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Sample records for arterial baroreceptor function

  1. Role of arterial baroreceptors in mediating cardiovascular response to exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcritchie, R. J.; Vatner, S. F.; Patrick, T. A.; Braunwald, E.; Boettcher, D.; Heyndrickx, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to define the role of the major arterial baroreceptors during moderately severe exercise by comparing the responses of untethered conscious dogs instrumented for the measurement of aortic pressure and cardiac output with those of dogs with total arterial baroreceptor denervation. The reflex heart rate responses to intravenous bolus doses of methoxamine were also examined in intact animals, both at rest and during exercise. Methoxamine is found to cause striking bradycardia at rest, but little bradycardia during exercise. Experimental findings suggest that the arterial baroreceptor reflex is normally inhibited during severe exercise and therefore plays little role in modulating the cardiovascular response to exercise.

  2. Arterial baroreceptors in the management of systemic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kougias, Panagiotis; Weakley, Sarah M.; Yao, Qizhi; Lin, Peter H.; Chen, Changyi

    2010-01-01

    Summary Hypertension is a multifactorial disease associated with significant morbidity. Increased sympathetic nervous system activity has been noted as an important etiologic factor and is, in part, regulated by afferent input arising from arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors, activation of which causes inhibition of sympathetic output. It was thought for many years that baroreceptors control only short-term blood pressure changes, a conclusion stemming from observations in sinoaortic denervation (SAD) animal models and the phenomenon of rapid baroreceptor resetting, also seen in animal models. Newer observations, however, indicate that SAD is rather imperfect and resetting is rarely complete. Recent studies reveal that baroreceptors control sympathetic output on a more long-term basis and participate in fluid volume regulation by the kidney, and thus have the potential to adjust blood pressure chronically. Importantly, these findings are consistent with studies and observations in humans. Meanwhile, a model of electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus has been developed and successfully tested in animals. Following these encouraging results human trials to evaluate the clinical application of electrical carotid sinus manipulation in the treatment of systemic hypertension have commenced, and results so far indicate that this represents an exciting potential tool in the clinician’s armament against chronic arterial hypertension. PMID:20037502

  3. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Arterial Baroreceptor Pathways: Implications for Activity-Dependent Plasticity at Baroafferent Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jessica L.; Jenkins, Victoria K.; Hsieh, Hui-ya; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    Functional characteristics of the arterial baroreceptor reflex change throughout ontogenesis, including perinatal adjustments of the reflex gain and adult resetting during hypertension. However, the cellular mechanisms that underlie these functional changes are not completely understood. Here, we provide evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin with a well-established role in activity-dependent neuronal plasticity, is abundantly expressed in vivo by a large subset of developing and adult rat baroreceptor afferents. Immunoreactivity to BDNF is present in the cell bodies of baroafferent neurons in the nodose ganglion (NG), their central projections in the solitary tract, and terminal-like structures in the lower brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). Using ELISA in situ combined with electrical field stimulation, we show that native BDNF is released from cultured newborn NG neurons in response to patterns that mimic the in vivo activity of baroreceptor afferents. In particular, high-frequency bursting patterns of baroreceptor firing, which are known to evoke plastic changes at baroreceptor synapses, are significantly more effective at releasing BDNF than tonic patterns of the same average frequency. Together, our study indicates that BDNF expressed by first-order baroreceptor neurons is a likely mediator of both developmental and post-developmental modifications at first-order synapses in arterial baroreceptor pathways. PMID:19054281

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in arterial baroreceptor pathways: implications for activity-dependent plasticity at baroafferent synapses.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica L; Jenkins, Victoria K; Hsieh, Hui-ya; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2009-01-01

    Functional characteristics of the arterial baroreceptor reflex change throughout ontogenesis, including perinatal adjustments of the reflex gain and adult resetting during hypertension. However, the cellular mechanisms that underlie these functional changes are not completely understood. Here, we provide evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin with a well-established role in activity-dependent neuronal plasticity, is abundantly expressed in vivo by a large subset of developing and adult rat baroreceptor afferents. Immunoreactivity to BDNF is present in the cell bodies of baroafferent neurons in the nodose ganglion, their central projections in the solitary tract, and terminal-like structures in the lower brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius. Using ELISA in situ combined with electrical field stimulation, we show that native BDNF is released from cultured newborn nodose ganglion neurons in response to patterns that mimic the in vivo activity of baroreceptor afferents. In particular, high-frequency bursting patterns of baroreceptor firing, which are known to evoke plastic changes at baroreceptor synapses, are significantly more effective at releasing BDNF than tonic patterns of the same average frequency. Together, our study indicates that BDNF expressed by first-order baroreceptor neurons is a likely mediator of both developmental and post-developmental modifications at first-order synapses in arterial baroreceptor pathways. PMID:19054281

  5. Reflexes from pulmonary arterial baroreceptors in dogs: interaction with carotid sinus baroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jonathan P; Hainsworth, Roger; Drinkhill, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In contrast to the reflex vasodilatation occurring in response to stimulation of baroreceptors in the aortic arch, carotid sinuses and coronary arteries, stimulation of receptors in the wall of pulmonary arteries results in reflex systemic vasoconstriction. It is rare for interventions to activate only one reflexogenic region, therefore we investigated how these two types of reflexes interact. In anaesthetized dogs connected to cardiopulmonary bypass, reflexogenic areas of the carotid sinuses, aortic arch and coronary arteries and the pulmonary artery were subjected to independently controlled pressures. Systemic perfusion pressure (SPP) measured in the descending aorta (constant flow) provided an index of systemic vascular resistance. In other experiments, sympathetic efferent neural activity was recorded in fibres dissected from the renal nerve (RSNA). Physiological increases in pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) induced significant increases in SPP (+39.1 ± 10.4 mmHg) and RSNA (+17.6 ± 2.2 impulses s−1) whereas increases in carotid sinus pressure (CSP) induced significant decreases in SPP (−42.6 ± 10.8 mmHg) and RSNA (−42.8 ± 18.2 impulses s−1) (P < 0.05 for each comparison; paired t test). To examine possible interactions, PAP was changed at different levels of CSP in both studies. With CSP controlled at 124 ± 2 mmHg, the threshold, ‘set point’ and saturation pressures of the PAP–SPP relationship were higher than those with CSP at 60 ± 1 mmHg; this rightward shift was associated with a significant decrease in the reflex gain. Similarly, increasing CSP produced a rightward shift of the PAP–RSNA relationship, although the effect on reflex gain was inconsistent. Furthermore, the responses to changes in CSP were influenced by setting PAP at different levels; increasing the level of PAP from 5 ± 1 to 33 ± 3 mmHg significantly increased the set point and threshold pressures of the CSP–SPP relationship; the reflex gain was not

  6. Aortic wall properties and baroreceptor behaviour at normal arterial pressure and in acute hypertensive resetting in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Coleridge, H M; Coleridge, J C; Poore, E R; Roberts, A M; Schultz, H D

    1984-01-01

    In order to throw light on the mechanism of acute hypertensive baroreceptor resetting, we examined the relationship between aortic baroreceptor firing and aortic wall properties in anaesthetized dogs as pressure was varied in a number of ways. We recorded baroreceptor impulses from the left aortic nerve, and measured aortic pressure with a catheter-tip transducer and external aortic diameter with ultrasonic transit-time transducers. Narrow anticlockwise hysteresis loops were evident in the pressure-diameter relationship of the upper thoracic aorta, both during the rapid pulsatile pressure changes of the cardiac cycle and during the slow excursions of mean pressure imposed for construction of baroreceptor pressure--response curves. In contrast to the 'phase-lag' response of diameter to pressure, the baroreceptor response was 'phaselead' in character, decreasing when stress-induced creep occurred in the aortic wall. When the mean arterial pressure set-point was increased from 100 to 125 mmHg for 20 min, the hysteresis loops relating mean diameter to mean pressure in the range 60-200 mmHg were displaced along the diameter axis in the direction of wall creep. A reduction in the baroreceptor response to pressure (i.e. resetting) always accompanied this displacement. Administration of ouabain (25-35 micrograms/kg) had no consistent effect on baroreceptor resetting. It has been suggested that acute baroreceptor resetting is akin to adaptation. To investigate the possibility that the two processes are accompanied by similar changes in aortic wall properties, we converted the aorta into a closed sac and distended it with a square wave of pressure. Like resetting, adaptation of the baroreceptor response to maintained pressure was associated with a small degree of creep of the aortic wall. Our results are compatible with the hypothesis that acute hypertensive resetting of aortic baroreceptors is similar to adaptation, both phenomena being attributable to relaxation of

  7. Involvement of vasodilator mechanisms in arterial pressure lability after sino-aortic baroreceptor denervation in rat.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z Q; Barrès, C; Julien, C

    1995-01-01

    1. To examine the regional haemodynamic basis of arterial pressure lability seen after sino-aortic baroreceptor denervation (SAD), simultaneous beat-to-beat recordings of arterial pressure and indices of regional blood flows (Doppler probes around the subdiaphragmatic and lower abdominal aortae and the superior mesenteric artery) were performed in the same conscious rats (n = 7) before, 1 and 14 days after SAD. 2. Acute SAD increased arterial pressure, decreased regional blood flows and vascular conductances, and potentiated the depressor and vasodilator effects of ganglionic blockade with trimethaphan, suggesting sympathetic overactivity. All parameters chronically returned to or near normal. 3. Both acute and chronic SAD increased the variability of arterial pressure and of regional conductances. Arterial pressure lability was characterized by a mixture of depressor and pressor events which were associated with regional vasodilatations and vasoconstrictions, respectively. This haemodynamic pattern was not affected by acute beta-adrenoceptor blockade with propranolol. 4. In conscious rats, the baroreceptor reflex acts to buffer the spontaneous variability of regional vascular conductances and thereby stabilizes arterial pressure. Sino-aortic baroreceptor denervation-induced arterial pressure lability does not depend on the level of sympathetic activation, and is determined by the relative contribution of depressor and pressor events accompanied by extensive vasodilatations and vasoconstrictions, respectively. Vasodilatations are not caused by the stimulation of vascular beta 2-adrenoceptors. PMID:7714834

  8. Vasopressin responses to unloading arterial baroreceptors during cardiac nerve blockade in conscious dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, C. P.; Keil, L. C.; Thrasher, T. N.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the relative contributions of afferent input from the heart and from arterial baroreceptors in the stimulation of arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion in response to hypotension caused by thoracic inferior vena caval constriction (TIVCC). Afferent input from cardiac receptors was reversibly blocked by infusing 2% procaine into the pericardial space to anesthetize the cardiac nerves. Acute cardiac nerve blockade (CNB) alone caused a rise in mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 24 +/- 3 mmHg but no change in plasma AVP. If the rise in MAP was prevented by TIVCC, plasma AVP increased by 39 +/- 15 pg/ml, and if MAP was allowed to increase and then was forced back to control by TIVCC, plasma AVP increased by 34 +/- 15 pg/ml. Thus the rise in MAP during CNB stimulated arterial baroreceptors, which in turn compensated for the loss of inhibitory input from cardiac receptors on AVP secretion. These results indicate that the maximum secretory response resulting from complete unloading of cardiac receptors at a normal MAP results in a mean increase in plasma AVP of 39 pg/ml in this group of dogs. When MAP was reduced 25% below control levels (from 95 +/- 5 to 69 +/- 3 mmHg) by TIVCC during pericardial saline infusion, plasma AVP increased by 79 +/- 42 pg/ml. However, the same degree of hypotension during CNB (MAP was reduced from 120 +/- 5 to 71 +/- 3 mmHg) led to a greater (P less than 0.05) increase in plasma AVP of 130 +/- 33 pg/ml. Because completely unloading cardiac receptors can account for an increase of only 39 pg/ml on average in this group of dogs, the remainder of the increase in plasma AVP must be due to other sources of stimulation. We suggest that the principal stimulus to AVP secretion after acute CNB in these studies arises from unloading the arterial baroreceptors.

  9. Aortic Baroreceptors Display Higher Mechanosensitivity than Carotid Baroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Eva On-Chai; Lo, Chun-Yin; Yao, Yifei; Mak, Arthur Fuk-Tat; Jiang, Liwen; Huang, Yu; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Arterial baroreceptors are mechanical sensors that detect blood pressure changes. It has long been suggested that the two arterial baroreceptors, aortic and carotid baroreceptors, have different pressure sensitivities. However, there is no consensus as to which of the arterial baroreceptors are more sensitive to changes in blood pressure. In the present study, we employed independent methods to compare the pressure sensitivity of the two arterial baroreceptors. Firstly, pressure-activated action potential firing was measured by whole-cell current clamp with a high-speed pressure clamp system in primary cultured baroreceptor neurons. The results show that aortic depressor neurons possessed a higher percentage of mechano-sensitive neurons. Furthermore, aortic baroreceptor neurons show a lower pressure threshold than that of carotid baroreceptor neurons. Secondly, uniaxial stretching of baroreceptor neurons, that mimics the forces exerted on blood vessels, elicited a larger increase in intracellular Ca2+ rise in aortic baroreceptor neurons than in carotid baroreceptor neurons. Thirdly, the pressure-induced action potential firing in the aortic depressor nerve recorded in vivo was also higher. The present study therefore provides for a basic physiological understanding on the pressure sensitivity of the two baroreceptor neurons and suggests that aortic baroreceptors have a higher pressure sensitivity than carotid baroreceptors.

  10. Afferent fibres from pulmonary arterial baroreceptors in the left cardiac sympathetic nerve of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, K.; Sakanashi, M.; Takenaka, F.

    1974-01-01

    1. Afferent discharges were recorded from the left cardiac sympathetic nerve or the third sympathetic ramus communicans of anaesthetized cats. Twenty-one single units with baroreceptor activity were obtained. 2. The receptors of each unit were localized to the extrapulmonary part of the pulmonary artery, determined by direct mechanical probing of the wall of the pulmonary artery after death of the animals. Conduction velocity of the fibres ranged from 2·5 to 15·7 m/sec. 3. Afferent discharges occurred irregularly under artificial ventilation. The impulse activity was increased when pulmonary arterial pressure was raised by an intravenous infusion of Locke solution, or by occlusion of lung roots, and decreased by bleeding the animal from the femoral artery. 4. Above a threshold pressure, discharges occurred synchronously with the systolic pressure pulse in the pulmonary artery. A progressive further rise in pressure did not produce an increase in the number of impulses per heart beat. Occlusion of lung roots initially elicited a burst of discharges but the number of impulses for each cardiac cycle gradually decreased. 5. The receptors responded to repetitive mechanical stimuli up to a frequency of 10/sec, but failed to respond to stimuli delivered at 20/sec. 6. The results provide further evidence for the presence of afferent fibres in the cardiac sympathetic nerve. These afferent fibres are likely to provide the spinal cord with specific information only on transient changes in pulmonary arterial pressure. PMID:4850456

  11. Right prefrontal activation produced by arterial baroreceptor stimulation: a PET study.

    PubMed

    Weisz, J; Emri, M; Fent, J; Lengyel, Z; Márián, T; Horváth, G; Bogner, P; Trón, L; Adám, G

    2001-10-29

    This study was performed to test the hypothesis of greater right hemispheric involvement in the processing of baroreceptor stimuli. Carotid sinus baroreceptors were stimulated by rhythmically decreasing air pressure in a neck chamber, and under control conditions the thorax was stimulated in a similar manner. Changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were measured by PET. Baroreceptor stimulation resulted in rCBF increase in the right anterior-inferior prefrontal cortex (Brodmann areas (BA) 10/44/47) and bilaterally in BA 6/8. We conclude that in at least some stages of baroreceptor information processing the right hemisphere plays a greater role than the left hemisphere. PMID:11711862

  12. Expression of messenger RNAs for peptides and tyrosine hydroxylase in primary sensory neurons that innervate arterial baroreceptors and chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Bayliss, D A; Lawson, E E; Millhorn, D E

    1991-08-01

    Retrograde fiber tracing and in situ hybridization were used to determine expression of mRNAs for preprotachykinin A (ppTA), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), preproenkephalin A (ENK), neuropeptide tyrosine (NPY) and somatostatin (SOM) as well as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the petrosal ganglia primary sensory neurons which innervate carotid sinus baroreceptors and carotid body chemoreceptors. Perfusion of the carotid sinus with the retrogradely transported dye (Fluoro-Gold) labeled primary sensory neurons in petrosal ganglion. Numerous somata in the petrosal ganglion labeled with dye contained mRNAs for all the above peptides, except SOM. Moreover, TH mRNA was found in a substantial number of retrogradely labeled cells in the petrosal ganglion. This study provides information concerning which of the numerous peptides identified in sensory neurons of petrosal ganglion may be involved in modulation of the arterial baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes. PMID:1681484

  13. Effects of chronic lesions of the anteroventral third ventricle region on baroreceptor reflex function in conscious rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, S. J.; Whalen, E. J.; Beltz, T. G.; Johnson, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    This study determined baroreceptor reflex (BR) function in conscious rats which had received sham or electrolytic lesions of the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) 54-56 days previously. Resting mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) values of the AV3V-lesion rats were similar to those of sham-lesion rats (P>0.05 for both comparisons). The sensitivity of the BR-mediated tachycardia in AV3V-lesion was greater than in sham-lesion rats (-9. 92+/-1.00 vs. -4.54+/-0.45 bpm/mmHg, P<0.05). The sensitivity of the BR-mediated bradycardia in AV3V-lesion rats was also greater than in rats with sham lesions (-3.56+/-0.38 vs. -2.06+/-0.42 bpm/mmHg, P<0. 05). The AV3V lesions did not affect other BR parameters. These findings demonstrate that chronic lesions of the AV3V region increase the sensitivity of the baroreceptor HR reflex in conscious rats. Copyright 1999 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  14. System identification of dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance by arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aljuri, A. N.; Bursac, N.; Marini, R.; Cohen, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity in space flight missions (days) impairs the mechanisms responsible for defense of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cardiac output (CO) against orthostatic stress in the post-flight period. The mechanisms responsible for the observed orthostatic intolerance are not yet completely understood. Additionally, effective counter measures to attenuate this pathophysiological response are not available. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of our proposed system identification method to predict closed-loop dynamic changes in TPR induced by changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and right atrial pressure (RAP). For this purpose we designed and employed a novel experimental animal model for the examination of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in the dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance (TPR), and applied system identification to the analysis of beat-to-beat fluctuations in the measured signals. Grant numbers: NAG5-4989. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Angiotensin II-superoxide-NFκB signaling and aortic baroreceptor dysfunction in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongze; Muelleman, Robert L.; Li, Yu-Long

    2015-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) affects approximately 5.7 million people in the United States. Increasing evidence from both clinical and experimental studies indicates that the sensitivity of arterial baroreflex is blunted in the CHF state, which is a predictive risk factor for sudden cardiac death. Normally, the arterial baroreflex regulates blood pressure and heart rate through sensing mechanical alteration of arterial vascular walls by baroreceptor terminals in the aortic arch and carotid sinus. There are aortic baroreceptor neurons in the nodose ganglion (NG), which serve as the main afferent component of the arterial baroreflex. Functional changes of baroreceptor neurons are involved in the arterial baroreflex dysfunction in CHF. In the CHF state, circulating angiotensin II (Ang II) and local Ang II concentration in the NG are elevated, and AT1R mRNA and protein are overexpressed in the NG. Additionally, Ang II-superoxide-NFκB signaling pathway regulates the neuronal excitability of aortic baroreceptors through influencing the expression and activation of Nav channels in aortic baroreceptors, and subsequently causes the impairment of the arterial baroreflex in CHF. These new findings provide a basis for potential pharmacological interventions for the improvement of the arterial baroreflex sensitivity in the CHF state. This review summarizes the mechanisms responsible for the arterial baroreflex dysfunction in CHF. PMID:26528122

  16. Decreased excitability and voltage-gated sodium currents in aortic baroreceptor neurons contribute to the impairment of arterial baroreflex in cirrhotic rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choong-Ku; Park, Kwang-Hwa; Baik, Soon-Koo; Jeong, Seong-Woo

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction, which is manifested by an impairment of the arterial baroreflex, is prevalent irrespective of etiology and contributes to the increased morbidity and mortality in cirrhotic patients. However, the cellular mechanisms that underlie the cirrhosis-impaired arterial baroreflex remain unknown. In the present study, we examined whether the cirrhosis-impaired arterial baroreflex is attributable to the dysfunction of aortic baroreceptor (AB) neurons. Biliary and nonbiliary cirrhotic rats were generated via common bile duct ligation (CBDL) and intraperitoneal injections of thioacetamide (TAA), respectively. Histological and molecular biological examinations confirmed the development of fibrosis in the livers of both cirrhotic rat models. The heart rate changes during phenylephrine-induced baroreceptor activation indicated that baroreflex sensitivity was blunted in the CBDL and TAA rats. Under the current-clamp mode of the patch-clamp technique, cell excitability was recorded in DiI-labeled AB neurons. The number of action potential discharges in the A- and C-type AB neurons was significantly decreased because of the increased rheobase and threshold potential in the CBDL and TAA rats compared with sham-operated rats. Real-time PCR and Western blotting indicated that the NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9 transcripts and proteins were significantly downregulated in the nodose ganglion neurons from the CBDL and TAA rats compared with the sham-operated rats. Consistent with these molecular data, the tetrodotoxin-sensitive NaV currents and the tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV currents were significantly decreased in A- and C-type AB neurons, respectively, from the CBDL and TAA rats compared with the sham-operated rats. Taken together, these findings implicate a key cellular mechanism in the cirrhosis-impaired arterial baroreflex. PMID:26984890

  17. Altered central nervous system processing of baroreceptor input following hindlimb unloading in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, J. A.; Schadt, J. C.; Hasser, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of cardiovascular deconditioning on central nervous system processing of baroreceptor afferent activity was evaluated following 14 days of hindlimb unloading (HU). Inactin-anesthetized rats were instrumented with catheters, renal sympathetic nerve electrodes, and aortic depressor nerve electrodes for measurement of mean arterial pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and aortic depressor nerve activity (ADNA). Baroreceptor and baroreflex functions were assessed during infusion of phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside. Central processing of baroreceptor afferent input was evaluated by linear regression relating RSNA to ADNA. The maximum baroreflex-elicited increase in RSNA was significantly reduced in HU rats (122 +/- 3.8 vs. 144 +/- 4.9% of baseline RSNA), whereas ADNA was not altered. The slope (-0.18 +/- 0.04 vs. -0.40 +/- 0.04) and y-intercept (121 +/- 3.2 vs. 146 +/- 4.3) of the linear regression relating increases in efferent RSNA to decreases in afferent ADNA during hypotension were significantly reduced in HU rats. There were no differences during increases in arterial pressure. Results demonstrate that the attenuation in baroreflex-mediated increases in RSNA following HU is due to changes in central processing of baroreceptor afferent information rather than aortic baroreceptor function.

  18. Unilateral baroreceptor activation therapy: the beauty of asymmetry.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    With respect to paired internal organs, we commonly think that these are symmetrical and have identical physiological functions. This, however, appears not to be the case. A particular organ where asymmetry comes to expression is the baroreceptor system. Clinical data in patients with resistant hypertension who are treated with device-based baroreceptor activation clearly show that there are functional differences between the left and the right baroreceptor systems. This has implications for our understanding of certain diseases. PMID:26106932

  19. Arterial baroreceptor reflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity following chronic myocardial infarction in male, female, and ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Whalley, Gillian A; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Malpas, Simon C; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2015-07-15

    There is controversy regarding whether the arterial baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in heart failure is altered. We investigated the impact of sex and ovarian hormones on changes in the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA following a chronic myocardial infarction (MI). Renal SNA and arterial pressure were recorded in chloralose-urethane anesthetized male, female, and ovariectomized female (OVX) Wistar rats 6-7 wk postsham or MI surgery. Animals were grouped according to MI size (sham, small and large MI). Ovary-intact females had a lower mortality rate post-MI (24%) compared with both males (38%) and OVX (50%) (P < 0.05). Males and OVX with large MI, but not small MI, displayed an impaired ability of the arterial baroreflex to inhibit renal SNA. As a result, the male large MI group (49 ± 6 vs. 84 ± 5% in male sham group) and OVX large MI group (37 ± 3 vs. 75 ± 5% in OVX sham group) displayed significantly reduced arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA (P < 0.05). In ovary-intact females, arterial baroreflex control of normalized renal SNA was unchanged regardless of MI size. In males and OVX there was a significant, positive correlation between left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction and arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA, but not absolute renal SNA, that was not evident in ovary-intact females. The current findings demonstrate that the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA post-MI is preserved in ovary-intact females, and the state of left ventricular dysfunction significantly impacts on the changes in the arterial baroreflex post-MI. PMID:25994953

  20. Influence of low and high pressure baroreceptors on plasma renin activity in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, A. L.; Abboud, F. M.; Fitz, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of low and high pressure baroreceptors on plasma renin activity (immunoassay) were evaluated using graded lower body suction (LBS) in six healthy men. LBS at -10 and -20 mmHg for 10 min decreased central venous pressure without changing arterial pressure and thereby presumably reduced low but not high pressure baroreceptor inhibition of renin release. LBS at these levels produced forearm vasoconstriction, but did not increase renin. LBS at -40 mmHG decreased central venous and arterial pulse pressure and thus reduced both low and high pressure baroreceptor inhibition. LBS at this level produced forearm vasoconstriction and tachycardia and increased renin. In summary, reduction in low pressure baroreceptor inhibition in humans did not increase renin in the presence of physiological tonic inhibition from high pressure baroreceptors. Increases in renin did not occur until there was combined reduction of high and low pressure baroreceptor inhibition on plasma renin activity.

  1. Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity in human neonates: the effect of postmenstrual age

    PubMed Central

    Andriessen, Peter; Oetomo, Sidarto Bambang; Peters, Chris; Vermeulen, Barbara; Wijn, Pieter FF; Blanco, Carlos E

    2005-01-01

    We performed a cross-sectional study in human infants to determine if indices of R–R interval variability, systolic blood pressure (SBP) variability, and baroreceptor reflex sensitivity change with postmenstrual age (PMA: gestational age + postnatal age). The electrocardiogram, arterial SBP and respiration were recorded in clinically stable infants (PMA, 28–42 weeks) in the quiet sleep state in the first days after birth. (Cross-)spectral analyses of R–R interval series and SBP series were performed to calculate the power of low-frequency (LF, indicating baroreceptor reflex activity, 0.04–0.15 Hz) and high-frequency (HF, indicating parasympathetic activity, individualized between the p-10 and p-90 values of respiratory frequency) fluctuations, and transfer function phase and gain. The mean R–R interval, and LF and HF spectral powers of R–R interval series increased with PMA. The mean SBP increased with PMA, but not the LF and HF spectral powers of SBP series. In the LF range, cross-spectral analysis showed high coherence values (> 0.5) with a consistent negative phase shift between R–R interval and SBP, indicating a ∼3 s lag in R–R interval changes in relation to SBP. Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity, calculated from LF transfer gain, increased significantly with PMA, from 5 (preterm) to 15 ms mmHg−1 (term). Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity correlated significantly with the (LF and) HF spectral powers of R–R interval series, but not with the LF and HF spectral powers of SBP series. The principal conclusions are that baroreceptor reflex sensitivity and spectral power in R–R interval series increase in parallel with PMA, suggesting a progressive vagal maturation with PMA. PMID:16051623

  2. Carotid baroreceptor influence on forearm vascular resistance during low level lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Cynthia A.; Ludwig, David A.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    The degree of forearm vasoconstriction induced by low levels of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) provides a measure of the responsiveness of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex. The validity of this measurement is based on the assumption that this vasoconstriction response is not influenced by unloading of carotid baroreceptors. To test the hypothesis that arterial baroreceptor unloading does not alter the degree of forearm vascular resistance during low levels of LBNP, 12 subjects were exposed to -15 and -20 mm Hg LBNP with and without additional artificial (+ 10 mm Hg neck pressure) unloading of the carotid baroreceptors. There was no measurable influence of carotid unloading on forearm vascular resistance at either level of LBNP. It is concluded that forearm vascular resistance measured during cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading is unaffected by carotid baroreceptor unloading within the magnitude encountered during low levels of LBNP.

  3. CHBPR Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Detection of Neurotransmitters in Dorsomedial Medulla Correlate with Spontaneous Baroreceptor Reflex Function

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Espinosa, Maria A.; Shaltout, Hossam A.; Olson, John; Westwood, Brian M.; Robbins, Mike E.; Link, Kerry; Diz, Debra I.

    2010-01-01

    Control of heart rate variability (HRV) via modulation of sympathovagal balance is a key function of nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus localized in the dorsomedial medulla oblongata. Normal blood pressure regulation involves precise balance of glutamate-glutamine-GABA (Glu-Gln-GABA) transmitter systems, and angiotensin (Ang) II modulates these transmitters to produce tonic suppression of reflex function. It is not known, however, whether other brain transmitters/metabolites are indicators of baroreflex function. This study establishes the concept that comprehensive baseline transmitter/metabolite profiles obtained using in vivo 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H MRS) in rats with well characterized differences in resting blood pressure and baroreflex function can be used as indices of autonomic balance or baroreflex sensitivity. Glu concentration in dorsal medulla is significantly higher in ASrAogen rats compared to either SD and (mRen2)27. Glu levels and the ratio of Glu/Gln correlated positively with indices of higher vagal tone consistent with the importance of these neurotransmitters in baroreflex function. Interestingly, the levels of choline containing metabolites showed a significant positive correlation with spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity and a negative correlation with sympathetic tone. Thus, we demonstrate the concept that non-invasive assessment of neurochemical biomarkers may be used as an index of baroreflex sensitivity. PMID:20065146

  4. Experimenting With Baroreceptor Reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.; Goble, Ross L.

    1988-01-01

    Carotid arteries stimulated by pressure or suction on neck. Baro-Cuff is silicone-rubber chamber that fits on front of subject's neck. Electronic system, stepping motor, bellows, and umbilical tube furnish controlled pressure to chamber. Pressure sensor provides feedback to microprocessor in electronic system. Developed to study blood-pressure-reflex responses of astronauts in outer space. Useful for terrestrial studies of patients with congestive heart failure, chronic diabetes mellitus, and other conditions in which blood-pressure-reflex controls behave abnormally.

  5. Phase dependencies of the human baroreceptor reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, H.; Herzel, H.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the influence of respiratory and cardiac phase on responses of the cardiac pacemaker to brief (0.35-s) increases of carotid baroreceptor afferent traffic provoked by neck suction in seven healthy young adult subjects. Cardiac responses to neck suction were measured indirectly from electrocardiographic changes of heart period. Our results show that it is possible to separate the influences of respiratory and cardiac phases at the onset of a neck suction impulse by a product of two factors: one depending only on the respiratory phase and one depending only on the cardiac phase. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that efferent vagal activity is a function of afferent baroreceptor activity, whereas respiratory neurons modulate that medullary throughput independent of the cardiac phase. Furthermore, we have shown that stimulus broadening and stimulus cropping influence the outcome of neck suction experiments in a way that makes it virtually impossible to obtain information on the phase dependency of the cardiac pacemaker's sensitivity to vagal stimulation without accurate knowledge of the functional shape of stimulus broadening.

  6. [Anesthesia management in implantation of baroreceptor stimulators].

    PubMed

    Werner, T; Lebar, L; Wittmann, S; Keyser, A; Fischer, M; Schmidli, J; Graf, B M; Zausig, Y A

    2015-09-01

    Baroreceptor stimulators are novel implantable devices that activate the carotid baroreceptor reflex. This results in a decrease in activity of the sympathetic nervous system and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. In patients with drug-resistant hypertension, permanent electrical activation of the baroreceptor reflex results in blood pressure reduction and cardiac remodeling. For correct intraoperative electrode placement at the carotid bifurcation, the baroreceptor reflex needs to be activated several times. Many common anesthetic agents, such as inhalation anesthetics and propofol dampen or inhibit the baroreceptor reflex and complicate or even prevent successful placement. Therefore, a specific anesthesia and pharmacological management is necessary to ensure successful implantation of baroreceptor reflex stimulators. PMID:26275386

  7. Differential distribution of voltage-gated channels in myelinated and unmyelinated baroreceptor afferents.

    PubMed

    Schild, John H; Kunze, Diana L

    2012-12-24

    Voltage gated ion channels (VGC) make possible the frequency coding of arterial pressure and the neurotransmission of this information along myelinated and unmyelinated fiber pathways. Although many of the same VGC isoforms are expressed in both fiber types, it is the relative expression of each that defines the unique discharge properties of myelinated A-type and unmyelinated C-type baroreceptors. For example, the fast inward Na⁺ current is a major determinant of the action potential threshold and the regenerative transmembrane current needed to sustain repetitive discharge. In A-type baroreceptors the TTX-sensitive Na(v)1.7 VGC contributes to the whole cell Na⁺ current. Na(v)1.7 is expressed at a lower density in C-type neurons and in conjunction with TTX-insensitive Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 VGC. As a result, action potentials of A-type neurons have firing thresholds that are 15-20 mV more negative and upstroke velocities that are 5-10 times faster than unmyelinated C-type neurons. A more depolarized threshold in conjunction with a broader complement of non-inactivating K(V) VGC subtypes produces C-type action potentials that are 3-4 times longer in duration than A-type neurons and at markedly lower levels of cell excitability. Unmyelinated baroreceptors also express KCa1.1 which provides approximately 25% of the total outward K⁺ current. KCa1.1 plays a critically important role in shaping the action potential profile of C-type neurons and strongly impacts neuronal excitability. A-type neurons do not functionally express the KCa1.1 channel despite having a whole cell Ca(V) current quite similar to that of C-type neurons. As a result, A-type neurons do not have the frequency-dependent braking forces of KCa1.1. Lack of a KCa current and only a limited complement of non-inactivating K(V) VGC in addition to a hyperpolarization activated HCN1 current that is nearly 10 times larger than in C-type neurons leads to elevated levels of discharge in A-type neurons, a

  8. Short-duration spaceflight impairs human carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsch, Janice M.; Charles, John B.; Bennett, Barbara S.; Jones, Michele M.; Eckberg, Dwain L.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of a spaceflight on the vagally mediated baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses of humans were investigated by measuring the responses (provoked by neck pressure changes) in supine position and the heart rate and blood pressure in the supine and standing positions in 16 astronauts before and after 4- to 5-day long Space Shuttle missions. The results showed that exposures to spaceflight resulted in reduced baseline levels of the vagal-cardiac outflow and the vagally mediated responses to changes of the arterial baroreceptor input and that these changes contribute to postflight reductions of astronauts' ability to maintain standing arterial pressures.

  9. Cardiopulmonary baroreceptor control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Etzel, R. A.; Farr, D. B.

    1999-01-01

    Whole body heating decreases central venous pressure (CVP) while increasing muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). In normothermia, similar decreases in CVP elevate MSNA, presumably via cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading. The purpose of this project was to identify whether increases in MSNA during whole body heating could be attributed to cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading coincident with the thermal challenge. Seven subjects were exposed to whole body heating while sublingual temperature, skin blood flow, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and MSNA were monitored. During the heat stress, 15 ml/kg warmed saline was infused intravenously over 7-10 min to increase CVP and load the cardiopulmonary baroreceptors. We reported previously that this amount of saline was sufficient to return CVP to pre-heat stress levels. Whole body heating increased MSNA from 25 +/- 3 to 39 +/- 3 bursts/min (P < 0. 05). Central blood volume expansion via rapid saline infusion did not significantly decrease MSNA (44 +/- 4 bursts/min, P > 0.05 relative to heat stress period) and did not alter mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) or pulse pressure. To identify whether arterial baroreceptor loading decreases MSNA during heat stress, in a separate protocol MAP was elevated via steady-state infusion of phenylephrine during whole body heating. Increasing MAP from 82 +/- 3 to 93 +/- 4 mmHg (P < 0.05) caused MSNA to decrease from 36 +/- 3 to 15 +/- 4 bursts/min (P < 0.05). These data suggest that cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading during passive heating is not the primary mechanism resulting in elevations in MSNA. Moreover, arterial baroreceptors remain capable of modulating MSNA during heat stress.

  10. Measuring How Elastic Arteries Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMont, M. Edwin; MacGillivray, Patrick S.; Davison, Ian G.; McConnell, Colin J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a procedure used to measure force and pressure in elastic arteries. Discusses the physics of the procedure and recommends the use of bovine arteries. Explains the preparation of the arteries for the procedure. (DDR)

  11. Inappropriate mediastinal baroreceptor reflex as a possible cause of sudden infant death syndrome - Is thorough burping before sleep protective?

    PubMed

    Flaig, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Despite extensive research, a link between the assumed mechanisms of death and known risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) has not yet been established. Modifiable risk factors such as prone sleeping position, nicotine exposure and thermal stress and non-avoidable risk factors like male gender and some risky socio-economic conditions could be detected, but the etiology of SIDS remains unknown. In many SIDS cases histopathological findings suggest an involvement of vital autonomic control functions and unidentified trigger factors seem to play a role. From a hypothetical point of view, a developmental sympatheticovagal imbalance of the cardiovascular reflex control could cause a predisposition for SIDS. An assumed gastroesophageal trigger impulse is possibly developed during the first weeks of life and could lead to the infant's vagal reflex death. Air swallowed during feeding escapes through the esophagus while the infant is sleeping. The temporarily bloated esophagus exerts pressure on neighboring mediastinal baroreceptors, which is potentially misinterpreted as a rise in arterial pressure. The following cardiodepressoric baroreceptor reflex could lead to arterial hypotension, bradycardia and cardiac arrest. Sleeping in prone position may create an increased thoracic pressure on mediastinal baroreceptors, causing a more pronounced vagal reflex and an increased likelihood of SIDS. Prone position in connection with soft objects in the infant's sleeping environment potentially generates an increased oculobulbar pressure, resulting in an additional cardiodepressoric condition (Aschner-Dagnini phenomenon). From the sixth month of life onwards the sympatheticovagal balance seems to have matured sufficiently to compensate the life-threatening challenges in most infants. Insufficient postprandial burping could either create another independent modifiable risk factor or present the missing link to a common trigger mechanism for SIDS. Further investigations

  12. Chronic inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in nucleus tractus solitarii enhances baroreceptor reflex in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Waki, Hidefumi; Kasparov, Sergey; Wong, Liang-Fong; Murphy, David; Shimizu, Tsuyoshi; Paton, Julian F R

    2003-01-01

    In acute experiments, we demonstrated previously that nitric oxide (NO) donors exogenously applied to the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) depressed the baroreceptor cardiac reflex. In this study, we determined a role for endogenous endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity in the NTS for chronically regulating baroreceptor reflex function in conscious rats. A recombinant adenoviral vector directing expression of a truncated form of eNOS was microinjected bilaterally into the NTS to inhibit endogenous eNOS activity. Arterial pressure was monitored continuously using radio-telemetry in freely moving animals and spontaneous baroreceptor reflex gain (sBRG) determined by a time-series method. sBRG showed a gradual increase from day 7 to 21 after gene transfer and the value at day 21 (1.68 ± 0.20 ms mmHg−1, n = 6) was significantly higher than that before gene transfer (1.13 ± 0.09 ms mmHg−1, P < 0.001). This value was also significantly higher than that in rats in which enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was expressed in the NTS (1.04 ± 0.21 ms mmHg−1; n = 6, P < 0.01) and saline-treated groups (1.12 ± 0.15 ms mmHg−1; n = 4, P < 0.05), which did not change from control levels. In addition, heart rate decreased from 336 ± 6 to 318 ± 8 b.p.m. (P < 0.05) 21 days after gene transfer. This value was also significantly lower than that in control groups (eGFP: 348 ± 9 b.p.m., n = 6, P < 0.01; saline: 347 ± 5 b.p.m., n = 4, P < 0.05). Gene transfer did not affect arterial pressure. These findings suggest that in the conscious rat eNOS is constitutively active within the NTS and is a factor regulating baroreceptor reflex gain and heart rate. PMID:12509491

  13. Arterial endothelial function measurement method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F

    2014-03-04

    A "relaxoscope" (100) detects the degree of arterial endothelial function. Impairment of arterial endothelial function is an early event in atherosclerosis and correlates with the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. An artery (115), such as the brachial artery (BA) is measured for diameter before and after several minutes of either vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. The change in arterial diameter is a measure of flow-mediated vasomodification (FMVM). The relaxoscope induces an artificial pulse (128) at a superficial radial artery (115) via a linear actuator (120). An ultrasonic Doppler stethoscope (130) detects this pulse 10-20 cm proximal to the point of pulse induction (125). The delay between pulse application and detection provides the pulse transit time (PTT). By measuring PTT before (160) and after arterial diameter change (170), FMVM may be measured based on the changes in PTT caused by changes in vessel caliber, smooth muscle tone and wall thickness.

  14. Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ta-Chen; Torng, Pao-Ling; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chen, Ming-Fong; Liau, Chiau-Suong

    2011-01-01

    Background: Vegetarianism is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies of arterial function in vegetarians are limited. Methods: This study investigated arterial function in vegetarianism by comparing 49 healthy postmenopausal vegetarians with 41 age-matched omnivores. The arterial function of the common carotid artery was assessed by carotid duplex, while the pulse dynamics method was used to measure brachial artery distensibility (BAD), compliance (BAC), and resistance (BAR). Fasting blood levels of glucose, lipids, lipoprotein (a), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and vitamin B12 were also measured. Results: Vegetarians had significantly lower serum cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and glucose compared with omnivores. They also had lower vitamin B12 but higher homocysteine levels. Serum levels of lipoprotein (a) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were no different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD between the two groups even after adjustment for associated covariates. However, BAR was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and pulse pressure were two important determinants of carotid beta stiffness index and BAD. Vegetarianism is not associated with better arterial elasticity. Conclusion: Apparently healthy postmenopausal vegetarians are not significantly better in terms of carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD, but have significantly decreased BAR than omnivores. Prevention of vitamin B12 deficiency might be beneficial for cardiovascular health in vegetarians. PMID:21915169

  15. Integrating the theories of Darwin and Bernoulli: maladaptive baroreceptor network dysfunction may explain the pathogenesis of aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Conley, Buford R; Doux, John D; Lee, Patrick Y; Bazar, Kimberly A; Daniel, Stephanie M; Yun, Anthony J

    2005-01-01

    Current treatment options for aortic aneurysms are suboptimal and their pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear. We propose the existence of a coordinated multi-node baroreceptor network that measures pressures at all vascular bifurcations and enables system-wide hemodynamic coordination and vasomotor regulation, in accordance with the principle of Bernoulli. While the presence of baroreceptors at bifurcations remains unknown, behavior at the level of systems predicts their existence, possibly as glomus cell derivatives. We propose that pressure misregistration among sensor nodes at different vascular bifurcations can precipitate feed-forward dysfunctions that promote thrombosis, inflammation, and vasomotor dysregulation resulting in aneurysm formation. One example of this phenomenon is aortic aneurysm, which is currently attributed to focal anatomic defects. As plaque builds in the infrarenal aorta, the increased blood velocity through this segment can widen the difference between pressures sensed at the iliac and the renal artery bifurcations. Due to the Bernoulli effect, this change creates an incorrect impression of reduced dynamic pressure at the kidneys. The erroneous perception of hypovolemia can induce a pernicious cycle of maladaptive adrenergia and associated coagulation and thrombosis, particularly in the infrarenal aortic segment as the body attempts to normalize renal perfusion. Atherosclerosis can further exacerbate baroreceptor dysfunction by interfering with sensor biology in feed-forward fashion. Hypertension may be a consequence as well as a source of atherosclerosis and aneurysm. The described system may have evolved when trauma-related hypovolemia was a far more prevalent driver of natural selection but may be rendered maladaptive in the setting of modern stressors. Failure to address these factors may explain the suboptimal long-term outcomes with current surgical and endovascular treatments for aneurysms. Implications for other potential sensor

  16. Effects of acute and chronic baroreceptor denervation on diving responses in ducks.

    PubMed

    Smith, F M; Jones, D R

    1990-04-01

    To investigate the effects of barodenervation on the cardiovascular responses to forced submersion, we implanted snares around the aortic nerves innervating the baroreceptors in anesthetized (pentobarbital sodium, 35-45 mg/kg) ducks (Anas platyrhynchos). Snares were withdrawn 1 wk after surgery to effect barodenervation in the absence of complications from surgical trauma or anesthesia. After barodenervation, resting heart rate (HR), hind limb vascular resistance (HLVR), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) all increased, with different time courses, over the 16-day observation period. Bradycardia developed during forced submersion in ducks before and after barodenervation, although this response was reduced for 1-3 days after nerve section. The HR response to diving intensified 4-5 days after denervation, and the level of dive bradycardia at 16 days was similar to that before denervation. End-dive MAP fell further, as a proportion of predive MAP, with time after baroreceptor loss. The absolute level of HLVR reached during diving was unaffected by barodenervation. These results show that diving responses develop in the absence of baroreceptors, but MAP in the dive is not maintained as well in barodenervates as in baroreceptor-intact animals. PMID:2331033

  17. Functional arteries grown in vitro.

    PubMed

    Niklason, L E; Gao, J; Abbott, W M; Hirschi, K K; Houser, S; Marini, R; Langer, R

    1999-04-16

    A tissue engineering approach was developed to produce arbitrary lengths of vascular graft material from smooth muscle and endothelial cells that were derived from a biopsy of vascular tissue. Bovine vessels cultured under pulsatile conditions had rupture strengths greater than 2000 millimeters of mercury, suture retention strengths of up to 90 grams, and collagen contents of up to 50 percent. Cultured vessels also showed contractile responses to pharmacological agents and contained smooth muscle cells that displayed markers of differentiation such as calponin and myosin heavy chains. Tissue-engineered arteries were implanted in miniature swine, with patency documented up to 24 days by digital angiography. PMID:10205057

  18. Effect of simvastatin in the autonomic system is dependent on the increased gain/sensitivity of the baroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Edson D; Mostarda, Cristiano T; Moraes-Silva, Ivana C; Ferreira, Janaina B; dos Santos, Fernando; Lacchini, Silvia; De Angelis, Kátia; Rodrigues, Bruno; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia

    2013-01-01

    A number of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the pleiotropic effect of statin therapy to reduce sympathetic outflow in cardiovascular disease. We tested the hypothesis that statin treatment could improve baroreflex gain-sensitivity triggered by morphological adaptations in the mechanoreceptor site, thus reducing sympathetic activity, regardless of arterial pressure (AP) level reduction. Male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were divided into control (SHR, n = 8) and SHR-simvastatin (5 mg/kg/day, for 7 days) (SHR-S, n = 8). After treatment, AP, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in response to AP-induced changes, aortic depressor nerve activity, and spectral analyses of pulse interval (PI) and AP variabilities were performed. Internal and external carotids were prepared for morphoquantitative evaluation. Although AP was similar between groups, sympathetic modulation, represented by the low frequency band of PI (SHR: 6.84 ± 3.19 vs. SHR-S: 2.41 ± 0.96 msec2) and from systolic AP variability (SHR: 3.95 ± 0.36 vs. SHR-S: 2.86 ± 0.18 mmHg2), were reduced in treated animals. In parallel, simvastatin induced an increase of 26% and 21% in the number of elastic lamellae as well as a decrease of 9% and 25% in the carotid thickness in both, external and internal carotid, respectively. Moreover, improved baroreceptor function (SHR: 0.78 ± 0.03 vs. SHR-S: 1.06 ± 0.04% mv/mmHg) was observed in addition to a 115% increase in aortic depressor nerve activity in SHR-S rats. Therefore, our data suggest that the reduction of sympathetic outflow in hypertension by simvastatin treatment may be triggered by structural changes in the carotid arteries and increased BRS in response to an improvement of the baroreceptors discharge and consequently of the afferent pathway of the baroreflex arch. PMID:24303130

  19. Baroreceptor sensitivity in supine man following inhalation of amyl nitrite

    SciTech Connect

    Rubal, B.J.; Moody, J.M.; Bailey, S.R. Univ. of Texas, San Antonio )

    1991-03-15

    This study compares baroreceptor sensitivity derived from high-fidelity central aortic blood pressure (BP) measurements following amyl nitrite inhalation (ANI) during BP fall and recovery in seven male subjects undergoing diagnostic catheterization for chest pain syndrome. Continuous beat-by-beat plots of BP va pulse interval revealed that all subjects exhibited a counter-clockwise loop with varying degrees of hysteresis. Baroreceptor sensitivity was derived from the slope of a linear plot of systolic BP vs pulse interval and central aortic BP. When baroreceptor sensitivities were compared during BP fall and recovery, the mean values did not differ for the group; however, the slope of regression lines differed in six of the seven subjects. In summary, this study: describes the use of hi-fi central aortic pressure recordings in assessments of baroreceptor sensitivity which avoids the influence of local BP wave reflections in determining baroreceptor sensitivity, and demonstrates the complex nature of the baroreceptor responses to ANI.

  20. Effects of horizontal body casting on the baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, G. E.; Dickey, D. T.; Sandler, H.; Stone, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term horizontal body position on baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate. Six male rhesus monkeys (6.2-9.4 kg) were given bolus injections of 4.0 microgram/kg, phenylephrine during each of the following conditions: awake, anesthetized (10 mg/kg ketamine HCl), and after beta-blockade (1 mg/kg propranolol HCl) before, 7, 14, and 28 days after being placed in a horizontal body cast. R-R interval vs. systolic arterial pressure was plotted, and the slope was determined by least-squares-fit linear regression. Baroreceptor slope was significantly reduced by 7 days of horizontal body position and remained attenuated throughout the 28-day restraint period both before and after beta-receptor blockade. These data are consistent with the thesis that prolonged exposure to a zero-gravity environment impairs autonomic reflex regulation of the cardiovascular system.

  1. Sensitization of aortic and cardiac baroreceptors by arginine vasopressin in mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, F M; Aylward, P E; Floras, J S; Gupta, B N

    1986-01-01

    Vasopressin facilitates the baroreflex control of the circulation. The peptide may act at several sites to augment the baroreflex. In this study we examined the effect of vasopressin on aortic baroreceptors in anaesthetized rabbits and on left ventricular mechanoreceptors in anaesthetized cats. Vasopressin (16 mu./kg. min) did not change resting nerve discharge in single fibres from aortic baroreceptors. Vasopressin (16 mu./kg. min) significantly enhanced the response of single aortic nerve fibre discharge to elevation in arterial pressure. The slope relating nerve activity to mean arterial pressure increased from 0.24 +/- 0.05 (mean +/- S.E. of mean) to 0.50 +/- 0.16 impulses/cardiac cycle. mmHg (P less than 0.05) in ten aortic medullated fibres and from 0.06 +/- 0.03 to 0.18 +/- 0.04 impulses/cardiac cycle. mmHg (P less than 0.05) in three non-medullated fibres. Vasopressin (16 mu./kg. min) did not change resting nerve discharge in single fibres from left ventricular mechanoreceptors. Vasopressin (16 mu./kg. min) significantly enhanced the response of single nerve fibre discharge from left ventricular mechanoreceptors in response to elevation of left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. The slope relating nerve activity to left ventricular end-diastolic pressure increased from 0.24 +/- 0.07 to 0.32 +/- 0.07 impulses/cardiac cycle. mmHg (P less than 0.05) in six medullated fibres and from 0.10 +/- 0.01 to 0.15 +/- 0.02 impulses/cardiac cycle. mmHg (P less than 0.05) in four non-medullated fibres. These data show that vasopressin sensitizes high and low pressure baroreceptors and suggest a mechanism by which vasopressin may facilitate the baroreflex control of the circulation. PMID:3795090

  2. Arterial structure and function in vascular ageing: are you as old as your arteries?

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Carter, Sophie E; Green, Daniel J

    2016-04-15

    Advancing age may be the most potent independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, a relationship that is not fully explained by time-related changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Since some arteries exhibit differential susceptibility to atherosclerosis, generalisations regarding the impact of ageing in humans may be overly simplistic, whereas in vivo assessment of arterial function and health provide direct insight. Coronary and peripheral (conduit, resistance and skin) arteries demonstrate a gradual, age-related impairment in vascular function that is likely to be related to a reduction in endothelium-derived nitric oxide bioavailability and/or increased production of vasoconstrictors (e.g. endothelin-1). Increased exposure and impaired ability for defence mechanisms to resist oxidative stress and inflammation, but also cellular senescence processes, may contribute to age-related changes in vascular function and health. Arteries also undergo structural changes as they age. Gradual thickening of the arterial wall, changes in wall content (i.e. less elastin, advanced glycation end-products) and increase in conduit artery diameter are observed with older age and occur similarly in central and peripheral arteries. These changes in structure have important interactive effects on artery function, with increases in small and large arterial stiffness representing a characteristic change with older age. Importantly, direct measures of arterial function and structure predict future cardiovascular events, independent of age or other cardiovascular risk factors. Taken together, and given the differential susceptibility of arteries to atherosclerosis in humans, direct measurement of arterial function and health may help to distinguish between biological and chronological age-related change in arterial health in humans. PMID:26140618

  3. Plasma leptin inhibits the response of nucleus of the solitary tract neurons to aortic baroreceptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John

    2013-08-01

    Leptin receptors have been identified within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and leptin injections into the caudal NTS inhibit the baroreceptor reflex. However, whether plasma leptin alters the discharge of NTS neurons mediating aortic baroreceptor reflex activity is not known. A series of electrophysiological single unit recording experiments was done in the urethane-chloralose anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated Wistar and Zucker obese rat with either their neuroaxis intact or with mid-collicular transections. Single units in NTS antidromically activated by electrical stimulation of depressor sites in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) were found to display a cardiac cycle-related rhythmicity. These units were tested for their responses to stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) and intra-carotid injections of leptin (50-200ng/0.1ml). Of 63 single units tested in NTS, 33 were antidromically activated by stimulation of CVLM depressor sites and 18 of these single units responded with a decrease in discharge rate after intracarotid injections of leptin. Thirteen of these leptin responsive neurons (∼72%) were excited by ADN stimulation. Furthermore, the excitatory response of these single units to ADN stimulation was attenuated by about 50% after the intracarotid leptin injection. Intracarotid injections of leptin (200ng/0.1ml) in the Zucker obese rat did not alter the discharge rate of NTS-CVLM projecting neurons. These data suggest that leptin exerts a modulatory effect on brainstem neuronal circuits that control cardiovascular responses elicited during the reflex activation of arterial baroreceptors. PMID:23792336

  4. Medullary raphe neurones and baroreceptor modulation of the respiratory motor pattern in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, B G; Arata, A; Morris, K F; Hernandez, Y M; Shannon, R

    1998-01-01

    Perturbations of arterial blood pressure change medullary raphe neurone activity and the respiratory motor pattern. This study sought evidence for actions of baroresponsive raphe neurones on the medullary respiratory network.Blood pressure was perturbed by intravenous injection of an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, unilateral pressure changes in the carotid sinus, or occlusion of the descending aorta in thirty-six Dial-urethane-anaesthetized, vagotomized, paralysed, artificially ventilated cats. Neurones were monitored with microelectrode arrays in two or three of the following domains: nucleus raphe obscurus-nucleus raphe pallidus, nucleus raphe magnus, and rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla. Data were analysed with cycle-triggered histograms, peristimulus time and cumulative sum histograms, cross-correlograms and spike-triggered averages of efferent phrenic nerve activity.Prolongation of the expiratory phase and decreased peak integrated phrenic amplitude were most frequently observed. Of 707 neurones studied, 310 had altered firing rates during stimulation; changes in opposite directions were monitored simultaneously in fifty-six of eighty-seven data sets with at least two baroresponsive neurones.Short time scale correlations were detected between neurones in 347 of 3388 pairs. Seventeen pairs of baroresponsive raphe neurones exhibited significant offset correlogram features indicative of paucisynaptic interactions. In correlated raphe-ventrolateral medullary neurone pairs with at least one baroresponsive neurone, six of seven ventrolateral medullary decrementing expiratory (E-Decr) neurones increased their firing rate during baroreceptor stimulation. Thirteen of fifteen ventrolateral medullary inspiratory neurones correlated with raphe cells decreased their firing rate during baroreceptor stimulation.The results support the hypothesis that raphe neuronal assemblies transform and transmit information from baroreceptors to neurones in the ventral

  5. Cardiac hypertrophy and telemetered blood pressure 6 wk after baroreceptor denervation in normotensive rats.

    PubMed

    Van Vliet, B N; Hu, L; Scott, T; Chafe, L; Montani, J P

    1996-12-01

    We investigated cardiac morphometry 6 wk after sinoaortic baroreceptor denervation (SAD) in Long-Evans rats. SAD (n = 19) was associated with an 11% increase in the weight of the left ventricle (LV) plus septum (P < 0.001) and a 39% increase in that of the right ventricular (RV) free wall (P < 0.001), relative to sham-operated rats (n = 18). RV wall thickness was significantly increased in SAD animals, but there was no difference in the LV wall thickness and volumes of the RV and LV between groups. Constrictor responses to methoxamine and dilation responses to acetylcholine were assessed in an in vitro perfused mesenteric circulation preparation, but neither response was affected by SAD. Baroreceptor denervation was associated with marked and significant increases in the variability (2.8-fold) and daily peak (39 mmHg) levels of telemetered mean arterial pressure (MAP) and small (5%) but significant increases in the daily mean MAP level. Our results are consistent with an effect of increased MAP variability on ventricular weight but cannot rule out possible contributions from other mechanisms. PMID:8997380

  6. Static and dynamic changes in carotid artery diameter in humans during and after strenuous exercise

    PubMed Central

    Studinger, Péter; Lénárd, Zsuzsanna; Kováts, Zsuzsanna; Kocsis, László; Kollai, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Arterial baroreflex function is altered by dynamic exercise, but it is not clear to what extent baroreflex changes are due to altered transduction of pressure into deformation of the barosensory vessel wall. In this study we measured changes in mean common carotid artery diameter and the pulsatile pressure: diameter ratio (PDR) during and after dynamic exercise. Ten young, healthy subjects performed a graded exercise protocol to exhaustion on a bicycle ergometer. Carotid dimensions were measured with an ultrasound wall-tracking system; central arterial pressure was measured with the use of radial tonometry and the generalized transfer function; baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was assessed in the post-exercise period by spectral analysis and the sequence method. Data are given as means ± s.e.m. Mean carotid artery diameter increased during exercise as compared with control levels, but carotid distension amplitude did not change. PDR was reduced from 27.3 ± 2.7 to 13.7 ± 1.0 μm mmHg−1. Immediately after stopping exercise, the carotid artery constricted and PDR remained reduced. At 60 min post-exercise, the carotid artery dilated and the PDR increased above control levels (33.9 ± 1.4 μm mmHg−1). The post-exercise changes in PDR were closely paralleled by those in BRS (0.74 ≤ r ≤ 0.83, P < 0.05). These changes in mean carotid diameter and PDR suggest that the mean baroreceptor activity level increases during exercise, with reduced dynamic sensitivity; at the end of exercise baroreceptors are suddenly unloaded, then at 1 h post-exercise, baroreceptor activity increases again with increasing dynamic sensitivity. The close correlation between PDR and BRS observed at post-exercise underlies the significance of mechanical factors in arterial baroreflex control. PMID:12766246

  7. Static and dynamic responses of carotid sinus baroreceptors in dogs with chronic volume overload.

    PubMed Central

    Niebauer, M; Zucker, I H

    1985-01-01

    In this study we determined if there are any alterations in carotid sinus baroreceptor discharge in a model of heart failure in the dog. The left carotid sinus was isolated and perfused at 100 mmHg with a modified Krebs-Henseleit solution. Two groups of dogs were used: a normal group and a group with a chronic aorto-caval fistula (a.v.f.) of up to 20 weeks duration. The a.v.f. group had a significantly elevated heart rate and left ventricular end diastolic pressure as well as an increased arterial pulse pressure compared to normals. However, mean arterial pressure measured in the aortic arch was not significantly different. Carotid sinus pressure-discharge curves were constructed during increases in carotid sinus pressure by steps and by ramps of pressure change up to 200 mmHg/s. Carotid sinus diameter was also measured using sonomicrometer crystals. In six dogs from each group the sodium, potassium and water content of the right carotid sinus was measured. Several parameters of second order polynomial curves that were fitted to the data were compared between the two groups for step and ramp increases in pressure. These included maximum baroreceptor gain, threshold pressure and plateau pressure. Baroreceptor gain was significantly lower in the a.v.f. group for the step and lowest ramp rate pressure changes. Threshold pressure was significantly higher for the a.v.f. group for steps and the three slowest ramp rates. Plateau pressures were significantly higher for the steps and lowest ramp rate. The carotid sinus strain that was produced at any given carotid sinus pressure was not significantly different between the two groups. In addition, there was no difference in the sodium, potassium or water content of the carotid sinus between the two groups. It was concluded that there is a depression of the static discharge characteristics in this model of heart failure which is not due to an alteration in electrolyte or water content or to the compliance of the carotid sinus

  8. [Ischemic white matter lesions may be caused by the baroreceptor reflex are dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Obi, T

    1995-08-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA, bursts/min) was recorded microneurographically from the tibial nerve in the control group (8 males and 8 females) and the cerebral infarction group (12 males and 12 females) with ischemic white matter lesions (WMLs) diagnosed on T2-weighted MR imaging. Subjects in the latter group were more hypertensive. A significant positive correlation between age and the MSNA at rest was detected in the control group, but not in the cerebral infarction group. The MSNA at rest was significantly low exclusively in infarcted females. Although the blood pressure did not decrease in either group during a 30 degrees head-up tilt, the MSNA was enhanced in the control group alone. On the cold pressor test, the control group demonstrated a significant pressor response, but not an increase in MSNA. In contrast, the cerebral infarction group showed a significant increase in MSNA, and, within the group, only infarcted females lacked a clear pressor response. These results indicated the existence of an insensitivity in the baroreceptor reflex arc on the part of infarcted males, as already indicated in hypertensive patients. On the other hand, on infarcted females, there were both a hypofunction of the baroreceptor reflex arc and a decline of the vascular reactivity, possibly due to an inadequate development of the sympathetic nervous system and a low level of estrogen. Interestingly mean WMLs%, which was calculated as total WMLs areas x 100/total subdural areas on four horizontal T2-weighted MR images, 10, 20, 30, 40 mm above the bicommisural plane, was significantly larger in infarcted females (8.7 +/- 0.7%, mean +/- S.E.) than males (5.1 +/- 0.7%). This discrepancy may be caused by the above-mentioned difference on the results between them. WMLs are mostly distributed in the watershed zone supplied by the long penetrating arteries. Therefore, the lesions may be produced by wide fluctuations in blood pressure as the result of a dysfunction of the

  9. Leptin in nucleus of the solitary tract alters the cardiovascular responses to aortic baroreceptor activation.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, John

    2013-06-01

    Recent data suggests that neurons expressing the long form of the leptin receptor form at least two distinct groups within the caudal nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS): a group within the lateral NTS (Slt) and one within the medial (Sm) and gelantinosa (Sg) NTS. Discrete injections of leptin into Sm and Sg, a region that receives chemoreceptor input, elicit increases in arterial pressure (AP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). However, the effect of microinjections of leptin into Slt, a region that receives baroreceptor input is unknown. Experiments were done in the urethane-chloralose anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated Wistar or Zucker obese rat to determine leptin's effect in Slt on heart rate (HR), AP and RSNA during electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN). Depressor sites within Slt were first identified by the microinjection of l-glutamate (Glu; 0.25M; 10nl) followed by leptin microinjections. In the Wistar rat leptin microinjection (50ng; 20nl) into depressor sites within the lateral Slt elicited increases in HR and RSNA, but no changes in AP. Additionally, leptin injections into Slt prior to Glu injections at the same site or to stimulation of the ADN were found to attenuate the decreases in HR, AP and RSNA to both the Glu injection and ADN stimulation. In Zucker obese rats, leptin injections into NTS depressor sites did not elicit cardiovascular responses, nor altered the cardiovascular responses elicited by stimulation of ADN. Those data suggest that leptin acts at the level of NTS to alter the activity of neurons that mediate the cardiovascular responses to activation of the aortic baroreceptor reflex. PMID:23535030

  10. A single air dive reduces arterial endothelial function in man.

    PubMed

    Brubakk, A O; Duplancic, D; Valic, Z; Palada, I; Obad, A; Bakovic, D; Wisloff, U; Dujic, Z

    2005-08-01

    During and after decompression from dives, gas bubbles are regularly observed in the right ventricular outflow tract. A number of studies have documented that these bubbles can lead to endothelial dysfunction in the pulmonary artery but no data exist on the effect of diving on arterial endothelial function. The present study investigated if diving or oxygen breathing would influence endothelial arterial function in man. A total of 21 divers participated in this study. Nine healthy experienced male divers with a mean age of 31 +/- 5 years were compressed in a hyperbaric chamber to 280 kPa at a rate of 100 kPa min(-1) breathing air and remaining at pressure for 80 min. The ascent rate during decompression was 9 kPa min(-1) with a 7 min stop at 130 kPa (US Navy procedure). Another group of five experienced male divers (31 +/- 6 years) breathed 60% oxygen (corresponding to the oxygen tension of air at 280 kPa) for 80 min. Before and after exposure, endothelial function was assessed in both groups as flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) by ultrasound in the brachial artery. The results were compared to data obtained from a group of seven healthy individuals of the same age who had never dived. The dive produced few vascular bubbles, but a significant arterial diameter increase from 4.5 +/- 0.7 to 4.8 +/- 0.8 mm (mean +/- s.d.) and a significant reduction of FMD from 9.2 +/- 6.9 to 5.0 +/- 6.7% were observed as an indication of reduced endothelial function. In the group breathing oxygen, arterial diameter increased significantly from 4.4 +/- 0.3 mm to 4.7 +/- 0.3 mm, while FMD showed an insignificant decrease. Oxygen breathing did not decrease nitroglycerine-induced dilatation significantly. In the normal controls the arterial diameter and FMD were 4.1 +/- 0.4 mm and 7.7 +/- 0.2.8%, respectively. This study shows that diving can lead to acute arterial endothelial dysfunction in man and that oxygen breathing will increase arterial diameter after return to breathing air. Further

  11. A single air dive reduces arterial endothelial function in man

    PubMed Central

    Brubakk, AO; Duplancic, D; Valic, Z; Palada, I; Obad, A; Bakovic, D; Wisloff, U; Dujic, Z

    2005-01-01

    During and after decompression from dives, gas bubbles are regularly observed in the right ventricular outflow tract. A number of studies have documented that these bubbles can lead to endothelial dysfunction in the pulmonary artery but no data exist on the effect of diving on arterial endothelial function. The present study investigated if diving or oxygen breathing would influence endothelial arterial function in man. A total of 21 divers participated in this study. Nine healthy experienced male divers with a mean age of 31 ± 5 years were compressed in a hyperbaric chamber to 280 kPa at a rate of 100 kPa min−1 breathing air and remaining at pressure for 80 min. The ascent rate during decompression was 9 kPa min−1 with a 7 min stop at 130 kPa (US Navy procedure). Another group of five experienced male divers (31 ± 6 years) breathed 60% oxygen (corresponding to the oxygen tension of air at 280 kPa) for 80 min. Before and after exposure, endothelial function was assessed in both groups as flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) by ultrasound in the brachial artery. The results were compared to data obtained from a group of seven healthy individuals of the same age who had never dived. The dive produced few vascular bubbles, but a significant arterial diameter increase from 4.5 ± 0.7 to 4.8 ± 0.8 mm (mean ± s.d.) and a significant reduction of FMD from 9.2 ± 6.9 to 5.0 ± 6.7% were observed as an indication of reduced endothelial function. In the group breathing oxygen, arterial diameter increased significantly from 4.4 ± 0.3 mm to 4.7 ± 0.3 mm, while FMD showed an insignificant decrease. Oxygen breathing did not decrease nitroglycerine-induced dilatation significantly. In the normal controls the arterial diameter and FMD were 4.1 ± 0.4 mm and 7.7 ± 0.2.8%, respectively. This study shows that diving can lead to acute arterial endothelial dysfunction in man and that oxygen breathing will increase arterial diameter after return to breathing air. Further studies

  12. Renal Artery Stenting in Patients with a Solitary Functioning Kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Cioni, Roberto; Vignali, Claudio; Petruzzi, Pasquale; Neri, Emanuele; Caramella, Davide; Vagli, Paola; Bargellini, Irene; Napoli, Vinicio; Pinto, Stefania; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2001-12-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the results of renal artery stenting in patients with renovascular disease and a solitary functioning kidney.Methods: Palmazstents were placed in 16 patients with a solitary functioning kidney,renal artery stenosis, hypertension and renal failure. Stenoses were evaluated with color Doppler ultrasound, MR angiography and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Indications for stenting were: recoil after percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) (63%),arterial dissection after PTRA (13%) and primary stenting (25%).Immediate results were evaluated by DSA. On follow-up (6-36 months),patients underwent periodical evaluation of clinical conditions (blood pressure and serum creatinine level) and stent patency, by means of color Doppler ultrasound.Results: Stent placement was successful in all patients (100%). Cumulative primary patency rate was: 100% at 1 day, 93.75% at 6 months, 81.25% at 12 months and 75% at 24 months. A significant reduction in diastolic blood pressure occurred (mean {+-} SD 104 {+-} 6 vs 92 {+-} 3;p < 0.05); renal function improved or stabilized in over 80% of patients. However, there was no significant difference in the creatinine values before and after treatment (mean {+-} SD 200 {+-} 142 mmol/l vs 197 {+-} 182 mmol/l; p> 0.05).Conclusion: Renal artery stenting, both after PTRA and as primary stenting, represents a safe procedure, able to preserve renal function in patients with a solitary functioning kidney.

