, likely by dephosphorylating p53. Knocking down all forms of p63 or DUSP6 and DUSP7 (DUSP6/7) inhibited the basal or TGF-β-induced or epidermal growth factor (which activates Ras)-induced migration and invasion in cultures of p53-mutant breast cancer and squamous skin cancer cells. Alternatively, overexpressing ΔNp63 in the breast cancer cells increased their capacity to colonize various tissues upon intracardiac injection in mice, and this was inhibited by knocking down DUSP6/7 in these ΔNp63-overexpressing cells. High abundance of ΔNp63 in various tumors correlated with poor prognosis in patients, and this correlation was stronger in patients whose tumors also had a mutation in the gene encoding p53. Thus, oncogenic Ras and TGF-β signaling stimulate cancer progression through activation of the ΔNp63 transcriptional program. PMID:27555661

  17. Arsenics as bioenergetic substrates.

    PubMed

    van Lis, Robert; Nitschke, Wolfgang; Duval, Simon; Schoepp-Cothenet, Barbara

    2013-02-01

    Although at low concentrations, arsenic commonly occurs naturally as a local geological constituent. Whereas both arsenate and arsenite are strongly toxic to life, a number of prokaryotes use these compounds as electron acceptors or donors, respectively, for bioenergetic purposes via respiratory arsenate reductase, arsenite oxidase and alternative arsenite oxidase. The recent burst in discovered arsenite oxidizing and arsenate respiring microbes suggests the arsenic bioenergetic metabolisms to be anything but exotic. The first goal of the present review is to bring to light the widespread distribution and diversity of these metabolizing pathways. The second goal is to present an evolutionary analysis of these diverse energetic pathways. Taking into account not only the available data on the arsenic metabolizing enzymes and their phylogenetical relatives but also the palaeogeochemical records, we propose a crucial role of arsenite oxidation via arsenite oxidase in primordial life. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems. PMID:22982475

  18. DDA1 promotes stage IIB–IIC colon cancer progression by activating NFκB/CSN2/GSK-3β signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongcheng; Wen, Yugang; Yu, Fudong; Cui, Feifei; Zhang, Dongyuan; Xue, Yingming; Liu, Chenchen; Yue, Ben; Chen, Jian; Wang, Jingtao; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Yang; Jiang, Weiliang; Liu, Xisheng; Mi, Yushuai; Zhou, Zongguang; Qin, Xuebin; Peng, Zhihai

    2016-01-01

    Conventional high-recurrence risk factors are not sufficient to predict post-operative risk of tumor recurrence or sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy for stage II colon cancer. DDA1, an evolutionarily conserved gene located at 19p13.11, may be involved in the activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NFκB). This study aimed to investigate whether DDA1 contributes to tumorigenesis and progression of stage II colon cancer via activation of the NFκB pathway. We found that positive expression of DDA1 alone or in combination with p65 nuclear translocation correlated with increased risk of tumor recurrence in patients with stage IIB–IIC colon cancer. DDA1 overexpression in colon cancer lines promoted cell proliferation, facilitated cell cycle progression, inhibited 5-FU-induced apoptosis, enhanced invasion, and induced the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Suppression of DDA1 inhibited tumor progression, and reduced tumor growth in vivo. We also demonstrated that DDA1-mediated tumor progression is associated with the activation of the NFκB/COP9 signalosome 2(CSN2)/glycogen synthase kinase3β (GSK3β) pathway. These results indicate that DDA1 promotes colon cancer progression through activation of NFκB/CSN2/GSK3β signaling. DDA1, together with NFκB activation status, may serve as a sensitive biomarker for tumor recurrence risk and prognosis in patients with stage IIB–IIC colon cancers. PMID:26942699

  19. Arsenic levels in Oregon waters.

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, J C; Whanger, P D; Weswig, P H

    1977-01-01

    The arsenic content of well water in certain areas of Oregon can range up to 30 to 40 times the U.S.P.H.S. Drinking Water Standard of 1962, where concentrations in excess of 50 ppb are grounds for rejection. The elevated arsenic levels in water are postulated to be due to volcanic deposits. Wells in central Lane County, Oregon, that are known to contain arsenic rich water are in an area underlain by a particular group of sedimentary and volcanic rocks, which geologists have named the Fischer formation. The arsenic levels in water from wells ranged from no detectable amounts to 2,000 ppb. In general the deeper wells contained higher arsenic water. The high arsenic waters are characterized by the small amounts of calcium and magnesium in relation to that of sodium, a high content of boron, and a high pH. Water from some hot springs in other areas of Oregon was found to range as high as 900 ppb arsenic. Arsenic blood levels ranged from 32 ppb for people living in areas where water is low in arsenic to 250 ppb for those living in areas where water is known to contain high levels of arsenic. Some health problems associated with consumption of arsenic-rich water are discussed. PMID:908291

  20. Environmental Source of Arsenic Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jin-Yong; Yu, Seung-Do; Hong, Young-Seoub

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring metalloid that may be a significant risk factor for cancer after exposure to contaminated drinking water, cigarettes, foods, industry, occupational environment, and air. Among the various routes of arsenic exposure, drinking water is the largest source of arsenic poisoning worldwide. Arsenic exposure from ingested foods usually comes from food crops grown in arsenic-contaminated soil and/or irrigated with arsenic-contaminated water. According to a recent World Health Organization report, arsenic from contaminated water can be quickly and easily absorbed and depending on its metabolic form, may adversely affect human health. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration regulations for metals found in cosmetics to protect consumers against contaminations deemed deleterious to health; some cosmetics were found to contain a variety of chemicals including heavy metals, which are sometimes used as preservatives. Moreover, developing countries tend to have a growing number of industrial factories that unfortunately, harm the environment, especially in cities where industrial and vehicle emissions, as well as household activities, cause serious air pollution. Air is also an important source of arsenic exposure in areas with industrial activity. The presence of arsenic in airborne particulate matter is considered a risk for certain diseases. Taken together, various potential pathways of arsenic exposure seem to affect humans adversely, and future efforts to reduce arsenic exposure caused by environmental factors should be made. PMID:25284196

  1. Arsenic Speciation of Terrestrial Invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, M.M.; Koch, I.; Gordon, R.A.; Reimer, K.J. ); )

    2009-07-01

    The distribution and chemical form (speciation) of arsenic in terrestrial food chains determines both the amount of arsenic available to higher organisms, and the toxicity of this metalloid in affected ecosystems. Invertebrates are part of complex terrestrial food webs. This paper provides arsenic concentrations and arsenic speciation profiles for eight orders of terrestrial invertebrates collected at three historical gold mine sites and one background site in Nova Scotia, Canada. Total arsenic concentrations, determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), were dependent upon the classification of invertebrate. Arsenic species were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) ICP-MS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Invertebrates were found by HPLC ICP-MS to contain predominantly arsenite and arsenate in methanol/water extracts, while XAS revealed that most arsenic is bound to sulfur in vivo. Examination of the spatial distribution of arsenic within an ant tissue highlighted the differences between exogenous and endogenous arsenic, as well as the extent to which arsenic is transformed upon ingestion. Similar arsenic speciation patterns for invertebrate groups were observed across sites. Trace amounts of arsenobetaine and arsenocholine were identified in slugs, ants, and spiders.

  2. ELUCIDATING THE PATHWAY FOR ARSENIC METHYLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enzymatically-catalyzed methylation of arsenic is part of a metabolic pathway that converts inorganic arsenic into methylated products. Hence, in humans chronically exposed to inorganic arsenic, methyl and dimethyl arsenic account for most of the arsenic that is excreted in the ...

  3. ARSENIC SPECIATION ANALYSIS IN HUMAN SALIVA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Determination of arsenic species in human saliva is potentially useful for biomonitoring of human exposure to arsenic and for studying arsenic metabolism. However, there is no report on the speciation analysis of arsenic in saliva. Methods: Arsenic species in saliva ...

  4. Arsenic doped zinc oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Volbers, N.; Lautenschlaeger, S.; Leichtweiss, T.; Laufer, A.; Graubner, S.; Meyer, B. K.; Potzger, K.; Zhou Shengqiang

    2008-06-15

    As-doping of zinc oxide has been approached by ion implantation and chemical vapor deposition. The effect of thermal annealing on the implanted samples has been investigated by using secondary ion mass spectrometry and Rutherford backscattering/channeling geometry. The crystal damage, the distribution of the arsenic, the diffusion of impurities, and the formation of secondary phases is discussed. For the thin films grown by vapor deposition, the composition has been determined with regard to the growth parameters. The bonding state of arsenic was investigated for both series of samples using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  5. Arsenic removal by coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, K.N.; Green, J.F.; Do, H.D.; McLean, S.J.

    1995-04-01

    This study evaluated the removal of naturally occurring arsenic in a full-scale (106-mgd) conventional treatment plant. When the source water was treated with 3--10 mg/L of ferric chloride or 6, 10, or 20 mg/L of alum, arsenic removal was 81--96% (ferric chloride) and 23--71% (alum). Metal concentrations in the sludge produced during this study were below the state`s current hazardous waste levels at all coagulant dosages. No operational difficulties were encountered.

  6. Arsenic and Selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, J. A.; Kinniburgh, D. G.; Smedley, P. L.; Fordyce, F. M.; Klinck, B. A.

    2003-12-01

    Arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) have become increasingly important in environmental geochemistry because of their significance to human health. Their concentrations vary markedly in the environment, partly in relation to geology and partly as a result of human activity. Some of the contamination evident today probably dates back to the first settled civilizations which used metals.Arsenic is in group 15 of the periodic table (Table 1) and is usually described as a metalloid. It has only one stable isotope, 75As. It can exist in the -III, -I, 0, III, and V oxidation states (Table 2).

  7. ARSENIC REMOVAL TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR SINGLE FAMILY HOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information on POU and POE arsenic removal drinking water treatment systems. The presentation provides information on the arsenic rule, arsenic chemistry and arsenic treatment. The arsenic treatment options proposed for POU and POE treatment consist prim...

  8. Efficacy of arsenic filtration by Kanchan arsenic filter in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anjana; Smith, Linda S; Shrestha, Shreekrishna; Maden, Narendra

    2014-09-01

    Groundwater arsenic contamination has caused a significant public health burden in lowland regions of Nepal. For arsenic mitigation purposes, the Kanchan Arsenic Filter (KAF) was developed and validated for use in 2003 after pilot studies showed its effectiveness in removing arsenic. However, its efficacy in field conditions operating for a long period has been scarcely observed. In this study, we observe the efficacy of KAFs running over 6 months in highly arsenic-affected households in Nawalparasi district. We assessed pair-wise arsenic concentrations of 62 randomly selected household tubewells before filtration and after filtration via KAFs. Of 62 tubewells, 41 had influent arsenic concentration exceeding the Nepal drinking water quality standard value (50 μg/L). Of the 41 tubewells having unsafe arsenic levels, KAFs reduced arsenic concentration to the safe level for only 22 tubewells, an efficacy of 54%. In conclusion, we did not find significantly high efficacy of KAFs in reducing unsafe influent arsenic level to the safe level under the in situ field conditions. PMID:25252363

  9. Cancer in Experimental Animals Exposed to Arsenic and Arsenic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Tokar, Erik J.; Benbrahim-Tallaa, Lamia; Ward, Jerold M.; Lunn, Ruth; Sams, Reeder L.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant that has long been considered a human carcinogen. Recent studies raise further concern about the metalloid as a major, naturally occurring carcinogen in the environment. However, during this same period it has proven difficult to provide experimental evidence of the carcinogenicity of inorganic arsenic in laboratory animals and, until recently, there was considered to be a lack of clear evidence for carcinogenicity of any arsenical in animals. More recent work with arsenical methylation metabolites and early life exposures to inorganic arsenic has now provided evidence of carcinogenicity in rodents. Given that tens of millions of people worldwide are exposed to potentially unhealthy levels of environmental arsenic, in vivo rodent models of arsenic carcinogenesis are a clear necessity for resolving critical issues, like mechanisms of action, target tissue specificity, and sensitive subpopulations, and in developing strategies to reduce cancers in exposed human populations. This work reviews the available rodent studies considered relevant to carcinogenic assessment of arsenicals, taking advantage of the most recent review by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) that has not yet appeared as a full monograph but has been summarized (IARC 2009). Many valid studies show that arsenic can interact with other carcinogens/agents to enhance oncogenesis, and help elucidate mechanisms, and these too are summarized in this review. Finally, this body of rodent work is discussed in light of its impact on mechanisms and in the context of the persistent argument that arsenic is not carcinogenic in animals. PMID:20812815

  10. Arsenic release by indigenous bacteria Bacillus cereus from aquifer sediments at Datong Basin, northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zuoming; Wang, Yanxin; Duan, Mengyu; Xie, Xianjun; Su, Chunli

    2011-03-01

    Endemic arsenic poisoning due to long-term drinking of high arsenic groundwater has been reported in Datong Basin, northern China. To investigate the effects of microbial activities on arsenic mobilization in contaminated aquifers, Bacillus cereus ( B. cereus) isolated from high arsenic aquifer sediments of the basin was used in our microcosm experiments. The arsenic concentration in the treatment with both bacteria and sodium citrate or glucose had a rapid increase in the first 18 d, and then, it declined. Supplemented with bacteria only, the concentration could increase on the second day. By contrast, the arsenic concentration in the treatment supplemented with sodium citrate or glucose was kept very low. These results indicate that bacterial activities promoted the release of arsenic in the sediments. Bacterial activities also influenced other geochemical parameters of the aqueous phase, such as pH, Eh, and the concentrations of dissolved Fe, Mn, and Al that are important controls on arsenic release. The removal of Fe, Mn, and Al from sediment samples was observed with the presence of B. cereus. The effects of microbial activities on Fe, Mn, and Al release were nearly the same as those on As mobilization. The pH values of the treatments inoculated with bacteria were lower than those without bacteria, still at alkaline levels. With the decrease of Eh values in treatments inoculated with bacteria, the microcosms became more reducing and are thus favorable for arsenic release.

  11. Arsenic in ground-water under oxidizing conditions, south-west United States.

    PubMed

    Robertson, F N

    1989-12-01

    Concentrations of dissolved arsenic in ground-water in alluvial basins of Arizona commonly exceed 50 μg L(-1) and reach values as large as 1,300 μg L(-1). Arsenic speciation analyses show that arsenic occurs in the fully oxidized state of plus 5 (As+5), most likely in the form of HAsO4(∼2), under existing oxidizing and pH conditions. Arsenic in source areas presumably is oxidized to soluble As before transport into the basin or, if after transport, before burial. Probable sources of arsenic are the sulphide and arsenide deposits in the mineralized areas of the mountains surrounding the basins. Arsenic content of alluvial material ranged from 2 to 88 ppm. Occurrence and removal of arsenic in ground-water are related to the pH and the redox condition of the ground-water, the oxidation state of arsenic, and sorption or exchange. Within basins, dissolved arsenic correlates (P<0.01) with dissolved molybdenum, selenium, vanadium, and fluoride and with pH, suggesting sorption of negative ions. The sorption hypothesis is further supported by enrichment of teachable arsenic in the basin-fill sediments by about tenfold relative to the crustal abundance and by as much as a thousandfold relative to concentrations found in ground-water. Silicate hydrolysis reactions, as defined within the alluvial basins, under closed conditions cause increases in pH basinward and would promote desorption. Within the region, large concentrations of arsenic are commonly associated with the central parts of basins whose chemistries evolve under closed conditions. Arsenic does not correlate with dissolved iron (r = 0.09) but may be partly controlled by iron in the solid phase. High solid-phase arsenic contents were found in red clay beds. Large concentrations of arsenic also were found in water associated with red clay beds. Basins that contain the larger concentrations are bounded primarily by basalt and andesite, suggesting that the iron content as well as the arsenic content of the basin

  12. Arsenic in ground-water under oxidizing conditions, south-west United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, F.N.

    1989-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved arsenic in ground-water in alluvial basins of Arizona commonly exceed 50 ??g L-1 and reach values as large as 1,300 ??g L-1. Arsenic speciation analyses show that arsenic occurs in the fully oxidized state of plus 5 (As+5), most likely in the form of HAsO4???2, under existing oxidizing and pH conditions. Arsenic in source areas presumably is oxidized to soluble As before transport into the basin or, if after transport, before burial. Probable sources of arsenic are the sulphide and arsenide deposits in the mineralized areas of the mountains surrounding the basins. Arsenic content of alluvial material ranged from 2 to 88 ppm. Occurrence and removal of arsenic in ground-water are related to the pH and the redox condition of the ground-water, the oxidation state of arsenic, and sorption or exchange. Within basins, dissolved arsenic correlates (P<0.01) with dissolved molybdenum, selenium, vanadium, and fluoride and with pH, suggesting sorption of negative ions. The sorption hypothesis is further supported by enrichment of teachable arsenic in the basin-fill sediments by about tenfold relative to the crustal abundance and by as much as a thousandfold relative to concentrations found in ground-water. Silicate hydrolysis reactions, as defined within the alluvial basins, under closed conditions cause increases in pH basinward and would promote desorption. Within the region, large concentrations of arsenic are commonly associated with the central parts of basins whose chemistries evolve under closed conditions. Arsenic does not correlate with dissolved iron (r = 0.09) but may be partly controlled by iron in the solid phase. High solid-phase arsenic contents were found in red clay beds. Large concentrations of arsenic also were found in water associated with red clay beds. Basins that contain the larger concentrations are bounded primarily by basalt and andesite, suggesting that the iron content as well as the arsenic content of the basin fill may

  13. Reactive oxygen species mediate arsenic induced cell transformation and tumorigenesis through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma DLD1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zhuo; Wang Xin; Cheng Senping; Sun Lijuan; Son, Young-Ok; Yao Hua; Li Wenqi; Budhraja, Amit; Li Li; Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas; Arnold, Susanne M.; Shi Xianglin

    2011-10-15

    Long term exposure to arsenic can increase incidence of human cancers, such as skin, lung, and colon rectum. The mechanism of arsenic induced carcinogenesis is still unclear. It is generally believed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play an important role in this process. In the present study, we investigate the possible linkage between ROS, {beta}-catenin and arsenic induced transformation and tumorigenesis in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line, DLD1 cells. Our results show that arsenic was able to activate p47{sup phox} and p67{sup phox}, two key proteins for activation of NADPH oxidase. Arsenic was also able to generate ROS in DLD1 cells. Arsenic increased {beta}-catenin expression level and its promoter activity. ROS played a major role in arsenic-induced {beta}-catenin activation. Treatment of DLD1 cells by arsenic enhanced both transformation and tumorigenesis of these cells. The tumor volumes of arsenic treated group were much larger than those without arsenic treatment. Addition of either superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase reduced arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation. The results indicate that ROS are involved in arsenic induced cell transformation and tumor formation possible through Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line DLD1 cells. - Highlights: > Arsenic activates NADPH oxidase and increases reactive oxygen species generation in DLD1 cells. > Arsenic increases {beta}-catenin expression. > Inhibition of ROS induced by arsenic reduce {beta}-catenin expression. > Arsenic increases cell transformation in DLD1 cells and tumorigenesis in nude mice. > Blockage of ROS decrease cell transformation and tumorigenesis induced by arsenic.

  14. ARSENIC TREATMENT OPTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The PPT presentation will provide information on the drinking water treatment options for small utilities to remove arsenic from ground water. The discussion will include information on the EPA BAT listed processes and on some of the newer technologies, such as the iron based ad...

  15. Arsenic Content in American Wine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Denise

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies that have investigated arsenic content in juice, rice, milk, broth (beef and chicken), and other foods have stimulated an interest in understanding how prevalent arsenic contamination is in the U.S. food and beverage supply. The study described here focused on quantifying arsenic levels in wine. A total of 65 representative wines from the top four wine-producing states in the U.S. were analyzed for arsenic content. All samples contained arsenic levels that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) exposure limit for drinking water of 10 parts per billion (ppb) and all samples contained inorganic arsenic. The average arsenic detected among all samples studied was 23.3 ppb. Lead, a common co-contaminant to arsenic, was detected in 58% of samples tested, but only 5% exceeded the U.S. EPA exposure limit for drinking water of 15 ppb. Arsenic levels in American wines exceeded those found in other studies involving water, bottled water, apple juice, apple juice blend, milk, rice syrup, and other beverages. When taken in the context of consumption patterns in the U.S., the pervasive presence of arsenic in wine can pose a potential health risk to regular adult wine drinkers. PMID:26591333

  16. Arsenic in shrimp from Kuwait

    SciTech Connect

    Bou-Olayan, A.H.; Al-Yakoob, S.; Al-Hossaini, M.

    1995-04-01

    Arsenic is ubiquitous in the environment and can accumulate in food via contaminated soil, water or air. It enters the food chain through dry and wet atmospheric deposition. Combustion of oil and coal, use of arsenical fertilizers and pesticides and smelting of ores contributes significantly to the natural background of arsenic in soils and sediments. The metal can be transferred from soil to man through plants. In spite of variation in acute, subacute, and chronic toxic effects to plants and animals, evidence of nutritional essentiality of arsenic for rats, goats, and guinea pigs has been suggested, but has not been confirmed for humans. Adverse toxic effects of arsenic as well as its widespread distribution in the environment raises concern about levels of arsenic in man`s diet. Higher levels of arsenic in the diet can result in a higher accumulation rate. Arsenic levels in marine organisms are influenced by species differences, size of organism, and human activities. Bottom dwellers such as shrimp, crab, and lobster accumulate more arsenic than fish due to their frequent contact with bottom sediments. Shrimp constitute approximately 30% of mean total seafood consumption in Kuwait. This study was designed to determine the accumulation of arsenic in the commercially important jinga shrimp (Metapenaeus affinis) and grooved tiger prawn (Penaeus semisulcatus). 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. GENE METHYLATION CHANGES IN TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENES INDUCED BY ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The choice of a dose-response model used for extrapolation can be influenced by knowledge of mechanism of action. We have already showed that arsenic affects methylation of the human p53 gene promoter. Evidence that genes other than the p53 tumor suppressor gene are affected woul...

  18. Progress in Teachers' Readiness to Promote Positive Youth Development among Students during the Lions Quest Teaching Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talvio, Markus; Berg, Minna; Ketonen, Elina; Komulainen, Erkki; Lonka, Kirsti

    2015-01-01

    Modern learning psychology places an emphasis on the ability of teachers to promote their students' social and emotional learning (SEL) and living a good life. Research on precisely how teachers promote SEL and well-being among their students, however, remains scarce. This study focused on evaluating the Lions Quest teaching workshop (LQ), which…

  19. Arsenic-induced Aurora-A activation contributes to chromosome instability and tumorigenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Han; Tseng, Ya-Shih; Yang, Chao-Chun; Kao, Yu-Ting; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic may cause serious environmental pollution and is a serious industrial problem. Depending on the dosage, arsenic may trigger the cells undergoing either proliferation or apoptosis-related cell death. Because of lack of the proper animal model to study arsenic induced tumorigenesis, the accurate risk level of arsenic exposure has not been determined. Arsenic shows genotoxic effect on human beings who uptake water contaminated by arsenic. Chromosome aberration is frequently detected in arsenic exposure-related diseases and is associated with increased oxidative stress and decreased DNA repairing activity, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Aurora-A is a mitotic kinase, over-expression of Aurora-A leads to centrosome amplification, chromosomal instability and cell transformation. We revealed that Aurora-A is over-expressed in the skin and bladder cancer patients from blackfoot-disease endemic areas. Our cell line studies reveal that arsenic exposure between 0.5 μM and 1 μM for 2-7 days are able to induce Aurora-A expression and activation based on promoter activity, RNA and protein analysis. Aurora-A overexpression further increases the frequency of unsymmetrical chromosome segregation through centrosome amplification followed by cell population accumulated at S phase in immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) and uroepithelial cells (E7). Furthermore, Aurora-A over-expression was sustained for 1-4 weeks by chronic treatment of immortalized bladder and skin cells with NaAsO2. Aurora-A promoter methylation and gene amplification was not detected in the long-term arsenic treated E7 cells. Furthermore, the expression level of E2F1 transcription factor (E2F1) is increased in the presence of arsenic, and arsenic-related Aurora-A over-expression is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1. We further demonstrated that overexpression of Aurora-A and mutant Ha-ras or Aurora-A and mutant p53 may act additively to trigger arsenic-related bladder and skin cancer

  20. Arsenic poisoning in dairy cattle from naturally occurring arsenic pyrites.

    PubMed

    Hopkirk, R G

    1987-10-01

    An outbreak of arsenic poisoning occurred in which most of a 200 cow dairy herd were affected and six died. The source of the arsenic was naturally occurring arsenic pyrites from the Waiotapu Stream, near Rotorua. Arsenic levels in the nearby soil were as high as 6618 ppm. There was little evidence to suggest that treatment affected the course of the disease. Haematology was of little use in diagnosis, post-mortem signs were not always consistent and persistence of the element in the liver appeared short. Control of further outbreaks have been based on practical measures to minimise the intake of contaminated soil and free laying water by the stock. PMID:16031332

  1. Arsenic Exposure and Toxicology: A Historical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael F.; Beck, Barbara D.; Chen, Yu; Lewis, Ari S.; Thomas, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The metalloid arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed in food, water, air, and soil. Arsenic has a long history of use as a homicidal agent, but in the past 100 years arsenic, has been used as a pesticide, a chemotherapeutic agent and a constituent of consumer products. In some areas of the world, high levels of arsenic are naturally present in drinking water and are a toxicological concern. There are several structural forms and oxidation states of arsenic because it forms alloys with metals and covalent bonds with hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, and other elements. Environmentally relevant forms of arsenic are inorganic and organic existing in the trivalent or pentavalent state. Metabolism of arsenic, catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase, is a sequential process of reduction from pentavalency to trivalency followed by oxidative methylation back to pentavalency. Trivalent arsenic is generally more toxicologically potent than pentavalent arsenic. Acute effects of arsenic range from gastrointestinal distress to death. Depending on the dose, chronic arsenic exposure may affect several major organ systems. A major concern of ingested arsenic is cancer, primarily of skin, bladder, and lung. The mode of action of arsenic for its disease endpoints is currently under study. Two key areas are the interaction of trivalent arsenicals with sulfur in proteins and the ability of arsenic to generate oxidative stress. With advances in technology and the recent development of animal models for arsenic carcinogenicity, understanding of the toxicology of arsenic will continue to improve. PMID:21750349

  2. Monitoring and evaluation of plant and hydrological controls on arsenic transport across the water sediment interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, P. R.; MacDonald, L. H.; Paull, J.