  13. Endothelial function and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kinlay, S; Libby, P; Ganz, P

    2001-08-01

    The endothelium produces a number of vasodilator and vasoconstrictor substances that not only regulate vasomotor tone, but also the recruitment and activity of inflammatory cells and the propensity towards thrombosis. Endothelial vasomotor function is a convenient way to assess these other functions, and is related to the long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. Lipids (particularly low density lipoprotein cholesterol) and oxidant stress play a major role in impairing these functions, by reducing the bioavailability of nitric oxide and activating pro-inflammatory signalling pathways such as nuclear factor kappa B. Biomechanical forces on the endothelium, including low shear stress from disturbed blood flow, also activate the endothelium increasing vasomotor dysfunction and promoting inflammation by upregulating pro-atherogenic genes. In contrast, normal laminar shear stress promotes the expression of genes that may protect against atherosclerosis. The sub-cellular structure of endothelial cells includes caveolae that play an integral part in regulating the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Low density lipoprotein cholesterol and oxidant stress impair caveolae structure and function and adversely affect endothelial function. Lipid-independent pathways of endothelial cell activation are increasingly recognized, and may provide new therapeutic targets. Endothelial vasoconstrictors, such as endothelin, antagonize endothelium-derived vasodilators and contribute to endothelial dysfunction. Some but not all studies have linked certain genetic polymorphisms of the nitric oxide synthase enzyme to vascular disease and impaired endothelial function. Such genetic heterogeneity may nonetheless offer new insights into the variability of endothelial function. PMID:11507322

  14. Gadolinium inhibits mechanoelectrical transduction in rabbit carotid baroreceptors. Implication of stretch-activated channels.

    PubMed Central

    Hajduczok, G; Chapleau, M W; Ferlic, R J; Mao, H Z; Abboud, F M

    1994-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd3+) has been shown to prevent mechanoelectrical transduction believed to be mediated through stretch-activated channels. We investigated the possible role of Gd(3+)-sensitive channels in mediating baroreceptor activity in the carotid sinus of rabbits. Baroreceptor activity induced by a ramp increase of carotid sinus pressure was reduced significantly during exposure to Gd3+. The inhibition was dose-related and reversible, and was not associated with alteration of carotid sinus wall mechanics as the pressure-strain relationship was unaffected. Veratrine triggered action potentials from single- and multiple-baroreceptor fibers when their response to pressure was inhibited by Gd3+. This suggests that the effect of Gd3+ on baroreceptors in the isolated carotid sinus was specific to their mechanical activation. The results suggest that stretch-activated ion channels sensitive to Gd3+ may be the mechanoelectrical transducers of rabbit carotid sinus baroreceptors. PMID:7527431

  15. From anatomy to function: diagnosis of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Odudu, Aghogho; Vassallo, Diana; Kalra, Philip A

    2015-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) affects 7% of the over 65 s and will be increasingly common with an ageing population. ARAS obstructs normal renal perfusion with adverse renal and cardiovascular consequences. Drug therapy is directed at reducing atherosclerotic risk. Two recent major trials of revascularization for ARAS showed that clinical outcomes were not improved beyond those offered by optimal drug therapy in most patients. This reflects experimental data showing that restoration of blood flow alone may not attenuate a cascade of tissue injury. A shift from anatomic to functional imaging of ARAS coupled to novel therapies might improve clinical outcomes in selected patients. This review outlines the case for separately assessing hemodynamic significance of arterial stenosis and functional reserve of renal parenchymal tissue. The authors consider current and emerging diagnostic techniques for ARAS and their potential to allow individualized and functionally directed treatments. PMID:26480218

  16. Arterial Compliance and Autonomic Functions in Adult Male Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Yogesh; Gupta, Rani

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Smoking is known to augment sympathetic activity and may lead to increased arterial stiffness. Several studies have reported association of increased sympathetic activity and arterial stiffness to cardiovascular risks among smokers. Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) of peripheral arteries, instead of aorta can be used as a non-invasive indicator of arterial stiffness. Aim To measure non-invasively, the autonomic functions and peripheral arterial stiffness in smokers, and to find out whether the aforementioned factors are modified by the level of physical activity in these smokers. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in the Department of Physiology, HIMS, Dehradun, over a period of 12 months (2013-2014) on 100 adult males (20-40 years); 50 smokers and 50 non-smokers. The parameters analysed include relevant anthropometric and cardiovascular parameters, Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV), sustained Hand Grip Test (HGT) and Heart Rate Variability (HRV) domains. Data interpretation and analysis was carried out using SPSS 17.0. Comparison of the above mentioned parameters amongst groups was done with unpaired t-test. The relationship of pack-years & physical activity with vascular functions was assessed by Pearson’s correlation. Interaction of various grades of smoking and physical activity with Cardiovascular System (CVS) parameters was assessed by one-way ANOVA. Results Smokers had higher values of PWV (5.7±0.5m/s) as compared to non-smokers (4.8±0.4m/s) (p<0.001). ΔDBP during HGT was lower (7±3.18mmHg) among smokers as compared to non-smokers (19.4±3.5mmHg) (p<0.001). Smoking (pack-years) was positively related to PWV (r= .03) but showed a weak negative relationship with change in Diastolic Blood Pressure (ΔDBP) (r= -0.084, p=0.56) showing that, more the frequency of smoking, the more was arterial stiffening and the lesser was the sympathetic response to the HGT. The smokers had significantly higher sympathetic activity; Low

  17. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Human Small Artery Function

    PubMed Central

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Greenstein, Adam S.; Yadav, Rahul; Jeziorska, Maria; Hama, Salam; Soltani, Fardad; Pemberton, Phil W.; Ammori, Basil; Malik, Rayaz A.; Soran, Handrean; Heagerty, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of bariatric surgery on small artery function and the mechanisms underlying this. Background In lean healthy humans, perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) exerts an anticontractile effect on adjacent small arteries, but this is lost in obesity-associated conditions such as the metabolic syndrome and type II diabetes where there is evidence of adipocyte inflammation and increased oxidative stress. Methods Segments of small subcutaneous artery and perivascular fat were harvested from severely obese individuals before (n = 20) and 6 months after bariatric surgery (n = 15). Small artery contractile function was examined in vitro with wire myography, and perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) morphology was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Results The anticontractile activity of PVAT was lost in obese patients before surgery when compared with healthy volunteers and was restored 6 months after bariatric surgery. In vitro protocols with superoxide dismutase and catalase rescued PVAT anticontractile function in tissue from obese individuals before surgery. The improvement in anticontractile function after surgery was accompanied by improvements in insulin sensitivity, serum glycemic indexes, inflammatory cytokines, adipokine profile, and systolic blood pressure together with increased PVAT adiponectin and nitric oxide bioavailability and reduced macrophage infiltration and inflammation. These changes were observed despite the patients remaining severely obese. Conclusions Bariatric surgery and its attendant improvements in weight, blood pressure, inflammation, and metabolism collectively reverse the obesity-induced alteration to PVAT anticontractile function. This reversal is attributable to reductions in local adipose inflammation and oxidative stress with improved adiponectin and nitric oxide bioavailability. PMID:23665100

  18. Greater impairments in cerebral artery compared with skeletal muscle feed artery endothelial function in a mouse model of increased large artery stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ashley E; Henson, Grant D; Reihl, Kelly D; Morgan, R Garrett; Dobson, Parker S; Nielson, Elizabeth I; Ling, Jing; Mecham, Robert P; Li, Dean Y; Lesniewski, Lisa A; Donato, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Advancing age as well as diseases such as diabetes are characterized by both increased large artery stiffness and impaired peripheral artery function. It has been hypothesized that greater large artery stiffness causes peripheral artery dysfunction; however, a cause-and-effect relationship has not previously been established. We used elastin heterozygote mice (Eln+/–) as a model of increased large artery stiffness without co-morbidities unrelated to the large artery properties. Aortic stiffness, measured by pulse wave velocity, was ∼35% greater in Eln+/– mice than in wild-type (Eln+/+) mice (P = 0.04). Endothelium-dependent dilatation (EDD), assessed by the maximal dilatation to acetylcholine, was ∼40% lower in Eln+/– than Eln+/+ mice in the middle cerebral artery (MCA, P < 0.001), but was similar between groups in the gastrocnemius feed arteries (GFA, P = 0.79). In the MCA, EDD did not differ between groups after incubation with the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (P > 0.05), indicating that lower NO bioavailability contributed to the impaired EDD in Eln+/– mice. Superoxide production and content of the oxidative stress marker nitrotyrosine was higher in MCAs from Eln+/− compared with Eln+/+ mice (P < 0.05). In the MCA, after incubation with the superoxide scavenger TEMPOL, maximal EDD improved by ∼65% in Eln+/– (P = 0.002), but was unchanged in Eln+/+ mice (P = 0.17). These results indicate that greater large artery stiffness has a more profound effect on endothelial function in cerebral arteries compared with skeletal muscle feed arteries. Greater large artery stiffness can cause cerebral artery endothelial dysfunction by reducing NO bioavailability and increasing oxidative stress. PMID:25627876

  19. Carotid Baroreceptor Stimulation and Arteriovenous Shunts for Resistant Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Paivanas, Nicholas; Bisognano, John D; Gassler, John P

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic therapy for hypertension is effective for the majority of patients with hypertension, but there is a subset of the population with treatment-resistant hypertension who cannot achieve their blood pressure goal despite taking multiple medications. Since these patients are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease and end-organ damage, additional therapies must be considered. This review discusses several novel interventional therapies-including baroreflex activation therapy, baroreceptor stenting, and creation of an arteriovenous shunt-that may provide alternative options for blood pressure control in those with treatment-resistant hypertension. All of these therapies remain investigational, and each has its own strengths and weaknesses that will be critical to assess as they come to market. PMID:27057291

  20. Predictive Value of Endothelial Function by Non-invasive Peripheral Arterial Tonometry for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Li, Jing; Aoki, Tatsuo; Guddeti, Raviteja R.; Kwon, Taek-Geun; Cilluffo, Rebecca; Widmer, R. Jay.; Gulati, Rajiv; Lennon, Ryan J.; Lerman, Lilach O.; Lerman, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction is a key step in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular complications. We examined whether peripheral endothelial function, as assessed by fingertip reactive hyperemia-peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT) can provide additional clinical value to traditional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in predicting coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods We included 118 stable patients who were referred for coronary angiography for chest pain evaluation or abnormal stress test. A natural logarithmic value of RH-PAT index (Ln_RHI) was obtained before cardiac catheterization by an independent operator. Significant CAD was defined as luminal stenosis ≥70% (≥50% at left main) and/or fractional flow reserve ≤0.80 in one or more major coronary arteries or their major branches. Results Levels of Ln_RHI were significantly lower in patients with CAD (n=60) compared to patients without CAD (n=58) (0.69±0.29 vs. 0.88±0.27, p<0.001). Ln_RHI was significantly associated with CAD independent from traditional risk factors (odds ratio [OR] for 0.1 decrease in Ln_RHI 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04 to 1.52, p=0.01). The net reclassification index was improved when Ln_RHI was added to traditional risk factors (0.62, 95% CI: 0.27 to 0.97, p=0.001). Conclusions Peripheral endothelial function, as assessed by RH-PAT, improved risk stratification when added to traditional risk factors. RH-PAT is potentially useful for identifying patients at high risk for CAD. PMID:25503420

  1. TRPC5 channels participate in pressure-sensing in aortic baroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lau, On-Chai; Shen, Bing; Wong, Ching-On; Tjong, Yung-Wui; Lo, Chun-Yin; Wang, Hui-Chuan; Huang, Yu; Yung, Wing-Ho; Chen, Yang-Chao; Fung, Man-Lung; Rudd, John Anthony; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure is maintained within a normal physiological range by a sophisticated regulatory mechanism. Baroreceptors serve as a frontline sensor to detect the change in blood pressure. Nerve signals are then sent to the cardiovascular control centre in the brain in order to stimulate baroreflex responses. Here, we identify TRPC5 channels as a mechanical sensor in aortic baroreceptors. In Trpc5 knockout mice, the pressure-induced action potential firings in the afferent nerve and the baroreflex-mediated heart rate reduction are attenuated. Telemetric measurements of blood pressure demonstrate that Trpc5 knockout mice display severe daily blood pressure fluctuation. Our results suggest that TRPC5 channels represent a key pressure transducer in the baroreceptors and play an important role in maintaining blood pressure stability. Because baroreceptor dysfunction contributes to a variety of cardiovascular diseases including hypertension, heart failure and myocardial infarction, our findings may have important future clinical implications. PMID:27411851

  2. TRPC5 channels participate in pressure-sensing in aortic baroreceptors.

    PubMed

    Lau, On-Chai; Shen, Bing; Wong, Ching-On; Tjong, Yung-Wui; Lo, Chun-Yin; Wang, Hui-Chuan; Huang, Yu; Yung, Wing-Ho; Chen, Yang-Chao; Fung, Man-Lung; Rudd, John Anthony; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure is maintained within a normal physiological range by a sophisticated regulatory mechanism. Baroreceptors serve as a frontline sensor to detect the change in blood pressure. Nerve signals are then sent to the cardiovascular control centre in the brain in order to stimulate baroreflex responses. Here, we identify TRPC5 channels as a mechanical sensor in aortic baroreceptors. In Trpc5 knockout mice, the pressure-induced action potential firings in the afferent nerve and the baroreflex-mediated heart rate reduction are attenuated. Telemetric measurements of blood pressure demonstrate that Trpc5 knockout mice display severe daily blood pressure fluctuation. Our results suggest that TRPC5 channels represent a key pressure transducer in the baroreceptors and play an important role in maintaining blood pressure stability. Because baroreceptor dysfunction contributes to a variety of cardiovascular diseases including hypertension, heart failure and myocardial infarction, our findings may have important future clinical implications. PMID:27411851

  3. Trans-arterial Onyx Embolization of a Functional Thoracic Paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Chacón-Quesada, Tatiana; Maud, Alberto; Ramos-Duran, Luis; Torabi, Alireza; Fitzgerald, Tamara; Akle, Nassim; Cruz Flores, Salvador; Trier, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Paragangliomas are rare tumors of the endocrine system. They are highly vascular and in some cases hormonally active, making their management challenging. Although there is strong evidence of the safety and effectiveness of preoperative embolization in the management of spinal tumors, only five cases have been reported in the setting of thoracic paragangliomas. We present the case of a 19-year-old man with a large, primary, functional, malignant paraganglioma of the thoracic spine causing a vertebral fracture and spinal cord compression. To our knowledge this is the first report of preoperative trans-arterial balloon augmented Onyx embolization of a thoracic paraganglioma. PMID:25763296

  4. Phrenic and diaphragm function after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed Central

    Estenne, M; Yernault, J C; De Smet, J M; De Troyer, A

    1985-01-01

    We studied respiratory mechanics and phrenic nerve and diaphragm function in 12 patients on the day before and eight to 13 days after coronary artery bypass grafting. The average vital capacity, functional residual capacity, and total lung capacity decreased by 20.5%, 9.5%, and 14.7% respectively after operation. Eleven patients showed less negative maximum inspiratory mouth pressures at any given lung volume after surgery and the magnitude of the change correlated with the reduction in total lung capacity. In 11 of the 12 patients the conduction times of the right and left phrenic nerves did not change substantially after operation and the ratio of inspiratory electrical activity (Edi) of left and right hemidiaphragms was similar before and after the procedure. One patient, however, showed a considerable increase in left phrenic nerve conduction time and a reduction in the left to right Edi ratio postoperatively. In three patients diaphragm function was also assessed by changes in transdiaphragmatic pressure during supramaximal phrenic nerve stimulation and voluntary increase in inspired volume; in none of the three patients did the transdiaphragmatic pressure swings show any significant change in the postoperative period. These data indicate that phrenic nerve paralysis only occasionally accounts for the postoperative loss of lung volume after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. The mechanism of these abnormalities therefore remains to be determined. PMID:3875161

  5. Congestive cardiac failure: central role of the arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, P

    1987-01-01

    A review of the history of our knowledge and understanding of the peripheral oedema of congestive cardiac failure points to the conclusion that an inability of the heart to maintain the arterial pressure is of central importance in this condition. Although the function of the circulation is to perfuse the tissues, the body monitors the adequacy of its perfusion, not not through metabolic messengers carried from the tissues in the blood stream, but by sensing the arterial pressure; and the mechanisms evoked act to maintain the arterial pressure. In the short term this is achieved by autonomic regulation of the heart and blood vessels; in the longer term the arterial pressure is maintained through an increase in the blood volume by a retention of salt and water by the kidney. To support the latter process, intrinsic renal mechanisms are successively magnified by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and by the activities of the sympathetic system and vasopressin. The natriuretic influence mediated through volume receptors and the release of atrial peptide is overruled by the arterial baroreceptors, so that the body maintains the arterial pressure at the expense of an increase in blood volume. In these ways the syndrome of congestive cardiac failure may be regarded as one which arises when the heart becomes chronically unable to maintain an appropriate arterial pressure without support. PMID:3311096

  6. Beneficial effects of lifelong caloric restriction on endothelial function are greater in conduit arteries compared to cerebral resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Walker, Ashley E; Henson, Grant D; Reihl, Kelly D; Nielson, Elizabeth I; Morgan, R Garrett; Lesniewski, Lisa A; Donato, Anthony J

    2014-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction occurs in conduit and cerebral resistance arteries with advancing age. Lifelong caloric restriction (CR) can prevent the onset of age-related dysfunction in many tissues, but its effects on cerebral resistance artery function, as compared with conduit artery function, have not been determined. We measured endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) in the carotid artery and middle cerebral artery (MCA) from young (5-7 months), old ad libitum fed (AL, 29-32 months), and old lifelong CR (CR, 40 % CR, 29-32 months) B6D2F1 mice. Compared with young, EDD for old AL was 24 % lower in the carotid and 47 % lower in the MCA (p < 0.05). For old CR, EDD was not different from young in the carotid artery (p > 0.05), but was 25 % lower than young in the MCA (p < 0.05). EDD was not different between groups after NO synthase inhibition with N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester in the carotid artery or MCA. Superoxide production by the carotid artery and MCA was greater in old AL compared with young and old CR (p < 0.05). In the carotid, incubation with the superoxide scavenger TEMPOL improved EDD for old AL (p > 0.05), with no effect in young or old CR (p > 0.05). In the MCA, incubation with TEMPOL or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin augmented EDD in old AL (p < 0.05), but reduced EDD in young and old CR (p < 0.05). Thus, age-related endothelial dysfunction is prevented by lifelong CR completely in conduit arteries, but only partially in cerebral resistance arteries. These benefits of lifelong CR on EDD result from lower oxidative stress and greater NO bioavailability. PMID:24065292

  7. Blood pressure and mesenteric resistance arterial function after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Chapman, Justin; Xue, Hong; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; McCarron, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Ground studies indicate that spaceflight may diminish vascular contraction. To examine that possibility, vascular function was measured in spontaneously hypertensive rats immediately after an 18-day shuttle flight. Isolated mesenteric resistance arterial responses to cumulative additions of norepinephrine, acetylcholine, and sodium nitroprusside were measured using wire myography within 17 h of landing. After flight, maximal contraction to norepinephrine was attenuated (P < 0.001) as was relaxation to acetylcholine (P < 0.001) and sodium nitroprusside (P < 0.05). At high concentrations, acetylcholine caused vascular contraction in vessels from flight animals but not in vessels from vivarium control animals (P < 0.05). The results are consistent with data from ground studies and indicate that spaceflight causes both endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent alterations in vascular function. The resulting decrement in vascular function may contribute to orthostatic intolerance after spaceflight.

  8. Improvement of renal function after opening occluded atherosclerotic renal arteries.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Hiroshi; Toma, Masanao; Fukatsu, Atsushi

    2009-09-01

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) with stenting has been effective in the control of hypertension, renal function and pulmonary edema caused by atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS). However, concerning the viability of renal function, this procedure has not been fully established, especially in the presence of renal atrophy or severe renal parenchymal disease. We report a dramatically improved case of acute renal failure caused by acute worsening ARAS treated by stenting. A 72-year-old female was admitted for accelerated renal dysfunction (serum ceatinine; 1.2-2.3 mg/dl) and hypertension (190/100 mmHg). At 10 days after admission, the patient's serum ceatinine increased to 6.7 mg/dl, her pulmonary edema was exaggerated and hemodialysis was required. Ultrasonography showed bilateral high-echoic kidneys, but no apparent finding of renal artery stenosis (RAS). At day 15, computed tomographic angiography indicated bilateral ostial RAS. Renal angiography demonstrated total occlusion of the right and severe (90%) disease in the left. ARAS was diagnosed by intravascular ultrasonography. The guidewire was inserted in both renal arteries, PTRA with stenting was performed in the right and a stent was directly implanted in the left. Immediately, each kidney enlarged to almost normal size, leading to satisfactory urination. She was released from hemodialysis the next day since her serum creatinine was normal and the pulmonary edema was improved. Although there is still no reliable prognostic factor including resistive index or kidney size, it is important that PTRA with stenting in ARAS should be considered in a case of accelerated renal dysfunction because of the possible improvement. PMID:19726830

  9. Transcutaneous measurement of the arterial input function in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Litton, J.E.; Eriksson, L. )

    1990-04-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides a powerful tool in medical research. Biochemical function can be both precisely localized and quantitatively measured. To achieve reliable quantitation it is necessary to know the time course of activity concentration in the arterial blood during the measurement. In this study the arterial blood curve from the brachial artery is compared to the activity measured in the internal carotid artery with a new transcutaneous detector.

  10. Direct Characterization of Arterial Input Functions by Fluorescence Imaging of Exposed Carotid Artery to Facilitate Kinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose With the goal of facilitating tracer kinetic analysis in small-animal planar fluorescence imaging, an experimental method for characterizing tracer arterial input functions is presented. The proposed method involves exposing the common carotid arteries by surgical dissection, which can then be imaged directly during tracer injection and clearance. Procedures Arterial concentration curves of IRDye-700DX-carboxylate, IRDye-800CW-EGF, and IRDye-800CW conjugated to anti-EGFR Affibody are recovered from athymic female mice (n=12) by directly imaging exposed vessels. Images were acquired with two imaging protocols: a slow-kinetics approach (temporal resolution=45 s) to recover the arterial curves from two tracers simultaneously, and a fast-kinetics approach (temporal resolution=500 ms) to characterize the first-pass peak of a single tracer. Arterial input functions obtained by the carotid imaging technique, as well as plasma curves measured by blood sampling were fit with a biexponential pharmacokinetic model. Results Pharmacological fast- and slow-phase rate constants recovered with the proposed method were 0.37±0.26 and 0.007±0.001 min−1, respectively, for the IRDye700DX-C. For the IRDye800CW-EGF, the rate constants were 0.11±0.13 and 0.003±0.002 min−1. These rate constants did not differ significantly from those calculated previously by blood sampling, as determined by an F test; however, the between-subject variability was four times lower for arterial curves recovered using the proposed technique, compared with blood sampling. Conclusions The proposed technique enables the direct characterization of arterial input functions for kinetic analysis. As this method requires no additional instrumentation, it is immediately deployable in commercially available planar fluorescence imaging systems. PMID:24420443

  11. Vascular endothelial function of patients with stable coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Yang, Xinchun; Cai, Jun; Shi, Hui; Zhong, Guangzhen; Chi, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate vascular endothelial function and contributing factors in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. Methods: One hundred twenty six CHD outpatients were randomly recruited. Reactive hyperemia index (RHI) <1.67 indicates endothelial dysfunction. Correlation between RHI and different biochemical parameters was evaluated. Results: RHI in patients receiving statins treatment was significantly higher than patients without statins treatment (P<0.05). RHI in patients with more than 3 risk factors for CHD was also markedly lower than that in patients with ≤2 risk factors (P<0.05). Patients with lesions at several branches of coronary artery had a markedly lower RHI when compared with those with coronary lesions at a single branch (P<0.05). For patients without statins treatment, RHI increased significantly after statins treatment for 1 month (P=0.01). In patients with endothelial dysfunction, FBG, HbA1C, hs-CRP and Hcy were significantly higher than those in patients with normal endothelial function (P<0.05 for all). Smokers with CHD had a remarkably lower RHI when compared with non-smokers (P<0.05). Conclusions: Smoking, FBG, HbA1C, Hcy and hs-CRP are significantly associated with endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction is also related to the numbers of risk factors for CHD, degree of coronary lesions and statins. Statins treatment may significantly improve the endothelial function of CHD patients. PMID:26150839

  12. Evaluation of ventricular function in patients with coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rocco, T.P.; Dilsizian, V.; Fischman, A.J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1989-07-01

    The recent expansion of interventional cardiovascular technologies has stimulated a concomitant expansion of noninvasive cardiac studies, both to assist in diagnosis and to evaluate treatment outcomes. Radionuclide ventricular function studies provide a reliable, reproducible means to quantify global left ventricular systolic performance, a critical determinant of prognosis in patients with cardiovascular disease. In addition, the ability to evaluate regional left ventricular wall motion and to assess ventricular performance during exercise have secured a fundamental role for such studies in the screening and treatment of patients with coronary artery disease. Radionuclide techniques have been extended to the evaluation of left ventricular relaxation/filling events, left ventricular systolic/diastolic function in the ambulatory setting, and with appropriate technical modifications, to the assessment of right ventricular performance at rest and with exercise. As a complement to radionuclide perfusion studies, cardiac blood-pool imaging allows for thorough noninvasive description of cardiac physiology and function in both normal subjects and in patients with a broad range of cardiovascular diseases. 122 references.

  13. [Modern morpho-functional concepts in cephalic arterial distribution].

    PubMed

    Scutariu, M D; Ciupilan, Corina

    2005-01-01

    The present paper provides a general morphofunctional study of the oro-maxillary-facial cephalic arterial area that shows some particular hemodynamic characteristics. The internal maxillary artery supplies a very large territory, with numerous and wide anastomoses. In order to understand the hemodynamic characteristics of this artery, we analyzed some older theories, such as: Ludwig von Bertalanffy's General Systems Theory, Walter Zimmermann's Telome Theory, and some general rheological principles also. PMID:16607795

  14. Outcomes of Anatomical versus Functional Testing for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Pamela S.; Hoffmann, Udo; Patel, Manesh R.; Mark, Daniel B.; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R.; Cavanaugh, Brendan; Cole, Jason; Dolor, Rowena J.; Fordyce, Christopher B.; Huang, Megan; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Kosinski, Andrzej S.; Krucoff, Mitchell W.; Malhotra, Vinay; Picard, Michael H.; Udelson, James E.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Yow, Eric; Cooper, Lawton S.; Lee, Kerry L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many patients have symptoms suggestive of coronary artery disease (CAD) and are often evaluated with the use of diagnostic testing, although there are limited data from randomized trials to guide care. METHODS We randomly assigned 10,003 symptomatic patients to a strategy of initial anatomical testing with the use of coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) or to functional testing (exercise electrocardiography, nuclear stress testing, or stress echocardiography). The composite primary end point was death, myocardial infarction, hospitalization for unstable angina, or major procedural complication. Secondary end points included invasive cardiac catheterization that did not show obstructive CAD and radiation exposure. RESULTS The mean age of the patients was 60.8±8.3 years, 52.7% were women, and 87.7% had chest pain or dyspnea on exertion. The mean pretest likelihood of obstructive CAD was 53.3±21.4%. Over a median follow-up period of 25 months, a primary end-point event occurred in 164 of 4996 patients in the CTA group (3.3%) and in 151 of 5007 (3.0%) in the functional-testing group (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.83 to 1.29; P = 0.75). CTA was associated with fewer catheterizations showing no obstructive CAD than was functional testing (3.4% vs. 4.3%, P = 0.02), although more patients in the CTA group underwent catheterization within 90 days after randomization (12.2% vs. 8.1%). The median cumulative radiation exposure per patient was lower in the CTA group than in the functional-testing group (10.0 mSv vs. 11.3 mSv), but 32.6% of the patients in the functional-testing group had no exposure, so the overall exposure was higher in the CTA group (mean, 12.0 mSv vs. 10.1 mSv; P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS In symptomatic patients with suspected CAD who required noninvasive testing, a strategy of initial CTA, as compared with functional testing, did not improve clinical outcomes over a median follow-up of 2 years. (Funded by the

  15. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI with Localized Arterial Input Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J.J.; Bretthorst, G.L.; Derdeyn, C.P.; Powers, W.J.; Videen, T.O.; Snyder, A.Z.; Markham, J.; Shimony, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Compared to gold-standard measurements of cerebral perfusion with positron emission tomography (PET) using H2[15O] tracers, measurements with dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MR are more accessible, less expensive and less invasive. However, existing methods for analyzing and interpreting data from DSC MR have characteristic disadvantages that include sensitivity to incorrectly modeled delay and dispersion in a single, global arterial input function (AIF). We describe a model of tissue microcirculation derived from tracer kinetics which estimates for each voxel a unique, localized AIF (LAIF). Parameters of the model were estimated using Bayesian probability theory and Markov-chain Monte Carlo, circumventing difficulties arising from numerical deconvolution. Applying the new method to imaging studies from a cohort of fourteen patients with chronic, atherosclerotic, occlusive disease showed strong correlations between perfusion measured by DSC MR with LAIF and perfusion measured by quantitative PET with H2[15O]. Regression to PET measurements enabled conversion of DSC MR to a physiological scale. Regression analysis for LAIF gave estimates of a scaling factor for quantitation which described perfusion accurately in patients with substantial variability in hemodynamic impairment. PMID:20432301

  16. [Functional-anatomical prerequisites of revascularization of the femoro-popliteal arterial segment].

    PubMed

    Losev, R Z; Nikolenko, V N; Mikul'skaia, E G; Eliseev, A A; Burov, Iu A

    2008-01-01

    Improved results of surgical treatment of patients with critical ischemia of lower extremities can be obtained by using the collateral bed. The condition of the profound femoral artery and the popliteal artery, especially in the zone of its trifurcation, is of the greatest significance for the decision on the volume of surgery. The carrying capacity of the collateral bed of the profound femoral artery in occlusion of the femoral artery was on average 284 ml/min. A positive prognostic criterion of recovered circulation in the extremity using the profound femoral artery is preservation of the patent trifurcation of the popliteal artery and/or the anterior tibial artery. The blood flow volume along the profound femoral artery under the given functional-anatomical conditions should be not less than 150 ml/min. Semiclosed loop endarterectomy of the superficial femoral and popliteal arteries with multilevel lesions of the lower extremity arteries allows the main zones of the collateral bed of the femoro-popliteal-tibial segment to be included in the blood flow. PMID:18411661

  17. Surgical neuroangiography. Vol. 1: Functional anatomy of craniofacial arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lasjaunias, P.; Berenstein, A.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Arterial Anatomy: Introduction. - The Internal Maxillary System. - The Pharyngo-occipital System. - The Upper Cervical Vertebral Column: The Cervical Arteries. - The Musculocutaneous Elements of the Head and Mouth. - Thyrolaryngeal Arteries. - The Transosseous Peripheral Nervous System Arterial Supply. - Dangerous Vessels. - Collateral Circulation. - The Pharyngoocipital Collateral Pattern. - The Internal Maxillary Collateral Pattern. - The Linguofacial Collateral Pattern. - Multiple Constraints and Chronology of the Collateral Response. - Angiographic Protocols. - Angiographic Protocol of the Parasellar Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Posterior Base of the Skull. - Angiographic Protocol of the Carotid Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Nasomaxillaary Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Maxillomandibular Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Temporofacial and Scalp Region. - Angiographic Protocol of the Thyrolaryngeal Region. - References. - Subject Index.

  18. Assessments of Arterial Stiffness and Endothelial Function Using Pulse Wave Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, Lee; Young, Joanna M.; Fryer, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Conventionally, the assessments of endothelial function and arterial stiffness require different sets of equipment, making the inclusion of both tests impractical for clinical and epidemiological studies. Pulse wave analysis (PWA) provides useful information regarding the mechanical properties of the arterial tree and can also be used to assess endothelial function. PWA is a simple, valid, reliable, and inexpensive technique, offering great clinical and epidemiological potential. The current paper will outline how to measure arterial stiffness and endothelial function using this technique and include discussion of validity and reliability. PMID:22666595

  19. Influence of central venous pressure upon sinus node responses to arterial baroreflex stimulation in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, A. L.; Takeshita, A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Abboud, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements were made of sinus node responses to arterial baroreceptor stimulation with phenylephrine injection or neck suction, before and during changes of central venous pressure provoked by lower body negative pressure or leg and lower truck elevation. Variations of central venous pressure between 1.1 and 9.0 mm Hg did not influence arterial baroreflex mediated bradycardia. Baroreflex sinus node responses were augmented by intravenous propranolol, but the level of responses after propranolol was comparable during the control state, lower body negative pressure, and leg and trunk elevation. Sinus node responses to very brief baroreceptor stimuli applied during the transitions of central venous pressure also were comparable in the three states. The authors conclude that physiological variations of central venous pressure do not influence sinus node responses to arterial baroreceptor stimulation in man.

  20. Interaction of semicircular canal stimulation with carotid baroreceptor reflex control of heart rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.

    1998-01-01

    The carotid-cardiac baroreflex contributes to the prediction of orthostatic tolerance; experimental attenuation of the reflex response leads to orthostatic hypotension in humans and animals. Anecdotal observations indicate that rotational head movements about the vertical axis of the body can also induce orthostatic bradycardia and hypotension through increased parasympathetic activity. We therefore measured the chronotropic response to carotid baroreceptor stimulation in 12 men during varying conditions of vestibulo-oculomotor stimulation to test the hypothesis that stimulation of the semicircular canals associated with head movements in the yaw plane inhibits cardioacceleration through a vagally mediated baroreflex. Carotid-cardiac baroreflex response was assessed by plotting R-R intervals (ms) at each of 8 neck pressure steps with their respective carotid distending pressures (mmHg). Calculated baroreflex gain (maximal slope of the stimulus-response relationship) was measured under 4 experimental conditions: 1) sinusoidal whole-body yaw rotation of the subject in the dark without visual fixation (combined vestibular-oculomotor stimulation); 2) yaw oscillation of the subject while tracking a small head-fixed light moving with the subject (vestibular stimulation without eye movements); 3) subject stationary while fixating on a small light oscillating in yaw at the same frequency, peak acceleration, and velocity as the chair (eye movements without vestibular stimulation); and 4) subject stationary in the dark (no eye or head motion). Head motion alone and with eye movement reduced baseline baroreflex responsiveness to the same stimulus by 30%. Inhibition of cardioacceleration during rotational head movements may have significant impact on functional performance in aerospace environments, particularly in high-performance aircraft pilots during high angular acceleration in aerial combat maneuvers or in astronauts upon return from spaceflight who already have

  1. Evidence for local relaxin ligand-receptor expression and function in arteries.

    PubMed

    Novak, Jacqueline; Parry, Laura J; Matthews, Julianna E; Kerchner, Laurie J; Indovina, Kimberly; Hanley-Yanez, Karen; Doty, Ketah D; Debrah, Dan O; Shroff, Sanjeev G; Conrad, Kirk P

    2006-11-01

    Relaxin is a 6 kDa protein hormone produced by the corpus luteum and secreted into the blood during pregnancy in rodents and humans. Growing evidence indicates that circulating relaxin causes vasodilatation and increases in arterial compliance, which may be among its most important actions during pregnancy. Here we investigated whether there is local expression and function of relaxin and relaxin receptor in arteries of nonpregnant females and males. Relaxin-1 and its major receptor, Lgr7, mRNA are expressed in thoracic aortas, small renal and mesenteric arteries from mice and rats of both sexes, as well as in small renal arteries from female tammar wallabies (an Australian marsupial). Using available antibodies for rat and mouse Lgr7 receptor and rat relaxin, we also identified protein expression in arteries. Small renal arteries isolated from relaxin-1 gene-deficient mice demonstrate enhanced myogenic reactivity and decreased passive compliance relative to wild-type (WT) and heterozygous mice. Taken together, these findings reveal an arterial-derived, relaxin ligand-receptor system that acts locally to regulate arterial function. PMID:17077312

  2. Development of functional in vivo imaging of cerebral lenticulostriate artery using novel synchrotron radiation angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaojie; Miao, Peng; Mu, Zhihao; Jiang, Zhen; Lu, Yifan; Guan, Yongjing; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2015-02-01

    The lenticulostriate artery plays a vital role in the onset and development of cerebral ischemia. However, current imaging techniques cannot assess the in vivo functioning of small arteries such as the lenticulostriate artery in the brain of rats. Here, we report a novel method to achieve a high resolution multi-functional imaging of the cerebrovascular system using synchrotron radiation angiography, which is based on spatio-temporal analysis of contrast density in the arterial cross section. This method provides a unique tool for studying the sub-cortical vascular elasticity after cerebral ischemia in rats. Using this technique, we demonstrated that the vascular elasticity of the lenticulostriate artery decreased from day 1 to day 7 after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats and recovered from day 7 to day 28 compared to the controls (p < 0.001), which paralleled with brain edema formation and inversely correlated with blood flow velocity (p < 0.05). Our results demonstrated that the change of vascular elasticity was related to the levels of brain edema and the velocity of focal blood flow, suggesting that reducing brain edema is important for the improvement of the function of the lenticulostriate artery in the ischemic brain.

  3. Effects of Renal Denervation on Renal Artery Function in Humans: Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Doltra, Adelina; Hartmann, Arthur; Stawowy, Philipp; Goubergrits, Leonid; Kuehne, Titus; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Gebker, Rolf; Schneeweis, Christopher; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Esler, Murray; Fleck, Eckart; Kelle, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Aim To study the effects of RD on renal artery wall function non-invasively using magnetic resonance. Methods and Results 32 patients undergoing RD were included. A 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance of the renal arteries was performed before RD and after 6-month. We quantified the vessel sharpness of both renal arteries using a quantitative analysis tool (Soap-Bubble®). In 17 patients we assessed the maximal and minimal cross-sectional area of both arteries, peak velocity, mean flow, and renal artery distensibility. In a subset of patients wall shear stress was assessed with computational flow dynamics. Neither renal artery sharpness nor renal artery distensibility differed significantly. A significant increase in minimal and maximal areas (by 25.3%, p = 0.008, and 24.6%, p = 0.007, respectively), peak velocity (by 16.9%, p = 0.021), and mean flow (by 22.4%, p = 0.007) was observed after RD. Wall shear stress significantly decreased (by 25%, p = 0.029). These effects were observed in blood pressure responders and non-responders. Conclusions RD is not associated with adverse effects at renal artery level, and leads to an increase in cross-sectional areas, velocity and flow and a decrease in wall shear stress. PMID:27003912

  4. MR and CT imaging of the structural and functional changes of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Schiebler, Mark L.; Bhalla, Sanjeev; Runo, James; Jarjour, Nizar; Roldan, Alejandro; Chesler, Naomi; François, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The current Dana Point classification system (2009) divides elevation of pulmonary artery pressure into Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH). Fortunately, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is not a common disease. However, with the aging of the first world’s population, heart failure is now an important cause of pulmonary hypertension with up to 9% of the population involved. PAH is usually asymptomatic until late in the disease process. While there are indirect features of PAH found on noninvasive imaging studies, the diagnosis and management still requires right heart catheterization. Imaging features of PAH include: 1. Enlargement of the pulmonary trunk and main pulmonary arteries, 2. Decreased pulmonary arterial compliance, 3. Tapering of the peripheral pulmonary arteries, 4. Enlargement of the inferior vena cava, and 5. Increased mean transit time. The chronic requirement to generate high pulmonary arterial pressures measurably affects the right heart and main pulmonary artery. This change in physiology causes the following structural and functional alterations that have been shown to have prognostic significance: Relative area change of the pulmonary trunk, RVSVindex, RVSV, RVEDVindex, LVEDVindex, and baseline RVEF <35%. All of these variables can be quantified non-invasively and followed longitudinally in each patient using MRI to modify the treatment regimen. Untreated PAH frequently results in a rapid clinical decline and death within 3 years of diagnosis. Unfortunately, even with treatment, less than 1/2 of these patients are alive at four years. PMID:23612440

  5. Chronic Interactions Between Carotid Baroreceptors and Chemoreceptors in Obesity Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lohmeier, Thomas E; Iliescu, Radu; Tudorancea, Ionut; Cazan, Radu; Cates, Adam W; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios; Irwin, Eric D

    2016-07-01

    Carotid bodies play a critical role in protecting against hypoxemia, and their activation increases sympathetic activity, arterial pressure, and ventilation, responses opposed by acute stimulation of the baroreflex. Although chemoreceptor hypersensitivity is associated with sympathetically mediated hypertension, the mechanisms involved and their significance in the pathogenesis of hypertension remain unclear. We investigated the chronic interactions of these reflexes in dogs with sympathetically mediated, obesity-induced hypertension based on the hypothesis that hypoxemia and tonic activation of carotid chemoreceptors may be associated with obesity. After 5 weeks on a high-fat diet, the animals experienced a 35% to 40% weight gain and increases in arterial pressure from 106±3 to 123±3 mm Hg and respiratory rate from 8±1 to 12±1 breaths/min along with hypoxemia (arterial partial pressure of oxygen=81±3 mm Hg) but eucapnia. During 7 days of carotid baroreflex activation by electric stimulation of the carotid sinus, tachypnea was attenuated, and hypertension was abolished before these variables returned to prestimulation values during a recovery period. After subsequent denervation of the carotid sinus region, respiratory rate decreased transiently in association with further sustained reductions in arterial partial pressure of oxygen (to 65±2 mm Hg) and substantial hypercapnia. Moreover, the severity of hypertension was attenuated from 125±2 to 116±3 mm Hg (45%-50% reduction). These findings suggest that hypoxemia may account for sustained stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors in obesity and that this activation leads to compensatory increases in ventilation and central sympathetic outflow that contributes to neurogenically mediated hypertension. Furthermore, the excitatory effects of chemoreceptor hyperactivity are abolished by chronic activation of the carotid baroreflex. PMID:27160198

  6. Poor left ventricular function is not a contraindication for robotic totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Atiq; Garcia, Jose; Deshpande, Seema; Fitzpatrick, Mollie; Odonkor, Patrick; Zimrin, David; Griffith, Bartley; Bonatti, Johannes

    2009-06-01

    Robotic technology has enabled performance of totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass grafting (TECABG). Published series on TECABG were primarily performed in low-risk patients, and little is known about the outcome after totally endoscopic coronary surgery in patients with severely impaired left ventricular function. We report successful endoscopic placement of a left internal mammary artery bypass graft to the left anterior descending artery using the daVinci robotic system in a patient with a severely reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. PMID:19546067

  7. Device for rapid quantification of human carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprenkle, J. M.; Eckberg, D. L.; Goble, R. L.; Schelhorn, J. J.; Halliday, H. C.

    1986-01-01

    A new device has been designed, constructed, and evaluated to characterize the human carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex response relation rapidly. This system was designed for study of reflex responses of astronauts before, during, and after space travel. The system comprises a new tightly sealing silicon rubber neck chamber, a stepping motor-driven electrodeposited nickel bellows pressure system, capable of delivering sequential R-wave-triggered neck chamber pressure changes between +40 and -65 mmHg, and a microprocessor-based electronics system for control of pressure steps and analysis and display of responses. This new system provokes classic sigmoid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses with threshold, linear, and saturation ranges in most human volunteers during one held expiration.

  8. Rab25 influences functional Cav1.2 channel surface expression in arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bannister, John P; Bulley, Simon; Leo, M Dennis; Kidd, Michael W; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2016-06-01

    Plasma membrane-localized CaV1.2 channels are the primary calcium (Ca(2+)) influx pathway in arterial smooth muscle cells (myocytes). CaV1.2 channels regulate several cellular functions, including contractility and gene expression, but the trafficking pathways that control the surface expression of these proteins are unclear. Similarly, expression and physiological functions of small Rab GTPases, proteins that control vesicular trafficking in arterial myocytes, are poorly understood. Here, we investigated Rab proteins that control functional surface abundance of CaV1.2 channels in cerebral artery myocytes. Western blotting indicated that Rab25, a GTPase previously associated with apical recycling endosomes, is expressed in cerebral artery myocytes. Immunofluorescence Förster resonance energy transfer (immunoFRET) microscopy demonstrated that Rab25 locates in close spatial proximity to CaV1.2 channels in myocytes. Rab25 knockdown using siRNA reduced CaV1.2 surface and intracellular abundance in arteries, as determined using arterial biotinylation. In contrast, CaV1.2 was not located nearby Rab11A or Rab4 and CaV1.2 protein was unaltered by Rab11A or Rab4A knockdown. Rab25 knockdown resulted in CaV1.2 degradation by a mechanism involving both lysosomal and proteasomal pathways and reduced whole cell CaV1.2 current density but did not alter voltage dependence of current activation or inactivation in isolated myocytes. Rab25 knockdown also inhibited depolarization (20-60 mM K(+)) and pressure-induced vasoconstriction (myogenic tone) in cerebral arteries. These data indicate that Rab25 is expressed in arterial myocytes where it promotes surface expression of CaV1.2 channels to control pressure- and depolarization-induced vasoconstriction. PMID:27076616

  9. Functional Prostacyclin Synthase Promoter Polymorphisms. Impact in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Amber R.; Lu, Xiao; Conklin, David S.; Del Rosario, Mark J.; Lowe, Anita M.; Elos, Mihret T.; Fettig, Lynsey M.; Wong, Randall E.; Hara, Naoko; Cogan, Joy D.; Phillips, John A.; Taylor, Matthew R.; Graham, Brian B.; Tuder, Rubin M.; Loyd, James E.; Geraci, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease characterized by elevated pulmonary artery pressure, vascular remodeling, and ultimately right ventricular heart failure. PAH can have a genetic component (heritable PAH), most often through mutations of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2, and idiopathic and associated forms. Heritable PAH is not completely penetrant within families, with approximately 20% concurrence of inactivating bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 mutations and delayed onset of PAH disease. Because one of the treatment options is using prostacyclin analogs, we hypothesized that prostacyclin synthase promoter sequence variants associated with increased mRNA expression may play a protective role in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 unaffected carriers. Objectives: To characterize the range of prostacyclin synthase promoter variants and assess their transcriptional activities in PAH-relevant cell types. To determine the distribution of prostacyclin synthase promoter variants in PAH, unaffected carriers in heritable PAH families, and control populations. Methods: Polymerase chain reaction approaches were used to genotype prostacyclin synthase promoter variants in more than 300 individuals. Prostacyclin synthase promoter haplotypes’ transcriptional activities were determined with luciferase reporter assays. Measurements and Main Results: We identified a comprehensive set of prostacyclin synthase promoter variants and tested their transcriptional activities in PAH-relevant cell types. We demonstrated differences of prostacyclin synthase promoter activities dependent on their haplotype. Conclusions: Prostacyclin synthase promoter sequence variants exhibit a range of transcriptional activities. We discovered a significant bias for more active prostacyclin synthase promoter variants in unaffected carriers as compared with affected patients with PAH. PMID:24605778

  10. Age-associated Pro-inflammatory Remodeling and Functional Phenotype in the Heart and Large Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyi; Shah, Ajay M

    2015-01-01

    The aging population is increasing dramatically. Aging–associated stress simultaneously drives proinflammatory remodeling, involving angiotensin II and other factors, in both the heart and large arteries. The structural remodeling and functional changes that occur with aging include cardiac and vascular wall stiffening, systolic hypertension and suboptimal ventricular-arterial coupling, features that are often clinically silent and thus termed a silent syndrome. These age-related effects are the result of responses initiated by cardiovascular proinflammatory cells. Local proinflammatory signals are coupled between the heart and arteries due to common mechanical and humoral messengers within a closed circulating system. Thus, targeting proinflammatory signaling molecules would be a promising approach to improve age-associated suboptimal ventricular-arterial coupling, a major predisposing factor for the pathogenesis of clinical cardiovascular events such as heart failure. PMID:25665458

  11. Effects of cranberry juice consumption on vascular function in patients with coronary artery disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cranberry juice contains polyphenolic compounds that could improve endothelial function and reduce cardiovascular disease risk. The objective was to examine the effects of cranberry juice on vascular function in subjects with coronary artery disease. We completed an acute pilot study with no placebo...

  12. Hemodynamics and right-ventricle functional characteristics of a swine carotid artery-jugular vein shunt model of pulmonary arterial hypertension: An 18-month experimental study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji; Luo, Xiaoju; Huang, Yuanyuan; He, Yun; Li, Zhixian

    2015-10-01

    The continuous changes in pulmonary hemodynamic properties and right ventricular (RV) function in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have not been fully characterized in large animal model of PAH induced by a carotid artery-jugular vein shunt. A minipig model of PAH was induced by a surgical anastomosis between the left common carotid artery and the left jugular vein. The model was validated by catheter examination and pathologic analyses, and the hemodynamic features and right-ventricle functional characteristics of the model were continuously observed by Doppler echocardiography. Of the 45 minipigs who received the surgery, 27 survived and were validated as models of PAH, reflected by mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mmHg, and typical pathologic changes of pulmonary arterial remodeling and RV fibrosis. Non-invasive indices of pulmonary hemodynamics (pulmonary artery accelerating time and its ratio to RV ventricular ejection time) were temporarily increased, then reduced later, similar to changes in tricuspid annular displacement. The Tei index of the RV was elevated, indicating a progressive impairment in RV function. Surgical anastomosis between carotid artery and jugular vein in a minipig is effective to establish PAH, and non-invasive hemodynamic and right-ventricle functional indices measured by Doppler echocardiography may be used as early indicators of PAH. PMID:25595189

  13. Reduced baroreceptor sensitivity during hypotension in ANP-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, U; Deliva, R D

    2001-03-01

    We studied baroreflex gain in inactin-anesthetized mice that had been genetically modified to be depleted of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP -/-). Wild-type mice (ANP +/+) served as controls. ANP -/- mice had a significantly higher basal arterial blood pressure (ABP) than ANP +/+ mice [112+/-7 vs. 80+/-5 mmHg (mean +/- SEM)]. Their basal heart rates were not different (491+/-13 vs. 446+/-19 bpm). A third group, composed of ANP +/+ mice only, was rendered acutely hypertensive by an intravenous infusion of arginine vasopressin acetate (0.3 pg bolus followed by 0.3 pg/h) so as to serve as a control for the elevated ABP in the ANP -/- mice. Transient changes in ABP were caused by bolus injections of oxymetazoline hydrochloride (1.5-3 ng) or sodium nitroprusside (20-100 ng). Baroreflex gain was calculated as the ratio of the peak heart rate change that followed the peak change in mean ABP resulting from injection of oxymetazoline or nitroprusside. There were no significant differences among the groups in their responses to transient hypertension. On the other hand, the ANP -/- mice showed a significantly depressed tachycardic response to transient hypotension when compared with the other two groups. We conclude that the ANP -/- mice are unable to increase efferent sympathetic nervous activity adequately above the high basal activity that is a feature of this animal model. PMID:11294595

  14. Effect of posture on arterial baroreflex control of heart rate in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, M. H.; Rittenhouse, D.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of blood-volume redistribution induced by postural changes on baroreflex activity are investigated. The central blood volume and baroreceptor functions of ten males between 23-51 years old were examined while they were in the head-up tilt (HUT), head-down tilt (HDT), and supine positions. It is observed that during HDT at 15 deg the pulse interval over the first five cardiac cycles following neck suction onset is 51 + or - 18 ms longer, at 30 deg it is 61 + or - 20 ms longer, and at 45 deg it is 74 + or - 35 ms longer than at supine; during HUT at 15 deg the pulse interval is 25 + or - 9 ms shorter than when supine, but for the 30 and 45 deg there is no significant difference in pulse interval detected. The data reveal that posture does modify arterial baroreflex control of heart rate.

  15. Oral trehalose supplementation improves resistance artery endothelial function in healthy middle-aged and older adults.

    PubMed

    Kaplon, Rachelle E; Hill, Sierra D; Bispham, Nina Z; Santos-Parker, Jessica R; Nowlan, Molly J; Snyder, Laura L; Chonchol, Michel; LaRocca, Thomas J; McQueen, Matthew B; Seals, Douglas R

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesized that supplementation with trehalose, a disaccharide that reverses arterial aging in mice, would improve vascular function in middle-aged and older (MA/O) men and women. Thirty-two healthy adults aged 50-77 years consumed 100 g/day of trehalose (n=15) or maltose (n=17, isocaloric control) for 12 weeks (randomized, double-blind). In subjects with Δbody mass less than 2.3kg (5 lb.), resistance artery endothelial function, assessed by forearm blood flow to brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine (FBFACh), increased ~30% with trehalose (13.3±1.0 vs. 10.5±1.1 AUC, P=0.02), but not maltose (P=0.40). This improvement in FBFACh was abolished when endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production was inhibited. Endothelium-independent dilation, assessed by FBF to sodium nitroprusside (FBFSNP), also increased ~30% with trehalose (155±13 vs. 116±12 AUC, P=0.03) but not maltose (P=0.92). Changes in FBFACh and FBFSNP with trehalose were not significant when subjects with Δbody mass ≥ 2.3kg were included. Trehalose supplementation had no effect on conduit artery endothelial function, large elastic artery stiffness or circulating markers of oxidative stress or inflammation (all P>0.1) independent of changes in body weight. Our findings demonstrate that oral trehalose improves resistance artery (microvascular) function, a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, in MA/O adults, possibly through increasing NO bioavailability and smooth muscle sensitivity to NO. PMID:27208415

  16. Oral trehalose supplementation improves resistance artery endothelial function in healthy middle-aged and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Kaplon, Rachelle E.; Hill, Sierra D.; Bispham, Nina Z.; Santos-Parker, Jessica R.; Nowlan, Molly J.; Snyder, Laura L.; Chonchol, Michel; LaRocca, Thomas J.; McQueen, Matthew B.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that supplementation with trehalose, a disaccharide that reverses arterial aging in mice, would improve vascular function in middle-aged and older (MA/O) men and women. Thirty-two healthy adults aged 50-77 years consumed 100 g/day of trehalose (n=15) or maltose (n=17, isocaloric control) for 12 weeks (randomized, double-blind). In subjects with Δbody mass<2.3kg (5 lb.), resistance artery endothelial function, assessed by forearm blood flow to brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine (FBFACh), increased ∼30% with trehalose (13.3±1.0 vs. 10.5±1.1 AUC, P=0.02), but not maltose (P=0.40). This improvement in FBFACh was abolished when endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production was inhibited. Endothelium-independent dilation, assessed by FBF to sodium nitroprusside (FBFSNP), also increased ∼30% with trehalose (155±13 vs. 116±12 AUC, P=0.03) but not maltose (P=0.92). Changes in FBFACh and FBFSNP with trehalose were not significant when subjects with Δbody mass≥2.3kg were included. Trehalose supplementation had no effect on conduit artery endothelial function, large elastic artery stiffness or circulating markers of oxidative stress or inflammation (all P>0.1) independent of changes in body weight. Our findings demonstrate that oral trehalose improves resistance artery (microvascular) function, a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, in MA/O adults, possibly through increasing NO bioavailability and smooth muscle sensitivity to NO. PMID:27208415

  17. Off-pump versus on-pump coronary artery revascularization: effects on pulmonary function.

    PubMed

    e Silva, Ana M R P; Saad, Roberto; Stirbulov, Roberto; Rivetti, Luiz A

    2010-07-01

    Many studies have shown important changes in lung function tests after coronary artery surgeries. It is controversial if off-pump surgery can give a better and shorter recovery than the on-pump. A prospective study was conducted on 42 patients submitted to coronary artery surgery and divided into two groups: 21 off-pump using intraluminal shunt (G (I)) and 21 on-pump (G (II)), matched by the anatomical location of the coronary arteries lesions. All patients had spirometric evaluation, blood gas measurements and alveolo-arterial oxygen gradient (A-aDO(2)), at the fourth and 10th postoperative days (PO(4) and PO(10)). Preoperatively, G(I) and G(II) had similar results (P>0.372). Spirometry showed decreases at PO(4) and remained decreased until PO(10) for both groups, with significant differences between the groups. The blood gas measurements showed reduction in arterial oxygen pressure (PaO(2)) and carbon dioxide pressure (PaCO(2)), while there was an increase in A-aDO(2) at PO(4) and PO(10) in both groups. The results suggest that different changes occur in pulmonary function when the surgery is performed with or without cardiopulmonary bypass. The off-pump patients showed significantly greater improvement than the on-pump group. PMID:20403972

  18. Association of Hypertension With Erectile Function in Chronic Peripheral Arterial Insufficiency Patients

    PubMed Central

    Spessoto, Luis Cesar Fava; Facio, Fernando Nestor; de Arruda, Jose Germano Ferraz; Arruda, Pedro Francisco F.; Gatti, Marcio; Antoniassi, Thiago Silveira; Facio, Maria Fernanda Warick; de Godoy, Jose Maria Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Background Risk factors may influence the improvement or worsening of erectile dysfunction (ED). The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of systemic hypertension on ED in patients with peripheral arterial disease. Methods The effect of hypertension on ED was assessed in 125 consecutive patients in a cross-sectional quantitative study. The ages of the patients ranged from 19 to 88 years old (mean: 59.82 ± 10.48 years). The only exclusion criterion was the amputation of one or both legs. The ankle-arm index was assessed and the international index of ED questionnaire was applied to all participants in the study. Results Of the 125 patients, 22 (17.6%) had mild (grade 1), 50 (40.0%) had moderate (grade 2) and 53 (42.4%) had severe (grade 3) ED. Hypertensive patients have more ED, with ED in hypertensive patients being associated to chronic arterial disease. However, in comparison with normotensive patients, hypertension exerts an immediate protective effect on erectile function. Conclusions In conclusion, although erectile function is initially protected by systemic arterial hypertension in patients with chronic arterial disease, both chronic arterial disease and ED deteriorate over the long term in hypertensive patients. PMID:27429678

  19. Correlation of CT cerebral vascular territories with function. 3. Middle cerebral artery

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S.A.; Hayman, L.A.; Hinck, V.C.

    1984-05-01

    Schematic displays are presented of the cerebral territories supplied by branches of the middle cerebral artery as they would appear on axial and coronal computed tomographic (CT) scan sections. Companion diagrams of regional cortical function and a discussion of the fiber tracts are provided to simplify correlation of clinical deficits with coronal and axial CT abnormalities.

  20. Effect of age on left ventricular function during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hakki, A.H.; DePace, N.L.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1983-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of age on left ventricular performance during exercise in 79 patients with coronary artery disease (greater than or equal to 50% narrowing of one or more major coronary arteries). Fifty patients under the age of 60 years (group I) and 29 patients 60 years or older (group II) were studied. Radionuclide angiograms were obtained at rest and during symptom-limited upright bicycle exercise. The history of hypertension, angina or Q wave myocardial infarction was similar in both groups. Multivessel coronary artery disease was present in 30 patients (60%) in group I and in 19 patients (66%) in group II (p . not significant). There were no significant differences between the two groups in the hemodynamic variables (at rest or during exercise) of left ventricular ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and cardiac index. Exercise tolerance was higher in group I than in group II (7.8 +/- 0.4 versus 5.7 +/- 0.4 minutes, p . 0.009), although the exercise heart rate and rate-pressure product were not significantly different between the groups. There was poor correlation between age and ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume and end-systolic volume at rest and during exercise. Abnormal left ventricular function at rest or an abnormal response to exercise was noted in 42 patients (84%) in group I and in 25 patients (86%) in group II (p . not significant). Thus, in patients with coronary artery disease, age does not influence left ventricular function at rest or response to exercise. Older patients with coronary artery disease show changes in left ventricular function similar to those in younger patients with corresponding severity of coronary artery disease.

  1. Modification of sympathetic neuronal function in the rat tail artery by dietary lipid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Panek, R.L.; Dixon, W.R.; Rutledge, C.O.

    1985-06-01

    The effect of dietary lipid treatment on sympathetic neuronal function was examined in isolated perfused tail arteries of adult rats. The hypothesis that dietary manipulations alter the lipid environment of receptor proteins which may result in the perturbation of specific membrane-associated processes that regulate peripheral adrenergic neurotransmission in the vasculature was the basis for this investigation. In the present study, rats were fed semisynthetic diets enriched in either 16% coconut oil (saturated fat) or 16% sunflower oil (unsaturated fat). The field stimulation-evoked release of endogenous norepinephrine and total /sup 3/H was decreased significantly in rats receiving the coconut oil diet when compared to either sunflower oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats. Norepinephrine content in artery segments from coconut oil-treated rats was significantly higher compared to either sunflower oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats. Tail arteries from rats receiving the coconut oil diet displayed significantly lower perfusion pressure responses to nerve stimulation at all frequencies tested when compared to the sunflower oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats. Vasoconstrictor responses of perfused tail arteries exposed to exogenous norepinephrine resulted in an EC50 for norepinephrine that was not changed by the dietary treatment, but adult rats receiving the sunflower oil diet displayed a significantly greater maximum response to exogenous norepinephrine (10(-5) M) compared to arteries from either coconut oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats.

  2. Muscle metaboreceptors modulate postexercise sweating, but not cutaneous blood flow, independent of baroreceptor loading status.