    2009-12-01

    Plants and hydrology influence the transport of arsenic in wetlands by changing the dominant redox chemistry in the subsurface, and different plant and hydrological regimes can serve as effective barriers or promoters of metal transport. Inorganic arsenic, especially arsenate, binds to iron oxides in wetlands. In flooded wetland sediments, organic carbon from plants consumes oxygen and promotes reductive iron dissolution, which leads to arsenic release, while plants simultaneously create microoxic regimes around root hairs that oxidize and precipitate iron, promoting arsenic capture. Hydrology influences arsenic mobility by promoting wetting and drying cycles. Such cycles can lead to rapid shifts from anaerobic to aerobic conditions, and vice versa, with lasting impact on the oxidation state of iron and, by extension, the mobility of arsenic. Remediation strategies should take these competing conditions into account, and to help inform these strategies this study examines the chemistry of an industrially contaminated wetland when the above mechanisms aggregate. The study tests whether, in bulk, plants promote iron reduction or oxidation in intermittently flooded or consistently flooded sediments, and how this impacts arsenic mobility. This research uses a novel dialysis-based monitoring technique to examine the macro-properties of arsenic transport at the sediment water interface and at depth. Dialysis-based monitoring allows long-term seasonal trends in anaerobic porewater and allows active hypothesis testing on the influence of plants on redox chemistry. This study finds that plants promote iron reduction and that iron-reducing zones tend to correlate with zones with mobile arsenic. However, one newly reported and important finding of this study is that a brief summer drought that dried and oxidized sediments with a long history of iron-reduction zone served to effectively halt iron reduction for many months, and this corresponded to a lasting decline in

  3. Arsenic-induced plant growth of arsenic-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata: Impact of arsenic and phosphate rock.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong-He; Yang, Guang-Mei; Fu, Jing-Wei; Guan, Dong-Xing; Chen, Yanshan; Ma, Lena Q

    2016-04-01

    Phosphate rock (PR) has been shown to promote plant growth and arsenic (As) uptake by As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata (PV). However, little is known about its behaviors in agricultural soils. In this study, impact of 50 mg kg(-1) As and/or 1.5% PR amendment on plant As accumulation and growth was investigated by growing PV for 90 d in three agricultural soils. While As amendment significantly increased plant As uptake and substantially promoted PV growth, the opposite was observed with PR amendment. Arsenic amendment increased plant frond As from 16.9-265 to 961-6017 mg kg(-1),whereas PR amendment lowered frond As to 10.2-216 mg kg(-1). The As-induced plant growth stimulation was 69-71%. While PR amendment increased plant Ca and P uptake, As amendment showed opposite results. The PV biomass was highly correlated with plant As at r = 0.82, but with weak correlations with plant Ca or P at r < 0.30. This study confirmed that 1) As significantly promoted PV growth, probably independent of Ca or P uptake, 2) PR amendment didn't enhance plant growth or As uptake by PV in agricultural soils with adequate available P, and 3) PV effluxed arsenite (AsIII) growing in agricultural soils. PMID:26874625

  4. Arsenic content of homeopathic medicines

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, H.D.; Saryan, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to test the widely held assumption that homeopathic medicines contain negligible quantities of their major ingredients, six such medicines labeled in Latin as containing arsenic were purchased over the counter and by mail order and their arsenic contents measured. Values determined were similar to those expected from label information in only two of six and were markedly at variance in the remaining four. Arsenic was present in notable quantities in two preparations. Most sales personnel interviewed could not identify arsenic as being an ingredient in these preparations and were therefore incapable of warning the general public of possible dangers from ingestion. No such warnings appeared on the labels.

  5. Interleukin 6 Is Required for Pancreatic Cancer Progression by Promoting MAPK Signaling Activation and Oxidative Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yaqing; Yan, Wei; Collins, Meredith A.; Bednar, Filip; Rakshit, Sabita; Zetter, Bruce R.; Stanger, Ben Z.; Chung, Ivy; Rhim, Andrew D.; di Magliano, Marina Pasca

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest human malignancies, is almost invariably associated with the presence of an oncogenic form of Kras. Mice expressing oncogenic Kras in the pancreas recapitulate the step-wise progression of the human disease. The inflammatory cytokine interleukin 6 (IL6) is often expressed by multiple cell types within the tumor microenvironment. Here, we show that IL6 is required for the maintenance and progression of pancreatic cancer precursor lesions. In fact, the lack of IL6 completely ablates cancer progression even in presence of oncogenic Kras. Mechanistically, we show that IL6 synergizes with oncogenic Kras to activate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification program downstream of the MAPK/ERK signaling cascade. In addition, IL6 regulates the inflammatory microenvironment of pancreatic cancer throughout its progression, providing several signals that are essential for carcinogenesis. Thus, IL6 emerges as a key player at all stages of pancreatic carcinogenesis, and a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24097820

  6. Arsenic release during managed aquifer recharge (MAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, T.; Lazareva, O.; Druschel, G.

    2013-12-01

    The mobilization and addition of geogenic trace metals to groundwater is typically caused by anthropogenic perturbations of the physicochemical conditions in the aquifer. This can add dangerously high levels of toxins to groundwater, thus compromising its use as a source of drinking water. In several regions world-wide, aquifer storage and recovery (ASR), a form of managed aquifer recharge (MAR), faces the problem of arsenic release due to the injection of oxygenated storage water. To better understand this process we coupled geochemical reactive transport modeling to bench-scale leaching experiments to investigate and verify the mobilization of geogenic arsenic (As) under a range of redox conditions from an arsenic-rich pyrite bearing limestone aquifer in Central Florida. Modeling and experimental observations showed similar results and confirmed the following: (1) native groundwater and aquifer matrix, including pyrite, were in chemical equilibrium, thus preventing the release of As due to pyrite dissolution under ambient conditions; (2) mixing of oxygen-rich surface water with oxygen-depleted native groundwater changed the redox conditions and promoted the dissolution of pyrite, and (3) the behavior of As along a flow path was controlled by a complex series of interconnected reactions. This included the oxidative dissolution of pyrite and simultaneous sorption of As onto neo-formed hydrous ferric oxides (HFO), followed by the reductive dissolution of HFO and secondary release of adsorbed As under reducing conditions. Arsenic contamination of drinking water in these systems is thus controlled by the re-equilibration of the system to more reducing conditions rather than a purely oxidative process.

  7. Photooxidation of arsenic(III) to arsenic(V) on the surface of kaolinite clay.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Wang, Yajie; Yu, Yingtan; Zhang, Xiangzhi; Li, Jinjun; Wu, Feng

    2015-10-01

    As one of the most toxic heavy metals, the oxidation of inorganic arsenic has drawn great attention among environmental scientists. However, little has been reported on the solar photochemical behavior of arsenic species on top-soil. In the present work, the influencing factors (pH, relative humidity (RH), humic acid (HA), trisodium citrate, and additional iron ions) and the contributions of reactive oxygen species (ROS, mainly HO and HO2/O2(-)) to photooxidation of As(III) to As(V) on kaolinite surfaces under UV irradiation (λ=365nm) were investigated. Results showed that lower pH facilitated photooxidation, and the photooxidation efficiency increased with the increase of RH and trisodium citrate. Promotion or inhibition of As(III) photooxidation by HA was observed at low or high dosages, respectively. Additional iron ions greatly promoted the photooxidation, but excessive amounts of Fe(2+) competed with As(III) for oxidation by ROS. Experiments on scavengers indicated that the HO radical was the predominant oxidant in this system. Experiments on actual soil surfaces proved the occurrence of As(III) photooxidation in real topsoil. This work demonstrates that the photooxidation process of As(III) on the soil surface should be taken into account when studying the fate of arsenic in natural soil newly polluted with acidic wastewater containing As(III). PMID:26456603

  8. Homicidal arsenic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Andrew; Taylor, Andrew; Leese, Elizabeth; Allen, Sam; Morton, Jackie; McAdam, Julie

    2015-07-01

    The case of a 50-year-old man who died mysteriously after being admitted to hospital is reported. He had raised the possibility of being poisoned prior to his death. A Coroner's post-mortem did not reveal the cause of death but this was subsequently established by post-mortem trace element analysis of liver, urine, blood and hair all of which revealed very high arsenic concentrations. PMID:25344454

  9. INFLUENCE OF DIETARY ARSENIC ON URINARY ARSENIC METABOLITE EXCRETION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of Dietary Arsenic on Urinary Arsenic Metabolite Excretion

    Cara L. Carty, M.S., Edward E. Hudgens, B.Sc., Rebecca L. Calderon, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., Richard Kwok, M.S.P.H., Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch/HSD, NHEERL/US EPA; David J. Thomas, Ph.D., Pharmacokinetics...

  10. Histone Methyltransferase Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2-Mediated ABCA1 Promoter DNA Methylation Contributes to the Progression of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Wei; Yao, Feng; He, Ping-Ping; Xie, Wei; Mo, Zhong-Cheng; Shi, Jin-Feng; Wu, Jian-Feng; Peng, Juan; Liu, Dan; Cayabyab, Francisco S.; Zheng, Xi-Long; Tang, Xiang-Yang; Ouyang, Xin-Ping; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) plays a critical role in maintaining cellular cholesterol homeostasis. The purpose of this study is to identify the molecular mechanism(s) underlying ABCA1 epigenetic modification and determine its potential impact on ABCA1 expression in macrophage-derived foam cell formation and atherosclerosis development. DNA methylation induced foam cell formation from macrophages and promoted atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE−/−) mice. Bioinformatics analyses revealed a large CpG island (CGI) located in the promoter region of ABCA1. Histone methyltransferase enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) downregulated ABCA1 mRNA and protein expression in THP-1 and RAW264.7 macrophage-derived foam cells. Pharmacological inhibition of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) with 5-Aza-dC or knockdown of DNMT1 prevented the downregulation of macrophage ABCA1 expression, suggesting a role of DNA methylation in ABCA1 expression. Polycomb protein EZH2 induced DNMT1 expression and methyl-CpG-binding protein-2 (MeCP2) recruitment, and stimulated the binding of DNMT1 and MeCP2 to ABCA1 promoter, thereby promoting ABCA1 gene DNA methylation and atherosclerosis. Knockdown of DNMT1 inhibited EZH2-induced downregulation of ABCA1 in macrophages. Conversely, EZH2 overexpression stimulated DNMT1-induced ABCA1 gene promoter methylation and atherosclerosis. EZH2-induced downregulation of ABCA1 gene expression promotes foam cell formation and the development of atherosclerosis by DNA methylation of ABCA1 gene promoter. PMID:27295295

  11. Histone Methyltransferase Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2-Mediated ABCA1 Promoter DNA Methylation Contributes to the Progression of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yun-Cheng; Tang, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Ping; Wan, Wei; Yao, Feng; He, Ping-Ping; Xie, Wei; Mo, Zhong-Cheng; Shi, Jin-Feng; Wu, Jian-Feng; Peng, Juan; Liu, Dan; Cayabyab, Francisco S; Zheng, Xi-Long; Tang, Xiang-Yang; Ouyang, Xin-Ping; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) plays a critical role in maintaining cellular cholesterol homeostasis. The purpose of this study is to identify the molecular mechanism(s) underlying ABCA1 epigenetic modification and determine its potential impact on ABCA1 expression in macrophage-derived foam cell formation and atherosclerosis development. DNA methylation induced foam cell formation from macrophages and promoted atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE-/-) mice. Bioinformatics analyses revealed a large CpG island (CGI) located in the promoter region of ABCA1. Histone methyltransferase enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) downregulated ABCA1 mRNA and protein expression in THP-1 and RAW264.7 macrophage-derived foam cells. Pharmacological inhibition of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) with 5-Aza-dC or knockdown of DNMT1 prevented the downregulation of macrophage ABCA1 expression, suggesting a role of DNA methylation in ABCA1 expression. Polycomb protein EZH2 induced DNMT1 expression and methyl-CpG-binding protein-2 (MeCP2) recruitment, and stimulated the binding of DNMT1 and MeCP2 to ABCA1 promoter, thereby promoting ABCA1 gene DNA methylation and atherosclerosis. Knockdown of DNMT1 inhibited EZH2-induced downregulation of ABCA1 in macrophages. Conversely, EZH2 overexpression stimulated DNMT1-induced ABCA1 gene promoter methylation and atherosclerosis. EZH2-induced downregulation of ABCA1 gene expression promotes foam cell formation and the development of atherosclerosis by DNA methylation of ABCA1 gene promoter. PMID:27295295

  12. Arsenic speciation in Mono Lake, California: Response to seasonal stratification and anoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollibaugh, James T.; Carini, Steve; Gürleyük, Hakan; Jellison, Robert; Joye, Samantha B.; LeCleir, Gary; Meile, Christof; Vasquez, Lydia; Wallschläger, Dirk

    2005-04-01

    Mono Lake is a closed-basin, alkaline, hypersaline lake located at the western edge of the Great Basin in eastern California. We studied the distribution of arsenic (As) species in the water column of Mono Lake between February and November, 2002. This period captured the seasonal progression from winter mixing, through summer thermal stratification, to autumn overturn. Arsenic speciation was determined by ion chromatography-inductively coupled-plasma-mass spectrometry of samples preserved in the field by flash-freezing in liquid nitrogen. We found that arsenic speciation was dominated (>90%) by arsenate when oxygen was detectable. Once levels fell below 6 μmol/L O 2, arsenic speciation shifted to dominance by reduced species. Arsenate and arsenite co-occurred in a transition zone immediately below the base of the oxycline and low but significant concentrations of arsenate were occasionally detected in sulfidic hypolimnion samples. Thio-arsenic species were the dominant form of As found in sulfidic waters. Maxima of thio-arsenic species with stoichiometries consistent with mono-, di- and trithio-arsenic occurred in succession as sulfide concentration increased. A compound with a stoichiometry consistent with trithio-arsenic was the dominant As species (˜50% of total As) in high sulfide (2 mmol/L) bottom water. Lower concentrations of total As in bottom water relative to surface water suggest precipitation of As/S mineral phases in response to sulfide accumulation during prolonged anoxia.

  13. Reduced LINE-1 methylation is associated with arsenic-induced genotoxic stress in children.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Apurba K; Paul, Somnath; Adak, Shanta; Giri, Ashok K

    2016-08-01

    Early life exposure to arsenic has profound effect towards development of arsenic induced toxic outcomes. Some districts in the state of West Bengal, India are highly affected by arsenic, mainly through ground water. In children, not much of the toxic outcomes like dermatological lesions are observed but it is thought that the exposure leads to transient alteration in their biological processes that leads to various deleterious health effects later on. We evaluated the global methylation status by analyzing the LINE-1 methylation profile in children from arsenic exposed region between the age group 5-15 years along with the cytogenetic stress induced by arsenic as measured by lymphocyte micronucleus (MN) frequency. A total of 52 arsenic exposed and 32 unexposed children were analyzed. Whole blood DNA was used to measure the LINE-1 methylation by qRT-MSP. We found a significant association of MN-frequency in exposed individuals with highly depleted LINE-1 methylation compared to the exposed individuals with near baseline (which was comparable to unexposed control) methylation index as well as with those with the hypermethylated LINE-1 promoters. From our results, we interpret that LINE-1 methylation index may serve as a potent global epigenetic mark to detect the degree of arsenic genotoxicity at a very early age. We propose that this may be utilized to determine the extent of toxic influence exerted by arsenic, from a very early age. PMID:27465741

  14. Involvement of epigenetics and EMT related miRNA in arsenic induced neoplastic transformation and their potential clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Michailidi, Christina; Hayashi, Masamichi; Datta, Sayantan; Sen, Tanusree; Zenner, Kaitlyn; Oladeru, Oluwadamilola; Brait, Mariana; Izumchenko, Evgeny; Baras, Alexander; VandenBussche, Christopher; Argos, Maria; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Ahsan, Habibul; Hahn, Noah M.; Netto, George J.; Sidransky, David; Hoque, Mohammad O.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to toxicants leads to cumulative molecular changes that overtime increase a subject’s risk of developing urothelial carcinoma (UC). To assess the impact of arsenic exposure at a time progressive manner, we developed and characterized a cell culture model and tested a panel of miRNAs in urine samples from arsenic exposed subjects, UC patients and controls. To prepare an in vitro model, we chronically exposed an immortalized normal human bladder cell line (HUC1) to arsenic. Growth of the HUC1 cells was increased in a time dependent manner after arsenic treatment and cellular morphology was changed. In soft agar assay, colonies were observed only in arsenic treated cells and the number of colonies gradually increased with longer periods of treatment. Similarly, invaded cells in invasion assay were observed only in arsenic treated cells. Withdrawal of arsenic treatment for 2.5 months did not reverse the tumorigenic properties of arsenic treated cells. Western blot analysis demonstrated decreased PTEN and increased AKT and mTOR in arsenic treated HUC1 cells. Levels of miR-200a, miR-200b, and miR-200c were down-regulated in arsenic exposed HUC1 cells by quantitative RT-PCR. Furthermore, in human urine, miR-200c and miR-205 were inversely associated with arsenic exposure (P=0.005 and 0.009, respectively). Expression of miR-205 discriminated cancer cases from controls with high sensitivity and specificity (AUC=0.845). Our study suggests that exposure to arsenic rapidly induces a multifaceted dedifferentiation program and miR-205 has potential to be used as a marker of arsenic exposure as well as a maker of early UC detection. PMID:25586904

  15. Subhepatotoxic exposure to arsenic enhances lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Arteel, Gavin E.; Guo, Luping; Schlierf, Thomas; Beier, Juliane I; Kaiser, J. Phillip; Chen, Theresa S; Liu, Marsha; Conklin, Daniel P.; Miller, Heather L.; von Montfort, Claudia; States, J. Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to arsenic via drinking water is a serious health concern in the US. Whereas studies have identified arsenic alone as an independent risk factor for liver disease, concentrations of arsenic required to damage this organ are generally higher than found in the US water supply. The purpose of the current study was to test the hypothesis that arsenic (at subhepatotoxic doses) may also sensitize the liver to a second hepatotoxin. To test this hypothesis, the effect of chronic exposure to arsenic on liver damage caused by acute lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was determined in mice. Male C57Bl/6J mice (4-6 weeks) were exposed to arsenic (49 ppm as sodium arsenite in drinking water). After 7 months of exposure, animals were injected with LPS (10 mg/kg i.p.) and sacrificed 24 h later. Arsenic alone caused no overt hepatotoxicity, as determined by plasma enzymes and histology. In contrast, arsenic exposure dramatically enhanced liver damage caused by LPS, increasing the number and size of necroinflammatory foci. This effect of arsenic was coupled with increases in indices of oxidative stress (4-HNE adducts, depletion of GSH and methionine pools). The number of apoptotic (TUNEL) hepatocytes was similar in the LPS and arsenic/LPS groups. In contrast, arsenic pre-exposure blunted the increase in proliferating (PCNA) hepatocytes caused by LPS; this change in the balance between cell death and proliferation was coupled with a robust loss of liver weight in the arsenic/LPS compared to the LPS alone group. The impairment of proliferation after LPS caused by arsenic was also coupled with alterations in the expression of key mediators of cell cycle progression (p27, p21, CDK6 and Cyclin D1). Taken together, these results suggest that arsenic, at doses that are not overtly hepatotoxic per se, significantly enhances LPS-induced liver injury. These results further suggest that arsenic levels in the drinking water may be a risk modifier for the development of chronic liver diseases

  16. Pigment Epithelium-Derived Factor (PEDF) Expression Induced by EGFRvIII Promotes Self-renewal and Tumor Progression of Glioma Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jinlong; Park, Gunwoo; Kim, Tae Hoon; Hong, Jun Hee; Kim, Youn-Jae; Jin, Xiong; Kang, Sangjo; Jung, Ji-Eun; Kim, Jeong-Yub; Yun, Hyeongsun; Lee, Jeong Eun; Kim, Minkyung; Chung, Junho; Kim, Hyunggee; Nakano, Ichiro; Gwak, Ho-Shin; Yoo, Heon; Yoo, Byong Chul; Kim, Jong Heon; Hur, Eun-Mi; Lee, Jeongwu; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Park, Myung-Jin; Park, Jong Bae

    2015-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) has been associated with glioma stemness, but the direct molecular mechanism linking the two is largely unknown. Here, we show that EGFRvIII induces the expression and secretion of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) via activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), thereby promoting self-renewal and tumor progression of glioma stem cells (GSCs). Mechanistically, PEDF sustained GSC self-renewal by Notch1 cleavage, and the generated intracellular domain of Notch1 (NICD) induced the expression of Sox2 through interaction with its promoter region. Furthermore, a subpopulation with high levels of PEDF was capable of infiltration along corpus callosum. Inhibition of PEDF diminished GSC self-renewal and increased survival of orthotopic tumor-bearing mice. Together, these data indicate the novel role of PEDF as a key regulator of GSC and suggest clinical implications. PMID:25992628

  17. Galectin-1 mediates TGF-β-induced transformation from normal fibroblasts into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts and promotes tumor progression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lingyan; Xu, Cong; Guan, Zhonghai; Su, Xingyun; Xu, Zhenzhen; Cao, Jiang; Teng, Lisong

    2016-01-01

    Rcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major constituent of the tumor microenvironment. Cancer cells can induce the transformation from normal fibroblasts (NFs) into CAFs, reciprocally, CAFs promote tumor invasion and proliferation. TGF-β has been the mostly accepted factor to fuel NFs transformation into CAFs. Galectin-1 (Gal1) is highly upregulated in CAFs of multiple human cancers, and overexpression of Gal1 in CAFs promotes tumor progression. The effect of Gal1 on TGF-β-induced CAFs activation has not yet been established in gastric cancer (GC). In this study, we show that Gal1 expression in stroma is positively related to TGF-β in epithelial cells by retrospective analysis of GC patient samples. Meanwhile, conditioned media (CMs) from gastric cancer cells induce expression of both Gal1 and the CAFs marker alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in NFs via TGF-β secretion. Knockdown of Gal1 prevents TGF-β-induced the conversion of NFs to CAFs. CMs from fibroblasts overexpressing Gal1 inhibits cancer cells apoptosis, promotes migration and invasion in vitro. Thus, Gal1 is significantly involved in the development of tumor-promoting microenvironment by enhancing TGF-β signaling in a positive feedback loop. Targeting Gal1 in tumor stroma should be considered as a potential therapeutic target for GC. PMID:27186290

  18. KINETIC AND DYNAMIC ASPECTS OF ARSENIC TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project integrates research on aspects of the kinetic and dynamic behavior of arsenic. A PBPK model for arsenic will be developed using metabolism and disposition data from studies in mice. Retention of arsenic in the tissues following exposure to arsenic will be investigate...

  19. OPTIMIZING ARSENIC REMOVAL DURING IRON REMOVAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recently promulgated Arsenic rule will require that many new drinking water systems treat their water to remove arsenic. Many groundwaters that have arsenic in their source water also have iron in their water. As a result, arsenic treatment at these sites will most likely b...

  20. Arsenic Is A Genotoxic Carcinogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen; however, there is controversy over whether or not it should be considered a genotoxic carcinogen. Many possible modes of action have been proposed on how arsenic induces cancer, including inhibiting DNA repair, altering methylation patter...

  1. ARSENIC - SUSCEPTIBILITY & IN UTERO EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic remains a serious public health problem at many locations worldwide. If has often been noted that prevalences of signs and symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning differ among various populations. For example, skin lesions or peripheral vascular dis...

  2. MECHANISMS OF ARSENICAL INDUCED MALFORMATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our research uses the whole embryo culture system to expose mouse embryos to arsenic at the neurulation stage of development (This stage of development is most susceptible to arsenical-induced defects). This includes studies to assess the distribution of cells in the cell cycle a...

  3. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Web cast presentation covered six topics: 1), Arsenic Chemistry, 2), Technology Selection/Arsenic Demonstration Program, 3), Case Study 1, 4), Case Study 2,5), Case Study 3, and 6), Media Regeneration Project. The presentation consists of material presented at other training sess...

  4. ARSENIC TECHNICAL WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS DOCUMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is a semi-metallic element or metalloid which has several different allotropic forms. Arsenic compounds, mainly as As2O3, can be recovered as a by-product from processing complex ores mined for other minerals such as copper, lead, zinc, gold and silver. Consequently, ...

  5. Enhanced mammary progesterone receptor-A isoform activity in the promotion of mammary tumor progression by dietary soy in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary contribution to breast cancer risk, recurrence, and progression remains incompletely understood. Increased consumption of soy and soy isoflavones is associated with reduced mammary cancer susceptibility in women and in rodent models of carcinogenesis. In rats treated with N-Methyl-N-Nitrosou...

  6. Chromatin inactivation precedes de novo dna methylation during the progressive epigenetic silencing of the rassf1a promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Strunnikova Maria; Schagdarsurengin, Undraga; Kehlen, Astrid; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Dammann, Reinhard

    2005-02-23

    Epigenetic inactivation of the RASSF1A tumor suppressor by CpG island methylation was frequently detected in cancer. However, the mechanisms of this aberrant DNA methylation are unknown. In the RASSF1A promoter, we characterized four Sp1 sites, which are frequently methylated in cancer. We examined the functional relationship between DNA methylation, histone modification, Sp1 binding, and RASSF1A expression in proliferating human mammary epithelial cells. With increasing passages, the transcription of RASSF1A was dramatically silenced. This inactivation was associated with deacetylation and lysine 9 trimethylation of histone H3 and an impaired binding of Sp1 at the RASSF1A promoter. In mammary epithelial cells that had overcome a stress-associated senescence barrier, a spreading of DNA methylation in the CpG island promoter was observed. When the RASSF1A-silenced cells were treated with inhibitors of DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase, binding of Sp1 and expression of RASSF1 A reoccurred. In summary, we observed that histone H3 deacetylation and H3 lysine 9 trimethylation occur in the same time window as gene inactivation and precede DNA methylation. Our data suggest that in epithelial cells, histone inactivation may trigger de novo DNA methylation of the RASSF1A promoter and this system may serve as a model for CpG island inactivation of tumor suppressor genes.

  7. High mobility group box-1 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma progression through miR-21-mediated matrix metalloproteinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Man; Liu, Yao; Varley, Patrick; Chang, Ying; He, Xing-xing; Huang, Hai; Tang, Daolin; Lotze, Michael T.; Lin, Jusheng; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Liver inflammation plays a critical role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) etiology. Damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), such as high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), and dysregulated microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in inflammatory disease states, such as miR-21, may participate in the link between inflammation and cancer. We sought to determine the role of HMGB1 signaling in HCC tumor progression. We first document the concordant expression increase of HMGB1 and miR-21 in HCC cell lines and primary HCC tumor samples and subsequently show that HMGB1 stimulation results in over-expression of miR-21. These changes were found to be dependent on the IL-6/Stat3 signaling axis. Invasion and migration of HCC cells in vitro was inhibited by both Stat3 and miR-21 antagonists, suggesting a role for this pathway in HCC tumor progression. We verified that HMGB1-induced expression of miR-21 in HCC provides a post-transcriptional repression of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors RECK and TIMP3, which are known to impact HCC progression and metastases. Finally, we found that inhibition of miR-21 in murine HMGB1-overexpressing HCC xenografts led to reduced tumor MMP activity through released repression of the miR-21 targets RECK and TIMP3, which ultimately impeded tumor progression. The prototypical DAMP, HMGB1, is released during liver inflammation and provides a favorable environment for HCC growth. HMGB1 signaling increases miR-21 expression to mediate the enhanced activity of MMPs through RECK and TIMP3. These findings provide a novel mechanism for HMGB1-mediated HCC progression through the IL-6/Stat3-miR-21 axis. PMID:25720799

  8. Elevated Human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene expression in blood cells associated with chronic and arsenic exposure in Inner Mongolia, China

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Arsenic exposure is associated with human cancer. Telomerase containing the catalytic subunit, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), can extend telomeres of chromosomes, delay senescence and promoting cell proliferation leading to tumorigenesis. OBJECTIVE:...

  9. Arsenic concentrations in Chinese coals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingshi; Zheng, Baoshan; Wang, Binbin; Li, Shehong; Wu, Daishe; Hu, Jun

    2006-03-15

    The arsenic concentrations in 297 coal samples were collected from the main coal-mines of 26 provinces in China were determined by molybdenum blue coloration method. These samples were collected from coals that vary widely in coal rank and coal-forming periods from the five main coal-bearing regions in China. Arsenic content in Chinese coals range between 0.24 to 71 mg/kg. The mean of the concentration of Arsenic is 6.4+/-0.5 mg/kg and the geometric mean is 4.0+/-8.5 mg/kg. The level of arsenic in China is higher in northeastern and southern provinces, but lower in northwestern provinces. The relationship between arsenic content and coal-forming period, coal rank is studied. It was observed that the arsenic contents decreases with coal rank in the order: Tertiary>Early Jurassic>Late Triassic>Late Jurassic>Middle Jurassic>Late Permian>Early Carboniferous>Middle Carboniferous>Late Carboniferous>Early Permian; It was also noted that the arsenic contents decrease in the order: Subbituminous>Anthracite>Bituminous. However, compared with the geological characteristics of coal forming region, coal rank and coal-forming period have little effect on the concentration of arsenic in Chinese coal. The average arsenic concentration of Chinese coal is lower than that of the whole world. The health problems in China derived from in coal (arsenism) are due largely to poor local life-style practices in cooking and home heating with coal rather than to high arsenic contents in the coal. PMID:16256172

  10. Technologies for Arsenic Removal from Water: Current Status and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nicomel, Nina Ricci; Leus, Karen; Folens, Karel; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Du Laing, Gijs

    2016-01-01

    This review paper presents an overview of the available technologies used nowadays for the removal of arsenic species from water. Conventionally applied techniques to remove arsenic species include oxidation, coagulation-flocculation, and membrane techniques. Besides, progress has recently been made on the utility of various nanoparticles for the remediation of contaminated water. A critical analysis of the most widely investigated nanoparticles is presented and promising future research on novel porous materials, such as metal organic frameworks, is suggested. PMID:26703687

  11. Technologies for Arsenic Removal from Water: Current Status and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Nicomel, Nina Ricci; Leus, Karen; Folens, Karel; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Du Laing, Gijs

    2015-01-01

    This review paper presents an overview of the available technologies used nowadays for the removal of arsenic species from water. Conventionally applied techniques to remove arsenic species include oxidation, coagulation-flocculation, and membrane techniques. Besides, progress has recently been made on the utility of various nanoparticles for the remediation of contaminated water. A critical analysis of the most widely investigated nanoparticles is presented and promising future research on novel porous materials, such as metal organic frameworks, is suggested. PMID:26703687

  12. *Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the methylation of arsenicals in the invertebrate chordate ciona intestinalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotransformation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) involves methylation catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) , yielding mono-, di-, and trimethylated arsenicals. A comparative genomic approach focused on Ciona intestinaJis, an invertebrate chordate, was u...

  13. THE ROLE OF PROTEIN BINDING OF TRIVALENT ARSENICALS IN ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS AND TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three of the most plausible biological theories of arsenic carcinogenesis are protein binding, oxidative stress and altered DNA methylation. This review presents the role of trivalent arsenicals binding to proteins in arsenic carcinogenesis. Using vacuum filtration based receptor...

  14. Expression of Heterogenous Arsenic Resistance Genes in the Obligately Autotrophic Biomining Bacterium Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Peng, J B; Yan, W M; Bao, X Z

    1994-07-01

    Two arsenic-resistant plasmids were constructed and introduced into Thiobacillus ferrooxidans strains by conjugation. The plasmids with the replicon of wide-host-range plasmid RSF1010 were stable in T. ferrooxidans. The arsenic resistance genes originating from the heterotroph were expressed in this obligately autotrophic bacterium, but the promoter derived from T. ferrooxidans showed no special function in its original host. PMID:16349341

  15. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short.

  16. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.

    1994-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short.

  17. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, D.R.

    1994-12-06

    Methods and apparatus are described for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72. The invention provides apparatus which can be located at a site where arsenic-72 is used, for purposes such as PET imaging, to produce arsenic-72 as needed, since the half-life of arsenic-72 is very short. 2 figures.

  18. Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans May Promote or Inhibit Cancer Progression by Interacting with Integrins and Affecting Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Mariana A.; Teixeira, Felipe C. O. B.; Fontes, Miguel; Arêas, Ana Lúcia; Leal, Marcelo G.; Pavão, Mauro S. G.; Stelling, Mariana P.

    2015-01-01

    The metastatic disease is one of the main consequences of tumor progression, being responsible for most cancer-related deaths worldwide. This review intends to present and discuss data on the relationship between integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans in health and cancer progression. Integrins are a family of cell surface transmembrane receptors, responsible for cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion. Integrins' main functions include cell adhesion, migration, and survival. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are cell surface molecules that play important roles as cell receptors, cofactors, and overall direct or indirect contributors to cell organization. Both molecules can act in conjunction to modulate cell behavior and affect malignancy. In this review, we will discuss the different contexts in which various integrins, such as α5, αV, β1, and β3, interact with HSPGs species, such as syndecans and perlecans, affecting tissue homeostasis. PMID:26558271

  19. Deletion of 5-Lipoxygenase in the Tumor Microenvironment Promotes Lung Cancer Progression and Metastasis through Regulating T Cell Recruitment.

    PubMed

    Poczobutt, Joanna M; Nguyen, Teresa T; Hanson, Dwight; Li, Howard; Sippel, Trisha R; Weiser-Evans, Mary C M; Gijon, Miguel; Murphy, Robert C; Nemenoff, Raphael A

    2016-01-15

    Eicosanoids, including PGs, produced by cyclooxygenases (COX), and leukotrienes, produced by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) have been implicated in cancer progression. These molecules are produced by both cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME). We previously reported that both COX and 5-LO metabolites increase during progression in an orthotopic immunocompetent model of lung cancer. Although PGs in the TME have been well studied, less is known regarding 5-LO products produced by the TME. We examined the role of 5-LO in the TME using a model in which Lewis lung carcinoma cells are directly implanted into the lungs of syngeneic WT mice or mice globally deficient in 5-LO (5-LO-KO). Unexpectedly, primary tumor volume and liver metastases were increased in 5-LO-KO mice. This was associated with an ablation of leukotriene (LT) production, consistent with production mainly mediated by the microenvironment. Increased tumor progression was partially reproduced in global LTC4 synthase KO or mice transplanted with LTA4 hydrolase-deficient bone marrow. Tumor-bearing lungs of 5-LO-KO had decreased numbers of CD4 and CD8 T cells compared with WT controls, as well as fewer dendritic cells. This was associated with lower levels of CCL20 and CXL9, which have been implicated in dendritic and T cell recruitment. Depletion of CD8 cells increased tumor growth and eliminated the differences between WT and 5-LO mice. These data reveal an antitumorigenic role for 5-LO products in the microenvironment during lung cancer progression through regulation of T cells and suggest that caution should be used in targeting this pathway in lung cancer. PMID:26663781

  20. Deletion of 5-Lipoxygenase in the Tumor Microenvironment Promotes Lung Cancer Progression and Metastasis through Regulating T Cell Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Poczobutt, Joanna M.; Nguyen, Teresa T.; Hanson, Dwight; Li, Howard; Sippel, Trisha R.; Weiser-Evans, Mary C. M.; Gijon, Miguel; Murphy, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids, including PGs, produced by cyclooxygenases (COX), and leukotrienes, produced by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) have been implicated in cancer progression. These molecules are produced by both cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment (TME). We previously reported that both COX and 5-LO metabolites increase during progression in an orthotopic immunocompetent model of lung cancer. Although PGs in the TME have been well studied, less is known regarding 5-LO products produced by the TME. We examined the role of 5-LO in the TME using a model in which Lewis lung carcinoma cells are directly implanted into the lungs of syngeneic WT mice or mice globally deficient in 5-LO (5-LO-KO). Unexpectedly, primary tumor volume and liver metastases were increased in 5-LO-KO mice. This was associated with an ablation of leukotriene (LT) production, consistent with production mainly mediated by the microenvironment. Increased tumor progression was partially reproduced in global LTC4 synthase KO or mice transplanted with LTA4 hydrolase-deficient bone marrow. Tumor-bearing lungs of 5-LO-KO had decreased numbers of CD4 and CD8 T cells compared with WT controls, as well as fewer dendritic cells. This was associated with lower levels of CCL20 and CXL9, which have been implicated in dendritic and T cell recruitment. Depletion of CD8 cells increased tumor growth and eliminated the differences between WT and 5-LO mice. These data reveal an antitumorigenic role for 5-LO products in the microenvironment during lung cancer progression through regulation of T cells and suggest that caution should be used in targeting this pathway in lung cancer. PMID:26663781

  1. Heterochromatin protein HP1γ promotes colorectal cancer progression and is regulated by miR-30a.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Huang, Feifei; Zhang, Dan; Ju, Junyi; Wu, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Ying; Wang, Yadong; Wu, Yupeng; Nie, Min; Li, Zhuchen; Ma, Chi; Chen, Xi; Zhou, Jin-Yong; Tan, Renxiang; Yang, Bo-Lin; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Chen, Yu-Gen; Zhao, Quan

    2015-11-01

    Colorectal cancer pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. Here, we report that the heterochromatin protein HP1γ is upregulated commonly in human colorectal cancer, where it promotes cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Gene-expression and promoter-binding experiments demonstrated that HP1γ directly regulated CDKN1A (p21(Waf1/Cip1)) in a manner associated with methylation of histone H3K9 on its promoter. We identified miR-30a as a tumor-suppressive microRNA that targets HP1γ in vitro and in vivo to specifically suppress the growth of colorectal cancer in mouse xenograft models. MiR-30a was widely downregulated in primary human colorectal cancer tissues, where its expression correlated inversely with high levels of HP1γ protein. Our results identify a new miR-30a/HP1γ/p21 regulatory axis controlling colorectal cancer development, which may offer prognostic and therapeutic opportunities. PMID:26333808

  2. Structure and regulation of an archaebacterial promoter: An in vivo study. Progress report, August 1, 1991--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, C.J.

    1993-06-01

    We have established that a 100 bp DNA fragment from the Haloferax volcanii tRNALys gene directs transcription in vivo. This element served as the starting point for a detailed analysis of the requirements for in vivo transcription. Among several gene tentatively identified as reporter elements, we selected a eukaryotic intron-containing tRNAPro gene for when it is driven by the H. volcanii tRNALys promoter fragment, produces a single small transcript. Transcript analysis, by Sl mapping and primer extension, showed that this RNA initiated at the expected tRNALys BoxB sequence and terminated in the tRNAPro RNA Pol III termination element present on the DNA fragment. In initial studies we determined that the 3 inches proximal region of this tRNALys promoter element was sufficient for transcription initiation in vivo. This 40 bp region contains only the BoxA and BoxB regions and short purine rich regions 5 inches to the BoxA and BoxB sequence. Using the tRNAPro gene as the reporter and this minimal promoter, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the BoxA region. Each position of the BoxA region was converted to an four possible nucleotides and the transcription of 36 mutants was quantitated. Among the sites analyzed, only five of the positions showed high levels of discrimination; the preferred BoxA element was 5 inches-TT({sub T}/A)({sup A}/T) ANNNN-3 inches. Mutational analysis demonstrated that a transition from T-rich to A-rich sequences in the BoxA element is essential and that there is some flexibility in the location of the ``TA`` sequence. Additionally the TA sequence appears to determine the location of the transcription start site. The BoxA element defined in this study is similar to those observed for Sulfolobus and the methanogen promoters, and supports the hypothesis that a similar core promoter element is used by all archaeal RNA polymerases.

  3. Lung tumor-associated dendritic cell-derived resistin promoted cancer progression by increasing Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome candidate 1/Twist pathway.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chih-Hsin; Chen, Kuei-Fang; Chou, Shah-Hwa; Huang, Ya-Fang; Wu, Cheng-Ying; Cheng, Da-En; Chen, Yu-Wen; Yang, Chih-Jen; Hung, Jen-Yu; Huang, Ming-Shyan

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between tumors and their microenvironments leads to a vicious cycle, which strengthens both immune suppression and cancer progression. The present study demonstrates for the first time that tumor-associated dendritic cells (TADCs) are a source of resistin, which is responsible for increasing lung cancer epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. In addition, large amounts of resistin in the condition medium (CM) of TADCs increase cell migration and invasion, as well as the osteolytic bone metastatic properties of lung cancer cells. Neutralization of resistin from TADC-CM prevents the advanced malignancy-inducing features of TADC-CM. Significantly elevated levels of resistin have been observed in mice transplanted with lung cancer cells, tumor-infiltrating CD11c(+) DCs in human lung cancer samples and lung cancer patients' sera. Induction of lung cancer progression by TADC-derived resistin is associated with increased expression of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome candidate 1 (WHSC1), a histone methyltransferase. Resistin-induced WHSC1 increases the dimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 36 and decreases the trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 27 on the promoter of Twist, resulting in an enhancement of the expression of Twist. Knockdown of WHSC1 by small interfering RNA transfection significantly decreases resistin-mediated cancer progression by decreasing the upregulation of Twist, suggesting that WHSC1 plays a critical role in the regulation of Twist by epigenetic modification. Furthermore, mice that received antiresistin antibodies showed a decreased incidence of cancer development and metastasis. These findings suggest that TADC-derived resistin may be a novel candidate in promoting the development of lung cancer. PMID:23955539

  4. IGF-1R signaling is essential for the proliferation of cultured mouse spermatogonial stem cells by promoting the G2/M progression of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si; Wang, Xiuxia; Wu, Yujian; Han, Chunsheng

    2015-02-15

    Culture of mouse spermatogonial stem cells (mSSCs) contributes to understanding the mechanisms of mammalian spermatogenesis. Several key growth factors such as GDNF and FGF2 have been known to be essential for the proliferation of cultured mSSCs. However, additional factors regulating SSC proliferation remain to be identified. In this study, we report that IGF-1R signaling is required for the proliferation of cultured mSSCs by promoting the G2/M progression of the cell cycle. IGF-1 and its receptor IGF-1R are expressed in cultured mSSCs as well as in isolated Sertoli cells and interstitial cells. Blockage of IGF-1R signaling either by knockdown of IGF-1R or by the IGF-1R-specific inhibitor picropodophyllin (PPP) significantly reduced the proliferation of mSSCs, increased their apoptosis, and impaired their stem cell activity in an insulin-independent manner. PPP treatment of mSSCs blocked the G2/M progression. In contrast, both GDNF withdrawal and FGF2 signaling blockade decreased the entry of mSSCs into their S phases. Consistently, IGF-1 promoted the G2/M progression of thymidine-treated mSSCs, which were arrested at G1/S boundary synchronously; while GDNF and/or FGF2 stimulated their entry into the S phase. Moreover, IGF-1 activated the phosphorylation of AKT but not that of ERK1/2 in mSSCs. These results indicate that IGF-1R signaling stimulates the proliferation of mSSCs using a distinct mechanism from those by GDNF and FGF2, and will contribute to the establishment of a chemically defined culture system. PMID:25356638

  5. Long intergenic non-coding RNA 00152 promotes tumor cell cycle progression by binding to EZH2 and repressing p15 and p21 in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Rong; Xu, Tong-peng; Xia, Rui; Zhang, Er-bao; Shu, Yong-qian

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important regulatory roles in several human cancers. Integrated analysis revealed that expression of long intergenic non-coding RNA 152 (LINC00152) was significantly upregulated in gastric cancer (GC). Further analysis in a cohort of 97 GC patients revealed that LINC00152 expression was positively correlated with tumor invasion depth, lymph node metastasis, higher TNM stage, and poor survival. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that cell proliferation and cell cycle progression were increased in patients with high LINC00152 expression. In both GC cell lines and xenograft systems, LINC00152 overexpression facilitated GC cell proliferation by accelerating the cell cycle, whereas LINC00152 knockdown had the opposite effect. Moreover, by binding to enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), LINC00152 promotes GC tumor cell cycle progression by silencing the expression of p15 and p21. These findings suggest that LINC00152 may play contribute to the progression of GC and may be an effective therapeutic target. PMID:26799422

  6. RABL6A promotes G1-S phase progression and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell proliferation in an Rb1-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Jussara; Muniz, Viviane P.; Falls, Kelly; Reed, Sara M.; Taghiyev, Agshin F.; Quelle, Frederick W.; Gourronc, Francoise; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Major, Heather J.; Askeland, Ryan; Sherman, Scott K.; O'Dorisio, Thomas M.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Howe, James R.; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) proliferation are poorly understood and therapies that effectively control NET progression and metastatic disease are limited. We found amplification of a putative oncogene, RABL6A, in primary human pancreatic NETs(PNETs) that correlated with high level RABL6A protein expression. Consistent with those results, stable silencing of RABL6A in cultured BON-1 PNET cells revealed that it is essential for their proliferation and survival. Cells lacking RABL6A predominantly arrested in G1 phase with a moderate mitotic block. Pathway analysis of microarray data suggested activation of the p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb1) tumor suppressor pathways in the arrested cells. Loss of p53 had no effect on the RABL6A knockdown phenotype, indicating RABL6A functions independent of p53 in this setting. By comparison, Rb1 inactivation partially restored G1 to S phase progression in RABL6A knockdown cells although it was insufficient to override the mitotic arrest and cell death caused by RABL6A loss. Thus, RABL6A promotes G1 progression in PNET cells by inactivating Rb1, an established suppressor of PNET proliferation and development. This work identifies RABL6A as a novel negative regulator of Rb1 that is essential for PNET proliferation and survival. We suggest RABL6A is a new potential biomarker and target for anticancer therapy in PNET patients. PMID:25273089

  7. Association of Transcription Factor IIA with TATA Binding Protein Is Required for Transcriptional Activation of a Subset of Promoters and Cell Cycle Progression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Josef; Lezina, Larissa E.; Ewing, Joshua; Audi, Salma; Lieberman, Paul M.

    1998-01-01

    The general transcription factor IIA (TFIIA) interacts with the TATA binding protein (TBP) and promoter DNA to mediate transcription activation in vitro. To determine if this interaction is generally required for activation of all class II genes in vivo, we have constructed substitution mutations in yeast TFIIA which compromise its ability to bind TBP. Substitution mutations in the small subunit of TFIIA (Toa2) at residue Y69 or W76 significantly impaired the ability of TFIIA to stimulate TBP-promoter binding in vitro. Gene replacement of wild-type TOA2 with a W76E or Y69A/W76A mutant was lethal in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, while the Y69F/W76F mutant exhibited extremely slow growth at 30°C. Both the Y69A and W76A mutants were conditionally lethal at higher temperatures. Light microscopy indicated that viable toa2 mutant strains accumulate as equal-size dumbbells and multibudded clumps. Transcription of the cell cycle-regulatory genes CLB1, CLB2, CLN1, and CTS1 was significantly reduced in the toa2 mutant strains, while the noncycling genes PMA1 and ENO2 were only modestly affected, suggesting that these toa2 mutant alleles disrupt cell cycle progression. The differential effect of these toa2 mutants on gene transcription was examined for a number of other genes. toa2 mutant strains supported high levels of CUP1, PHO5, TRP3, and GAL1 gene activation, but the constitutive expression of DED1 was significantly reduced. Activator-induced start site expression for HIS3, GAL80, URA1, and URA3 promoters was defective in toa2 mutant strains, suggesting that the TFIIA-TBP complex is important for promoters which require an activator-dependent start site selection from constitutive to regulated expression. We present evidence to indicate that transcription defects in toa2 mutants can be both activator and promoter dependent. These results suggest that the association of TFIIA with TBP regulates activator-induced start site selection and cell cycle progression in S

  8. Akt/Protein Kinase B-Dependent Phosphorylation and Inactivation of WEE1Hu Promote Cell Cycle Progression at G2/M Transition

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Kazuhiro; Fujita, Naoya; Tsuruo, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Akt is known to promote cell growth by regulating the cell cycle in G1 phase through activation of cyclin/Cdk kinases and inactivation of Cdk inhibitors. However, how the G2/M phase is regulated by Akt remains unclear. Here, we show that Akt counteracts the function of WEE1Hu. Inactivation of Akt by chemotherapeutic drugs or the phosphatidylinositide-3-OH kinase inhibitor LY294002 induced G2/M arrest together with the inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdc2. Because the increased Cdc2 phosphorylation was completely suppressed by wee1hu gene silencing, WEE1Hu was associated with G2/M arrest induced by Akt inactivation. Further analyses revealed that Akt directly bound to and phosphorylated WEE1Hu during the S to G2 phase. Serine-642 was identified as an Akt-dependent phosphorylation site. WEE1Hu kinase activity was not affected by serine-642 phosphorylation. We revealed that serine-642 phosphorylation promoted cytoplasmic localization of WEE1Hu. The nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation was mediated by phosphorylation-dependent WEE1Hu binding to 14-3-3θ but not 14-3-3β or -σ. These results indicate that Akt promotes G2/M cell cycle progression by inducing phosphorylation-dependent 14-3-3θ binding and cytoplasmic localization of WEE1Hu. PMID:15964826

  9. Expression of the murine RanBP1 and Htf9-c genes is regulated from a shared bidirectional promoter during cell cycle progression.

    PubMed Central

    Guarguaglini, G; Battistoni, A; Pittoggi, C; Di Matteo, G; Di Fiore, B; Lavia, P

    1997-01-01

    The murine Htf9-a/RanBP1 and Htf9-c genes are divergently transcribed from a bidirectional promoter. The Htf9-a gene encodes the RanBP1 protein, a major partner of the Ran GTPase. The divergently transcribed Htf9-c gene encodes a protein sharing similarity with yeast and bacterial nucleic acid-modifying enzymes. We report here that both mRNA species produced by the Htf9-associated genes are regulated during the cell cycle progression, peak in S phase and decrease during mitosis. Transient expression experiments with reporter constructs showed that cell cycle expression is controlled at the transcriptional level, because the bidirectional Htf9 promoter is down-regulated in growth-arrested cells, is activated at the G1/S transition and reaches maximal activity in S phase, though with a different efficiency for each orientation. We have delimited specific promoter regions controlling S phase activity in one or both orientations: identified elements contain recognition sites for members belonging to both the E2F and Sp1 families of transcription factors. Together, the results suggest that the sharing of the regulatory region supports co-regulation of the Htf9-a/RanBP1 and Htf9-c genes in a common window of the cell cycle. PMID:9224656

  10. Mouse arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase genotype affects metabolism and tissue dosimetry of arsenicals after arsenite administration in drinking water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt) catalyzes methylation of inorganic arsenic producing a number of methylated arsenic metabolites. Although methylation has been commonly considered a pathway for detoxification of arsenic, some highly reactive methylated ars...

  11. Enhanced coagulation for arsenic removal

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R.C.; Liang, S.; Wang, H.C.; Beuhler, M.D. )

    1994-09-01

    The possible use of enhanced coagulation for arsenic removal was examined at the facilities of a California utility in 1992 and 1993. The tests were conducted at bench, pilot, and demonstration scales, with two source waters. Alum and ferric chloride, with cationic polymer, were investigated at various influence arsenic concentrations. The investigators concluded that for the source waters tested, enhanced coagulation could be effective for arsenic removal and that less ferric chloride than alum, on a weight basis, is needed to achieve the same removal.