    PubMed

    Paull, Gabrielle; Dervis, Sheila; McGinn, Ryan; Haqani, Baies; Flouris, Andreas D; Kondo, Narihiko; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-12-01

    We examined whether sustained changes in baroreceptor loading status during prolonged postexercise recovery can alter the metaboreceptors' influence on heat loss. Thirteen young males performed a 1-min isometric handgrip exercise (IHG) at 60% maximal voluntary contraction followed by 2 min of forearm ischemia (to activate metaboreceptors) before and 15, 30, 45, and 60 min after a 15-min intense treadmill running exercise (>90% maximal heart rate) in the heat (35°C). This was repeated on three separate days with continuous lower body positive (LBPP, +40 mmHg), negative (LBNP, -20 mmHg), or no pressure (Control) from 13- to 65-min postexercise. Sweat rate (ventilated capsule; forearm, chest, upper back) and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; forearm, upper back) were measured. Relative to pre-IHG levels, sweating at all sites increased during IHG and remained elevated during ischemia at baseline and similarly at 30, 45, and 60 min postexercise (site average sweat rate increase during ischemia: Control, 0.13 ± 0.02; LBPP, 0.12 ± 0.02; LBNP, 0.15 ± 0.02 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2); all P < 0.01), but not at 15 min (all P > 0.10). LBPP and LBNP did not modulate the pattern of sweating to IHG and ischemia (all P > 0.05). At 15-min postexercise, forearm CVC was reduced from pre-IHG levels during both IHG and ischemia under LBNP only (ischemia: 3.9 ± 0.8% CVCmax; P < 0.02). Therefore, we show metaboreceptors increase postexercise sweating in the middle to late stages of recovery (30-60 min), independent of baroreceptor loading status and similarly between skin sites. In contrast, metaboreflex modulation of forearm but not upper back CVC occurs only in the early stages of recovery (15 min) and is dependent upon baroreceptor unloading. PMID:26377560

  3. Assessments of endothelial function and arterial stiffness are reproducible in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Miguelez, Paula; Seigler, Nichole; Bass, Leon; Dillard, Thomas A; Harris, Ryan A

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated cardiovascular disease risk is observed in patients with COPD. Non-invasive assessments of endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness have recently emerged to provide mechanistic insight into cardiovascular disease risk in COPD; however, the reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness has yet to be investigated in this patient population. Objectives This study sought to examine the within-day and between-day reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with COPD. Methods Baseline diameter, peak diameter, flow-mediated dilation, augmentation index, augmentation index at 75 beats per minute, and pulse wave velocity were assessed three times in 17 patients with COPD (six males, eleven females, age range 47–75 years old; forced expiratory volume in 1 second =51.5% predicted). Session A and B were separated by 3 hours (within-day), whereas session C was conducted at least 7 days following session B (between-day). Reproducibility was assessed by: 1) paired t-tests, 2) coefficients of variation, 3) coefficients of variation prime, 4) intra-class correlation coefficient, 5) Pearson’s correlations (r), and 6) Bland–Altman plots. Five acceptable assessments were required to confirm reproducibility. Results Six out of six within-day criteria were met for endothelial function and arterial stiffness outcomes. Six out of six between-day criteria were met for baseline and peak diameter, augmentation index and pulse wave velocity, whereas five out of six criteria were met for flow-mediated dilation. Conclusion The present study provides evidence for within-day and between-day reproducibility of endothelial function and arterial stiffness in patients with COPD. PMID:26396509

  4. Automated Determination of Arterial Input Function for Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI from Regions around Arteries Using Independent Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jui-Jen; Chang, Chin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurement using dynamic susceptibility contrast- (DSC-) MRI requires accurate estimation of the arterial input function (AIF). The present work utilized the independent component analysis (ICA) method to determine the AIF in the regions adjacent to the middle cerebral artery (MCA) by the alleviated confounding of partial volume effect. Materials and Methods. A series of spin-echo EPI MR scans were performed in 10 normal subjects. All subjects received 0.2 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA contrast agent. AIFs were calculated by two methods: (1) the region of interest (ROI) selected manually and (2) weighted average of each component selected by ICA (weighted-ICA). The singular value decomposition (SVD) method was then employed to deconvolve the AIF from the tissue concentration time curve to obtain quantitative CBF values. Results. The CBF values calculated by the weighted-ICA method were 41.1 ± 4.9 and 22.1 ± 2.3 mL/100 g/min for cortical gray matter (GM) and deep white matter (WM) regions, respectively. The CBF values obtained based on the manual ROIs were 53.6 ± 12.0 and 27.9 ± 5.9 mL/100 g/min for the same two regions, respectively. Conclusion. The weighted-ICA method allowed semiautomatic and straightforward extraction of the ROI adjacent to MCA. Through eliminating the partial volume effect to minimum, the CBF thus determined may reflect more accurate physical characteristics of the T2⁎ signal changes induced by the contrast agent. PMID:27547451

  5. Automated Determination of Arterial Input Function for Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI from Regions around Arteries Using Independent Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sharon; Tyan, Yu-Chang; Lai, Jui-Jen; Chang, Chin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurement using dynamic susceptibility contrast- (DSC-) MRI requires accurate estimation of the arterial input function (AIF). The present work utilized the independent component analysis (ICA) method to determine the AIF in the regions adjacent to the middle cerebral artery (MCA) by the alleviated confounding of partial volume effect. Materials and Methods. A series of spin-echo EPI MR scans were performed in 10 normal subjects. All subjects received 0.2 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA contrast agent. AIFs were calculated by two methods: (1) the region of interest (ROI) selected manually and (2) weighted average of each component selected by ICA (weighted-ICA). The singular value decomposition (SVD) method was then employed to deconvolve the AIF from the tissue concentration time curve to obtain quantitative CBF values. Results. The CBF values calculated by the weighted-ICA method were 41.1 ± 4.9 and 22.1 ± 2.3 mL/100 g/min for cortical gray matter (GM) and deep white matter (WM) regions, respectively. The CBF values obtained based on the manual ROIs were 53.6 ± 12.0 and 27.9 ± 5.9 mL/100 g/min for the same two regions, respectively. Conclusion. The weighted-ICA method allowed semiautomatic and straightforward extraction of the ROI adjacent to MCA. Through eliminating the partial volume effect to minimum, the CBF thus determined may reflect more accurate physical characteristics of the T2(⁎) signal changes induced by the contrast agent. PMID:27547451

  6. [Involvement of cross interaction between central cholinergic and histaminergic systems in the nucleus tractus solitarius in regulating carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex].

    PubMed

    Hu, Li-Xun; Zhang, Guo-Xing; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Zhao, Hong-Fen; Yu, Kang-Ying; Wang, Guo-Qing

    2013-12-25

    The carotid sinus baroreceptor reflex (CSR) is an important approach for regulating arterial blood pressure homeostasis instantaneously and physiologically. Activation of the central histaminergic or cholinergic systems results in CSR functional inhibitory resetting. However, it is unclear whether two systems at the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) level display cross interaction to regulate the CSR or not. In the present study, the left or right carotid sinus region was isolated from the systemic circulation in Sprague-Dawley rats (sinus nerve was reserved) anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium. Respective intubation was conducted into one side isolated carotid sinus and into the femoral artery for recording the intracarotid sinus pressure (ISP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) simultaneously with pressure transducers connection in vivo. ISP was set at the level of 0 mmHg to eliminate the effect of initial internal pressure of the carotid sinus on the CSR function. To trigger CSR, the ISP was quickly elevated from 0 mmHg to 280 mmHg in a stepwise manner (40 mmHg) which was added at every step for over 4 s, and then ISP returned to 0 mmHg in similar steps. The original data of ISP and corresponding MAP were fitted to a modified logistic equation with five parameters to obtain the ISP-MAP, ISP-Gain relationship curves and the CSR characteristic parameters, which were statistically compared and analyzed separately. Under the precondition of no influence on the basic levels of the artery blood pressure, the effects and potential regulatory mechanism of preceding microinjection with different cholinoceptor antagonists, the selective cholinergic M1 receptor antagonist, i.e., pirenzepine (PRZ), the M2 receptor antagonist, i.e., methoctramine (MTR) or the N1 receptor antagonist, i.e., hexamethonium (HEX) into the NTS on the changes in function of CSR induced by intracerebroventricular injection (i.c.v.) of histamine (HA) in rats were observed. Meanwhile, the actions and

  7. Serial assessment of arterial structure and function in patients with coarctation of the aorta undergoing stenting.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Carlos A; Assef, Jorge E; Pedra, Simone R F F; Ferreira, Waldinai P; Davoglio, Tathiane A; Petisco, Ana Cláudia G P; Saleh, Mohamed H; Le Bihan, David C S; Barretto, Rodrigo B M; Pedra, Carlos A C

    2016-05-01

    Stenting for CoA has become an acceptable treatment modality in the last 20 years. However little is known about arterial changes after this procedure. To assess arterial structure and function including peripheral reactivity and stiffness and intima-media thickness (IMT) pre and post stenting for coarctation of the aorta (CoA). Twenty-one patients [median age: 15 years (8-39)] were studied at baseline, 1 day, 6 months and 1 year after stenting. Twenty-one healthy subjects (1:1 matched) were used as controls. Left ventricular (LV) mass, ejection fraction, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and nitrate-mediated dilation (NMD) of left brachial artery, common carotid (CC) and right subclavian artery (RSCA) IMT and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were assessed by echocardiography and vascular ultrasound. CoA patients had higher LV indexed mass (p < 0.0001), impaired FMD (p < 0.0001) and NMD (p < 0.0001), increased PWV (p < 0.0001), carotid and RSCA IMT (both p < 0.0001). All procedures were successful and resulted in significant gradient reduction (p < 0.001). One year after stenting there was improvement in LV function (p = 0.034) and although there was significant reduction of LV mass (103.29 ± 24.77 vs. 74.39 ± 22.07 g/m(2), p < 0.0001) values did not normalize. There was no significant change in FMD, NMD, PWV and CC or RSCA IMT. In patients with CoA, arterial reactivity is impaired and LV mass, arterial stiffness and thickness are increased. Although stenting is successful to relieve the obstruction resulting in better LV function and mass reduction, arterial structure and function remains abnormal after 1 year of follow-up. PMID:26723574

  8. An adaptive transfer function for deriving the aortic pressure waveform from a peripheral artery pressure waveform.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Gokul; Xu, Da; Olivier, N Bari; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2009-11-01

    We developed a new technique to mathematically transform a peripheral artery pressure (PAP) waveform distorted by wave reflections into the physiologically more relevant aortic pressure (AP) waveform. First, a transfer function relating PAP to AP is defined in terms of the unknown parameters of a parallel tube model of pressure and flow in the arterial tree. The parameters are then estimated from the measured PAP waveform along with a one-time measurement of the wave propagation delay time between the aorta and peripheral artery measurement site (which may be accomplished noninvasively) by exploiting preknowledge of aortic flow. Finally, the transfer function with its estimated parameters is applied to the measured waveform so as to derive the AP waveform. Thus, in contrast to the conventional generalized transfer function, the transfer function is able to adapt to the intersubject and temporal variability of the arterial tree. To demonstrate the feasibility of this adaptive transfer function technique, we performed experiments in 6 healthy dogs in which PAP and reference AP waveforms were simultaneously recorded during 12 different hemodynamic interventions. The AP waveforms derived by the technique showed agreement with the measured AP waveforms (overall total waveform, systolic pressure, and pulse pressure root mean square errors of 3.7, 4.3, and 3.4 mmHg, respectively) statistically superior to the unprocessed PAP waveforms (corresponding errors of 8.6, 17.1, and 20.3 mmHg) and the AP waveforms derived by two previously proposed transfer functions developed with a subset of the same canine data (corresponding errors of, on average, 5.0, 6.3, and 6.7 mmHg). PMID:19783780

  9. Metabotropic glutamate receptors depress vagal and aortic baroreceptor signal transmission in the NTS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Chen, C Y; Bonham, A C

    1998-11-01

    We sought to determine whether metabotropic glutamate receptors contribute to frequency-dependent depression of vagal and aortic baroreceptor signal transmission in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in vivo. In alpha-chloralose-anesthetized rabbits, we determined the number of extracellular action potentials synaptically evoked by low (1 Hz)- or high-frequency vagal (3-20 Hz) or aortic depressor nerve (ADN) (6-80 Hz) stimulation and postsynaptically evoked by the ionotropic glutamate receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). The metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (2S,1'S, 2'S)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-I) attenuated NTS responses monosynaptically evoked by 1-Hz vagus stimulation by 34% (n = 25; P = 0.011), while augmenting AMPA-evoked responses by 64% (n = 17; P = 0.026). The metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) did not affect NTS responses to low-frequency vagal stimulation (n = 11) or AMPA (n = 10) but augmented responses to high-frequency stimulation by 50% (n = 25; P = 0.0001). MPPG also augmented NTS responses to high-frequency ADN stimulation by 35% (n = 9; P = 0.048) but did not affect responses to low-frequency stimulation (n = 9) or AMPA (n = 7). The results suggest that metabotropic glutamate receptors, presumably at presynaptic sites, contribute to frequency-dependent depression of vagal and aortic baroreceptor signal transmission in NTS. PMID:9815076

  10. Endothelin receptor subtypes and their functional relevance in human small coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Pierre, Lisa N; Davenport, Anthony P

    1998-01-01

    The potent constrictor peptide endothelin (ET) has been implicated in various cardiovascular disorders including myocardial infarction and atherosclerosis. We have investigated the nature of ET receptor subtypes present on human small coronary arteries.Small coronary arteries were mounted in a wire-myograph for in vitro pharmacology. To investigate the ET receptor subtypes present in different segments of the coronary vascular tree, arteries were grouped according to internal diameter. Responses in arteries with small internal diameters (mean 316.7±7.9 μm; Group B) were compared to those in larger arteries (mean 586.2±23.1 μm; Group A).ET-1 consistently and potently contracted arteries from Group A and B, with EC50 values of 1.7 (0.9–3.2) nM (n=15) and 2.3 (1.4–4.2) nM (n=14), respectively. No correlation was observed between ET-1 potency and internal diameter. The response to ET-1 was potently antagonized by the selective ETA receptor antagonist PD156707 in both Group A and Group B, yielding pA2 values of 8.60±0.12 (n=4–6) and 8.38±0.17 (n=4–6), respectively. Slopes from Schild regression were not significantly different from unity.In contrast to ET-1, individual responses to ET-3 were variable. While all arteries from Group A responded to ET-3 (EC50∼69 (23–210) nM) (n=12), no response was obtained in 5 of the 14 tested in Group B. Of those responding, many failed to reach a maximum at concentrations up to 1 μM. ET-1 was more potent than ET-3 in all arteries tested. A biphasic ET-3 response was observed in 8 arteries suggesting that a small ETB population was also present in some patients. The selective ETB receptor agonist sarafotoxin S6c had little or no effect up to 10 nM (n=4–6).Responses to ET-1 and ET-3 were unaffected by removal of the endothelium in arteries from both groups suggesting a lack of functional, relaxant ETB receptors on endothelial cells (n=5).Using autoradiography, specific high density binding of the non

  11. Two functional polymorphisms of ROCK2 enhance arterial stiffening through inhibiting its activity and expression

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yi-Chu; Liu, Ping-Yen; Lin, Hsiu-Fen; Lin, Wen-Yi; Liao, James K.; Juo, Suh-Hang H.

    2016-01-01

    Derangement of Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs) has been related to coronary artery disease and stroke. ROCK2, rather than ROCK1, plays a predominant role in vascular contractility. The present study aims to test (1) the associations between ROCK2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and arterial stiffness, and (2) the molecular mechanism accounting for their effects. Stiffness parameters including beta (β), elasticity modulus (Ep) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were obtained by carotid ultrasonography. Seven tagging SNPs of ROCK2 were initially genotyped in 856 subjects and significant SNPs were replicated in another group of 527 subjects. Two SNPs in complete linkage disequilibrium were found to be significantly associated with arterial stiffness. The major alleles of rs978906 (A allele) and rs9808232 (C allele) were associated with stiffer arteries. SNP rs978906 was predicted to influence microRNA(miR)-1183 binding to ROCK2, while rs9808232 causes amino acid substitution. To determine their functional impact, plasmid constructs carrying different alleles of the significant SNPs were created. Compared to rs978906G-allele constructs, cells transfected with rs978906A-allele constructs had higher baseline luciferase activities and were less responsive to miR-1183 changes. Oxidized-low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) suppressed miR-1183 levels and increased ROCK2 protein amounts. For rs9808232, cells transfected with C-allele constructs had significantly higher ROCK activities than those with A-allele constructs. Leukocyte ROCK activities were further measured in 52 healthy subjects. The average ROCK activity was highest in human subjects with CC genotype at rs9808232, followed by those with AC and lowest in AA. Taken together, the present study showed that two functional SNPs of ROCK2 increase susceptibility of arterial stiffness in the Chinese population. Non-synonymous SNP rs9808232 influences ROCK2 activity, while 3' UTR SNP rs978906 affects the ROCK2 protein

  12. Sox7 controls arterial specification in conjunction with hey2 and efnb2 function.

    PubMed

    Hermkens, Dorien M A; van Impel, Andreas; Urasaki, Akihiro; Bussmann, Jeroen; Duckers, Henricus J; Schulte-Merker, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    SoxF family members have been linked to arterio-venous specification events and human pathological conditions, but in contrast to Sox17 and Sox18, a detailed in vivo analysis of a Sox7 mutant model is still lacking. In this study we generated zebrafish sox7 mutants to understand the role of Sox7 during vascular development. By in vivo imaging of transgenic zebrafish lines we show that sox7 mutants display a short circulatory loop around the heart as a result of aberrant connections between the lateral dorsal aorta (LDA) and either the venous primary head sinus (PHS) or the common cardinal vein (CCV). In situ hybridization and live observations in flt4:mCitrine transgenic embryos revealed increased expression levels of flt4 in arterial endothelial cells at the exact location of the aberrant vascular connections in sox7 mutants. An identical circulatory short loop could also be observed in newly generated mutants for hey2 and efnb2. By genetically modulating levels of sox7, hey2 and efnb2 we demonstrate a genetic interaction of sox7 with hey2 and efnb2. The specific spatially confined effect of loss of Sox7 function can be rescued by overexpressing the Notch intracellular domain (NICD) in arterial cells of sox7 mutants, placing Sox7 upstream of Notch in this aspect of arterial development. Hence, sox7 levels are crucial in arterial specification in conjunction with hey2 and efnb2 function, with mutants in all three genes displaying shunt formation and an arterial block. PMID:25834021

  13. Platelet Consumption by Arterial Prostheses: The Effects of Endothelialization and Pharmacologic Inhibition of Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Harker, Laurence A.; Slichter, Sherrill J.; Sauvage, Lester R.

    1977-01-01

    The thrombogenic mechanism of arterial grafts has been studied by determining the relative utilization of platelets, fibrinogen and plasminogen by human arterial prostheses, and by direct examination of arterial grafts in a baboon model. Forty-one survival and turnover measurements of 51Crplatelets, 131I-fibrinogen and 125I-plasminogen in ten patients with aortofemoral knitted Dacron prostheses demonstrated platelet consumption after graft placement (platelet survival 4.2 days ± 0.5 and turnover 68,000 plat/ul/day ±10,000 compared with 8.2 days ± 0.3 and 35,000 plat/ul/day ± 5,000 respectively for control subjects with stable vascular disease, p < 0.01). In vitro platelet function test results were normal. Platelet consumption was interrupted by dipyridamole or a combination of dipyridamole and acetylsalicylic acid, and platelet survival normalized spontaneously during nine months postoperatively. No significantly increased consumption of fibrinogen or plasminogen was found in these patients with arterial grafts. Placement of impervious knitted Dacron velour aortic grafts in baboons reproduced platelet consumption that progressively normalized over six weeks postoperatively. Platelet survival measurements correlated directly with endothelial cell coverage of the graft luminal surface in these animals implying that endothelialization of the graft surface was also occurring postoperatively in patients. ImagesFig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:411428

  14. Determinants of Functional and Structural Properties of Large Arteries in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Tolezani, Elaine Cristina; Costa-Hong, Valéria; Correia, Gustavo; Mansur, Alfredo José; Drager, Luciano Ferreira; Bortolotto, Luiz Aparecido

    2014-01-01

    Background Changes in the properties of large arteries correlate with higher cardiovascular risk. Recent guidelines have included the assessment of those properties to detect subclinical disease. Establishing reference values for the assessment methods as well as determinants of the arterial parameters and their correlations in healthy individuals is important to stratify patients. Objective To assess, in healthy adults, the distribution of the values of pulse wave velocity, diameter, intima-media thickness and relative distensibility of the carotid artery, in addition to assessing the demographic and clinical determinants of those parameters and their correlations. Methods This study evaluated 210 individuals (54% women; mean age, 44 ± 13 years) with no evidence of cardiovascular disease. The carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was measured with a Complior® device. The functional and structural properties of the carotid artery were assessed by using radiofrequency ultrasound. Results The means of the following parameters were: pulse wave velocity, 8.7 ± 1.5 m/s; diameter, 6,707.9 ± 861.6 μm; intima-media thickness, 601 ± 131 μm; relative distensibility, 5.3 ± 2.1%. No significant difference related to sex or ethnicity was observed. On multiple linear logistic regression, the factors independently related to the vascular parameters were: pulse wave velocity, to age (p < 0.01) and triglycerides (p = 0.02); intima-media thickness, to age (p < 0.01); diameter, to creatinine (p = 0.03) and age (p = 0.02); relative distensibility, to age (p < 0.01) and systolic and diastolic blood pressures (p = 0.02 and p = 0.01, respectively). Pulse wave velocity showed a positive correlation with intima media thickness (p < 0.01) and with relative distensibility (p < 0.01), while diameter showed a positive correlation with distensibility (p = 0.03). Conclusion In healthy individuals, age was the major factor related to aortic stiffness, while age and diastolic blood pressure

  15. Relationship between occupational exposure to lead and local arterial stiffness and left ventricular diastolic function in individuals with arterial hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Poreba, Rafal; Gac, Pawel; Poreba, Malgorzata; Antonowicz-Juchniewicz, Jolanta; Andrzejak, Ryszard

    2011-08-01

    Relationship between occupational exposure to lead and frequency of complications in persons with arterial hypertension has been poorly investigated. This study aimed at evaluation of the relationship between occupational exposure to lead and manifestation of an increased local arterial stiffness and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. The studies included 105 men (mean age: 44.47 {+-} 9.12 years) with arterial hypertension, treated with hypotensive drugs: group I - men occupationally exposed to lead (n = 53), and group II - men not exposed to lead (n = 52). In echocardiographic examination, the left ventricular diastolic dysfunction was diagnosed significantly more frequently in group I than in group II. In eTracking examination mean values of stiffness parameter ({beta}), augmentation index (AI) and one-point pulse wave velocity (PWV-{beta}) were significantly higher and mean values of arterial compliance (AC) were significantly lower in group I than in group II. The logistic regression showed that in the group of persons with arterial hypertension occupationally exposed to lead a more advanced age, higher blood lead concentration and higher mean values of augmentation index represent independent risk factors of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. The multifactorial regression showed that amongst persons with arterial hypertension occupationally exposed to lead higher blood zinc protoporphyrin concentration, a more advanced age and higher value of body mass index (BMI) represent independent risk factors of an increased local arterial stiffness. In summary, we should note that in the group of persons with arterial hypertension occupationally exposed to lead the study has demonstrated a significantly more frequent manifestation of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and an increase in local arterial stiffness. - Highlights: > Amongst persons with AH exposed to Pb higher ZnPP represent independent risk factor of increased local arterial stiffness

  16. Acute effects of self-myofascial release using a foam roller on arterial function.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Takanobu; Masuhara, Mitsuhiko; Ikuta, Komei

    2014-01-01

    Flexibility is associated with arterial distensibility. Many individuals involved in sport, exercise, and/or fitness perform self-myofascial release (SMR) using a foam roller, which restores muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, and/or soft-tissue extensibility. However, the effect of SMR on arterial stiffness and vascular endothelial function using a foam roller is unknown. This study investigates the acute effect of SMR using a foam roller on arterial stiffness and vascular endothelial function. Ten healthy young adults performed SMR and control (CON) trials on separate days in a randomized controlled crossover fashion. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), blood pressure, heart rate, and plasma nitric oxide (NO) concentration were measured before and 30 minutes after both SMR and CON trials. The participants performed SMR of the adductor, hamstrings, quadriceps, iliotibial band, and trapezius. Pressure was self-adjusted during myofascial release by applying body weight to the roller and using the hands and feet to offset weight as required. The roller was placed under the target tissue area, and the body was moved back and forth across the roller. In the CON trial, SMR was not performed. The baPWV significantly decreased (from 1,202 ± 105 to 1,074 ± 110 cm·s-1) and the plasma NO concentration significantly increased (from 20.4 ± 6.9 to 34.4 ± 17.2 μmol·L-1) after SMR using a foam roller (both p < 0.05), but neither significantly differed after CON trials. These results indicate that SMR using a foam roller reduces arterial stiffness and improves vascular endothelial function. PMID:23575360

  17. Effect of periodontal therapy on arterial structure and function among aboriginal australians: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kapellas, Kostas; Maple-Brown, Louise J; Jamieson, Lisa M; Do, Loc G; O'Dea, Kerin; Brown, Alex; Cai, Tommy Y; Anstey, Nicholas M; Sullivan, David R; Wang, Hao; Celermajer, David S; Slade, Gary D; Skilton, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    Observational studies and nonrandomized trials support an association between periodontal disease and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Both diseases occur frequently in Aboriginal Australians. We hypothesized that nonsurgical periodontal therapy would improve measures of arterial function and structure that are subclinical indicators of atherosclerotic vascular disease. This parallel-group, randomized, open label clinical trial enrolled 273 Aboriginal Australians aged ≥18 years with periodontitis. Intervention participants received full-mouth periodontal scaling during a single visit, whereas controls received no treatment. Prespecified primary end points measured 12-month change in carotid intima-media thickness, an indicator of arterial structure, and 3- and 12-month change in pulse wave velocity, an indicator of arterial function. ANCOVA used complete case data to evaluate treatment group differences. End points could be calculated for 169 participants with follow-up data at 3 months and 168 participants at 12 months. Intima-media thickness decreased significantly after 12 months in the intervention group (mean reduction=-0.023 [95% confidence interval {CI}, -0.038 to -0.008] mm) but not in the control group (mean increase=0.002 [95% CI, -0.017 to 0.022] mm). The difference in intima-media thickness change between treatment groups was statistically significant (-0.026 [95% CI, -0.048 to -0.003] mm; P=0.03). In contrast, there were no significant differences between treatment groups in pulse wave velocity at 3 months (mean difference, 0.06 [95% CI, -0.17 to 0.29] m/s; P=0.594) or 12 months (mean difference, 0.21 [95% CI, -0.01 to 0.43] m/s; P=0.062). Periodontal therapy reduced subclinical arterial thickness but not function in Aboriginal Australians with periodontal disease, suggesting periodontal disease and atherosclerosis are significantly associated. PMID:24958498

  18. Correlation of arterial blood pressure and compliance with left ventricular structure and function in the very elderly.

    PubMed

    Rosendorff, Clive; Go, Orson; Schmeidler, James; Silverman, Jeremy M; Beeri, Michal S

    2012-01-01

    There are very few data on the relationship between systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), arterial compliance, and left ventricular structure and function, particularly left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), in the very elderly (>75 years). SBP and arterial stiffness increase with age, and the question is: which of the two is the main stimulus to LVH? This is a cross-sectional study to compare blood pressure and arterial stiffness measures with regard to their correlations with echocardiographic parameters of LV structure and function, controlling for age and cardiovascular risk factors, in a very elderly population. Arterial stiffness was determined by radial pulse waveform using pulse contour analysis. LV dimensions were measured by transthoracic M-mode echocardiography, and diastolic function by tissue Doppler measurements of diastolic mitral annular velocities. There were 179 subjects, all male, with a mean age of 81.8 years. Using age-adjusted partial correlations, SBP, DBP, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were correlated with parameters of LV structure and function. Correlation coefficients were: SBP versus left ventricular mass index (LVMI), r = 0.246; SBP versus early diastolic mitral annular velocity (MAV), r = -0.179; DBP versus LVMI, r = 0.199; DBP versus MAV, r = -0.199; MAP versus LVMI, r = 0.276; and MAP versus MAV, r = -0.206, all with P < .05. However, neither capacitative nor reflective arterial compliance was significantly correlated with any parameter of LV structure and function. After controlling for age and 10 cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors, the correlation between blood pressure and the measured LV parameters was substantially unchanged, as was the lack of correlation between indices of arterial compliance and the LV indices. Arterial blood pressure is correlated with LV structure and function in the very elderly, but arterial stiffness, as measured by diastolic pulse contour analysis, is not. PMID:22243840

  19. Can selective arterial clamping with fluorescence imaging preserve kidney function during robotic partial nephrectomy?

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Tyler R.; Bjurlin, Marc A.; Wysock, James S.; Borofsky, Michael S.; Marien, Tracy P.; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Stifelman, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare renal functional outcomes in robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN) with selective arterial clamping guided by near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging to a matched cohort of patients who underwent RPN without selective arterial clamping and NIRF imaging. Methods From April 2011 to December 2012, NIRF imaging-enhanced RPN with selective clamping was utilized in 42 cases. Functional outcomes of successful cases were compared with a cohort of patients, matched by tumor size, preoperative eGFR, functional kidney status, age, sex, body mass index, and American Society of Anesthesiologists score, who underwent RPN without selective clamping and NIRF imaging. Results In matched-pair analysis, selective clamping with NIRF was associated with superior kidney function at discharge, as demonstrated by postoperative eGFR (78.2 vs 68.5 ml/min per 1.73m2; P=0.04), absolute reduction of eGFR (−2.5 vs −14.0 ml/min per 1.73m2; P<0.01) and percent change in eGFR (−1.9% vs −16.8%, P<0.01). Similar trends were noted at three month follow up but these differences became non-significant (P[eGFR]=0.07], P[absolute reduction of eGFR]=0.10, and P[percent change in eGFR]=0.07). In the selective clamping group, a total of four perioperative complications occurred in three patients, all of which were Clavien I-III. Conclusion Utilization of NIRF imaging was associated with improved short-term renal functional outcomes when compared to RPN without selective arterial clamping and NIRF imaging. With this effect attenuated at later follow-up, randomized prospective studies and long-term assessment of kidney-specific functional outcomes are needed to further assess the benefits of this technology. PMID:24909960

  20. Modelling arterial pressure waveforms using Gaussian functions and two-stage particle swarm optimizer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengyu; Zhuang, Tao; Zhao, Lina; Chang, Faliang; Liu, Changchun; Wei, Shoushui; Li, Qiqiang; Zheng, Dingchang

    2014-01-01

    Changes of arterial pressure waveform characteristics have been accepted as risk indicators of cardiovascular diseases. Waveform modelling using Gaussian functions has been used to decompose arterial pressure pulses into different numbers of subwaves and hence quantify waveform characteristics. However, the fitting accuracy and computation efficiency of current modelling approaches need to be improved. This study aimed to develop a novel two-stage particle swarm optimizer (TSPSO) to determine optimal parameters of Gaussian functions. The evaluation was performed on carotid and radial artery pressure waveforms (CAPW and RAPW) which were simultaneously recorded from twenty normal volunteers. The fitting accuracy and calculation efficiency of our TSPSO were compared with three published optimization methods: the Nelder-Mead, the modified PSO (MPSO), and the dynamic multiswarm particle swarm optimizer (DMS-PSO). The results showed that TSPSO achieved the best fitting accuracy with a mean absolute error (MAE) of 1.1% for CAPW and 1.0% for RAPW, in comparison with 4.2% and 4.1% for Nelder-Mead, 2.0% and 1.9% for MPSO, and 1.2% and 1.1% for DMS-PSO. In addition, to achieve target MAE of 2.0%, the computation time of TSPSO was only 1.5 s, which was only 20% and 30% of that for MPSO and DMS-PSO, respectively. PMID:24967415

  1. Modelling Arterial Pressure Waveforms Using Gaussian Functions and Two-Stage Particle Swarm Optimizer

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Tao; Zhao, Lina; Chang, Faliang; Liu, Changchun; Wei, Shoushui; Li, Qiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Changes of arterial pressure waveform characteristics have been accepted as risk indicators of cardiovascular diseases. Waveform modelling using Gaussian functions has been used to decompose arterial pressure pulses into different numbers of subwaves and hence quantify waveform characteristics. However, the fitting accuracy and computation efficiency of current modelling approaches need to be improved. This study aimed to develop a novel two-stage particle swarm optimizer (TSPSO) to determine optimal parameters of Gaussian functions. The evaluation was performed on carotid and radial artery pressure waveforms (CAPW and RAPW) which were simultaneously recorded from twenty normal volunteers. The fitting accuracy and calculation efficiency of our TSPSO were compared with three published optimization methods: the Nelder-Mead, the modified PSO (MPSO), and the dynamic multiswarm particle swarm optimizer (DMS-PSO). The results showed that TSPSO achieved the best fitting accuracy with a mean absolute error (MAE) of 1.1% for CAPW and 1.0% for RAPW, in comparison with 4.2% and 4.1% for Nelder-Mead, 2.0% and 1.9% for MPSO, and 1.2% and 1.1% for DMS-PSO. In addition, to achieve target MAE of 2.0%, the computation time of TSPSO was only 1.5 s, which was only 20% and 30% of that for MPSO and DMS-PSO, respectively. PMID:24967415

  2. Functional assessment of the stenotic carotid artery by CFD-based pressure gradient evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Heye; Ren, Lijie; Xiong, Huahua; Gao, Zhifan; Xu, Pengcheng; Huang, Wenhua; Wu, Wanqing

    2016-09-01

    The functional assessment of a hemodynamic significant stenosis base on blood pressure variation has been applied for evaluation of the myocardial ischemic event. This functional assessment shows great potential for improving the accuracy of the classification of the severity of carotid stenosis. To explore the value of grading the stenosis using a pressure gradient (PG)-we had reconstructed patient-specific carotid geometries based on MRI images-computational fluid dynamics were performed to analyze the PG in their stenotic arteries. Doppler ultrasound image data and the corresponding MRI image data of 19 patients with carotid stenosis were collected. Based on these, 31 stenotic carotid arterial geometries were reconstructed. A combinatorial boundary condition method was implemented for steady-state computer fluid dynamics simulations. Anatomic parameters, including tortuosity (T), the angle of bifurcation, and the cross-sectional area of the remaining lumen, were collected to investigate the effect on the pressure distribution. The PG is highly correlated with the severe stenosis (r = 0.902), whereas generally, the T and the angle of the bifurcation negatively correlate to the pressure drop of the internal carotid artery stenosis. The calculation required <10 min/case, which made it prepared for the fast diagnosis of the severe stenosis. According to the results, we had proposed a potential threshold value for distinguishing severe stenosis from mild-moderate stenosis (PG = 0.88). In conclusion, the PG could serve as the additional factor for improving the accuracy of grading the severity of the stenosis. PMID:27371686

  3. Characterization of endothelial function in the brachial artery via affine registration of ultrasonographic image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamata, Pablo; Laclaustra, Martin; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2003-05-01

    The assessment and characterization of the endothelial function is a current research topic as it may play an important role in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. Flow mediated dilatation may be used to investigate endothelial function, and B-mode ultrasonography is a cheap and non-invasive way to assess the vasodilation response. Computerized analysis techniques are very desirable to give higher accuracy and objectivity to the measurements. A new method is presented that solves some limitations of existing methods, which in general depend on accurate edge detection of the arterial wall. This method is based on a global image analysis strategy. The arterial vasodilation between two frames is modeled by a superposition of a rigid motion model and a stretching perpendicular to the artery. Both transformation models are recovered using an image registration algorithm based on normalized mutual information and a multi-resolution search framework. Temporal continuity of in the variation of the registration parameters is enforced with a Kalman filter, since the dilation process is known to be a gradual and continuous physiological phenomenon. The proposed method presents a negligible bias when compared with manual assessment. It also eliminates artifacts introduced by patient and probe motion, thus improving the accuracy of the measurements. Finally, it is also robust to typical problems of ultrasound, like speckle noise and poor image quality.

  4. Clinical characteristics of functional recovery after coronary artery bypass graft surgery in Japanese octogenarians

    PubMed Central

    Tobita, Ryo; Iwata, Kentaro; Kamisaka, Kenta; Yuguchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Masayuki; Oura, Keisuke; Morisawa, Tomoyuki; Ohhashi, Satoko; Kumamaru, Megumi; Hanafusa, Yusuke; Kato, Michitaka; Saitoh, Masakazu; Sakurada, Koji; Takahashi, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to elucidate characteristics of postoperative physical functional recovery in octogenarians undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. [Subjects and Methods] This was a multi-center, retrospective study. Nine hundred and twenty-seven elective isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgeries were evaluated (746 males and 181 females, mean age: 68.6 years, range: 31–86 years). Participants were stratified according to age < 80 years (n = 840; mean age, 67.1; range, 31–79) or > 80 years (n = 87; mean age, 82.2; range, 80–86). Patient characteristics and postoperative physical functional recovery outcomes were compared between groups. [Results] There was no significant difference between groups when considering the postoperative day at which patients could sit on the edge of the bed, stand at bedside, or walk around the bed. The postoperative day at which patients could walk 100 m independently was later in octogenarians, when compared with non-octogenarians (6.1 ± 3.2 days vs. 4.9 ± 3.9 days). In octogenarians, the percentage of patients who could walk 100 m independently within 8 days after surgery was 79.5%. [Conclusion] A postoperative target time in octogenarians for independent walking, following coronary artery bypass grafting, can be set at approximately 6 days. PMID:27065553

  5. First-ever ischemic stroke in elderly patients: predictors of functional outcome following carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Chang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Age is an important risk factor for stroke, and carotid artery stenosis is the primary cause of first-ever ischemic stroke. Timely intervention with stenting procedures can effectively prevent secondary stroke; however, the impact of stenting on various periprocedural physical functionalities has never been thoroughly investigated. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether prestenting characteristics were associated with long-term functional outcomes in patients presenting with first-ever ischemic stroke. The secondary aim was to investigate whether patient age was an important factor in outcomes following stenting, measured by the modified Rankin scale (mRS). In total, 144 consecutive patients with first-ever ischemic stroke who underwent carotid artery stenting from January 2010 to November 2014 were included. Clinical data were obtained by review of medical records. The Barthel index (BI) and mRS were used to assess disability before stenting and at 12-month follow-up. In total, 72/144 patients showed improvement (mRS[+]), 71 showed stationary and one showed deterioration in condition (mRS[-]). The prestenting parameters, ratio of cerebral blood volume (1.41 vs 1.2 for mRS[-] vs mRS[+]), BI (75 vs 85), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP 5.0 vs 3.99), differed significantly between the two outcome groups (P<0.05). The internal carotid artery/common carotid artery ratio (P=0.011), BI (P=0.019), ipsilateral internal carotid artery resistance index (P=0.003), and HbA1c (P=0.039) were all factors significantly associated with patient age group. There was no significant association between age and poststenting outcome measured by mRS with 57% of patients in the ≥75 years age group showing mRS(-) and 43% showing mRS(+) (P=0.371). Our findings indicate that in our elderly patient series, carotid artery stenting may benefit a significant proportion of carotid stenotic patients regardless of age. Ratio of cerebral blood volume, BI, and

  6. First-ever ischemic stroke in elderly patients: predictors of functional outcome following carotid artery stenting

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Ming; Chang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Chi-Kuang; Yu, Cheng-Sheng; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Age is an important risk factor for stroke, and carotid artery stenosis is the primary cause of first-ever ischemic stroke. Timely intervention with stenting procedures can effectively prevent secondary stroke; however, the impact of stenting on various periprocedural physical functionalities has never been thoroughly investigated. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether prestenting characteristics were associated with long-term functional outcomes in patients presenting with first-ever ischemic stroke. The secondary aim was to investigate whether patient age was an important factor in outcomes following stenting, measured by the modified Rankin scale (mRS). In total, 144 consecutive patients with first-ever ischemic stroke who underwent carotid artery stenting from January 2010 to November 2014 were included. Clinical data were obtained by review of medical records. The Barthel index (BI) and mRS were used to assess disability before stenting and at 12-month follow-up. In total, 72/144 patients showed improvement (mRS[+]), 71 showed stationary and one showed deterioration in condition (mRS[−]). The prestenting parameters, ratio of cerebral blood volume (1.41 vs 1.2 for mRS[−] vs mRS[+]), BI (75 vs 85), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP 5.0 vs 3.99), differed significantly between the two outcome groups (P<0.05). The internal carotid artery/common carotid artery ratio (P=0.011), BI (P=0.019), ipsilateral internal carotid artery resistance index (P=0.003), and HbA1c (P=0.039) were all factors significantly associated with patient age group. There was no significant association between age and poststenting outcome measured by mRS with 57% of patients in the ≥75 years age group showing mRS(−) and 43% showing mRS(+) (P=0.371). Our findings indicate that in our elderly patient series, carotid artery stenting may benefit a significant proportion of carotid stenotic patients regardless of age. Ratio of cerebral blood volume, BI, and

  7. Use of functional mass in renal scintigraphy to detect segmental arterial lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Stibolt, T.B. Jr.; Bacher, J.D.; Dunnick, N.R.; Lock, A.; Jones, A.E.; Bailey, J.J.

    1982-04-01

    Renography using a gamma camera, a minicomputer, (/sup 123/I)orthoiodohippurate ((/sup 123/I)OIH), and a canine model was employed to evaluate computer-generated maps of regional renal function. Renograms were obtained before and after ligations of the right renal arterial branch in four dogs, with subsequent angiographic and histologic confirmation of the lesions. Postoperative time-activity curves were normal. Washout and persistence index in three of four right kidneys showed regional abnormality. Functional renal mapping may provide a clinical technique for evaluating human renal vascular hypertension.

  8. Exercise training improves endothelial function in resistance arteries of young prehypertensives.

    PubMed

    Beck, D T; Martin, J S; Casey, D P; Braith, R W

    2014-05-01

    Prehypertension is associated with reduced conduit artery endothelial function and perturbation of oxidant/antioxidant status. It is unknown whether endothelial dysfunction persists to resistance arteries and whether exercise training affects oxidant/antioxidant balance in young prehypertensives. We examined resistance artery function using venous occlusion plethysmography measurement of forearm (FBF) and calf blood flow (CBF) at rest and during reactive hyperaemia (RH), as well as lipid peroxidation (8-iso-PGF2α) and antioxidant capacity (Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity; TEAC) before and after exercise intervention or time control. Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive and 15 matched normotensive time controls met screening requirements and participated in the study (age: 21.1±0.8 years). Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to resistance exercise training (PHRT; n=15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n=13) or time-control groups (PHTC; n=15). Treatment groups exercised 3 days per week for 8 weeks. Peak and total FBF were lower in prehypertensives than normotensives (12.7±1.2 ml min(-1) per100 ml tissue and 89.1±7.7 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue vs 16.3±1.0 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue and 123.3±6.4 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue, respectively; P<0.05). Peak and total CBF were lower in prehypertensives than normotensives (15.3±1.2 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue and 74±8.3 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue vs 20.9±1.4 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue and 107±9.2 ml min(-1) per 100 ml tissue, respectively; P<0.05). PHRT and PHET improved humoral measures of TEAC (+24 and +30%) and 8-iso-PGF2α (-43 and -40%, respectively; P < or = 0.05). This study provides evidence that young prehypertensives exhibit reduced resistance artery endothelial function and that short-term (8 weeks) resistance or endurance training are effective in improving resistance artery endothelial function and oxidant

  9. EXERCISE TRAINING IMPROVES ENDOTHELIAL FUNCTION IN RESISTANCE ARTERIES OF YOUNG PREHYPERTENSIVES

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Darren T.; Martin, Jeffrey S.; Casey, Darren P.; Braith, Randy W.

    2013-01-01

    Prehypertension is associated with reduced conduit artery endothelial function and perturbation of oxidant/antioxidant status. It is unknown if endothelial dysfunction persists to resistance arteries and if exercise training effects oxidant/antioxidant balance in young prehypertensives. We examined resistance artery function using venous occlusion plethysmography measurement of forearm (FBF) and calf blood flow (CBF) at rest and during reactive hyperemia, as well as lipid peroxidation (8-iso-PGF2α) and antioxidant capacity (Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity; TEAC) before and after exercise intervention or time-control. Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive and fifteen matched normotensive time-controls met screening requirements and participated in the study (age: 21.1±0.8 years). Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to resistance exercise training (PHRT; n=15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n=13) or time-control groups (PHTC; n=15). Treatment groups exercised 3 days per week for 8 weeks. Peak and total FBF were lower in prehypertensives than normotensives (12.7±1.2 ml/min/100ml tissue and 89.1±7.7 ml/min/100ml tissue vs. 16.3±1.0 ml/min/100ml tissue and 123.3±6.4 ml/min/100ml tissue, respectively; p<0.05). Peak and total CBF were lower in prehypertensives than normotensives (15.3±1.2 ml/min/100ml tissue and 74±8.3 ml/min/100ml tissue vs. 20.9±1.4 ml/min/100ml tissue and 107±9.2 ml/min/100ml tissue, respectively; p<0.05). PHRT and PHET improved humoral measures of Trolox-equivalent antioxidant-capacity (TEAC) (+24% and +30%) and 8-iso-PGF2α (−43% and −40%, respectively; p<0.05). This study provides evidence that young prehypertensives exhibit reduced resistance artery endothelial function and that short term (8weeks) resistance or endurance training are effective in improving resistance artery endothelial function and oxidant/antioxidant balance in young prehypertensives. PMID:24172292

  10. Functional Development of the Coronary Collateral Circulation During Coronary Artery Occlusion in the Conscious Dog

    PubMed Central

    Bloor, Colin M.; White, Francis C.

    1972-01-01

    We studied changes in the coronary collateral circulation during coronary artery occlusion in 14 conscious dogs by: a) determining simultaneous changes in peripheral coronary pressure (PCP) and retrograde flow (RF) after abrupt coronary artery occlusion; b) correlating these functional indices with quantitative anatomic indices (AI) of coronary collateral development (Menick et al: Am Heart J 82:503-510, 1971); and c) observing changes in these indices after repeated reocclusions of a coronary artery. These dogs were subjected to left circumflex coronary artery (LCCA) occlusions for 2 hours to 8 days; pressure tubes were implanted in the aorta and LCCA, the latter tube placed distal to an occlusive cuff for PCP and RF measurements. Afterwards the animals were sacrificed, their hearts injected with a modified Schlesinger's gelatin mass, and AI determined. During 2 to 24 hour LCCA occlusions (11 dogs) mean PCP rose to levels 50 to 80% of prevailing aortic pressure. During repreated 2- to 24-hour occlusions (2 dogs) in the same dog, the rate at which PCP rose increased. Retrograde flow was unchanged during 2- to 24-hour occlusions. Anatomic indices of these dogs were in the same range as those observed in unoccluded controls. When LCCA occlusion was maintained for more than 4 days (3 dogs), mean PCP rose during the first 24 hours and then remained stable; RF did not change until 4 days into occlusion and then increased. Anatomic indices of dogs occluded for more than 4 days were significantly greater (P < 0.001) than those of the 2- to 24-hour occlusion groups. Our study shows that: a) the early PCP rise after occlusion is not associated with an increase in RF, b) RF is a better index of collateral function and c) RF correlated well with the anatomic development of the collateral bed. ImagesFig 2Fig 1 PMID:5033259

  11. Impact of Intensive Physiotherapy on Cognitive Function after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, Elder dos Santos; Magario, Rosmeiri; Conforti, César Augusto; Cipriano Júnior, Gerson; Arena, Ross; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos C.; Buffolo, Enio; Luna Filho, Bráulio

    2014-01-01

    Background Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) is a standard surgical option for patients with diffuse and significant arterial plaque. This procedure, however, is not free of postoperative complications, especially pulmonary and cognitive disorders. Objective This study aimed at comparing the impact of two different physiotherapy treatment approaches on pulmonary and cognitive function of patients undergoing CABG. Methods Neuropsychological and pulmonary function tests were applied, prior to and following CABG, to 39 patients randomized into two groups as follows: Group 1 (control) – 20 patients underwent one physiotherapy session daily; and Group 2 (intensive physiotherapy) – 19 patients underwent three physiotherapy sessions daily during the recovery phase at the hospital. Non-paired and paired Student t tests were used to compare continuous variables. Variables without normal distribution were compared between groups by using Mann-Whitney test, and, within the same group at different times, by using Wilcoxon test. The chi-square test assessed differences of categorical variables. Statistical tests with a p value ≤ 0.05 were considered significant. Results Changes in pulmonary function were not significantly different between the groups. However, while Group 2 patients showed no decline in their neurocognitive function, Group 1 patients showed a decline in their cognitive functions (P ≤ 0.01). Conclusion Those results highlight the importance of physiotherapy after CABG and support the implementation of multiple sessions per day, providing patients with better psychosocial conditions and less morbidity. PMID:25352459

  12. Peripheral artery disease is associated with severe impairment of vascular function.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Soroosh; Aasen, Jonathan G; Holbrook, Monika; Khemka, Abhishek; Sharmeen, Farhana; LeLeiko, Rebecca M; Tabit, Corey E; Farber, Alik; Eberhardt, Robert T; Gokce, Noyan; Vita, Joseph A; Hamburg, Naomi M

    2013-04-01

    Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have higher cardiovascular event rates than patients with established coronary artery disease (CAD) and abnormal endothelial function predicts cardiovascular risk in PAD and CAD. We investigated the hypothesis that PAD is associated with a greater degree of impairment in vascular function than CAD. We used several non-invasive tests to evaluate endothelial function in 1320 men and women with combined PAD and CAD (n = 198), PAD alone (n = 179), CAD alone (n = 466), or controls aged > 45 years without CAD or PAD (n = 477). Patients with PAD had lower brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (5.1 ± 3.9% PAD and CAD, 5.9 ± 4.4% PAD alone) compared to patients with CAD alone (7.0 ± 4.5%) and no PAD or CAD (8.1 ± 5.1%, p < 0.0001). In multivariable models adjusting for clinical covariates and the presence of CAD, PAD remained associated with lower flow-mediated dilation (p < 0.0001). PAD was associated also with lower nitroglycerin-mediated dilation and reactive hyperemia. Patients with both PAD and CAD had a lower digital pulse amplitude tonometry (PAT) ratio in unadjusted models but not in adjusted models. Flow-mediated dilation was modestly associated with PAT ratio in patients with atherosclerotic disease (r = 0.23, p < 0.0001) but not among control participants (r = 0.008, p = 0.93). Our findings indicate that patients with PAD have greater impairment of vasodilator function and are consistent with the possibility that endothelial dysfunction may contribute to adverse cardiovascular prognosis in PAD. PMID:23509089

  13. Peripheral artery disease is associated with severe impairment of vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Soroosh; Aasen, Jonathan G; Holbrook, Monika; Khemka, Abhishek; Sharmeen, Farhana; LeLeiko, Rebecca M; Tabit, Corey E; Farber, Alik; Eberhardt, Robert T; Gokce, Noyan; Vita, Joseph A; Hamburg, Naomi M

    2013-01-01

    Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have higher cardiovascular event rates than patients with established coronary artery disease (CAD) and abnormal endothelial function predicts cardiovascular risk in PAD and CAD. We investigated the hypothesis that PAD is associated with a greater degree of impairment in vascular function than CAD. We used several non-invasive tests to evaluate endothelial function in 1320 men and women with combined PAD and CAD (n = 198), PAD alone (n = 179), CAD alone (n = 466), or controls aged > 45 years without CAD or PAD (n = 477). Patients with PAD had lower brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (5.1 ± 3.9% PAD and CAD, 5.9 ± 4.4% PAD alone) compared to patients with CAD alone (7.0 ± 4.5%) and no PAD or CAD (8.1 ± 5.1%, p < 0.0001). In multivariable models adjusting for clinical covariates and the presence of CAD, PAD remained associated with lower flow-mediated dilation (p < 0.0001). PAD was associated also with lower nitroglycerin-mediated dilation and reactive hyperemia. Patients with both PAD and CAD had a lower digital pulse amplitude tonometry (PAT) ratio in unadjusted models but not in adjusted models. Flow-mediated dilation was modestly associated with PAT ratio in patients with atherosclerotic disease (r = 0.23, p < 0.0001) but not among control participants (r = 0.008, p = 0.93). Our findings indicate that patients with PAD have greater impairment of vasodilator function and are consistent with the possibility that endothelial dysfunction may contribute to adverse cardiovascular prognosis in PAD. PMID:23509089

  14. Effect of coronary artery bypass grafting on left ventricular diastolic function.

    PubMed

    Lawson, W E; Seifert, F; Anagnostopoulos, C; Hills, D J; Swinford, R D; Cohn, P F

    1988-02-01

    Because left ventricular (LV) diastolic function is abnormal in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), pulsed Doppler echocardiography was used to evaluate LV filling before and after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Filling was evaluated by Doppler in 2 studies: (1) in a group of 41 unpaired patients (11 with angiographically normal coronary arteries, 14 with CAD but without CABG and 16 at 1 week after CABG) and (2) in a group of 12 patients with CAD before and 1 week after CABG. Doppler sampling at the level of the mitral anulus was analyzed for the deceleration half-time and for the ratio of peak late (A) to peak early (E) filling velocity, measures reflecting early ventricular filling and the relative contribution of atrial contraction to ventricular filling. In the first study the deceleration half-time was significantly prolonged in both CAD and CABG groups. The late to early peak transmitral velocity ratio, however, was significantly prolonged only in the nonrevascularized CAD patients. In the second group of CAD patients studied before and 1 week after surgical revascularization, both the late to early peak transmitral velocity ratio and the deceleration half-time showed significant postoperative improvement. Thus, patients with CAD showed impairment in early LV filling and a compensatory increase in the proportion of filling with active atrial contraction. Successful CABG appears to result in normalization of early filling and decreased reliance on active atrial transport. PMID:3257633

  15. Effect of electron radiation on vasomotor function of the left anterior descending coronary artery

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Billings, Paul C.; Wilson, Jolaine M.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A.; Thorne, Pamela K.; Laughlin, M. H.; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    The left anterior descending (LAD, interventricular) coronary artery provides the blood supply to the mid-region of the heart and is a major site of vessel stenosis. Changes in LAD function can have major effects on heart function. In this report, we examined the effect of electron simulated solar particle event (eSPE) radiation on LAD function in a porcine animal model. Vasodilatory responses to adenosine diphosphate (ADP; 10−9 – 10−4 M), bradykinin (BK; 10−11 – 10−6 M), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 10−10 – 10−4 M) were assessed. The LAD arteries from Control (non-irradiated) and the eSPE (irradiated) animals were isolated and exhibited a similar relaxation response following treatment with either ADP or SNP. In contrast, a significantly reduced relaxation response to BK treatment was observed in the eSPE irradiated group, compared to the control group. These data demonstrate that simulated SPE radiation exposure alters LAD function. PMID:26072960

  16. Molecular and functional significance of Ca2+-activated Cl− channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Abigail S.; Ayon, Ramon J.; Wiwchar, Michael; Angermann, Jeff E.; Pritchard, Harry A. T.; Singer, Cherie A.; Valencik, Maria L.; Britton, Fiona; Greenwood, Iain A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Increased peripheral resistance of small distal pulmonary arteries is a hallmark signature of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and is believed to be the consequence of enhanced vasoconstriction to agonists, thickening of the arterial wall due to remodeling, and increased thrombosis. The elevation in arterial tone in PH is attributable, at least in part, to smooth muscle cells of PH patients being more depolarized and displaying higher intracellular Ca2+ levels than cells from normal subjects. It is now clear that downregulation of voltage-dependent K+ channels (e.g., Kv1.5) and increased expression and activity of voltage-dependent (Cav1.2) and voltage-independent (e.g., canonical and vanilloid transient receptor potential [TRPC and TRPV]) Ca2+ channels play an important role in the functional remodeling of pulmonary arteries in PH. This review focuses on an anion-permeable channel that is now considered a novel excitatory mechanism in the systemic and pulmonary circulations. It is permeable to Cl− and is activated by a rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+-activated Cl− channel, or CaCC). The first section outlines the biophysical and pharmacological properties of the channel and ends with a description of the molecular candidate genes postulated to encode for CaCCs, with particular emphasis on the bestrophin and the newly discovered TMEM16 and anoctamin families of genes. The second section provides a review of the various sources of Ca2+ activating CaCCs, which include stimulation by mobilization from intracellular Ca2+ stores and Ca2+ entry through voltage-dependent and voltage-independent Ca2+ channels. The third and final section summarizes recent findings that suggest a potentially important role for CaCCs and the gene TMEM16A in PH. PMID:26064450

  17. Circulating MicroRNAs Characterizing Patients with Insufficient Coronary Collateral Artery Function

    PubMed Central

    Hakimzadeh, Nazanin; Nossent, A. Yaël; van der Laan, Anja M.; Schirmer, Stephan H.; de Ronde, Maurice W. J.; Pinto-Sietsma, Sara-Joan; van Royen, Niels; Quax, Paul H. A.; Hoefer, Imo E.; Piek, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Coronary collateral arteries function as natural bypasses in the event of coronary obstruction. The degree of collateral network development significantly impacts the outcome of patients after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) have arisen as biomarkers to identify heterogeneous patients, as well as new therapeutic targets in cardiovascular disease. We sought to identify miRNAs that are differentially expressed in chronic total occlusion (CTO) patients with well or poorly developed collateral arteries. Methods and Results Forty-one CTO patients undergoing coronary angiography and invasive assessment of their coronary collateralization were dichotomized based on their collateral flow index (CFI). After miRNA profiling was conducted on aortic plasma, four miRNAs were selected for validation by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in patients with low (CFI<0.39) and high (CFI>0.39) collateral artery capacity. We confirmed significantly elevated levels of miR423-5p (p<0.05), miR10b (p<0.05), miR30d (p<0.05) and miR126 (p<0.001) in patients with insufficient collateral network development. We further demonstrated that each of these miRNAs could serve as circulating biomarkers to discriminate patients with low collateral capacity (p<0.01 for each miRNA). We also determined significantly greater expression of miR30d (p<0.05) and miR126 (p<0.001) in CTO patients relative to healthy controls. Conclusion The present study identifies differentially expressed miRNAs in patients with high versus low coronary collateral capacity. We have shown that these miRNAs can function as circulating biomarkers to discriminate between patients with insufficient or sufficient collateralization. This is the first study to identify miRNAs linked to coronary collateral vessel function in humans. PMID:26331273

  18. Effects of Recombinant Human Erythropoietin on Resistance Artery Endothelial Function in Stage 4 Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Briet, Marie; Barhoumi, Tlili; Mian, Muhammad Oneeb Rehman; Sierra, Cristina; Boutouyrie, Pierre; Davidman, Michael; Bercovitch, David; Nessim, Sharon J.; Frisch, Gershon; Paradis, Pierre; Lipman, Mark L.; Schiffrin, Ernesto L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have raised concern about the safety of erythropoiesis‐stimulating agents because of evidence of increased risk of hypertension and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. In the present study, we investigated the effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) on endothelial function of gluteal subcutaneous resistance arteries isolated from 17 stage 4 patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate 21.9±7.4 mL/min per 1.73 m2) aged 63±13 years. Methods and Results Arteries were mounted on a pressurized myograph. EPO impaired endothelium‐dependent relaxation in a concentration‐dependent manner. The maximal response to acetylcholine with EPO at 1, 10, and 20 IU/mL was reduced by 12%, 34%, and 43%, respectively, compared with the absence of EPO (P<0.001). EPO‐induced endothelial dysfunction was significantly associated with carotid stiffness and history of cardiovascular events. EPO had no effect on norepinephrine‐induced vasoconstriction or sodium nitroprusside–induced relaxation. ABT‐627, an endothelin type A receptor antagonist, and tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic, partially reversed the altered endothelial function in the presence of EPO (P<0.01). Increased expression of endothelin‐1 was found in the vessel wall after incubation with EPO. Conclusions EPO alters endothelial function of resistance arteries in CKD patients via a mechanism involving in part oxidative stress and signaling through an endothelin type A receptor. EPO‐induced endothelial dysfunction could contribute to deleterious effects of EPO described in large interventional trials. PMID:23584809

  19. Intra-Arterial Administration of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promotes Functional Recovery of the Brain After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Silachev, D N; Plotnikov, E Yu; Babenko, V A; Danilina, T I; Zorov, L D; Pevzner, I B; Zorov, D B; Sukhikh, G T

    2015-08-01

    We compared the efficiency of delivery of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells into the brain after their intravenous and intra-arterial injection. Analysis of the therapeutic effects of cells after experimental traumatic brain injury revealed improvement of the neurological status and motor functions of the damaged hemisphere, the effect being more pronounced after intraarterial injection of cells. Intra-arterial administration was followed by rapid infiltration of the cells into the brain tissue and their number considerably surpassed that after intravenous infusion. Targeted delivery of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells into the brain after their injection into the carotid arteries substantially potentiated their neuroprotective effects in traumatic brain injury. PMID:26388566

  20. Physiological functions of transient receptor potential channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Ru; Lin, Mo-Jun; Sham, James S K

    2010-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) gene superfamily, which consists of 7 subfamilies with at least 28 mammalian homologues, is known to encode a wide variety of cation channels with diverse biophysical properties, activation mechanisms, and physiological functions. Recent studies have identified multiple TRP channel subtypes, belonging to the canonical (TRPC), melastatin-related (TRPM), and vanilloid-related (TRPV) subfamilies, in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). They operate as specific Ca(2+) pathways responsive to stimuli, including Ca(2+) store depletion, receptor activation, reactive oxygen species, growth factors, and mechanical stress. Increasing evidence suggests that these channels play crucial roles in agonist-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction, hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell proliferation, vascular remodeling, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. This chapter highlighted and discussed these putative physiological functions of TRP channels in pulmonary vasculatures. Since Ca(2+) ions regulate many cellular processes via specific Ca(2+) signals, future investigations of these novel channels will likely uncover more important regulatory mechanisms of pulmonary vascular functions in health and in disease states. PMID:20204726

  1. Improved factor analysis of dynamic PET images to estimate arterial input function and tissue curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutchko, Rostyslav; Mitra, Debasis; Pan, Hui; Jagust, William; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2015-03-01

    Factor analysis of dynamic structures (FADS) is a methodology of extracting time-activity curves (TACs) for corresponding different tissue types from noisy dynamic images. The challenges of FADS include long computation time and sensitivity to the initial guess, resulting in convergence to local minima far from the true solution. We propose a method of accelerating and stabilizing FADS application to sequences of dynamic PET images by adding preliminary cluster analysis of the time activity curves for individual voxels. We treat the temporal variation of individual voxel concentrations as a set of time-series and use a partial clustering analysis to identify the types of voxel TACs that are most functionally distinct from each other. These TACs provide a good initial guess for the temporal factors for subsequent FADS processing. Applying this approach to a set of single slices of dynamic 11C-PIB images of the brain allows identification of the arterial input function and two different tissue TACs that are likely to correspond to the specific and non-specific tracer binding-tissue types. These results enable us to perform direct classification of tissues based on their pharmacokinetic properties in dynamic PET without relying on a compartment-based kinetic model, without identification of the reference region, or without using any external methods of estimating the arterial input function, as needed in some techniques.

  2. Impact of acute caffeine ingestion on endothelial function in subjects with and without coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Shechter, Michael; Shalmon, Guy; Scheinowitz, Mickey; Koren-Morag, Nira; Feinberg, Micha S; Harats, Dror; Sela, Ben Ami; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Chouraqui, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    Although coffee is a widely used, pharmacologically active beverage, its impact on the cardiovascular system is controversial. To explore the effect of acute caffeine ingestion on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in subjects without coronary artery disease (CAD; controls) and patients with CAD, we prospectively assessed brachial artery FMD in 40 controls and 40 age- and gender-matched patients with documented stable CAD on 2 separate mornings 1 week to 2 weeks apart. After overnight fasting, discontinuation of all medications for ≥12 hours, and absence of caffeine for >48 hours, participants received capsules with caffeine 200 mg or placebo. One hour after drug ingestion, participants underwent brachial artery FMD and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NTG) using high-resolution ultrasound. As expected, patients with CAD were more often diabetic, hypertensive, obese, dyslipidemic, and smoked more than controls (p <0.01 for all comparisons). Aspirin, Clopidogrel, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, β blockers, and statins were significantly more common in patients with CAD than in controls (p <0.01 for all comparisons). At baseline, FMD, but not NTG, was significantly lower in patients with CAD compared to controls. Acute caffeine ingestion significantly increased FMD (patients with CAD 5.6 ± 5.0% vs 14.6 ± 5.0%, controls 8.4 ± 2.9% vs 18.6 ± 6.8%, p <0.001 for all comparisons) but not NTG (patients with CAD 13.0 ± 5.2% vs 13.8 ± 6.1%, controls 12.9 ± 3.9% vs 13.9 ± 5.8%, p = NS for all comparisons) and significantly decreased high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (patients with CAD 2.6 ± 1.4 vs 1.4 ± 1.2 mg/L, controls 3.4 ± 3.0 vs 1.2 ± 1.0 mg/L, p <0.001 for all comparisons) in the 2 groups compared to placebo. In conclusion, acute caffeine ingestion significantly improved endothelial function assessed by brachial artery FMD in subjects with and without CAD and was associated with lower plasma markers of inflammation. PMID:21349479

  3. Arterial Structure and Function in Women and Men Following Long Duration Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Stenger, Michael B.; Martin, David S.; Platts, Steven H.

    2008-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is a well-recognized consequence of space flight and bed rest (BR), with a greater incidence reported in women. We hypothesized that leg, but not arm, arterial structure and function would be altered following prolonged BR, as a model of space flight, and that women would be more susceptible to BR-induced deconditioning than men. METHODS: Ten volunteers (5 males, 5 females) completed 90 d of 6 head-down BR. Subjects participated in tests of brachial (BA) and anterior tibial (AT) artery endothelium-dependent (flow mediated dilation [FMD] following 5-7 min of arterial occlusion) and endothelium-independent (0.4 mg sublingual nitroglycerin [SN]) vasodilation before BR (PRE) and on days 7 (BR7), 21 (BR21), and 90 (BR90) of BR. Vessel diameter and intimal medial thickness (IMT) were measured by ultrasound. IMT, baseline diameter, and percent change in diameter from baseline during FMD and SN tests were compared across BR and between genders using repeated measures two-way ANOVA with Bonferroni post-hoc tests in which PRE and women were control conditions. RESULTS: Baseline vessel diameter was lower in women than in men in both the BA (p=0.005) and AT (p=0.01) across all days. Baseline AT diameter decreased during BR (p=0.01) and tended to be more profound in women (interaction, p=0.06). AT diameter was reduced in women at BR21 and BR90 (p<0.01) but not in men. In contrast, there was no BR effect on baseline BA diameter. IMT also decreased in the AT (p<0.001) but not in the BA during BR; AT IMT was reduced by BR21 (p<0.05). As a group, there was no effect of BR on AT FMD, BA FMD, and AT SN-dilation, although BA SN-dilation was significantly reduced on BR21 (p=0.01). Across all BR days, women exhibited higher AT FMD (p=0.03), BA FMD (p=0.02), and BA SN-dilation (p=0.01) and tended to demonstrate greater AT SN-dilation (p=0.11). CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary results suggest that arterial remodeling occurs during BR in the leg (decreased diameter

  4. The Effect of Endovascular Revascularization of Common Iliac Artery Occlusions on Erectile Function

    SciTech Connect

    Gur, Serkan; Ozkan, Ugur; Onder, Hakan; Tekbas, Gueven; Oguzkurt, Levent

    2013-02-15

    To determine the incidence of erectile dysfunction in patients with common iliac artery (CIA) occlusive disease and the effect of revascularization on erectile function using the sexual health inventory for males (SHIM) questionnaire. All patients (35 men; mean age 57 {+-} 5 years; range 42-67 years) were asked to recall their sexual function before and 1 month after iliac recanalization. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine variables effecting improvement of impotence. The incidence of impotence in patients with CIA occlusion was 74% (26 of 35) preoperatively. Overall 16 (46%) of 35 patients reported improved erectile function after iliac recanalization. The rate of improvement of impotence was 61.5% (16 of 26 impotent patients). Sixteen patients (46%), including seven with normal erectile function before the procedure, had no change. Three patients (8%) reported deterioration of their sexual function, two of whom (6%) had normal erectile function before the procedure. The median SHIM score increased from 14 (range 4-25) before the procedure to 20 (range 1-25) after the procedure (P = 0.005). The type of recanalization, the age of the patients, and the length of occlusion were related to erectile function improvement in univariate analysis. However, these factors were not independent factors for improvement of erectile dysfunction in multivariate analysis (P > 0.05). Endovascular recanalization of CIA occlusions clearly improves sexual function. More than half of the patients with erectile dysfunction who underwent endovascular recanalization of the CIA experienced improvement.