  12. Olfactomedin 4 deficiency promotes prostate neoplastic progression and is associated with upregulation of the hedgehog-signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhen; Liu, Wenli; Chen, Weiping; Zhu, Jianqiong; Deng, Chu-Xia; Rodgers, Griffin P

    2015-01-01

    Loss of olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) gene expression is associated with the progression of human prostate cancer, but its role and the molecular mechanisms involved in this process have not been completely understood. In this study, we found that Olfm4-knockout mice developed prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and prostatic adenocarcinoma. Importantly, we found that the hedgehog-signaling pathway was significantly upregulated in the Olfm4-knockout mouse model. We also found that restoration of OLFM4 in human prostate-cancer cells that lack OLFM4 expression significantly downregulated hedgehog signaling-pathway component expression. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the OLFM4 protein interacts with sonic hedgehog protein, as well as significantly inhibits GLI-reporter activity. Bioinformatic and immunohistochemistry analyses revealed that decreased OLFM4 and increased SHH expression was significantly associated with advanced human prostate cancer. Thus, olfactomedin 4 appears to play a critical role in regulating progression of prostate cancer, and has potential as a new biomarker for prostate cancer. PMID:26581960

  13. Cytoskeletal protein flightless I inhibits apoptosis, enhances tumor cell invasion and promotes cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Kopecki, Zlatko; Yang, Gink N.; Jackson, Jessica E.; Melville, Elizabeth L.; Cal1ey, Matthew P.; Murrell, Dedee F.; Darby, Ian A.; O'Toole, Edel A.; Samuel, Michael S.; Cowin, Allison J.

    2015-01-01

    Flightless I (Flii) is an actin remodeling protein that affects cellular processes including adhesion, proliferation and migration. In order to determine the role of Flii during carcinogenesis, squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) were induced in Flii heterozygous (Flii+/−), wild-type and Flii overexpressing (FliiTg/Tg) mice by intradermal injection of 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA). Flii levels were further assessed in biopsies from human SCCs and the human SCC cell line (MET-1) was used to determine the effect of Flii on cellular invasion. Flii was highly expressed in human SCC biopsies particularly by the invading cells at the tumor edge. FliiTg/Tg mice developed large, aggressive SCCs in response to MCA. In contrast Flii+/− mice had significantly smaller tumors that were less invasive. Intradermal injection of Flii neutralizing antibodies during SCC initiation and progression significantly reduced the size of the tumors and, in vitro, decreased cellular sphere formation and invasion. Analysis of the tumors from the Flii overexpressing mice showed reduced caspase I and annexin V expression suggesting Flii may negatively regulate apoptosis within these tumors. These studies therefore suggest that Flii enhances SCC tumor progression by decreasing apoptosis and enhancing tumor cell invasion. Targeting Flii may be a potential strategy for reducing the severity of SCCs. PMID:26497552

  14. β2-adrenergic receptor signaling promotes pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) progression through facilitating PCBP2-dependent c-myc expression.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunhua; Gong, Chen; Zhang, Haifeng; Hua, Lu; Li, Xiaohong; Chen, Xudong; Chen, Yinji; Ding, Xiaoling; He, Song; Cao, Wei; Wang, Yingying; Fan, Shaoqing; Xiao, Ying; Zhou, Guoxiong; Shen, Aiguo

    2016-04-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) plays a crucial role in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) progression. In this report, we identified poly(rC)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) as a novel binding partner for β2-AR using immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry (IP-MS) approach. The association between β2-AR and PCBP2 was verified using reciprocal immunoprecipitation. Importantly, we found significant interaction and co-localization of the two proteins in the presence of β2-AR agonist in Panc-1 and Bxpc3 PDAC cells. β2-AR-induced recruitment of PCBP2 led to augmented protein level of c-myc in PDAC cells, likely as a result of enhanced internal ribosome entry segment (IRES)-mediated translation of c-myc. The activation of β2-AR accelerated cell proliferation and colony formation, while knockdown of PCBP2 or c-myc restrained the effect. Furthermore, overexpression of PCBP2 was observed in human PDAC cell lines and tissue specimens compared to the normal pancreatic ductal epithelial cells and the non-cancerous tissues respectively. Overexpression of β2-AR and PCBP2 was associated with advanced tumor stage and significantly worsened prognosis in patients with PDAC. Our results elucidate a new molecular mechanism by which β2-AR signaling facilitates PDAC progression through triggering PCBP2-dependent c-myc expression. PMID:26803058

  15. Overexpressed KDM5B is associated with the progression of glioma and promotes glioma cell growth via downregulating p21

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Bin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Huang, Hui; Zhu, Guangtong; Xiao, Zhiyong; Wan, Weiqing; Zhang, Peng; Jia, Wang; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • KDM5B is overexpressed in glioma samples. • KDM5B stimulated proliferation of glioma cells. • Inhibition of p21contributes to KDM5B-induced proliferation. - Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Upregulation of lysine (K)-specific demethylase 5B (KDM5B) has been reported in a variety of malignant tumors. However, the impact of KDM5B in glioma remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic value of KDM5B in glioma. In clinical glioma samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly upregulated in cancer lesions compared with normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with glioma and higher KDM5B expression tend to have shorter overall survival time. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in glioma cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted glioma proliferation partly via regulation of the expression of p21. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in glioma and may be a potential therapeutic target for glioma management.

  16. Ly6E/K Signaling to TGFβ Promotes Breast Cancer Progression, Immune Escape, and Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    AlHossiny, Midrar; Luo, Linlin; Frazier, William R; Steiner, Noriko; Gusev, Yuriy; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Glasgow, Eric; Creswell, Karen; Madhavan, Subha; Kumar, Rakesh; Upadhyay, Geeta

    2016-06-01

    Stem cell antigen Sca-1 is implicated in murine cancer stem cell biology and breast cancer models, but the role of its human homologs Ly6K and Ly6E in breast cancer are not established. Here we report increased expression of Ly6K/E in human breast cancer specimens correlates with poor overall survival, with an additional specific role for Ly6E in poor therapeutic outcomes. Increased expression of Ly6K/E also correlated with increased expression of the immune checkpoint molecules PDL1 and CTLA4, increased tumor-infiltrating T regulatory cells, and decreased natural killer (NK) cell activation. Mechanistically, Ly6K/E was required for TGFβ signaling and proliferation in breast cancer cells, where they contributed to phosphorylation of Smad1/5 and Smad2/3. Furthermore, Ly6K/E promoted cytokine-induced PDL1 expression and activation and binding of NK cells to cancer cells. Finally, we found that Ly6K/E promoted drug resistance and facilitated immune escape in this setting. Overall, our results establish a pivotal role for a Ly6K/E signaling axis involving TGFβ in breast cancer pathophysiology and drug response, and highlight this signaling axis as a compelling realm for therapeutic invention. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3376-86. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197181

  17. Arsenic behavior in newly drilled wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, M.-J.; Nriagu, J.; Haack, S.

    2003-01-01

    In the present paper, inorganic arsenic species and chemical parameters in groundwater were determined to investigate the factors related to the distribution of arsenic species and their dissolution from rock into groundwater. For the study, groundwater and core samples were taken at different depths of two newly drilled wells in Huron and Lapeer Counties, Michigan. Results show that total arsenic concentrations in the core samples varied, ranging from 0.8 to 70.7 mg/kg. Iron concentration in rock was about 1800 times higher than that of arsenic, and there was no correlation between arsenic and iron occurrences in the rock samples. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater ranged from <1 to 171 ??g/l. The arsenic concentration in groundwater depended on the amount of arsenic in aquifer rocks, and as well decreased with increasing depth. Over 90% of arsenic existed in the form of As(III), implying that the groundwater systems were in the reduced condition. The results such as high ferrous ion, low redox potential and low dissolved oxygen supported the observed arsenic species distribution. There was no noticeable difference in the total arsenic concentration and arsenic species ratio between unfiltered and filtered (0.45 ??m) waters, indicating that the particulate form of arsenic was negligible in the groundwater samples. There were correlations between water sampling depth and chemical parameters, and between arsenic concentration and chemical parameters, however, the trends were not always consistent in both wells. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A biosensor for organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Sun, Samio; Li, Chen-Zhong; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    The toxic metalloid arsenic is widely distributed in food, water, and soil. While inorganic arsenic enters the environment primarily from geochemical sources, methylarsenicals either result from microbial biotransformation of inorganic arsenic or are introduced anthropogenically. Methylarsenicals such as monosodium methylarsonic acid (MSMA) have been extensively utilized as herbicides, and aromatic arsenicals such as roxarsone (Rox) are used as growth promoters for poultry and swine. Organoarsenicals are degraded to inorganic arsenic. The toxicological effects of arsenicals depend on their oxidation state, chemical composition, and bioavailability. Here we report that the active forms are the trivalent arsenic-containing species. We constructed a whole-cell biosensor utilizing a modified ArsR repressor that is highly selective toward trivalent methyl and aromatic arsenicals, with essentially no response to inorganic arsenic. The biosensor was adapted for in vitro detection of organoarsenicals using fluorescence anisotropy of ArsR-DNA interactions. It detects bacterial biomethylation of inorganic arsenite both in vivo and in vitro with detection limits of 10−7 M and linearity to 10−6 M for phenylarsenite and 5×10−6 M for methylarsenite. The biosensor detects reduced forms of MSMA and roxarsone and offers a practical, low cost method for detecting activate forms and breakdown products of organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters. PMID:24359149

  19. Association of oxidative stress with arsenic methylation in chronic arsenic-exposed children and adults

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yuanyuan; Wang Yi; Zheng Quanmei; Li Xin; Li Bing; Jin Yaping; Sun Xiance; Sun Guifan

    2008-10-01

    Though oxidative stress is recognized as an important pathogenic mechanism of arsenic, and arsenic methylation capacity is suggested to be highly involved in arsenic-related diseases, the association of arsenic methylation capacity with arsenic-induced oxidative stress remains unclear. To explore oxidative stress and its association with arsenic methylation, cross-sectional studies were conducted among 208 high and 59 low arsenic-exposed subjects. Levels of urinary arsenic species [inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylated arsenic (MMA) and dimethylated arsenic (DMA)] were determined by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Proportions of urinary arsenic species, the first methylation ratio (FMR) and the secondary methylation ratio (SMR) were used as indicators for arsenic methylation capacity. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentrations were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in whole blood were determined to reflect anti-oxidative status. The high arsenic-exposed children and adults were significantly increased in urinary 8-OHdG concentrations but decreased in blood GSH levels compared with the low exposed children and adults. In multiple linear regression models, blood GSH levels and urinary 8-OHdG concentrations of arsenic-exposed children and adults showed strong associations with the levels of urinary arsenic species. Arsenic-exposed subjects in the lower and the upper quartiles of proportions of urinary arsenic species, FMR or SMR were significantly different in urinary 8-OHdG, blood GSH and SOD. The associations of arsenic methylation capacity with 8-OHdG, GSH and SOD were also observed in multivariate regression analyses. These results may provide linkage between arsenic methylation capacity and oxidative stress in humans and suggest that adverse health effects induced by arsenic are related to arsenic methylation through oxidative stress.

  20. Melanocytes and keratinocytes have distinct and shared responses to ultraviolet radiation and arsenic.

    PubMed

    Cooper, K L; Yager, J W; Hudson, L G

    2014-01-30

    The rise of melanoma incidence in the United States is a growing public health concern. A limited number of epidemiology studies suggest an association between arsenic levels and melanoma risk. Arsenic acts as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet radiation (UVR) for the development of squamous cell carcinoma and proposed mechanisms include generation of oxidative stress by arsenic and UVR and inhibition of UVR-induced DNA repair by arsenic. In this study, we investigate similarities and differences in response to arsenic and UVR in keratinocytes and melanocytes. Normal melanocytes are markedly more resistant to UVR-induced cytotoxicity than normal keratinocytes, but both cell types are equally sensitive to arsenite. Melanocytes were more resistant to arsenite and UVR stimulation of superoxide production than keratinocytes, but the concentration of arsenite necessary to inhibit the activity of the DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase and enhance retention of UVR-induced DNA damage was essentially equivalent in both cell types. These findings suggest that although melanocytes are less sensitive than keratinocytes to initial UVR-mediated DNA damage, both of these important target cells in the skin share a mechanism related to arsenic inhibition of DNA repair. These findings suggest that concurrent chronic arsenic exposure could promote retention of unrepaired DNA damage in melanocytes and act as a co-carcinogen in melanoma. PMID:24270004

  1. NOK/STYK1 promotes the genesis and remodeling of blood and lymphatic vessels during tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue; Li, Tianqi; Hu, Dan; Zhang, Shuping

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the overexpression of NOK, also named STYK1, led to tumorigenesis and metastasis. Here, we provide evidence that increased expression of NOK/STYK1 caused marked alterations in the overall and inner structures of tumors and substantially facilitates the genesis and remodeling of the blood and lymphatic vessels during tumor progression. In particular, NOK-expressed HeLa stable cells (HeLa-K) significantly enhanced tumor growth and metastasis in xenografted nude mice. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining demonstrated that the tumor tissues generated by HeLa-K cells were much more ichorous and had more interspaces than those generated by control HeLa cells (HeLa-C). The fluorescent areas stained with cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31), a marker protein for blood vessels, appeared to be in different patterns. The total blood vessels, especially the ring patterns, within the tumors of the HeLa-K group were highly enriched compared with those in the HeLa-C group. NOK-HA was demonstrated to be well colocalized with CD31 in the wall of the tubular structures within tumor tissues. Interestingly, antibody staining of the lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor (LYVE-1) further revealed the increase in ring (oratretic strip-like) lymphatic vessels in either the peritumoral or intratumoral areas in the HeLa-K group compared with the HeLa-C group. Consistently, the analysis of human cancerous tissue also showed that NOK was highly expressed in the walls of tubular structures. Thus, our results reveal a novel tumorigenic function of NOK to mediate the genesis and remodeling of blood and lymphatic vessels during tumor progression. PMID:27444381

  2. Continuous Taurocholic Acid Exposure Promotes Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Progression Due to Reduced Cell Loss Resulting from Enhanced Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Sho; Yamamoto, Hiroto; Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Saito, Shota; Hattori, Takanori; Yamamoto, Gaku; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background Refluxogenic effects of smoking and alcohol abuse may be related to the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The present study attempts to clarify the effects of continuous taurocholic acid (TCA) exposure, which is neither mutagenic nor genotoxic, on ESCC progression. Methods A squamous carcinoma cell line (ESCC-DR) was established from a tumor induced in a rat model of gastroduodenal reflux. ESCC-DR cells were incubated with 2 mM TCA for ≥2 months. The effects of continuous TCA exposure were evaluated in vitro on cell morphology, growth, and invasion and in vivo on xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. Moreover, the mean level of secreted transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) proteins in cell culture supernatants and mRNA synthesis of TGF-β1 and VEGF-A of ESCC cells were measured. The angiogenic potential was further examined by a migration assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Results Continuous TCA exposure induced marked formation of filopodia in vitro. Expression levels of angiogenic factors were significantly higher in the cells treated with TCA than in control cells. Tumor xenografts derived from cells pre-exposed to TCA were larger and more vascularized than those derived from control cells. In addition, TCA exposure increased HUVEC migration. Conclusion Continuous TCA exposure enhanced ESCC progression due to reduced cell loss in vivo. Cell loss was inhibited by TCA-induced vascular endothelial cell migration, which was mediated by TGF-β1 and VEGF-A released from ESCC cells. PMID:24551170

  3. The pro-inflammatory peptide LL-37 promotes ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Marini, Frank C; Watson, Keri; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Dembinski, Jennifer L; LaMarca, Heather L; Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Honer zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Danka, Elizabeth S; Henkle, Sarah L; Scandurro, Aline B

    2009-03-10

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to engraft into the stroma of several tumor types, where they contribute to tumor progression and metastasis. However, the chemotactic signals mediating MSC migration to tumors remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that LL-37 (leucine, leucine-37), the C-terminal peptide of human cationic antimicrobial protein 18, stimulates the migration of various cell types and is overexpressed in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Although there is evidence to support a pro-tumorigenic role for LL-37, the function of the peptide in tumors remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that neutralization of LL-37 in vivo significantly reduces the engraftment of MSCs into ovarian tumor xenografts, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth as well as disruption of the fibrovascular network. Migration and invasion experiments conducted in vitro indicated that the LL-37-mediated migration of MSCs to tumors likely occurs through formyl peptide receptor like-1. To assess the response of MSCs to the LL-37-rich tumor microenvironment, conditioned medium from LL-37-treated MSCs was assessed and found to contain increased levels of several cytokines and pro-angiogenic factors compared with controls, including IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6, IL-10, CCL5, VEGF, and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Similarly, Matrigel mixed with LL-37, MSCs, or the combination of the two resulted in a significant number of vascular channels in nude mice. These data indicate that LL-37 facilitates ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of progenitor cell populations to serve as pro-angiogenic factor-expressing tumor stromal cells. PMID:19234121

  4. The pro-inflammatory peptide LL-37 promotes ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Marini, Frank C.; Watson, Keri; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Dembinski, Jennifer L.; LaMarca, Heather L.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; zu Bentrup, Kerstin Honer; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Henkle, Sarah L.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to engraft into the stroma of several tumor types, where they contribute to tumor progression and metastasis. However, the chemotactic signals mediating MSC migration to tumors remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that LL-37 (leucine, leucine-37), the C-terminal peptide of human cationic antimicrobial protein 18, stimulates the migration of various cell types and is overexpressed in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Although there is evidence to support a pro-tumorigenic role for LL-37, the function of the peptide in tumors remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that neutralization of LL-37 in vivo significantly reduces the engraftment of MSCs into ovarian tumor xenografts, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth as well as disruption of the fibrovascular network. Migration and invasion experiments conducted in vitro indicated that the LL-37-mediated migration of MSCs to tumors likely occurs through formyl peptide receptor like-1. To assess the response of MSCs to the LL-37-rich tumor microenvironment, conditioned medium from LL-37-treated MSCs was assessed and found to contain increased levels of several cytokines and pro-angiogenic factors compared with controls, including IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6, IL-10, CCL5, VEGF, and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Similarly, Matrigel mixed with LL-37, MSCs, or the combination of the two resulted in a significant number of vascular channels in nude mice. These data indicate that LL-37 facilitates ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of progenitor cell populations to serve as pro-angiogenic factor-expressing tumor stromal cells. PMID:19234121

  5. Receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) promotes the progression of OSCC via the AKT/mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Liu, Na; Ma, Danhua; Liu, Ling; Jiang, Lu; Zhou, Yu; Zeng, Xin; Li, Jing; Chen, Qianming

    2016-08-01

    Our previous study suggested that receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1) contribute to the progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The aim of this study is to elucidate the mechanism by which RACK1 regulates cell growth in OSCC using in vitro and in vivo models. The effects of RACK1 knockdown with lentivirus based shRNA in stable cell lines were evaluated by Q-PCR and western blot analysis. RACK1 silencing effects on the cell cycle in OSCC cells were detected by flow cytometry and western blot analysis. The effect of RACK1 silencing on inhibiting the progression of OSCC was illustrated using a xenografted mouse model. RACK1 and relevant signaling pathways were investigated in tissues and cells using immunohistochemistry and/or western blot analysis. Stable silencing of the RACK1 gene resulted in a distinct G1 and G2 phase arrest by downregulating Cyclin B1 and Cyclin D1. Depleted RACK1 led to markedly decreased tumor volume and the expression of Ki67, CD34, and VEGF in vivo. The expression of RACK1 and p-AKT has a parallel pattern in different stages of oral carcinogenesis tissues. In addition, the protein level of RACK1 was positively correlated with p-AKT in OSCC tissue samples and cell lines. We found specific transient knockdown of RACK1 could downregulate the protein levels of p-AKT, p-mTOR, and p-S6 in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrates that RACK1-dependent OSCC growth and survival may be related to the increased activation of the AKT/mTOR/S6 pathway. PMID:27279145

  6. Smoking accelerates pancreatic cancer progression by promoting differentiation of MDSCs and inducing HB-EGF expression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Torres, M P; Kaur, S; Rachagani, S; Joshi, S; Johansson, S L; Momi, N; Baine, M J; Gilling, C E; Smith, L M; Wyatt, T A; Jain, M; Joshi, S S; Batra, S K

    2015-04-16

    Smoking is an established risk factor for pancreatic cancer (PC), but late diagnosis limits the evaluation of its mechanistic role in the progression of PC. We used a well-established genetically engineered mouse model (LSL-K-ras(G12D)) of PC to elucidate the role of smoking during initiation and development of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN). The 10-week-old floxed mice (K-ras(G12D); Pdx-1cre) and their control unfloxed (LSL-K-ras(G12D)) littermates were exposed to cigarette smoke (total suspended particles: 150 mg/m(3)) for 20 weeks. Smoke exposure significantly accelerated the development of PanIN lesions in the floxed mice, which correlated with tenfold increase in the expression of cytokeratin19. The systemic accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) decreased significantly in floxed mice compared with unfloxed controls (P<0.01) after the smoke exposure with the concurrent increase in the macrophage (P<0.05) and dendritic cell (DCs) (P<0.01) population. Further, smoking-induced inflammation (IFN-γ, CXCL2; P<0.05) was accompanied by enhanced activation of pancreatic stellate cells and elevated levels of serum retinoic acid-binding protein 4, indicating increased bioavailability of retinoic acid which contributes to differentiation of MDSCs to tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and DCs. TAMs predominantly contribute to the increased expression of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (EGFR ligand) in pre-neoplastic lesions in smoke-exposed floxed mice that facilitate acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM). Further, smoke exposure also resulted in partial suppression of the immune system early during PC progression. Overall, the present study provides a novel mechanism of smoking-induced increase in ADM in the presence of constitutively active K-ras mutation. PMID:24909166

  7. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.

    1995-12-31

    The preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal advanced in three major research areas. One area of research resulted in the development of a method for measuring the rate of agglomeration of dilute particle suspensions and using the method to relate the rate of agglomeration of coal particles to various key parameters. A second area of research led to the development of a method for monitoring a batch agglomeration process by measuring changes in agitator torque. With this method it was possible to show that the agglomeration of a concentrated coal particle suspension is triggered by the introduction of a small amount of gas. The method was also used in conjunction with optical microscopy to study the mechanism of agglomeration. A third area of research led to the discovery that highly hydrophobic particles in an aqueous suspension can be agglomerated by air alone.

  8. Development of a gas-promoted oil agglomeration process. Technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wheelock, T.D.; Drzymala, J.; Zhang, F.; Nelson, C.

    1994-09-01

    The overall purpose of this research project is to carry out the preliminary laboratory-scale development of a gas-promoted, oil agglomeration process for cleaning coal using model mixing systems. The design and construction of a model mixing system for conducting oil agglomeration tests were reported previously as well as the results of a series of calibration and shakedown tests. The system consists of a flat bottom tank which is fitted with four vertical baffles, a cover, and a turbine agitator. The tank has an inside diameter of 15.24 cm (6.0 in.), height of 15.24 cm (6.0 in.), and net volume of 2.87 L. The tank is connected to a photometric dispersion analyzer so that the turbidity of a coal particle suspension undergoing agglomeration can be monitored. Measuring the turbidity of a particle suspension requires application of the Beer-Lambert law. However, since this law applies for dilute suspensions, it is questionable whether or not it applies to the somewhat more concentrated coal suspensions required for the present project. Therefore, to determine the law`s applicability, a series of turbidity measurements was conducted on particle suspensions which varied in particle concentration over a wide range, and the results were analyzed to see how well they agreed with the law. To determine the effect of air in promoting the oil agglomeration of coal particles in an aqueous suspension, a number of agglomeration tests were conducted with the model mixing system. Finely ground Pittsburgh No. 8 coal was used for these tests, and the amount of air present was controlled carefully. The agglomeration process was monitored by observing the change in turbidity of the system.

  9. Prostate tumor OVerexpressed-1 (PTOV1) down-regulates HES1 and HEY1 notch targets genes and promotes prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background PTOV1 is an adaptor protein with functions in diverse processes, including gene transcription and protein translation, whose overexpression is associated with a higher proliferation index and tumor grade in prostate cancer (PC) and other neoplasms. Here we report its interaction with the Notch pathway and its involvement in PC progression. Methods Stable PTOV1 knockdown or overexpression were performed by lentiviral transduction. Protein interactions were analyzed by co-immunoprecipitation, pull-down and/or immunofluorescence. Endogenous gene expression was analyzed by real time RT-PCR and/or Western blotting. Exogenous promoter activities were studied by luciferase assays. Gene promoter interactions were analyzed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP). In vivo studies were performed in the Drosophila melanogaster wing, the SCID-Beige mouse model, and human prostate cancer tissues and metastasis. The Excel package was used for statistical analysis. Results Knockdown of PTOV1 in prostate epithelial cells and HaCaT skin keratinocytes caused the upregulation, and overexpression of PTOV1 the downregulation, of the Notch target genes HEY1 and HES1, suggesting that PTOV1 counteracts Notch signaling. Under conditions of inactive Notch signaling, endogenous PTOV1 associated with the HEY1 and HES1 promoters, together with components of the Notch repressor complex. Conversely, expression of active Notch1 provoked the dismissal of PTOV1 from these promoters. The antagonist role of PTOV1 on Notch activity was corroborated in the Drosophila melanogaster wing, where human PTOV1 exacerbated Notch deletion mutant phenotypes and suppressed the effects of constitutively active Notch. PTOV1 was required for optimal in vitro invasiveness and anchorage-independent growth of PC-3 cells, activities counteracted by Notch, and for their efficient growth and metastatic spread in vivo. In prostate tumors, the overexpression of PTOV1 was associated with decreased expression

  10. [Arsenic as an environmental problem].

    PubMed

    Jensen, K

    2000-12-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic through drinking water is known in different continents. Arsenic compounds from disintegrating rock may be solubilized after reduction by organic material, and harmful concentrations of arsenic may be found in surface water as well as in water from drilled wells. Because of well drilling since the sixties in the Ganges delta numerous millions of people have been exposed to toxic amounts, and hundreds of thousands demonstrate signs of chronic poisoning. A changed water technology and chemical precipitation of arsenic in the drinking water can reduce the size of the problem, but the late sequelae i.e. malignant disease are incalculable. Indications for antidotal treatment of exposed individuals have not yet been outlined. PMID:11188053

  11. THE PATHWAY OF ARSENIC METABLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pathway of Arsenic Methylation

    David J. Thomas, Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Understanding ...

  12. ARSENIC TREATMENT BY ADSORPTIVE TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the removal of arsenic from drinking water using the adsorptive media treatment process. Fundamental information is provided on the design and operation of adsorptive media technology including the selection of the adsorptive media. The information cites...

  13. Arsenic exposure disrupts epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, Katharine J.; Holloway, Adele; Cook, Anthony L.; Chin, Suyin P.; Snow, Elizabeth T.

    2014-11-15

    Arsenic is an environmental toxin which increases skin cancer risk for exposed populations worldwide; however the underlying biomolecular mechanism for arsenic-induced carcinogenesis is complex and poorly defined. Recent investigations show that histone deacetylase and DNA methyltransferase activity is impaired, and epigenetic patterns of gene regulation are consistently altered in cancers associated with arsenic exposure. Expression of the histone deacetylase SIRT1 is altered in solid tumours and haematological malignancies; however its role in arsenic-induced pathology is unknown. In this study we investigated the effect of arsenic on epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 and its targeting microRNA, miR-34a in primary human keratinocytes. Acetylation of histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16) increased in keratinocytes exposed to 0.5 μM arsenite [As(III)]; and this was associated with chromatin remodelling at the miR-34a promoter. Moreover, although SIRT1 protein initially increased in these As(III)-exposed cells, after 24 days expression was not significantly different from untreated controls. Extended exposure to low-dose As(III) (0.5 μM; > 5 weeks) compromised the pattern of CpG methylation at SIRT1 and miR-34a gene promoters, and this was associated with altered expression for both genes. We have found that arsenic alters epigenetic regulation of SIRT1 expression via structural reorganisation of chromatin at the miR-34a gene promoter in the initial 24 h of exposure; and over time, through shifts in miR-34a and SIRT1 gene methylation. Taken together, this investigation demonstrates that arsenic produces cumulative disruptions to epigenetic regulation of miR-34a expression, and this is associated with impaired coordination of SIRT1 functional activity. - Highlights: • Submicromolar arsenic concentrations disrupt SIRT1 activity and expression in human keratinocytes. • Arsenic-induced chromatin remodelling at the miR-34a gene promoter is associated with hyperacetylation

  14. Life and death with arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Barry P.; Ajees, A. Abdul; McDermott, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic and phosphorus are group 15 elements with similar chemical properties. Is it possible that arsenate could replace phosphate in some of the chemicals that are required for life? Phosphate esters are ubiquitous in biomolecules and are essential for life, from the sugar phosphates of intermediary metabolism to ATP to phospholipids to the phosphate backbone of DNA and RNA. Some enzymes that form phosphate esters catalyze the formation of arsenate esters. Arsenate esters hydrolyze very rapidly in aqueous solution, which makes it improbable that phosphorous could be completely replaced with arsenic to support life. Studies of bacterial growth at high arsenic:phosphorus ratios demonstrate that relatively high arsenic concentrations can be tolerated, and that arsenic can become involved in vital functions in the cell, though likely much less efficiently than phosphorus. Recently Wolfe-Simon et al. [1] reported the isolation of a microorganism that they maintain uses arsenic in place of phosphorus for growth. Here, we examine and evaluate their data and conclusions. PMID:21387349

  15. Arsenic removal by ferric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Hering, J.G.; Chen, P.Y.; Wilkie, J.A.; Elimelech, M.; Liang, S.

    1996-04-01

    Bench-scale studies were conducted in model freshwater systems to investigate how various parameters affected arsenic removal during coagulation with ferric chloride and arsenic adsorption onto preformed hydrous ferric oxide. Parameters included arsenic oxidation state and initial concentration, coagulant dosage or adsorbent concentration, pH, and the presence of co-occurring inorganic solutes. Comparison of coagulation and adsorption experiments and of experimental results with predictions based on surface complexation modeling demonstrated that adsorption is an important (though not the sole) mechanism governing arsenic removal during coagulation. Under comparable conditions, better removal was observed with arsenic(V) [As(V)] than with arsenic(III) [As(III)] in both coagulation and adsorption experiments. Below neutral pH values, As(III) removal-adsorption was significantly decreased in the presence of sulfate, whereas only a slight decrease in As(V) removal-adsorption was observed. At high pH, removal-adsorption of As(V) was increased in the presence of calcium. Removal of As(V) during coagulation with ferric chloride is both more efficient and less sensitive than that of As(III) to variations in source water composition.

  16. P01.08LINEAGE-SPECIFIC SPLICING OF AN ALTERNATIVE EXON OF ANXA7 PROMOTES EGFR SIGNALING ACTIVATION AND TUMOR PROGRESSION IN GLIOBLASTOMA

    PubMed Central

    Ferrarese, R.; Bug, E.; Maticzka, D.; Reichardt, W.; Masilamani, A.P.; Dai, F.; Weyerbrock, A.; Prinz, M.; Bredel, M.; Carro, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-specific alternative splicing is critical to the emergence of tissue identity during development, yet its role in malignant transformation is undefined. Tissue-specific splicing involves evolutionarily-conserved, alternative exons, which represent only a minority of total alternative exons. Many, however, have functional features that influence signaling pathways to profound biological effect. In the brain, Annexin A7 isoform 1 (ANXA7-I1) is exclusively expressed in mature neurons, while isoform 2 (ANXA7-I2) in which exon 6 is skipped, is expressed in glial and progenitor cells. We show that lineage-specific splicing of the cassette exon 6 in the membrane-binding tumor suppressor ANXA7diminishes endosomal targeting and consequent signal termination of the EGFR oncoprotein during brain tumor progression. Splicing of this exon is mediated by Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein 1 (PTBP1), a ribonucleoprotein normally repressed during neuronal development but which we found to be highly expressed also in glioblastomas through loss of a brain-enriched microRNA, miR-124, and gene amplification. Here, we show that the PTBP1-ANXA7 splicing-EGFR signal activation axis promotes in vitro cell migration and invasion, and tumor angiogenesis in vivo. In glioblastoma, ANXA7 splicing is likely inherited from a potential tumor-initiating ancestor but this trait is further exploited through accumulation of mutations that enhance EGFR signaling. Our data illustrate how lineage-specific splicing of a tissue-regulated alternative exon in a constituent of an oncogenic pathway eliminates its tumor suppressor function and promotes glioblastoma progression. This paradigm may offer a general model as to how tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms can contribute to reprogramming normal development to oncogenesis.

  17. Modifications of protein-DNA interactions in the proximal promoter of a cell-growth-regulated histone gene during onset and progression of osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, T A; Holthuis, J; Markose, E; van Wijnen, A J; Wolfe, S A; Grimes, S R; Lian, J B; Stein, G S

    1990-01-01

    A temporal sequence of interrelated cellular, biochemical, and molecular events which occurs during the progressive expression of the differentiated osteoblast phenotype in primary cultures of fetal rat calvarial cells results in the development of a bone-tissue-like organization. This ordered developmental sequence encompasses three periods: proliferation, matrix maturation, and mineralization. Initially, the cells actively proliferate and synthesize type I collagen. This is followed by a period of matrix organization and maturation and then by a period of extracellular matrix mineralization. At the completion of proliferation, when expression of osteoblast phenotype markers such as alkaline phosphatase is observed, the cell-cycle-related histone genes are down-regulated transcriptionally, suggesting that a key signaling mechanism at this transition point involves modifications of protein-DNA interactions in the regulatory elements of these growth-regulated genes. Our results demonstrate that there is a selective loss of interaction of the promoter binding factor HiNF-D with the site II region of an H4 histone gene proximal promoter that regulates the specificity and level of transcription only when the down-regulation of proliferation is accompanied by modifications in the extracellular matrix that contribute to progression of osteoblast differentiation. Thus, this specific loss of protein-DNA interaction serves as a marker for a key transition point in the osteoblast developmental sequence, where the down-regulation of proliferation is functionally coupled to the appearance of osteoblast phenotypic properties associated with the organization and maturation of an extracellular matrix that becomes competent to mineralize. Images PMID:2367528

  18. P01.23NEUROTENSIN PROMOTES THE PROGRESSION OF MALIGNANT GLIOMA THROUGH NTSR1 AND IMPACTS THE PROGNOSIS OF GLIOMA PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Yi, L.; Xu, M.; Xu, L.; Feng, H.; Cui, H.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neurotensin (NTS) functions as a neuromodulator and induces cellular proliferation and migration in various solid tumors. However, whether NTS can promote the progression of malignant glioma and its prognostic significance for glioma patients remain unclear. METHODS: NTS and its high-affinity receptor (NTSR1) expression levels in clinical glioma samples were detected by immunohistochemistry and immunobloting. The prognostic analysis in glioma patients were conducted online by R2 microarray analysis and the visualization platform. The proliferation of glioma cells were evaluated by CCK8 and BrdU incorporation assay. The celluar invasiveness were tested by wound healing model and the Matrigel transwell assay. A neutralizing antibody to NTS, NTSR1-selective antagonist SR48692 and NTSR1-siRNA were used to suppress the NTS stimulation. Erk1/2 phosphorylation was tested by immunobloting. The orthotopic glioma implantation model was established to examine the role of NTS and NTSR1 in the progression of glioma in vivo. RESULTS: Positive correlations were shown between the expression levels of NTS and NTSR1 with the pathological grade of gliomas. The high levels of NTS and NTSR1 expression indicate a worse prognosis in glioma patients. The proliferation and invasiveness of glioma cells could be enhanced by NTS stimulation and impaired by the inhibition of NTSR1 functions. NTS stimulated Erk1/2 phosphorylation in glioma cells, which could be reversed by treatment with SR48692 or NTSR1-siRNA. In vivo experiments showed that therapy with SR48692 significantly prolonged the survival length of glioma-bearing mice and inhibited glioma cell invasiveness in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: NTS promotes the proliferation and invasion of glioma via the activation of NTSR1 and its downstream signaling molecules, resulting in Erk1/2 phosphorylation. High levels of NTS and NTSR1 expression predict a bad prognosis in glioma patients.

  19. Arsenic Toxicity in Male Reproduction and Development

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon-Jae; Kim, Jong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic metalloid that exists ubiquitously in the environment, and affects global health problems due to its carcinogenicity. In most populations, the main source of arsenic exposure is the drinking water. In drinking water, chronic exposure to arsenic is associated with increased risks of various cancers including those of skin, lung, bladder, and liver, as well as numerous other non-cancer diseases including gastrointestinal and cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and neurologic and cognitive problems. Recent emerging evidences suggest that arsenic exposure affects the reproductive and developmental toxicity. Prenatal exposure to inorganic arsenic causes adverse pregnancy outcomes and children’s health problems. Some epidemiological studies have reported that arsenic exposure induces premature delivery, spontaneous abortion, and stillbirth. In animal studies, inorganic arsenic also causes fetal malformation, growth retardation, and fetal death. These toxic effects depend on dose, route and gestation periods of arsenic exposure. In males, inorganic arsenic causes reproductive dysfunctions including reductions of the testis weights, accessory sex organs weights, and epididymal sperm counts. In addition, inorganic arsenic exposure also induces alterations of spermatogenesis, reductions of testosterone and gonadotrophins, and disruptions of steroidogenesis. However, the reproductive and developmental problems following arsenic exposure are poorly understood, and the molecular mechanism of arsenic-induced reproductive toxicity remains unclear. Thus, we further investigated several possible mechanisms underlying arsenic-induced reproductive toxicity. PMID:26973968

  20. Arsenic Toxicity in Male Reproduction and Development.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Jae; Kim, Jong-Min

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic is a toxic metalloid that exists ubiquitously in the environment, and affects global health problems due to its carcinogenicity. In most populations, the main source of arsenic exposure is the drinking water. In drinking water, chronic exposure to arsenic is associated with increased risks of various cancers including those of skin, lung, bladder, and liver, as well as numerous other non-cancer diseases including gastrointestinal and cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and neurologic and cognitive problems. Recent emerging evidences suggest that arsenic exposure affects the reproductive and developmental toxicity. Prenatal exposure to inorganic arsenic causes adverse pregnancy outcomes and children's health problems. Some epidemiological studies have reported that arsenic exposure induces premature delivery, spontaneous abortion, and stillbirth. In animal studies, inorganic arsenic also causes fetal malformation, growth retardation, and fetal death. These toxic effects depend on dose, route and gestation periods of arsenic exposure. In males, inorganic arsenic causes reproductive dysfunctions including reductions of the testis weights, accessory sex organs weights, and epididymal sperm counts. In addition, inorganic arsenic exposure also induces alterations of spermatogenesis, reductions of testosterone and gonadotrophins, and disruptions of steroidogenesis. However, the reproductive and developmental problems following arsenic exposure are poorly understood, and the molecular mechanism of arsenic-induced reproductive toxicity remains unclear. Thus, we further investigated several possible mechanisms underlying arsenic-induced reproductive toxicity. PMID:26973968

  1. Approaches to Increase Arsenic Awareness in Bangladesh: An Evaluation of an Arsenic Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Christine Marie; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Khan, Khalid; Islam, Tariqul; Singha, Ashit; Moon-Howard, Joyce; van Geen, Alexander; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a household-level arsenic education and well water arsenic testing intervention to increase arsenic awareness in Bangladesh. The authors randomly selected 1,000 study respondents located in 20 villages in Singair, Bangladesh. The main outcome was the change in knowledge of arsenic from…

  2. Arsenic Toxicity to Juvenile Fish: Effects of Exposure Route, Arsenic Speciation, and Fish Species

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic toxicity to juvenile rainbow trout and fathead minnows was evaluated in 28-day tests using both dietborne and waterborne exposures, both inorganic and organic arsenic species, and both a live diet and an arsenic-spiked pellet diet. Effects of inorganic arsenic on rainbow...

  3. Long non-coding RNA APTR promotes the activation of hepatic stellate cells and the progression of liver fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Fujun; Zheng, Jianjian; Mao, Yuqing; Dong, Peihong; Li, Guojun; Lu, Zhongqiu; Guo, Chuanyong; Liu, Zhanju; Fan, Xiaoming

    2015-08-07

    In this study, we aimed at assessing a role of Alu-mediated p21 transcriptional regulator (APTR) in hepatofibrogenesis. APTR was upregulated in fibrotic liver samples and activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Knockdown of APTR inhibited the activation of HSCs in vitro and mitigated the accumulation of collagen in vivo. Importantly, APTR silencing could abrogate TGF-β{sub 1}-induced upregulation of α-SMA in HSCs. In addition, inhibition of cell cycle and cell proliferation by APTR knockdown was attenuated by p21 siRNA1 in primary HSCs. Finally, serum APTR levels were increased in patients with liver cirrhosis, indicating a potential biomarker for liver cirrhosis. Collectively, evidence is proposed for a new biological role of APTR in hepatofibrogenesis. - Highlights: • APTR is upregulated in fibrotic liver tissues and activated HSCs. • APTR silencing inhibits HSC activation and the progression of liver fibrosis. • Antifibrotic effect of APTR silencing is achieved by increasing p21.

  4. Telomerase reverse transcriptase potentially promotes the progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma through induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tengda; Hu, Fengchun; Qiao, Bin; Chen, Zhifeng; Tao, Qian

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, researchers have found the critical role of telomerase in cellular transformation, proliferation, stemness and cell survival. High levels of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression and telomerase activation have been reported in most cancer cells. Moreover, overexpression of human TERT (hTERT) is reported to be correlated with advanced invasive stage of the tumor progression and poor prognosis. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), characterized by the loss of the cell-cell contact of epithelial cells and the acquisition of migratory and motile properties, is known to be a central mechanism responsible for invasiveness and metastasis of various cancers. Thus, we investigated whether hTERT plays a potential role in the development of EMT. As we expected, our clinical results showed that hTERT is overexpressed in oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and OSCC tissues and correlates with clinical aggressiveness of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients. We then overexpressed hTERT in primary human oral epithelial cells (HOECS) and found that hTERT has the potential to prolong the lifespan, a process confering the characteristics of EMT by activating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Our findings provided an explanation for the aggressive nature of human tumors overexpressing hTERT and the possibly mechanism that links hTERT to EMT property, which represents a possible therapeutic target in highly metastatic cancers. PMID:25775973

  5. Integrin α5 promotes tumor progression and is an independent unfavorable prognostic factor in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jian-Jun; Guo, Jin-Cheng; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Xu, Xiu-E; Wu, Jian-Yi; Chen, Bo; Ran, Li-Qiang; Liao, Lian-Di; Li, En-Min; Xu, Li-Yan

    2016-02-01

    The integrin family plays a major role in complex biological events such as differentiation, development, wound healing, and the altered adhesive and invasive properties of tumor cells. The expression and function of integrin α5 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) are not clear. Here, by using tissue microarrays and immunohistochemical method, integrin α5 expression was retrospectively evaluated in 147 samples of human ESCC. Results showed that expression of integrin α5 was heterogeneous and varied from negative to intense expression in a membrane and cytoplasmic distribution manner. High expression of integrin α5 was significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis (P = .042) and tumor size (P = .042). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that high expression of integrin α5 was related to poor overall survival of ESCC patients (P = .018). Multivariate analysis suggested that integrin α5 expression status was an independent prognostic factor for ESCC (P = .003). Moreover, integrin α5 expression was associated with the survival of patients with lymph node metastasis (P = .020), but did not influence the survival of patients without lymph node metastasis. Finally, we found that RNAi-mediated knockdown of integrin α5 led to decreased growth, migration, and invasion of ESCC cells. Combined, integrin α5 might play important roles in the progression of ESCC. Integrin α5 is a novel biomarker to predict the prognosis of ESCC patients. PMID:26772401

  6. Innate immune signaling through differential RIPK1 expression promote tumor progression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Kevin D; Ghosh, Arundhati; Trivedi, Sumita; Wang, Lin; Coyne, Carolyn B; Ferris, Robert L; Sarkar, Saumendra N

    2016-05-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a devastating disease for which new treatments, such as immunotherapy are needed. Synthetic double-stranded RNAs, which activate toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), have been used as potent adjuvants in cancer immunotherapy by triggering a proapoptotic response in cancer cells. A better understanding of the mechanism of TLR3-mediated apoptosis and its potential involvement in controlling tumor metastasis could lead to improvements in current treatment. Using paired, autologous primary and metastatic HNSCC cells we previously showed that metastatic, but not primary tumor-derived cells, were unable to activate prosurvival NF-κB in response to p(I):p(C) resulting in an enhanced apoptotic response. Here, we show that transcriptional downregulation of receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) in metastatic HNSCC cells causes a loss of TLR3-mediated NF-κB signaling, resulting in enhanced apoptosis. Loss of RIPK1 strongly correlates with metastatic disease in a cohort of HNSCC patients. This downregulation of RIPK1 is possibly mediated by enhanced methylation of the RIPK1 promoter in tumor cells and enhances protumorigenic properties such as cell migration. The results described here establish a novel mechanism of TLR3-mediated apoptosis in metastatic cells and may create new opportunities for using double stranded RNA to target metastatic tumor cells. PMID:26992898

  7. Effect of chronic intake of arsenic-contaminated water on liver

    SciTech Connect

    Guha Mazumder, D.N. . E-mail: dngm@apexmail.com

    2005-08-07

    The hepatotoxic effect of arsenic when used in therapeutic dose has long been recognized. We described the nature and degree of liver involvement and its pathogenesis due to prolonged drinking of arsenic-contaminated water in West Bengal, India. From hospital-based studies on 248 cases of arsenicosis, hepatomegaly was found in 190 patients (76.6%). Non cirrhotic portal fibrosis was the predominant lesions in 63 out of 69 cases who underwent liver biopsy. The portal fibrosis was characterized by expansion of portal zones with streaky fibrosis, a few of which contained leash of vessels. However, portal hypertension was found in smaller number of cases. A cross-sectional epidemiological study was carried out on 7683 people residing in arsenic-affected districts of West Bengal. Out of these, 3467 and 4216 people consumed water-containing arsenic below and above 0.05 mg/l, respectively. Prevalence of hepatomegaly was significantly higher in arsenic-exposed people (10.2%) compared to controls (2.99%, P < 0.001). The incidence of hepatomegaly was found to have a linear relationship proportionate to increasing exposure of arsenic in drinking water in both sexes (P < 0.001). In an experimental study, BALB/C mice were given water contaminated with arsenic (3.2 mg/l) ad libitum for 15 months, the animals being sacrificed at 3-month intervals. We observed progressive reduction of hepatic glutathione and enzymes of anti-oxidative defense system associated with lipid peroxidation. Liver histology showed fatty infiltration at 12 months and hepatic fibrosis at 15 months. Our studies show that prolong drinking of arsenic-contaminated water is associated with hepatomegaly. Predominant lesion of hepatic fibrosis appears to be caused by arsenic induced oxystress.

  8. Aortic smooth muscle cell alterations in mice systemically exposed to arsenic.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Shin-Yin; Lin, Wen-Ting; Yang, Rei-Cheng; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2016-05-01

    Previous epidemiological studies showed that chronic arsenic exposure is related to increased cardiovascular disease incidence. The detailed biochemical mechanisms by which arsenic exerts its effects remain unknown. Vascular disease progression is characterized by smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypic switching, vessel wall reorganization, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) production. The objective of this study was to examine early biochemical and structural changes in the aortas of ICR mice systemically exposed to arsenic. Animals were fed sodium arsenite (20 mg/kg) via gavage 5 days/week or Milli-Q water only (control) for 8 weeks. Aortic proteins were subjected to two-dimensional (2-D) differential gel electrophoresis and proteomic studies. Two 2-D gel protein spots were identified as the same protein, smooth muscle (SM)22α, using proteomics. SM22α and Rho kinase 2 gene and protein expression were significantly decreased in the aortic tissue of arsenic-exposed mice compared with that of control mice. No atherosclerotic lesion formation or tissue injury was detected in the aortic wall of either the arsenic-fed or the control group. However, the percent (%) SMC area of the aortic wall was significantly decreased in arsenic-fed mice compared with that in control mice. Additionally, the expression levels of PDGF-BB and early growth response-1 (Egr-1) were significantly higher in the arsenic group than that in the control group. These findings reveal biochemical alterations of SM22α, PDGF, and Egr-1 in conjunction with decreased SMC area in the aortic wall of arsenic-fed mice. Arsenic may initiate aortic SMC alterations that subsequently lead to vascular dysfunction. PMID:26135927

  9. Distinct effects of concomitant Jak2V617F expression and Tet2 loss in mice promote disease progression in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Edwin; Schneider, Rebekka K.; Breyfogle, Lawrence J.; Rosen, Emily A.; Poveromo, Luke; Elf, Shannon; Ko, Amy; Brumme, Kristina; Levine, Ross; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Signaling mutations (eg, JAK2V617F) and mutations in genes involved in epigenetic regulation (eg, TET2) are the most common cooccurring classes of mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). Clinical correlative studies have demonstrated that TET2 mutations are enriched in more advanced phases of MPNs such as myelofibrosis and leukemic transformation, suggesting that they may cooperate with JAK2V617F to promote disease progression. To dissect the effects of concomitant Jak2V617F expression and Tet2 loss within distinct hematopoietic compartments in vivo, we generated Jak2V617F/Tet2 compound mutant genetic mice. We found that the combination of Jak2V617F expression and Tet2 loss resulted in a more florid MPN phenotype than that seen with either allele alone. Concordant with this, we found that Tet2 deletion conferred a strong functional competitive advantage to Jak2V617F-mutant hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Transcriptional profiling revealed that both Jak2V617F expression and Tet2 loss were associated with distinct and nonoverlapping gene expression signatures within the HSC compartment. In aggregate, our findings indicate that Tet2 loss drives clonal dominance in HSCs, and Jak2V617F expression causes expansion of downstream precursor cell populations, resulting in disease progression through combinatorial effects. This work provides insight into the functional consequences of JAK2V617F-TET2 comutation in MPNs, particularly as it pertains to HSCs. PMID:25281607

  10. MicroRNA-92b promotes hepatocellular carcinoma progression by targeting Smad7 and is mediated by long non-coding RNA XIST

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, L K; Yang, Y T; Ma, X; Han, B; Wang, Z S; Zhao, Q Y; Wu, L Q; Qu, Z Q

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) have been demonstrated to participate in the progression of many cancers. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and aggressive malignant tumors worldwide, while the molecular mechanisms underlying HCC tumorigenesis are not completely clear. In this study, we showed that miR-92b was significantly upregulated in tumor tissue and plasma of HCC patients, and its expression level was highly correlated with gender and microvascular invasion. Functionally, miR-92b could promote cell proliferation and metastasis of HCC in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic investigations suggested that Smad7, which exhibited an inverse relationship with miR-92b expression in HCC, was a direct target of miR-92b and could reverse its effects on HCC tumorigenesis. Furthermore, long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) and miR-92b could directly interact with and repress each other, and XIST could inhibit HCC cell proliferation and metastasis by targeting miR-92b. Taken together, our study not only revealed for the first time the importance of XIST/miR-92b/Smad7 signaling axis in HCC progression but also suggested the potential value of miR-92b as a biomarker in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of HCC. PMID:27100897

  11. MicroRNA-92b promotes hepatocellular carcinoma progression by targeting Smad7 and is mediated by long non-coding RNA XIST.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, L K; Yang, Y T; Ma, X; Han, B; Wang, Z S; Zhao, Q Y; Wu, L Q; Qu, Z Q

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) have been demonstrated to participate in the progression of many cancers. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common and aggressive malignant tumors worldwide, while the molecular mechanisms underlying HCC tumorigenesis are not completely clear. In this study, we showed that miR-92b was significantly upregulated in tumor tissue and plasma of HCC patients, and its expression level was highly correlated with gender and microvascular invasion. Functionally, miR-92b could promote cell proliferation and metastasis of HCC in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic investigations suggested that Smad7, which exhibited an inverse relationship with miR-92b expression in HCC, was a direct target of miR-92b and could reverse its effects on HCC tumorigenesis. Furthermore, long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) and miR-92b could directly interact with and repress each other, and XIST could inhibit HCC cell proliferation and metastasis by targeting miR-92b. Taken together, our study not only revealed for the first time the importance of XIST/miR-92b/Smad7 signaling axis in HCC progression but also suggested the potential value of miR-92b as a biomarker in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of HCC. PMID:27100897

  12. Association of Myxovirus Resistance Gene Promoter Polymorphism with Response to Combined Interferon Treatment and Progression of Liver Disease in Chronic HCV Egyptian Patients.