  5. Integrative functional genomics identifies regulatory mechanisms at coronary artery disease loci.

    PubMed

    Miller, Clint L; Pjanic, Milos; Wang, Ting; Nguyen, Trieu; Cohain, Ariella; Lee, Jonathan D; Perisic, Ljubica; Hedin, Ulf; Kundu, Ramendra K; Majmudar, Deshna; Kim, Juyong B; Wang, Oliver; Betsholtz, Christer; Ruusalepp, Arno; Franzén, Oscar; Assimes, Themistocles L; Montgomery, Stephen B; Schadt, Eric E; Björkegren, Johan L M; Quertermous, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity, driven by both genetic and environmental risk factors. Meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies have identified >150 loci associated with CAD and myocardial infarction susceptibility in humans. A majority of these variants reside in non-coding regions and are co-inherited with hundreds of candidate regulatory variants, presenting a challenge to elucidate their functions. Herein, we use integrative genomic, epigenomic and transcriptomic profiling of perturbed human coronary artery smooth muscle cells and tissues to begin to identify causal regulatory variation and mechanisms responsible for CAD associations. Using these genome-wide maps, we prioritize 64 candidate variants and perform allele-specific binding and expression analyses at seven top candidate loci: 9p21.3, SMAD3, PDGFD, IL6R, BMP1, CCDC97/TGFB1 and LMOD1. We validate our findings in expression quantitative trait loci cohorts, which together reveal new links between CAD associations and regulatory function in the appropriate disease context. PMID:27386823

  6. Integrative functional genomics identifies regulatory mechanisms at coronary artery disease loci

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Clint L.; Pjanic, Milos; Wang, Ting; Nguyen, Trieu; Cohain, Ariella; Lee, Jonathan D.; Perisic, Ljubica; Hedin, Ulf; Kundu, Ramendra K.; Majmudar, Deshna; Kim, Juyong B.; Wang, Oliver; Betsholtz, Christer; Ruusalepp, Arno; Franzén, Oscar; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Schadt, Eric E.; Björkegren, Johan L.M.; Quertermous, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity, driven by both genetic and environmental risk factors. Meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies have identified >150 loci associated with CAD and myocardial infarction susceptibility in humans. A majority of these variants reside in non-coding regions and are co-inherited with hundreds of candidate regulatory variants, presenting a challenge to elucidate their functions. Herein, we use integrative genomic, epigenomic and transcriptomic profiling of perturbed human coronary artery smooth muscle cells and tissues to begin to identify causal regulatory variation and mechanisms responsible for CAD associations. Using these genome-wide maps, we prioritize 64 candidate variants and perform allele-specific binding and expression analyses at seven top candidate loci: 9p21.3, SMAD3, PDGFD, IL6R, BMP1, CCDC97/TGFB1 and LMOD1. We validate our findings in expression quantitative trait loci cohorts, which together reveal new links between CAD associations and regulatory function in the appropriate disease context. PMID:27386823

  7. Transfer function for vital infrasound pressures between the carotid artery and the tympanic membrane.

    PubMed

    Furihata, Kenji; Yamashita, Masato

    2013-02-01

    While occupational injury is associated with numerous individual and work-related risk factors, including long working hours and short sleep duration, the complex mechanisms causing such injuries are not yet fully understood. The relationship between the infrasound pressures of the tympanic membrane [ear canal pressure (ECP)], detected using an earplug embedded with a low-frequency microphone, and the carotid artery [carotid artery pressure (CAP)], detected using a stethoscope fitted with the same microphone, can be quantitatively characterized using systems analysis. The transfer functions of 40 normal workers (19 to 57 years old) were characterized, involving the analysis of 446 data points. The ECP waveform exhibits a pulsatile character with a slow respiratory component, which is superimposed on a biphasic recording that is synchronous with the cardiac cycle. The respiratory ECP waveform correlates with the instantaneous heart rate. The results also revealed that various fatigue-related risk factors may affect the mean magnitudes of the measured pressures and the delay transfer functions between CAP and ECP in the study population; these factors include systolic blood pressure, salivary amylase activity, age, sleep duration, postural changes, chronic fatigue, and pulse rate. PMID:23363133

  8. TRPV3 expression and vasodilator function in isolated uterine radial arteries from non-pregnant and pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy V; Kanagarajah, Arjna; Toemoe, Sianne; Bertrand, Paul P; Grayson, T Hilton; Britton, Fiona C; Leader, Leo; Senadheera, Sevvandi; Sandow, Shaun L

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the expression and function of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-3 ion channels (TRPV3) in uterine radial arteries isolated from non-pregnant and twenty-day pregnant rats. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) suggested TRPV3 is primarily localized to the smooth muscle in arteries from both non-pregnant and pregnant rats. IHC using C' targeted antibody, and qPCR of TRPV3 mRNA, suggested pregnancy increased arterial TRPV3 expression. The TRPV3 activator carvacrol caused endothelium-independent dilation of phenylephrine-constricted radial arteries, with no difference between vessels from non-pregnant and pregnant animals. Carvacrol-induced dilation was reduced by the TRPV3-blockers isopentenyl pyrophosphate and ruthenium red, but not by the TRPA1 or TRPV4 inhibitors HC-030031 or HC-067047, respectively. In radial arteries from non-pregnant rats only, inhibition of NOS and sGC, or PKG, enhanced carvacrol-mediated vasodilation. Carvacrol-induced dilation of arteries from both non-pregnant and pregnant rats was prevented by the IKCa blocker TRAM-34. TRPV3 caused an endothelium-independent, IKCa-mediated dilation of the uterine radial artery. NO-PKG-mediated modulation of TRPV3 activity is lost in pregnancy, but this did not alter the response to carvacrol. PMID:27073026

  9. Changes in functional status and functional capacity following coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Douki, Z Esmaeili; Vaezzadeh, N; Zakizad, M; Shahmohammadi, S; Sadeghi, R; Mohammadpour, R A

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare changes in health related-quality of life (H-RQOL) on physical functioning and mental health domains, changes in functional capacity before and 18 months after CABG surgery. Comprehensive data on 187 patients who underwent CABG surgery were prospectively collected, including preoperative factors and postoperative morbidity. Assessing functional status, the change in physical functioning score and change in mental health score were obtained using the physical functioning and mental health subscales out of the eight total subscales of the (SF-36) questionnaire. Also, functional capacity was estimated according to New York Heart Association (NYHA) class. The results showed 18 months after CABG surgery survival rates were (95.7%). Significant improvements in functional status were seen in physical functioning (p < 0.001), mental health (p < 0.000). However, there were no significant changes in the mean of functional status scores among patients in three age groups. Other significant improvement was found in functional capacity and NYHA class before and the 18 months after CABG. Functional status markedly and significantly improved after CABG surgery, particularly in physical functioning. However, the functional status among survivors of CABG surgery is worse than that of the general population. It seems further research is needed to identify factors explaining the change in H-RQOL to develop interventions to support patients. PMID:20836288

  10. Orthostatic hypotension and the Holmes-Adie syndrome. A study of two patients with afferent baroreceptor block.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R H; McLellan, D L; Love, D R

    1971-10-01

    Two patients who presented with symptoms due to orthostatic hypotension were found on examination to have the Holmes-Adie syndrome. Physiological investigation suggested that they both had an afferent block from baroreceptors in contrast to the efferent autonomic block found in most other cases of idiopathic orthostatic hypotension, including the cases of multisystem disease, now often called the Shy-Drager syndrome. PMID:5122384

  11. LOWER EXTREMITY MANIFESTATIONS OF PERIPHERAL ARTERY DISEASE: THE PATHOPHYSIOLOGIC AND FUNCTIONAL IMPLICATIONS OF LEG ISCHEMIA

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary McGrae

    2015-01-01

    Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) is frequently under-diagnosed, in part because of the wide variety of leg symptoms manifested by patients with PAD and in part because of the high prevalence of asymptomatic PAD. In primary care medical practices, 30% to 60% of PAD patients report no exertional leg symptoms and approximately 45–50% report exertional leg symptoms that are not consistent with classic intermittent claudication. The prevalence and extent of functional impairment and functional decline in PAD may also be underappreciated. Functional impairment and functional decline is common in PAD, even among those who are asymptomatic. Lower extremity ischemia is also associated with pathophysiologic changes in calf skeletal muscle including smaller calf muscle area, increased calf muscle fat content, impaired leg strength, and impaired metabolic function. People with severe PAD have poorer peroneal nerve conduction velocity compared to people with mild PAD or no PAD. The degree of ischemia-related pathophysiologic changes in lower extremity muscles and peripheral nerves of people with PAD are associated with the degree of functional impairment. New interventions are needed to improve functional performance and prevent mobility loss in the large number of PAD patients, including in those who are asymptomatic or who have exertional leg symptoms other than claudication. PMID:25908727

  12. Increase in Ultrasonic Intensity of Blood Speckle across Moderate Coronary Artery Stenosis Is an Independent Predictor of Functional Coronary Artery Stenosis Measured by Fractional Flow Reserve: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanno, Jun; Nakano, Shintaro; Kasai, Takatoshi; Ako, Junya; Nakamura, Sunao; Senbonmatsu, Takaaki; Nishimura, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The degree of coronary artery stenosis should be assessed both anatomically and functionally. We observed that the intensity of blood speckle (IBS) on intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is low proximal to a coronary artery stenosis, and high distal to the stenosis. We defined step-up IBS as the distal minus the proximal IBS, and speculated that this new parameter could be used for the functional evaluation of stenosis on IVUS. The aims of this study were to assess the relationships between step-up IBS and factors that affect coronary blood flow, and between step-up IBS and fractional flow reserve (FFR). Methods and Results This study enrolled 36 consecutive patients with angina who had a single moderate stenosis in the left anterior descending artery. All patients were evaluated by integrated backscatter IVUS and intracoronary pressure measurements. FFR was calculated from measurements using a coronary pressure wire during hyperemia. Conventional gray-scale IVUS images were recorded, and integrated backscatter was measured in three cross-sectional slices proximal and distal to the stenosis. Step-up IBS was calculated as (mean distal integrated backscatter value) − (mean proximal integrated backscatter value). Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that the heart rate (r = 0.45, P = 0.005), ejection fraction (r = −0.39, P = 0.01), and hemoglobin level (r = −0.32, P = 0.04) were independently correlated with step-up IBS, whereas proximal and distal IBS were not associated with these factors. There was a strong inverse correlation between step-up IBS and FFR (r = −0.84, P < 0.001), which remained significant on stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. Conclusions The newly defined parameter of step-up IBS is potentially useful for the functional assessment of coronary artery stenosis. PMID:25607986

  13. [Peculiarities of cardiac contractile function in patients with arterial hypertension depending on temperament and anxiety state].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the work was to elucidate the relationship between temperament and personal anxiety and between left ventricular myocardium hypertrophy, contractility and diastolic function in 671 men (mean age 54 +/- 1.8 yr) with newly diagnosed grade II arterial hypertension who took no antihypertensive drugs before the study. The tone of vegetative nervous system, serum levels of cortisol, aldosterone, thyroxin, and insulin were measured. EchoCG was used to determine left ventricular myocardium mass (LVMM), LVMM index, the ratio of transmitral blood flow at the beginning and end of diastole, left ventricular ejection and shortening fractions, end-systolic and diastolic size and volume. Phlegmatic and melancholic patients differed from cholerics and sanguinics in the predominance of parasympathetic influences, elevated blood aldosterone and insulin levels in combination with higher LVMM and LVMM index but lower left ventricular systolic and diastolic function. These characteristics were especially well apparent in anxious subjects comprising a risk group for cardiac insufficiency. PMID:22420192

  14. [Structural, developmental and functional evaluation of the family of individuals with arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Radovanovic, Cremilde Aparecida Trindade; Cecilio, Hellen Pollyanna Mantelo; Marcon, Sonia Silva

    2013-03-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the structure, development and functionality of the family that suffers from arterial hypertension. This is a qualitative study, developed with two families using the Calgary Model of Family Evaluation. It proposes the use of three categories of analysis: structural developmental and functional, and the use of a genogram and an ecomap. The two families are nuclear, however one is formed by the couple and their three sons who are married and reside in different homes. The other is a single-parent family established by the mother and children. The married son resides at another house in the same backyard with wife and daughter The application of the model of family evaluation allowed knowing the aspects related to the structure, operation and development of the two families that interfere impair or favor the development of the care in their quotidian. PMID:23781723

  15. The effect of plasma osmolality and baroreceptor loading status on postexercise heat loss responses.

    PubMed

    Paull, Gabrielle; Dervis, Sheila; Barrera-Ramirez, Juliana; McGinn, Ryan; Haqani, Baies; Flouris, Andreas D; Kenny, Glen P

    2016-03-15

    We examined the separate and combined effects of plasma osmolality and baroreceptor loading status on postexercise heat loss responses. Nine young males completed a 45-min treadmill exercise protocol at 58 ± 2% V̇o2 peak, followed by a 60-min recovery. On separate days, participants received 0.9% NaCl (ISO), 3.0% NaCl (HYP), or no infusion (natural recovery) throughout exercise. In two additional sessions (no infusion), lower-body negative (LBNP) or positive (LBPP) pressure was applied throughout the final 45 min of recovery. Local sweat rate (LSR; ventilated capsule: chest, forearm, upper back, forehead) and skin blood flow (SkBF; laser-Doppler flowmetry: forearm, upper back) were continuously measured. During HYP, upper back LSR was attenuated from end-exercise to 10 min of recovery by ∼0.35 ± 0.10 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2) and during the last 20 min of recovery by ∼0.13 ± 0.03 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2), while chest LSR was lower by 0.18 ± 0.06 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2) at 50 min of recovery compared with natural recovery (all P < 0.05). Forearm and forehead LSRs were not affected by plasma hyperosmolality during HYP (all P > 0.28), which suggests regional differences in the osmotic modulation of postexercise LSR. Furthermore, LBPP application attenuated LSR by ∼0.07-0.28 mg·min(-1)·cm(-2) during the last 30 min of recovery at all sites except the forehead compared with natural recovery (all P < 0.05). Relative to natural recovery, forearm and upper back SkBF were elevated during LBPP, ISO, and HYP by ∼6-10% by the end of recovery (all P < 0.05). We conclude that 1) hyperosmolality attenuates postexercise sweating heterogeneously among skin regions, and 2) baroreceptor loading modulates postexercise SkBF independently of changes in plasma osmolality without regional differences. PMID:26764055

  16. Measurement of brachial artery endothelial function using a standard blood pressure cuff.

    PubMed

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Tison, Geoffrey H; Alley, Hugh F; Budinger, Thomas F; Owens, Christopher D; Olgin, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    The integrity of endothelial function in major arteries (EFMA) is a powerful independent predictor of heart attack and stroke. Existing ultrasound-based non-invasive assessment methods are technically challenging and suitable only for laboratory settings. EFMA, like blood pressure (BP), is both acutely and chronically affected by factors such as lifestyle and medication. Consequently, laboratory-based measurements cannot fully gauge the effects of medical interventions on EFMA. EFMA and BP have, arguably, comparable (but complementary) value in the assessment of cardiovascular health. Widespread deployment of EFMA assessment is thus a desirable clinical goal. To this end, we propose a device based on modifying the measurement protocol of a standard electronic sphygmomanometer. The protocol involves inflating the cuff to sub-diastolic levels to enable recording of the pulse waveform before and after vasodilatory stimulus. The mechanical unloading of the arterial wall provided by the cuff amplifies the distension that occurs with each pulse, which is measured as a pressure variation in the cuff. We show that the height of the rising edge of each pulse is proportional to the change in lumen area between diastole and systole. This allows the effect of vasodilatory stimuli on the artery to be measured with high sensitivity. We compare the proposed cuff flow-mediated dilation (cFMD) method to ultrasound flow-mediated dilation (uFMD). We find significant correlation (r = 0.55, p = 0.003, N = 27) between cFMD- and uFMD-based metrics obtained when the release of a 5 min cuff occlusion is employed to induce endothelial stimulus via reactive hyperemia. cFMD is approximately proportional to the square of uFMD, representing a typical increase in sensitivity to vasodilation of 300-600%. This study illustrates the potential for an individual to conveniently measure his/her EFMA by using a low-cost reprogrammed home sphygmomanometer. PMID:26393958

  17. Measurement of brachial artery endothelial function using a standard blood pressure cuff

    PubMed Central

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Tison, Geoffrey H; Alley, Hugh F; Budinger, Thomas F; Owens, Christopher D; Olgin, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The integrity of endothelial function in major arteries (EFMA) is a powerful independent predictor of heart attack and stroke. Existing ultrasound-based non-invasive assessment methods are technically challenging and suitable only for laboratory settings. EFMA, like blood pressure (BP), is both acutely and chronically affected by factors such as lifestyle and medication. Consequently, lab-based measurements cannot fully gauge the effects of medical interventions on EFMA. EFMA and BP have, arguably, comparable (but complementary) value in the assessment of cardiovascular health. Widespread deployment of EFMA assessment is thus a desirable clinical goal. To this end, we propose a device based on modifying the measurement protocol of a standard electronic sphygmomanometer. Methods The protocol involves inflating the cuff to sub-diastolic levels to enable recording of the pulse waveform before and after vasodilatory stimulus. The mechanical unloading of the arterial wall provided by the cuff amplifies the distension that occurs with each pulse, which is measured as a pressure variation in the cuff. We show that the height of the rising edge of each pulse is proportional to the change in lumen area between diastole and systole. This allows the effect of vasodilatory stimuli on the artery to be measured with high sensitivity. We compare the proposed cuff flow-mediated dilation (cFMD) method to ultrasound FMD (uFMD). Results We find significant correlation (r=0.55, p = 0.003, N=27) between cFMD- and uFMD-based metrics obtained when the release of a 5-minute cuff occlusion is employed to induce endothelial stimulus via reactive hyperemia. cFMD is approximately proportional to the square of uFMD, representing a typical increase in sensitivity to vasodilation of 300–600%. Conclusion This study illustrates the potential for an individual to conveniently measure his/her EFMA by using a low-cost reprogrammed home sphygmomanometer. PMID:26393958

  18. Brachial artery retrograde flow increases with age: relationship to physical function

    PubMed Central

    Credeur, Daniel P.; Dobrosielski, Devon A.; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A.; Welsch, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the flow velocity pattern of the brachial artery and to determine its relationship to measures of physical function. Subjects from the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study (n = 95; age = 84 ± 10 years) were evaluated. Brachial artery flow velocities and dimensions were measured using high-resolution ultrasonography. The continuous scale of physical function and performance test (CS-PFP10) was used to assess physical function. This test is based on the performance of 11 activities of daily living. Total CS-PFP10 score was 39.51 ± 21.21 U. Mean antegrade and retrograde velocities at rest were 14.2 ± 4.7 and 3.6 ± 2.2 cm/s, respectively. Ante-/retrograde ratio was 5.5 ± 4.6. Brachial artery diameter was 4.3 ± 0.7 mm. Pulse pressure and vascular conductance were 66 ± 18 mmHg, and 0.9 ± 0.5 ml/min/mmHg, respectively. Vascular conductance (r = −0.34), ante-/retrograde ratio (r = −0.42) and CS-PFP10 (r = −0.65) were inversely and retrograde velocity (r = 0.40) and pulse pressure (r = 0.36), were directly associated with age. Retrograde velocity was inversely related to vascular conductance (r = −0.27) and CS-PFP10 total score (r = −0.45). A MANOVA revealed that those with the higher CS-PFP10 scores had a lower retrograde velocity (P = 0.0001), but this association was, in part, age-dependent. Among nonagenarians (n = 52), those in the lower tertiles of the CS-PFP10 scores had significantly higher retrograde velocities compared to those in the higher tertiles (P = 0.035). These data indicate an increase in brachial retrograde velocity with age. These hemodynamic changes are related to a decline in physical function. PMID:19565260

  19. Anatomical and Functional Estimations of Brachial Artery Diameter and Elasticity Using Oscillometric Measurements with a Quantitative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Fujii, Satoshi; Tomiyama, Yuuki; Takeuchi, Keisuke; Tamaki, Nagara

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive vascular function measurement plays an important role in detecting early stages of atherosclerosis and in evaluating therapeutic responses. In this regard, recently, new vascular function measurements have been developed. These new measurements have been used to evaluate vascular function in coronary arteries, large aortic arteries, or peripheral arteries. Increasing vascular diameter represents vascular remodeling related to atherosclerosis. Attenuated vascular elasticity may be a reliable marker for atherosclerotic risk assessment. However, previous measurements for vascular diameter and vascular elasticity have been complex, operator-dependent, or invasive. Therefore, simple and reliable approaches have been sought. We recently developed a new automated oscillometric method to measure the estimated area (eA) of a brachial artery and its volume elastic modulus (VE). In this review, we further report on this new measurement and other vascular measurements. We report on the reliability of the new automated oscillometric measurement of eA and VE. Based on our findings, this measurement technique should be a reliable approach, and this modality may have practical application to automatically assess muscular artery diameter and elasticity in clinical or epidemiological settings. In this review, we report the characteristics of our new oscillometric measurements and other related vascular function measurements. PMID:27493898

  20. The predictive value of arterial stiffness on major adverse cardiovascular events in individuals with mildly impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jie; Wang, Xiaona; Ye, Ping; Cao, Ruihua; Yang, Xu; Xiao, Wenkai; Zhang, Yun; Bai, Yongyi; Wu, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Despite growing evidence that arterial stiffness has important predictive value for cardiovascular disease in patients with advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, the predictive significance of arterial stiffness in individuals with mildly impaired renal function has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of arterial stiffness on cardiovascular disease in this specific population. Materials and methods We analyzed measurements of arterial stiffness (carotid–femoral pulse-wave velocity [cf-PWV]) and the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) in 1,499 subjects from a 4.8-year longitudinal study. Results A multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis showed that in individuals with normal renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2), the baseline cf-PWV was not associated with occurrence of MACEs (hazard ratio 1.398, 95% confidence interval 0.748–2.613; P=0.293). In individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2), a higher baseline cf-PWV level was associated with a higher risk of MACEs (hazard ratio 2.334, 95% confidence interval 1.082–5.036; P=0.031). Conclusion Arterial stiffness is a moderate and independent predictive factor for MACEs in individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2). PMID:27621605

  1. Sirtuin 3 deficiency is associated with inhibited mitochondrial function and pulmonary arterial hypertension in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Paulin, Roxane; Dromparis, Peter; Sutendra, Gopinath; Gurtu, Vikram; Zervopoulos, Sotirios; Bowers, Lyndsay; Haromy, Alois; Webster, Linda; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sebastien; Michelakis, Evangelos D

    2014-11-01

    Suppression of mitochondrial function promoting proliferation and apoptosis suppression has been described in the pulmonary arteries and extrapulmonary tissues in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but the cause of this metabolic remodeling is unknown. Mice lacking sirtuin 3 (SIRT3), a mitochondrial deacetylase, have increased acetylation and inhibition of many mitochondrial enzymes and complexes, suppressing mitochondrial function. Sirt3KO mice develop spontaneous PAH, exhibiting previously described molecular features of PAH pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC). In human PAH PASMC and rats with PAH, SIRT3 is downregulated, and its normalization with adenovirus gene therapy reverses the disease phenotype. A loss-of-function SIRT3 polymorphism, linked to metabolic syndrome, is associated with PAH in an unbiased cohort of 162 patients and controls. If confirmed in large patient cohorts, these findings may facilitate biomarker and therapeutic discovery programs in PAH. PMID:25284742

  2. Thrombospondin-4 knockout in hypertension protects small-artery endothelial function but induces aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Palao, Teresa; Rippe, Catarina; van Veen, Henk; VanBavel, Ed; Swärd, Karl; Bakker, Erik N T P

    2016-06-01

    Thrombospondin-4 (TSP-4) is a multidomain calcium-binding protein that has both intracellular and extracellular functions. As an extracellular matrix protein, it is involved in remodeling processes. Previous work showed that, in the cardiovascular system, TSP-4 expression is induced in the heart in response to experimental pressure overload and infarction injury. Intracellularly, it mediates the endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the heart. In this study, we explored the role of TSP-4 in hypertension. For this purpose, wild-type and TSP-4 knockout (Thbs4(-/-)) mice were treated with angiotensin II (ANG II). Hearts from ANG II-treated Thbs4(-/-) mice showed an exaggerated hypertrophic response. Interestingly, aortas from Thbs4(-/-) mice treated with ANG II showed a high incidence of aneurysms. In resistance arteries, ANG II-treated wild-type mice showed impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation. This was not observed in ANG II-treated Thbs4(-/-) mice or in untreated controls. No differences were found in the passive pressure-diameter curves or stress-strain relationships, although ANG II-treated Thbs4(-/-) mice showed a tendency to be less stiff, associated with thicker diameters of the collagen fibers as revealed by electron microscopy. We conclude that TSP-4 plays a role in hypertension, affecting cardiac hypertrophy, aortic aneurysm formation, as well as endothelial-dependent relaxation in resistance arteries. PMID:26968543

  3. Effect of coronary artery recanalization on right ventricular function in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Verani, M.S.; Tortoledo, F.E.; Batty, J.W.; Raizner, A.E.

    1985-05-01

    The effects of coronary artery recanalization by intracoronary administration of streptokinase on left ventricular function during acute myocardial infarction have received increasing attention in recent years. Although myocardial dysfunction is often more pronounced in the right ventricle than in the left ventricle in patients with acute inferior wall myocardial infarction, the effect of coronary artery recanalization on right ventricular dysfunction has not been previously addressed. Accordingly, in this investigation, 54 patients who participated in a prospective, controlled, randomized trial of recanalization during acute myocardial infarction were studied. Among 30 patients with inferior wall infarction, 19 had right ventricular dysfunction on admission; 11 of these 19 had positive uptake of technetium-99m pyrophosphate in the right ventricle, indicative of right ventricular infarction. Patients with successful recanalization exhibited improved right ventricular ejection fraction from admission to day 10. However, control patients and patients who did not undergo recanalization also exhibited improvement. These data indicate that the right ventricular dysfunction commonly associated with inferior wall infarction is often transient, and improvement is the rule, irrespective of early recanalization of the infarct vessel.

  4. A functional SNP in FLT1 increases risk of coronary artery disease in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Konta, Atsuko; Ozaki, Kouichi; Sakata, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Morizono, Takashi; Suna, Shinichiro; Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Kubo, Michiaki; Komuro, Issei; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2016-05-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) including myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes of death in many countries. Similar to other common diseases, its pathogenesis is thought to result from complex interactions among multiple genetic and environmental factors. Recent large-scale genetic association analysis for CAD identified 15 new loci. We examined the reproducibility of these previous association findings with 7990 cases and 6582 controls in a Japanese population. We found a convincing association of rs9319428 in FLT1, encoding fms-related tyrosine kinase 1 (P=5.98 × 10(-8)). Fine mapping using tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at FLT1 locus revealed that another SNP (rs74412485) showed more profound genetic effect for CAD (P=2.85 × 10(-12)). The SNP, located in intron 1 in FLT1, enhanced the transcriptional level of FLT1. RNA interference experiment against FLT1 showed that the suppression of FLT1 resulted in decreased expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules. Expression of FLT1 was observed in endothelial cells of human coronary artery. Our results indicate that the genetically coded increased expression of FLT1 by a functional SNP implicates activation in an inflammatory cascade that might eventually lead to CAD. PMID:26791355

  5. Validating a local Arterial Input Function method for improved perfusion quantification in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Willats, Lisa; Christensen, Soren; K Ma, Henry; A Donnan, Geoffrey; Connelly, Alan; Calamante, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    In bolus-tracking perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), temporal dispersion of the contrast bolus due to stenosis or collateral supply presents a significant problem for accurate perfusion quantification in stroke. One means to reduce the associated perfusion errors is to deconvolve the bolus concentration time-course data with local Arterial Input Functions (AIFs) measured close to the capillary bed and downstream of the arterial abnormalities causing dispersion. Because the MRI voxel resolution precludes direct local AIF measurements, they must be extrapolated from the surrounding data. To date, there have been no published studies directly validating these local AIFs. We assess the effectiveness of local AIFs in reducing dispersion-induced perfusion error by measuring the residual dispersion remaining in the local AIF deconvolved perfusion maps. Two approaches to locating the local AIF voxels are assessed and compared with a global AIF deconvolution across 19 bolus-tracking data sets from patients with stroke. The local AIF methods reduced dispersion in the majority of data sets, suggesting more accurate perfusion quantification. Importantly, the validation inherently identifies potential areas for perfusion underestimation. This is valuable information for the identification of at-risk tissue and management of stroke patients. PMID:21629260

  6. Collateral vessel number, plaque burden, and functional decline in peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M; Carr, James; Liu, Kiang; Kramer, Christopher M; Yuan, Chun; Tian, Lu; Criqui, Michael H; Guralnik, Jack M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zhao, Lihui; Xu, Dongxiang; Kibbe, Melina; Berry, Jarett; Carroll, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Associations of collateral vessels and lower extremity plaque with functional decline are unknown. Among people with peripheral artery disease (PAD), we determined whether greater superficial femoral artery (SFA) plaque burden combined with fewer lower extremity collateral vessels was associated with faster functional decline, compared to less plaque and/or more numerous collateral vessels. A total of 226 participants with ankle–brachial index (ABI) <1.00 underwent magnetic resonance imaging of lower extremity collateral vessels and cross-sectional imaging of the proximal SFA. Participants were categorized as follows: Group 1 (best), maximum plaque area < median and collateral vessel number ≥6 (median); Group 2, maximum plaque area < median and collateral vessel number <6; Group 3, maximum plaque area > median and collateral vessel number ≥6; Group 4 (worst), maximum plaque area > median and collateral vessel number <6. Functional measures were performed at baseline and annually for 2 years. Analyses adjust for age, sex, race, comorbidities, and other confounders. Annual changes in usual-paced walking velocity were: Group 1, +0.01 m/s; Group 2, −0.02 m/s; Group 3, −0.01 m/s; Group 4, −0.05 m/s (p-trend=0.008). Group 4 had greater decline than Group 1 (p<0.001), Group 2 (p=0.029), and Group 3 (p=0.010). Similar trends were observed for fastest-paced 4-meter walking velocity (p-trend=0.018). Results were not substantially changed when analyses were repeated with additional adjustment for ABI. However, there were no associations of SFA plaque burden and collateral vessel number with decline in 6-minute walk. In summary, a larger SFA plaque burden combined with fewer collateral vessels is associated with a faster decline in usual and fastest-paced walking velocity in PAD. PMID:25047855

  7. Pulmonary Artery Dilation and Right Ventricular Function in Acute Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Numano, Fujito; Shimizu, Chisato; Tremoulet, Adriana H; Dyar, Dan; Burns, Jane C; Printz, Beth F

    2016-03-01

    Coronary artery inflammation and aneurysm formation are the most common complications of Kawasaki disease (KD). Valvulitis and myocarditis are also well described and may lead to valvar regurgitation and left ventricular dysfunction. However, functional changes in the right heart have rarely been reported. We noted several acute KD patients with dilated pulmonary arteries (PA) and thus sought to systematically characterize PA size and right-heart function in an unselected cohort of KD patients cared for at a single clinical center. Clinical, laboratory, and echocardiographic data from 143 acute KD subjects were analyzed. PA dilation was documented in 23 subjects (16.1 %); these subjects had higher median right ventricle myocardial performance index (RV MPI), higher ratio of early tricuspid inflow velocity to tricuspid annular early diastolic velocity (TV E/e'), and lower median TV e' velocity compared to the non-PA dilation group (0.50 vs 0.38 p < 0.01, 4.2 vs 3.6 p < 0.05, and 13.5 vs 15.2 cm/s p < 0.01, respectively). Almost all subjects with PA dilation had improved PA Z-score, RV MPI, and TV E/e' in the subacute phase (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences in indices of left ventricle function between PA dilation group and non-PA dilation group. In summary, PA dilation was documented in 16 % of acute KD subjects. These subjects were more likely to have echocardiographic indices consistent with isolated RV dysfunction that improved in the subacute phase. The long-term consequence of these findings will require longitudinal studies of this patient population. PMID:26681305

  8. Carotid baroreceptor stimulation prevents arrhythmias induced by acute myocardial infarction through autonomic modulation.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kai; Yu, Lilei; He, Bo; Huang, Bing; Yang, Kang; Saren, Gaowa; Wang, Songyun; Zhou, Xiaoya; Jiang, Hong

    2014-11-01

    : Electrical carotid baroreceptor stimulation (CBS) has shown therapeutic potential for resistant hypertension and heart failure by resetting autonomic nervous system, but the impacts on arrhythmias remains unclear. This study evaluated the effects of CBS on ventricular electrophysiological properties in normal dog heart and arrhythmias after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). In the acute protocol, anesthetized open chest dogs were exposed to 1 hour left anterior descending coronary occlusion as AMI model. Dogs were received either sham treatment (Control group, n = 8) or CBS (CBS group, n = 8), started 1 hour before AMI. CBS resulted in pronounced prolongation of ventricular effective refractory period and reduction of the maximum action potential duration restitution slope (from 0.85 ± 0.15 in the baseline state to 0.67 ± 0.09 at the end of 1 hour, P < 0.05) before AMI. Number of premature ventricular contractions (277 ± 168 in the Control group vs. 103 ± 84 in the CBS group, P < 0.05) and episodes of ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (7 ± 3 in the Control group vs. 3 ± 2 in the CBS group, P < 0.05) was decreased compared with the control group during AMI. CBS buffered low-frequency/high-frequency ratio raise during AMI. Ischemic size was not affected by CBS. CBS may have a beneficial impact on ventricular arrhythmias induced by AMI through modulation of autonomic tone. PMID:24979392

  9. Material coefficients of the strain energy function of pulmonary arteries in normal and cigarette smoke-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, S Q; Fung, Y C

    1993-11-01

    The effect of cigarette smoke on the stress-strain relationship of pulmonary arteries was studied in 2- and 3-month smoke-exposed rats. The animals were exposed to cigarette smoke in a smoke-generating system 10 times daily with one cigarette each time. The smoke density and the puffing duration and frequency of the system were regulated in accordance with reference values measured from human smokers. The mechanical properties of the pulmonary arteries about 450 microns in external diameter (at zero pressure) were determined in vitro by inflation and deflation tests. The average stress and middle-wall strain of the selected pulmonary arteries were determined on the basis of experimental data including inflation and deflation pressures during loading and unloading processes, respectively, and vessel diameter and length at various pressure levels, and vessel circumferential and longitudinal lengths at zero-stress state. A constitutive equation for the pulmonary arteries was derived from an energy function depending on circumferential and longitudinal Green's strains. The coefficients of the strain energy function of the pulmonary arteries were determined in both the smoke-exposed and control rats by fitting the experimental stress-strain data with the constitutive equation. It was found that the wall stress of the pulmonary arteries at a given strain and most of the coefficients of the strain energy function were increased in both the 2- and 3-month smoke-exposed rats in comparison with those in the corresponding controls. These results indicated that cigarette smoke induced an increase in the wall stiffness of the pulmonary arteries in the rats. PMID:8262988

  10. Heterogeneous function of ryanodine receptors, but not IP3 receptors, in hamster cremaster muscle feed arteries and arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Westcott, Erika B.

    2011-01-01

    The roles played by ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) in vascular smooth muscle in the microcirculation remain unclear. Therefore, the function of both RyRs and IP3Rs in Ca2+ signals and myogenic tone in hamster cremaster muscle feed arteries and downstream arterioles were assessed using confocal imaging and pressure myography. Feed artery vascular smooth muscle displayed Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ waves, which were inhibited by the RyR antagonists ryanodine (10 μM) or tetracaine (100 μM). Despite the inhibition of sparks and waves, ryanodine or tetracaine increased global intracellular Ca2+ and constricted the arteries. The blockade of IP3Rs with xestospongin D (5 μM) or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (100 μM) or the inhibition of phospholipase C using U-73122 (10 μM) also attenuated Ca2+ waves without affecting Ca2+ sparks. Importantly, the IP3Rs and phospholipase C antagonists decreased global intracellular Ca2+ and dilated the arteries. In contrast, cremaster arterioles displayed only Ca2+ waves: Ca2+ sparks were not observed, and neither ryanodine (10–50 μM) nor tetracaine (100 μM) affected either Ca2+ signals or arteriolar tone despite the presence of functional RyRs as assessed by responses to the RyR agonist caffeine (10 mM). As in feed arteries, arteriolar Ca2+ waves were attenuated by xestospongin D (5 μM), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (100 μM), and U-73122 (10 μM), accompanied by decreased global intracellular Ca2+ and vasodilation. These findings highlight the contrasting roles played by RyRs and IP3Rs in Ca2+ signals and myogenic tone in feed arteries and demonstrate important differences in the function of RyRs between feed arteries and downstream arterioles. PMID:21357503

  11. Selective down-regulation of KV2.1 function contributes to enhanced arterial tone during diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Cintrón, Madeline; Nystoriak, Matthew A; Prada, Maria Paz; Johnson, Kenneth; Fayer, William; Dell'Acqua, Mark L; Scott, John D; Navedo, Manuel F

    2015-03-20

    Enhanced arterial tone is a leading cause of vascular complications during diabetes. Voltage-gated K(+) (KV) channels are key regulators of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contractility and arterial tone. Whether impaired KV channel function contributes to enhance arterial tone during diabetes is unclear. Here, we demonstrate a reduction in KV-mediated currents (IKv) in VSMCs from a high fat diet (HFD) mouse model of type 2 diabetes. In particular, IKv sensitive to stromatoxin (ScTx), a potent KV2 blocker, were selectively reduced in diabetic VSMCs. This was associated with decreased KV2-mediated regulation of arterial tone and suppression of the KV2.1 subunit mRNA and protein in VSMCs/arteries isolated from HFD mice. We identified protein kinase A anchoring protein 150 (AKAP150), via targeting of the phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), and the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells c3 (NFATc3) as required determinants of KV2.1 suppression during diabetes. Interestingly, substantial reduction in transcript levels for KV2.1 preceded down-regulation of large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BKCa) channel β1 subunits, which are ultimately suppressed in chronic hyperglycemia to a similar extent. Together, our study supports the concept that transcriptional suppression of KV2.1 by activation of the AKAP150-CaN/NFATc3 signaling axis contributes to enhanced arterial tone during diabetes. PMID:25670860

  12. Endothelial function, arterial stiffness and adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Sauder, Katherine A; Proctor, David N; Chow, Mosuk; Troy, Lisa M; Wang, Na; Vita, Joseph A; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Mitchell, Gary F; Jacques, Paul F; Hamburg, Naomi M; West, Sheila G

    2015-06-14

    Endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness are early predictors of CVD. Intervention studies have suggested that diet is related to vascular health, but most prior studies have tested individual foods or nutrients and relied on small samples of younger adults. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationships between adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and vascular health in a large cross-sectional analysis. In 5887 adults in the Framingham Heart Study Offspring and Third Generation cohorts, diet quality was quantified with the 2010 Dietary Guidelines Adherence Index (DGAI-2010). Endothelial function was assessed via brachial artery ultrasound and arterial stiffness via arterial tonometry. In age-, sex- and cohort-adjusted analyses, a higher DGAI-2010 score (greater adherence) was modestly associated with a lower resting flow velocity, hyperaemic response, mean arterial pressure, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), and augmentation index, but not associated with resting arterial diameter or flow-mediated dilation (FMD). In multivariable models adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors, only the association of a higher DGAI-2010 score with a lower baseline flow velocity and augmentation index persisted (β = - 0·002, P= 0·003 and β = - 0·05 ± 0·02, P< 0·001, respectively). Age-stratified multivariate-adjusted analyses suggested that the relationship of higher DGAI-2010 scores with lower mean arterial pressure, PWV and augmentation index was more pronounced among adults younger than 50 years. Better adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, particularly in younger adults, is associated with a lower peripheral blood flow velocity and arterial wave reflection, but not FMD. The present results suggest a link between adherence to the Dietary Guidelines and favourable vascular health. PMID:25885520

  13. Impaired renal function impacts negatively on vascular stiffness in patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and coronary artery disease (CAD) are independently associated with increased vascular stiffness. We examined whether renal function contributes to vascular stiffness independently of CAD status. Methods We studied 160 patients with CAD and 169 subjects without CAD. The 4-variable MDRD formula was used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); impaired renal function was defined as eGFR <60 mL/min. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with the SphygmoCor® device. Circulating biomarkers were assessed in plasma using xMAP® multiplexing technology. Results Patients with CAD and impaired renal function had greater PWV compared to those with CAD and normal renal function (10.2 [9.1;11.2] vs 7.3 [6.9;7.7] m/s; P < 0.001). In all patients, PWV was a function of eGFR (β = −0.293; P < 0.001) even after adjustment for age, sex, systolic blood pressure, body mass index and presence or absence of CAD. Patients with CAD and impaired renal function had higher levels of adhesion and inflammatory molecules including E-selectin and osteopontin (all P < 0.05) compared to those with CAD alone, but had similar levels of markers of oxidative stress. Conclusions Renal function is a determinant of vascular stiffness even in patients with severe atherosclerotic disease. This was paralleled by differences in markers of cell adhesion and inflammation. Increased vascular stiffness may therefore be linked to inflammatory remodeling of the vasculature in people with impaired renal function, irrespective of concomitant atherosclerotic disease. PMID:23937620

  14. [Functional assessment of the hepatic arterial blood flow by pharmacoradiography (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stellamor, K; Hruby, W; Peschl, L

    1981-12-01

    By means of celiacography it was possible to demonstrate that parenteral medication with parathormone creates a selective dilatation of the liver vessels in man, provided that they are dilatable. This hemodynamic hormone effect could not be traced in the other mesenteric vessels. The increase of portal hypertension resulting from cirrhosis leads to a loss of the dilating ability of liver vessels. This regressive reaction is well demonstrated on the parathormon-celiaco-gram. Thus a functional assessment of the hepatic blood flow is possible. The extent of the dilatability of the liver artery seems to be of great importance for the prognosis and indication of the porto-systemic shunt-operation. Moreover we could show that an increase in the liver perfusion demonstrates pathologic liver processes in a better way. PMID:7323629

  15. ITPKC functional polymorphism associated with Kawasaki disease susceptibility and formation of coronary artery aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Gunji, Tomohiko; Burns, Jane C; Shimizu, Chisato; Newburger, Jane W; Yashiro, Mayumi; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Yanagawa, Hiroshi; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kishi, Fumio; Hamamoto, Kunihiro; Terai, Masaru; Sato, Yoshitake; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Saji, Tsutomu; Nariai, Akiyoshi; Kaburagi, Yoichi; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Suzuki, Kyoko; Tanaka, Takeo; Nagai, Toshiro; Cho, Hideo; Fujino, Akihiro; Sekine, Akihiro; Nakamichi, Reiichiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hata, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is a pediatric systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology for which a genetic influence is suspected. We identified a functional SNP (itpkc_3) in the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase C (ITPKC) gene on chromosome 19q13.2 that is significantly associated with Kawasaki disease susceptibility and also with an increased risk of coronary artery lesions in both Japanese and US children. Transfection experiments showed that the C allele of itpkc_3 reduces splicing efficiency of the ITPKC mRNA. ITPKC acts as a negative regulator of T-cell activation through the Ca2+/NFAT signaling pathway, and the C allele may contribute to immune hyper-reactivity in Kawasaki disease. This finding provides new insights into the mechanisms of immune activation in Kawasaki disease and emphasizes the importance of activated T cells in the pathogenesis of this vasculitis. PMID:18084290

  16. Arterial input function and gray matter cerebral blood volume measurements in children

    PubMed Central

    Withey, Stephanie B.; Novak, Jan; MacPherson, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate how arterial input functions (AIFs) vary with age in children and compare the use of individual and population AIFs for calculating gray matter CBV values. Quantitative measures of cerebral blood volume (CBV) using dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) require measurement of an AIF. AIFs are affected by numerous factors including patient age. Few data presenting AIFs in the pediatric population exists. Materials and Methods Twenty‐two previously treated pediatric brain tumor patients (mean age, 6.3 years; range, 2.0–15.3 years) underwent DSC‐MRI scans on a 3T MRI scanner over 36 visits. AIFs were measured in the middle cerebral artery. A functional form of an adult population AIF was fitted to each AIF to obtain parameters reflecting AIF shape. The relationship between parameters and age was assessed. Correlations between gray matter CBV values calculated using the resulting population and individual patient AIFs were explored. Results There was a large variation in individual patient AIFs but correlations between AIF shape and age were observed. The center (r = 0.596, P < 0.001) and width of the first‐pass peak (r = 0.441, P = 0.007) were found to correlate significantly with age. Intrapatient coefficients of variation were significantly lower than interpatient values for all parameters (P < 0.001). Differences in CBV values calculated with an overall population and age‐specific population AIF compared to those calculated with individual AIFs were 31.3% and 31.0%, respectively. Conclusion Parameters describing AIF shape correlate with patient age in line with expected changes in cardiac output. In pediatric DSC‐MRI studies individual patient AIFs are recommended. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;43:981–989 PMID:26514288

  17. Cardiovascular and neurohumoral postural responses and baroreceptor abnormalities during a course of adjunctive vasodilator therapy with felodipine for congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kassis, E; Amtorp, O

    1987-06-01

    Studies in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) have demonstrated an abnormal beta-adrenergic reflex vasodilation during orthostatic tilt. Baroreflex modulation of vascular resistance in patients with CHF was investigated during therapy with a vasoselective calcium antagonist, felodipine. Eight patients on conventional therapy for severe CHF were studied after a 3 week course of additional felodipine or placebo treatment under randomized, double-blind, and crossover conditions. Forearm subcutaneous vascular resistance (FSVR) was estimated with use of the local 133Xe washout. Aortic pulsatile stretch, expressed as the systolic distension in percent of diastolic diameter, was calculated from echocardiographic measurements of aortic root diameters. At 3 weeks, felodipine reduced the arterial pressure, systemic vascular resistance, and FSVR, preserved cardiac filling pressures and heart rate, and increased cardiac output, stroke volume, and aortic pulsatile stretch. Upright tilt (45 degrees) was used to study baroreflex-mediated cardiovascular responses. The unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors during upright tilt was substantial and about equal during both treatment courses, but the pulse pressure was maintained during the placebo and decreased during the felodipine period. During tilt, the patients on placebo failed to increase heart rate and their FSVR, systemic vascular resistance, and arterial mean pressure were decreased, whereas during tilt after felodipine, heart rate and systemic vascular resistance increased to maintain arterial mean pressure and FSVR also tended to increase. Both the stroke volume and aortic pulsatile stretch increased during tilt in patients on placebo but they decreased in those on felodipine. The tilt caused increments in circulating norepinephrine and epinephrine levels during both treatment regimens. Regulation of FSVR during the sympathetic stimulation of orthostatic stress was further elucidated. Proximal neural blockade

  18. Multimarker assessment for the prediction of renal function improvement after percutaneous revascularization for renal artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Partovi, Sasan; Zeller, Thomas; Breidthardt, Tobias; Kaech, Max; Boeddinghaus, Jasper; Puelacher, Christian; Nestelberger, Thomas; Aschwanden, Markus; Mueller, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying patients likely to have improved renal function after percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty and stenting (PTRA) for renal artery stenosis (RAS) is challenging. The purpose of this study was to use a comprehensive multimarker assessment to identify those patients who would benefit most from correction of RAS. Methods In 127 patients with RAS and decreased renal function and/or hypertension referred for PTRA, quantification of hemodynamic cardiac stress using B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), renal function using estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), parenchymal renal damage using resistance index (RI), and systemic inflammation using C-reactive protein (CRP) were performed before intervention. Results Predefined renal function improvement (increase in eGFR ≥10%) at 6 months occurred in 37% of patients. Prognostic accuracy as quantified by the area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve for the ability of BNP, eGFR, RI and CRP to predict renal function improvement were 0.59 (95% CI, 0.48–0.70), 0.71 (95% CI, 0.61–0.81), 0.52 (95% CI, 0.41–0.65), and 0.56 (95% CI, 0.44–0.68), respectively. None of the possible combinations increased the accuracy provided by eGFR (lower eGFR indicated a higher likelihood for eGFR improvement after PTRA, P=ns for all). In the subgroup of 56 patients with pre-interventional eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2, similar findings were obtained. Conclusions Quantification of renal function, but not any other pathophysiologic signal, provides at least moderate accuracy in the identification of patients with RAS in whom PTRA will improve renal function. PMID:27280085

  19. The influence of coronary angioplasty of the infarct-dependent artery on systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Khalilov, Sh D; Guluzade, V U; Alieva, Kh A; Mirzakhanova, L R; Imanov, G G

    2009-01-01

    The target of research is to compare the changes of systolic and diastolic functions of the left ventricle in patients with at least one month infarction after infarct-dependent artery recanalization through elective stenting. The group of 60 patients was selected, 47 men and 13 women, who underwent hospitalization in Central Hospital of Oilworkers in 2006-2007. The investigation was conducted on 30 patients (24 men and 6 women), who underwent elective stenting of LAD. The control group was composed of 30 patients (23 men and 7 women) after anterior myocardial infarction without further stenting of infarct-dependent artery. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by coronary ventriculography. The patients underwent the echocardiography the day before stenting. The "Sonoline G60 (Siemens, Germany)" machine with 2.5MHz probe has been used. The echocardiography was repeated after 7 days and 3, 6, 12 months after stent implantation. The standard parameters of systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle were identified during investigation. The statistical processing was delivered through PC with Excel program set. All data are presented in (M+/-m), where the M--mean value, m--standard mean fault. Comparison of the data was conducted with Student criterion. The results of treatment of patients with and without further stenting of infarct-dependent artery were compared. It was found that the stenting of infarct-dependent artery with standard therapy in patients after myocardial infarction has better impact on systolic function, than traditional medical therapy without further reperfusion. The stenting of infarct-dependent artery facilitates earlier improvement of the systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle. The diastolic relaxation grade of the left ventricle after stenting of the left coronary artery is higher, than in patients without further revascularization. PMID:19644191

  20. Perinatal Taurine Alters Arterial Pressure Control and Renal Function in Adult Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Roysommuti, Sanya; Lerdweeraphon, Wichaporn; Malila, Pisamai; Jirakulsomchok, Dusit; Wyss, J. Michael

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of perinatal taurine exposure on renal function in adult, female rats on a high sugar diet. Perinatal taurine depleted (TD), supplemented (TS) or untreated control (C) female offspring were fed normal rat chow and tap water (CW,TDW or TSW) or tap water with 5% glucose (CG, TDG or TSG) after weaning. At 7–8 weeks of age, renal function was studied in the conscious, restrained rats. Mean arterial pressure was significantly higher in TDW, TDG, and TSG rats. Plasma sodium concentration was significantly lower in all glucose treated animals, but the greatest decrease was in TDW rats. Basal renal blood flow was lowest in TSW and TSG, and the responses to a saline load were also lowest in those two groups. These changes were consistent with increased renal vascular resistance. The basal glomerular filtration rate was lowest in TSW, but the responses to a saline load were similar in all of the groups. Water excretion was lower in TSG and TSW, consistent with increased renal tubular water reabsorption. These data suggest that perinatal taurine exposure alters normal renal function and renal responses to dietary sugar in adult female offspring. PMID:19239145

  1. [Effect of sanatorium treatment on endothelial function in children with primary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Ianina, T Iu

    2014-01-01

    To study the effect of sanatorium treatment (ST) using sodium chloride baths and metabolic drug mildronat on the dynamics of the ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), markers of endothelial function in children with primary arterial hypertension (PAH). ABPM and held defined level of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide (NO) in the serum of 114 children with PAH aged 12-17. The positive dynamics of ABPM in all groups, but significantly (P < 0.05) decrease in mean BP was noted in the group with combined ST using sodium chloride baths. When analyzing the level of NO a positive trend (P < 0.01) in the group was using metabolic therapy, but significantly (P < 0.001) pronounced effect was observed when it is combined balneotherapy and metabolic therapy. Analysis of ET-1 and ADMA at ST in conjunction with therapy and metabolic rate of sodium chloride baths there was a significant (P < 0.01) decrease in these parameters in comparison with those before treatment. In children with PAH have been identified violations of the functional activity of the endothelium, which is reflected in increased levels of ET-1, ADMA and reducing NO. Conducting rehabilitation inclusion complex balneotherapy and metabolic therapy helps to reduce average daily blood pressure, normalization of functional activity of the endothelium as a normalization of the synthesis of NO (P < 0.,001), a significant decrease of ET-1 (P < 0.01) and ADMA (P < 0.01). PMID:24908958

  2. MRI-derived arterial input functions for PET kinetic modelling in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Eleanor; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Adrian Carpenter, T.

    2013-02-01

    Simultaneous PET-MR acquisition provides the high temporal and spatial resolution of MRI with the specificity of PET. In PET, accurate modelling of physiological function in vivo requires the time-activity curve of tracer in blood plasma, known as the arterial input function (AIF). As the gold standard method of blood sampling is inherently prohibitive in the small animal case, here we discuss how we prepare to rapidly sample MRI signals from gadolinium-doped tracer to obtain the tracer input functions from a simultaneous PET-MR measurement. ΔR2* measurements taken from EPI images were used to obtain first pass bolus AIFs in the rat brain from DSC-MRI datasets of 5 rats. AIFs obtained using our automatic algorithm were found to be consistent between animals and compared well with manual methods without need for a priori voxel selection. A variable flip angle FLASH sequence used for T1 mapping was successfully tested in a phantom study, providing accurate measurements of Gd concentration.

  3. Functional Class and Targeted Therapy Are Related to the Survival in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yae Min; Choi, Deok Young; Baek, Han Joo; Jung, Sung Hwan; Choi, In Suck; Shin, Eak Kyun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an orphan disease showing poor prognosis. The purpose of study was to evaluate clinical factors influencing outcomes in PAH. Materials and Methods Patients who were diagnosed with PAH at a single center were reviewed retrospectively. Forty patients (34.9±14.5 years, 80% of female) were enrolled. Results Causes were congenital heart disease in 24 (60%), connective tissue disease in 8 (20%) and idiopathic PAH in 6 (15%). Sixteen patients (40%) were WHO functional class III or IV at the time of diagnosis. Twenty seven patients (67.5%) received molecular targeted therapy. During follow-up (53.6±45.5 months), 10 patients (25%) died and 1-, 2-, and 8 year survival rates were 91.3%, 78.7%, and 66.8%, respectively. As expected, median survival of patients with functional class I or II were significantly longer than patients with III or IV (p=0.041). Interestingly, patients with molecular targeted therapy showed longer survival than conventional therapy (p=0.021). Conclusion WHO functional class at the time of diagnosis was the strong predictor of survival, and molecular targeted therapy could significantly improve the survival. Therefore, early screening and intensive management would be crucial to improve the prognosis in the patient with PAH. PMID:25323888

  4. Parameters of arterial function and structure in adult patients after coarctation repair.

    PubMed

    Trojnarska, Olga; Mizia-Stec, Katarzyna; Gabriel, Marcin; Szczepaniak-Chicheł, Ludwina; Katarzyńska-Szymańska, Agnieszka; Grajek, Stefan; Tykarski, Andrzej; Gąsior, Zbigniew; Kramer, Lucyna

    2011-07-01

    Regardless of a successful operation, patients with coarctation of aorta (CoAo) are exposed to the risk of hypertension and a propensity to vascular and end-organ damage. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of residual aorta stenosis as well as the age at the operation on the parameters of arterial function and structure in patients after CoAo repair. Eighty-five patients after CoAo repair (53 males; mean age: 34.6 ± 10.3 years, mean age at the repair: 10.9 ± 8.2 years) were enrolled in the study. The control group consisted of 30 healthy subjects (18 males; mean age: 33.6 ± 8.2 years). Indices of systemic arterial remodeling [flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), nitroglycerine-mediated vasodilatation (NMD), carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), pulse wave velocity (PWV)] were analyzed in all study patients. In normotensive patients after CoAo repair (47/55%), a significantly increased PWV was observed in comparison to the control group (6.8 ± 1.2 vs. 5.4 ± 0.9 m/s; p = 0.003), with no difference in IMT values (0.53 ± 0.1 vs. 0.51 ± 0.1 mm; p = 0.06). Mean FMD (4.8 ± 2.8 vs. 8.5 ± 2.3%; p = 0.00003) and NMD (11.3 ± 4.6 vs. 19.8 ± 7.2%; p = 0.00001) were lower than in the controls. In patients with a residual aorta stenosis (46/54%), defined as an arm-leg pressure gradient ≥ 20 mmHg, no differences were found within the scope of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure and of all of the examined vascular parameters. No significant correlations were revealed between the vascular parameters and the gradient across descending aorta as well as the age at the operation. Residual stenosis in the descending aorta does not affect the arterial vasodilatation nor stiffness in patients after CoAo repair. An early surgery does not influence the remodeling of the vessels, which supports the thesis that CoAo is a generalized vascular disease and that even an early operation cannot prevent the progressive and vascular changes and end-organ damage. PMID

  5. Cardiovascular function in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A. E.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.; Leach-Huntoon, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    Postflight orthostatic intolerance and cardiac hemodynamics associated with manned space flight have been investigated on seven STS missions. Orthostatic heart rates appear to be influenced by the mission duration. The rates increase during the first 7-10 days of flight and recover partially after that. Fluid loading is used as a countermeasure to the postflight orthostatic intolerance. The carotid baroreceptor function shows only slight responsiveness to orthostatic stimulation. Plots of the baroreceptor function are presented. It is concluded that an early adaptation to the space flight conditions involves a fluid shift and that the subsequent alterations in the neutral controlling mechanisms contribute to the orthoststic intolerance.

  6. Functional differences between the arteries perfusing gas exchange and nutritional membranes in the late chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Riazudin; Cavallaro, Giacomo; Kessels, Carolina G A; Villamor, Eduardo

    2015-10-01

    The chicken extraembryonic arterial system comprises the allantoic arteries, which irrigate the gas exchange organ (the chorioallantoic membrane, CAM) and the yolk sac (YS) artery, which irrigates the nutritional organ (the YS membrane). We compared, using wire myography, the reactivity of allantoic and YS arteries from 19-day chicken embryos (total incubation 21 days). The contractions induced by KCl, the adrenergic agonists norepinephrine (NE, nonselective), phenylephrine (α1), and oxymetazoline (α2), electric field stimulation (EFS), serotonin, U46619 (TP receptor agonist), and endothelin (ET)-1 and the relaxations induced by acetylcholine (ACh), sodium nitroprusside (SNP, NO donor), forskolin (adenylate cyclase activator), and isoproterenol (β-adrenergic agonist) were investigated. Extraembryonic allantoic arteries did not show α-adrenergic-mediated contraction (either elicited by exogenous agonists or EFS) or ACh-induced (endothelium-dependent) relaxation, whereas these responses were present in YS arteries. Interestingly, the intraembryonic segment of the allantoic artery showed EFS- and α-adrenergic-induced contraction and ACh-mediated relaxation. Moreover, glyoxylic acid staining showed the presence of catecholamine-containing nerves in the YS and the intraembryonic allantoic artery, but not in the extraembryonic allantoic artery. Isoproterenol- and forskolin-induced relaxation and ET-1-induced contraction were higher in YS than in allantoic arteries, whereas serotonin- and U46619-induced contraction and SNP-induced relaxation did not significantly differ between the two arteries. In conclusion, our study demonstrates a different pattern of reactivity in the arteries perfusing the gas exchange and the nutritional membranes of the chicken embryo. PMID:26119481

  7. Regulation of sympathetic nervous system function after cardiovascular deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasser, E. M.; Moffitt, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Humans subjected to prolonged periods of bed rest or microgravity undergo deconditioning of the cardiovascular system, characterized by resting tachycardia, reduced exercise capability, and a predisposition for orthostatic intolerance. These changes in cardiovascular function are likely due to a combination of factors, including changes in control of body fluid balance or cardiac alterations resulting in inadequate maintenance of stroke volume, altered arterial or venous vascular function, reduced activation of cardiovascular hormones, and diminished autonomic reflex function. There is evidence indicating a role for each of these mechanisms. Diminished reflex activation of the sympathetic nervous system and subsequent vasoconstriction appear to play an important role. Studies utilizing the hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rat, an animal model of deconditioning, evaluated the potential role of altered arterial baroreflex control of the sympathetic nervous system. These studies indicate that HU results in blunted baroreflex-mediated activation of both renal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in response to a hypotensive stimulus. HU rats are less able to maintain arterial pressure during hemorrhage, suggesting that diminished ability to increase sympathetic activity has functional consequences for the animal. Reflex control of vasopressin secretion appears to be enhanced following HU. Blunted baroreflex-mediated sympathoexcitation appears to involve altered central nervous system function. Baroreceptor afferent activity in response to changes in arterial pressure is unaltered in HU rats. However, increases in efferent sympathetic nerve activity for a given decrease in afferent input are blunted after HU. This altered central nervous system processing of baroreceptor inputs appears to involve an effect at the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Specifically, it appears that tonic GABAA-mediated inhibition of the RVLM is enhanced after HU. Augmented inhibition apparently

  8. The functional and structural changes in the basilar artery due to overpressure blast injury

    PubMed Central

    Toklu, Hale Z; Muller-Delp, Judy; Yang, Zhihui; Oktay, Şehkar; Sakarya, Yasemin; Strang, Kevin; Ghosh, Payal; Delp, Michael D; Scarpace, Philip J; Wang, Kevin KW; Tümer, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Overpressure blast-wave induced brain injury (OBI) leads to progressive pathophysiologic changes resulting in a reduction in brain blood flow, blood brain barrier breakdown, edema, and cerebral ischemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate cerebral vascular function after single and repeated OBI. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: Control (Naive), single OBI (30 psi peak pressure, 1 to 2 msec duration), and repeated (days 1, 4, and 7) OBI (r-OBI). Rats were killed 24 hours after injury and the basilar artery was isolated, cannulated, and pressurized (90 cm H2O). Vascular responses to potassium chloride (KCl) (30 to 100 mmol/L), endothelin-1 (10−12 to 10−7 mol/L), acetylcholine (ACh) (10−10 to 10−4 mol/L) and diethylamine-NONO-ate (DEA-NONO-ate) (10−10 to 10−4 mol/L) were evaluated. The OBI resulted in an increase in the contractile responses to endothelin and a decrease in the relaxant responses to ACh in both single and r-OBI groups. However, impaired DEA-NONO-ate-induced vasodilation and increased wall thickness to lumen ratio were observed only in the r-OBI group. The endothelin-1 type A (ETA) receptor and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) immunoreactivity were significantly enhanced by OBI. These findings indicate that both single and r-OBI impairs cerebral vascular endothelium-dependent dilation, potentially a consequence of endothelial dysfunction and/or vascular remodelling in basilar arteries after OBI. PMID:26104291

  9. Effects of melatonin and Pycnogenol on small artery structure and function in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Rezzani, Rita; Porteri, Enzo; De Ciuceis, Carolina; Bonomini, Francesca; Rodella, Luigi F; Paiardi, Silvia; Boari, Gianluca E M; Platto, Caterina; Pilu, Annamaria; Avanzi, Daniele; Rizzoni, Damiano; Agabiti Rosei, Enrico

    2010-06-01

    It was suggested that oxidative stress has a key role in the development of endothelial dysfunction, as well as microvascular structural alterations. Therefore, we have investigated 2 substances with antioxidant properties: melatonin and Pycnogenol. We treated 7 spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) with melatonin and 7 with Pycnogenol for 6 weeks. We compared results obtained with those observed in 7 SHRs and 7 Wistar-Kyoto normotensive control rats kept untreated. Mesenteric small resistance arteries were dissected and mounted on a wire myograph, and a concentration-response curve to acetylcholine was performed. Aortic contents of metalloproteinase 2, Bax, inducible NO synthase, and cyclooxygenase 2 were evaluated, together with the aortic content of total collagen and collagen subtypes and apoptosis rate. A small reduction in systolic blood pressure was observed. A significant improvement in mesenteric small resistance artery structure and endothelial function was observed in rats treated with Pycnogenol and melatonin. Total aortic collagen content was significantly greater in untreated SHRs compared with Wistar-Kyoto control rats, whereas a full normalization was observed in treated rats. Apoptosis rate was increased in the aortas of untreated SHRs compared with Wistar-Kyoto control rats; an even more pronounced increase was observed in treated rats. Bax and metalloproteinase 2 expressions changed accordingly. Cyclooxygenase 2 and inducible NO synthase were more expressed in the aortas of untreated SHRs compared with Wistar-Kyoto control rats; this pattern was normalized by both treatments. In conclusion, our data suggest that treatment with Pycnogenol and melatonin may protect the vasculature, partly independent of blood pressure reduction, probably through their antioxidant effects. PMID:20421515

  10. The functional and structural changes in the basilar artery due to overpressure blast injury.

    PubMed

    Toklu, Hale Z; Muller-Delp, Judy; Yang, Zhihui; Oktay, Şehkar; Sakarya, Yasemin; Strang, Kevin; Ghosh, Payal; Delp, Michael D; Scarpace, Philip J; Wang, Kevin K W; Tümer, Nihal

    2015-12-01

    Overpressure blast-wave induced brain injury (OBI) leads to progressive pathophysiologic changes resulting in a reduction in brain blood flow, blood brain barrier breakdown, edema, and cerebral ischemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate cerebral vascular function after single and repeated OBI. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: Control (Naive), single OBI (30 psi peak pressure, 1 to 2 msec duration), and repeated (days 1, 4, and 7) OBI (r-OBI). Rats were killed 24 hours after injury and the basilar artery was isolated, cannulated, and pressurized (90 cm H2O). Vascular responses to potassium chloride (KCl) (30 to 100 mmol/L), endothelin-1 (10(-12) to 10(-7) mol/L), acetylcholine (ACh) (10(-10) to 10(-4) mol/L) and diethylamine-NONO-ate (DEA-NONO-ate) (10(-10) to 10(-4) mol/L) were evaluated. The OBI resulted in an increase in the contractile responses to endothelin and a decrease in the relaxant responses to ACh in both single and r-OBI groups. However, impaired DEA-NONO-ate-induced vasodilation and increased wall thickness to lumen ratio were observed only in the r-OBI group. The endothelin-1 type A (ET(A)) receptor and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) immunoreactivity were significantly enhanced by OBI. These findings indicate that both single and r-OBI impairs cerebral vascular endothelium-dependent dilation, potentially a consequence of endothelial dysfunction and/or vascular remodelling in basilar arteries after OBI. PMID:26104291

  11. Short-term exercise training improves vascular function in hypercholesterolemic rabbit femoral artery.

    PubMed

    Jen, Chauying J; Liu, Yu-Fan; Chen, Hsiun-Ing

    2005-06-30

    Chronic exercise in healthy or hypercholesteremic animals for at least two months improves their vascular functions. This study is to examine whether short-term exercise training protocols can correct early-stage vascular dysfunction induced by high-cholesterol diet feeding. Male New Zealand White rabbits were fed for 2, 4 or 6 weeks with rabbit chow with or without the addition of 2% (w/w) cholesterol. They were further divided into control and exercise groups. Animals in exercise groups ran on a leveled treadmill for the same time periods as diet intervention. At the end of experiments, femoral arteries were dissected, loaded with fura 2-AM, and mounted in a tissue flow chamber. Phenylephrine-precontracted vessel specimens were exposed to acetylcholine. The endothelial intracellular calcium elevation and vasorelaxation were determined simultaneously under an epifluorescence microscope with ratio imaging capability. En face oil red O staining was used to evaluate fatty streak formation. Our results showed that 1) high-cholesterol diet feeding for > or = 4 weeks caused lipid deposition, reduced the acetylcholine-evoked endothelial calcium signaling, and impaired both endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vascular responses in a time-dependent manner; 2) vasorelaxation at given levels of endothelial intracellular calcium elevation decreased in hypercholesterolemia; 3) concomitant exercise program had reverse effects. We conclude that high-cholesterol diet intervention for as short as 4 weeks induces vascular structural changes, impairs endothelial intracellular calcium signaling and vasodilatation in rabbit femoral arteries. Short-term exercise training in parallel completely eliminates these adverse effects so long as the diet intervention is no more than 6 weeks. PMID:16201452

  12. Arterial Structure and Function in Ambulatory Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy Are Not Different from Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Audra A.; Cotie, Lisa M.; Timmons, Brian W.; Gorter, Jan Willem; MacDonald, Maureen J.

    2012-01-01

    Physical inactivity in youth with cerebral palsy (CP) places them at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The current study assessed indices of arterial health in adolescents with CP, classified as levels I-II of the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) (n = 11, age 13.2 ± 2.1 yr), in comparison to age- and sex-matched controls (n = 11, age 12.4 ± 2.3 yr). Groups were similar in anthropometric measurements, resting blood pressures, and heart rates. There were no group differences in brachial flow-mediated dilation (11.1 ± 7.8 versus 6.1 ± 3.6), carotid intima-media thickness (0.42 ± 0.04 versus 0.41 ± 0.03 mm), and distensibility (0.008 ± 0.002 versus 0.008 ± 0.002 mmHg) or central (4.3 ± 0.6 versus 4.1 ± 0.9 m/s) and peripheral pulse wave velocity (7.1 ± 1.7 versus 7.6 ± 1.1 m/s); CP versus healthy controls, respectively. Vigorous intensity physical activity (PA) was lower in the CP group (CP: 38 ± 80 min versus controls: 196 ± 174 min); groups were similar in light and moderate intensity PA levels. Arterial health of ambulatory youth with CP is not different from a control group despite lower vigorous PA levels. Similar studies need to examine individuals with more pronounced mobility limitations (GMFCS level III–V). PMID:22778755

  13. Alterations in Perivascular Sympathetic and Nitrergic Innervation Function Induced by Late Pregnancy in Rat Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Caracuel, Laura; Callejo, María; Balfagón, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated whether pregnancy was associated with changed function in components of perivascular mesenteric innervation and the mechanism/s involved. Experimental Approach We used superior mesenteric arteries from female Sprague-Dawley rats divided into two groups: control rats (in oestrous phase) and pregnant rats (20 days of pregnancy). Modifications in the vasoconstrictor response to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were analysed in the presence/absence of phentolamine (alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist) or L-NAME (nitric oxide synthase-NOS- non-specific inhibitor). Vasomotor responses to noradrenaline (NA), and to NO donor DEA-NO were studied, NA and NO release measured and neuronal NOS (nNOS) expression/activation analysed. Key Results EFS induced a lower frequency-dependent contraction in pregnant than in control rats. Phentolamine decreased EFS-induced vasoconstriction in segments from both experimental groups, but to a greater extent in control rats. EFS-induced vasoconstriction was increased by L-NAME in arteries from both experimental groups. This increase was greater in segments from pregnant rats. Pregnancy decreased NA release while increasing NO release. nNOS expression was not modified but nNOS activation was increased by pregnancy. Pregnancy decreased NA-induced vasoconstriction response and did not modify DEA-NO-induced vasodilation response. Conclusions and Implications Neural control of mesenteric vasomotor tone was altered by pregnancy. Diminished sympathetic and enhanced nitrergic components both contributed to the decreased vasoconstriction response to EFS during pregnancy. All these changes indicate the selective participation of sympathetic and nitrergic innervations in vascular adaptations produced during pregnancy. PMID:25951331

  14. Identification of neural firing patterns, frequency and temporal coding mechanisms in individual aortic baroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Huaguang; Pan, Baobao

    2015-01-01

    In rabbit depressor nerve fibers, an on-off firing pattern, period-1 firing, and integer multiple firing with quiescent state were observed as the static pressure level was increased. A bursting pattern with bursts at the systolic phase of blood pressure, continuous firing, and bursting with burst at diastolic phase and quiescent state at systolic phase were observed as the mean level of the dynamic blood pressure was increased. For both static and dynamic pressures, the firing frequency of the first two firing patterns increased and of the last firing pattern decreased due to the quiescent state. If the quiescent state is disregarded, the spike frequency becomes an increasing trend. The instantaneous spike frequency of the systolic phase bursting, continuous firing, and diastolic phase bursting can reflect the temporal process of the systolic phase, whole procedure, and diastolic phase of the dynamic blood pressure signal, respectively. With increasing the static current corresponding to pressure level, the deterministic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) model manifests a process from a resting state first to period-1 firing via a subcritical Hopf bifurcation and then to a resting state via a supercritical Hopf bifurcation, and the firing frequency increases. The on-off firing and integer multiple firing were here identified as noise-induced firing patterns near the subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcation points, respectively, using the stochastic HH model. The systolic phase bursting and diastolic phase bursting were identified as pressure-induced firings near the subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcation points, respectively, using an HH model with a dynamic signal. The firing, spike frequency, and instantaneous spike frequency observed in the experiment were simulated and explained using HH models. The results illustrate the dynamics of different firing patterns and the frequency and temporal coding mechanisms of aortic baroreceptor. PMID:26379539

  15. Increased plasma neopterin levels are associated with reduced endothelial function and arterial elasticity in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-Y; Tong, X-Z; Xia, W-H; Xie, W-L; Yu, B-B; Zhang, B; Chen, L; Tao, J

    2016-07-01

    Inflammation has been shown to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis and development of hypertensive vascular injury. Neopterin is a novel marker of immune activation produced mainly by activated macrophages. Few data are available to show the association between neopterin and vascular function in hypertension. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between neopterin levels related to arterial stiffness and endothelial function in patients with hypertension, and their changes after blood pressure-lowering treatment. Twenty-four hypertensive patients and 30 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers were recruited. Plasma neopterin levels were higher in hypertensive patients compared with their counterparts (log-neopterin: 0.77±0.18 versus 0.61±0.16, P=0.003). Increased neopterin levels were correlated with increased brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV; control: r=0.659, P<0.001; hypertension: r=0.487, P=0.021), and inversely associated with impaired brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD; control: r=-0.735, P<0.001; hypertension: r=-0.557, P=0.005). Fifteen hypertensives received 3 months of standard antihypertensive treatment. Three months later, their plasma neopterin levels decreased (log-neopterin: 0.63±0.17 versus 0.50±0.19, P=0.001), whereas arterial elasticity (baPWV: 1764±101 versus 1685±96 cm s(-1), P=0.272) and endothelial function (FMD: 5.92±1.43% versus 7.73±1.31%, P<0.05) were improved. The decline in neopterin levels was linearly correlated with baPWV decrease (r=0.800, P<0.001), FMD improvement (r=0.670, P=0.006) and blood pressure reduction (r=0.548, P=0.042). Our present study demonstrated for the first time that neopterin is closely correlated with vascular dysfunctions, and measurement of plasma neopterin levels might be used as a surrogate biomarker for the clinical evaluation of vascular damage and risk stratification of future atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients with hypertension. PMID

  16. Analysis of the Baroreceptor and Vestibular Receptor Inputs in the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla following Hypotension in Conscious Rats.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yan; Lu, Huan-Jun; Jiang, Xian; Li, Li-Wei; Yang, Yan-Zhao; Jin, Guang-Shi; Park, Joo Young; Kim, Min Sun; Park, Byung Rim; Jin, Yuan-Zhe

    2015-03-01

    Input signals originating from baroreceptors and vestibular receptors are integrated in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) to maintain blood pressure during postural movement. The contribution of baroreceptors and vestibular receptors in the maintenance of blood pressure following hypotension were quantitatively analyzed by measuring phosphorylated extracellular regulated protein kinase (pERK) expression and glutamate release in the RVLM. The expression of pERK and glutamate release in the RVLM were measured in conscious rats that had undergone bilateral labyrinthectomy (BL) and/or sinoaortic denervation (SAD) following hypotension induced by a sodium nitroprusside (SNP) infusion. The expression of pERK was significantly increased in the RVLM in the control group following SNP infusion, and expression peaked 10 min after SNP infusion. The number of pERK positive neurons increased following SNP infusion in BL, SAD, and BL+SAD groups, although the increase was smaller than seen in the control group. The SAD group showed a relatively higher reduction in pERK expression when compared with the BL group. The level of glutamate release was significantly increased in the RVLM in control, BL, SAD groups following SNP infusion, and this peaked 10 min after SNP infusion. The SAD group showed a relatively higher reduction in glutamate release when compared with the BL group. These results suggest that the baroreceptors are more powerful in pERK expression and glutamate release in the RVLM following hypotension than the vestibular receptors, but the vestibular receptors still have an important role in the RVLM. PMID:25729278

  17. The Genetic Basis for Altered Blood Vessel Function in Disease: Large Artery Stiffening

    PubMed Central

    Agrotis, Alex

    2005-01-01

    The progressive stiffening of the large arteries in humans that occurs during aging constitutes a potential risk factor for increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and is accompanied by an elevation in systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure. While the underlying basis for these changes remains to be fully elucidated, factors that are able to influence the structure and composition of the extracellular matrix and the way it interacts with arterial smooth muscle cells could profoundly affect the properties of the large arteries. Thus, while age and sex represent important factors contributing to large artery stiffening, the variation in growth-stimulating factors and those that modulate extracellular production and homeostasis are also being increasingly recognized to play a key role in the process. Therefore, elucidating the contribution that genetic variation makes to large artery stiffening could ultimately provide the basis for clinical strategies designed to regulate the process for therapeutic benefit. PMID:17315605

  18. Absence of arterial baroreflex modulation of skin sympathetic activity and sweat rate during whole-body heating in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T. E.; Cui, J.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    1. Prior findings suggest that baroreflexes are capable of modulating skin blood flow, but the effects of baroreceptor loading/unloading on sweating are less clear. Therefore, this project tested the hypothesis that pharmacologically induced alterations in arterial blood pressure in heated humans would lead to baroreflex-mediated changes in both skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) and sweat rate. 2. In seven subjects mean arterial blood pressure was lowered (approximately 8 mmHg) and then raised (approximately 13 mmHg) by bolus injections of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine, respectively. Moreover, in a separate protocol, arterial blood pressure was reduced via steady-state administration of sodium nitroprusside. In both normothermia and heat-stress conditions the following responses were monitored: sublingual and mean skin temperatures, heart rate, beat-by-beat blood pressure, skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry), local sweat rate and SSNA (microneurography from peroneal nerve). 3. Whole-body heating increased skin and sublingual temperatures, heart rate, cutaneous blood flow, sweat rate and SSNA, but did not change arterial blood pressure. Heart rate was significantly elevated (from 74 +/- 3 to 92 +/- 4 beats x min(-1); P < 0.001) during bolus sodium nitroprusside-induced reductions in blood pressure, and significantly reduced (from 92 +/- 4 to 68 +/- 4 beats x min(-1); P < 0.001) during bolus phenylephrine-induced elevations in blood pressure, thereby demonstrating normal baroreflex function in these subjects. 4. Neither SSNA nor sweat rate was altered by rapid (bolus infusion) or sustained (steady-state infusion) changes in blood pressure regardless of the thermal condition. 5. These data suggest that SSNA and sweat rate are not modulated by arterial baroreflexes in normothermic or moderately heated individuals.

  19. Left ventricular diastolic function in young adults: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study.

    PubMed

    Xie, X; Gidding, S S; Gardin, J M; Bild, D E; Wong, N D; Liu, K

    1995-01-01

    Doppler transmitral flow velocities have been used to assess left ventricular diastolic function. Associations of transmitral velocities with specific physiologic variables and cardiovascular risk factors have not been reported previously in a large population-based study of young adults. We performed Doppler analysis of left ventricular inflow in 3492 black and white men and women (aged 23 to 35 years) in the year-5 examination of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. First third filling fraction, peak flow velocity in early diastole (PFVE), peak flow velocity in late diastole (PFVA), and the PFVA/PFVE ratio were measured. Women had higher PFVE and PFVA than had men (PFVE: 0.81 +/- 0.13 m/sec versus 0.76 +/- 0.13 m/sec; PFVA: 0.47 +/- 0.11 m/sec versus 0.43 +/- 0.10 m/sec; both p < 0.001). Gender-specific multiple regression analyses showed that age, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, left ventricular percent fractional shortening, and body weight were independently and positively related to PFVA (all p < 0.001) in men and women. Age, heart rate, and forced expiratory lung capacity in 1 second were inversely related to PFVE and first third filling fraction (both p < 0.01). Left ventricular percent fractional shortening was positively related to PFVE and first third filling fraction (p < 0.001). Age, heart rate, and body weight were positively correlated with the PFVA/PFVE ratio (all p < 0.001). Height had weak negative associations with PFVA and PFVE in women only. These results suggest that, in young adults, Doppler measures of left ventricular diastolic filling are related to age, sex, body weight, blood pressure, heart rate, left ventricular systolic function, and lung function. PMID:8611277

  20. Assessment of left ventricular function in coronary artery disease with the nuclear probe during intervention studies.

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, A; Bowles, M J; Jones, R I; Crawley, J C; Raftery, E B

    1984-01-01

    The nuclear probe was used for measuring left ventricular function in 11 normal subjects and the results compared with those using a digital gammacamera. The probe was then used to measure left ventricular function in patients with coronary artery disease during dynamic exercise and stress atrial pacing. The ability of the probe to detect changes induced by glyceryl trinitrate was also evaluated in separate parallel studies. In the 11 normal subjects there was a good correlation between the left ventricular ejection fraction measured by the gammacamera and the nuclear probe both at rest and during exercise. Exercise increased this value by at least 5% in all normal subjects during measurements with both the gammacamera and the nuclear probe. The mean (SD) difference was -0.3% (2.60) at rest and 2.3% (5.02) at peak exercise. Both exercise and pacing produced angina in the patient group and the mean (SEM) value fell from 52% (3.5) to 28% (2.6) and from 46% (5.1) to 34% (3.2) respectively. Glyceryl trinitrate prolonged the exercise and pacing times, and the corresponding falls in ejection fraction were significantly reduced. The non-imaging nuclear probe is a cheap and portable instrument capable of assessing left ventricular function in patients with cardiac disease. It is designed for high count rate acquisition over a short period of time and can thus provide both beat to beat and summated left ventricular time activity curves suitable for quantitative analysis. It therefore has important advantages in the clinical setting and during controlled interventions compared with the gammacameras. PMID:6433946

  1. Impaired Cerebrovascular Function in Coronary Artery Disease Patients and Recovery Following Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Anazodo, Udunna C.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Suskin, Neville; Ssali, Tracy; Wang, Danny J. J.; St. Lawrence, Keith S.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) poses a risk to the cerebrovascular function of older adults and has been linked to impaired cognitive abilities. Using magnetic resonance perfusion imaging, we investigated changes in resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) to hypercapnia in 34 CAD patients and 21 age-matched controls. Gray matter volume (GMV) images were acquired and used as a confounding variable to separate changes in structure from function. Compared to healthy controls, CAD patients demonstrated reduced CBF in the superior frontal, anterior cingulate (AC), insular, pre- and post-central gyri, middle temporal, and superior temporal regions. Subsequent analysis of these regions demonstrated decreased CVR in the AC, insula, post-central and superior frontal regions. Except in the superior frontal and precentral regions, regional reductions in CBF and CVR were identified in brain areas where no detectable reductions in GMV were observed, demonstrating that these vascular changes were independent of brain atrophy. Because aerobic fitness training can improve brain function, potential changes in regional CBF were investigated in the CAD patients after completion of a 6-months exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation program. Increased CBF was observed in the bilateral AC, as well as recovery of CBF in the dorsal aspect of the right AC, where the magnitude of increased CBF was roughly equal to the reduction in CBF at baseline compared to controls. These exercise-related improvements in CBF in the AC is intriguing given the role of this area in cognitive processing and regulation of cardiovascular autonomic control. PMID:26779011

  2. Effect of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention on Left Ventricular Diastolic Function in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Nahid; Saidi, Mohammadreza; Rai, Alireza; Najafi, Farid; Javeedannejad, Seedmokhtar; Babanejad, Mehran; Tadbiri, Hooman

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is considerable disagreement over the effects of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on left ventricular diastolic function that has necessitated the investigation of diastolic indices. The present study was conducted to evaluate left ventricular diastolic function and its indices, three months after performing the PCI procedure in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: In a quasi-experimental clinical trial study (before and after), 51 patients with CAD scheduled for elective PCI were investigated provided that their Ejection Fraction (EF) was > 30%. Before and three months after PCI, echocardiography was carried out to evaluate left ventricular diastolic indices including the E/Ea as the most important criteria for diagnosis of diastolic heart failure (DHF). Results: Based on the E/Ea indices and after PCI, the number of patients with DHF decreased significantly: 40 patients (78.4%) before PCI versus 28 patients (54.9%) after PCI (p<0.05). The Mean and Standard error of deceleration time (DT), isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT), early diastolic mitral annulus velocity; Ea (E’), E/Ea and left ventricular ejection function (LVEF) indices underwent significant changes. In addition, MVA dur/PVA dur, PVs/PVd, and E/Ea indices had changed significantly after PCI in both genders. However, no significant difference was reported for the other indices. Conclusion: The E/Ea ratio as an important criterion for diagnosis of DHF was improved after PCI. Improvement of several other diastolic indices was observed after the PCI procedure. It can be concluded that PCI can be an effective treatment modality in patients with left ventricular diastolic indices. PMID:26234973

  3. Variability of residual platelet function despite clopidogrel treatment in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Schwonberg, Jan; Toennes, Stefan W; Mani, Helen; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2010-04-01

    Residual platelet function despite treatment with clopidogrel may predict an unfavourable cardiovascular outcome. The majority of studies have investigated the effects of clopidogrel administration in conjunction with aspirin in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. The primary objective of the present study was to assess the platelet response to clopidogrel in the absence of aspirin in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and to investigate whether non-responsiveness to clopidogrel is reproducible during long-term follow-up. Fifty-four clinically stable PAOD patients on a maintenance dose of 75 mg/d clopidogrel were enrolled in this study. Platelet function was assessed at baseline and after a median follow-up of 18 months using light transmittance aggregometry (LTA) with 2 microM ADP as an agonist. HPLC-coupled mass spectrometry was used to detect clopidogrel and clopidogrel carboxylic acid, the main metabolite of clopidogrel. Residual platelet function, as defined by late aggregation values within the reference range (i.e., >43%), was observed in 35.2% of patients at baseline and 17.6% during follow-up. During the observation period, 26.5% had switched from responder to non-responder status or vice versa. Among non-responders, either clopidogrel or its metabolite was detected in 89.5% and 83.3% of patients at baseline and at follow-up, respectively. We conclude that non-responsiveness to clopidogrel as determined by ADP-induced LTA is not stable over time. This phenomenon cannot be attributed to non-compliance alone. PMID:20153859

  4. Impact of Intensive Physiotherapy on Cognitive Function after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Elder Dos Santos; Magario, Rosmeiri; Conforti, César Augusto; Cipriano Júnior, Gerson; Arena, Ross; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos C; Buffolo, Enio; Luna Filho, Bráulio

    2014-11-01

    Background: Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) is a standard surgical option for patients with diffuse and significant arterial plaque. This procedure, however, is not free of postoperative complications, especially pulmonary and cognitive disorders. Objective: This study aimed at comparing the impact of two different physiotherapy treatment approaches on pulmonary and cognitive function of patients undergoing CABG. Methods: Neuropsychological and pulmonary function tests were applied, prior to and following CABG, to 39 patients randomized into two groups as follows: Group 1 (control) - 20 patients underwent one physiotherapy session daily; and Group 2 (intensive physiotherapy) - 19 patients underwent three physiotherapy sessions daily during the recovery phase at the hospital. Non-paired and paired Student t tests were used to compare continuous variables. Variables without normal distribution were compared between groups by using Mann-Whitney test, and, within the same group at different times, by using Wilcoxon test. The chi-square test assessed differences of categorical variables. Statistical tests with a p value ≤ 0.05 were considered significant. Results: Changes in pulmonary function were not significantly different between the groups. However, while Group 2 patients showed no decline in their neurocognitive function, Group 1 patients showed a decline in their cognitive functions (P ≤ 0.01). Conclusion: Those results highlight the importance of physiotherapy after CABG and support the implementation of multiple sessions per day, providing patients with better psychosocial conditions and less morbidity.Fundamento: A cirurgia de revascularização miocárdica (CRM) é a opção cirúrgica padrão para pacientes com placas arteriais difusas e significativas. Tal procedimento, no entanto, não é desprovido de complicações pós-operatórias, especialmente distúrbios pulmonares e cognitivos. Objetivo: Comparar o impacto de duas abordagens fisioterap

  5. Mutant LRP6 Impairs Endothelial Cell Functions Associated with Familial Normolipidemic Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian; Li, Yang; Ren, Yi-Hong; Sun, Zhijun; Dong, Jie; Yan, Han; Xu, Yujun; Wang, Dao Wen; Zheng, Gu-Yan; Du, Jie; Tian, Xiao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the genes low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein-6 (LRP6) and myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A) were reported in families with coronary artery disease (CAD). We intend to determine the mutational spectrum of these genes among hyperlipidemic and normolipidemic CAD families. Forty probands with early-onset CAD were recruited from 19 hyperlipidemic and 21 normolipidemic Chinese families. We sequenced all exons and intron-exon boundaries of LRP6 and MEF2A, and found a novel heterozygous variant in LRP6 from a proband with normolipidemic CAD. This variant led to a substitution of histidine to tyrosine (Y418H) in an evolutionarily conserved domain YWTD in exon 6 and was not found in 1025 unrelated healthy individuals. Co-segregated with CAD in the affected family, LRP6Y418H significantly debilitated the Wnt3a-associated signaling pathway, suppressed endothelial cell proliferation and migration, and decreased anti-apoptotic ability. However, it exhibited no influences on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol uptake. Thus, mutation Y418H in LRP6 likely contributes to normolipidemic familial CAD via impairing endothelial cell functions and weakening the Wnt3a signaling pathway. PMID:27455246

  6. Identification of Functional Voltage-gated Na+ Channels in Cultured Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sison, Tiffany; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2005-01-01

    Electrical excitability, which plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling in the pulmonary vasculature, is regulated by transmembrane ion flux in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC). This study aimed to characterize the electrophysiological properties and molecular identities of voltage-gated Na+ channels in cultured human PASMC. We recorded tetrodotoxin-sensitive and rapidly inactivating Na+ currents with properties similar to those described in cardiac myocytes. Using RT-PCR, we detected transcripts of seven Na+ channel α genes (SCN2A, 3A, 4A, 7A, 8A, 9A, and 11A), and two β subunit genes (SCN1B and 2B). Our results demonstrate that human PASMC express TTX-sensitive voltage-gated Na+ channels. Their physiological functions remain unresolved, although our data suggest that Na+ channel activity does not directly influence membrane potential, intracellular Ca2+ release, or proliferation in normal human PASMC. Whether their expression and/or activity are heightened in the pathological state is discussed. PMID:16052353

  7. Low levels of adiponectin predict worsening of arterial morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Störk, Stefan; Bots, Michiel L; Angerer, Peter; von Schacky, Clemens; Grobbee, Diederick E; Angermann, Christiane E; Seufert, Jochen

    2007-10-01

    Adipocytokines are under investigation as mediators of cardiovascular risk. In 142 non-diabetic postmenopausal women, we investigated whether plasma levels of adiponectin and leptin are associated with changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and distensibility as assessed by high-resolution ultrasound. Adiponectin but not leptin correlated weakly with baseline measures of IMT and distensibility. After 12 months, carotid IMT showed a significant progression [0.023 mm (95% CI, 0.014-0.031 mm)] whereas stiffness was unaltered. A threshold was identified for the relation of adiponectin with both progression of IMT and stiffness. Age-adjusted adiponectin levels in the lowest quartile versus second to fourth quartile were related to progression of IMT (odds ratio, 2.99; 95% CI, 1.81-5.09) and stiffness (odds ratio, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.19-4.07). Adjustment for possible confounding factors and intermediates weakened this association only to a minor degree. No such associations were observed for leptin. We conclude that low levels of adiponectin are associated with adverse changes in morphology and function of central arteries over time independently of other cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal non-diabetic women. PMID:17239889

  8. Functional reconstitution of receptors for bradykinin and des argZ-bradykinin from pulmonary artery membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, M.C.; Polgar, P.; Dickey, B.F.; Fishman, J.B.

    1987-05-01

    Bradykinin (BK) is a vasoactive peptide which mediates a number of vascular functions, including activation of prostaglandin biosynthesis and modulation of vasomotor tone. BK and its kinase II metabolite, des argZ-BK, have been reported to activate the B2 and B1 receptors, respectively. The authors prepared membranes from the bovine pulmonary artery and solubilized membrane proteins using the zwitterionic detergent CHAPS (3-((3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate). The solubilized proteins were reconstituted into liposomes via a gel filtration method. The vesicles specifically bound both TH-BK and TH-des argZ-BK, although the latter bound with significantly lower affinity. The binding of TH-BK was inhibited 65% by guanosine 5'-0-thiotriphosphate S while the binding of TH-des argZ-BK was unaffected. This suggests that the receptor for BK was associated with a guanine-nucleotide binding protein whereas the receptor for des argZ-BK was not. Since des argZ-BK has recently been reported to be considerably less potent than BK at activating the turnover of phosphatidylinositol, the authors data suggest that this is due to the des argZ-BK receptor not being coupled to a G-protein. Further work towards characterizing these receptors is now underway.

  9. Mutant LRP6 Impairs Endothelial Cell Functions Associated with Familial Normolipidemic Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jian; Li, Yang; Ren, Yi-Hong; Sun, Zhijun; Dong, Jie; Yan, Han; Xu, Yujun; Wang, Dao Wen; Zheng, Gu-Yan; Du, Jie; Tian, Xiao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the genes low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein-6 (LRP6) and myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A) were reported in families with coronary artery disease (CAD). We intend to determine the mutational spectrum of these genes among hyperlipidemic and normolipidemic CAD families. Forty probands with early-onset CAD were recruited from 19 hyperlipidemic and 21 normolipidemic Chinese families. We sequenced all exons and intron-exon boundaries of LRP6 and MEF2A, and found a novel heterozygous variant in LRP6 from a proband with normolipidemic CAD. This variant led to a substitution of histidine to tyrosine (Y418H) in an evolutionarily conserved domain YWTD in exon 6 and was not found in 1025 unrelated healthy individuals. Co-segregated with CAD in the affected family, LRP6Y418H significantly debilitated the Wnt3a-associated signaling pathway, suppressed endothelial cell proliferation and migration, and decreased anti-apoptotic ability. However, it exhibited no influences on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol uptake. Thus, mutation Y418H in LRP6 likely contributes to normolipidemic familial CAD via impairing endothelial cell functions and weakening the Wnt3a signaling pathway. PMID:27455246

  10. Arterial input functions (AIFs) measured directly from arteries with low and standard doses of contrast agent, and AIFs derived from reference tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiyang; Fan, Xiaobing; Medved, Milica; Pineda, Federico D.; Yousuf, Ambereen; Oto, Aytekin; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of arterial input function (AIF) can have large systematic errors at standard contrast agent doses in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). We compared measured AIFs from low dose (AIFLD) and standard dose (AIFSD) contrast agent injections, as well as the AIF derived from a muscle reference tissue and artery (AIFref). Twenty-two prostate cancer patients underwent DCE-MRI. Data were acquired on a 3 T scanner using an mDixon sequence. Gadobenate dimeglumine was injected twice, at doses of 0.015 and 0.085 mmol/kg. Directly measured AIFs were fitted with empirical mathematical models (EMMs) and compared to the AIF derived from a muscle reference tissue (AIFref). EMMs accurately fitted the AIFs. The 1st and 2nd pass peaks were visualized in AIFLD, but not in AIFSD, thus the peak and shape of AIFSD could not be accurately measured directly. The average scaling factor between AIFSD and AIFLD in the washout phase was only 56% of the contrast dose ratio (~6:1). The shape and magnitude of AIFref closely approximated that of AIFLD after empirically determined dose-dependent normalization. This suggests that AIFref may be a good approximation of the local AIF. PMID:26523650

  11. Functional characterization of voltage-gated K+ channels in mouse pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eun A; Burg, Elyssa D; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Msefya, Joseph; Firth, Amy L; Yuan, Jason X-J

    2007-09-01

    Mice are useful animal models to study pathogenic mechanisms involved in pulmonary vascular disease. Altered expression and function of voltage-gated K(+) (K(V)) channels in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) have been implicated in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. K(V) currents (I(K(V))) in mouse PASMCs have not been comprehensively characterized. The main focus of this study was to determine the biophysical and pharmacological properties of I(K(V)) in freshly dissociated mouse PASMCs with the patch-clamp technique. Three distinct whole cell I(K(V)) were identified based on the kinetics of activation and inactivation: rapidly activating and noninactivating currents (in 58% of the cells tested), rapidly activating and slowly inactivating currents (23%), and slowly activating and noninactivating currents (17%). Of the cells that demonstrated the rapidly activating noninactivating current, 69% showed I(K(V)) inhibition with 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), while 31% were unaffected. Whole cell I(K(V)) were very sensitive to tetraethylammonium (TEA), as 1 mM TEA decreased the current amplitude by 32% while it took 10 mM 4-AP to decrease I(K(V)) by a similar amount (37%). Contribution of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (K(Ca)) channels to whole cell I(K(V)) was minimal, as neither pharmacological inhibition with charybdotoxin or iberiotoxin nor perfusion with Ca(2+)-free solution had an effect on the whole cell I(K(V)). Steady-state activation and inactivation curves revealed a window K(+) current between -40 and -10 mV with a peak at -31.5 mV. Single-channel recordings revealed large-, intermediate-, and small-amplitude currents, with an averaged slope conductance of 119.4 +/- 2.7, 79.8 +/- 2.8, 46.0 +/- 2.2, and 23.6 +/- 0.6 pS, respectively. These studies provide detailed electrophysiological and pharmacological profiles of the native K(V) currents in mouse PASMCs. PMID:17581857

  12. Relative sensitivities of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters to arterial input function (AIF) scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Cai, Yu; Moloney, Brendan; Chen, Yiyi; Huang, Wei; Woods, Mark; Coakley, Fergus V.; Rooney, William D.; Garzotto, Mark G.; Springer, Charles S.

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) has been used widely for clinical applications. Pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI data that extracts quantitative contrast reagent/tissue-specific model parameters is the most investigated method. One of the primary challenges in pharmacokinetic analysis of DCE-MRI data is accurate and reliable measurement of the arterial input function (AIF), which is the driving force behind all pharmacokinetics. Because of effects such as inflow and partial volume averaging, AIF measured from individual arteries sometimes require amplitude scaling for better representation of the blood contrast reagent (CR) concentration time-courses. Empirical approaches like blinded AIF estimation or reference tissue AIF derivation can be useful and practical, especially when there is no clearly visible blood vessel within the imaging field-of-view (FOV). Similarly, these approaches generally also require magnitude scaling of the derived AIF time-courses. Since the AIF varies among individuals even with the same CR injection protocol and the perfect scaling factor for reconstructing the ground truth AIF often remains unknown, variations in estimated pharmacokinetic parameters due to varying AIF scaling factors are of special interest. In this work, using simulated and real prostate cancer DCE-MRI data, we examined parameter variations associated with AIF scaling. Our results show that, for both the fast-exchange-limit (FXL) Tofts model and the water exchange sensitized fast-exchange-regime (FXR) model, the commonly fitted CR transfer constant (Ktrans) and the extravascular, extracellular volume fraction (ve) scale nearly proportionally with the AIF, whereas the FXR-specific unidirectional cellular water efflux rate constant, kio, and the CR intravasation rate constant, kep, are both AIF scaling insensitive. This indicates that, for DCE-MRI of prostate cancer and possibly other cancers, kio and kep may be more suitable imaging

  13. Heterogeneous function of ryanodine receptors, but not IP3 receptors, in hamster cremaster muscle feed arteries and arterioles.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Erika B; Jackson, William F

    2011-05-01

    The roles played by ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP₃Rs) in vascular smooth muscle in the microcirculation remain unclear. Therefore, the function of both RyRs and IP₃Rs in Ca(²+) signals and myogenic tone in hamster cremaster muscle feed arteries and downstream arterioles were assessed using confocal imaging and pressure myography. Feed artery vascular smooth muscle displayed Ca(²+) sparks and Ca(²+) waves, which were inhibited by the RyR antagonists ryanodine (10 μM) or tetracaine (100 μM). Despite the inhibition of sparks and waves, ryanodine or tetracaine increased global intracellular Ca(²+) and constricted the arteries. The blockade of IP₃Rs with xestospongin D (5 μM) or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (100 μM) or the inhibition of phospholipase C using U-73122 (10 μM) also attenuated Ca(2+) waves without affecting Ca(²+) sparks. Importantly, the IP₃Rs and phospholipase C antagonists decreased global intracellular Ca(2+) and dilated the arteries. In contrast, cremaster arterioles displayed only Ca(²+) waves: Ca(²+) sparks were not observed, and neither ryanodine (10-50 μM) nor tetracaine (100 μM) affected either Ca(²+) signals or arteriolar tone despite the presence of functional RyRs as assessed by responses to the RyR agonist caffeine (10 mM). As in feed arteries, arteriolar Ca(²+) waves were attenuated by xestospongin D (5 μM), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (100 μM), and U-73122 (10 μM), accompanied by decreased global intracellular Ca(²+) and vasodilation. These findings highlight the contrasting roles played by RyRs and IP₃Rs in Ca(²+) signals and myogenic tone in feed arteries and demonstrate important differences in the function of RyRs between feed arteries and downstream arterioles. PMID:21357503

  14. Influence of cigarette smoking on human autonomic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedermaier, O. N.; Smith, M. L.; Beightol, L. A.; Zukowska-Grojec, Z.; Goldstein, D. S.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Although cigarette smoking is known to lead to widespread augmentation of sympathetic nervous system activity, little is known about the effects of smoking on directly measured human sympathetic activity and its reflex control. METHODS AND RESULTS. We studied the acute effects of smoking two research-grade cigarettes on muscle sympathetic nerve activity and on arterial baroreflex-mediated changes of sympathetic and vagal neural cardiovascular outflows in eight healthy habitual smokers. Measurements were made during frequency-controlled breathing, graded Valsalva maneuvers, and carotid baroreceptor stimulation with ramped sequences of neck pressure and suction. Smoking provoked the following changes: Arterial pressure increased significantly, and RR intervals, RR interval spectral power at the respiratory frequency, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity decreased. Plasma nicotine levels increased significantly, but plasma epinephrine, norepinephrine, and neuropeptide Y levels did not change. Peak sympathetic nerve activity during and systolic pressure overshoots after Valsalva straining increased significantly in proportion to increases of plasma nicotine levels. The average carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex relation shifted rightward and downward on arterial pressure and RR interval axes; average gain, operational point, and response range did not change. CONCLUSIONS. In habitual smokers, smoking acutely reduces baseline levels of vagal-cardiac nerve activity and completely resets vagally mediated arterial baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses. Smoking also reduces muscle sympathetic nerve activity but augments increases of sympathetic activity triggered by brief arterial pressure reductions. This pattern of autonomic changes is likely to influence smokers' responses to acute arterial pressure reductions importantly.

  15. Translational informatics approach for identifying the functional molecular communicators linking coronary artery disease, infection and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ankit; Ghatge, Madankumar; Mundkur, Lakshmi; Vangala, Rajani Kanth

    2016-05-01

    Translational informatics approaches are required for the integration of diverse and accumulating data to enable the administration of effective translational medicine specifically in complex diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD). In the current study, a novel approach for elucidating the association between infection, inflammation and CAD was used. Genes for CAD were collected from the CAD‑gene database and those for infection and inflammation were collected from the UniProt database. The cytomegalovirus (CMV)‑induced genes were identified from the literature and the CAD‑associated clinical phenotypes were obtained from the Unified Medical Language System. A total of 55 gene ontologies (GO) termed functional communicator ontologies were identified in the gene sets linking clinical phenotypes in the diseasome network. The network topology analysis suggested that important functions including viral entry, cell adhesion, apoptosis, inflammatory and immune responses networked with clinical phenotypes. Microarray data was extracted from the Gene Expression Omnibus (dataset: GSE48060) for highly networked disease myocardial infarction. Further analysis of differentially expressed genes and their GO terms suggested that CMV infection may trigger a xenobiotic response, oxidative stress, inflammation and immune modulation. Notably, the current study identified γ‑glutamyl transferase (GGT)‑5 as a potential biomarker with an odds ratio of 1.947, which increased to 2.561 following the addition of CMV and CMV‑neutralizing antibody (CMV‑NA) titers. The C‑statistics increased from 0.530 for conventional risk factors (CRFs) to 0.711 for GGT in combination with the above mentioned infections and CRFs. Therefore, the translational informatics approach used in the current study identified a potential molecular mechanism for CMV infection in CAD, and a potential biomarker for risk prediction. PMID:27035874

  16. Translational informatics approach for identifying the functional molecular communicators linking coronary artery disease, infection and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    SHARMA, ANKIT; GHATGE, MADANKUMAR; MUNDKUR, LAKSHMI; VANGALA, RAJANI KANTH

    2016-01-01

    Translational informatics approaches are required for the integration of diverse and accumulating data to enable the administration of effective translational medicine specifically in complex diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD). In the current study, a novel approach for elucidating the association between infection, inflammation and CAD was used. Genes for CAD were collected from the CAD-gene database and those for infection and inflammation were collected from the UniProt database. The cytomegalovirus (CMV)-induced genes were identified from the literature and the CAD-associated clinical phenotypes were obtained from the Unified Medical Language System. A total of 55 gene ontologies (GO) termed functional communicator ontologies were identifed in the gene sets linking clinical phenotypes in the diseasome network. The network topology analysis suggested that important functions including viral entry, cell adhesion, apoptosis, inflammatory and immune responses networked with clinical phenotypes. Microarray data was extracted from the Gene Expression Omnibus (dataset: GSE48060) for highly networked disease myocardial infarction. Further analysis of differentially expressed genes and their GO terms suggested that CMV infection may trigger a xenobiotic response, oxidative stress, inflammation and immune modulation. Notably, the current study identified γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT)-5 as a potential biomarker with an odds ratio of 1.947, which increased to 2.561 following the addition of CMV and CMV-neutralizing antibody (CMV-NA) titers. The C-statistics increased from 0.530 for conventional risk factors (CRFs) to 0.711 for GGT in combination with the above mentioned infections and CRFs. Therefore, the translational informatics approach used in the current study identified a potential molecular mechanism for CMV infection in CAD, and a potential biomarker for risk prediction. PMID:27035874

  17. Preservation of retinal structure and function after cilioretinal artery occlusion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Brown, Craig J

    2016-01-01

    Cilioretinal artery occlusion is a cause of sudden, often catastrophic loss of central vision. There are no established effective treatments. Recently, a patient presented 24 hours after a cilioretinal artery occlusion, following a cardiac catheterization prior to which her blood thinners had been discontinued. Lacking an effective way to address the severe retinal ischemic oxidative stress, she was offered, under compassionate use, a multivitamin complex designed to address retinal ischemia and oxidative stress. Significant components of this product are L-methylfolate and n-acetyl cysteine. The patient experienced a rapid unexpected improvement in vision and preservation of retinal structure, suggesting that marked improvement in retinal artery occlusions outcomes may be possible as late as 24 hours postocclusion. This is the third reported case of cilioretinal artery occlusion associated with cardiac catheterization. PMID:26929671

  18. Preservation of retinal structure and function after cilioretinal artery occlusion: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Craig J

    2016-01-01

    Cilioretinal artery occlusion is a cause of sudden, often catastrophic loss of central vision. There are no established effective treatments. Recently, a patient presented 24 hours after a cilioretinal artery occlusion, following a cardiac catheterization prior to which her blood thinners had been discontinued. Lacking an effective way to address the severe retinal ischemic oxidative stress, she was offered, under compassionate use, a multivitamin complex designed to address retinal ischemia and oxidative stress. Significant components of this product are L-methylfolate and n-acetyl cysteine. The patient experienced a rapid unexpected improvement in vision and preservation of retinal structure, suggesting that marked improvement in retinal artery occlusions outcomes may be possible as late as 24 hours postocclusion. This is the third reported case of cilioretinal artery occlusion associated with cardiac catheterization. PMID:26929671

  19. Cardiac structure and function, and ventricular-arterial interaction 11 years following a pregnancy with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Al-Nashi, Maha; Eriksson, Maria J; Östlund, Eva; Bremme, Katarina; Kahan, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is associated with acute left ventricular dysfunction. Whether these changes eventually resolve remains unclear. This study assessed left and right ventricular structure and function, and ventricular-arterial interaction in 15 women 11 years after a pregnancy with PE and 16 matched control subjects with a normal pregnancy. We found normal left and right ventricular dimensions, systolic function, and global left ventricular strain, with no differences between the groups. In addition, indices of diastolic function, left and right atrial size, and amino-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide were normal and did not differ between the groups. Women with a previous PE had impaired night/day ratios for systolic and diastolic ambulatory blood pressure. However, indices of aortic stiffness or ventricular-arterial coupling did not differ between the groups. In conclusion, we could not demonstrate remaining alterations in systolic or diastolic left or right ventricular function, or in ventricular-arterial interaction in women 11 years after PE. PMID:26852291

  20. Weight Loss Alone Improves Conduit and Resistance Artery Endothelial Function in Young and Older Overweight/Obese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Gary L.; Beske, Stacy D.; Lawson, Brooke R.; Southall, Kara L.; Benay, Francoise J.; Donato, Anthony J.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction, as indicated by impaired endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD). Presently there is no direct evidence that energy intake restricted weight loss alone improves conduit or resistance artery EDD, the mechanisms involved, or if improvements differ with patient age. A total of 40 overweight or obese (body mass index ≥ 25<40 kg/m2) non-diabetic men and women aged 21–69 years completed 12 weeks of reduced energy intake (n=26, 15M) or attention control (n=14, 9M) and 4 weeks of weight maintenance (randomized trial). Energy intake restriction reduced estimated total energy intake (33%), body weight (10.5%), total and abdominal body fat, plasma leptin, oxidized LDL, and improved some metabolic risk factors. Brachial artery flow mediated dilation (FMD) was increased by 30% (6.0 ± 0.7 vs. 7.9 ± 0.7 % Δ, P=0.01, n=17). Peak forearm blood flow during intra-brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine was increased by 26% (16.8 ± 1.4 vs. 21.1± 1.9 ml/100ml/min, P<0.05, n=15); this was inversely related to the reduction in abdominal visceral:subcutaneous fat ratio (r=−0.46, P<0.05) and was abolished by inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis with Ng-monomethyl L-arginine. Improvements in EDD were not related to age: mean increases in subjects >50 years were similar to or greater than those <50. Energy intake restricted weight loss alone is an effective intervention for improving peripheral conduit and resistance artery endothelial function in young and older overweight/obese adults. The improvements in resistance artery function are mediated by an increase in nitric oxide bioavailability and are related to reductions in abdominal visceral fat. PMID:18504322

  1. Monitoring changes in heart tissue temperature and evaluation of graft function after coronary artery bypass grafting surgery.

    PubMed

    Lekas, Raimundas; Jakuska, Povilas; Krisciukaitis, Algimantas; Veikutis, Vincentas; Dzemyda, Gintautas; Mickevicius, Tomas; Morkūnaite, Kristina; Vilke, Alina; Treigys, Povilas; Civinskiene, Genuvaite; Andriuskevicius, Jonas; Vanagas, Tomas; Skauminas, Kestutis; Bernatoniene, Jurga

    2009-01-01

    Thermography is a relatively new contact-free method used in experimental and clinical studies and in cardiovascular surgery to investigate the myocardium and coronary artery function. Objects of complex study included mongrel dogs and patients with coronary artery disease who underwent cardiac surgery. For active dynamic thermography, we used a thermovision camera "A20V" (FLIR Systems, USA). Our data indicate that both experimental and clinical study performed on beating hearts could be an important approach to interoperation inspection of autovenous graft function. An infrared camera also can be successfully used to determine the extent of ischemic damage to the myocardium, heart, and blood vessels during surgery as a significant prognostic tool for evaluating outcome after cardiac operation. PMID:19357452

  2. [Coronary artery disease, myocardial perfusion and ventricular function in Q-wave and non-Q-wave myocardial infarcts].

    PubMed

    Macieira-Coelho, E; Garcia-Alves, M; da Costa, B; Cantinho, G; Pedro, P; Dionisio, I; Gouveia, A; de Padua, F

    1997-04-01

    Controversy remains in considering non-Q wave myocardial infarction (NQMI) a distinct pathophysiological entity of Q wave myocardial infarction (QMI). In order to analyze the severity of coronary artery disease, extension of myocardial scar or myocardial ischemia and ventricular function, 78 consecutive patients with QMI and 32 with NQMI, mean age 55.4 +/- 8.5, not submitted to thrombolytic therapy, were studied. Coronary angiography, exercise thallium scintigraphy and radionuclide ventriculography were performed in all at least within 3 months of a prior myocardial infarction. In the present study the occurrence of QMI was significantly more frequent in older patients than NQMI. There was no prevalence of occlusion either in the right, left circumflex or left anterior descending coronary arteries in both groups. Ejection fraction, degree of occlusion and presence of collateral circulation showed an equal prevalence in QMI and NQMI patients. A higher incidence of multivessel disease was found in NQMI that had less necrosis than QMI patients. The prevalence of exercise induced thallium-201 redistribution defects within the infarct zone was substantially higher and involved more scar segments in NQMI patients. Physiological and clinical consequences of coronary thrombosis depends on the size and the number of diseased arteries, the approach the pathophysiologic consequences of coronary disease in terms of fractal structure has been suggested. A pronounced heterogeneity in regional myocardial blood flow in a fractal branching arterial network may be responsible for the pathophysiologic differences of coronary thrombosis between Q-wave and non Q-wave infarction. PMID:9341032

  3. Resveratrol Decreases TXNIP mRNA and Protein Nuclear Expressions With an Arterial Function Improvement in Old Mice.

    PubMed

    Bedarida, Tatiana; Baron, Stephanie; Vibert, Françoise; Ayer, Audrey; Henrion, Daniel; Thioulouse, Elizabeth; Marchiol, Carmen; Beaudeux, Jean-Louis; Cottart, Charles-Henry; Nivet-Antoine, Valerie

    2016-06-01

    Aging leads to a high prevalence of glucose intolerance and cardiovascular diseases, with oxidative stress playing a potential role. Resveratrol has shown promising effects on glucose tolerance and tends to improve endothelial function in elderly patients. Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) was recently proposed as a potential link connecting glucose metabolism to oxidative stress. Here, we investigated the resveratrol-induced improvement of arterial aging phenotype in old mice and the expression of aortic TXNIP. Using an in vivo model of old mice with or without 3-month resveratrol treatment, we investigated the effects of resveratrol on age-related impairments from a cardiovascular Doppler analysis, to a molecular level, by studying inflammation and oxidative stress factors. We found a dual effect of resveratrol, with a decrease of age-related glucose intolerance and oxidative stress imbalance leading to reduced matrix remodeling that forestalls arterial aging phenotype in terms of intima-media thickness and arterial distensibility. These results provide the first evidence that aortic TXNIP mRNA and protein nuclear expressions are increased in the arterial aging and decreased by resveratrol treatment. In conclusion, we demonstrated that resveratrol helped to restore several aging impaired processes in old mice, with a decrease of aortic TXNIP mRNA and protein nuclear expressions. PMID:26041427

  4. Kinetic quantitation of cerebral PET-FDG studies without concurrent blood sampling: statistical recovery of the arterial input function.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, F; Kirrane, J; Muzi, M; O'Sullivan, J N; Spence, A M; Mankoff, D A; Krohn, K A

    2010-03-01

    Kinetic quantitation of dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) studies via compartmental modeling usually requires the time-course of the radio-tracer concentration in the arterial blood as an arterial input function (AIF). For human and animal imaging applications, significant practical difficulties are associated with direct arterial sampling and as a result there is substantial interest in alternative methods that require no blood sampling at the time of the study. A fixed population template input function derived from prior experience with directly sampled arterial curves is one possibility. Image-based extraction, including requisite adjustment for spillover and recovery, is another approach. The present work considers a hybrid statistical approach based on a penalty formulation in which the information derived from a priori studies is combined in a Bayesian manner with information contained in the sampled image data in order to obtain an input function estimate. The absolute scaling of the input is achieved by an empirical calibration equation involving the injected dose together with the subject's weight, height and gender. The technique is illustrated in the context of (18)F -Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET studies in humans. A collection of 79 arterially sampled FDG blood curves are used as a basis for a priori characterization of input function variability, including scaling characteristics. Data from a series of 12 dynamic cerebral FDG PET studies in normal subjects are used to evaluate the performance of the penalty-based AIF estimation technique. The focus of evaluations is on quantitation of FDG kinetics over a set of 10 regional brain structures. As well as the new method, a fixed population template AIF and a direct AIF estimate based on segmentation are also considered. Kinetics analyses resulting from these three AIFs are compared with those resulting from radially sampled AIFs. The proposed penalty-based AIF extraction method is found to

  5. Baroreceptor reflex during forced expiratory maneuvers in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Legg Ditterline, Bonnie E; Aslan, Sevda C; Randall, David C; Harkema, Susan J; Ovechkin, Alexander V

    2016-07-15

    Pulmonary and cardiovascular dysfunctions are leading causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic Spinal Cord Injury (SCI). Impaired respiratory motor function and decreased Baroreflex Sensitivity (BS) are predictors for the development of cardiopulmonary disease. This observational case-controlled clinical study was undertaken to investigate if respiratory motor control deficits in individuals with SCI affect their ability to perform the Valsalva maneuver, and to determine if a sustained Maximum Expiratory Pressure (MEP) effort can serve as an acceptable maneuver for determination of the BS in the event that the Valsalva maneuver cannot be performed. The BS outcomes (ms/mmHg) were obtained using continuous beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) recordings during Valsalva or MEP maneuvers in thirty nine individuals with chronic C3-T12 SCI. Twenty one participants (54%) reported signs of intolerance during the Valsalva maneuver and only 15 individuals (39%) were able to complete this task. Cervical level of injury was a significant risk factor (p=0.001) for failing to complete the Valsalva maneuver, and motor-complete injury was a significant risk factor for symptoms of intolerance (p=0.04). Twenty eight participants (72%) were able to perform the MEP maneuver; the other 11 participants failed to exceed the standard airway pressure threshold of 27cm H2O. Neither level nor completeness of injury were significant risk factors for failure of MEP maneuver. When the required airway pressure was sustained, there were no significant differences between BS outcomes obtained during Valsalva and MEP maneuvers. The results of this study indicate that individuals with high-level and motor-complete SCI are at increased risk of not completing the Valsalva maneuver and that baroreflex-mediated responses can be evaluated by using sustained MEP maneuver when the Valsalva maneuver cannot be performed. PMID:27137412

  6. Direct binding and functional studies on muscarinic cholinoceptors in porcine coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Yamazawa, T; Nakayama, K

    1990-02-01

    The muscarinic cholinoceptors in porcine coronary artery were identified and characterized by a binding assay using (-)-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and also by pharmacological method. Specific (-)-[3H]QNB binding in the coronary artery was saturable and of high affinity (Kd = 0.08 nM), and it showed a pharmacological specificity as well as stereoselectivity which characterized muscarinic receptors. Muscarinic antagonists competed with the (-)-[3H]QNB binding in order: nonlabeled QNB greater than dexetimide greater than atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116 greater than levetimide greater than gallamine. Dexetimide was approximately 2000 times as potent as levetimide. The potencies (pKi) of these muscarinic antagonists in competing for (-)-[3H]QNB binding sites in porcine coronary artery correlated well with their pharmacological potencies (pA2 for antagonistic effect of acetylcholine-induced contraction of coronary artery). The decrease in the (-)-[3H]QNB binding by atropine and pirenzepine was due to a reduction in the apparent affinity with little change in the number of maximal binding sites, suggesting a competitive antagonism. Specific (-)-[3H]QNB binding (Kd and maximal number of binding sites) in porcine coronary artery was not changed by the removal of endothelium. We conclude: 1) (-)-[3H]QNB selectively labels the physiologically relevant muscarinic receptors in porcine coronary artery and 2) the majority of these receptors is localized on vascular smooth muscles and the receptors mediate the acetylcholine-induced contractile response of coronary artery. PMID:2313599

  7. Effects of Clopidogrel Therapy on Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, Vascular Function and Progenitor Cells in Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Ronnie; Dhawan, Saurabh S.; Syed, Hamid; Pohlel, F. Khan; Binongo, Jose Nilo G.; Ghazzal, Ziyad B.; Quyyumi, Arshed A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Traditional cardiovascular risk factors lead to endothelial injury and activation of leucocytes and platelets that initiate and propagate atherosclerosis. We proposed that clopidogrel therapy in patients with stable CAD imparts a pleiotropic effect that extends beyond anti-platelet aggregation to other athero-protective processes. Methods Forty-one subjects were randomized in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study to either clopidogrel 75 mg daily or placebo for 6-weeks, and then transitioned immediately to the other treatment for an additional 6 weeks. We assessed 1) endothelial function as flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery, 2) arterial stiffness and central augmentation index using applanation tonometry, 3) vascular function as fingertip reactive hyperemia index, 4) inflammation by measuring plasma CD40 ligand and serum high-sensitivity c-reactive protein levels, 5) oxidative stress by measuring plasma aminothiols, and 6) circulating progenitor cells, at baseline and at the end of each 6-week treatment period. Results Clopidogrel therapy resulted in a significant reduction in soluble CD40 ligand (p=0.03), a pro-thrombotic and pro-inflammatory molecule derived mainly from activated platelets. However, clopidogrel therapy had no effect on endothelial function, arterial stiffness, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, or progenitor cells. Conclusions Our findings suggest a solitary anti-platelet effect of clopidogrel therapy in patients with stable CAD, with no effect on other sub-clinical markers of cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:24336012

  8. Do preoperative pulmonary function indices predict morbidity after coronary artery bypass surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Mahdi; Sheikhvatan, Mehrdad; Mortazavi, Seyedeh Hamideh

    2015-01-01

    Context: The reported prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) varies among different groups of cardiac surgical patients. Moreover, the prognostic value of preoperative COPD in outcome prediction is controversial. Aims: The present study assessed the morbidity in the different levels of COPD severity and the role of pulmonary function indices in predicting morbidity in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Settings and Design: Patients who were candidates for isolated CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass who were recruited for Tehran Heart Center-Coronary Outcome Measurement Study. Methods: Based on spirometry findings, diagnosis of COPD was considered based on Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease category as forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1]/forced vital capacity <0.7 (absolute value, not the percentage of the predicted). Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) definition was used for determining COPD severity and the patients were divided into three groups: Control group (FEV1 >75% predicted), mild (FEV1 60–75% predicted), moderate (FEV1 50–59% predicted), severe (FEV1<50% predicted). The preoperative pulmonary function indices were assessed as predictors, and postoperative morbidity was considered the surgical outcome. Results: This study included 566 consecutive patients. Patients with and without COPD were similar regarding baseline characteristics and clinical data. Hypertension, recent myocardial infarction, and low ejection fraction were higher in patients with different degrees of COPD than the control group while male gender was more frequent in control patients than the others. Restrictive lung disease and current cigarette smoking did not have any significant impact on postoperative complications. We found a borderline P = 0.057 with respect to respiratory failure among different patients of COPD severity so that 14.1% patients in control group, 23.5% in mild, 23.4% in moderate, and 21.9% in severe

  9. The effect of hypoxia-induced intrauterine growth restriction on renal artery function.

    PubMed

    Verschuren, M T C; Morton, J S; Abdalvand, A; Mansour, Y; Rueda-Clausen, C F; Compston, C A; Luyckx, V; Davidge, S T

    2012-10-01

    The risk of developing cardiovascular diseases is known to begin before birth and the impact of the intrauterine environment on subsequent adult health is currently being investigated from many quarters. Following our studies demonstrating the impact of hypoxia in utero and consequent intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) on the rat cardiovascular system, we hypothesized that changes extend throughout the vasculature and alter function of the renal artery. In addition, we hypothesized that hypoxia induces renal senescence as a potential mediator of altered vascular function. We demonstrated that IUGR females had decreased responses to the adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PE; pEC50 6.50 ± 0.05 control v. 6.17 ± 0.09 IUGR, P < 0.05) and the endothelium-dependent vasodilator methylcholine (MCh; E max 89.8 ± 7.0% control v. 41.0 ± 6.5% IUGR, P < 0.001). In IUGR females, this was characterised by increased basal nitric oxide (NO) modulation of vasoconstriction (PE pEC50 6.17 ± 0.09 IUGR v. 6.42 ± 0.08 in the presence of the NO synthase inhibitor N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME; P < 0.01) but decreased activated NO modulation (no change in MCh responses in the presence of l-NAME), respectively. In contrast, IUGR males had no changes in PE or MCh responses but demonstrated increased basal NO (PE pEC50 6.29 ± 0.06 IUGR v. 6.42 ± 0.12 plus l-NAME, P < 0.01) and activated NO (E max 37.8 ± 9.4% control v. -0.8 ± 13.0% plus l-NAME, P < 0.05) modulation. No significant changes were found in gross kidney morphology, proteinuria or markers of cellular senescence in either sex. In summary, renal vascular function was altered by hypoxia in utero in a sex-dependent manner but was unlikely to be mediated by premature renal senescence. PMID:25102262

  10. Echocardiographic assessment of right ventricular functions in patients with proximal right coronary artery chronic total occlusion.

    PubMed

    Missiri, Ahmed Mohamed El; Guindy, Ramez Raouf

    2016-06-01

    To assess right ventricular functions by echocardiography in patients with proximal right coronary artery (RCA) CTO and correlating it with clinical and angiographic variables. We studied 60 consecutive patients with CTO of the proximal RCA and no other significant lesions in the left coronary system. Echocardiography was performed in order to measure left ventricular (LV) dimensions, LVEF, RV end diastolic area (RVEDA), RV end systolic area (RVESA), RV fractional area change (RVFAC), tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), Doppler myocardial performance index (MPI), trans-tricuspid E and A waves, E/A ratio, S', e' and a'. Grades of coronary collaterals was assessed. Doppler MPI showed negative correlation with TAPSE (r = -0.8997, p < 0.0001) and RVFAC (r = -0.928, p < 0.0001). Positive correlation with trans-tricuspid E/A ratio (r = 0.893, p < 0.0001) and E/e' ratio (r = 0.783, p < 0.0001). Patients with no evidence of MI had more well-developed (grade 3) coronary collaterals (83.8 vs. 17.4 %). Patients with evidence of MI had lower RVFAC 38.13 ± 5.39 versus 45.08 ± 4.99 % (p < 0.0001), lower TAPSE 20.17 ± 3.85 versus 25.35 ± 3.46 mm (p < 0.0001), higher MPI 0.4 ± 0.08 versus 0.31 ± 0.05 (p < 0.0001), higher trans-tricuspid E/A ratio 1.79 ± 0.38 versus 1.13 ± 0.36 (p < 0.0001) and E/e' ratio 5.23 ± 1.02 versus 3.61 ± 0.88 (p < 0.0001). Patients with poorly developed collaterals had lower TAPSE and RVFAC and a higher MPI (p < 0.0001 for each). Patients with proximal RCA CTOs and evidence of inferior wall MI have significant impairment of RV functions in addition to poorly developed coronary collaterals. Those with proximal RCA CTOs and well-developed coronary collaterals have better RV functions. PMID:26850438

  11. Coronary Artery Calcium and Physical Function in Older Adults: The Cardiovascular Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Inzitari, Marco; Naydeck, Barbara L.; Newman, Anne B.

    2016-01-01

    Background In older adults without clinical cardiovascular disease, coronary artery calcium (CAC) is associated with other subclinical vascular diseases, which, in turn, predict physical dysfunction. However, the association between CAC and physical function is unstudied. Methods In 387 older community-dwellers from the Cardiovascular Health Study without clinical cardiovascular diseases (mean age ± standard deviation = 78.7 ± 3.7, 35% men, 22% African Americans), CAC was measured using electron beam tomography, and physical performance was assessed by usual pace gait speed, chair stand, and tandem stand. Differences in physical performance across CAC quartiles were investigated in the whole cohort and by gender. Associations with gait speed (m/s) were assessed in multivariable models using both the continuous form of CAC score (log(CAC)) and quartiles of CAC, adjusting for demographics and comorbidities. Results No differences in physical performance were observed across CAC quartiles in the whole group. In gender-stratified analyses, a significant association was shown among women, who had progressively lower gait speed across CAC quartiles: Those with CAC > 220 walked more than 0.1 m/s slower than those with CAC < 35 (age-adjusted ptrend =.017). After multivariable adjustment, the association remained statistically significant for women in both linear (log(CAC) and gait speed, p =.025) and logistic models: Each of the top three CAC quartiles (35–220, 221–659, and ≥660) had a more than twofold odds of walking slower than 1 m/s, compared to the lowest CAC quartile (< 35; p =.021). Conclusions In this sample of older community-dwellers without overt cardiovascular disease, CAC was inversely related to gait speed in women, but not in men. PMID:18948563

  12. Nogo-B Receptor Modulates Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Function in Developing Lungs.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Kent S; Rana, Ujala; Jing, Xigang; Konduri, G Ganesh; Miao, Qing R; Teng, Ru-Jeng

    2016-06-01

    Nogo-B and its receptor (NgBR) are involved in blood vessel growth in developing lungs, but their role in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) growth is unknown. We hypothesized that NgBR regulates growth of PASMCs by modulating the function of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In utero constriction of the ductus arteriosus created pulmonary hypertension in fetal lambs (hypertensive fetal lamb [HTFL]). PASMCs isolated 8 days after surgery were assessed for the alteration of protein levels by immunoblots and ROS formation by dihydroethidium and Cell ROX deep red fluorescence. NgBR small interfering RNA and plasmid DNA were used to manipulate NgBR levels. Proliferation and wound healing were assessed by cell counts and scratch recovery assay, respectively. Acute ER stress was induced by tunicamycin. Differences of mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt pathway activation in HTFL versus control PASMCs were evaluated. Results showed that HTFL PASMCs had decreased NgBR levels and increased proliferation, wound healing, ER stress, and ROS formation compared with controls. Knockdown of NgBR in control PASMCs generated a phenotype similar to HTFL, and overexpression in HTFL restored the defective phenotype to control. Decreased NgBR levels were associated with increased ROS formation in HTFL PASMCs. Subsequently, scavenging ROS decreased proliferation and wound healing. Mechanistically, ROS formation decreases NgBR expression, which induces ER stress. This leads to extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway activation and PASMC phenotype alteration. Our data suggest that decreased NgBR expression in pulmonary hypertension of the newborn contributes to increased PASMC proliferation and oxidative stress, which lead to the pathogenesis of lung injury. PMID:26652754

  13. Intrapericardial denervation - Radial artery blood flow and heart rate responses to LBNP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeever, Kenneth H.; Skidmore, Michael G.; Keil, Lanny C.; Sandler, Harold

    1990-01-01

    The effects of intrapericardial denervation on the radial artery blood flow velocity (RABFV) and heart rate (HR) responses to LBNP in rhesus monkeys were investigated by measuring the RABFV transcutaneously by a continuous-wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter in order to derive an index of forearm blood flow response to low (0 to -20 mm Hg) and high (0 to -60 mm Hg) ramp exposures during supine LBNP. Four of the eight subjects were subjected to efferent and afferent cardiac denervation. It was found that, during low levels of LBNP, monkeys with cardiac denervation exhibited no cardiopulmonary baroreceptor-mediated change in the RABFV or HR, unlike the intact animals, which showed steady decreases in RABFV during both high- and low-pressure protocols. It is suggested that forearm blood flow and HR responses to low-level LBNP, along with pharmacological challenge, are viable physiological tests for verifying the completeness of atrial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptor denervation.