    PubMed

    Bader El Din, Noha Gamal; Salum, Ghada M; Anany, Mohamed A; Ibrahim, Marwa Khalil; Dawood, Reham Mohamed; Zayed, Naglaa; El Abd, Yasmine S; El-Shenawy, Reem; El Awady, Mostafa K

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the frequency of single-nucleotide polymorphism at the -88 myxovirus resistance (MxA) gene promoter region in relation to the status of hepatitis C virus (HCV) progression and response to combined interferon (IFN) in chronic HCV Egyptian patients. One hundred ten subjects were enrolled in the study; 60 HCV genotype 4-infected patients who underwent combined IFN therapy and 50 healthy individuals. All subjects were genotyped for -88 MxA polymorphism by the restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. There was an increasing trend of response to combined IFN treatment as 34.9% of GG, 64.3% of GT, and 66.7% of TT genotypes were sustained responders (P=0.05). The T allele was significantly affecting the response rate more than G allele (P=0.032). Moreover, the hepatic fibrosis score and hepatitis activity were higher in GG genotypes compared with the GT and TT genotypes. The multivariate analysis showed that the MxA GG genotype was an independent factor increasing the no response to IFN therapy (P=0.04, odds ratio [OR] 3.822, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.056-11.092), also MxA G allele (P=0.0372, OR 2.905, 95% CI 1.066-7.919). MxA -88 polymorphism might be a potential biomarker to predict response to IFN and disease progression in chronic HCV-infected patients. PMID:25868067

  13. Androgen receptor regulated microRNA miR-182-5p promotes prostate cancer progression by targeting the ARRDC3/ITGB4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jingjing; Xu, Chen; Fang, Ziyu; Li, Yaoming; Liu, Houqi; Wang, Yue; Xu, Chuanliang; Sun, Yinghao

    2016-05-20

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important endogenous gene regulators that play key roles in prostate cancer development and metastasis. However, specific miRNA expression patterns in prostate cancer tissues from Chinese patients remain largely unknown. In this study, we compared miRNA expression patterns in 65 pairs of prostate cancer and para-cancer tissues by RNA sequencing and found that miR-182-5p was the most up-regulated miRNA in prostate cancer tissues. The result was validated using realtime PCR in 18 pairs of prostate cancer and para-cancer tissues. In in vitro analysis, it was confirmed that miR-182-5p promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation, invasion and migration and inhibit apoptosis. In addition, the androgen receptor directly regulated the transcription of miR-182-5p, which could target to the 3'UTR of ARRDC3 mRNA and affect the expression of ARRDC3 and its downstream gene ITGB4. For the in vivo experiment, miR-182-5p overexpression also promoted the growth and progression of prostate cancer tumors. In this regard, we suggest that miR-182-5p may be a key androgen receptor-regulated factor that contributes to the development and metastasis of Chinese prostate cancers and may be a potential target for the early diagnosis and therapeutic studies of prostate cancer. PMID:27109471

  14. Regeneration of Commercial SCR Catalysts: Probing the Existing Forms of Arsenic Oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Li, Junhua; Peng, Yue; Si, Wenzhe; He, Xu; Hao, Jiming

    2015-08-18

    To investigate the poisoning and regeneration of SCR catalysts, fresh and arsenic-poisoned commercial V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalysts are researched in the context of deactivation mechanisms and regeneration technology. The results indicate that the forms of arsenic oxide on the poisoned catalyst are related to the proportion of arsenic (As) on the catalyst. When the surface coverage of (V+W+As) is lower than 1, the trivalent arsenic species (As(III)) is the major component, and this species prefers to permeate into the bulk-phase channels. However, at high As concentrations, pentavalent arsenic species (As(IV)) cover the surface of the catalyst. Although both arsenic species lower the NOx conversion, they affect the formation of N2O differently. In particular, N2O production is limited when trivalent arsenic species predominate, which may be related to As2O3 clogging the pores of the catalyst. In contrast, the pentavalent arsenic oxide species (As2O5) possess several As-OH groups. These As-OH groups could not only enhance the ability of the catalyst to become reduced, but also provide several Brønsted acid sites with weak thermal stability that promote the formation of N2O. Finally, although our novel Ca(NO3)2-based regeneration method cannot completely remove As2O3 from the micropores of the catalyst, this approach can effectively wipe off surface arsenic oxides without a significant loss of the catalyst's active components. PMID:26186082

  15. A novel long non-coding RNA FOXCUT and mRNA FOXC1 pair promote progression and predict poor prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pan, Fei; Yao, Jie; Chen, Yang; Zhou, Changxi; Geng, Peiliang; Mao, Hui; Fang, Xiangqun

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidences demonstrated that many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) can cooperate with the adjacent coding genes, forming into "lncRNA-mRNA gene pairs" in multiple biological cellular processes. Here, we showed that a novel long non-coding RNA FOXCUT (FOXC1 promoter upstream transcript) and its neighboring gene FOXC1 played a similar important role in the oncogenesis and progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). In this study, the expression of FOXCUT/FOXC1 was measured in 82 ESCC tissues and adjacent noncancerous tissues by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The prognostic significance of the lncRNA-mRNA gene pair was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank test. Cell biological experiments were performed in ESCC cell lines to explore their functions in tumor progression. Notably elevated FOXCUT and FOXC1 expression levels were observed in cancerous tissues compared to adjacent noncancerous tissues (86.6% and 84.1%, respectively; P < 0.01), showing strong correlations with poor differentiation, advanced lymph node classification and metastasis (P < 0.05). Moreover, patients with upregulated FOXCUT or FOXC1 experienced a significantly worse prognosis than those with downregulated FOXCUT or FOXC1 (P < 0.001 and P = 0.014, respectively). In addition, the expression of FOXCUT was positively correlated with expression of FOXC1 in ESCC specimens. And the expression of FOXC1 was also decreased as the FOXCUT expression was silenced by siRNA. Assays in vitro demonstrated that knockdown of either FOXCUT or FOXC1 remarkably inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, invasion in ESCC cells. In conclusion, FOXCUT may be functionally involved in the tumor progression and survival of ESCC patients, at least in part, by modulating FOXC1. FOXCUT and FOXC1 may function as a lncRNA-mRNA gene pair, which may represent a potential prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for ESCC patients. PMID:25031703

  16. Phytoremediation of arsenic contaminated soil by arsenic accumulators: a three year study.

    PubMed

    Raj, Anshita; Singh, Nandita

    2015-03-01

    To investigate whether phytoremediation can remove arsenic from the contaminated area, a study was conducted for three consecutive years to determine the efficiency of Pteris vittata, Adiantum capillus veneris, Christella dentata and Phragmites karka, on arsenic removal from the arsenic contaminated soil. Arsenic concentrations in the soil samples were analysed after harvesting in 2009, 2010 and 2011 at an interval of 6 months. Frond arsenic concentrations were also estimated in all the successive harvests. Fronds resulted in the greatest amount of arsenic removal. Root arsenic concentrations were analysed in the last harvest. Approximately 70 % of arsenic was removed by P. vittata which was recorded as the highest among the four plant species. However, 60 % of arsenic was removed by A. capillus veneris, 55.1 % by C. dentata and 56.1 % by P. karka of arsenic was removed from the contaminated soil in 3 years. PMID:25666567

  17. Effect of organic matter amendment, arsenic amendment and water management regime on rice grain arsenic species.

    PubMed

    Norton, Gareth J; Adomako, Eureka E; Deacon, Claire M; Carey, Anne-Marie; Price, Adam H; Meharg, Andrew A

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic accumulation in rice grain has been identified as a major problem in some regions of Asia. A study was conducted to investigate the effect of increased organic matter in the soil on the release of arsenic into soil pore water and accumulation of arsenic species within rice grain. It was observed that high concentrations of soil arsenic and organic matter caused a reduction in plant growth and delayed flowering time. Total grain arsenic accumulation was higher in the plants grown in high soil arsenic in combination with high organic matter, with an increase in the percentage of organic arsenic species observed. The results indicate that the application of organic matter should be done with caution in paddy soils which have high soil arsenic, as this may lead to an increase in accumulation of arsenic within rice grains. Results also confirm that flooding conditions substantially increase grain arsenic. PMID:23466730

  18. VNN1 promotes atherosclerosis progression in apoE−/− mice fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan-Wei; Wu, Shao-Guo; Zhao, Jing-Jing; Ma, Xin; Lu, Jing-Bo; Xiu, Jian-cheng; Zhang, Yuan; Huang, Chuan; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Sha, Yan-Hua; Gao, Ji-Juan; Wang, Yan-Chao; Li, Shu-Fen; Zhao, Jia-Yi; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence shows that vanin-1 (VNN1) plays a key part in glucose metabolism. We explored the effect of VNN1 on cholesterol metabolism, inflammation, apoptosis in vitro, and progression of atherosclerotic plaques in apoE−/− mice. Oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL) significantly induced VNN1 expression through an ERK1/2/cyclooxygenase-2/PPARα signaling pathway. VNN1 significantly increased cellular cholesterol content and decreased apoAI and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C)-mediated efflux by 25.16% and 23.13%, respectively, in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells (P < 0.05). In addition, VNN1 attenuated Ox-LDL-induced apoptosis through upregulation of expression of p53 by 59.15% and downregulation of expression of B-cell lymphoma-2 127.13% in THP-1 macrophage (P < 0.05). In vivo, apoE−/− mice were divided randomly into two groups and transduced with lentivirus (LV)-Mock or LV-VNN1 for 12 weeks. VNN1-treated mice showed increased liver lipid content and plasma levels of TG (124.48%), LDL-cholesterol (119.64%), TNF-α (148.74%), interleukin (IL)-1β (131.81%), and IL-6 (156.51%), whereas plasma levels of HDL-C (25.75%) were decreased significantly (P < 0.05). Consistent with these data, development of atherosclerotic lesions was increased significantly upon infection of apoE−/− mice with LV-VNN1. These observations suggest that VNN1 may be a promising therapeutic candidate against atherosclerosis. PMID:27281478

  19. TUSC3 promotes colorectal cancer progression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through WNT/β-catenin and MAPK signalling.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ye; Wang, Qian; Guo, Kang; Qin, Weizhao; Liao, Wenting; Wang, Shuang; Ding, Yanqing; Lin, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies and is the second leading cause of cancer death in humans. Tumour suppressor candidate 3 (TUSC3) plays an important role in embryogenesis and metabolism. Deletion of TUSC3 often causes non-syndromic mental retardation. Even though TUSC3 deregulation is frequently observed in epithelial cancers, the function of TUSC3 in CRC has remained unknown. In this study, we observed greater expression of TUSC3 at the mRNA and protein level in clinical colorectal tumour samples compared with paired normal tissues. Gain- and loss-of-function analyses were performed to evaluate the functional significance of TUSC3 in CRC initiation and progression. Immunoblotting, immunofluorescence, and co-immunoprecipitation analyses were used to identify potential pathways with which TUSC3 might be involved. Overexpression of TUSC3 in CRC cells induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in CRC cells, accompanied by down-regulation of the epithelial marker, E-cadherin, and up-regulation of the mesenchymal marker, vimentin. Increased proliferation, migration, and invasion, as well as accelerated xenograft tumour growth, were observed in TUSC3-overexpressing CRC cells, while opposite effects were achieved in TUSC3-silenced cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrated the oncogenic role of TUSC3 in CRC and showed that TUSC3 may be responsible for alternations in the proliferation ability, aggressiveness, and invasive/metastatic potential of CRC through regulating the MAPK, PI3K/Akt, and Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathways. PMID:27071482

  20. VNN1 promotes atherosclerosis progression in apoE-/- mice fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan-Wei; Wu, Shao-Guo; Zhao, Jing-Jing; Ma, Xin; Lu, Jing-Bo; Xiu, Jian-Cheng; Zhang, Yuan; Huang, Chuan; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Sha, Yan-Hua; Gao, Ji-Juan; Wang, Yan-Chao; Li, Shu-Fen; Zhao, Jia-Yi; Zheng, Lei; Wang, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Accumulated evidence shows that vanin-1 (VNN1) plays a key part in glucose metabolism. We explored the effect of VNN1 on cholesterol metabolism, inflammation, apoptosis in vitro, and progression of atherosclerotic plaques in apoE(-/-) mice. Oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL) significantly induced VNN1 expression through an ERK1/2/cyclooxygenase-2/PPARα signaling pathway. VNN1 significantly increased cellular cholesterol content and decreased apoAI and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C)-mediated efflux by 25.16% and 23.13%, respectively, in THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells (P < 0.05). In addition, VNN1 attenuated Ox-LDL-induced apoptosis through upregulation of expression of p53 by 59.15% and downregulation of expression of B-cell lymphoma-2 127.13% in THP-1 macrophage (P < 0.05). In vivo, apoE(-/-) mice were divided randomly into two groups and transduced with lentivirus (LV)-Mock or LV-VNN1 for 12 weeks. VNN1-treated mice showed increased liver lipid content and plasma levels of TG (124.48%), LDL-cholesterol (119.64%), TNF-α (148.74%), interleukin (IL)-1β (131.81%), and IL-6 (156.51%), whereas plasma levels of HDL-C (25.75%) were decreased significantly (P < 0.05). Consistent with these data, development of atherosclerotic lesions was increased significantly upon infection of apoE(-/-) mice with LV-VNN1. These observations suggest that VNN1 may be a promising therapeutic candidate against atherosclerosis. PMID:27281478

  1. Arginase-1-dependent promotion of TH17 differentiation and disease progression by MDSCs in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Zhen, Yu; Ma, Zhanchuan; Li, Huimin; Yu, Jinyu; Xu, Zhong-Gao; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Yi, Huanfa; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-03-23

    Expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) has been documented in some murine models and patients with autoimmune diseases, but the exact role of MDSCs in this process remains largely unknown. The current study investigates this question in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Patients with active SLE showed a significant increase in HLA-DR(-)CD11b(+)CD33(+)MDSCs, including both CD14(+)CD66b(-)monocytic and CD14(-)CD66b(+)granulocytic MDSCs, in the peripheral blood compared to healthy controls (HCs). The frequency of MDSCs was positively correlated with the levels of serum arginase-1 (Arg-1) activity, T helper 17 (TH17) responses, and disease severity in SLE patients. Consistently, in comparison with MDSCs from HCs, MDSCs from SLE patients exhibited significantly elevated Arg-1 production and increased potential to promote TH17 differentiation in vitro in an Arg-1-dependent manner. Moreover, in a humanized SLE model, MDSCs were essential for the induction of TH17 responses and the associated renal injuries, and the effect of MDSCs was Arg-1-dependent. Our data provide direct evidence demonstrating a pathogenic role for MDSCs in human SLE. This study also provides a molecular mechanism of the pathogenesis of SLE by demonstrating an Arg-1-dependent effect of MDSCs in the development of TH17 cell-associated autoimmunity, and suggests that targeting MDSCs or Arg-1 may offer potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of SLE and other TH17 cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:27009269

  2. Transformer 2β (Tra2β/SFRS10) positively regulates the progression of NSCLC via promoting cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lili; Ni, Tingting; Shen, Yanbo; Xue, Qun; Liu, Yifei; Chen, Buyou; Cui, Xuefan; Lv, Liting; Yu, Xiafei; Cui, Yuan; Lu, Xiaoning; Chen, Jie; Mao, Guoxin; Wang, Yuchan

    2014-10-01

    Transformer 2β (Tra2β), a member of the serine/arginine-rich-like protein family, is an important RNA-binding protein involved in alternative splice. Deregulation of Tra2β has been observed in several cancers. However, the detailed role of Tra2β in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been elucidated. In this study, the contribution of Tra2β to NSCLC development was investigated. On histological level, the expression of Tra2β was determined by Western and immunohistochemistry assays. It demonstrated that Tra2β was expressed higher in NSCLC tumor tissues compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues. In addition to confirm the association of Tra2β expression with histological differentiation and clinical stage (p < 0.05), we also confirmed significant positive correlation between the expression level of Tra2β and that of Ki67 (p < 0.05, r = 0.446) by Spearman rank correlation test. Moreover, high expression of Tra2β predicted poor prognosis by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. And Tra2β among with other clinicopathologic variables was an independent prognostic indicator for patients' overall survival by multivariate analysis. On cellular level, Tra2β expression was demonstrated to promote proliferation of NSCLC cells through a series of assays, including serum starvation and release assay, Western blot assay and flow cytometry analysis. Moreover, knockdown of Tra2β was confirmed to inhibit proliferation and to induce apoptosis of NSCLC cells through flow cytometry analysis, western analysis, cell counting kit-8 assay and Tunnel assay. Our results indicated that Tra2β was involved in the tumorigenesis of NSCLC and might be a potential therapeutic target of NSCLC. PMID:24952301

  3. Arsenic Speciation in Groundwater: Role of Thioanions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The behavior of arsenic in groundwater environments is fundamentally linked to its speciation. Understanding arsenic speciation is important because chemical speciation impacts reactivity, bioavailability, toxicity, and transport and fate processes. In aerobic environments arsen...

  4. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.

    1993-01-01

    Methods for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72.

  5. Production of selenium-72 and arsenic-72

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, D.R.

    1993-04-20

    Methods are described for producing selenium-72, separating it from its daughter isotope arsenic-72, and generating multiple portions of a solution containing arsenic-72 from a reusable parent substance comprised of selenium-72.

  6. Arsenic - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arsenic URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/arsenic.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  7. Arsenic bioavailability in soils before and after soil washing: the use of Escherichia coli whole-cell bioreporters.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Youngdae; Kang, Yerin; Chae, Yooeun; Kim, Sunghoon; Lee, Youngshim; Jeong, Seung-Woo; An, Youn-Joo

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the quantification of bioavailable arsenic in contaminated soils and evaluation of soil-washing processes in the aspect of bioavailability using a novel bacterial bioreporter developed in present study. The whole-cell bioreporter (WCB) was genetically engineered by fusing the promoter of nik operon from Escherichia coli and green fluorescent protein as a sensing domain and reporter domain. Among eight well-known hazardous heavy metals and metalloid, this system responded specifically to arsenic, thereby inferring association of As(III) with NikR inhibits the repression. Moreover, the response was proportional to the concentration of As(III), thereby it was capable to determine the amount of bioavailable arsenic quantitatively in contaminated soils. The bioavailable portion of arsenic was 5.9 (3.46-10.96) and 0.9 (0.27-1.74) % of total from amended and site soils, respectively, suggesting the bioavailability of arsenic in soils was related to the soil properties and duration of aging. On the other hand, only 1.37 (0.21-2.97) % of total arsenic was extracted into soil solutions and 19.88 (11.86-28.27) % of arsenic in soil solution was bioavailable. This result showed that the soluble arsenic is not all bioavailable and most of bioavailable arsenic in soils is water non-extractable. In addition, the bioavailable arsenic was increased after soil-washing while total amount was decreased, thereby suggesting the soil-washing processes release arsenic associated with soil materials to be bioavailable. Therefore, it would be valuable to have a tool to assess bioavailability and the bioavailability should be taken into consideration for soil remediation plans. PMID:26411448

  8. Attenuation of arsenic in a karst subterranean stream and correlation with geochemical factors: a case study at Lihu, South China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liankai; Yang, Hui; Tang, Jiansheng; Qin, Xiaoqun; Yu, Au Yik

    2014-11-01

    Arsenic (As) pollutants generated by human activities in karst areas flow into subterranean streams and contaminate groundwater easily because of the unique hydrogeological characteristics of karst areas. To elucidate the reaction mechanisms of arsenic in karst subterranean streams, physical-chemical analysis was conducted by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer and an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. The results show that inorganic species account for most of the total arsenic, whereas organic arsenic is not detected or occurs in infinitesimal amounts. As(III) accounts for 51.0%±9.9% of the total inorganic arsenic. Arsenic attenuation occurs and the attenuation rates of total As, As(III) and As(V) in the Lihu subterranean stream are 51%, 36% and 59%, respectively. To fully explain the main geochemical factors influencing arsenic attenuation, SPSS 13.0 and CANOCO 4.5 bundled with CanoDraw for Windows were used for simple statistical analysis and redundancy analysis (RDA). Eight main factors, i.e., sediment iron (SFe), sediment aluminum (SAl), sediment calcium (SCa), sediment organic matter (SOM), sediment manganese (SMn), water calcium (WCa(2+)), water magnesium (WMg(2+)), and water bicarbonate ion (WHCO3(-)) were extracted from thirteen indicators. Their impacts on arsenic content rank as: SFe>SCa>WCa(2+)>SAl>WHCO3(-)>SMn>SOM>WMg(2+). Of these factors, SFe, SAl, SCa, SOM, SMn, WMg(2+) and WCa(2+) promote arsenic attenuation, whereas WHCO3(-) inhibits it. Further investigation revealed that the redox potential (Eh) and pH are adverse to arsenic removal. The dramatic distinction between karst and non-karst terrain is that calcium and bicarbonate are the primary factors influencing arsenic migration in karst areas due to the high calcium concentration and alkalinity of karst water. PMID:25458676

  9. Arsenic round the world: a review.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Badal Kumar; Suzuki, Kazuo T

    2002-08-16

    This review deals with environmental origin, occurrence, episodes, and impact on human health of arsenic. Arsenic, a metalloid occurs naturally, being the 20th most abundant element in the earth's crust, and is a component of more than 245 minerals. These are mostly ores containing sulfide, along with copper, nickel, lead, cobalt, or other metals. Arsenic and its compounds are mobile in the environment. Weathering of rocks converts arsenic sulfides to arsenic trioxide, which enters the arsenic cycle as dust or by dissolution in rain, rivers, or groundwater. So, groundwater contamination by arsenic is a serious threat to mankind all over the world. It can also enter food chain causing wide spread distribution throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. However, fish, fruits, and vegetables primarily contain organic arsenic, less than 10% of the arsenic in these foods exists in the inorganic form, although the arsenic content of many foods (i.e. milk and dairy products, beef and pork, poultry, and cereals) is mainly inorganic, typically 65-75%. A few recent studies report 85-95% inorganic arsenic in rice and vegetables, which suggest more studies for standardisation. Humans are exposed to this toxic arsenic primarily from air, food, and water. Thousands and thousands of people are suffering from the toxic effects of arsenicals in many countries all over the world due to natural groundwater contamination as well as industrial effluent and drainage problems. Arsenic, being a normal component of human body is transported by the blood to different organs in the body, mainly in the form of MMA after ingestion. It causes a variety of adverse health effects to humans after acute and chronic exposures such as dermal changes (pigmentation, hyperkeratoses, and ulceration), respiratory, pulmonary, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, hematological, hepatic, renal, neurological, developmental, reproductive, immunologic, genotoxic, mutagenetic, and carcinogenic effects. Key research

  10. GROUND WATER TREATMENT PROCESSES FOR ARSENIC REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1975 EPA established a maximum contaminant level (MCL) for arsenic at 0.05 mg/L. In 1996, Congress amended the SDWA and these amendments required that EPA develop an arsenic research strategy and publish a proposal to revise the arsenic MCL by January 2000. The Agency proposed...

  11. Linking Arsenic Metabolism and Toxic Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although arsenic has been long recognized as a toxicant and a carcinogen, the molecular basis for few of its adverse effects are well understood. Like other metalloids, arsenic undergoes extensive metabolism involving oxidation state changes and formation of methyl-arsenic bonds ...

  12. Arsenic Metabolism and Distribution in Developing Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    A growing body of evidence suggests that exposure to inorganic arsenic during early life has long term adverse effects. The extent of exposure to inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites in utero is determined not only by the rates of formation and transfer of arsenicals...

  13. Arsenic Exposure and Toxicology: A Historical Perspective

    EPA Science Inventory

    The metalloid arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed in food, water, air and soil. Arsenic has a long history of use as a homicidal agent, but in the past 100 years arsenic, in various forms, has also been used as a pesticide and a ch...

  14. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC IN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT MATRICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The speciaton of arsenic in water, food and urine are analytical capabilities which are an essential part in arsenic risk assessment. The cancer risk associated with arsenic has been the driving force in generating the analytical research in each of these matrices. This presentat...

  15. 21 CFR 556.60 - Arsenic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arsenic. 556.60 Section 556.60 Food and Drugs FOOD... New Animal Drugs § 556.60 Arsenic. (a) (b) Tolerances. The tolerances for total residue of combined arsenic (calculated as As) are: (1) Turkeys—(i) Muscle and eggs: 0.5 parts per million (ppm). (ii)...

  16. Arsenic - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arsenic URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arsenic.html Other topics A-Z A B C ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Arsenic - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  17. TYPES OF ARSENIC AND TREATMENT OPTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the state-of-the-art technology for removal of arsenic from drinking water. Presentation includes results of several EPA field studies on removal of arsenic from existing arsenic removal plants and key results from several EPA sponsored research studies...

  18. Involvement of epigenetics and EMT-related miRNA in arsenic-induced neoplastic transformation and their potential clinical use.

    PubMed

    Michailidi, Christina; Hayashi, Masamichi; Datta, Sayantan; Sen, Tanusree; Zenner, Kaitlyn; Oladeru, Oluwadamilola; Brait, Mariana; Izumchenko, Evgeny; Baras, Alexander; VandenBussche, Christopher; Argos, Maria; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Ahsan, Habibul; Hahn, Noah M; Netto, George J; Sidransky, David; Hoque, Mohammad Obaidul

    2015-03-01

    Exposure to toxicants leads to cumulative molecular changes that overtime increase a subject's risk of developing urothelial carcinoma. To assess the impact of arsenic exposure at a time progressive manner, we developed and characterized a cell culture model and tested a panel of miRNAs in urine samples from arsenic-exposed subjects, urothelial carcinoma patients, and controls. To prepare an in vitro model, we chronically exposed an immortalized normal human bladder cell line (HUC1) to arsenic. Growth of the HUC1 cells was increased in a time-dependent manner after arsenic treatment and cellular morphology was changed. In a soft agar assay, colonies were observed only in arsenic-treated cells, and the number of colonies gradually increased with longer periods of treatment. Similarly, invaded cells in an invasion assay were observed only in arsenic-treated cells. Withdrawal of arsenic treatment for 2.5 months did not reverse the tumorigenic properties of arsenic-treated cells. Western blot analysis demonstrated decreased PTEN and increased AKT and mTOR in arsenic-treated HUC1 cells. Levels of miR-200a, miR-200b, and miR-200c were downregulated in arsenic-exposed HUC1 cells by quantitative RT-PCR. Furthermore, in human urine, miR-200c and miR-205 were inversely associated with arsenic exposure (P = 0.005 and 0.009, respectively). Expression of miR-205 discriminated cancer cases from controls with high sensitivity and specificity (AUC = 0.845). Our study suggests that exposure to arsenic rapidly induces a multifaceted dedifferentiation program and miR-205 has potential to be used as a marker of arsenic exposure as well as a maker of early urothelial carcinoma detection. PMID:25586904

  19. Seasonal Variation in Arsenic Speciation in a Shallow Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illera, V.; O'Day, P. A.; Root, R. A.; Rivera, N.; Rafferty, M. T.; Vlassopoulos, D.