  14. Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Avolio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Stiffness of large arteries has been long recognized as a significant determinant of pulse pressure. However, it is only in recent decades, with the accumulation of longitudinal data from large and varied epidemiological studies of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease, that it has emerged as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. This has generated substantial interest in investigations related to intrinsic causative and associated factors responsible for the alteration of mechanical properties of the arterial wall, with the aim to uncover specific pathways that could be interrogated to prevent or reverse arterial stiffening. Much has been written on the haemodynamic relevance of arterial stiffness in terms of the quantification of pulsatile relationships of blood pressure and flow in conduit arteries. Indeed, much of this early work regarded blood vessels as passive elastic conduits, with the endothelial layer considered as an inactive lining of the lumen and as an interface to flowing blood. However, recent advances in molecular biology and increased technological sophistication for the detection of low concentrations of biochemical compounds have elucidated the highly important regulatory role of the endothelial cell affecting vascular function. These techniques have enabled research into the interaction of the underlying passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall with the active cellular and molecular processes that regulate the local environment of the load-bearing components. This review addresses these emerging concepts. PMID:26587425

  15. Unique Expression of Angiotensin Type-2 Receptor in Sex-Specific Distribution of Myelinated Ah-Type Baroreceptor Neuron Contributing to Sex-Dimorphic Neurocontrol of Circulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Zhou, Jia-Ying; Zhou, Yu-Hong; Wu, Di; He, Jian-Li; Han, Li-Min; Liang, Xiao-Bo; Wang, Lu-Qi; Lu, Xiao-Long; Chen, Hanying; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Shou, Weinian; Li, Bai-Yan

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to understand the special expression patterns of angiotensin-II receptor (AT1R and AT2R) in nodose ganglia and nucleus of tractus solitary of baroreflex afferent pathway and their contribution in sex difference of neurocontrol of blood pressure regulation. In this regard, action potentials were recorded in baroreceptor neurons (BRNs) using whole-cell patch techniques; mRNA and protein expression of AT1R and AT2R in nodose ganglia and nucleus of tractus solitary were evaluated using real time-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry at both tissue and single-cell levels. The in vivo effects of 17β-estradiol on blood pressure and AT2R expression were also tested. The data showed that AT2R, rather than AT1R, expression was higher in female than age-matched male rats. Moreover, AT2R was downregulated in ovariectomized rats, which was restored by the administration of 17β-estradiol. Single-cell real time-polymerase chain reaction data indicated that AT2R was uniquely expressed in Ah-type BRNs. Functional study showed that long-term administration of 17β-estradiol significantly alleviated the blood pressure increase in ovariectomized rats. Electrophysiological recordings showed that angiotensin-II treatment increased the neuroexcitability more in Ah- than C-type BRNs, whereas no such effect was observed in A-types. In addition, angiotensin-II treatment prolonged action potential duration, which was not further changed by iberiotoxin. The density of angiotensin-II-sensitive K(+) currents recorded in Ah-types was equivalent with iberiotoxin-sensitive component. In summary, the unique, sex- and afferent-specific expression of AT2R was identified in Ah-type BRNs, and AT2R-mediated KCa1.1 inhibition in Ah-type BRNs may exert great impacts on baroreflex afferent function and blood pressure regulation in females. PMID:26883269

  16. Effects of age and sex on cerebrovascular function in the rat middle cerebral artery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of estrogen on cerebrovascular function are well known, the age-dependent deleterious effects of estrogen are largely unstudied. It was hypothesized that age and sex interact in modulating cerebrovascular reactivity to vasopressin (VP) by altering the role of prostanoids in vascular function. Methods Female (F) Sprague–Dawley rats approximating key stages of “hormonal aging” in humans were studied: premenopausal (mature multigravid, MA, cyclic, 5–6 months) and postmenopausal (reproductively senescent, RS, acyclic, 10–12 months). Age-matched male (M) rats were also studied. Reactivity to VP (10−12–10−7 M) was measured in pressurized middle cerebral artery segments in the absence or presence of selective inhibitors of COX-1 (SC560, SC, 1 μM) or COX-2 (NS398, NS, 10 μM). VP-stimulated release of PGI2 and TXA2 were measured using radioimmunoassay of 6-keto-PGF1α and TXB2 (stable metabolites, pg/mg dry wt/45 min). Results In M, there were no changes in VP-induced vasoconstriction with age. Further, there were no significant differences in basal or in low- or high-VP-stimulated PGI2 or TXA2 production in younger or older M. In contrast, there were marked differences in cerebrovascular reactivity and prostanoid release with advancing age in F. Older RS F exhibited reduced maximal constrictor responses to VP, which can be attributed to enhanced COX-1 derived dilator prostanoids. VP-induced vasoconstriction in younger MA F utilized both COX-1 and COX-2 derived constrictor prostanoids. Further, VP-stimulated PGI2 and TXA2 production was enhanced by endogenous estrogen and decreased with advancing age in F, but not in M rats. Conclusions This is the first study to examine the effects of age and sex on the mechanisms underlying cerebrovascular reactivity to VP. Interestingly, VP-mediated constriction was reduced by age in F, but was unchanged in M rats. Additionally, it was observed

  17. [The biological reaction of inflammation, methylglyoxal of blood plasma, functional and structural alterations in elastic type arteries at the early stage of hypertension disease].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Dmitriev, V A; Oshchepkov, E V; Balakhonova, T V; Tripoten', M I; Shiriaeva, Iu K

    2012-08-01

    The article deals with studying of the relationship between biologic reaction of inflammation with glycosylation reaction and content of methylglyoxal in blood serum. The positive correlation between pulse wave velocity and content of methylglyoxal, C-reactive protein in intercellular medium and malleolar brachial index value was established. This data matches the experimental results concerning involvement of biological reaction of inflammation into structural changes of elastic type arteries under hypertension disease, formation of arteries' rigidity and increase of pulse wave velocity. The arterial blood pressure is a biological reaction of hydrodynamic pressure which is used in vivo by several biological functions: biological function of homeostasis, function of endoecology, biological function of adaptation and function of locomotion. The biological reaction of hydrodynamic (hydraulic) pressure is a mode of compensation of derangement of several biological functions which results in the very high rate of hypertension disease in population. As a matter of fact, hypertension disease is a syndrome of lingering pathological compensation by higher arterial blood pressure of the biological functions derangements occurring in the distal section at the level of paracrine cenoses of cells. The arterial blood pressure is a kind of in vivo integral indicator of deranged metabolism. The essential hypertension disease pathogenically is a result of the derangement of three biological functions: biological function of homeostasis, biological function of trophology - nutrition (biological reaction of external feeding - exotrophia) and biological function of endoecology. In case of "littering" of intercellular medium in vivo with nonspecific endogenic flogogens a phylogenetically earlier activation of biological reactions of excretion, inflammation and hydrodynamic arterial blood pressure occur. In case of derangement of biological function of homeostasis, decreasing of

  18. New Insight into Effects of β-Blockers on Arterial Functions

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    The effects of β-blockers on arterial properties are not well investigated. In our recent study, we compared the effects of the two β-blockers celiprolol and bisoprolol on blood pressure, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), flow-mediated vasodilatation, and vascular stiffness. We found that bisoprolol achieved a greater reduction in the pulse rate and improved BRS and vascular stiffness, whereas celiprolol reduced the central blood pressure level. In this review, the mechanisms of different types of β-blockers and their effects on arteries are discussed, and the appropriate use of β-blockers in hypertensive subjects will be proposed. PMID:27195240

  19. Preserved structural and functional characteristics of common carotid artery in properly treated normoglycemic women with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Vastagh, Ildikó; Horváth, T; Garamvölgyi, Z; Rosta, K; Folyovich, A; Rigó, J; Kollai, M; Bereczki, D; Somogyi, A

    2011-09-01

    Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are at high risk of subsequently developing type 2 diabetes mellitus which is an important cardiovascular risk factor. We have evaluated whether preclinical morphological and functional arterial changes are present in GDM. Diameter, intima-media thickness (IMT), intima-media cross-section area (IMCSA) and elasticity features (compliance, distensibility coefficient, circumferential strain, stiffness index (SI) α and β, incremental elastic modulus) of the common carotid arteries (CCA) were studied in the 3rd trimester in 25 women with GDM, and 17 normal pregnant women matched for age and body mass index using an ultrasonographic vessel wall-movement tracking system and applanation tonometry. Mean IMT, IMCSA and SI α tended to be larger, whereas compliance was smaller in women with GDM but none of these differences were significant. Serum glucose (4.99 ± 0.51 vs. 4.79 ± 0.61 mmol/L, p=0.37) and HbA1c (5.33 ± 0.27 vs. 5.36 ± 0.47 mmol/L, p=0.85) proved normoglycemia in both groups. In conclusion, by the combination of methods we applied in this case control study, neither morphological nor functional characteristics of large elastic arteries differ significantly between well-treated normoglycemic women with GDM and non-diabetic pregnant women in the 3rd trimester. PMID:21893468

  20. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis in the post-CORAL era part 1: the renal penumbra concept and next-generation functional diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Sag, Alan Alper; Inal, Ibrahim; Okcuoglu, John; Rossignol, Patrick; Ortiz, Alberto; Afsar, Baris; Sos, Thomas A; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    After three neutral trials in which renal artery stenting failed to improve renal function or reduce cardiovascular and renal events, the controversy surrounding diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis and renovascular hypertension has led to paradigm shifts in the diagnostic algorithm. Noninvasive determination of earlier events (cortex hypoxia and renal artery hemodynamic changes) will supersede late sequelae (calcific stenosis, renal cortical thinning). Therefore, this review proposes the concept of renal penumbra in defining at-risk ischemic renal parenchyma. The complex field of functional renal magnetic resonance imaging will be reviewed succinctly in a clinician-directed fashion. PMID:26944791

  1. Association between arterial stiffness, disease activity and functional impairment in ankylosing spondylitis patients: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Avram, Claudiu; Drăgoi, Răzvan Gabriel; Popoviciu, Horațiu; Drăgoi, Mihai; Avram, Adina; Amaricăi, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular risk is an important factor for increased morbidity and mortality in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The aim of this study is to assess arterial stiffness in relation to the disease activity and functional limitation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Twenty-four patients (mean age 45.8 ± 11.7 years) suffering of ankylosing spondylitis (disease duration 11.1 ± 5.1 years) and 24 gender and age-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Clinical, biological, and functional status of ankylosing spondylitis patients was recorded. Arterial stiffness was assessed by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis (PWA) was performed using applanation tonometry. We found significant differences between ankylosing spondylitis patients and healthy controls in regard to PWV (p = 0.047), aortic augmentation pressure-AP (p = 0.028), augmentation index-AIx (p = 0.038) and aortic augmentation index adjusted for heart rate-AIx75 (p = 0.011). PWV and AIx75 were significantly associated with the disease functioning score-BASFI (p = 0.012, r = 0.504; p = 0.041, r = 0.421). Aortic AP and augmentation indexes (AIx and AIx75) were all associated to ASDAS score (p = 0.028, r = 0.448; p = 0.005, r = 0.549; p = 0.025, r = 0.455). Our study showed that ankylosing spondylitis patients have a higher arterial stiffness than the age-matched controls, leading to an increased cardiovascular risk. We found that arterial stiffness is positively associated with disease activity and functional impairment. Chronic spondiloarthropaties should be screened for arterial stiffness, even in the absence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, in order to benefit from primary prevention measures. PMID:27169859

  2. High dietary fructose does not exacerbate the detrimental consequences of high fat diet on basilar artery function.

    PubMed

    Toklu, H Z; Muller-Delp, J; Sakaraya, Y; Oktay, S; Kirichenko, N; Matheny, M; Carter, C S; Morgan, D; Strehler, K Y E; Tumer, N; Scarpace, P J

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of a high fat (HF) diet alone or with high fructose (HF/F) on functional and structural changes in the basilar arteries and cardiovascular health parameters in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a HF (30%) or HF/F (30/40%) diet for 12 weeks. The basilar artery was cannulated in a pressurized system (90 cm H2O) and vascular responses to KCl (30 - 120 mM), endothelin (10(-11) - 10(-7) M), acetylcholine (ACh) (10(-10) - 10(-4) M), diethylamine (DEA)-NONO-ate (10(-10) - 10(-4) M), and papaverine (10(-10) - 10(-4) M) were evaluated. Rats were also monitored for food intake, body weight, blood lipids, blood pressure, and heart rate. At death, asymmetrical dimethyl arginine level (ADMA) and leptin were assayed in serum. Although there was no significant difference in weight gain and food intake, HF and HF/F diets increased body fat composition and decreased the lean mass. HF/F diet accelerated the development of dyslipidemia. Although resting blood pressure remained unchanged, stress caused a significant elevation in blood pressure and a modest increase in heart rate in HF fed rats. Both HF and HF/F diet resulted in decreased response to endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation, whereas increased basilar artery wall thickness was observed only in HF group. Serum leptin levels positively correlated with wall thickness. Moreover serum ADMA was increased and eNOS immunofluorescence was significantly decreased with both diets. These data suggest that the presence of high fructose in a HF diet does not exacerbate the detrimental consequences of a HF diet on basilar artery function. PMID:27226180

  3. Characterization of the image-derived carotid artery input function using independent component analysis for the quantitation of [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; Chen, X.; Renaut, R.; Alexander, G. E.; Bandy, D.; Guo, H.; Reiman, E. M.

    2007-12-01

    We previously developed a noninvasive technique for the quantification of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) images using an image-derived input function obtained from a manually drawn carotid artery region. Here, we investigate the use of independent component analysis (ICA) for more objective identification of the carotid artery and surrounding tissue regions. Using FDG PET data from 22 subjects, ICA was applied to an easily defined cubical region including the carotid artery and neighboring tissue. Carotid artery and tissue time activity curves and three venous samples were used to generate spillover and partial volume-corrected input functions and to calculate the parametric images of the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRgl). Different from a blood-sampling-free ICA approach, the results from our ICA approach are numerically well matched to those based on the arterial blood sampled input function. In fact, the ICA-derived input functions and CMRgl measurements were not only highly correlated (correlation coefficients >0.99) to, but also highly comparable (regression slopes between 0.92 and 1.09), with those generated using arterial blood sampling. Moreover, the reliability of the ICA-derived input function remained high despite variations in the location and size of the cubical region. The ICA procedure makes it possible to quantify FDG PET images in an objective and reproducible manner. Image-derived input function by ICA for FDG-PET.

  4. SOD1 Overexpression Preserves Baroreflex Control of Heart Rate with an Increase of Aortic Depressor Nerve Function.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, Jeffrey; Gu, He; Cheng, Zixi Jack

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide radical (O2 (∙-)), is associated with diseases which compromise cardiac autonomic function. Overexpression of SOD1 may offer protection against ROS damage to the cardiac autonomic nervous system, but reductions of O2 (∙-) may interfere with normal cellular functions. We have selected the C57B6SJL-Tg (SOD1)2 Gur/J mouse as a model to determine whether SOD1 overexpression alters cardiac autonomic function, as measured by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and aortic depressor nerve (ADN) recordings, as well as evaluation of baseline heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Under isoflurane anesthesia, C57 wild-type and SOD1 mice were catheterized with an arterial pressure transducer and measurements of HR and MAP were taken. After establishing a baseline, hypotension and hypertension were induced by injection of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and phenylephrine (PE), respectively, and ΔHR versus ΔMAP were recorded as a measure of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). SNP and PE treatment were administered sequentially after a recovery period to measure arterial baroreceptor activation by recording aortic depressor nerve activity. Our findings show that overexpression of SOD1 in C57B6SJL-Tg (SOD1)2 Gur/J mouse preserved the normal HR, MAP, and BRS but enhanced aortic depressor nerve function. PMID:26823951

  5. SOD1 Overexpression Preserves Baroreflex Control of Heart Rate with an Increase of Aortic Depressor Nerve Function

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Jeffrey; Gu, He; Cheng, Zixi (Jack)

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide radical (O2∙−), is associated with diseases which compromise cardiac autonomic function. Overexpression of SOD1 may offer protection against ROS damage to the cardiac autonomic nervous system, but reductions of O2∙− may interfere with normal cellular functions. We have selected the C57B6SJL-Tg (SOD1)2 Gur/J mouse as a model to determine whether SOD1 overexpression alters cardiac autonomic function, as measured by baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and aortic depressor nerve (ADN) recordings, as well as evaluation of baseline heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Under isoflurane anesthesia, C57 wild-type and SOD1 mice were catheterized with an arterial pressure transducer and measurements of HR and MAP were taken. After establishing a baseline, hypotension and hypertension were induced by injection of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and phenylephrine (PE), respectively, and ΔHR versus ΔMAP were recorded as a measure of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). SNP and PE treatment were administered sequentially after a recovery period to measure arterial baroreceptor activation by recording aortic depressor nerve activity. Our findings show that overexpression of SOD1 in C57B6SJL-Tg (SOD1)2 Gur/J mouse preserved the normal HR, MAP, and BRS but enhanced aortic depressor nerve function. PMID:26823951

  6. Noise Reduction in Arterial Spin Labeling Based Functional Connectivity Using Nuisance Variables.

    PubMed

    Jann, Kay; Smith, Robert X; Rios Piedra, Edgar A; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J J

    2016-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion image series have recently been utilized for functional connectivity (FC) analysis in healthy volunteers and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Noise reduction by using nuisance variables has been shown to be necessary to minimize potential confounding effects of head motion and physiological signals on BOLD based FC analysis. The purpose of the present study is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of different noise reduction strategies (NRS) using nuisance variables to improve perfusion based FC analysis in two cohorts of healthy adults using state of the art 3D background-suppressed (BS) GRASE pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL sequences. Five different NRS were performed in healthy volunteers to compare their performance. We then compared seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in a cohort of 12 children with ASD (3f/9m, age 12.8 ± 1.3 years) and 13 typically developing (TD) children (1f/12m; age 13.9 ± 3 years) in conjunction with NRS. Regression of different combinations of nuisance variables affected FC analysis from a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to other areas of the default mode network (DMN) in both BOLD and pCASL data sets. Consistent with existing literature on BOLD-FC, we observed improved spatial specificity after physiological noise reduction and improved long-range connectivity using head movement related regressors. Furthermore, 3D BS GRASE pCASL shows much higher temporal SNR compared to dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL and similar effects of noise reduction as those observed for BOLD. Seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in children with ASD and TD children showed that noise reduction including physiological and motion related signals as nuisance variables is crucial for identifying altered long-range connectivity from PCC to frontal brain areas associated with ASD. This is the first study that systematically evaluated the effects of

  7. Noise Reduction in Arterial Spin Labeling Based Functional Connectivity Using Nuisance Variables

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Kay; Smith, Robert X.; Rios Piedra, Edgar A.; Dapretto, Mirella; Wang, Danny J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) perfusion image series have recently been utilized for functional connectivity (FC) analysis in healthy volunteers and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Noise reduction by using nuisance variables has been shown to be necessary to minimize potential confounding effects of head motion and physiological signals on BOLD based FC analysis. The purpose of the present study is to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of different noise reduction strategies (NRS) using nuisance variables to improve perfusion based FC analysis in two cohorts of healthy adults using state of the art 3D background-suppressed (BS) GRASE pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) and dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL sequences. Five different NRS were performed in healthy volunteers to compare their performance. We then compared seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in a cohort of 12 children with ASD (3f/9m, age 12.8 ± 1.3 years) and 13 typically developing (TD) children (1f/12m; age 13.9 ± 3 years) in conjunction with NRS. Regression of different combinations of nuisance variables affected FC analysis from a seed in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to other areas of the default mode network (DMN) in both BOLD and pCASL data sets. Consistent with existing literature on BOLD-FC, we observed improved spatial specificity after physiological noise reduction and improved long-range connectivity using head movement related regressors. Furthermore, 3D BS GRASE pCASL shows much higher temporal SNR compared to dual-echo 2D-EPI pCASL and similar effects of noise reduction as those observed for BOLD. Seed-based FC analysis using 3D BS GRASE pCASL in children with ASD and TD children showed that noise reduction including physiological and motion related signals as nuisance variables is crucial for identifying altered long-range connectivity from PCC to frontal brain areas associated with ASD. This is the first study that systematically evaluated the effects of

  8. Impact of age on the vasodilatory function of human skeletal muscle feed arteries.

    PubMed

    Park, Song-Young; Ives, Stephen J; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Hyngstrom, John R; Reese, Van; Layec, Gwenael; Bharath, Leena P; Symons, John D; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-01-15

    Although advancing age is often associated with attenuated skeletal muscle blood flow and skeletal muscle feed arteries (SMFAs) have been recognized to play a regulatory role in the vasculature, little is known about the impact of age on the vasodilatory capacity of human SMFAs. Therefore, endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilation were assessed in SMFAs (diameter: 544 ± 63 μm) obtained from 24 (equally represented) young (33 ± 2 yr) and old (71 ± 2 yr) subjects in response to three stimuli: 1) flow-induced shear stress, 2) ACh, and 3) sodium nitropusside (SNP). Both assessments of endothelium-dependent vasodilation, flow (young subjects: 68 ± 1% and old subjects: 32 ± 7%) and ACh (young subjects: 92 ± 3% and old subjects: 73 ± 4%), were significantly blunted (P < 0.05) in SMFAs of old compared with young subjects, with no such age-related differences in endothelium-independent vasodilation (SNP). In response to an increase in flow-induced shear stress, vasodilation kinetics (time constant to reach 63% of the amplitude of the response: 55 ± 1 s in young subjects and 92 ± 7 s in old subjects) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation (phospho-eNOS(s1177)/total eNOS: 1.0 ± 0.1 in young subjects and 0.2 ± 0.1 in old subjects) were also significantly attenuated in old compared with young subjects (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the vessel superoxide concentration was greater in old subjects (old subjects: 3.9 ± 1.0 area under curve/mg and young subjects: 1.7 ± 0.1 area under the curve/mg, P < 0.05). These findings reveal that the endothelium-dependent vasodilatory capacity, including vasodilation kinetics but not smooth muscle function, of human SMFAs is blunted with age and may be due to free radicals. Given the potential regulatory role of SMFAs in skeletal muscle blood flow, these findings may explain, at least in part, the often observed attenuated perfusion of skeletal muscle with advancing age that may contribute to exercise

  9. The relation of arterial stiffness to endothelial function in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Wright, C I; Brouwer-de Cock, K A J; Kroner, C I; Hoeks, A P G; Draijer, R

    2007-05-01

    Local wall stiffness affects endothelial responsiveness but how global measures affect responsiveness is unanswered. We assessed this by comparing reactive hyperaemic responses of brachial diameter (RHRBD) with central (heart-to-brachial artery pulse wave velocity (PWV); large (C1)) and peripheral (C2) arterial stiffness. Twelve healthy subjects were investigated. RHRBD was induced via an upper- or forearm occluding cuff. Arterial diameter changes were measured using echo ultrasound. Arterial stiffness and RHRBD were compared using a Pearson correlation coefficient (r) and Bland-Altman analysis of Z-scores (indicated as 95% confidence intervals (CI) and expressed in units of standard deviation (SD) from the mean). Weak relations were found between upper-arm RHRBD responses and C2 (r = 0.56, P = 0.06; 95% CI +/- 1.84 SDs) and C1 (r = 0.55, P = 0.06; 95% CI +/- 1.86 SDs). An inverse relation was found between upper-arm RHRBD responses and PWV (r = -0.55, P = 0.06), but Bland-Altman plots revealed no agreement between these parameters (P > 0.05; 95% CI +/- 3.46 SDs). Forearm RHRBD were not related to PWV, C1 or C2 (P > 0.05; 95% CI > 2 SDs). The weak relation between upper-arm endothelial responses and C2 and C1 seems to suggest that C2, and also C1, is not a good and reliable method for assessments of endothelial health. Furthermore, if anything, upper-arm mediated RHRBD responses are more affected by arterial stiffness than forearm responses. PMID:17470989

  10. Exercise reduces GABA synaptic input onto NTS baroreceptor second-order neurons via NK1 receptor internalization in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao-Yin; Bechtold, Andrea G.; Tabor, Jocelyn; Bonham, Ann C.

    2009-01-01

    A single bout of mild to moderate exercise can lead to a post-exercise decrease in blood pressure in hypertensive subjects, namely post-exercise hypotension (PEH). The full expression of PEH requires a functioning baroreflex, hypertension and activation of muscle afferents (exercise), suggesting that interactions in the neural networks regulating exercise and blood pressure result in this fall in blood pressure. The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) is the first brain site that receives inputs from nerves carrying blood pressure and muscle activity information, making it an ideal site for integrating cardiovascular responses to exercise. During exercise, muscle afferents excite NTS GABA neurons via substance P and microinjection of a substance P-neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1-R) antagonist into the NTS attenuates PEH. The data suggest that an interaction between the substance P NK1-R and GABAergic transmission in the NTS may contribute to PEH. We performed voltage-clamping on NTS baroreceptor second-order neurons in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). All animals were sacrificed within 30 min and the patch-clamp recordings were performed 2-8 hr after the sham/exercise protocol. The data showed that a single bout of exercise reduces 1) the frequency but not the amplitude of GABA spontaneous inhibitory synaptic currents (sIPCs), 2) endogenous substance P influence on sIPSC frequency, and 3) sIPSC frequency response to exogenous application of substance P. Furthermore, immunofluorescence labeling in NTS show an increased substance P NK1-R internalization on GABA neurons. The data suggest that exercise-induced NK1-R internalization results in a reduced intrinsic inhibitory input to the neurons in the baroreflex pathway. PMID:19261870

  11. Impaired pulmonary artery contractile responses in a rat model of microgravity: role of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyhan, Daniel; Kim, Soonyul; Dunbar, Stacey; Li, Dechun; Shoukas, Artin; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2002-01-01

    Vascular contractile hyporesponsiveness is an important mechanism underlying orthostatic intolerance after microgravity. Baroreceptor reflexes can modulate both pulmonary resistance and capacitance function and thus cardiac output. We hypothesized, therefore, that pulmonary vasoreactivity is impaired in the hindlimb-unweighted (HLU) rat model of microgravity. Pulmonary artery (PA) contractile responses to phenylephrine (PE) and U-46619 (U4) were significantly decreased in the PAs from HLU vs. control (C) animals. N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10(-5) M) enhanced the contractile responses in the PA rings from both C and HLU animals and completely abolished the differential responses to PE and U4 in HLU vs. C animals. Vasorelaxant responses to ACh were significantly enhanced in PA rings from HLU rats compared with C. Moreover, vasorelaxant responses to sodium nitroprusside were also significantly enhanced. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and soluble guanlyl cyclase expression were significantly enhanced in PA and lung tissue from HLU rats. In marked contrast, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was unchanged in lung tissue. These data support the hypothesis that vascular contractile responsiveness is attenuated in PAs from HLU rats and that this hyporesponsiveness is due at least in part to increased nitric oxide synthase activity resulting from enhanced eNOS expression. These findings may have important implications for blood volume distribution and attenuated stroke volume responses to orthostatic stress after microgravity exposure.

  12. [The inversion of concepts about biological role of system rennin-angiotensin II- aldosterone and functions of arterial tension as a metabolism regulator].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2015-02-01

    The phylogenetic theory of general pathology postulates that in physiology and pathology the concepts of biological role of arterial tension had been subjected to inversion. The activation by nephron of synthesis of components rennin-angiotensin II and increasing of aldosterone secretion are directed not to increase arterial tension but to preserve volume of piece of third world ocean privatized by each entity as pool of intercellular medium where all cells continue to live as billions years before. In phylogenetic sense, early organs can't regulate effect of physical factor of regulation of metabolism the late one in phylogenesis of arterial tension. The cause of increasing of arterial tension is the vasomotor center but not the kidneys. The vasomotor center increases arterial tension in the proximal section and further hydrodynamic tension in the distal section of arterial stream and tends to resuscitate function of nephrons, biological function of endoecology and biological reaction of excretion. The arterial tension, besides the main role in biological function of locomotion, is a physical factor of compensation of disorders of biological functions of homeostasis, trophology, endoecology and adaptation. In phylogenesis, three levels of metabolism regulation has been developed The specific regulation of biochemical reactions occurs on autocrine level. In paracrin regulated cell cenosises, at distal section of arterial stream, metabolism is regulated by billions of local peristaltic pumps through compensation of biological reaction of endothelium-depended vasodilatation, micro-circulation, effect of humoral mediators and hormonal principles. In vivo, from the level of vasomotor center, metabolism non-specifically and systemic regulates physical factor-arterial tension through sympathetic activation of heart. The arterial tension in proximal section of arterial stream overcomes resistance and physically "forces through" arterioles with disordered micro

  13. Vitamin D Level is Associated with Increased Left Ventricular Mass and Arterial Stiffness in Older Patients with Impaired Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jing; Ye, Xiao-Guang; Hou, Yuan-Ping; Wu, Jin-Ling; Li, Sheng-Li; Sun, Qian-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired renal function is common among older patients. Deficiency of vitamin D is a frequent phenomenon among patients with impaired renal function, who are likely to develop cardiovascular diseases. This study aimed to explore the association of 25 (OH) D levels with left ventricular mass and arterial stiffness in older patients with impaired renal function. Material/Methods Based on their admission estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 273 inpatients (≥65 years) were allocated into a normal eGFR group (≥60 ml/min) and an impaired eGFR group (<60 ml/min). The 25 (OH) D levels were measured and the left ventricular mass index (LVMI) was estimated. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was used to explore arterial stiffness. Results The 25 (OH) D levels of patients in the impaired eGFR group were significantly lower than in the normal eGFR group [(11.92±6.01) μg/L vs. (18.14±8.07) μg/L, p<0.05). LVMI and PWV were both significantly higher in the impaired eGFR group than in the normal eGFR group [(104.89±33.50) g/m2 vs. (92.95±18.95) g/m2, P<0.05; (15.99±3.10) m/s vs. (13.62±2.90) m/s, P<0.05]. After adjusting for age, sex, eGFR, cardiovascular risk factors, serum calcium, and iPTH levels, the inverse association between LVMI and 25 (OH) D, PWV, and 25 (OH) D were statistically significant. Conclusions Vitamin D level is lower in older patients with impaired renal function. Lower vitamin D levels were correlated with higher left ventricular mass and increased arterial stiffness in older patients. PMID:26691016

  14. Very rapid effect of pitavastatin on microvascular function in comparison to rosuvastatin: reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometric study

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Yasushi; Fukuda, Shota; Shimada, Kenei; Nakanishi, Koki; Otsuka, Kenichiro; Kubo, Tomoichiro; Jissho, Satoshi; Taguchi, Haruyuki; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Background: It has been reported that pitavastatin improves endothelial function faster than other statins. Recently introduced reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT) provides objective and quantitative assessment of peripheral microvascular function. Purpose: This study aimed to investigate whether peripheral microvascular function improved 2 hours after pitavastatin in subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD) using RH-PAT, and the results were compared with those of rosuvastatin. Methods: This study included 94 subjects with CAD, assigned to a group given 2 mg of pitavastatin (n = 36), a group given 2.5 mg of rosuvastatin (n = 38), and a control group (n = 20). RH-PAT examinations were performed before and 2 hours after statin administration. Results: The RH-PAT index increased 2 hours after pitavastatin administration from 1.82 ± 0.45 to 2.16 ± 0.62 (P = 0.02), whereas there were no differences in the RH-PAT index in the rosuvastatin group (1.79 ± 0.71 to 1.91 ± 0.53, P = 0.09) and the control group (1.68 ± 0.36 to 1.84 ± 0.58, P = 0.4). No significant changes were observed at 2 hours in serum cholesterol levels in each group. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that peripheral microvascular function improved 2 hours after a single clinical dose of pitavastatin, but not after rosuvastatin. PMID:23667308

  15. Functional Relevance of Coronary Artery Disease by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and Cardiac Computed Tomography: Myocardial Perfusion and Fractional Flow Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Andreini, Daniele; Bertella, Erika; Mushtaq, Saima; Guaricci, Andrea Igoren; Pepi, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality and it is responsible for an increasing resource burden. The identification of patients at high risk for adverse events is crucial to select those who will receive the greatest benefit from revascularization. To this aim, several non-invasive functional imaging modalities are usually used as gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography, but the diagnostic yield of elective invasive coronary angiography remains unfortunately low. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging by cardiac magnetic resonance (stress-CMR) has emerged as an accurate technique for diagnosis and prognostic stratification of the patients with known or suspected CAD thanks to high spatial and temporal resolution, absence of ionizing radiation, and the multiparametric value including the assessment of cardiac anatomy, function, and viability. On the other side, cardiac computed tomography (CCT) has emerged as unique technique providing coronary arteries anatomy and more recently, due to the introduction of stress-CCT and noninvasive fractional flow reserve (FFR-CT), functional relevance of CAD in a single shot scan. The current review evaluates the technical aspects and clinical experience of stress-CMR and CCT in the evaluation of functional relevance of CAD discussing the strength and weakness of each approach. PMID:25692133

  16. Association of Thyroid Function with Severity of Coronary Artery Disease in Euthyroid Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jayaprakash, B.; Shetty, Ranjan; Rau, N.R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Thyroid hormone exerts multiple effects on the heart and vascular system. Variations of free T3 have been linked to coronary artery disease. We conducted a study to observe whether there is a relationship between the variation of the serum thyroid hormone levels (TSH, FT3 and FT4) and the presence and severity of CAD in the euthyroid patients. Aim To study association of serum TSH, FT4 and FT3 levels within the normal range with presence and severity of coronary artery disease. Materials and Methods A total of 100 euthyroid patients with stable angina, who underwent coronary angiography were enrolled in the study. Coronary artery disease was defined as >50% stenosis in the luminal diameter in at least one major epicardial coronary artery. The Gensini scoring system was used to define the severity of the CAD and serum TSH, FT3 and FT4 levels were measured by the chemiluminescence method. Results Single vessel disease was found in 23%, double vessel disease in 15% and triple vessel disease in 17% of patients. TSH and FT4 levels were also comparable between the groups. Normal coronary group had significantly higher mean FT3 values than triple vessel disease (p=0.004) and FT3 levels showed an inverse relation with Gensini score (Pearson’s correlation =- 0.30) (p =0.002). A level of FT3 ≤ 2.7 predicted the severity of CAD with a 70% sensitivity and 60% specificity (area under curve (AUC): 0.755, p=0.001). Conclusion In the absence of primary thyroid disease and acute coronary syndrome, the occurrence of CAD is associated with lower serum levels of FT3. FT3 and not the FT4 and TSH levels may be used as an indicator of increased risk for severe CAD. The present study clearly shows the existence of a strong association between the reduction of biologically active T3 and severity of coronary artery disease. However, low T3 state could be at first interpreted as just a biological risk factor of severe coronary artery disease; only the demonstration of

  17. Improved parameters of metabolic glycaemic and immune function and arterial stiffness with naltrexone implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2009-01-01

    Here the dramatic and rapid response of a 54-year-old obese hypertensive man with poorly controlled insulin-dependent diabetes with a 33 year history of high dose heroin use, a 1 year history of refractory ulceration of his hands, ankles and feet, treated coronary artery disease, and the metabolic syndrome, to implantation with long-acting naltrexone implants is presented. In particular his hyperlipidaemia, hyperglycaemia, proinflammatory state, evidence of hepatic and renal insufficiency, arterial stiffness, and extensive and chronic cutaneous ulceration all improved dramatically over just 13 weeks, in association with complete control of his heroin, benzodiazepine, tobacco and cannabis use. The metabolic and vascular benefits were all highly statistically significant. The case is the first to document dramatic and rapid metabolic, immune and vascular improvements in association with clinical naltrexone therapy and are consistent with its likely effects in restoring addiction-related stem cell and immunological deficits. PMID:21687046

  18. Functional comparison of endothelin receptors in human and rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Bialecki, R A; Fisher, C S; Murdoch, W W; Barthlow, H G; Bertelsen, D L

    1997-02-01

    The receptors mediating arterial smooth muscle contraction to endothelins (ET) differ among species and origin of vascular bed. We characterized ET receptors mediating contraction of endothelium-denuded human intralobar pulmonary artery (hIPA) and rat intralobar (rIPA) and extralobar left branch (rLPA) pulmonary artery with ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, sarafotoxin S6c, sarafotoxin S6b, and ET receptor antagonists in vitro. Rat aorta was studied for comparison. Each vascular segment showed concentration-dependent contraction with a rank order sensitivity (pD2) profile of ET-1 > or = ET-2 = sarafotoxin S6b > ET-3. Maximum contraction to ET-1 was greater than to sarafotoxin S6c in all preparations. Responses of rIPA and rLPA to sarafotoxin S6c were conspicuous when compared with hIPA or aorta. The ET(A) receptor blockers BQ-123 and BMS-182874 competitively antagonized ET-1 responses of hIPA and aorta, but not rLPA. The ET(B) receptor antagonist BQ-788 attenuated contractions of rIPA and rLPA to ET-3 and sarafotoxin S6c, respectively. In conclusion, ET(B)-mediated contraction of endothelium-denuded conduit pulmonary arteries varies among species and may contribute more to contraction of rIPA and rLPA than of hIPA and aorta, although maximum ET(B)-mediated contraction is smaller than that mediated by the ET(A) receptor. PMID:9124371

  19. Targeting of Rho Kinase Ameliorates Impairment of Diabetic Endothelial Function in Intrarenal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hongping; Ru, Hailong; Yu, Liping; Kang, Yanhua; Lin, Guohua; Liu, Chuanfei; Sun, Lixian; Shi, Liyun; Sun, Qinghua; Liu, Cuiqing

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction in kidney vasculature is the initial and key element for nephropathy in diabetes mellitus. Accumulating evidence suggests the protective role of Rho kinase inhibitors in endothelial dysfunction via modulating eNOS activity and NO production. However, the role of Rho kinase in diabetes-related endothelial dysfunction in kidney vasculature and the relevant mechanisms remain unknown. We assessed whether pharmacological inhibition of Rho kinase attenuates endothelial dysfunction in intrarenal arteries from type 1 diabetic rats. Fasudil, a Rho kinase inhibitor effectively decreased the phosphorylated level of MYPT1 without affecting the expression of ROCKs in the kidney. Fasudil treatment showed no improvement in diabetes-related abnormality in metabolic indices, but it significantly ameliorated endothelial dysfunction in intrarenal arteries and lessened the mesangial matrix expansion in the kidney cortex. Mechanistically, superoxide production in the intrarenal artery and NOX4 member of NADPH oxidase in the renal cortex that contribute to diabetic nephropathy were also prevented by the Rho kinase inhibitor. In conclusion, the present results indicate that Rho kinase is involved in endothelial dysfunction in type 1 diabetes via enhancement of oxidative stress and provides new evidence for Rho kinase inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24129169

  20. Pathological function of Ca2+-sensing receptor in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Aya

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is defined as an intractable disease characterized by a progressive elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), leading to right heart failure and premature death. The five-year survival rate after diagnosis is approximately 57%. Although extensive research has identified some factors associated with the cause of PAH, the etiology and pathogenesis remain unclear. In addition to Ca(2+) channel blockers (nifedipine, diltiazem), three categories of drug have been developed for the treatment of PAH based on the pathological mechanisms: prostacyclin and its analogues (epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost), endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, ambrisentan), and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (sildenafil, tadalafil). However, screening of novel types of drug acting on the signal pathway associated with the pathological mechanism underlying PAH is ongoing. We recently found that the extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR), which belongs to family C of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, is upregulated in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from patients with idiopathic PAH (IPAH). The upregulated CaSR is necessary for the enhanced Ca(2+) signaling and the augmented cell proliferation in PASMCs from IPAH patients. Most importantly, blockage of CaSR with an antagonist, NPS2143, prevents the development of pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy in animal models of pulmonary hypertension. The use of calcilytics, antagonists of CaSR, may be a novel therapeutic approach for PAH patients. PMID:24770445

  1. Arterial embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... the artery (arterial bypass) to create a second source of blood supply Clot removal through a balloon catheter placed into the affected artery or through open surgery on the artery (embolectomy) Opening of the ...

  2. Changes in the structure-function relationship of elastin and its impact on the proximal pulmonary arterial mechanics of hypertensive calves.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Steven R; Kao, Phil H; Qi, H Jerry; Hunter, Kendall; Lanning, Craig; Albietz, Joseph; Hofmeister, Stephen; Mecham, Robert; Stenmark, Kurt R; Shandas, Robin

    2008-10-01

    Extracellular matrix remodeling has been proposed as one mechanism by which proximal pulmonary arteries stiffen during pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Although some attention has been paid to the role of collagen and metallomatrix proteins in affecting vascular stiffness, much less work has been performed on changes in elastin structure-function relationships in PAH. Such work is warranted, given the importance of elastin as the structural protein primarily responsible for the passive elastic behavior of these conduit arteries. Here, we study structure-function relationships of fresh arterial tissue and purified arterial elastin from the main, left, and right pulmonary artery branches of normotensive and hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertensive neonatal calves. PAH resulted in an average 81 and 72% increase in stiffness of fresh and digested tissue, respectively. Increase in stiffness appears most attributable to elevated elastic modulus, which increased 46 and 65%, respectively, for fresh and digested tissue. Comparison between fresh and digested tissues shows that, at 35% strain, a minimum of 48% of the arterial load is carried by elastin, and a minimum of 43% of the change in stiffness of arterial tissue is due to the change in elastin stiffness. Analysis of the stress-strain behavior revealed that PAH causes an increase in the strains associated with the physiological pressure range but had no effect on the strain of transition from elastin-dominant to collagen-dominant behavior. These results indicate that mechanobiological adaptations of the continuum and geometric properties of elastin, in response to PAH, significantly elevate the circumferential stiffness of proximal pulmonary arterial tissue. PMID:18660454

  3. Restoration of Failed Renal Graft Function After Successful Angioplasty of Pressure-Resistant Renal Artery Stenosis Using a Cutting Balloon: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Peregrin, J. H.; Buergelova, M.

    2009-05-15

    This study is the report of a 37-year-old male with a transplanted kidney from a 3.5-year-old donor: the graft had two arteries transplanted with an aortic patch to an external iliac artery. Four months after transplantation, the graft function deteriorated, together with the development of hypertension. Stenosis of both graft arteries was detected and the patient was referred for angioplasty. The angiographic result was suboptimal, nevertheless, the graft function improved and was more or less stable (serum creatinine, 160-200 {mu}mol/l) for 4 years, along with persistently difficult-to-control hypertension. Five years after transplantation, the graft function deteriorated again and severe graft artery restenosis was detected. The restenosis did not respond to dilatation, graft function failed, hypertension decompensated, and left ventricular failure developed. The patient required dialysis. A cutting balloon angioplasty opened the artery, and kidney function was restored after a few days: the serum creatinine level dropped to 140-160 {mu}mol/l, and the glomerular filtration rate (creatinine clearance) to 0.65 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2}. The graft function has now been stable for more than 2 years, however, the hypertension is still difficult to control.

  4. Angiotensin II-Induced Arterial Thickening, Fibrosis and Stiffening Involves Elevated Arginase Function

    PubMed Central

    Bhatta, Anil; Yao, Lin; Toque, Haroldo A.; Shatanawi, Alia; Xu, Zhimin; Caldwell, Ruth B.; Caldwell, R. William

    2015-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness (AS) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity/mortality. Smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and increased collagen synthesis are key features in development of AS. Arginase (ARG), an enzyme implicated in many cardiovascular diseases, can compete with nitric oxide (NO) synthase for their common substrate, L-arginine. Increased arginase can also provide ornithine for synthesis of polyamines via ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and proline/collagen via ornithine aminotransferase (OAT), leading to vascular cell proliferation and collagen formation, respectively. We hypothesized that elevated arginase activity is involved in Ang II-induced arterial thickening, fibrosis, and stiffness and that limiting its activity can prevent these changes. Methods and Results We tested this by studies in mice lacking one copy of the ARG1 gene that were treated with angiotensin II (Ang II, 4 weeks). Studies were also performed in rat aortic Ang II-treated SMC. In WT mice treated with Ang II, we observed aortic stiffening (pulse wave velocity) and aortic and coronary fibrosis and thickening that were associated with increases in ARG1 and ODC expression/activity, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, hydroxyproline levels, and collagen 1 protein expression. ARG1 deletion prevented each of these alterations. Furthermore, exposure of SMC to Ang II (1 μM, 48 hrs) increased ARG1 expression, ARG activity, ODC mRNA and activity, cell proliferation, collagen 1 protein expression and hydroxyproline content. Treatment with ABH prevented these changes. Conclusion Arginase 1 is crucially involved in Ang II-induced SMC proliferation and arterial fibrosis and stiffness and represents a promising therapeutic target. PMID:25807386

  5. Proximal Versus Distal Splenic Artery Embolisation for Blunt Splenic Trauma: What is the Impact on Splenic Immune Function?

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, P. T.; Kavnoudias, H.; Cameron, P. U.; Czarnecki, C.; Paul, E.; Lyon, S. M.

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo compare the impact of proximal or distal splenic artery embolisation versus that of splenectomy on splenic immune function as measured by IgM memory B cell levels.Materials and MethodsPatients with splenic trauma who were treated by splenic artery embolisation (SAE) were enrolled. After 6 months splenic volume was assessed by CT, and IgM memory B cells in peripheral blood were measured and compared to a local normal reference population and to a post-splenectomy population.ResultsOf the 71 patients who underwent embolisation, 38 underwent proximal embolisation, 11 underwent distal embolisation, 22 patients were excluded, 1 had both proximal and distal embolisation, 5 did not survive and 16 did not return for evaluation. There was a significant difference between splenectomy and proximal or distal embolisation and a trend towards greater preservation of IgM memory B cell number in those with distal embolisation—a difference that could not be attributed to differences in age, grade of injury or residual splenic volume.ConclusionIgM memory B cell levels are significantly higher in those treated with SAE compared to splenectomy. Our data provide evidence that splenic embolisation should reduce immunological complications of spleen trauma and suggest that distal embolisation may maintain better function.

  6. Circuit Resistance Training Attenuates Acute Exertion-Induced Reductions in Arterial Function but Not Inflammation in Obese Women

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Nina C.; Robinson, Austin T.; Bian, Jing-Tan; Ali, Mohamed M.; Norkeviciute, Edita; McGinty, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of preventable death among young women in the United States. Habitual resistance exercise training is known to have beneficial effects on endothelial function and CVD risk factors, including obesity; however, previous studies show that acute resistance exercise impairs endothelial function in obese adults who are sedentary, a response that may be linked to inflammation. We sought to determine if circuit-based resistance training (CRT) attenuates acute resistance exercise-induced reductions in endothelial function in a population of young, obese, sedentary women and whether or not inflammation plays a role in this response. Methods: Eighteen obese [body mass index (BMI) 30.0–40.0 kg·m−2] young premenopausal women were randomly assigned to either a CRT group or a no-exercise control group (CON). Conduit artery endothelial function was assessed using brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) determined by ultrasound before and after a single bout of strenuous weightlifting (SWL). In addition, circulating inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor-α and C-reactive protein), blood pressure, fasting blood lipids, glucose, waist circumference, body composition, and aerobic capacity were assessed. Results: Among participants randomized to the CRT group, 8 weeks of training led to considerable increases in FMD after SWL (P=0.001) compared to the CON group. However, no significant differences between the groups were observed in circulating inflammatory mediators, blood pressure, fasting blood lipids, or other physical and physiological characteristics. Conclusions: This study shows that CRT alleviates acute exertion-induced reductions in endothelial function among obese sedentary women in the absence of changes in inflammation. PMID:25844686

  7. External artery heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor); Ernst, Donald M. (Inventor); Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved heat pipe with an external artery. The longitudinal slot in the heat pipe wall which interconnects the heat pipe vapor space with the external artery is completely filled with sintered wick material and the wall of the external artery is also covered with sintered wick material. This added wick structure assures that the external artery will continue to feed liquid to the heat pipe evaporator even if a vapor bubble forms within and would otherwise block the liquid transport function of the external artery.

  8. Function and expression of ryanodine receptors and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors in smooth muscle cells of murine feed arteries and arterioles.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Erika B; Goodwin, Erica L; Segal, Steven S; Jackson, William F

    2012-04-15

    We tested the hypothesis that vasomotor control is differentially regulated between feed arteries and downstream arterioles from the cremaster muscle of C57BL/6 mice. In isolated pressurized arteries, confocal Ca(2+) imaging of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) revealed Ca(2+) sparks and Ca(2+) waves. Ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonists (ryanodine and tetracaine) inhibited both sparks and waves but increased global Ca(2+) and myogenic tone. In arterioles, SMCs exhibited only Ca(2+) waves that were insensitive to ryanodine or tetracaine. Pharmacological interventions indicated that RyRs are functionally coupled to large-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK(Ca)) in SMCs of arteries, whereas BK(Ca) appear functionally coupled to voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in SMCs of arterioles. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) antagonists (xestospongin D or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate) or a phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122) attenuated Ca(2+) waves, global Ca(2+) and myogenic tone in arteries and arterioles but had no effect on arterial sparks. Real-time PCR of isolated SMCs revealed RyR2 as the most abundant isoform transcript; arteries expressed twice the RyR2 but only 65% the RyR3 of arterioles and neither vessel expressed RyR1. Immunofluorescent localisation of RyR protein indicated bright, clustered staining of arterial SMCs in contrast to diffuse staining in arteriolar SMCs. Expression of IP(3)R transcripts and protein immunofluorescence were similar in SMCs of both vessels with IP(3)R1>IP(3)R2>IP(3)R3. Despite similar expression of IP(3)Rs and dependence of Ca(2+) waves on IP(3)Rs, these data illustrate pronounced regional heterogeneity in function and expression of RyRs between SMCs of the same vascular resistance network. We conclude that vasomotor control is differentially regulated in feed arteries vs. downstream arterioles. PMID:22331418

  9. Baroreflex control of arterial blood pressure during involuntary diving in ducks (Anas platyrhynchos var.).

    PubMed

    Smith, F M; Jones, D R

    1992-09-01

    The dynamic role of arterial baroreceptors in control of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), hindlimb vascular (HLVR) and total peripheral (TPR) resistance responses to forced dives was investigated in acutely and chronically barodenervated ducks. To activate the baroreflex, the proximal end of one aortic nerve was stimulated electrically with bipolar electrodes that had been implanted under pentobarbital sodium anesthesia. Predive nerve stimulation caused CO to fall (by reducing HR; stroke volume remained constant), producing a decrease in MAP to half the prestimulation level. During diving (for 2.5-min periods) nerve stimulation did not affect HR and MAP after the first minute of submersion. Neither HLVR nor TPR contributed to the fall in MAP during aortic nerve stimulation before or during diving. The effects of nerve stimulation on HR and MAP were maintained to the end of dives in animals given 100% O2 to breathe before diving. In separate experiments, increasing arterial chemoreceptor input by perfusing one vascularly isolated carotid body with venous blood caused a reduction in the effects of aortic nerve stimulation on MAP. Arterial baroreceptors may thus act on HR to alter MAP early in the dive, but as the dive progresses the baroreflex is attenuated by an increase in peripheral chemoreceptor drive. PMID:1415660

  10. Interactions between CO2 chemoreflexes and arterial baroreflexes.

    PubMed

    Henry, R A; Lu, I L; Beightol, L A; Eckberg, D L

    1998-06-01

    We studied interactions between CO2 chemoreflexes and arterial baroreflexes in 10 supine healthy young men and women. We measured vagal carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflexes and steady-state fast Fourier transform R-R interval and photoplethysmographic arterial pressure power spectra at three arterial pressure levels (nitroprusside, saline, and phenylephrine infusions) and three end-tidal CO2 levels (3, 4, and 5%, fixed-frequency, large-tidal-volume breathing, CO2 plus O2). Our study supports three principal conclusions. First, although low levels of CO2 chemoreceptor stimulation reduce R-R intervals and R-R interval variability, statistical modeling suggests that this effect is indirect rather than direct and is mediated by reductions of arterial pressure. Second, reductions of R-R intervals during hypocapnia reflect simple shifting of vagally mediated carotid baroreflex responses on the R-R interval axis rather than changes of baroreflex gain, range, or operational point. Third, the influence of CO2 chemoreceptor stimulation on arterial pressure (and, derivatively, on R-R intervals and R-R interval variability) depends critically on baseline arterial pressure levels: chemoreceptor effects are smaller when pressure is low and larger when arterial pressure is high. PMID:9841543

  11. Regulation and function of miR-214 in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lin; Grant, Jennifer S.; Pinel, Karine; Thomas, Matthew; Morrell, Nicholas W.; MacLean, Margaret R.; Baker, Andrew H.; Denby, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) can contribute to the etiology of diseases, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Here we investigated a potential role for the miR-214 stem loop miRNA and the closely linked miR-199a miRNAs in PAH. All 4 miRNAs were upregulated in the lung and right ventricle (RV) in mice and rats exposed to the Sugen (SU) 5416 hypoxia model of PAH. Further, expression of the miRNAs was increased in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells exposed to transforming growth factor β1 but not BMP4. We then examined miR-214−/− mice exposed to the SU 5416 hypoxia model of PAH or normoxic conditions and littermate controls. There were no changes in RV systolic pressure or remodeling observed between the miR-214−/− and wild-type hypoxic groups. However, we observed a significant increase in RV hypertrophy (RVH) in hypoxic miR-214−/− male mice compared with controls. Further, we identified that the validated miR-214 target phosphatase and tensin homolog was upregulated in miR-214−/− mice. Thus, miR-214 stem loop loss leads to elevated RVH and may contribute to the heart failure associated with PAH. PMID:27162619

  12. Left ventricular volumes and function during atrial pacing in coronary artery disease: a radionuclide angiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenman, Y.; Weiss, A.T.; Atlan, H.; Gotsman, M.S.

    1984-02-01

    This study set out to determine the pathophysiologic changes in the left ventricle during atrial pacing in 22 patients with coronary artery disease. Graduated right atrial pacing to a rate of 160 beats/min, or the induction of angina pectoris or significant ST depression was undertaken. Ventricular volumes were measured at rest and at rates of 100, 120, 140 and 160 beats/min using radionuclide angiography. The volumes at a pacing rate of 100 beats/min were used as a reference standard (100%). In the 22 patients with coronary artery disease, left ventricular end-diastolic volume decreased from 118 +/- 3% at rest to 80 +/- 5% at a rate of 160 beats/min; stroke volume from 121 +/- 3% to 54 +/- 5%; and ejection fraction (EF) from 49 +/- 3% to 37 +/- 5%. End-systolic volume decreased from 118 +/- 4% at rest, reached its minimal value of 94 +/- 5% at a rate of 120 beats/min and then increased slightly to 106 +/- 9% at 160 beats/min. Cardiac output and blood pressure did not change significantly. Compared to the control group of 10 normal subjects, the patients had a significantly smaller decrease in end-diastolic volume and end-systolic volume than in normal control subjects. EF in the normal subjects did not change. Blood pressure, cardiac output and stroke volume were similar in both groups. Atrial pacing tachycardia induced reversible ventricular dysfunction with a decrease in EF. Stroke volume was maintained because of relative ventricular dilatation.

  13. Functional characterization of α1-adrenoceptor subtypes in human skeletal muscle resistance arteries

    PubMed Central

    Jarajapu, Yagna P R; Coats, Paul; McGrath, John C; Hillier, Chris; MacDonald, Allan

    2001-01-01

    α1-adrenoceptor subtypes in human skeletal muscle resistance arteries were characterized using agonists noradrenaline (non-selective) and A61603 (α1A-selective), the antagonists prazosin (non-selective), 5-methyl-urapidil (α1A-selective) and BMY7378 (α1D-selective) and the alkylating agent chloroethylclonidine (preferential for α1B). Small arteries were obtained from the non-ischaemic skeletal muscle of limbs amputated for critical limb ischaemia and isometric tension recorded using wire myography. Prazosin antagonized responses to noradrenaline with a pA2 value of 9.18, consistent with the presence of α1-adrenoceptors, although the Schild slope (1.32) was significantly different from unity. 5-Methyl-urapidil competitively antagonized responses to noradrenaline with a pKB value of 8.48 and a Schild slope of 0.99, consistent with the presence of α1A-adrenoceptors. In the presence of 300 nM 5-methyl-urapidil, noradrenaline exhibited biphasic concentration response curves, indicating the presence of a minor population of a 5-methyl-urapidil-resistant subtype. Contractile responses to noradrenaline were not affected by 1 μM chloroethylclonidine suggesting the absence of α1B-adrenoceptors. Maximum responses to noradrenaline and A61603 were reduced to a similar extent by 10 μM chloroethylclonidine, suggesting an effect of chloroethylclonidine at α1A-adrenoceptors at the higher concentration. BMY7378 (10 and 100 nM) had no effect on responses to noradrenaline. BMY7378 (1 μM) poorly shifted the potency of noradrenaline giving a pA2 of 6.52. These results rule out the presence of the α1D-subtype. These results show that contractile responses to noradrenaline in human skeletal muscle resistance arteries are predominantly mediated by the α1A-adrenoceptor subtype with a minor population of an unknown α1-adrenoceptor subtype. PMID:11429392

  14. [Mitral valve replacement after previous coronary artrey bypass grafting( CABG) with functioning left internal thoracic artery( LITA) grafts in an elderly patient; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiroshi; Aono, Hitoshi; Samukawa, Masanobu; Ohkado, Akihiko

    2012-09-01

    An 85-year-old woman had a history of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) performed 7 years ago, and dyspnea on effort had been worsening recently. Since echocardiography showed severe mitral valve regurgitation( MR), mitral valve repair was suggested. Preoperative enhanced computed tomography (CT) showed the patent functioning left internal thoracic artery (LITA) graft. Mitral valve replacement (MVR) using a 25 mm CEP bioprosthesis was performed successfully via resternotomy without any intraoperative injury of the heart. Myocardial protection without clamping of functioning LITA was done by both antegrade and retrograde continuous coronary perfusion (RCCP) under mild hypothermia. The postoperative clinical course was uneventful without any hemodynamic compromise. She was discharged on postoperative day 21 without any cardiac events following early introduction of cardiac rehabilitation. From these results, mitral valve reoperation by RCCP under mild hypothermia without control of functioning internal thoracic artery( ITA) grafts could be a safe option in some cases. PMID:22940664

  15. Radionuclide measurement of right ventricular function in atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect and complete transposition of the great arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.J.; Shubao, C.; Clarke, S.E.; Fogelman, I.; Maisey, M.N.; Tynan, M.

    1986-05-01

    Right ventricular (RV) function was assessed in 80 patients with congenital heart disease by first-pass and gated equilibrium radionuclide angiography. In 30 patients with a ventricular septal defect (VSD) the mean RV ejection fraction (+/- standard deviation) was 64 +/- 7%. In 30 patients with a secundum atrial septal defect it was 61 +/- 9% and in 20 patients with surgically corrected complete transposition of the great arteries it was 49 +/- 13%. These values are in close agreement with values established with cineangiography for similar groups of patients. The mean ejection fraction in the group with transposition of the great arteries was significantly less than in the group with VSD (p less than 0.001). Phase analysis of the equilibrium studies showed that there was delayed RV contraction in many patients in the absence of conduction abnormalities. This delay was significantly greater in patients with atrial septal defect than in those with VSD (p less than 0.05). There was a strong correlation between size of left-to-right shunt and phase delay in patients with VSD (r = -0.72). Thus, first-pass gated radionuclide angiography provides a valid measurement of RV ejection fraction, and delayed RV contraction on phase analysis may be a sensitive index of early RV dysfunction.

  16. A Comparison of Measures of Endothelial Function in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease and Age and Gender Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Richard B.; Vun, Simon V.; Spark, J. Ian

    2016-01-01

    This study compared flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), peripheral artery tonometry (PAT), and serum nitric oxide (NO) measures of endothelial function in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) against age/gender matched controls. 25 patients (mean age: 72.4 years, M : F 18 : 7) with established PAD and an age/gender matched group of 25 healthy controls (mean age: 72.4 years, M : F 18 : 7) were studied. Endothelial function was measured using the % FMD, reactive hyperemia index (RHI) using PAT and serum NO (μmol). Difference for each method between PAD and control patients and correlation between the methods were investigated. FMD and RHI were lower in patients with PAD (median FMD for PAD = 2.16% versus control = 3.77%, p = 0.034 and median RHI in PAD = 1.64 versus control = 1.92, p = 0.005). NO levels were not significantly different between the groups (PAD median = 7.70 μmol, control median = 13.05 μmol, p = 0.662). These results were obtained in elderly patients and cannot be extrapolated to younger individuals. FMD and PAT both demonstrated a lower hyperaemic response in patients with PAD; however, FMD results in PAD patients were unequivocally reduced whereas half the PAD patients had RHI values above the established threshold for endothelial dysfunction. This suggests that FMD is a more appropriate method for the measurement of NO-mediated endothelial function. PMID:26942010

  17. Effect of remote ischemic preconditioning on cognitive function after off-pump coronary artery bypass graft: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Kyoung-Woon; Rhim, Jin-Ho; Chin, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Wook-Jong; Choi, Dae-Kee; Lee, Eun-Ho; Hahm, Kyung-Don; Sim, Ji-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown in animal models that remote ischemic preconditioning (rIPC) has a neuroprotective effect. However, a randomized controlled trial in human subjects to investigate the neuroprotective effect of rIPC after cardiac surgery has not yet been reported. Therefore, we performed this pilot study to determine whether rIPC reduced the occurrence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in patients who underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCAB) surgery. Methods Seventy patients who underwent OPCAB surgery were assigned to either the control or the rIPC group using a computer-generated randomization table. The application of rIPC consisted of four cycles of 5 min ischemia and 5 min reperfusion on an upper limb using a blood pressure cuff inflating 200 mmHg before coronary artery anastomosis. The cognitive function tests were performed one day before surgery and again on postoperative day 7. We defined postoperative cognitive dysfunction as decreased postoperative test values more than 20% of the baseline values in more than two of the six cognitive function tests that were performed. Results In the cognitive function tests, there were no significant differences in the results obtained during the preoperative and postoperative periods for all tests and there were no mean differences observed in the preoperative and postoperative scores. The incidences of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in the control and rIPC groups were 28.6% (10 patients) and 31.4% (11 patients), respectively. Conclusions rIPC did not reduce the incidence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction after OPCAB surgery during the immediate postoperative period. PMID:24363844

  18. Role of heme oxygenase in modulating endothelial function in mesenteric small resistance arteries of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Porteri, Enzo; Rodella, Luigi F; Rezzani, Rita; Rizzoni, Damiano; Paiardi, Silvia; de Ciuceis, Carolina; Boari, Gianluca E M; Foglio, Eleonora; Favero, Gaia; Rizzardi, Nicola; Platto, Caterina; Agabiti Rosei, Enrico

    2009-10-01

    It has been proposed that endothelial dysfunction is due to the excessive degradation of nitric oxide (NO) by oxidative stress. The enzyme heme-oxygenase (HO) seems to exert a protective effect on oxidative stress in the vasculature, both in animal models and in humans. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of inhibition or activation of HO on endothelial function in mesenteric small resistance arteries of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Six SHR were treated with cobalt protoporphyrin IX 50 mg/Kg (CoPP), an activator of HO; six SHR with stannous mesoporphyrin 30 mg/Kg (SnMP), an inhibitor of HO, and six SHR with saline. As controls, six Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were treated with CoPP, six WKY with SnMP, and six WKY with saline. Drugs were injected in the peritoneum once a week for 2 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured (tail cuff method) before and after treatment. Mesenteric small resistance arteries were mounted on a micromyograph. Endothelial function was evaluated as a cumulative concentration-response curve to acetylcholine (ACH), before and after preincubation with N(G)-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, inhibitor of NO synthase), and to bradykinin (BK). In SHR treatment with CoPP, improved ACH-and BK-induced vasodilatation (ANOVA p < 0.001) and this improvement was abolished by L-NMMA (ANOVA p < 0.001). SnMP was devoid of effects on endothelial function. In WKY, both activation and inhibition of HO did not substantially affect endothelium-mediated vasodilatation. The stimulation of HO seems to induce an improvement of endothelial dysfunction in SHR by possibly reducing oxidative stress and increasing NO availability. PMID:19886854

  19. The Activation Function-1 of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Prevents Arterial Neointima Development Through a Direct Effect on Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Natalia F.; Fontaine, Coralie; Buscato, Mélissa; Lupieri, Adrien; Vinel, Alexia; Valera, Marie-Cécile; Guillaume, Maeva; Malet, Nicole; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Lenfant, Francoise; Gourdy, Pierre; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Laffargue, Muriel; Arnal, Jean-Francois

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: 17β-Estradiol (E2) exerts numerous beneficial effects in vascular disease. It regulates gene transcription through nuclear estrogen receptor α (ERα) via 2 activation functions, AF1 and AF2, and can also activate membrane ERα. The role of E2 on the endothelium relies on membrane ERα activation, but the molecular mechanisms of its action on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are not fully understood. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine which cellular target and which ERα subfunction are involved in the preventive action of E2 on neointimal hyperplasia. Methods and Results: To trigger neointimal hyperplasia of VSMC, we used a mouse model of femoral arterial injury. Cre-Lox models were used to distinguish between the endothelial- and the VSMC-specific actions of E2. The molecular mechanisms underlying the role of E2 were further characterized using both selective ERα agonists and transgenic mice in which the ERαAF1 function had been specifically invalidated. We found that (1) the selective inactivation of ERα in VSMC abrogates the neointimal hyperplasia protection induced by E2, whereas inactivation of endothelial and hematopoietic ERα has no effect; (2) the selective activation of membrane ERα does not prevent neointimal hyperplasia; and (3) ERαAF1 is necessary and sufficient to inhibit postinjury VSMC proliferation. Conclusions: Altogether, ERαAF1-mediated nuclear action is both necessary and sufficient to inhibit postinjury arterial VSMC proliferation, whereas membrane ERα largely regulates the endothelial functions of E2. This highlights the exquisite cell/tissue-specific actions of the ERα subfunctions and helps to delineate the spectrum of action of selective ER modulators. PMID:26316608

  20. Effect of naringin on hemodynamic changes and left ventricular function in renal artery occluded renovascular hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    Visnagri, Asjad; Adil, Mohammad; Kandhare, Amit D.; Bodhankar, Subhash L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Renal artery occlusion (RAO) induced hypertension is a major health problem associated with structural and functional variations of the renal and cardiac vasculature. Naringin a flavanone glycoside derived possesses metal-chelating, antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the antihypertensive activity of naringin in RAO induced hypertension in rats. Material and Methods: Male Wistar rats (180-200 g) were divided into five groups Sham, RAO, naringin (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg). Animals were pretreated with naringin (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg p.o) for 4 weeks. On the last day of the experiment, left renal artery was occluded with renal bulldog clamp for 4 h. After assessment of hemodynamic and left ventricular function various biochemical (superoxide dismutase [SOD], glutathione [GSH] and malondialdehyde [MDA]) and histological parameters were determined in the kidney. Results: RAO group significantly (P < 0.001) increased hemodynamic parameters at 15, 30 and 45 min of clamp removal. Naringin (40 and 80 mg/kg) treated groups showed a significant decrease in hemodynamic parameters at 15 min. after clamp removal that remained sustained for 60 min. Naringin (40 and 80 mg/kg) treated groups showed significant improvement in left ventricular function at 15, 30 and 45 min after clamp removal. Alteration in level of SOD, GSH and MDA was significantly restored by naringin (40 and 80 mg/kg) treatment. It also reduced histological aberration induced in kidney by RAO. Conclusion: It is concluded that the antihypertensive activity of naringin may result through inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:25883516

  1. Static and Functional Hemodynamic Profiles of Women with Abnormal Uterine Artery Doppler at 22–24 Weeks of Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Widnes, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare cardiac function, systemic hemodynamics and preload reserve of women with increased (cases) and normal (controls) uterine artery (UtA) pulsatility index (PI) at 22–24 weeks of gestation. Materials and Methods A prospective cross-sectional study of 620 pregnant women. UtA blood flow velocities were measured using Doppler ultrasonography, and PI was calculated. Mean UtA PI ≥ 1.16 (90th percentile) was considered abnormal. Maternal hemodynamics was investigated at baseline and during passive leg raising (PLR) using impedance cardiography (ICG). Preload reserve was defined as percent increase in stroke volume (SV) 90 seconds after passive leg raising compared to baseline. Results Mean UtA PI was 1.49 among cases (n = 63) and 0.76 among controls (n = 557) (p < 0.0001). Eighteen (28.6%) cases and 53 (9.5%) controls developed pregnancy complications (p <0.0001). The mean arterial pressure and systemic vascular resistance were 83 mmHg and 1098.89±293.87 dyne s/cm5 among cases and 79 mmHg and 1023.95±213.83 dyne s/cm5 among controls (p = 0.007 and p = 0.012, respectively). Heart rate, SV and cardiac output were not different between the groups. Both cases and controls responded with a small (4–5%) increase in SV in response to PLR, but the cardiac output remained unchanged. The preload reserve was not significantly different between two groups. Conclusion Pregnant women with abnormal UtA PI had higher blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance, but similar functional hemodynamic profile at 22–24 weeks compared to controls. Further studies are needed to clarify whether functional hemodynamic assessment using ICG can be useful in predicting pregnancy complications. PMID:27308858

  2. Associations and clinical relevance of aortic-brachial artery stiffness mismatch, aortic reservoir function, and central pressure augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Martin G.; Hughes, Alun D.; Davies, Justin E.; Sharman, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Central augmentation pressure (AP) and index (AIx) predict cardiovascular events and mortality, but underlying physiological mechanisms remain disputed. While traditionally believed to relate to wave reflections arising from proximal arterial impedance (and stiffness) mismatching, recent evidence suggests aortic reservoir function may be a more dominant contributor to AP and AIx. Our aim was therefore to determine relationships among aortic-brachial stiffness mismatching, AP, AIx, aortic reservoir function, and end-organ disease. Aortic (aPWV) and brachial (bPWV) pulse wave velocity were measured in 359 individuals (aged 61 ± 9, 49% male). Central AP, AIx, and aortic reservoir indexes were derived from radial tonometry. Participants were stratified by positive (bPWV > aPWV), negligible (bPWV ≈ aPWV), or negative stiffness mismatch (bPWV < aPWV). Left-ventricular mass index (LVMI) was measured by two-dimensional-echocardiography. Central AP and AIx were higher with negative stiffness mismatch vs. negligible or positive stiffness mismatch (11 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 6 vs. 8 ± 6 mmHg, P < 0.001 and 24 ± 10 vs. 24 ± 11 vs. 21 ± 13%, P = 0.042). Stiffness mismatch (bPWV -aPWV) was negatively associated with AP (r = −0.18, P = 0.001) but not AIx (r = −0.06, P = 0.27). Aortic reservoir pressure strongly correlated to AP (r = 0.81, P < 0.001) and AIx (r = 0.62, P < 0.001) independent of age, sex, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and height (standardized β = 0.61 and 0.12, P ≤ 0.001). Aortic reservoir pressure independently predicted abnormal LVMI (β = 0.13, P = 0.024). Positive aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch does not result in higher AP or AIx. Aortic reservoir function, rather than discrete wave reflection from proximal arterial stiffness mismatching, provides a better model description of AP and AIx and also has clinical relevance as evidenced by an independent association of aortic reservoir pressure with LVMI. PMID:26276816

  3. Associations and clinical relevance of aortic-brachial artery stiffness mismatch, aortic reservoir function, and central pressure augmentation.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Martin G; Hughes, Alun D; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E

    2015-10-01

    Central augmentation pressure (AP) and index (AIx) predict cardiovascular events and mortality, but underlying physiological mechanisms remain disputed. While traditionally believed to relate to wave reflections arising from proximal arterial impedance (and stiffness) mismatching, recent evidence suggests aortic reservoir function may be a more dominant contributor to AP and AIx. Our aim was therefore to determine relationships among aortic-brachial stiffness mismatching, AP, AIx, aortic reservoir function, and end-organ disease. Aortic (aPWV) and brachial (bPWV) pulse wave velocity were measured in 359 individuals (aged 61 ± 9, 49% male). Central AP, AIx, and aortic reservoir indexes were derived from radial tonometry. Participants were stratified by positive (bPWV > aPWV), negligible (bPWV ≈ aPWV), or negative stiffness mismatch (bPWV < aPWV). Left-ventricular mass index (LVMI) was measured by two-dimensional-echocardiography. Central AP and AIx were higher with negative stiffness mismatch vs. negligible or positive stiffness mismatch (11 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 6 vs. 8 ± 6 mmHg, P < 0.001 and 24 ± 10 vs. 24 ± 11 vs. 21 ± 13%, P = 0.042). Stiffness mismatch (bPWV-aPWV) was negatively associated with AP (r = -0.18, P = 0.001) but not AIx (r = -0.06, P = 0.27). Aortic reservoir pressure strongly correlated to AP (r = 0.81, P < 0.001) and AIx (r = 0.62, P < 0.001) independent of age, sex, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and height (standardized β = 0.61 and 0.12, P ≤ 0.001). Aortic reservoir pressure independently predicted abnormal LVMI (β = 0.13, P = 0.024). Positive aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch does not result in higher AP or AIx. Aortic reservoir function, rather than discrete wave reflection from proximal arterial stiffness mismatching, provides a better model description of AP and AIx and also has clinical relevance as evidenced by an independent association of aortic reservoir pressure with LVMI. PMID:26276816

  4. Functional Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome: Poorly Understood and Frequently Missed? A Review of Clinical Features, Appropriate Investigations, and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Hislop, Matthew; Kennedy, Dominic; Cramp, Brendan; Dhupelia, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Functional popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) is an important and possibly underrecognized cause of exertional leg pain (ELP). As it is poorly understood, it is at risk of misdiagnosis and mismanagement. The features indicative of PAES are outlined, as it can share features with other causes of ELP. Investigating functional PAES is also fraught with potential problems and if it is performed incorrectly, it can result in false negative and false positive findings. A review of the current vascular investigations is provided, highlighting some of the limitations standard tests have in determining functional PAES. Once a clinical suspicion for PAES is satisfied, it is necessary to further distinguish the subcategories of anatomical and functional entrapment and the group of asymptomatic occluders. When definitive entrapment is confirmed, it is important to identify the level of entrapment so that precise intervention can be performed. Treatment strategies for functional PAES are discussed, including the possibility of a new, less invasive intervention of guided Botulinum toxin injection at the level of entrapment as an alternative to vascular surgery. PMID:26464888

  5. Characterization of histamine receptors in isolated pig basilar artery by functional and radioligand binding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Atsushi; Nishio, Akira )

    1993-01-01

    Histamine receptors in pig basilar arteries were investigated in vitro by radioligand binding assays and by measuring the contractile and relaxant responses to histamine. Histamine and 2-pyridyethylamine (H[sub 1]-agonist) induced concentration-dependent contractions, whereas impromidine (H[sub 2]-agonist) induced concentration-dependent relaxations. These responses were independent of the presence of endothelial cells. Diphenhydramine (H[sub 1]-antagonist) partially reversed the histamine-induced contractions to relaxations. Cimetidine (H[alpha][sub 2]-antagonist) potentiated the contraction in a concentration-dependent manner. In the presence of cimetidine, the pEC[sub 50] value of histamine for the contraction was 6.30, and diphenhydramine competitively antagonized the histamine-induced contractions (pA[sub 2], 7.77). In the presence of diphenhydramine, the pEC[sub 50] value of histamine for the relaxation was 5.93, and cimetidine competitively antagonized the histamine-induced relaxations (pA[sub 2], 6.62). In the binding studies, the K[sub d] value of [[sup 3]H]mepyramine was 2.1 nM and the B[sub max] value was 95.6 fmol/mg protein. A competition experiment with diphenhydramine showed that the pK[sub i] value (7.51) was similar to the pA[sub 2] value. The K[sub d] value for [[sup 3]H]cimetidine was 126.0 nM and the B[sub max] value was 459.8 fmol/mg protein. The pK[sub d] (6.90) for [[sup 3]H]cimetidine was similar to the pA[sub 2] for cimetidine. The Hill coefficients for these experiments were not significantly different from unity. The present findings indicate that the number of H[sub 1]-receptors, in terms of the B[sub max] value for [[sup 3]H]mepyramine, is smaller than that of H[sub 2]-receptors, in terms of the B[sub max] value for [[sup 3]H]cimetidine. However, the contractile response to histamine is predominantly mediated through stimulation of H[sub 1]-receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells in pig basilar artery.

  6. Arterial stick

    MedlinePlus

    ... venous blood) mainly in its content of dissolved gases . Testing arterial blood shows the makeup of the ... arteries. Blood samples are mainly taken to measure gases in the arteries. Abnormal results may point to ...

  7. Fluid balance and pulmonary functions during and after coronary artery bypass surgery: Ringer's acetate compared with dextran, polygeline, or albumin.

    PubMed

    Tølløfsrud, S; Svennevig, J L; Breivik, H; Kongsgaard, U; Ozer, M; Hysing, E; Mohr, B; Seem, E; Geiran, O; Abdelnour, M

    1995-07-01

    The effects on fluid balance, pulmonary functions and economics were evaluated in a randomized comparison of one colloid free and three colloid containing fluid regimens, for 48 hours during and after coronary artery bypass (CAB) surgery. A standard regimen for anaesthesia, extracorporeal circulation and monitoring was used. Only Ringer's acetate (RAc) was used as priming solution for extracorporeal circulation. Forty patients were randomized to receive either RAc, polygeline 35 mg.ml-1 (Haemaccel), dextran 70 (Macrodex) 60 mg.ml-1, or albumin 40 mg.ml-1 in saline whenever fluid volume was needed to stabilize haemodynamics. At the end of the operation, fluid retention was significantly lower in patients receiving polygeline and dextran 70, compared with patients receiving RAc. At 48 hours, however, there were no differences in cumulative fluid balance. Patients in the colloid groups postoperatively had a higher serum colloid osmotic pressure (s-COP), but a higher net lung capillary filtration pressure (delta P) only on the second postoperative day than the RAc group. However, this did not adversely affect intrapulmonary venous admixture, arterial oxygen tension, or time on respirator in the RAc group compared with the colloid groups. The most expensive colloid fluid regimen (albumin) cost about 230 US$ more per patient than the RAc fluid regimen. We conclude that Ringer's acetate for volume replacement to stabilize haemodynamics during and after CAB surgery is associated with increased fluid retention only during the intraoperative period, compared with dextran 70 or polygeline, and with a lower serum colloid osmotic pressure and net lung capillary filtration pressure postoperatively, compared with all three colloid groups. This does not affect pulmonary functions adversely.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7572019

  8. Pulmonary function differences in patients with chronic right heart failure secondary to pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic left heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-Hua; Luo, Qin; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Zhao, Qing; Xi, Qun-Ying; Xue, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Zhi-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary abnormalities are found in both chronic heart failure (CHF) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The differences of pulmonary function in chronic left heart failure and chronic right heart failure are not fully understood. Material/Methods We evaluated 120 patients with stable CHF (60 with chronic left heart failure and 60 with chronic right heart failure). All patients had pulmonary function testing, including pulmonary function testing at rest and incremental cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX). Results Patients with right heart failure had a significantly lower end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (PetCO2), higher end-tidal partial pressure of O2 (PetO2) and minute ventilation/CO2 production (VE/VCO2) at rest. Patients with right heart failure had a lower peak PetCO2, and a higher peak dead space volume/tidal volume (VD/VT) ratio, peak PetO2, peak VE/VCO2, and VE/VCO2 slope during exercise. Patients with right heart failure had more changes in ΔPetCO2 and ΔVE/VCO2, from rest to exercise. Conclusions Patients with right heart failure had worse pulmonary function at rest and exercise, which was due to severe ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatching, severe ventilation inefficiency, and gas exchange abnormality. PMID:24916204

  9. Sequential modulation of cardiac autonomic control induced by cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreflex mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlan, R.; Jacob, G.; Palazzolo, L.; Rimoldi, A.; Diedrich, A.; Harris, P. A.; Porta, A.; Malliani, A.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonhypotensive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) induces a reflex increase in forearm vascular resistance and muscle sympathetic neural discharge without affecting mean heart rate. We tested the hypothesis that a reflex change of the autonomic modulation of heartbeat might arise during low intensity LBNP without changes of mean heart rate. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ten healthy volunteers underwent plasma catecholamine evaluation and a continuous recording of ECG, finger blood pressure, respiratory activity, and central venous pressure (CVP) during increasing levels of LBNP up to -40 mm Hg. Spectrum and cross-spectrum analyses assessed the changes in the spontaneous variability of R-R interval, respiration, systolic arterial pressure (SAP), and CVP and in the gain (alpha(LF)) of arterial baroreflex control of heart rate. Baroreceptor sensitivity was also evaluated by the SAP/R-R spontaneous sequences technique. LBNP began decreasing significantly: CVP at -10, R-R interval at -20, SAP at -40, and the indexes alpha(LF) and baroreceptor sensitivity at -30 and -20 mm Hg, compared with baseline conditions. Plasma norepinephrine increased significantly at -20 mm Hg. The normalized low-frequency component of R-R variability (LF(R-R)) progressively increased and was significantly higher than in the control condition at -15 mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: Nonhypotensive LBNP elicits a reflex increase of cardiac sympathetic modulation, as evaluated by LF(R-R), which precedes the changes in the hemodynamics and in the indexes of arterial baroreflex control.

  10. Renal function and structure in a rat model of arterial calcification and increased pulse pressure.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Virginie; Jover, Bernard; Casellas, Daniel; Cordaillat, Magali; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Lartaud, Isabelle

    2008-10-01

    Clinical studies suggest a strong link between tissue calcification and pressure hyperpulsatility in end stage renal disease patients. Using a Wistar rat model of arterial elastocalcinosis and hyperpulsatility [vitamin D and nicotine (VDN) treatment], we evaluated the relative importance of tissue calcification and hyperpulsatility in the etiology of renal failure. VDN rats showed significant increases in aortic wall calcium content (50 times; 992+/-171 vs. control 19+/-1 micromol/g dry wt) and pulse pressure (1.5 times; 61+/-4 vs. control 40+/-2 mmHg). Significant renal calcification (16 times; 124+/-27 vs. control 8.1+/-0.7 micromol/g dry wt) occurred mainly within the media of the preglomerular vasculature and in the areas of interstitial fibrosis in VDN. Extensive renal damages (5 times; 26+/-5% of collapsed-atrophic or sclerotic glomeruli, or glomerular cysts vs. control 5.2+/-0.3%; 28 times; 61+/-12% areas of focal, cortical areas exhibiting interstitial fibrosis per section vs. control 2.2+/-0.6%) were observed histologically. The glomerular filtration rate significantly decreased (880+/-40 vs. control 1,058+/-44 microl.min(-1).g kidney wt(-1)). Albuminuria increased six times (1.6+/-0.4 vs. control 0.27+/-0.04 mg/24 h). There were significant linear relationships between albuminuria and pulse pressure (r2=0.408; n=24) or renal calcium content (r2=0.328; n=24; P<0.05) and between glomerular filtration rate and pulse pressure (r2=0.168; n=27). To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence of links between both 1) hyperpulsatility and renal dysfunction, and 2) renal calcification and renal dysfunction. Given the increasing frequency of end-stage renal disease, this model could prove useful for preclinical evaluation of drugs that prevent or attenuate hyperpulsatility and/or tissue calcification. PMID:18715942

  11. Influence of physical activity and gender on arterial function in type 2 diabetes, normal and impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ring, Margareta; Eriksson, Maria J; Fritz, Tomas; Nyberg, Gunnar; Östenson, Claes Göran; Krook, Anna; Zierath, Juleen R; Caidahl, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    To determine whether Nordic walking improves cardiovascular function in middle-aged women and men, we included 121 with normal glucose tolerance, 33 with impaired glucose tolerance and 47 with Type 2 diabetes mellitus in a randomized controlled study. The intervention group added Nordic walking 5 h/week for 4 months to their ordinary activities. Aortic pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, stiffness index, reflection index, intima-media thickness in the radial and carotid arteries, echogenicity of the carotid intima-media and systemic vascular resistance were measured. While baseline blood pressure did not differ by gender or diagnosis, aortic augmentation index was found to be higher in women in all groups. Vascular function was unchanged with intervention, without differences by gender or diagnosis. In conclusion, 4 months of Nordic walking is an insufficient stimulus to improve vascular function. Future studies should consider hard endpoints in addition to measures of vascular health, as well as larger population groups, long-term follow-up and documented compliance to exercise training. PMID:26092821

  12. Trajectories of Parasympathetic Nervous System Function before, during, and after Feeding in Infants with Transposition of the Great Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Tondi M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Compromised parasympathetic response to stressors may underlie feeding difficulties in infants with complex congenital heart defects, but little is known about the temporal pattern of parasympathetic response across phases of feeding. Objectives To describe initial data exploration of trajectories of parasympathetic response to feeding in 15 infants with surgically corrected transposition of the great arteries and to explore effects of feeding method, feeding skill, and maternal sensitivity on trajectories. Method In this descriptive, exploratory study, parasympathetic function was measured using high frequency heart rate variability (HF HRV), feeding skill was measured using the Early Feeding Skills assessment, and maternal sensitivity was measured using the Parent-Child Early Relational Assessment. Data were collected before, during, and after feeding at 2 weeks and 2 months of age. Trajectories of parasympathetic function and relationships with possible contributing factors were examined graphically. Results Marked between-infant variability in HF HRV across phases of feeding was apparent at both ages, although attenuated at 2 months. Four patterns of HF HRV trajectories across phases of feeding were identified and associated with feeding method, feeding skill, and maternal sensitivity. Developmental increases in HF HRV were apparent in most breastfed, but not bottle-fed, infants. Discussion This exploratory data analysis provided critical information in preparation for a larger study in which varying trajectories and potential contributing factors can be modeled in relationship to infant outcomes. Findings support inclusion of feeding method, feeding skill, and maternal sensitivity in modeling parasympathetic function across feeding. PMID:21543958

  13. Influence of physical activity and gender on arterial function in type 2 diabetes, normal and impaired glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Maria J.; Fritz, Tomas; Nyberg, Gunnar; Östenson, Claes Göran; Krook, Anna; Zierath, Juleen R.; Caidahl, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether Nordic walking improves cardiovascular function in middle-aged women and men, we included 121 with normal glucose tolerance, 33 with impaired glucose tolerance and 47 with Type 2 diabetes mellitus in a randomized controlled study. The intervention group added Nordic walking 5 h/week for 4 months to their ordinary activities. Aortic pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, stiffness index, reflection index, intima–media thickness in the radial and carotid arteries, echogenicity of the carotid intima–media and systemic vascular resistance were measured. While baseline blood pressure did not differ by gender or diagnosis, aortic augmentation index was found to be higher in women in all groups. Vascular function was unchanged with intervention, without differences by gender or diagnosis. In conclusion, 4 months of Nordic walking is an insufficient stimulus to improve vascular function. Future studies should consider hard endpoints in addition to measures of vascular health, as well as larger population groups, long-term follow-up and documented compliance to exercise training. PMID:26092821

  14. Functional mutations in 5′UTR of the BMPR2 gene identified in Chinese families with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenting; Liu, Chunli; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Nuofu; Hadadi, Cyrus; Huang, Junyi; Zhong, Nanshan; Lu, Wenju

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive pulmonary vasculopathy with significant morbidity and mortality. Bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2) has been well recognized as the principal gene responsible for heritable and sporadic PAH. Four unrelated Chinese patients with PAH and their family members, both symptomatic and asymptomatic, were genetically evaluated by sequencing all exons and the flanking regions of BMPR2. Functionality of the aberrant mutations at the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of BMPR2 in the families with PAH was determined by site mutation, transient transfection, and promoter-reporter assays. Four individual mutations in the BMPR2 gene were identified in the 4 families, respectively: 10-GGC repeats, 13-GGC repeats, 4-AGC repeats in 5′UTR, and a novel missense mutation in exon 7 (c.961C>T; p.Arg321X). Moreover, we demonstrated that (1) these 5′UTR mutations decreased the transcription of BMPR2 and (2) the GGC repeats and AGC repeats in BMPR2 5′UTR bore functional binding sites of EGR-1 and MYF5, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating the presence of functional BMPR2 5′UTR mutations in familial patients with PAH and further indicating that EGR-1 and MYF5 are potential targets for correcting these genetic abnormalities for PAH therapy. PMID:27162618

  15. Conversion of arterial input functions for dual pharmacokinetic modeling using Gd-DTPA/MRI and 18F-FDG/PET.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Eric; Lebel, Réjean; Croteau, Etienne; Blanchette, Marie; Tremblay, Luc; Lecomte, Roger; Bentourkia, M'hamed; Lepage, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Reaching the full potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-positron emission tomography (PET) dual modality systems requires new methodologies in quantitative image analyses. In this study, methods are proposed to convert an arterial input function (AIF) derived from gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) in MRI, into a (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) AIF in PET, and vice versa. The AIFs from both modalities were obtained from manual blood sampling in a F98-Fisher glioblastoma rat model. They were well fitted by a convolution of a rectangular function with a biexponential clearance function. The parameters of the biexponential AIF model were found statistically different between MRI and PET. Pharmacokinetic MRI parameters such as the volume transfer constant (K(trans)), the extravascular-extracellular volume fraction (ν(e)), and the blood volume fraction (ν(p)) calculated with the Gd-DTPA AIF and the Gd-DTPA AIF converted from (18)F-FDG AIF normalized with or without blood sample were not statistically different. Similarly, the tumor metabolic rates of glucose (TMRGlc) calculated with (18) F-FDG AIF and with (18) F-FDG AIF obtained from Gd-DTPA AIF were also found not statistically different. In conclusion, only one accurate AIF would be needed for dual MRI-PET pharmacokinetic modeling in small animal models. PMID:22570280

  16. Pulmonary Artery Stiffness Is Independently Associated with Right Ventricular Mass and Function: A Cardiac MR Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Timothy J W; Gandhi, Ajay; de Marvao, Antonio; Buzaco, Rui; Tokarczuk, Paweł; Quinlan, Marina; Durighel, Giuliana; Diamond, Tamara; Monje Garcia, Laura; de Cesare, Alain; Cook, Stuart A; O'Regan, Declan P

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between pulmonary artery (PA) stiffness and both right ventricular (RV) mass and function with cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods The study was approved by the local research ethics committee, and all participants gave written informed consent. Cardiac MR imaging was performed at 1.5 T in 156 healthy volunteers (63% women; age range, 19-61 years; mean age, 36.1 years). High-temporal-resolution phase-contrast imaging was performed in the main and right PAs. Pulmonary pulse wave velocity (PWV) was determined by the interval between arterial systolic upslopes. RV function was assessed with feature tracking to derive peak systolic strain and strain rate, as well as peak early-diastolic strain rate. RV volumes, ejection fraction (RVEF), and mass were measured from the cine images. The association of pulmonary PWV with RV function and mass was quantified with univariate linear regression. Interstudy repeatability was assessed with intraclass correlation. Results The repeatability coefficient for pulmonary PWV was 0.96. Increases in pulmonary PWV and RVEF were associated with increases in age (r = 0.32, P < .001 and r = 0.18, P = .025, respectively). After adjusting for age (P = .090), body surface area (P = .073), and sex (P = .005), pulmonary PWV demonstrated an independent positive association with RVEF (r = 0.34, P = .026). Significant associations were also seen with RV mass (r = 0.41, P = .004), RV radial strain (r = 0.38, P = .022), and strain rate (r = 0.35, P = .002), and independent negative associations were seen with radial (r = 0.27, P = .003), longitudinal (r = 0.40, P = .007), and circumferential (r = 0.31, P = .005) peak early-diastolic strain rate with the same covariates. Conclusion Pulmonary PWV is reliably assessed with cardiac MR imaging. In subjects with no known cardiovascular disease, increasing PA stiffness is associated with increasing age and is also moderately associated with

  17. Executive Function and Theory of Mind in School-Aged Children after Neonatal Corrective Cardiac Surgery for Transposition of the Great Arteries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calderon, Johanna; Bonnet, Damien; Courtin, Cyril; Concordet, Susan; Plumet, Marie-Helene; Angeard, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Cardiac malformations resulting in cyanosis, such as transposition of the great arteries (TGA), have been associated with neurodevelopmental dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to assess, for the first time, theory of mind (ToM), which is a key component of social cognition and executive functions in school-aged children with TGA.…

  18. Efficacy of cardiac resynchronization with defibrillator insertion in patients undergone coronary artery bypass graft: A cohort study of cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Karbasi-Afshar, Reza; Ramezani-Binabaj, Mahdi; Rezaee-Zavareh, Mohammad Saeid; Saburi, Amin; Ajudani, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a proven therapeutic method in selected patients with heart failure and systolic dysfunction which increases left ventricular function and patient survival. We designed a study that included patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), with and without CRT-defibrillator (CRT-D) inserting and then measured its effects on these two groups. Patients and Methods: Between 2010 and 2013, we conducted a prospective cohort study on 100 coronary artery disease patients where candidate for CABG. Then based on the receiving CRT-D, the patients were categorized in two groups; Group 1 (n = 48, with CRT-D insertion before CABG) and Group 2 (n = 52 without receiving CRT-D). Thereafter both of these groups were followed-up at 1–3 months after CABG for mortality, hospitalization, atrial fibrillation (AF), echocardiographic assessment, and New York Heart Association (NYHA) class level. Results: The mean age of participants in Group 1 (48 male) and in Group 2 (52 male) was 58 ± 13 and 57 ± 12 respectively. Difference between Groups 1 and 2 in cases of mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) changes and NYHA class level was significant (P > 0.05). Hospitalization (P = 0.008), mortality rate (P = 0.007), and AF were significantly different between these two groups. Conclusions: The results showed that the increase in LVEF and patient's improvement according to NYHA-class was significant in the first group, and readmission, mortality rate and AF was increased significantly in the second group. PMID:25566709

  19. Muscarinic Receptor Activation Affects Pulmonary Artery Contractility in Sheep: The Impact of Maturation and Chronic Hypoxia on Endothelium-Dependent and Endothelium-Independent Function.

    PubMed

    Giang, Michael; Papamatheakis, Demosthenes G; Nguyen, Dan; Paez, Ricardo; Blum Johnston, Carla; Kim, Joon; Brunnell, Alexander; Blood, Quintin; Goyal, Ravi; Longo, Lawrence D; Wilson, Sean M

    2016-06-01

    Giang, Michael, Demosthenes G. Papamatheakis, Dan Nguyen, Ricardo Paez, Carla Blum Johnston, Joon Kim, Alexander Brunnell, Quintin Blood, Ravi Goyal, Lawrence D. Longo, and Sean M. Wilson. Muscarinic receptor activation affects pulmonary artery contractility in sheep: the impact of maturation and chronic hypoxia on endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent function. High Alt Med Biol. 17:122-132, 2015.-Muscarinic receptor activation in the pulmonary vasculature can cause endothelium-dependent vasodilation and smooth muscle-dependent vasoconstriction. Chronic hypoxia (CH) can modify both of these responses. This study aimed to assess the combined influence of CH and maturation on endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent muscarinic-induced vasoreactivity. This was accomplished by performing wire myography on endothelium-intact or endothelium-disrupted pulmonary arterial rings isolated from normoxic or CH fetal and adult sheep. In endothelium-intact arteries, vasodilation was evaluated using cumulative bradykinin doses in phenylephrine and carbachol precontracted pulmonary arterial segments; and vasoconstriction was examined using cumulative doses of carbachol following bradykinin predilation. Effects of nonselective (atropine) and selective M1 (pirenzepine), M2 (AFDX116), and M3 (4-DAMP and Dau5884) muscarinic receptor antagonists were assessed in disrupted arteries. In normoxic arteries, bradykinin relaxation was twofold greater in the adult compared to fetus, while carbachol contraction was fourfold greater. In adult arteries, CH increased bradykinin relaxation and carbachol contraction. In vessels with intact endothelium, maturation and CH augmented maximal response and efficacy for carbachol constriction and bradykinin relaxation. Approximately 50%-80% of adult normoxic and CH endothelium-disrupted arteries contracted to acetylcholine, while ∼50% of fetal normoxic and ∼10% of CH arteries responded. Atropine reduced carbachol

  20. Understanding How Space Travel Affects Blood Vessels: Arterial Remodeling and Functional Adaptations Induced by Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, Michael; Vasques, Marilyn; Aquilina, Rudy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ever rise quickly from the couch to get something from the kitchen and suddenly feel dizzy? With a low heart rate and relaxed muscles, the cardiovascular system does not immediately provide the resistance necessary to keep enough blood going to your head. Gravity wins, at least for a short time, before your heart and blood vessels can respond to the sudden change in position and correct the situation. Actually, the human cardiovascular system is quite well adapted to the constant gravitational force of the Earth. When standing, vessels in the legs constrict to prevent blood from collecting in the lower extremities. In the space environment, the usual head-to-foot blood pressure and tissue fluid gradients that exist during the upright posture on Earth are removed. The subsequent shift in fluids from the lower to the upper portions of the body triggers adaptations within the cardiovascular system to accommodate the new pressure and fluid gradients. In animal models that simulate microgravity, the vessels in the head become more robust while those in the lower limbs become thin and lax. Similar changes may also occur in humans during spaceflight and while these adaptations are appropriate for a microgravity environment, they can cause problems when the astronauts return to Earth or perhaps another planet. Astronauts often develop orthostatic intolerance which means they become dizzy or faint when standing upright. This dizziness can persist for a number of days making routine activities difficult. In an effort to understand the physiological details of these cardiovascular adaptations, Dr. Michael Delp at Texas A&M University, uses the rat as a model for his studies. For the experiment flown on STS-107, he will test the hypothesis that blood vessels in the rats' hindlimbs become thinner, weaker, and constrict less in response to pressure changes and to chemical signals when exposed to microgravity. In addition, he will test the hypothesis that arteries in the brain

  1. Overexpression of oxytocin receptors in the hypothalamic PVN increases baroreceptor reflex sensitivity and buffers BP variability in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Lozić, Maja; Greenwood, Michael; Šarenac, Olivera; Martin, Andrew; Hindmarch, Charles; Tasić, Tatjana; Paton, Julian; Murphy, David; Japundžić-Žigon, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus is an important integrative site for neuroendocrine control of the circulation. We investigated the role of oxytocin receptors (OT receptors) in PVN in cardiovascular homeostasis. Experimental Approach Experiments were performed in conscious male Wistar rats equipped with a radiotelemetric device. The PVN was unilaterally co-transfected with an adenoviral vector (Ad), engineered to overexpress OT receptors, and an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) tag. Control groups: PVN was transfected with an Ad expressing eGFP alone or untransfected, sham rats (Wt). Recordings were obtained without and with selective blockade of OT receptors (OTX), during both baseline and stressful conditions. Baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) and cardiovascular short-term variability were evaluated using the sequence method and spectral methodology respectively. Key Results Under baseline conditions, rats overexpressing OT receptors (OTR) exhibited enhanced BRS and reduced BP variability compared to control groups. Exposure to stress increased BP, BP variability and HR in all rats. In control groups, but not in OTR rats, BRS decreased during stress. Pretreatment of OTR rats with OTX reduced BRS and enhanced BP and HR variability under baseline and stressful conditions. Pretreatment of Wt rats with OTX, reduced BRS and increased BP variability under baseline and stressful conditions, but only increased HR variability during stress. Conclusions and Implications OT receptors in PVN are involved in tonic neural control of BRS and cardiovascular short-term variability. The failure of this mechanism could critically contribute to the loss of autonomic control in cardiovascular disease. PMID:24834854

  2. Depression Mediates the Effect of Sexual Function on Quality of Life among Men but Not Women with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Assari, Shervin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Poor sexual function is associated with impaired Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL), and patients with Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) are not exceptions. It is not known, however, if symptoms of depression mediate the effect of sexual function on HRQoL among men and women with CAD. Objectives: This study aimed to determine the mediating effect of depressive symptoms on the association between sexual function and HRQoL among men and women with CAD. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 401 men and 156 women with CAD. Sexual function, measured by the Relation and Sexuality Scale (RSS), was the independent variable. In addition, physical and mental HRQoL measured using physical and mental health summary scores of Short Form 36 (SF-36) were dependent variables. Besides, the severity of depressive symptoms measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was conceptualized as the mediator. Age, income, education, and medical comorbidities (Ifudu index) were control variables, and gender was the moderator. Multi-group path analysis was conducted using AMOS20.0 for data analysis. Results: When the effects of age, education, income, and comorbidities were controlled, sexual function was correlated with poor mental HRQoL in both genders. However, the association between sexual function and poor physical HRQoL could be found only among men but not women. Evidence also supported partial mediation of depressive symptoms on the effect of sexual function on mental HRQoL of both men and women. Nonetheless, the results suggested partial mediation of depressive symptoms on the effect of sexual function on physical HRQoL only among men but not women. Conclusions: Symptoms of depression may not have a similar role in explaining the effect of sexual function on physical HRQoL of men and women with CAD. Our findings suggest that only among men, depressive symptoms might be the mechanism by which sexual function affects the CAD

  3. Effects of high calcium diet on arterial smooth muscle function and electrolyte balance in mineralocorticoid-salt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Arvola, P.; Ruskoaho, H.; Pörsti, I.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of a high calcium diet (2.5%) on blood pressure, electrolyte balance, plasma and tissue atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), and arterial smooth muscle responses were studied in one-kidney deoxycorticosterone (DOC)-NaCl hypertensive Wistar rats. 2. Calcium supplementation for 8 weeks markedly attenuated the development of DOC-NaCl hypertension and the associated cardiac hypertrophy, and prevented the DOC-NaCl-induced sodium-volume retention as judged by reduced plasma Na+, and decreased plasma and ventricular ANP concentrations in high calcium-fed DOC-NaCl rats. However, calcium supplementation did not affect the DOC-NaCl-induced rise in platelet [Ca2+]i. 3. Smooth muscle contractions of isolated mesenteric arterial rings in response to depolarization by K+ (20-30 mM) were enhanced in DOC-NaCl-treated rats, this enhancement being abolished by concurrent oral calcium loading. The Ca2+ entry blocker nifedipine (10 nM) inhibited the contractions induced by K+ (30-125 mM) more effectively in DOC-NaCl rats than in controls, while the inhibition in calcium-loaded DOC-NaCl rats was significantly greater than in controls only with 30 mM K+. 4. The contractions of mesenteric arterial rings induced by omission of K+ from the organ baths were used to evaluate cell membrane permeability to ions. In chemically denervated rings the onset of the gradual rise in contractile force in K(+)-free medium occurred earlier, and the rate of the contraction was faster in DOC-NaCl-treated rats than in controls and high calcium-fed DOC-NaCl rats. Smooth muscle relaxation induced by 0.5 mM K+ upon K(+)-free contractions was clearly slower in DOC-NaCl rats than in controls and calcium-supplemented DOC-NaCl rats. 5. The functions of arterial smooth muscle Na+, Ca2+ exchange and Ca(2+)-ATPase were evaluated by the aortic contractions elicited by low Na+ medium, and the subsequent relaxation responses induced by Ca(2+)-free solution (in the

  4. Arterial input function of an optical tracer for dynamic contrast enhanced imaging can be determined from pulse oximetry oxygen saturation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Wright, Eric A.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Diop, Mamadou; Morrison, Laura B.; Pogue, Brian W.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2012-12-01

    In many cases, kinetic modeling requires that the arterial input function (AIF)—the time-dependent arterial concentration of a tracer—be characterized. A straightforward method to measure the AIF of red and near-infrared optical dyes (e.g., indocyanine green) using a pulse oximeter is presented. The method is motivated by the ubiquity of pulse oximeters used in both preclinical and clinical applications, as well as the gap in currently available technologies to measure AIFs in small animals. The method is based on quantifying the interference that is observed in the derived arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) following a bolus injection of a light-absorbing dye. In other words, the change in SaO2 can be converted into dye concentration knowing the chromophore-specific extinction coefficients, the true arterial oxygen saturation, and total hemoglobin concentration. A simple error analysis was performed to highlight potential limitations of the approach, and a validation of the method was conducted in rabbits by comparing the pulse oximetry method with the AIF acquired using a pulse dye densitometer. Considering that determining the AIF is required for performing quantitative tracer kinetics, this method provides a flexible tool for measuring the arterial dye concentration that could be used in a variety of applications.

  5. Physiologic Functional Evaluation of Left Internal Mammary Artery Graft to Left Anterior Descending Coronary Artery Steal due to Unligated First Thoracic Branch in a Case of Refractory Angina

    PubMed Central

    Sawaya, Fadi J.; Liberman, Henry; Devireddy, Chandan

    2016-01-01

    Unligated side branches of the left internal mammary artery (LIMA) have been described in the literature as a cause of coronary steal resulting in angina. Despite a number of studies reporting successful side branch embolization to relieve symptoms, this phenomenon remains controversial. Hemodynamic evidence of coronary steal using angiographic and intravascular Doppler techniques has been supported by some and rejected by others. In this case study using an intracoronary Doppler wire with adenosine, we demonstrate that a trial occlusion of the LIMA thoracic side branch with selective balloon inflation can confirm physiologic significant steal and whether coil embolization of the side branch is indicated. PMID:26981289

  6. The Effect of Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy on Right Ventricle Function and Pulmonary Artery Pressure by Using Doppler Echocardiography in Children

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Onur Çağlar; Üner, Abdurrahman; Garça, Mehmet Fatih; Ece, İbrahim; Epçaçan, Serdar; Turan, Mahfuz; Kalkan, Ferhat

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the present study is to emphasize the efficacy of the myocardial performance index and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) in the determination of impaired cardiac functions and recovery period following the treatment in children with adenoid and/or tonsillar hypertrophy. Methods Fifty-three healthy children after routine laboratory, imaging and clinical examinations, with adenoid and/or tonsillar hypertrophy were evaluated before and 3 months after adenotonsillectomy for cardiac functions using M mode and Doppler echocardiography. Results The mean age of cases was 6.4±3.0 years, 34 (65%) were male, and 19 (35%) were female. Pulmonary hypertension was observed to be mild in 3 patients and moderate in 1 patient preoperatively. When the preoperative and postoperative echocardiographic measurements of the patients were compared, the tricuspid valve E wave velocity, the E/A ratio (E, early diastolic flow rate; A, late diastolic flow rate), and the TAPSE values were determined to be significantly higher postoperatively (P<0.05). The tricuspid valve deceleration time, the isovolumetric relaxation time and the systolic pulmonary artery pressure were found to be significantly lower compared to the preoperative values (P<0.05). Conclusion Adenoidectomy and/or tonsillectomy may prevent cardiac dysfunctions that can develop in the later periods due to adenoid and/or tonsil hypertrophy in children, before the appearance of the clinical findings of cardiac failure. PMID:27090272

  7. Multi-modal pharmacokinetic modelling for DCE-MRI: using diffusion weighted imaging to constrain the local arterial input function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamy, Valentin; Modat, Marc; Shipley, Rebecca; Dikaios, Nikos; Cleary, Jon; Punwani, Shonit; Ourselin, Sebastien; Atkinson, David; Melbourne, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    The routine acquisition of multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging data in oncology yields the possibility of combined model fitting of traditionally separate models of tissue structure and function. In this work we hypothesise that diffusion weighted imaging data may help constrain the fitting of pharmacokinetic models to dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI data. Parameters related to tissue perfusion in the intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) modelling of diffusion weighted MRI provide local information on how tissue is likely to perfuse that can be utilised to guide DCE modelling via local modification of the arterial input function (AIF). In this study we investigate, based on multi-parametric head and neck MRI of 8 subjects (4 with head and neck tumours), the benefit of incorporating parameters derived from the IVIM model within the DCE modelling procedure. Although we find the benefit of this procedure to be marginal on the data used in this work, it is conceivable that a technique of this type will be of greater use in a different application.

  8. Low-speed treadmill running exercise improves memory function after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Haruka; Hamakawa, Michiru; Ishida, Akimasa; Tamakoshi, Keigo; Nakashima, Hiroki; Ishida, Kazuto

    2013-04-15

    Physical exercise may enhance the recovery of impaired memory function in stroke rats. However the appropriate conditions of exercise and the mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects are not yet known. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect exercise intensity on memory function after cerebral infarction in rats. The animals were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 90 min to induce stroke and were randomly assigned to four groups; Low-Ex, High-Ex, Non-Ex and Sham. On the fourth day after surgery, rats in the Low-Ex and High-Ex groups were forced to exercise using a treadmill for 30 min every day for four weeks. Memory functions were examined during the last 5 days of the experiment (27-32 days after MCAO) by three types of tests: an object recognition test, an object location test and a passive avoidance test. After the final memory test, the infarct volume, number of neurons and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) immunoreactivity in the hippocampus were analyzed by histochemistry. Memory functions in the Low-Ex group were improved in all tests. In the High-Ex group, only the passive avoidance test improved, but not the object recognition or object location tests. Both the Low-Ex and High-Ex groups had reduced infarct volumes. Although the number of neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of the Low-Ex and High-Ex groups was increased, the number for the Low-Ex group increased more than that for the High-Ex group. Moreover hippocampal MAP2 immunoreactivity in the High-Ex group was reduced compared to that in the Low-Ex group. These data suggest that the effects of exercise on memory impairment after cerebral infarction depend on exercise intensity. PMID:23266325

  9. Compliance Index, a Marker of Peripheral Arterial Stiffness, may Predict Renal Function Decline in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Te-Hui; Yang, Deng-Chi; Lin, Wei-Hung; Tseng, Chin-Chung; Chen, Ju-Yi; Ho, Chin-Shan; Cheng, Meng-Fu; Tsai, Wei-Chuan; Wang, Ming-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Compliance index derived from digital volume pulse (CI-DVP), measuring the relationship between volume and pressure changes in fingertip, is a surrogate marker of peripheral arterial stiffness. This study investigated if CI-DVP can predict renal function deterioration, cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: In this prospective observational study, 149 CKD patients were included for final analysis. CI-DVP and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) were measured, decline in renal function was assessed by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slope. Composite renal and cardiovascular outcomes were evaluated, including ≥50% eGFR decline, start of renal replacement therapy, and major adverse events. Results: Patients in CKD stages 3b to 5 had higher baPWV and lower CI-DVP values than those in patients with CKD stages 1 to 3a. Stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis showed that lower CI-DVP (p =0.0001) and greater proteinuria (p =0.0023) were independent determinants of higher eGFR decline rate. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that CI-DVP (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.46-1.00), baseline eGFR (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.98) and serum albumin (HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.07-0.42) were independent predictors for composite renal and cardiovascular outcomes. Conclusions: Compliance index, CI-DVP, was significantly associated with renal function decline in patients with CKD. A higher CI-DVP may have independent prognostic value in slower renal function decline and better composite renal and cardiovascular outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:26180508

  10. Progenitor Hematopoietic Cells Implantation Improves Functional Capacity of End Stage Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Yuniadi, Yoga; Kusnadi, Yuyus; Sandhow, Lakshmi; Erika, Rendra; Hanafy, Dicky A.; Sardjono, Caroline; Kaligis, R. W. M.; Kasim, Manoefris; Harimurti, Ganesja M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Proangiogenic Hematopoietic Cells (PHC) which comprise diverse mixture of cell types are able to secrete proangiogenic factors and interesting candidate for cell therapy. The aim of this study was to seek for benefit in implantation of PHC on functional improvement in end stage coronary artery disease patients with advanced heart failure. Methods. Patients with symptomatic heart failure despite guideline directed medical therapy and LVEF less than 35% were included. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, cultivated for 5 days, and then harvested. Flow cytometry and cell surface markers were used to characterize PHC. The PHC were delivered retrogradely via sinus coronarius. Echocardiography, myocardial perfusion, and clinical and functional data were analyzed up to 1-year observation. Results. Of 30 patients (56.4 ± 7.40 yo) preimplant NT proBNP level is 5124.5 ± 4682.50 pmol/L. Harvested cells characterized with CD133, CD34, CD45, and KDR showed 0.87 ± 0.41, 0.63 ± 0.66, 99.00 ± 2.60, and 3.22 ± 3.79%, respectively. LVEF was improved (22 ± 5.68 versus 26.8 ± 7.93, p < 0.001) during short and long term observation. Myocardial perfusion significantly improved 6 months after treatment. NYHA Class and six-minute walk test are improved during short term and long term follow-up. Conclusion. Expanded peripheral blood PHC implantation using retrograde delivery approach improved LV systolic function, myocardial perfusion, and functional capacity. PMID:27148465

  11. Mutational analysis clopidogrel resistance and platelet function in patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Correll, Mick; Johnson, Christopher K; Ferrari, Giovanni; Brizzio, Mariano; Mak, Andrew W C; Quackenbush, John; Shaw, Richard E; Zapolanski, Alex; Grau, Juan B

    2013-06-01

    Clopidogrel is an oral antiplatelet pro-drug prescribed to 40 million patients worldwide who are at risk for thrombotic events or receiving percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However about a fifth of patients treated with clopidogrel do not respond adequately to the drug. From a cohort of 105 patients on whom we had functional data on clopidogrel response, we used ultra-high throughput sequencing to assay mutations in CYP2C19 and ABCB1, the two genes genetically linked to respond. Testing for mutations in CYP2C19, as recommended by the FDA, only correctly predicted if a patient would respond to clopidogrel 52.4% of the time. Similarly, testing of the ABCB1 gene only correctly foretold response in 51 (48.6%) patients. These results are clinically relevant and suggest that until additional genetic factors are discovered that predict response more completely, functional assays are more appropriate for clinical use. PMID:23462555

  12. Influence of circadian blood pressure profile on endothelial function in patients with and without arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rekhviashvili, A; Giorgobiani, T; Minashvili, A; Baganashvili, E

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about the relationship between the circadian BP rhythm and endothelial function in patients with essential hypertension. Consequently, we have hypothesized, that hypertensive patients with non-dipper circadian BP profile have more deteriorated endothelial function, than those with dipper BP profile. 57 untreated hypertensive patients and 17 normotensive controls were undergone to the anthropometrical measurements, physical examinations, review of their medical histories, 24-hour ABPM and vascular doppler-echography with high resolution ultrasound. Circadian BP profile was not independent from the BP level; namely, dipper profile was more frequent in normotensives. Independent from hypertension, dipper patients had significantly higher FMD%. In the whole study population, FMD showed strong negative correlation with 24-hour SBP, DBP and PP. Our study confirms the presence of disturbed endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in AH. Furthermore, our study showed that non-dipper circadian BP rhythm is associated with the significant impairment of endothelial function. Consequently, we can suggest that patients with non-dipper circadian BP profile could be assessed as a high risk group, which might need permanent supervising for avoiding of future cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications. PMID:25879555

  13. A lumped model for blood flow and pressure in the systemic arteries based on an approximate velocity profile function.

    PubMed

    Huberts, Wouter; Bosboom, E Marielle H; van de Vosse, Frans N

    2009-01-01

    Previously, by assuming a viscous dominated flow in the boundary layer and an inertia dominated flow in the vessel core, a velocity profile function for a 1D-wave propagation model was derived. Because the time dependent shape of the velocity profile in this boundary layer model depends on the size of the inviscid core and the boundary layer, and thus on the Womersley number, it differs along the arterial tree. In this study we evaluated a lumped model for a vessel segment in which the element configuration is based on physical phenomena described by the boundary layer model and for which all parameters have a physically based quantitative value dependent on the Womersley numbers. The proposed electrical analog consists of a Womersley number dependent resistor and an inductor arranged in parallel, representing the flow impedence in respectively the vessel core and the boundary layer, in series with a second resistor. After incorporating a capacitor representing the vessel compliance in this rigid tube model, the element configuration resembles the configuration of the four-element windkessel model. For arbitrary Womersley numbers the relative impedence of Womersley theory is approximated with high accuracy. In the limits for small and large Womersley numbers the relative impedences of the proposed lumped model correspond exactly to Womersley theory. PMID:19292506

  14. Cardiovascular function in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A. E.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.; Leach-Huntoon, C. S.; Nicgossian, A. E.

    1991-01-01

    Changes in orthostatic heart rate have been noted universally in Soviet and U.S. crewmembers post space flight. The magnitude of these changes appears to be influenced by mission duration, with increasing orthostatic intolerance for the first 7-10 days of flight and then a partial recovery in the orthostatic heart rate response. Fluid loading has been used as a countermeasure to this postflight orthostatic intolerance. Previous reports have documented the effectiveness of this technique, but it has also been noted that the effectiveness of volume expansion diminishes as flight duration exceeds one week. The response of carotid baroreceptor function was investigated utilizing a commercially available neck collar which could apply positive and negative pressure to effect receptor stimulation. Bedrest studies had validated the usefulness and validity of the device. In these studies it was shown that carotid baroreceptor function curves demonstrated less responsiveness to orthostatic stimulation than control individuals. Twelve Space Shuttle crewmembers were examined pre- and postflight from flights lasting from 4-5 days. Plots of baroreceptor function were constructed and plotted as change in R-R interval vs. carotid distending pressure (an orthostatic stimulus). Typical sigmoidal curves were obtained. Postflight the resting heart rate was higher (smaller R-R interval) and the range of R-R value and the slope of the carotid sigmoidal response were both depressed. These changes were not significant immediately postflight (L + O), but did become significant by the second day postflight (L + 2), and remained suppressed for several days thereafter. It is hypothesized that the early adaptation to space flight involves a central fluid shift during the initial days of flight, but subsequent alterations in neural controlling mechanisms (such as carotid baroreceptor function) contribute to orthostatic intolerance.

  15. Effect of yoga regimen on lung functions including diffusion capacity in coronary artery disease patients: A randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Asha; Singh, Savita; Singh, KP; Pai, Preeti

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung functions are found to be impaired in coronary artery disease (CAD), congestive heart failure, left ventricular dysfunction, and after cardiac surgery. Diffusion capacity progressively worsens as the severity of CAD increases due to reduction in lung tissue participating in gas exchange. Aims and Objectives: Pranayama breathing exercises and yogic postures may play an impressive role in improving cardio-respiratory efficiency and facilitating gas diffusion at the alveolo-capillary membrane. This study was done to see the effect of yoga regimen on lung functions particularly diffusion capacity in CAD patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 stable CAD patients below 65 years of age of both sexes were selected and randomized into two groups of 40 each. Group I CAD patients were given yoga regimen for 3 months which consisted of yogic postures, pranayama breathing exercises, dietary modification, and holistic teaching along with their conventional medicine while Group II CAD patients were put only on conventional medicine. Lung functions including diffusion capacity were recorded thrice in both the groups: 0 day as baseline, 22nd day and on 90th day by using computerized MS medisoft Cardio-respiratory Instrument, HYP’AIR Compact model of cardio-respiratory testing machine was manufactured by P K Morgan, India. The recorded parameters were statistically analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA followed by Tukey's test in both the groups. Cardiovascular parameters were also compared before and after intervention in both the groups. Results: Statistically significant improvements were seen in slow vital capacity, forced vital capacity, peak expiratory flow rate, maximum voluntary ventilation, and diffusion factor/ transfer factor of lung for carbon monoxide after 3 months of yoga regimen in Group I. Forced expiratory volume in 1st sec (FEV1), and FEV1 % also showed a trend toward improvement although not statistically significant. HR, SBP and DBP also

  16. High Temporal Resolution Dynamic MRI and Arterial Input Function for Assessment of GFR in Pediatric Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Yoruk, Umit; Saranathan, Manojkumar; Loening, Andreas M; Hargreaves, Brian A; Vasanawala, Shreyas S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To introduce a respiratory-gated high-spatiotemporal-resolution dynamic-contrast-enhanced MRI technique and a high-temporal-resolution aortic input function (HTR-AIF) estimation method for glomerular filtration rate (GFR) assessment in children. Methods A high-spatiotemporal-resolution DCE-MRI method with view-shared reconstruction was modified to incorporate respiratory-gating, and an AIF estimation method that uses a fraction of the k-space data from each respiratory period was developed (HTR-AIF). The method was validated using realistic digital phantom simulations and demonstrated on clinical subjects. The GFR estimates using HTR-AIF were compared to estimates obtained by using an AIF derived directly from the view-shared images. Results Digital phantom simulations showed that using the HTR-AIF technique gives more accurate AIF estimates (RMSE = 0.0932) compared to the existing estimation method (RMSE = 0.2059) that used view-sharing (VS). For simulated GFR > 27 ml/min, GFR estimation error was between 32% and 17% using view-shared AIF, whereas estimation error was less than 10% using HTR-AIF. In all clinical subjects, the HTR-AIF method resulted in higher GFR estimations than the view-shared method. Conclusion The HTR-AIF method improves the accuracy of both the AIF and GFR estimates derived from the respiratory-gated acquisitions, and makes GFR estimation feasible in free-breathing pediatric subjects. PMID:25946307

  17. Pharmacological neutropenia prevents endothelial dysfunction but not smooth muscle functions impairment induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Pétrault, Olivier; Ouk, Thavarak; Gautier, Sophie; Laprais, Maud; Gelé, Patrick; Bastide, Michèle; Bordet, Régis

    2005-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) activation and mobilization observed in acute cerebral infarction contribute to the brain tissue damage, but PMN could also be involved in postischemic functional injury of ischemied blood vessel. This study was undertaken to investigate whether pharmacological neutropenia could modify the postischemic endothelial dysfunction in comparison to smooth muscle whose impairment is likely more related to reperfusion and oxidative stress. A cerebral ischemia–reperfusion by endoluminal occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (MCA) was performed 4 days after intravenous administration of vinblastine or 12 h after RP-3 anti-rat neutrophils monoclonal antibody (mAb RP-3) injection into the peritoneal cavity, on male Wistar rats with 1-h ischemia then followed by 24-h reperfusion period. Brain infarct volume was measured by histomorphometric analysis and vascular endothelial and smooth muscle reactivity of MCA was analysed using Halpern myograph. Neutropenia induced a neuroprotective effect as demonstrated by a significant decrease of brain infarct size. In parallel to neuroprotection, neutropenia prevented postischemic impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxing response to acetylcholine. In contrast, smooth muscle functional alterations were not prevented by neutropenia. Ischemia–reperfusion-induced myogenic tone impairment remained unchanged in vinblastine and mAb RP-3-treated rats. Postischemic Kir2.x-dependent relaxation impairment was not prevented in neutropenic conditions. The fully relaxation of smooth muscle response to sodium nitroprusside was similar in all groups. Our results evidenced the dissociate prevention of pharmacologically induced neutropenia on postischemic vascular endothelial and smooth muscle impairment. The selective endothelial protection by neutropenia is parallel to a neuroprotective effect suggesting a possible relationship between the two phenomena. PMID:15700030

  18. Osteoprotegerin is Associated With Endothelial Function and Predicts Early Carotid Atherosclerosis in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Morisawa, Taichirou; Nakagomi, Akihiro; Kohashi, Keiichi; Kosugi, Munenori; Kusama, Yoshiki; Atarashi, Hirotsugu; Shimizu, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a soluble glycoprotein belonging to the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily and is linked to vascular atherosclerosis and calcification. The carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) correlates with carotid atherosclerosis and is a significant predictor of cardiovascular events. The OPG levels are associated with the CIMT in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this pathway remain unclear. We investigated 114 CAD patients (89 men, 25 women; mean age: 68.7 ± 10.3 years) and measured the Gensini score (a marker of the extent of coronary atherosclerosis), the mean CIMT and the plasma levels of OPG and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA; a marker of endothelial function). Early carotid atherosclerosis was defined as a mean CIMT > 1.0 mm. Only 33 of the 114 patients (28.9%) had early carotid atherosclerosis. Patients with early carotid atherosclerosis had higher OPG levels than those without. The OPG levels were found to be significantly associated with ADMA (r = 0.191, P = 0.046) and the mean CIMT (r = 0.319, P = 0.001), but not with the Gensini score. A receiver operating curve analysis revealed the optimal cut-off value of the OPG levels for predicting early carotid atherosclerosis to be 100 pmol/L. A multivariate logistic regression analysis showed OPG ≥ 100 pmol/L to be significantly and independently associated with early carotid atherosclerosis (odds ratio: 2.98, 95% confidence interval: 1.22-7.20, P = 0.017). These data indicate that OPG is significantly associated with endothelial function and predicts early carotid atherosclerosis in patients with CAD. PMID:26549398

  19. L-citrulline for protection of endothelial function from ADMA–induced injury in porcine coronary artery

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Chao; Lun, Li-Min; Zhao, Jin-Xia; Wang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jue; Ning, Chun-Ping; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Bei-Bei; He, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is a cardiovascular risk factor. We tested the hypothesis that L-citrulline may ameliorate the endothelial function altered by ADMA in porcine coronary artery (PCA). Myograph study for vasorelaxation, electrochemical measurement for NO, RT-PCR, and Western blot analysis for expression of eNOS, argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS), and p-eNOSser1177 were performed. cGMP was determined by enzyme immunoassay. Superoxide anion (O2.−) production was detected by the lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence method. Compare with controls (96.03% ± 6.2%), the maximal relaxation induced by bradykinin was significantly attenuated (61.55% ± 4.8%, p < 0.01), and significantly restored by L-citrulline (82.67 ± 6.4%, p < 0.05) after 24 hours of ADMA exposure. Expression of eNOS, p-eNOSser1177, and ASS in PCA significantly increased after L-citrulline incubation. L-citrulline also markedly restored the NO production, and cGMP level which was reduced by ADMA. The increased O2.− production by ADMA was also inhibited by L-citrulline. L-citrulline restores the endothelial function in preparations treated with ADMA by preservation of NO production and suppression of O2.− generation. Preservation of NO is attributed to the upregulation of eNOS expression along with activation of p-eNOSser1177. L-citrulline improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation through NO/ cGMP pathway. PMID:26046576

  20. Heart function in magnetic resonance imaging and the mesenteric artery reactivity in rats receiving lead-contaminated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Skoczynska, A; Skórka, T; Wojakowska, A; Nowacki, D; Turczyn, B; Poręba, R; Tyrankiewicz, U; Byk, K; Szuba, A

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of lead (Pb)-contaminated drinking water on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-estimated cardiac function, vascular reactivity, and serum lipids in rats. For 3 months, male Wistar rats, aged 4-6 weeks, were given drinking water with the addition of lead acetate at a concentration of 100 ppm Pb (10 rats) or water free from Pb (8 control rats). The cardiac MRI was performed at rest and under β-adrenergic stimulation on a 4.7 T scanner using electrocardiogram-triggered gradient echo (FLASH) cine sequence. After 1-2 weeks of the MRI test, experiments were performed ex vivo. After stabilization of perfusion pressure (PP), norepinephrine at doses from 0.01 to 5.0 μg was dissolved in Krebs solution, injected in a volume of 100 μl, and next infused at a concentration of 0.5 μg/ml into the isolated mesenteric artery. In this manner, preconstricted mesenteric bed was used to determine PP changes induced by acetylcholine, given at doses from 0.05 to 5.0 μg, before and during the infusion of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (1.0 μg/ml). At the end, dobutamine (5 mg), followed by potassium chloride (10.5 mg), was injected. Lipid levels were determined enzymatically, blood Pb level was measured by the atomic absorption spectrophotometer. This study showed that Pb impairs the left ventricular systolic and diastolic function. Pb-induced changes in response to resistance of vessels to vasoactive agents may be secondary to the reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. The high-density lipoprotein subfraction 2 (HDL2) is involved in the cardiovascular effect of Pb. PMID:23760256

  1. L-citrulline for protection of endothelial function from ADMA-induced injury in porcine coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Chao; Lun, Li-Min; Zhao, Jin-Xia; Wang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jue; Ning, Chun-Ping; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Bei-Bei; He, Guo-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is a cardiovascular risk factor. We tested the hypothesis that L-citrulline may ameliorate the endothelial function altered by ADMA in porcine coronary artery (PCA). Myograph study for vasorelaxation, electrochemical measurement for NO, RT-PCR, and Western blot analysis for expression of eNOS, argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS), and p-eNOS(ser1177) were performed. cGMP was determined by enzyme immunoassay. Superoxide anion (O2.(-)) production was detected by the lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence method. Compare with controls (96.03% ± 6.2%), the maximal relaxation induced by bradykinin was significantly attenuated (61.55% ± 4.8%, p<0.01), and significantly restored by L-citrulline (82.67 ± 6.4%, p<0.05) after 24 hours of ADMA exposure. Expression of eNOS, p-eNOS(ser1177), and ASS in PCA significantly increased after L-citrulline incubation. L-citrulline also markedly restored the NO production, and cGMP level which was reduced by ADMA. The increased O2.(-) production by ADMA was also inhibited by L-citrulline. L-citrulline restores the endothelial function in preparations treated with ADMA by preservation of NO production and suppression of O2.(-) generation. Preservation of NO is attributed to the upregulation of eNOS expression along with activation of p-eNOS(ser1177). L-citrulline improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation through NO/ cGMP pathway. PMID:26046576

  2. Role of NO in arterial vascular function of intertidal fish (Girella laevifrons) and marine fish (Isacia conceptionis).

    PubMed

    Moraga, F A; Urriola-Urriola, N

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies performed in intertidal fish (Girella laevifrons),as well as marine fish (Isacia conceptionis), showed that acetylcholine (ACh) produced contractions mediated by cyclooxygenases that were dependent on the area and potency of contraction in several arterial vessels. Given that the role of nitric oxide is poorly understood in fish, the objective of our study was to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in branchial afferent (ABA), branchial efferent (ABE), dorsal (DA) and mesenteric (MA) arterial vessels from both Girella laevifrons and Isacia conceptionis. We studied afferent and efferent branchial, dorsal and mesenteric arteries that were dissected from 6 juvenile specimens. Isometric tension studies were done using dose response curves (DRC) for Ach (10-13 to 10-3 M) and blockade with L-NAME (10-5 M), and DRC for sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a donor of NO). L-NAME produced an attenuation of the contractile response in the dorsal, afferent and efferent branchial arteries and a potentiation of the contraction in the MA. SNP caused 70% dilation in the mesenteric artery and 40% in the dorsal artery. Our results suggest that Ach promotes precarious dilatation in MA mediated by NO; data that is supported by the use of sodium nitroprusside. In contrast, in the vessels DA, ABA and EBA our results support that the pathway Ach-NO-relaxation is absent in both species. PMID:27058601

  3. Effects of the Use of Assisted Reproductive Technologies and an Obesogenic Environment on Resistance Artery Function and Diabetes Biomarkers in Mice Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Perez, Francisco I.; Schenewerk, Angela L.; Coffman, Katy L.; Foote, Christopher; Ji, Tieming; Rivera, Rocio M.; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal obesity affects the incidence of cardiovascular disease and diabetes in offspring. Also the use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) has been associated with cardiovascular deficiencies in offspring. Obese women often suffer from infertility and use ART to achieve a pregnancy, but the combined effects of maternal obesity and ART on cardiovascular health and incidence of diabetes in the offspring is not known. Here, we report the effects of the use of ART within an obesogenic environment, consisting of feeding a western diet (WD) to dams and offspring, on resistance artery function and presence of diabetes biomarkers in juvenile mice offspring. Our results indicate that WD and ART interacted to induce endothelial dysfunction in mesenteric resistance arteries isolated from 7-week-old mice offspring. This was determined by presence of a reduced acetylcholine-induced dilation compared to controls. The arteries from these WD-ART mice also had greater wall cross-sectional areas and wall to lumen ratios indicative of vascular hypertrophic remodeling. Of the diabetes biomarkers measured, only resistin was affected by a WD×ART interaction. Serum resistin was significantly greater in WD-ART offspring compared to controls. Diet and sex effects were observed in other diabetes biomarkers. Our conclusion is that in mice the use of ART within an obesogenic environment interacts to favor the development of endothelial dysfunction in the resistance arteries of juvenile offspring, while having marginal effects on diabetes biomarkers. PMID:25386661

  4. The influence of isotonic exercise on cardiac hypertrophy in arterial hypertension: impact on cardiac function and on the capacity for aerobic work.