    2007-12-01

    Seasonal variation in arsenic speciation and concentration in sediments in a shallow aquifer were studied with respect to changes in water table elevation and rainfall. Sediment cores were collected at different times from 2004 to 2007 at a marsh site adjacent to San Francisco Bay (in East Palo Alto, CA), which experiences a strong wet winter/dry summer seasonality. The site is a former pesticide manufacturing plant that has undergone remediation and surface capping. Mobilization of post-remediation residual arsenic in sediments is inhibited by natural subsurface attenuation. This study examines the dynamics of seasonal changes on groundwater level and subsurface redox conditions, and its potential impact on arsenic mobilization. Cores (3-cm diameter) were collected from depths of 2.7-3.5 m, intersecting the range of seasonal elevation change in the water table. Groundwater level from a nearby well was monitored with continuous data logging. Sediment samples were analyzed for total and extractable element concentrations and characterized by arsenic and iron synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS). Three distinct redox zones are recognized spectroscopically within the shallow aquifer: a reduced zone in unsaturated sediments (~0.5-1.5 m depth) where arsenic is present as As-sulfide phases (orpiment or realgar); a transition zone between reduced and oxidized zones at the depth of water table (~1.5 m ±0.5 m) with mixed arsenic oxidation states; and an oxidized zone permeated with oxic groundwaters (~1.5-3 m depth) where only As(V) is present. Sediment samples from the reduced zone had arsenic concentrations from 50 to 150 mg kg-1. Arsenic concentrations decreased to a minimum in the transition zone to 20 mg kg-1, and reached a maximum in the oxidized zone (around 200 mg kg-1). Arsenic XANES spectra showed a progressive change from mostly arsenic sulfides in the upper reduced sediments (component sum ~100%\\) to a mixture of orpiment and As

  20. Dysregulation of DNA methylation induced by past arsenic treatment causes persistent genomic instability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Maurizio; Caradonna, Fabio; Klein, Catherine B

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms by which arsenic-induced genomic instability is initiated and maintained are poorly understood. To investigate potential epigenetic mechanisms, in this study we evaluated global DNA methylation levels in V79 cells and human HaCaT keratinocytes at several time points during expanded growth of cell cultures following removal of arsenite exposures. We have found altered genomic methylation patterns that persisted up to 40 cell generations in HaCaT cells after the treatments were withdrawn. Moreover, mRNA expression levels were evaluated by RT-PCR for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, HMLH1, and HMSH2 genes, demonstrating that the down regulation of DNMT3A and DNMT3B genes, but not DNMT1, occurred in an arsenic dose-dependent manner, and persisted for many cell generations following removal of the arsenite, offering a plausible mechanism of persistently genotoxic arsenic action. Analyses of promoter methylation status of the DNA mismatch repair genes HMLH1 and HMSH2 show that HMSH2, but not HMLH1, was epigenetically regulated by promoter hypermethylation changes following arsenic treatment. The results reported here demonstrate that arsenic exposure promptly induces genome-wide global DNA hypomethylation, and some specific gene promoter methylation changes, that persist for many cell generations following withdrawal of arsenite, supporting the hypothesis that the cells undergo epigenetic reprogramming at both the gene and genome level that is durable over many cell generations in the absence of further arsenic treatment. These DNA methylation changes, in concert with other known epigenome alterations, are likely contributing to long-lasting arsenic-induced genomic instability that manifests in several ways, including aberrant chromosomal effects. PMID:26581878

  1. Dysregulation of DNA Methylation Induced by Past Arsenic Treatment Causes Persistent Genomic Instability in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Maurizio; Caradonna, Fabio; Klein, Catherine B.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which arsenic-induced genomic instability is initiated and maintained are poorly understood. To investigate potential epigenetic mechanisms, in this study we evaluated global DNA methylation levels in V79 cells and human HaCaT keratinocytes at several time points during expanded growth of cell cultures following removal of arsenite exposures. We have found altered genomic methylation patterns that persisted up to 40 cell generations in HaCaT cells after the treatments were withdrawn. Moreover, mRNA expression levels were evaluated by RT-PCR for DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, HMLH1, and HMSH2 genes, demonstrating that the down regulation of DNMT3A and DNMT3B genes, but not DNMT1, occurred in an arsenic dose-dependent manner, and persisted for many cell generations following removal of the arsenite, offering a plausible mechanism of persistently genotoxic arsenic action. Analyses of promoter methylation status of the DNA mismatch repair genes HMLH1 and HMSH2 show that HMSH2, but not HMLH1, was epigenetically regulated by promoter hypermethylation changes following arsenic treatment. The results reported here demonstrate that arsenic exposure promptly induces genome-wide global DNA hypomethylation, and some specific gene promoter methylation changes, that persist for many cell generations following withdrawal of arsenite, supporting the hypothesis that the cells undergo epigenetic reprogramming at both the gene and genome level that is durable over many cell generations in the absence of further arsenic treatment. These DNA methylation changes, in concert with other known epigenome alterations, are likely contributing to long-lasting arsenic-induced genomic instability that manifests in several ways, including aberrant chromosomal effects. PMID:26581878

  2. Arsenic in groundwaters in the Northern Appalachian Mountain belt: A review of patterns and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Stephen C.

    2008-07-01

    Naturally occurring arsenic in the bedrock of the Northern Appalachian Mountain belt was first recognized in the late 19th century. The knowledge of the behavior of arsenic in groundwater in this region has lagged behind nearly a century, with the popular press reporting on local studies in the early 1980s, and most peer-reviewed research articles on regional patterns conducted and written in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Research reports have shown that within this high arsenic region, between 6% and 22% of households using private drinking water wells contain arsenic in excess of 10 µg/L, the United States Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level. In nearly all reports, arsenic in drinking water was derived from naturally occurring geologic sources, typically arsenopyrite, substituted sulfides such as arsenian pyrite, and nanoscale minerals such as westerveldite. In most studies, arsenic concentrations in groundwater were controlled by pH dependent adsorption to mineral surfaces, most commonly iron oxide minerals. In some cases, reductive dissolution of iron minerals has been shown to increase arsenic concentrations in groundwater, more commonly associated with anthropogenic activities such as landfills. Evidence of nitrate reduction promoting the presence of arsenic(V) and iron(III) minerals in anoxic environments has been shown to occur in surface waters, and in this manuscript we show this process perhaps applies to groundwater. The geologic explanation for the high arsenic region in the Northern Appalachian Mountain belt is most likely the crustal recycling of arsenic as an incompatible element during tectonic activity. Accretion of multiple terranes, in particular Avalonia and the Central Maine Terrane of New England appear to be connected to the presence of high concentrations of arsenic. Continued tectonic activity and recycling of these older terranes may also be responsible for the high arsenic observed in the Triassic rift basins

  3. BREAST CANCER, DERMATOFIBROMAS AND ARSENIC

    PubMed Central

    Dantzig, Paul I

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dermatofibromas are common benign tumors in women, and breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. The aim of this study is to determine if there is any relationship between the two conditions. Materials and Methods: Five patients with dermatofibromas and 10 control patients (two groups) had their skin biopsies measured for arsenic by inductively coupled mass spectrometry. Fifty randomly selected patients with breast cancer and 50 control patients were examined for the presence of dermatofibromas. Results: The dermatofibromas were found to have an arsenic concentration of 0.171 micrograms/gram, compared with 0.06 and 0.07 micrograms/gram of the two control groups. Forty-three out of 50 patients with breast cancer had dermatofibromas and 32/50 patients with breast cancer had multiple dermatofibromas, compared to 10/50 control patients with dermatofibromas and only 1/50 with multiple dermatofibromas. Conclusions: Arsenic is important in the development of dermatofibromas and dermatofibromas represent a reservoir and important sign of chronic arsenic exposure. Dermatofibromas represent an important sign for women at risk for breast cancer, and arsenic may represent the cause of the majority of cases of breast cancer. PMID:20049264

  4. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Autotrophy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    That microbes have resistance to the toxic arsenic oxyanions arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] has been recognized for some time. More recently it was shown that certain prokaryotes can demonstrate As- dependent growth by conserving the energy gained from the aerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), or from the reduction of As(V) to As(III) under anaerobic conditions. During the course of our field studies of two alkaline, hypersaline soda lakes (Mono Lake and Searles Lake, CA) we have discovered several new anaerobic chemo- and photo-autotrophic bacteria that can center their energy gain around the redox reactions between As(III) and As(V). Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii, isolated from the water column of Mono Lake is a nitrate-respiring, As(III)-oxidizing chemoautotroph of the gamma-proteobacteria that has a highly flexible metabolism. It can function either as a facultative anaerobe or as a chemo-autotroph, or as a heterotroph (Hoeft et al., 2007). In contrast, strain MLMS-1 of the delta-proteobacteria was also isolated from Mono Lake, but to date is the first example of an obligate As(V)-respirer that is also an obligate chemo-autotroph, gaining its energy via the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate (Hoeft et al., 2004). Strain SLAS-1, isolated from salt-saturated Searles Lake is a member of the Halananerobiales, and can either grow as a heterotroph (lactate e-donor) or chemo- autotroph (sulfide e-donor) while respiring As(V). The fact that it can achieve this feat at salt-saturation (~ 340 g/L) makes it a true extremophile (Oremland et. al., 2005). Finally, strain PHS-1 isolated from a hot spring on Paoha island in Mono Lake is the first example of a photosynthetic bacterium of the gamma- proteobacteria able to link its growth to As(III)-dependent anoxygenic photosynthesis (Kulp et al., 2008). These novel microbes give us new insights into the evolution of arsenic-based metabolism and their role in the biogeochemical cycling of this toxic element. Hoeft, S.E., et

  5. Mineral resource of the month: arsenic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, William E.

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic has a long and varied history: Although it was not isolated as an element until the 13th century, it was known to the ancient Chinese, Egyptians and Greeks in compound form in the minerals arsenopyrite, realgar and orpiment. In the 1400s, “Scheele’s Green” was first used as an arsenic pigment in wallpaper, and leached arsenic from wallpaper may have contributed to Napoleon’s death in 1821. The 1940s play and later movie, Arsenic and Old Lace, dramatizes the metal’s more sinister role. Arsenic continues to be an important mineral commodity with many modern applications.

  6. The studying of washing of arsenic and sulfur from coals having different ranges of arsenic contents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, M.; Song, D.; Zheng, B.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2008-01-01

    To study the effectiveness of washing in removal of arsenic and sulfur from coals with different ranges of arsenic concentration, coal was divided into three groups on the basis of arsenic content: 0-5.5 mg/kg, 5.5 mg/kg-8.00 mg/kg, and over 8.00 mg/kg. The result shows that the arsenic in coals with higher arsenic content occurs mainly in an inorganic state and can be relatively easily removed. Arsenic removal is very difficult and less complete when the arsenic content is lower than 5.5 mg/kg because most of this arsenic is in an organic state. There is no relationship between washing rate of total sulfur and arsenic content, but the relationship between the washing rate of total sulfur and percent of organic sulfur is very strong. ?? 2008 New York Academy of Sciences.

  7. The studying of washing of arsenic and sulfur from coals having different ranges of arsenic contents

    SciTech Connect

    Mingshi Wang; Dangyu Song; Baoshan Zheng; R.B. Finkelman

    2008-10-15

    To study the effectiveness of washing in removal of arsenic and sulfur from coals with different ranges of arsenic concentration, coal was divided into three groups on the basis of arsenic content: 0-5.5 mg/kg, 5.5 mg/kg-8.00 mg/kg, and over 8.00 mg/kg. The result shows that the arsenic in coals with higher arsenic content occurs mainly in an inorganic state and can be relatively easily removed. Arsenic removal is very difficult and less complete when the arsenic content is lower than 5.5 mg/kg because most of this arsenic is in an organic state. There is no relationship between washing rate of total sulfur and arsenic content, but the relationship between the washing rate of total sulfur and percent of organic sulfur is very strong.

  8. Mechanistic insights of O-GlcNAcylation that promote progression of cholangiocarcinoma cells via nuclear translocation of NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Phoomak, Chatchai; Vaeteewoottacharn, Kulthida; Sawanyawisuth, Kanlayanee; Seubwai, Wunchana; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Silsirivanit, Atit; Wongkham, Sopit

    2016-01-01

    O-GlcNAcylation, an O-linked protein glycosylation with a single molecule of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), is reversibly controlled by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and N-acetyl D-glucosaminidase (OGA). Aberrant O-GlcNAcylation contributes an important role in initiation and progression of many human cancers. Elevation of O-GlcNAcylation in tumor tissues and poor prognosis of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) patients have been reported. In this study, the role of O-GlcNAcylation in promoting tumor progression was further investigated in CCA cell lines. Suppression of O-GlcNAcylation using small interfering RNAs of OGT (siOGT) significantly reduced cell migration and invasion of CCA cells whereas siOGA treated cells exhibited opposite effects. Manipulating levels of O-GlcNAcylation did affect the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and Akt-phosphorylation together with expression of matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs). O-GlcNAcylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB, the upstream signaling cascade of MMP activation were shown to be important for MMP activation. Immunoprecipitation revealed the elevation of O-GlcNAc-modified NF-κB with increased cellular O-GlcNAcylation. Involvement of O-GlcNAcylation in MMP-mediated migration and invasion of CCA cells was shown to be via O-GlcNAcylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB. This information indicates the significance of O-GlcNAcylation in controlling the metastatic ability of CCA cells, hence, O-GlcNAcylation and its products may be new targets for treatment of metastatic CCA. PMID:27290989

  9. Mechanistic insights of O-GlcNAcylation that promote progression of cholangiocarcinoma cells via nuclear translocation of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Phoomak, Chatchai; Vaeteewoottacharn, Kulthida; Sawanyawisuth, Kanlayanee; Seubwai, Wunchana; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Silsirivanit, Atit; Wongkham, Sopit

    2016-01-01

    O-GlcNAcylation, an O-linked protein glycosylation with a single molecule of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), is reversibly controlled by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and N-acetyl D-glucosaminidase (OGA). Aberrant O-GlcNAcylation contributes an important role in initiation and progression of many human cancers. Elevation of O-GlcNAcylation in tumor tissues and poor prognosis of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) patients have been reported. In this study, the role of O-GlcNAcylation in promoting tumor progression was further investigated in CCA cell lines. Suppression of O-GlcNAcylation using small interfering RNAs of OGT (siOGT) significantly reduced cell migration and invasion of CCA cells whereas siOGA treated cells exhibited opposite effects. Manipulating levels of O-GlcNAcylation did affect the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and Akt-phosphorylation together with expression of matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs). O-GlcNAcylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB, the upstream signaling cascade of MMP activation were shown to be important for MMP activation. Immunoprecipitation revealed the elevation of O-GlcNAc-modified NF-κB with increased cellular O-GlcNAcylation. Involvement of O-GlcNAcylation in MMP-mediated migration and invasion of CCA cells was shown to be via O-GlcNAcylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB. This information indicates the significance of O-GlcNAcylation in controlling the metastatic ability of CCA cells, hence, O-GlcNAcylation and its products may be new targets for treatment of metastatic CCA. PMID:27290989

  10. Infiltrating T Cells Promote Bladder Cancer Progression via Increasing IL1→Androgen Receptor→HIF1α→VEGFa Signals.

    PubMed

    Tao, Le; Qiu, Jianxin; Jiang, Ming; Song, Wenbin; Yeh, Shuyuan; Yu, Hong; Zang, Lijuan; Xia, Shujie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-08-01

    The tumor microenvironment impacts tumor progression and individual cells, including CD4(+) T cells, which have been detected in bladder cancer tissues. The detailed mechanism of how these T cells were recruited to the bladder cancer tumor and their impact on bladder cancer progression, however, remains unclear. Using a human clinical bladder cancer sample survey and in vitro coculture system, we found that bladder cancer has a greater capacity to recruit T cells than surrounding normal bladder tissues. The consequences of higher levels of recruited T cells in bladder cancer included increased bladder cancer metastasis. Mechanism dissection revealed that infiltrating T cells might function through secreting the cytokine IL1, which increases the recruitment of T cells to bladder cancer and enhances the bladder cancer androgen receptor (AR) signaling that results in increased bladder cancer cell invasion via upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α)/VEGFa expression. Interruption of the IL1→AR→HIF1α→VEGFa signals with inhibitors of HIF1α or VEGFa partially reversed the enhanced bladder cancer cell invasion. Finally, in vivo mouse models of xenografted bladder cancer T24 cells with CD4(+) T cells confirmed in vitro coculture studies and concluded that infiltrating CD4(+) T cells can promote bladder cancer metastasis via modulation of the IL1→AR→HIF1α→VEGFa signaling. Future clinical trials using small molecules to target this newly identified signaling pathway may facilitate the development of new therapeutic approaches to better suppress bladder cancer metastasis. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(8); 1943-51. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196763

  11. H3K27 Demethylase JMJD3 Employs the NF-κB and BMP Signaling Pathways to Modulate the Tumor Microenvironment and Promote Melanoma Progression and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo-Yong; Hong, Beom-Jin; Lee, Jungsul; Choi, Chulhee; Kim, Mi-Young

    2016-01-01

    Histone methylation is a key epigenetic mark that regulates gene expression. Recently, aberrant histone methylation patterns caused by deregulated histone demethylases have been associated with carcinogenesis. However, the role of histone demethylases, particularly the histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase JMJD3, remains largely uncharacterized in melanoma. Here, we used human melanoma cell lines and a mouse xenograft model to demonstrate a requirement for JMJD3 in melanoma growth and metastasis. Notably, in contrast with previous reports examining T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and hepatoma cells, JMJD3 did not alter the general proliferation rate of melanoma cells in vitro. However, JMJD3 conferred melanoma cells with several malignant features such as enhanced clonogenicity, self-renewal, and transendothelial migration. In addition, JMJD3 enabled melanoma cells not only to create a favorable tumor microenvironment by promoting angiogenesis and macrophage recruitment, but also to activate protumorigenic PI3K signaling upon interaction with stromal components. Mechanistic investigations demonstrated that JMJD3 transcriptionally upregulated several targets of NF-κB and BMP signaling, including stanniocalcin 1 (STC1) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), which functioned as downstream effectors of JMJD3 in self-renewal and macrophage recruitment, respectively. Furthermore, JMJD3 expression was elevated and positively correlated with that of STC1 and CCL2 in human malignant melanoma. Moreover, we found that BMP4, another JMJD3 target gene, regulated JMJD3 expression via a positive feedback mechanism. Our findings reveal a novel epigenetic mechanism by which JMJD3 promotes melanoma progression and metastasis, and suggest JMJD3 as a potential target for melanoma treatment. PMID:26729791

  12. Influence of BCL2-938 C>A promoter polymorphism and BCL2 gene expression on the progression of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhushann Meka, Phanni; Jarjapu, Sarika; Vishwakarma, Sandeep Kumar; Nanchari, Santhoshi Rani; Cingeetham, Anuradha; Annamaneni, Sandhya; Mukta, Srinivasulu; Triveni, B; Satti, Vishnupriya

    2016-05-01

    BCL2 (B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2) gene functions as antiapoptotic regulatory element and known to be associated with tumorigenesis. The SNP-938 (C>A) (rs2279115), located in the inhibitory P2 promoter of the BCL2 gene, influences differential binding affinities of transcriptional factors thereby affecting BCL2 expression. The present study is an attempt to evaluate the association between BCL2(-938C>A) polymorphism and clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients as well as to analyze BCL2 expression and Ki67 proliferation index with respect to the genotypes. One hundred ten primary breast cancer tumor tissues were genotyped for -938 C>A polymorphism through PCR-RFLP method as well as evaluated for BCL2 expression and ki67 proliferation index by immunohistochemistry. Evaluation of apoptosis level was performed by flowcytometry. The results revealed that AA genotype was associated with an increased risk (AA Vs AC + CC) by 2.86-fold (p = 0.07) for breast cancer development which reflected in elevated A allele frequency also. AA genotype was found to be predominant among BCL2 positive tumors as compared to BCL2 negative tumors. Further, AA genotype was found to be associated with advanced stage tumors, node positive status, and high Ki67 proliferation index compared to CA and CC genotypes indicating that elevated expression of BCL2 gene in the presence of A allele might be associated with decreased apoptosis and enhanced proliferation rate. AA genotype of BCL2-938C>A polymorphism might influence BCL2 gene expression there by associated with elevated risk for breast cancer progression. Probably, failure of apoptosis due to enhanced expression and antiapoptotic protein BCL2 might promote malignant growth. PMID:26662799

  13. Tg737 inhibition results in malignant transformation in fetal liver stem/progenitor cells by promoting cell-cycle progression and differentiation arrest.

    PubMed

    You, Nan; Liu, Weihui; Zhong, Xiao; Ji, Ru; Zhang, Ming; You, Houcheng; Dou, Kefeng; Tao, Kaishan

    2012-08-01

    Cancer stem/progenitor cells (CSPCs) may originate from the malignant transformation of normal stem cells. However, the mechanism by which normal stem cells undergo such transformation is not understood. Our previous studies provided evidence that Tg737 may play an important role in carcinogenesis of liver stem cells. In this study, we investigated the role of Tg737 in the malignant transformation of fetal liver stem/progenitor cells (FLSPCs). We inhibited Tg737 in FLSPCs using short hairpin RNA (shRNA). The microscopic observations of freshly purified Tg737 normal FLSPCs (nFLSPCs) and Tg737-silent FLSPCs (sFLSPCs), which showed high expression levels of stem cell markers, revealed no significant morphological changes in sFLSPCs. Following RNAi of Tg737, the mRNA and protein levels of sFLSPCs decreased by 81.81% and 80.10% as shown by PCR, Western blot and immunocytochemistry analyses. Excluding apoptosis-related effects, we found that silencing of Tg737 resulted in enhanced cell proliferation through promoting cell-cycle progression via upregulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin B expression (P < 0.05). Silencing of Tg737 also resulted in significant arrest of cell differentiation (P < 0.05), stable expression of both albumin (ALB) and alpha fetoprotein (AFP) (P > 0.05) and quiescent ultrastructure. Assessment of cell malignant traits by transwell migration assays and by growth of xenograft tumors in athymic mice showed that reduced expression of Tg737 greatly promoted cell invasion and hepatocarcinogenesis of FLSPCs (P < 0.05). This work shows that inactivation of Tg737 may play an important role in malignant transformation of FLSPCs. PMID:21837759

  14. Far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FUBP1) is a potential c-Myc regulator in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and its expression promotes ESCC progression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhu, Jun-Ya; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Bao, Bo-Jun; Guan, Cheng-Qi; Yang, Xiao-Jing; Liu, Yan-Hua; Huang, Yue-Jiao; Ni, Run-Zhou; Ji, Li-Li

    2016-03-01

    The human far upstream element (FUSE) binding protein 1 (FUBP1) belongs to an ancient family which is required for proper regulation of the c-Myc proto-oncogene. Although c-Myc plays an important role in development of various carcinomas, the relevance of FUBP1 and their contribution to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) development remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between FUBP1 and c-Myc as well as their contribution to ESCC development. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to evaluate FUBP1 expression. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis was performed to explore the correlation between FUBP1 and c-Myc in ESCC. In addition, the role of FUBP1 in ESCC proliferation was studied in ESCC cells through knocking FUBP1 down. The regulation of FUBP1 on proliferation was confirmed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, flow cytometric assays, and clone formation assays. The expressions of FUBP1 and c-Myc were both upregulated in ESCC tissues. In addition to correlation between expression of FUBP1 and tumor grade, we also confirmed the correlation of FUBP1, c-Myc, and Ki-67 expression by twos. Moreover, upregulation of FUBP1 and c-Myc in ESCC was associated with poor survival. FUBP1 was confirmed to activate c-Myc in ESCC tissues and cells. FUBP1 was demonstrated to promote proliferation of ESCC cells. Moreover, downregulation of both FUBP1 and c-Myc was confirmed to inhibit proliferation of ESCC cells. Our results indicated that FUBP1 may potentially stimulate c-Myc expression in ESCC and its expression may promote ESCC progression. PMID:26490982

  15. Arsenic Contamination in Food-chain: Transfer of Arsenic into Food Materials through Groundwater Irrigation

    PubMed Central

    Joardar, J.C.; Parvin, S.; Correll, Ray; Naidu, Ravi

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic contamination in groundwater in Bangladesh has become an additional concern vis-à-vis its use for irrigation purposes. Even if arsenic-safe drinking-water is assured, the question of irrigating soils with arsenic-laden groundwater will continue for years to come. Immediate attention should be given to assess the possibility of accumulating arsenic in soils through irrigation-water and its subsequent entry into the food-chain through various food crops and fodders. With this possibility in mind, arsenic content of 2,500 water, soil and vegetable samples from arsenic-affected and arsenic-unaffected areas were analyzed during 1999–2004. Other sources of foods and fodders were also analyzed. Irrigating a rice field with groundwater containing 0.55 mg/L of arsenic with a water requirement of 1,000 mm results in an estimated addition of 5.5 kg of arsenic per ha per annum. Concentration of arsenic as high as 80 mg per kg of soil was found in an area receiving arsenic-contaminated irrigation. A comparison of results from affected and unaffected areas revealed that some commonly-grown vegetables, which would usually be suitable as good sources of nourishment, accumulate substantially-elevated amounts of arsenic. For example, more than 150 mg/kg of arsenic has been found to be accumulated in arum (kochu) vegetable. Implications of arsenic ingested in vegetables and other food materials are discussed in the paper. PMID:17366772

  16. Arsenic occurrence in New Hampshire drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, S.C.; Blum, J.D.; Klaue, B.; Karagas, M.R.

    1999-05-01

    Arsenic concentrations were measured in 992 drinking water samples collected from New Hampshire households using online hydride generation ICP-MS. These randomly selected household water samples contain much less arsenic than those voluntarily submitted for analysis to the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES). Extrapolation of the voluntarily submitted sample set to all New Hampshire residents significantly overestimates arsenic exposure. In randomly selected households, concentrations ranged from <0.0003 to 180 {micro}g/L, with water from domestic wells containing significantly more arsenic than water from municipal sources. Water samples from drilled bedrock wells had the highest arsenic concentrations, while samples from surficial wells had the lowest arsenic concentrations. The authors suggest that much of the groundwater arsenic in New Hampshire is derived from weathering of bedrock materials and not from anthropogenic contamination. The spatial distribution of elevated arsenic concentrations correlates with Late-Devonian Concord-type granitic bedrock. Field observations in the region exhibiting the highest groundwater arsenic concentrations revealed abundant pegmatite dikes associated with nearby granites. Analysis of rock digests indicates arsenic concentrations up to 60 mg/kg in pegmatites, with much lower values in surrounding schists and granites. Weak acid leaches show that approximately half of the total arsenic in the pegmatites is labile and therefore can be mobilized during rock-water interaction.

  17. Removal processes for arsenic in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Lizama A, Katherine; Fletcher, Tim D; Sun, Guangzhi

    2011-08-01

    Arsenic pollution in aquatic environments is a worldwide concern due to its toxicity and chronic effects on human health. This concern has generated increasing interest in the use of different treatment technologies to remove arsenic from contaminated water. Constructed wetlands are a cost-effective natural system successfully used for removing various pollutants, and they have shown capability for removing arsenic. This paper reviews current understanding of the removal processes for arsenic, discusses implications for treatment wetlands, and identifies critical knowledge gaps and areas worthy of future research. The reactivity of arsenic means that different arsenic species may be found in wetlands, influenced by vegetation, supporting medium and microorganisms. Despite the fact that sorption, precipitation and coprecipitation are the principal processes responsible for the removal of arsenic, bacteria can mediate these processes and can play a significant role under favourable environmental conditions. The most important factors affecting the speciation of arsenic are pH, alkalinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, the presence of other chemical species--iron, sulphur, phosphate--,a source of carbon, and the wetland substrate. Studies of the microbial communities and the speciation of arsenic in the solid phase using advanced techniques could provide further insights on the removal of arsenic. Limited data and understanding of the interaction of the different processes involved in the removal of arsenic explain the rudimentary guidelines available for the design of wetlands systems. PMID:21549410

  18. Introducing Simple Detection of Bioavailable Arsenic at Rafaela (Santa Fe Province, Argentina) Using the ARSOlux Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Siegfried, Konrad; Hahn-Tomer, Sonja; Koelsch, Andreas; Osterwalder, Eva; Mattusch, Juergen; Staerk, Hans-Joachim; Meichtry, Jorge M; De Seta, Graciela E; Reina, Fernando D; Panigatti, Cecilia; Litter, Marta I; Harms, Hauke

    2015-05-01

    Numerous articles have reported the occurrence of arsenic in drinking water in Argentina, and the resulting health effects in severely affected regions of the country. Arsenic in drinking water in Argentina is largely naturally occurring due to elevated background content of the metalloid in volcanic sediments, although, in some regions, mining can contribute. While the origin of arsenic release has been discussed extensively, the problem of drinking water contamination has not yet been solved. One key step in progress towards mitigation of problems related with the consumption of As-containing water is the availability of simple detection tools. A chemical test kit and the ARSOlux biosensor were evaluated as simple analytical tools for field measurements of arsenic in the groundwater of Rafaela (Santa Fe, Argentina), and the results were compared with ICP-MS and HPLC-ICP-MS measurements. A survey of the groundwater chemistry was performed to evaluate possible interferences with the field tests. The results showed that the ARSOlux biosensor performed better than the chemical field test, that the predominant species of arsenic in the study area was arsenate and that arsenic concentration in the studied samples had a positive correlation with fluoride and vanadium, and a negative one with calcium and iron. PMID:26006123

  19. Introducing Simple Detection of Bioavailable Arsenic at Rafaela (Santa Fe Province, Argentina) Using the ARSOlux Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Siegfried, Konrad; Hahn-Tomer, Sonja; Koelsch, Andreas; Osterwalder, Eva; Mattusch, Juergen; Staerk, Hans-Joachim; Meichtry, Jorge M.; De Seta, Graciela E.; Reina, Fernando D.; Panigatti, Cecilia; Litter, Marta I.; Harms, Hauke

    2015-01-01

    Numerous articles have reported the occurrence of arsenic in drinking water in Argentina, and the resulting health effects in severely affected regions of the country. Arsenic in drinking water in Argentina is largely naturally occurring due to elevated background content of the metalloid in volcanic sediments, although, in some regions, mining can contribute. While the origin of arsenic release has been discussed extensively, the problem of drinking water contamination has not yet been solved. One key step in progress towards mitigation of problems related with the consumption of As-containing water is the availability of simple detection tools. A chemical test kit and the ARSOlux biosensor were evaluated as simple analytical tools for field measurements of arsenic in the groundwater of Rafaela (Santa Fe, Argentina), and the results were compared with ICP-MS and HPLC-ICP-MS measurements. A survey of the groundwater chemistry was performed to evaluate possible interferences with the field tests. The results showed that the ARSOlux biosensor performed better than the chemical field test, that the predominant species of arsenic in the study area was arsenate and that arsenic concentration in the studied samples had a positive correlation with fluoride and vanadium, and a negative one with calcium and iron. PMID:26006123

  20. Diet and toenail arsenic concentrations in a New Hampshire population with arsenic-containing water

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited data exist on the contribution of dietary sources of arsenic to an individual’s total exposure, particularly in populations with exposure via drinking water. Here, the association between diet and toenail arsenic concentrations (a long-term biomarker of exposure) was evaluated for individuals with measured household tap water arsenic. Foods known to be high in arsenic, including rice and seafood, were of particular interest. Methods Associations between toenail arsenic and consumption of 120 individual diet items were quantified using general linear models that also accounted for household tap water arsenic and potentially confounding factors (e.g., age, caloric intake, sex, smoking) (n = 852). As part of the analysis, we assessed whether associations between log-transformed toenail arsenic and each diet item differed between subjects with household drinking water arsenic concentrations <1 μg/L versus ≥1 μg/L. Results As expected, toenail arsenic concentrations increased with household water arsenic concentrations. Among the foods known to be high in arsenic, no clear relationship between toenail arsenic and rice consumption was detected, but there was a positive association with consumption of dark meat fish, a category that includes tuna steaks, mackerel, salmon, sardines, bluefish, and swordfish. Positive associations between toenail arsenic and consumption of white wine, beer, and Brussels sprouts were also observed; these and most other associations were not modified by exposure via water. However, consumption of two foods cooked in water, beans/lentils and cooked oatmeal, was more strongly related to toenail arsenic among those with arsenic-containing drinking water (≥1 μg/L). Conclusions This study suggests that diet can be an important contributor to total arsenic exposure in U.S. populations regardless of arsenic concentrations in drinking water. Thus, dietary exposure to arsenic in the US warrants consideration as a potential

  1. Arsenic contamination of Bangladesh paddy field soils: implications for rice contribution to arsenic consumption.

    PubMed

    Meharg, Andrew A; Rahman, Md Mazibur

    2003-01-15

    Arsenic contaminated groundwater is used extensively in Bangladesh to irrigate the staple food of the region, paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.). To determine if this irrigation has led to a buildup of arsenic levels in paddy fields, and the consequences for arsenic exposure through rice ingestion, a survey of arsenic levels in paddy soils and rice grain was undertaken. Survey of paddy soils throughout Bangladesh showed that arsenic levels were elevated in zones where arsenic in groundwater used for irrigation was high, and where these tube-wells have been in operation for the longest period of time. Regression of soil arsenic levels with tube-well age was significant. Arsenic levels reached 46 microg g(-1) dry weight in the most affected zone, compared to levels below l0 microg g(-1) in areas with low levels of arsenic in the groundwater. Arsenic levels in rice grain from an area of Bangladesh with low levels of arsenic in groundwaters and in paddy soils showed that levels were typical of other regions of the world. Modeling determined, even these typical grain arsenic levels contributed considerably to arsenic ingestion when drinking water contained the elevated quantity of 0.1 mg L(-1). Arsenic levels in rice can be further elevated in rice growing on arsenic contaminated soils, potentially greatly increasing arsenic exposure of the Bangladesh population. Rice grain grown in the regions where arsenic is building up in the soil had high arsenic concentrations, with three rice grain samples having levels above 1.7 microg g(-1). PMID:12564892

  2. System for removal of arsenic from water

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2004-11-23

    Systems for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical systems for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A system for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a system for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  3. Arsenic for the fool: an exponential connection.

    PubMed

    Dani, Sergio U

    2010-03-15

    Anthropogenic arsenic is insidiously building up together with natural arsenic to a level unprecedented in the history of mankind. Arsenopyrite (FeAsS) is the principal ore of arsenic and gold in hard rock mines; it is formed by a coupled substitution of sulphur by arsenic in the structure of pyrite (FeS(2)) - nicknamed "fool's gold". Other important sources of anthropogenic arsenic are fossil fuels such as coal and oil. Here I report on the first indication that the environmental concentration of total arsenic in topsoils - in the 7-18ppm range - is exponentially related to the prevalence and mortality of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias in European countries. This evidence defies the imputed absence of verified cases of human morbidity or mortality resulting from exposure to low-level arsenic in topsoils. PMID:20123147

  4. Remediation of arsenic contaminated soil by coupling oxalate washing with subsequent ZVI/Air treatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Menghua; Ye, Yuanyao; Chen, Jing; Lu, Xiaohua

    2016-02-01

    The application of a novel coupled process with oxalate washing and subsequent zero-valent iron (ZVI)/Air treatment for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil was investigated in the present study. Oxalate is biodegradable and widely present in the environment. With addition of 0.1 mol L(-1) oxalate under circumneutral condition, 83.7% and 52.6% of arsenic could be removed from a spiked kaolin and an actual contaminated soil respectively. Much more oxalate adsorption on the actual soil was attributed to the higher soil organic matter and clay content. Interestingly, oxalate retained in the washing effluent could act as an organic ligand to promote the oxidation efficiency of ZVI/Air at near neutral pH. Compared with the absence of oxalate, much more As(III) was oxidized. Arsenic was effectively adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides as the consumption of oxalate and the increase of pH value. For the actual soil washing effluent, about 94.9% of total arsenic was removed after 120 min's treatment without pH adjustment. It has been demonstrated that As(V) was the dominant arsenic speciation adsorbed on iron (hydr)oxides. This study provides a promising alternative for remediation of arsenic contaminated soil in view of its low cost and environmental benign. PMID:26476769

  5. Selective Hyaluronan-CD44 Signaling Promotes miRNA-21 Expression and Interacts with Vitamin D Function during Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinomas Progression Following UV Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Lilly Y W; Bikle, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA), the major extracellular matrix component, is often anchored to CD44, a family of structurally/functionally important cell surface receptors. Recent results indicate that UV irradiation (UVR)-induced cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) overexpress a variety of CD44 variant isoforms (CD44v), with different CD44v isoforms appear to confer malignant SCC properties. UVR also stimulates HA degradation in epidermal keratinocytes. Both large HA polymers and their UVR-induced catabolic products (small HA) selectively activate CD44-mediated cellular signaling in normal keratinocytes and SCC cells, with all of the downstream processes being mediated by RhoGTPases (e.g., Rac1 and Rho). Importantly, we found that the hormonally active form of vitamin D 1,25(OH)2D3 not only prevents the UVR-induced small HA activation of abnormal keratinocyte behavior and SCC progression, but also enhances large HA stimulation of normal keratinocyte activities and epidermal function(s). The aim of this hypothesis and theory article is to question whether matrix HA and its UVR-induced catabolic products (e.g., large and small HA) can selectively activate CD44-mediated cellular signaling such as GTPase (Rac and RhA) activation. We suggested that large HA-CD44 interaction promotes Rac-signaling and normal keratinocyte differentiation (lipid synthesis), DNA repair, and keratinocyte survival function. Conversely, small HA-CD44 interaction stimulates RhoA activation, NFκB/Stat-3 signaling, and miR-21 production, resulting in inflammation and proliferation as well as SCC progression. We also question whether vitamin D treatment displays any effect on small HA-CD44v-mediated RhoA signaling, inflammation, and SCC progression, as well as large HA-CD44-mediated differentiation, DNA repair, keratinocyte survival, and normal keratinocyte function. In addition, we discussed that the topical application of signaling perturbation agents (e.g., Y27623, a ROK inhibitor) may be used to treat

  6. Knowledge Building Insights on Biomarkers of Arsenic Toxicity to Keratinocytes and Melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Isokpehi, Raphael D.; Udensi, Udensi K.; Anyanwu, Matthew N.; Mbah, Andreas N.; Johnson, Matilda O.; Edusei, Kafui; Bauer, Michael A.; Hall, Roger A.; Awofolu, Omotayo R.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic induces skin cancer and abnormal pigmentation in susceptible humans. High-throughput gene transcription assays such as DNA microarrays allow for the identification of biological pathways affected by arsenic that lead to initiation and progression of skin cancer and abnormal pigmentation. The overall purpose of the reported research was to determine knowledge building insights on biomarker genes for arsenic toxicity to human epidermal cells by integrating a collection of gene lists annotated with biological information. The information sets included toxicogenomics gene-chemical interaction; enzymes encoded in the human genome; enriched biological information associated with genes; environmentally relevant gene sequence variation; and effects of non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on protein function. Molecular network construction for arsenic upregulated genes TNFSF18 (tumor necrosis factor [ligand] superfamily member 18) and IL1R2 (interleukin 1 Receptor, type 2) revealed subnetwork interconnections to E2F4, an oncogenic transcription factor, predominantly expressed at the onset of keratinocyte differentiation. Visual analytics integration of gene information sources helped identify RAC1, a GTP binding protein, and TFRC, an iron uptake protein as prioritized arsenic-perturbed protein targets for biological processes leading to skin hyperpigmentation. RAC1 regulates the formation of dendrites that transfer melanin from melanocytes to neighboring keratinocytes. Increased melanocyte dendricity is correlated with hyperpigmentation. TFRC is a key determinant of the amount and location of iron in the epidermis. Aberrant TFRC expression could impair cutaneous iron metabolism leading to abnormal pigmentation seen in some humans exposed to arsenicals. The reported findings contribute to insights on how arsenic could impair the function of genes and biological pathways in epidermal cells. Finally, we developed visual analytics

  7. Oxidative stress and hepatic stellate cell activation are key events in arsenic induced liver fibrosis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, Subhadip; Biswas, Ayan; Dhali, Gopal Krishna; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Boyer, James L.; Santra, Amal

    2011-02-15

    Arsenic is an environmental toxicant and carcinogen. Exposure to arsenic is associated with development of liver fibrosis and portal hypertension through ill defined mechanisms. We evaluated hepatic fibrogenesis after long term arsenic exposure in a murine model. BALB/c mice were exposed to arsenic by daily gavages of 6 {mu}g/gm body weight for 1 year and were evaluated for markers of hepatic oxidative stress and fibrosis, as well as pro-inflammatory, pro-apoptotic and pro-fibrogenic factors at 9 and 12 months. Hepatic NADPH oxidase activity progressively increased in arsenic exposure with concomitant development of hepatic oxidative stress. Hepatic steatosis with occasional collection of mononuclear inflammatory cells and mild portal fibrosis were the predominant liver lesion observed after 9 months of arsenic exposure, while at 12 months, the changes included mild hepatic steatosis, inflammation, necrosis and significant fibrosis in periportal areas. The pathologic changes in the liver were associated with markers of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation, matrix reorganization and fibrosis including {alpha}-smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor-{beta}1, PDGF-R{beta}, pro-inflammatory cytokines and enhanced expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and pro({alpha}) collagen type I. Moreover, pro-apoptotic protein Bax was dominantly expressed and Bcl-2 was down-regulated along with increased number of TUNEL positive hepatocytes in liver of arsenic exposed mice. Furthermore, HSCs activation due to increased hepatic oxidative stress observed after in vivo arsenic exposure was recapitulated in co-culture model of isolated HSCs and hepatocytes exposed to arsenic. These findings have implications not only for the understanding of the pathology of arsenic related liver fibrosis but also for the design of preventive strategies in chronic arsenicosis.

  8. Managing hazardous pollutants in Chile: arsenic.

    PubMed

    Sancha, Ana María; O'Ryan, Raul

    2008-01-01

    Chile is one of the few countries that faces the environmental challenge posed by extensive arsenic pollution, which exists in the northern part of the country. Chile has worked through various options to appropriately address the environmental challenge of arsenic pollution of water and air. Because of cost and other reasons, copying standards used elsewhere in the world was not an option for Chile. Approximately 1.8 million people, representing about 12% of the total population of the country, live in arsenic-contaminated areas. In these regions, air, water, and soil are contaminated with arsenic from both natural and anthropogenic sources. For long periods, water consumed by the population contained arsenic levels that exceeded values recommended by the World Health Organization. Exposure to airborne arsenic also occurred near several large cities, as a consequence of both natural contamination and the intensive mining activity carried out in those areas. In rural areas, indigenous populations, who lack access to treated water, were also exposed to arsenic by consuming foods grown locally in arsenic-contaminated soils. Health effects in children and adults from arsenic exposure first appeared in the 1950s. Such effects included vascular, respiratory, and skin lesions from intake of high arsenic levels in drinking water. Methods to remove arsenic from water were evaluated, developed, and implemented that allowed significant reductions in exposure at a relatively low cost. Construction and operation of treatment plants to remove arsenic from water first began in the 1970s. Beginning in the 1990s, epidemiological studies showed that the rate of lung and bladder cancer in the arsenic-polluted area was considerably higher than mean cancer rates for the country. Cancer incidence was directly related to arsenic exposure. During the 1990s, international pressure and concern by Chile's Health Ministry prompted action to regulate arsenic emissions from copper smelters. A

  9. KDM4B and KDM4A promote endometrial cancer progression by regulating androgen receptor, c-myc, and p27kip1

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Suet-Ying; Chen, Limo; Chen, Jin-Hong; Ying, Zuo-Lin; Zhou, Ye; Gu, Wei; Wang, Li-Hua; Cheng, Wei-Wei; Zeng, Jianfang; Wan, Xiao-Ping; Mok, Samuel C.; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Bao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that elevated androgen levels and genetic variation related to the androgen receptor (AR) increase the risk of endometrial cancer (EC). However, the role of AR in EC is poorly understood. We report that two members of the histone demethylase KDM4 family act as major regulators of AR transcriptional activityin EC. In the MFE-296 cell line, KDM4B and AR upregulate c-myc expression, while in AN3CA cells KDM4A and AR downregulate p27kip1. Additionally, KDM4B expression is positively correlated with AR expression in EC cell lines with high baseline AR expression, while KDM4A and AR expression are positively correlated in low-AR cell lines. In clinical specimens, both KDM4B and KDM4A expression are significantly higher in EC tissues than that in normal endometrium. Finally, patients with alterations in AR, KDM4B, KDM4A, and c-myc have poor overall and disease-free survival rates. Together, these findings demonstrate that KDM4B and KDM4A promote EC progression by regulating AR activity. PMID:26397136

  10. KDM4B and KDM4A promote endometrial cancer progression by regulating androgen receptor, c-myc, and p27kip1.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Mei-Ting; Fan, Qiong; Zhu, Zhu; Kwan, Suet-Ying; Chen, Limo; Chen, Jin-Hong; Ying, Zuo-Lin; Zhou, Ye; Gu, Wei; Wang, Li-Hua; Cheng, Wei-Wei; Zeng, Jianfang; Wan, Xiao-Ping; Mok, Samuel C; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Bao, Wei

    2015-10-13

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that elevated androgen levels and genetic variation related to the androgen receptor (AR) increase the risk of endometrial cancer (EC). However, the role of AR in EC is poorly understood. We report that two members of the histone demethylase KDM4 family act as major regulators of AR transcriptional activityin EC. In the MFE-296 cell line, KDM4B and AR upregulate c-myc expression, while in AN3CA cells KDM4A and AR downregulate p27kip1. Additionally, KDM4B expression is positively correlated with AR expression in EC cell lines with high baseline AR expression, while KDM4A and AR expression are positively correlated in low-AR cell lines. In clinical specimens, both KDM4B and KDM4A expression are significantly higher in EC tissues than that in normal endometrium. Finally, patients with alterations in AR, KDM4B, KDM4A, and c-myc have poor overall and disease-free survival rates. Together, these findings demonstrate that KDM4B and KDM4A promote EC progression by regulating AR activity. PMID:26397136

  11. The nucleolar protein NIFK promotes cancer progression via CK1α/β-catenin in metastasis and Ki-67-dependent cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsung-Chieh; Su, Chia-Yi; Wu, Pei-Yu; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Pan, Wen-An; Jan, Yi-Hua; Chang, Yu-Chang; Yeh, Chi-Tai; Chen, Chi-Long; Ger, Luo-Ping; Chang, Hong-Tai; Yang, Chih-Jen; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Liu, Yu-Peng; Lin, Yuan-Feng; Shyy, John Y-J; Tsai, Ming-Daw; Hsiao, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolar protein interacting with the FHA domain of pKi-67 (NIFK) is a Ki-67-interacting protein. However, its precise function in cancer remains largely uninvestigated. Here we show the clinical significance and metastatic mechanism of NIFK in lung cancer. NIFK expression is clinically associated with poor prognosis and metastasis. Furthermore, NIFK enhances Ki-67-dependent proliferation, and promotes migration, invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo via downregulation of casein kinase 1α (CK1α), a suppressor of pro-metastatic TCF4/β-catenin signaling. Inversely, CK1α is upregulated upon NIFK knockdown. The silencing of CK1α expression in NIFK-silenced cells restores TCF4/β-catenin transcriptional activity, cell migration, and metastasis. Furthermore, RUNX1 is identified as a transcription factor of CSNK1A1 (CK1α) that is negatively regulated by NIFK. Our results demonstrate the prognostic value of NIFK, and suggest that NIFK is required for lung cancer progression via the RUNX1-dependent CK1α repression, which activates TCF4/β-catenin signaling in metastasis and the Ki-67-dependent regulation in cell proliferation. PMID:26984280

  12. The nucleolar protein NIFK promotes cancer progression via CK1α/β-catenin in metastasis and Ki-67-dependent cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tsung-Chieh; Su, Chia-Yi; Wu, Pei-Yu; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Pan, Wen-An; Jan, Yi-Hua; Chang, Yu-Chang; Yeh, Chi-Tai; Chen, Chi-Long; Ger, Luo-Ping; Chang, Hong-Tai; Yang, Chih-Jen; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Liu, Yu-Peng; Lin, Yuan-Feng; Shyy, John Y-J; Tsai, Ming-Daw; Hsiao, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolar protein interacting with the FHA domain of pKi-67 (NIFK) is a Ki-67-interacting protein. However, its precise function in cancer remains largely uninvestigated. Here we show the clinical significance and metastatic mechanism of NIFK in lung cancer. NIFK expression is clinically associated with poor prognosis and metastasis. Furthermore, NIFK enhances Ki-67-dependent proliferation, and promotes migration, invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo via downregulation of casein kinase 1α (CK1α), a suppressor of pro-metastatic TCF4/β-catenin signaling. Inversely, CK1α is upregulated upon NIFK knockdown. The silencing of CK1α expression in NIFK-silenced cells restores TCF4/β-catenin transcriptional activity, cell migration, and metastasis. Furthermore, RUNX1 is identified as a transcription factor of CSNK1A1 (CK1α) that is negatively regulated by NIFK. Our results demonstrate the prognostic value of NIFK, and suggest that NIFK is required for lung cancer progression via the RUNX1-dependent CK1α repression, which activates TCF4/β-catenin signaling in metastasis and the Ki-67-dependent regulation in cell proliferation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11288.001 PMID:26984280

  13. Evaluation of Arsenic Removal Technology: Arsenic Demonstration Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    Specific objectives of this program are to evaluate the reliability of the arsenic technologies of small scale systems; to gauge the simplicity of system operations, maintenance and operator skill; to determine the cost-effectiveness of the treatment technologies; and to characte...

  14. Arsenic silicide formation by oxidation of arsenic implanted silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagmann, D.; Euen, W.; Schorer, G.; Metzger, G.

    1989-07-01

    Wet oxidations of (100) silicon implanted with an arsenic dose of 2 × 1016 cm-2 and an energy of 30 keV were carried out in the temperature range between 600 and 900° C. The oxidation rate is increased on the arsenic implanted samples up to a factor of 2000 as compared to undoped samples. During these oxidations the arsenic suicide phase AsSi is precipitated at the oxide/silicon interface. After short oxidation times at 600° C, a continuous AsSi layer is found. It is dissolved during extended oxidation times and finally almost all As is incorporated in the oxide. After 900° C oxidations, substantial AsSi crystallites remain at the Si/SiO2 interface. They are still observed up to the larg-est oxide thickness grown (2.3 µm). The AsSi phase and the distribution of the im-planted arsenic were analyzed by TEM, SIMS and XRF measurements.

  15. Possible mechanisms for arsenic-induced proliferative diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Wetterhahn, K.E.; Dudek, E.J.; Shumilla, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    Possible mechanisms for cardiovascular diseases and cancers which have been observed on chronic exposure to arsenic have been investigated. We tested the hypothesis that nonlethal levels of arsenic are mitogenic, cause oxidative stress, increase nuclear translocation of trans-acting factors, and increase expression of genes involved in proliferation. Cultured porcine vascular (from aorta) endothelial cells were used as a model cell system to study the effects of arsenic on the target cells for cardiovascular diseases. Treatment of postconfluent cell cultures with nonovertly toxic concentrations of arsenite increased DNA synthesis, similar to the mitogenic response observed with hydrogen peroxide.