    PubMed

    Moreno Júnior, H; Cezareti, M L; Piçarro, I C; Barros Neto, T L; Kasinski, N; Martinez Filho, E E; Saragoça, M A

    1995-10-01

    Intense physical training through isotonic exercises has controversial effects in individuals with moderate to severe hypertension. In this study, normotensive Wistar rats and rats with renovascular hypertension (Goldblatt II) were subjected to intense physical exercise involving two 50-min swimming sessions per day for a period of 12 weeks. At the end of the study, we evaluated the effect of training on arterial pressure, the capacity for aerobic work and cardiac function. Our results demonstrate that intense physical training has no effect on the arterial blood pressure of normotensive rats or of animals with moderate renovascular hypertension. Hypertensive animals with cardiac hypertrophy require a greater period of training in order to attain the same capacity for aerobic work as normotensive rats. This difference may result from an inability of the former animals to increase cardiac compliance, thereby impeding more extensive usage of the Frank-Starling mechanism to subsequently increase the systolic cardiac performance. Cardiac hypertrophy induced by exercise did not summate with that induced by arterial hypertension. Physical exercise normalized the end-diastolic left ventricular pressure in hypertensive animals without any corresponding increase in the compliance of the chamber. The first derivative of left ventricular pulse pressure (+/- dP/dt) was greater in the hypertensive trained group than in the hypertensive sedentary rats. These observations suggest that a systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle involving an elevated residual volume secondary to arterial hypertension may be corrected by physical exercise such as swimming. PMID:7584822

  5. Geomagnetic field modulates artificial static magnetic field effect on arterial baroreflex and on microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmitrov, Juraj

    2007-03-01

    Spreading evidence suggests that geomagnetic field (GMF) modulates artificial magnetic fields biological effect and associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity. To explore the underlying physiological mechanism we studied 350 mT static magnetic field (SMF) effect on arterial baroreflex-mediated skin microcirculatory response in conjunction with actual geomagnetic activity, reflected by K and K p indices. Fourteen experiments were performed in rabbits sedated by pentobarbital infusion (5 mg/kg/h). Mean femoral artery blood pressure, heart rate, and the ear lobe skin microcirculatory blood flow, measured by microphotoelectric plethysmogram (MPPG), were simultaneously recorded before and after 40 min of NdFeB magnets local exposure to sinocarotid baroreceptors. Arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was estimated from heart rate/blood pressure response to intravenous bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. We found a significant positive correlation between SMF-induced increase in BRS and increment in microvascular blood flow (ΔBRS with ΔMPPG, r=0.7, p<0.009) indicated the participation of the arterial baroreflex in the regulation of the microcirculation and its enhancement after SMF exposure. Geomagnetic disturbance, as opposed to SMF, decreased both microcirculation and BRS, and counteracted SMF-induced increment in microcirculatory blood flow ( K-index with ΔMPPG; r s=-0.55, p<0.041). GMF probably affected central baroreflex pathways, diminishing SMF direct stimulatory effect on sinocarotid baroreceptors and on baroreflex-mediated vasodilatatory response. The results herein may thus point to arterial baroreflex as a possible physiological mechanism for magnetic-field cardiovascular effect. It seems that geomagnetic disturbance modifies artificial magnetic fields biological effect and should be taken into consideration in the assessment of the final effect.

  6. Geomagnetic field modulates artificial static magnetic field effect on arterial baroreflex and on microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Gmitrov, Juraj

    2007-03-01

    Spreading evidence suggests that geomagnetic field (GMF) modulates artificial magnetic fields biological effect and associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity. To explore the underlying physiological mechanism we studied 350 mT static magnetic field (SMF) effect on arterial baroreflex-mediated skin microcirculatory response in conjunction with actual geomagnetic activity, reflected by K and K ( p ) indices. Fourteen experiments were performed in rabbits sedated by pentobarbital infusion (5 mg/kg/h). Mean femoral artery blood pressure, heart rate, and the ear lobe skin microcirculatory blood flow, measured by microphotoelectric plethysmogram (MPPG), were simultaneously recorded before and after 40 min of NdFeB magnets local exposure to sinocarotid baroreceptors. Arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was estimated from heart rate/blood pressure response to intravenous bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. We found a significant positive correlation between SMF-induced increase in BRS and increment in microvascular blood flow (DeltaBRS with DeltaMPPG, r=0.7, p<0.009) indicated the participation of the arterial baroreflex in the regulation of the microcirculation and its enhancement after SMF exposure. Geomagnetic disturbance, as opposed to SMF, decreased both microcirculation and BRS, and counteracted SMF-induced increment in microcirculatory blood flow (K-index with DeltaMPPG; r (s)=-0.55, p<0.041). GMF probably affected central baroreflex pathways, diminishing SMF direct stimulatory effect on sinocarotid baroreceptors and on baroreflex-mediated vasodilatatory response. The results herein may thus point to arterial baroreflex as a possible physiological mechanism for magnetic-field cardiovascular effect. It seems that geomagnetic disturbance modifies artificial magnetic fields biological effect and should be taken into consideration in the assessment of the final effect. PMID:16983578

  7. Additive prognostic value of coronary artery calcium score and renal function in patients with acute chest pain without known coronary artery disease: up to 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Chaikriangkrai, Kongkiat; Nabi, Faisal; Mahmarian, John J; Chang, Su Min

    2015-12-01

    Long-term incremental prognostic value of renal function over coronary artery calcium score (CACS) in symptomatic patients without known coronary artery disease (CAD) is unclear. The objective of this study was to examine additive prognostic value of renal function over CACS in patients with acute chest pain suspected of CAD. Renal function and CACS were assessed in patients without known CAD who presented to the emergency department with chest pain from 2005 to 2008. Renal function was assessed using estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and chronic kidney disease (CKD) was defined as eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). A total of 949 patients (804 non-CKD and 145 CKD, age 54 ± 13 years) were included. During the follow-up period of up to 5.3 years, major adverse cardiac events (MACE) occurred in 5.7% of patients (19 cardiac deaths, 6 myocardial infarction and 29 late coronary revascularization). Annualized MACE rate was higher in patients in higher CACS categories with and without CKD (p = 0.011 and p < 0.001 respectively). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, CACS categories (CACS 1-100: HR 3.17, p = 0.005; CACS 101-400: HR 7.68, p < 0.001; CACS > 400: HR 8.88, p < 0.001) and CKD (HR 10.18, p < 0.001) were independent predictors for MACE. Both adding renal function and CACS significantly improved the overall predictive performance (p < 0.001 for global Chi square increase) from Framingham risk categories or thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) risk score. Both CACS and renal function were independent predictors for future cardiac events and provided additive prognostic value to each other and over either Framingham risk categories or TIMI risk score. PMID:26243534

  8. Uncultured undifferentiated adipose-derived nucleated cell fractions combined with inside-out artery graft accelerate sciatic nerve regeneration and functional recovery.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, R; Asadollahi, A; Amini, K

    2014-09-01

    Effects of transplantation of adipose-derived nucleated cell fractions (ADNCs) on sciatic nerve regeneration were studied. A 10-mm sciatic nerve defect was bridged using artery graft filled with ADNCs. In control group, artery graft was filled with saline alone. Regenerated nerve fibres were studied for 12 weeks. In sham-operated group, sciatic nerve was only exposed and manipulated. Behavioural and functional studies confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in ADNCs transplanted animals than in control group (P<0.05). At the end of study period, animals in ADNCs transplanted group achieved a sciatic functional index (SFI) value of -31.6 ± -3.14, whereas in control group a value of -42.5 ± -3.7 was found. Gastrocnemius muscle mass in ADNCs transplanted animals was found to be significantly higher than that in control group (P=0.001). Morphometric indices of regenerated fibres showed the number and diameter of myelinated fibres to be significantly higher in ADNCs transplanted animals than in control group (P=0.001). On immunohistochemistry, there was more positive staining of S100 in the ADNCs transplanted animals than in control group. ADNCs transplantation into an artery graft could be considered a readily accessible technique that improves functional recovery of sciatic nerve. PMID:24951175

  9. Conduit artery structure and function in lowlanders and native highlanders: relationships with oxidative stress and role of sympathoexcitation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nia C S; Bailey, Damian M; Dumanoir, Gregory R; Messinger, Laura; Lucas, Samuel J E; Cotter, James D; Donnelly, Joseph; McEneny, Jane; Young, Ian S; Stembridge, Mike; Burgess, Keith R; Basnet, Aparna S; Ainslie, Philip N

    2014-03-01

    Research detailing the normal vascular adaptions to high altitude is minimal and often confounded by pathology (e.g., chronic mountain sickness) and methodological issues. We examined vascular function and structure in: (1) healthy lowlanders during acute hypoxia and prolonged (∼2 weeks) exposure to high altitude, and (2) high-altitude natives at 5050 m (highlanders). In 12 healthy lowlanders (aged 32 ± 7 years) and 12 highlanders (Sherpa; 33 ± 14 years) we assessed brachial endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), endothelium-independent dilatation (via glyceryl trinitrate; GTN), common carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and diameter (ultrasound), and arterial stiffness via pulse wave velocity (PWV; applanation tonometry). Cephalic venous biomarkers of free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation (lipid hydroperoxides, LOOH), nitrite (NO2-) and lipid soluble antioxidants were also obtained at rest. In lowlanders, measurements were performed at sea level (334 m) and between days 3-4 (acute high altitude) and 12-14 (chronic high altitude) following arrival to 5050 m. Highlanders were assessed once at 5050 m. Compared with sea level, acute high altitude reduced lowlanders' FMD (7.9 ± 0.4 vs. 6.8 ± 0.4%; P = 0.004) and GTN-induced dilatation (16.6 ± 0.9 vs. 14.5 ± 0.8%; P = 0.006), and raised central PWV (6.0 ± 0.2 vs. 6.6 ± 0.3 m s(-1); P = 0.001). These changes persisted at days 12-14, and after allometrically scaling FMD to adjust for altered baseline diameter. Compared to lowlanders at sea level and high altitude, highlanders had a lower carotid wall:lumen ratio (∼19%, P ≤ 0.04), attributable to a narrower CIMT and wider lumen. Although both LOOH and NO2- increased with high altitude in lowlanders, only LOOH correlated with the reduction in GTN-induced dilatation evident during acute (n = 11, r = -0.53) and chronic (n = 7, r = -0.69; P ≤ 0.01) exposure to 5050 m. In a follow-up, placebo-controlled experiment (n = 11 healthy lowlanders

  10. Efficiency of muscle strength training on motor function in patients with coronary artery disease: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Jie; He, Xiao-Hua; Guo, Hai-Ying; Wang, Xue-Qiang; Zhu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Existing literature has shown that patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) can benefit greatly from the strength training; therefore, the strength training should play a more important role in cardiac rehabilitation. However, the medical community may still have conservation to apply the strength training owing to no comprehensive study so far to compare the effectiveness of the strength training to the other trainings, such as aerobic training. Objective: To evaluate the effect of strength training on motor function in patients with CAD. Methods: Published articles from the earliest date available to July 2015 were identified using electronic searches. Two reviewers selected independently relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating exercise program with strength training versus control interventions (exercise without strength training, including aerobic training and no exercise group) for the treatment of CAD patients. We examined effects of exercise with strength training versus control interventions on peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), duration of exercise test and muscle strength. Two reviewers extracted data independently. Results: Twenty seven trials that represented 1151 participants passed the selection criteria and were evaluated for the effects of strength training in CAD patients. For improving VO2peak [SMD (95%CI) = 0.58 (0.11, 1.06)] and muscle strength [upper limb, SMD (95% CI) =0.44 (0.34, 0.55); lower limb, SMD (95% CI) =0.33 (0.16, 0.50)], exercise program with strength training were significantly more effective than one without it. But there is no significantly difference on duration of exercise test [SMD (95%CI) = 0.17 (-0.04, 0.39)] in strength training group than in control group. Conclusions: We conclude strength training is effective in improving muscle strength and VO2peak, in CAD patients, when compared to patients with control group. Furthermore, our evaluations suggest that strength training does not compromise

  11. Testing the hypothesis of neurodegeneracy in respiratory network function with a priori transected arterially perfused brain stem preparation of rat.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sarah E; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2016-05-01

    Degeneracy of respiratory network function would imply that anatomically discrete aspects of the brain stem are capable of producing respiratory rhythm. To test this theory we a priori transected brain stem preparations before reperfusion and reoxygenation at 4 rostrocaudal levels: 1.5 mm caudal to obex (n = 5), at obex (n = 5), and 1.5 (n = 7) and 3 mm (n = 6) rostral to obex. The respiratory activity of these preparations was assessed via recordings of phrenic and vagal nerves and lumbar spinal expiratory motor output. Preparations with a priori transection at level of the caudal brain stem did not produce stable rhythmic respiratory bursting, even when the arterial chemoreceptors were stimulated with sodium cyanide (NaCN). Reperfusion of brain stems that preserved the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC) showed spontaneous and sustained rhythmic respiratory bursting at low phrenic nerve activity (PNA) amplitude that occurred simultaneously in all respiratory motor outputs. We refer to this rhythm as the pre-BötC burstlet-type rhythm. Conserving circuitry up to the pontomedullary junction consistently produced robust high-amplitude PNA at lower burst rates, whereas sequential motor patterning across the respiratory motor outputs remained absent. Some of the rostrally transected preparations expressed both burstlet-type and regular PNA amplitude rhythms. Further analysis showed that the burstlet-type rhythm and high-amplitude PNA had 1:2 quantal relation, with burstlets appearing to trigger high-amplitude bursts. We conclude that no degenerate rhythmogenic circuits are located in the caudal medulla oblongata and confirm the pre-BötC as the primary rhythmogenic kernel. The absence of sequential motor patterning in a priori transected preparations suggests that pontine circuits govern respiratory pattern formation. PMID:26888109

  12. Long-Term Functional Efficacy of a Novel Electrospun Poly(Glycerol Sebacate)-Based Arterial Graft in Mice.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Ramak; Best, Cameron A; Allen, Robert A; Stowell, Chelsea E T; Onwuka, Ekene; Zhuang, Jennifer J; Lee, Yong-Ung; Yi, Tai; Bersi, Matthew R; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Humphrey, Jay D; Wang, Yadong; Breuer, Christopher K

    2016-08-01

    Many surgical interventions for cardiovascular disease are limited by the availability of autologous vessels or suboptimal performance of prosthetic materials. Tissue engineered vascular grafts show significant promise, but have yet to achieve clinical efficacy in small caliber (<5 mm) arterial applications. We previously designed cell-free elastomeric grafts containing solvent casted, particulate leached poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) that degraded rapidly and promoted neoartery development in a rat model over 3 months. Building on this success but motivated by the need to improve fabrication scale-up potential, we developed a novel method for electrospinning smaller grafts composed of a PGS microfibrous core enveloped by a thin poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) outer sheath. Electrospun PGS-PCL composites were implanted as infrarenal aortic interposition grafts in mice and remained patent up to the 12 month endpoint without thrombosis or stenosis. Many grafts experienced a progressive luminal enlargement up to 6 months, however, due largely to degradation of PGS without interstitial replacement by neotissue. Lack of rupture over 12 months confirmed sufficient long-term strength, due primarily to the persistent PCL sheath. Immunohistochemistry further revealed organized contractile smooth muscle cells and neotissue in the inner region of the graft, but a macrophage-driven inflammatory response to the residual polymer in the outer region of the graft that persisted up to 12 months. Overall, the improved surgical handling, long-term functional efficacy, and strength of this new graft strategy are promising, and straightforward modifications of the PGS core should hasten cellular infiltration and associated neotissue development and thereby lead to improved small vessel replacements. PMID:26795977

  13. Low-Sodium DASH Diet Improves Diastolic Function and Ventricular-Arterial Coupling in Hypertensive Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Scott L.; Seymour, E. Mitchell; Brook, Robert D.; Sheth, Samar S.; Ghosh, Erina; Zhu, Simeng; Weder, Alan B.; Kovács, Sándor J.; Kolias, Theodore J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) involves failure of cardiovascular reserve in multiple domains. In HFPEF animal models, dietary sodium restriction improves ventricular and vascular stiffness and function. We hypothesized that the sodium-restricted Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet (DASH/SRD) would improve left ventricular diastolic function, arterial elastance, and ventricular-arterial (V-A) coupling in hypertensive HFPEF. Methods and Results Thirteen patients with treated hypertension and compensated HFPEF consumed the DASH/SRD (target sodium 50 mmol/2100 kcal) for 21 days. We measured baseline and post-DASH/SRD brachial and central BP (via radial arterial tonometry), and cardiovascular function with echocardiographic measures (all previously invasively validated). Diastolic function was quantified via the Parametrized Diastolic Filling formalism, which yields relaxation/viscoelastic (c) and passive/stiffness (k) constants through analysis of Doppler mitral inflow velocity (E-wave) contours. Effective arterial elastance (Ea) end-systolic elastance (Ees), and V-A coupling (defined as the ratio Ees:Ea) were determined using previously published techniques. Wilcoxon matched-pairs tests were used for pre-post comparisons. The DASH/SRD reduced clinic and 24-hour brachial systolic pressure (155±35 to 138±30 and 130±16 to 123±18 mmHg, both p=.02) and central end-systolic pressure trended lower (116±18 to 111±16 mmHg, p=.12). In conjunction, diastolic function improved (c, 24.3±5.3 to 22.7±8.1 s−1;p=.03; k, 252±115 to 170±37 s−1;p=.03), Ea decreased (2.0±0.4 to 1.7±0.4 mmHg/ml;p=.007), and V-A coupling improved (Ees:Ea, 1.5±0.3 to 1.7±0.4;p=.04). Conclusions In hypertensive HFPEF patients, the sodium-restricted DASH diet was associated with favorable changes in ventricular diastolic function, arterial elastance, and V-A coupling. PMID:23985432

  14. Smooth muscle filamin A is a major determinant of conduit artery structure and function at the adult stage.

    PubMed

    Retailleau, Kevin; Arhatte, Malika; Demolombe, Sophie; Jodar, Martine; Baudrie, Véronique; Offermanns, Stefan; Feng, Yuanyi; Patel, Amanda; Honoré, Eric; Duprat, Fabrice

    2016-07-01

    Human mutations in the X-linked FLNA gene are associated with a remarkably diverse phenotype, including severe arterial morphological anomalies. However, the role for filamin A (FlnA) in vascular cells remains partially understood. We used a smooth muscle (sm)-specific conditional mouse model to delete FlnA at the adult stage, thus avoiding the developmental effects of the knock-out. Inactivation of smFlnA in adult mice significantly lowered blood pressure, together with a decrease in pulse pressure. However, both the aorta and carotid arteries showed a major outward hypertrophic remodeling, resistant to losartan, and normally occurring in hypertensive conditions. Notably, arterial compliance was significantly enhanced in the absence of smFlnA. Moreover, reactivity of thoracic aorta rings to a variety of vasoconstrictors was elevated, while basal contractility in response to KCl depolarization was reduced. Enhanced reactivity to the thromboxane A2 receptor agonist U46619 was fully reversed by the ROCK inhibitor Y27632. We discuss the possibility that a reduction in arterial stiffness upon smFlnA inactivation might cause a compensatory increase in conduit artery diameter for normalization of parietal tension, independently of the ROCK pathway. In conclusion, deletion of smFlnA in adult mice recapitulates the vascular phenotype of human bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopia, culminating in aortic dilatation. PMID:27023351

  15. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  16. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  17. [Clinical significance and functional outcomes of ligation of exterior carotid artery in surgical treatment of oropharyngeal cancer].

    PubMed

    Klochikhin, A L; Trofimov, E I; Gamilovskaia, Iu V; Chistiakov, A L

    2010-01-01

    This work was designed to analyse outcomes of the treatment of 65 patients with advanced oropharyngeal cancer who had received combined treatment including radical resection of the tumour. Thirty three patients underwent surgery without ligation of exterior carotid artery while the remaining 32 (control group) were operated after preceding ligation of this vessel. The influence of ligation of exterior carotid artery on cerebral circulation was evaluated by the following methods: estimation of the intraoperative blood loss from A.T. Staroverov's formula, ultrasound dopplerography of extracranial carotid segments, electroencephalography, measurement of the fields of vision using statistical quantitative perimetry, evaluation of the patients' neurologic status. It was shown that ligation of exterior carotid artery has no apparent effect on the intraoperative blood loss during radical surgery for the management of oropharyngeal cancer nor does it influence healing of the postoperative wound and oncological outcome of this treatment. PMID:20436415

  18. Effects of carotid artery stenting on cognitive function in patients with mild cognitive impairment and carotid stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yong; Wang, Yan Jiang; Yan, Jia Chuan; Zhou, Rui; Zhou, Hua Dong

    2013-04-01

    Carotid stenosis is known to be an independent risk factor in the transformation process of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia and is treated by carotid artery stenting (CAS); however, the effects of CAS on cognitive function are unclear. In this study, 240 patients were prospectively assigned to a CAS or control group according to patient preference and underwent detailed neuropsychological examinations (NPEs) before and 6 months after treatment. Cerebral perfusion was assessed with computed tomography perfusion (CTP). Among the 240 patients included in the study, 208 patients completed NPEs at baseline and 6 months after therapy. The patients in the two groups did not differ with regard to baseline characteristics, educational level, vascular risk factors (VRFs) and NPEs prior to therapy. Significant improvements in the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE; before, 24.6±1.7 vs. after, 24.8±1.9; P=0.016), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MOCA; before, 23.7±1.7 vs. after, 24.1±2.0; P=0.006), Fuld Object Memory Evaluation (FOME; before, 13.8±2.2 vs. after, 14.0±2.3; P=0.031) and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-digital span (WAIS-DS; before, 6.7±2.1 vs. after, 6.9±2.3; P=0.040) were observed in the CAS group; however, improvements were not observed in the control group. Of the 84 patients in the CAS group who received CTP follow-up, 72 (86%) presented improvements in ipsilateral brain perfusion 6 months after the procedure; however, no improvement was observed in the control group. Close correlations were identified between the change in perfusion and the change in MMSE (r=0.575) and MOCA (r=0.574). CAS improves global cognitive function in patients with carotid stenosis and MCI and the improvement of cognition is closely related to the improvement of cerebral perfusion. PMID:23596467

  19. Assessment of the effect of off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery on right ventricle function using strain and strain rate imaging

    PubMed Central

    Khani, Mohammad; Hosseintash, Mahsa; Foroughi, Mahnoosh; Naderian, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Background Right ventricle function significantly decreases after coronary artery bypass surgery; as one of the likely causes, such a condition is attributed to the use of cardiopulmonary pump (CPB). Because nowadays there is a tendency toward increasing use of off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery, this study was conducted to evaluate the right ventricle function after this type of surgery using strain and strain rate imaging (SRI) echocardiography. Methods This study was conducted on 30 patients, candidate for elective OPCAB surgery, between 2011 and 2012. Standard echocardiography was performed before the surgery and the right ventricle function was examined using strain and SRI echocardiography. Then patient underwent surgery, 6 days and 3 months after surgery they underwent echocardiography again and the results obtained from the three stages were compared with each other. Results Participants included 30 patients (23 males and 7 females) with a mean age of 66±11 years. Compared to the prior of the surgery, 6 days and 3 months after the surgery there was a significant decrease in tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) at the lateral annulus of tricuspid valve, and strain and SRI of right ventricle. However, the values obtained 3 months after surgery were significantly higher than those obtained after 6 days. In other words, the right ventricle function 6 days after the surgery had dropped, however some of the values recovered 3 months after the surgery. Conclusions The findings of this study are consistent with other studies in this field and showed that after coronary artery surgery a decline occurs in right ventricular function. However, more detailed quantitative strain and SRI parameters which were measured in our study showed that at the early days after the OPCAB surgery there is a decline in the right ventricle function which is relatively reversible at longer intervals (3 months after surgery). PMID

  20. Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery: the effects of aortocoronary vein bypass on left ventricular function

    PubMed Central

    Tyrrell, Michael J.; Bharadwaj, Baikunth

    1972-01-01

    The diagnosis, angiographic evaluation and surgical treatment by aortocoronary vein bypass are described in a 3½-year-old girl with anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery. The anomaly had resulted in cardiac dilatation, diminished left ventricular contractility, an aneurysm of the left ventricular free wall and mitral regurgitation. At the postoperative cardiac catheterization the graft was demonstrated to be patent, but a significant proportion of the flow to the left coronary artery was derived from anastomotic connections with the right coronary artery. The most striking evidence of improvement was obtained from the left ventricular volume studies which showed that the end systoiic volume had decreased from 85 to 49 ml./m.2 with an increase in ejection fraction from 0.39 to 0.62, suggesting enhanced left ventricular contractility after surgery. The patient continues to do well and is free from symptoms. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8 PMID:5041933

  1. Body height and arterial pressure in seated and supine young males during +2 G centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Arvedsen, Sine K; Eiken, Ola; Kölegård, Roger; Petersen, Lonnie G; Norsk, Peter; Damgaard, Morten

    2015-11-01

    It is known that arterial pressure correlates positively with body height in males, and it has been suggested that this is due to the increasing vertical hydrostatic gradient from the heart to the carotid baroreceptors. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that a higher gravito-inertial stress induced by the use of a human centrifuge would increase mean arterial pressure (MAP) more in tall than in short males in the seated position. In short (162-171 cm; n = 8) and tall (194-203 cm; n = 10) healthy males (18-41 yr), brachial arterial pressure, heart rate (HR), and cardiac output were measured during +2G centrifugation, while they were seated upright with the legs kept horizontal (+2Gz). In a separate experiment, the same measurements were done with the subjects supine (+2Gx). During +2Gz MAP increased in the short (22 ± 2 mmHg, P < 0.0001) and tall (23 ± 2 mmHg, P < 0.0001) males, with no significant difference between the groups. HR increased more (P < 0.05) in the tall than in the short group (14 ± 2 vs. 7 ± 2 bpm). Stroke volume (SV) decreased in the short group (26 ± 4 ml, P = 0.001) and more so in the tall group (39 ± 5 ml, P < 0.0001; short vs. tall, P = 0.047). During +2Gx, systolic arterial pressure increased (P < 0.001) and SV (P = 0.012) decreased in the tall group only. In conclusion, during +2Gz, MAP increased in both short and tall males, with no difference between the groups. However, in the tall group, HR increased more during +2Gz, which could be caused by a larger hydrostatic pressure gradient from heart to head, leading to greater inhibition of the carotid baroreceptors. PMID:26290109

  2. MPST but not CSE is the primary regulator of hydrogen sulfide production and function in the coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Maggie M; Kim, Dae Hee; Jandu, Sandeep; Bergman, Yehudit; Tan, Siqi; Wang, Huilei; Pandey, Deepesh R; Abraham, Theodore P; Shoukas, Artin A; Berkowitz, Dan E; Santhanam, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important gasotransmitter in the vasculature. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that H2S contributes to coronary vasoregulation and evaluated the physiological relevance of two sources of H2S, namely, cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) and 3-mercaptypyruvate sulfertransferase (MPST). MPST was detected in human coronary artery endothelial cells as well as rat and mouse coronary artery; CSE was not detected in the coronary vasculature. Rat coronary artery homogenates produced H2S through the MPST pathway but not the CSE pathway in vitro. In vivo coronary vasorelaxation response was similar in CSE knockout mice, wild-type mice (WT), and WT mice treated with the CSE inhibitor propargylglycine, suggesting that CSE-produced H2S does not have a significant role in coronary vasoregulation in vivo. Ex vivo, the MPST substrate 3-mercaptopyruvate (3-MP) and H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) elicited similar coronary vasoreactivity responses. Pyruvate did not have any effects on vasoreactivity. The vasoactive effect of H2S appeared to be nitric oxide (NO) dependent: H2S induced coronary vasoconstriction in the presence of NO and vasorelaxation in its absence. Maximal endothelial-dependent relaxation was intact after 3-MP and NaHS induced an increase in preconstriction tone, suggesting that endothelial NO synthase activity was not significantly inhibited. In vitro, H2S reacted with NO, which may, in part explain the vasoconstrictive effects of 3-MP and NaHS. Taken together, these data show that MPST rather than CSE generates H2S in coronary artery, mediating its effects through direct modulation of NO. This has important implications for H2S-based therapy in healthy and diseased coronary arteries. PMID:26519030

  3. Ketamine-mediated afferent-specific presynaptic transmission blocks in low-threshold and sex-specific subpopulation of myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons of rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Yin, Lei; Fan, Yao; Wang, Ye; Chen, Wei-Ran; Chen, Pei; Liu, Yang; Lu, Xiao-Long; Sun, Hong-Li; Shou, Weinian; Qiao, Guo-Fen; Li, Bai-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background Ketamine enhances autonomic activity, and unmyelinated C-type baroreceptor afferents are more susceptible to be blocked by ketamine than myelinated A-types. However, the presynaptic transmission block in low-threshold and sex-specific myelinated Ah-type baroreceptor neurons (BRNs) is not elucidated. Methods Action potentials (APs) and excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) were investigated in BRNs/barosensitive neurons identified by conduction velocity (CV), capsaicin-conjugated with Iberiotoxin-sensitivity and fluorescent dye using intact nodose slice and brainstem slice in adult female rats. The expression of mRNA and targeted protein for NMDAR1 was also evaluated. Results Ketamine time-dependently blocked afferent CV in Ah-types in nodose slice with significant changes in AP discharge. The concentration-dependent inhibition of ketamine on AP discharge profiles were also assessed and observed using isolated Ah-type BRNs with dramatic reduction in neuroexcitability. In brainstem slice, the 2nd-order capsaicin-resistant EPSCs were identified and ∼50% of them were blocked by ketamine concentration-dependently with IC50 estimated at 84.4 μM compared with the rest (708.2 μM). Interestingly, the peak, decay time constant, and area under curve of EPSCs were significantly enhanced by 100 nM iberiotoxin in ketamine-more sensitive myelinated NTS neurons (most likely Ah-types), rather than ketamine-less sensitive ones (A-types). Conclusions These data have demonstrated, for the first time, that low-threshold and sex-specific myelinated Ah-type BRNs in nodose and Ah-type barosensitive neurons in NTS are more susceptible to ketamine and may play crucial roles in not only mean blood pressure regulation but also buffering dynamic changes in pressure, as well as the ketamine-mediated cardiovascular dysfunction through sexual-dimorphic baroreflex afferent pathway. PMID:26675761

  4. Arterial stick

    MedlinePlus

    ... limit tissue damage. Alternative Names Blood sample - arterial ... by: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, ...

  5. Arterial Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... rial line can provide valuable information to adjust oxygen therapy or mechanical ventilator (respirator; breathing machine) settings. The blood oxygen pres- sure measures from an arterial line give ...

  6. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies

    PubMed Central

    Winant, Celeste D; Aparici, Carina Mari; Zelnik, Yuval R; Reutter, Bryan W; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bacharach, Stephen L; Gullberg, Grant T

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomography (PET)) and SPECT/D (dynamic SPECT from database of SPECT phantom projections). SPECT/P simulated SPECT-like dynamic projections using reprojections of reconstructed dynamic 94Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (94Tc-MIBI) PET images acquired in three human subjects (1 min infusion). This approach was used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in rate parameters K1 for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 or 54 s. Blood input and myocardium tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K1. For the second method (SPECT/D), an anthropomorphic cardiac torso phantom was used to create real SPECT dynamic projection data of a tracer distribution derived from 94Tc-MIBI PET scans in the blood pool, myocardium, liver and background. This method introduced attenuation, collimation and scatter into the modeling of dynamic SPECT projections. Both approaches were used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in parameters for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 and 54 s. Dynamic cardiac SPECT was also performed in a human subject at rest using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of 99mTc-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 min. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using the same spatiotemporal splines. The spatiotemporal maximum

  7. Proinflammation of Aging Central Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyi; Monticone, Robert E.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial aging is a cornerstone of organismal aging. The central arterial wall structurally and functionally remodels under chronic proinflammatory stress over a lifetime. The low grade proinflammation that accompanies advancing age causes arterial wall thickening and stiffening. These structural and functional alterations are consequences of adverse molecular and cellular events, e.g., an increase in local angiotensin II signaling that induces an inflammatory phenotypic shift of endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Thus, interventions to restrict proinflammatory signaling are a rational approach to delay or prevent age-associated adverse arterial remodeling. PMID:25171100

  8. The Effects of Catheter-Based Radiofrequency Renal Denervation on Renal Function and Renal Artery Structure in Patients With Resistant Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Yang, Kan; Jiang, Feng-Lin; Zeng, Li-Xiong; Jiang, Wei-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Yan

    2014-01-01

    There are no clinical studies on the effects of catheter-based radiofrequency renal denervation (RDN) on renal artery structure using 64-detector computed tomography (CT). A total of 39 patients with resistant hypertension received RDN and 38 patients received drug treatment. Mean systolic pressure and diastolic pressure in the RDN group decreased after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of procedure (P<.05) and urinary protein level significantly decreased after 6 and 12 months (P<.05). The diameter, length, and sectional area of the renal artery; number of cases of atherosclerosis; and plaque burden of 64-detector CT renal arteriography did not change at 12 months of follow-up (P<.05), whereas the plaque burden increased significantly in the control group (P<.05). RDN significantly and persistently reduced blood pressure and decreased urinary protein excretion rate in patients with resistant hypertension and did not exhibit any adverse effect on renal function and renal artery structure. PMID:25039997

  9. [An effective case of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy based on biochemical modulation for hepatic recurrence of non-functioning islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Nishijima, K; Ohta, T; Elnemr, A; Yi, S; Ninomiya, I; Kitagawa, H; Fushida, S; Nishimura, G; Fujimura, T; Kayahara, M; Shimizu, K; Miwa, K

    2000-10-01

    A 55-year-old man had a metastasis in segment 3 of the liver 5 months after surgery for non-functioning islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas. The metastatic lesion increased in size in a short period, and other liver micro-metastases that could not be detected by imaging may exist, so hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy was scheduled for 3 months. The patient underwent hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy of 5-fluorouracil (250 mg/day/body for 5 days/week) and adriamycin (10 mg/day/body for 2 days/week) and cisplatin (10 mg/day/body for 5 days/week) and he was put on Leucovorin 30 mg/day as a biochemical modulator of 5-FU and tamoxifen 40 mg/day as a biochemical modulator of ADM. A total 6,000 mg of 5-FU, 100 mg of ADM and 240 mg of CDDP had been administered, until hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy was discontinued because of complicated gastric ulcer. Three months later, the size of the metastatic liver tumor was reduced remarkably and no other metastasis was detected on CT scan, so he underwent partial hepatectomy of the metastatic lesion. No recurrence was found and he has survived in good physical condition during the follow-up period of 5 months after the second operation. PMID:11086447

  10. PAF-receptor is preferentially expressed in a distinct synthetic phenotype of smooth muscle cells cloned from human internal thoracic artery: Functional implications in cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Stengel, Dominique; O'Neil, Caroline; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Karabina, Sonia-Athina; Durand, Herve; Caplice, Noel M.; Pickering, J. Geoffrey; Ninio, Ewa . E-mail: ninio@chups.jussieu.fr

    2006-08-04

    Platelet-activating-Factor (PAF) and its structural analogues formed upon low density lipoprotein oxidation are involved in atherosclerotic plaque formation and may signal through PAF-receptor (PAF-R) expressed in human macrophages and in certain smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media, but rarely in the intima of human plaques. Our aim was to determine which SMC phenotype expresses PAF-R and whether this receptor is functional in cell migration. Circulating SMC progenitors and two phenotypically distinct clones of proliferative, epithelioid phenotype vs contractile, spindle-shaped SMCs from the media of adult internal thoracic artery were studied for the presence of PAF-receptor (PAF-R). The levels of specific mRNA were obtained by reverse transcription/real-time PCR, the protein expression was deduced from immunohistochemistry staining, and the functional transmigration assay was performed by Boyden chamber-type chemotaxis assay. Only SMCs of spindle-shape and synthetic phenotype expressed both mRNA and PAF-R protein and in the functional test migrated at low concentrations of PAF. Two unrelated, specific PAF-R antagonists inhibited PAF-induced migration, but did not modify the migration initiated by PDGF. The presence of functional PAF-R in arterial spindle-shaped SMCs of synthetic phenotype may be important for their migration from the media into the intima and atherosclerotic plaques formation.

  11. Statins and Selective Inhibition of Rho Kinase Protect Small Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel Function (KCa2.3) in Cerebral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Altayo, Francesc; Cottrell, Graeme S.

    2012-01-01

    Background In rat middle cerebral and mesenteric arteries the KCa2.3 component of endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH) is lost following stimulation of thromboxane (TP) receptors, an effect that may contribute to the endothelial dysfunction associated with cardiovascular disease. In cerebral arteries, KCa2.3 loss is associated with NO synthase inhibition, but is restored if TP receptors are blocked. The Rho/Rho kinase pathway is central for TP signalling and statins indirectly inhibit this pathway. The possibility that Rho kinase inhibition and statins sustain KCa2.3 hyperpolarization was investigated in rat middle cerebral arteries (MCA). Methods MCAs were mounted in a wire myograph. The PAR2 agonist, SLIGRL was used to stimulate EDH responses, assessed by simultaneous measurement of smooth muscle membrane potential and tension. TP expression was assessed with rt-PCR and immunofluorescence. Results Immunofluorescence detected TP in the endothelial cell layer of MCA. Vasoconstriction to the TP agonist, U46619 was reduced by Rho kinase inhibition. TP receptor stimulation lead to loss of KCa2.3 mediated hyperpolarization, an effect that was reversed by Rho kinase inhibitors or simvastatin. KCa2.3 activity was lost in L-NAME-treated arteries, but was restored by Rho kinase inhibition or statin treatment. The restorative effect of simvastatin was blocked after incubation with geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate to circumvent loss of isoprenylation. Conclusions Rho/Rho kinase signalling following TP stimulation and L-NAME regulates endothelial cell KCa2.3 function. The ability of statins to prevent isoprenylation and perhaps inhibit of Rho restores/protects the input of KCa2.3 to EDH in the MCA, and represents a beneficial pleiotropic effect of statin treatment. PMID:23056429

  12. Evolution of myocardial ischemia and left ventricular function in patients with angina pectoris without myocardial infarction and total occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery and collaterals from other coronary arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Juilliere, Y.; Marie, P.Y.; Danchin, N.; Karcher, G.; Bertrand, A.; Cherrier, F. )

    1991-07-01

    Repeated episodes of myocardial ischemia might lead to progressive impairment of left ventricular (LV) function. This radionuclide study assessed myocardial ischemia and LV function several years after documented coronary occlusion without myocardial infarction. Over 5 years, 24 consecutive patients, who underwent cardiac catheterization for angina pectoris without myocardial infarction, had isolated total occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery with well-developed collateral vessels. Five patients were successfully treated by coronary bypass grafting and 3 by coronary angioplasty. Among the 16 medically treated patients, 1 was lost to follow-up and 1 died (extracardiac death). The mean (+/- standard deviation) follow-up (14 patients) was 48 +/- 15 months. At follow-up, 8 patients still had clinical chest pain, 11 received antianginal therapy, 4 patients had no stress ischemia and the other 10 had greater than or equal to 1 sign of stress ischemia. All patients had a normal LV ejection fraction at rest (mean 60 +/- 3%; range 55 to 65%). Collateral circulation preserves LV function at the time of occlusion and, in some cases, prevents the development of myocardial ischemia; in patients with persisting myocardial ischemia after well-collateralized coronary occlusion, LV function is not impaired at long-term follow-up.

  13. Improvement of Ejection Fraction After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Surgery in Patients with Impaired Left Ventricular Function

    PubMed Central

    Haxhibeqiri-Karabdic, Ilirijana; Hasanovic, Aida; Kabil, Emir; Straus, Slavenka

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: The present study evaluates our experience with aorto-coronary bypass grafting in patients with severe dysfunction of left ventricle (LV) and low ejection fraction-EF(<35%). Revascularization of myocardium in this settings remains contraversial because of concerns over morbidity, mortality and quality of life. Material and Methodes: Forty patients with severe coronary artery disease and dysfunction of LV (low ejection fraction <35%) underwent coronary artery bypass grafting in period of 3 years. Preoperative diagnostic of 40 patients was consisted of anamnesis, clinical exam, non-invasive methods EHO, MR and invasive diagnostic methods-cateterization. The major indication for surgery was severe anginal pain, heart failure symptoms and low ejection fraction. Internal mammary artery was used in all operated patients. Results: Average age of patients who have been operated was 59,8. In the present study, 81,3% were male and 18,8% female. We found one-vessel disease present in 2,5% (1/40) of patients, two -vessel disease in 40% (16/40), three-vessel disease in 42,5% (17/40) and four -vessel disease in 15% (6/40) of patients. One bypass grafting we implanted in 2,5% patients, two bypasses in 42,5%, three bypasses in 45 5%, and four bypasses in 10% of patients. Left ventricular ejection fraction assessed preoperativly was 18%-27% and postoperatively was improved to 31, 08% in period of 30 days. Conclusion: In patients with left ventricular dysfunction, coronary artery bypass grafting can be performed safely with improvement in quality of life and in left ventricular ejection fraction. PMID:25568566

  14. Robust estimation of the arterial input function for Logan plots using an intersectional searching algorithm and clustering in positron emission tomography for neuroreceptor imaging.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, Mika; Kimura, Yuichi; Yano, Junichi; Mishina, Masahiro; Yanagisawa, Masao; Ishii, Kenji; Oda, Keiichi; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2008-03-01

    The Logan plot is a powerful algorithm used to generate binding-potential images from dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) images in neuroreceptor studies. However, it requires arterial blood sampling and metabolite correction to provide an input function, and clinically it is preferable that this need for arterial blood sampling be obviated. Estimation of the input function with metabolite correction using an intersectional searching algorithm (ISA) has been proposed. The ISA seeks the input function from the intersection between the planes spanned by measured radioactivity curves in tissue and their cumulative integrals in data space. However, the ISA is sensitive to noise included in measured curves, and it often fails to estimate the input function. In this paper, we propose a robust estimation of the cumulative integral of the plasma time-activity curve (pTAC) using ISA (robust EPISA) to overcome noise issues. The EPISA reduces noise in the measured PET data using averaging and clustering that gathers radioactivity curves with similar kinetic parameters. We confirmed that a little noise made the estimation of the input function extremely difficult in the simulation. The robust EPISA was validated by application to eight real dynamic [(11)C]TMSX PET data sets used to visualize adenosine A(2A) receptors and four real dynamic [(11)C]PIB PET data sets used to visualize amyloid-beta plaque. Peripherally, the latter showed faster metabolism than the former. The clustering operation improved the signal-to-noise ratio for the PET data sufficiently to estimate the input function, and the calculated neuroreceptor images had a quality equivalent to that using measured pTACs after metabolite correction. Our proposed method noninvasively yields an alternative input function for Logan plots, allowing the Logan plot to be more useful in neuroreceptor studies. PMID:18187345

  15. Static magnetic field effect on the arterial baroreflex-mediated control of microcirculation: implications for cardiovascular effects due to environmental magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Gmitrov, Juraj

    2007-08-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that time-varying and static magnetic fields in the environment might affect the cardiovascular system. To explore the underlying physiology, the effect of static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the carotid baroreflex control of microcirculation was studied. Twenty-four hemodynamic monitorings were performed in rabbits sedated by pentobarbital infusion (5 mg/kg/h) during experiments that lasted 120 min. Mean femoral artery blood pressure, heart rate, and ear lobe skin microcirculatory blood flow, measured by microphotoelectric plethysmogram (MPPG), were simultaneously recorded before and after a 40 min exposure of the sinocarotid baroreceptors to Nd(2)-Fe(14)-B alloy magnets (n = 14) or sham magnets (n = 10, control series). The local SMF field was 350 mT, at the baroreceptors' site. Arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was estimated from heart rate/blood pressure response to intravenous bolus injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. A significant positive correlation was found between the SMF-induced increase in BRS (DeltaBRS = BRS(afterSMF) - BRS(priorSMF)) and the increment in microvascular blood flow (DeltaMPPG = MPPG(afterSMF) - MPPG(priorSMF)) (r = 0.66, p < 0.009). The SMF probably modulated the arterial baroreflex-mediated microcirculatory control. This could represent one possible mechanism how environmental magnetic fields act on the cardiovascular system, and a method how to complexly adjust macro- and microcirculation with potential clinical implementation. PMID:17530271

  16. Angioplasty and stent placement -- peripheral arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery; PTA - peripheral artery; Angioplasty - peripheral arteries; Iliac artery -angioplasty; Femoral artery - angioplasty; Popliteal artery - angioplasty; Tibial artery - angioplasty; Peroneal artery - ...

  17. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dead bowel - mesenteric; Dead gut - mesenteric; Atherosclerosis - mesenteric artery; Hardening of the arteries - mesenteric artery ... The arteries that supply blood to the intestines run directly from the aorta, the main artery from the heart. ...

  18. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  19. Correlation between mRNA levels and functional role of alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes in arteries: evidence of alpha1L as a functional isoform of the alpha1A-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Martí, Daniel; Miquel, Raquel; Ziani, Khalid; Gisbert, Regina; Ivorra, M Dolores; Anselmi, Elsa; Moreno, Lucrecia; Villagrasa, Victoria; Barettino, Domingo; D'Ocon, Pilar

    2005-11-01

    The mRNA levels for the three alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes, alpha1A, alpha1B, and alpha1D, were quantified by real-time RT-PCR in arteries from Wistar rats. The alpha1D-adrenoceptor was prominent in both aorta (79.0%) and mesenteric artery (68.7%), alpha1A predominated in tail (61.7%) and small mesenteric artery (73.3%), and both alpha1A- and alpha1D-subtypes were expressed at similar levels in iliac artery. The mRNA levels of the alpha1B-subtype were a minority in all vessels (1.7-11.1%). Concentration-response curves of contraction in response to phenylephrine or relaxation in response to alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists on maximal sustained contraction induced by phenylephrine were constructed from control vessels and vessels pretreated with 100 micromol/l chloroethylclonidine (CEC) for 30 min. The significant decrease in the phenylephrine potency observed after CEC treatment together with the inhibitory potency displayed by 8-{2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]-8-azaspiro (4,5) decane-7-dionedihydrochloride} (BMY-7378, an alpha1D-adrenoceptor antagonist) confirm the relevant role of alpha1D-adrenoceptors in aorta and iliac and proximal mesenteric arteries. The potency of 5-methylurapidil (an alpha1A-adrenoceptor antagonist) and the changes in the potency of both BMY-7378 and 5-methylurapidil after CEC treatment provided evidence of a mixed population of alpha1A- and alpha1D-adrenoceptors in iliac and distal mesenteric arteries. The low potency of prazosin (pIC50 < 9) as well as the high 5-methylurapidil potency in tail and small mesenteric arteries suggest the main role of alpha1A/alpha1L-adrenoceptors with minor participation of the alpha1D-subtype. The mRNA levels and CEC treatment corroborated this pattern and confirmed that the alpha1L-adrenoceptor could be a functional isoform of the alpha1A-subtype. PMID:15951348

  20. Regulation and function of an activation-dependent epitope of the beta 1 integrins in vascular cells after balloon injury in baboon arteries and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, N.; Seki, J.; Vergel, S.; Mattsson, E. J.; Yednock, T.; Kovach, N. L.; Harlan, J. M.; Clowes, A. W.

    1996-01-01

    Migration and proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) contribute to the response to injury in damaged and atherosclerotic vessels. These events might be regulated by cellular interactions with extracellular matrix through the expression and activation of integrins. To study the functions of beta 1 integrins in the vessel wall, we used monoclonal antibody (MAb) 15/7, which recognizes an activation epitope of beta 1 integrin subunits, and MAb 8A2, which induces a high affinity form of beta 1 integrins recognized by MAb 15/7. Immunohistochemical analyses were done on samples of normal baboon saphenous arteries and from arteries subjected to balloon injury. EC and SMC expressed the activation epitope of beta 1 integrin in uninjured arteries. By contrast, in balloon-injured arteries 6 weeks after injury, regenerating EC did not express the activation epitope, and there was no decrease in the expression of total beta 1 integrin, whereas SMC migrating into the intima exhibited decreased expression of the total and activated beta 1 integrin. Flow cytometer analysis of cultured cells indicated that baboon EC and SMC weakly express the activation epitope of beta 1 integrin. Next, we determined by utilizing MAb 8A2 the effects of increased expression of activation epitope of beta 1 integrin on the functions of SMC and EC. The activation of beta 1 integrins on SMC induced by MAb 8A2 enhanced SMC adhesion and suppressed SMC migration in a Boyden chamber assay. SMC proliferation was inhibited by MAb 8A2 dose-dependently. Similarly, MAb 8A2-induced activation of beta 1 integrins on EC suppressed EC migration into a wound. However, MAb 8A2 did not affect the basic fibroblast growth factor-induced proliferation of EC, although it blocked the decrease in EC number caused by the removal of basic fibroblast growth factor. These results suggest that activation of beta 1 integrins in vascular cells is regulated in a cell-type dependent manner and plays an

  1. Association of angiotensin converting enzyme and angiotensin II type 1 receptor genotypes with left ventricular function and mass in patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Hamon, M.; Amant, C.; Bauters, C.; Richard, F.; Helbecque, N.; McFadden, E.; Lablanche, J. M.; Bertrand, M.; Amouyel, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse the potential association of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) gene polymorphisms on left ventricular function and mass in patients with normal coronary arteries. DESIGN: Consecutive sample. SETTING: University hospital. SUBJECTS: 141 consecutive white patients referred for coronary angiography and with angiographically normal coronary arteries. Patients with valvar diseases, cardiomyopathies, or a history of myocardial infarction were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Left ventricular variables were measured for all patients. The ACE and AT1R genotypes were determined with a polymerase chain reaction based protocol using DNA prepared from white blood cells. A general linear model was used to compare data according to the ACE and to the AT1R genotypes. RESULTS: A strong association was observed between left ventricular mass and systemic hypertension (mean (SD) hypertension: 114 (31) g/m2; no hypertension 98 (23) g/m2; P < 0.003). However, no influence of ACE and AT1R polymorphisms on left ventricular mass was found, regardless of systemic hypertension. The subjects homozygous for the AT1R CC mutation had a significantly lower ejection fraction than those with allele A (AC+AA) (mean (SD) 62(12)% and 68(10)%, respectively, P < 0.05). No synergistic interaction of ACE and AT1R gene polymorphisms on left ventricular function and mass was found. CONCLUSIONS: These data do not support an association of the ACE and AT1R genotypes on left ventricular hypertrophy in white patients with normal coronary arteries. PMID:9227291

  2. Value of normal electrocardiographic findings in predicting resting left ventricular function in patients with chest pain and suspected coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, J.H. Jr.; Zinsmeister, A.R.; Gibbons, R.J.

    1989-06-01

    Characterization of left ventricular function is important in managing patients with coronary artery disease. Although many methods are available to assess left ventricular function, most are either expensive, invasive, or both. In this study, we examined the ability of normal or near-normal resting electrocardiographic findings to predict resting left ventricular ejection fraction, measured by resting radionuclide angiography, in 874 patients with chest pain and suspected coronary artery disease. A retrospective review was undertaken of 4,410 Mayo Clinic patients who underwent rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography for the evaluation of chest pain and known or suspected coronary artery disease; of these, 874 patients met the inclusion criteria for the current study. A 15-lead electrocardiogram, which was interpreted by the cardiologist or cardiology trainee working in the laboratory, was obtained at the same evaluation as the radionuclide study. In 590 patients with no previous history of a myocardial infarction and entirely normal resting electrocardiographic results without nonspecific ST-T wave abnormalities, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 0.63 +/- 0.004, and 559 patients (95%) had a normal resting ejection fraction (defined as 0.50 or more). Both nonspecific ST-T wave abnormalities (p less than 0.001) and, to a lesser degree, a history of myocardial infarction (p = 0.06) were independent predictors of an abnormal resting ejection fraction. In 185 patients with nonspecific ST-T wave abnormalities and no history of myocardial infarction, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 0.61 +/- 0.009, and 85% had a normal resting ejection fraction.

  3. Exploration of the Rapid Effects of Personal Fine Particulate Matter Exposure on Arterial Hemodynamics and Vascular Function during the Same Day

    PubMed Central

    Brook, Robert D.; Shin, Hwashin H.; Bard, Robert L.; Burnett, Richard T.; Vette, Alan; Croghan, Carry; Thornburg, Jonathan; Rodes, Charles; Williams, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Background Levels of fine particulate matter [≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)] are associated with alterations in arterial hemodynamics and vascular function. However, the characteristics of the same-day exposure–response relationships remain unclear. Objectives We aimed to explore the effects of personal PM2.5 exposures within the preceding 24 hr on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), brachial artery diameter (BAD), endothelial function [flow-mediated dilatation (FMD)], and nitroglycerin-mediated dilatation (NMD). Methods Fifty-one nonsmoking subjects had up to 5 consecutive days of 24-hr personal PM2.5 monitoring and daily cardiovascular (CV) measurements during summer and/or winter periods. The associations between integrated hour-long total personal PM2.5 exposure (TPE) levels (continuous nephelometry among compliant subjects with low secondhand tobacco smoke exposures; n = 30) with the CV outcomes were assessed over a 24-hr period by linear mixed models. Results We observed the strongest associations (and smallest estimation errors) between HR and TPE recorded 1–10 hr before CV measurements. The associations were not pronounced for the other time lags (11–24 hr). The associations between TPE and FMD or BAD did not show as clear a temporal pattern. However, we found some suggestion of a negative association with FMD and a positive association with BAD related to TPE just before measurement (0–2 hr). Conclusions Brief elevations in ambient TPE levels encountered during routine daily activity were associated with small increases in HR and trends toward conduit arterial vasodilatation and endothelial dysfunction within a few hours of exposure. These responses could reflect acute PM2.5-induced autonomic imbalance and may factor in the associated rapid increase in CV risk among susceptible individuals. PMID:21681997

  4. The Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Linagliptin Preserves Endothelial Function in Mesenteric Arteries from Type 1 Diabetic Rats without Decreasing Plasma Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Salheen, Salheen M.; Panchapakesan, Usha; Pollock, Carol A.; Woodman, Owen L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin on the mechanism(s) of endothelium-dependent relaxation in mesenteric arteries from STZ-induced diabetic rats. Both normal and diabetic animals received linagliptin (2 mg/kg) daily by oral gavage for a period of 4 weeks. To measure superoxide generation in mesenteric arteries, lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence was used. ACh-induced relaxation of mesenteric arteries was assessed using organ bath techniques and Western blotting was used to investigate protein expression. Pharmacological tools (1μM TRAM-34, 1μM apamin, 100 nM Ibtx, 100 μM L-NNA, 10 μM ODQ) were used to distinguish between NO and EDH-mediated relaxation. Linagliptin did not affect plasma glucose, but did decrease vascular superoxide levels. Diabetes reduced responses to ACh but did not affect endothelium-independent responses to SNP. Linagliptin improved endothelial function indicated by a significant increase in responses to ACh. Diabetes impaired the contribution of both nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH) to endothelium-dependent relaxation and linagliptin treatment significantly enhanced the contribution of both relaxing factors. Western blotting demonstrated that diabetes also increased expression of Nox2 and decreased expression and dimerization of endothelial NO synthase, effects that were reversed by linagliptin. These findings demonstrate treatment of type 1 diabetic rats with linagliptin significantly reduced vascular superoxide levels and preserved both NO and EDH-mediated relaxation indicating that linagliptin can improve endothelial function in diabetes independently of any glucose lowering activity. PMID:26618855

  5. Multimodal cardiovascular magnetic resonance quantifies regional variation in vascular structure and function in patients with coronary artery disease: Relationships with coronary disease severity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) of the vessel wall is highly reproducible and can evaluate both changes in plaque burden and composition. It can also measure aortic compliance and endothelial function in a single integrated examination. Previous studies have focused on patients with pre-identified carotid atheroma. We define these vascular parameters in patients presenting with coronary artery disease and test their relations to its extent and severity. Methods and Results 100 patients with CAD [single-vessel (16%); two-vessel (39%); and three-vessel (42%) non-obstructed coronary arteries (3%)] were studied. CAD severity and extent was expressed as modified Gensini score (mean modified score 12.38 ± 5.3). A majority of carotid plaque was located in the carotid bulb (CB). Atherosclerosis in this most diseased segment correlated modestly with the severity and extent of CAD, as expressed by the modified Gensini score (R = 0.251, P < 0.05). Using the AHA plaque classification, atheroma class also associated with CAD severity (rho = 0.26, P < 0.05). The distal descending aorta contained the greatest plaque, which correlated with the degree of CAD (R = 0.222; P < 0.05), but with no correlation with the proximal descending aorta, which was relatively spared (R = 0.106; P = n. s.). Aortic distensibility varied along its length with the ascending aorta the least distensible segment. Brachial artery FMD was inversely correlated with modified Gensini score (R = -0.278; P < 0.05). In multivariate analysis, distal descending aorta atheroma burden, distensibility of the ascending aorta, carotid atheroma class and FMD were independent predictors of modified Gensini score. Conclusions Multimodal vascular CMR shows regional abnormalities of vascular structure and function that correlate modestly with the degree and extent of CAD. PMID:22017860

  6. [Interpretation and use of routine pulmonary function tests: Spirometry, static lung volumes, lung diffusion, arterial blood gas, methacholine challenge test and 6-minute walk test].

    PubMed

    Bokov, P; Delclaux, C

    2016-02-01

    Resting pulmonary function tests (PFT) include the assessment of ventilatory capacity: spirometry (forced expiratory flows and mobilisable volumes) and static volume assessment, notably using body plethysmography. Spirometry allows the potential definition of obstructive defect, while static volume assessment allows the potential definition of restrictive defect (decrease in total lung capacity) and thoracic hyperinflation (increase in static volumes). It must be kept in mind that this evaluation is incomplete and that an assessment of ventilatory demand is often warranted, especially when facing dyspnoea: evaluation of arterial blood gas (searching for respiratory insufficiency) and measurement of the transfer coefficient of the lung, allowing with the measurement of alveolar volume to calculate the diffusing capacity of the lung for CO (DLCO: assessment of alveolar-capillary wall and capillary blood volume). All these pulmonary function tests have been the subject of an Americano-European Task force (standardisation of lung function testing) published in 2005, and translated in French in 2007. Interpretative strategies for lung function tests have been recommended, which define abnormal lung function tests using the 5th and 95th percentiles of predicted values (lower and upper limits of normal values). Thus, these recommendations need to be implemented in all pulmonary function test units. A methacholine challenge test will only be performed in the presence of an intermediate pre-test probability for asthma (diagnostic uncertainty), which is an infrequent setting. The most convenient exertional test is the 6-minute walk test that allows the assessment of walking performance, the search for arterial desaturation and the quantification of dyspnoea complaint. PMID:26657268

  7. Coronary Artery Imaging with Transthoracic Doppler Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Masaaki; Nakazono, Akemi

    2016-07-01

    Coronary artery imaging with transthoracic Doppler echocardiography is a simple and useful technique to diagnose significant coronary artery stenosis. The visualization of mosaic flow in the proximal left coronary artery provides a direct indication of the presence of significant stenosis at the corresponding site during routine echocardiography. Coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) has a high diagnostic accuracy and feasibility in detecting the presence of functionally significant coronary stenosis in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and in the right coronary artery. The measurement of CFVR in the LAD also provides prognostic information in patients with intermediate coronary stenosis. This review summarizes the utility of transthoracic coronary artery imaging. PMID:27216843

  8. Coronary Arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... side of the heart is smaller because it pumps blood only to the lungs. The left coronary artery, ... heart is larger and more muscular because it pumps blood to the rest of the body. Updated August ...

  9. Feasibility of temporary biventricular pacing after off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with reduced left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daniel Y; Kelly, Lauren A; Richmond, Marc E; Quinn, T Alexander; Cheng, Bin; Spotnitz, Michelle D; Cabreriza, Santos E; Naka, Yoshifumi; Stewart, Allan S; Smith, Craig R; Spotnitz, Henry M

    2013-01-01

    In selected patients undergoing cardiac surgery, our research group previously showed that optimized temporary biventricular pacing can increase cardiac output one hour after weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass. Whether pacing is effective after beating-heart surgery is unknown. Accordingly, in this study we examined the feasibility of temporary biventricular pacing after off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. The effects of optimized pacing on cardiac output were measured with an electromagnetic aortic flow probe at the conclusion of surgery in 5 patients with a preoperative mean left ventricular ejection fraction of 0.26 (range, 0.15-0.35). Atrioventricular (7) and interventricular (9) delay settings were optimized in randomized order. Cardiac output with optimized biventricular pacing was 4.2 ± 0.7 L/min; in sinus rhythm, it was 3.8 ± 0.5 L/min. Atrial pacing at a matched heart rate resulted in cardiac output intermediate to that of sinus rhythm and biventricular pacing (4 ± 0.6 L/min). Optimization of atrioventricular and interventricular delay, in comparison with nominal settings, trended toward increased flow. This study shows that temporary biventricular pacing is feasible in patients with preoperative left ventricular dysfunction who are undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Further study of the possible clinical benefits of this intervention is warranted. PMID:24082369

  10. Pleural subxyphoid drain confers better pulmonary function and clinical outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease after off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Guizilini, Solange; Viceconte, Marcela; Esperança, Gabriel Tavares da M.; Bolzan, Douglas W.; Vidotto, Milena; Moreira, Rita Simone L; Câncio, Andréia Azevedo; Gomes, Walter J

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the lung function and clinical outcome in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting with left internal thoracic artery graft, comparing the pleural drain insertion in the intercostal versus subxyphoid region. Methods A randomized controlled trial. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients were randomized into two groups according pleural drain site: II group (n=27) - pleural drain in intercostal space; SI group (n=29) - pleural drain in the subxyphoid region. Spirometry values (Forced Vital Capacity - and Forced expiratory volume in 1 second) were obtained on preoperative and 1, 3 and 5 postoperative days. Chest x-ray from preoperative until postoperative day 5 (POD5) was performed for monitoring respiratory events, such as atelectasis and pleural effusion. Pulmonary shunt fraction and pain score was evaluate preoperatively and on postoperative day 1. Results In both groups there was a significant decrease of the spirometry values (Forced Vital Capacity and Forced expiratory volume in 1 second) until POD5 (P<0.05). However, when compared, SI group presented less decrease in these parameters (P<0.05). Pulmonary shunt fraction was significantly lower in SI group (P<0.05). Respiratory events, pain score, orotracheal intubation time and postoperative length of hospital stay were lower in the SI group (P<0.05). Conclusion Subxyphoid pleural drainage in severe Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients determined better preservation and recovery of pulmonary capacity and volumes with lower pulmonary shunt fraction and better clinical outcomes on early postoperative off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. PMID:25714214

  11. High-resolution CT in simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis. Lack of correlation with pulmonary function tests and arterial blood gas values.

    PubMed

    Collins, L C; Willing, S; Bretz, R; Harty, M; Lane, E; Anderson, W H

    1993-10-01

    We examined 21 miners by means of standard chest radiography, high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT), pulmonary function tests, and resting arterial blood gas levels. Using the ILO/UC classification of pneumoconiosis, 7 miners had category 1/0 or 2/1 simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP). By HRCT, nodules were identified in 12 miners; 4 of 9 were classified as category 0/0 CWP; 2 of 5, 0/1 CWP; 5 of 6, 1/0 CWP; and 1 of 1, 2/1 CWP by chest radiograph. Focal emphysema was identified by HRCT in 7 miners; 4 of 9 were classified as 0/0 CWP; 2 of 5, 0/1 CWP; and 1 of 6, 1/0 CWP by standard chest radiography. Four miners with definite nodules confirmed by HRCT had focal emphysema, while three without nodules had focal emphysema. Pulmonary function testing was not different between miners with or without CWP by standard chest radiography, nor was it different between miners with or without definite nodules evidenced by HRCT. No difference in resting oxygenation was found between any group of miners. The presence of focal emphysema confirmed by HRCT did not significantly affect pulmonary function tests on resting arterial blood gas values. There was, however, a significantly lower FEV1 and mean forced expiratory flow during the middle half of forced vital capacity with lifetime nonsmoking miners. The presence of CWP on chest radiography was significantly correlated with smoking cigarettes but not the years of mining. The presence of nodules on HRCT approached a significant correlation with cigarette smoking, but focal emphysema did not. For detecting evidence of coal dust accumulation in lung parenchyma and identifying focal emphysema, HRCT was more sensitive than standard chest radiography. However, despite earlier detection of parenchymal abnormalities, abnormal pulmonary function attributable to coal dust could not be identified. PMID:8404184

  12. High-resolution CT in simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis. Lack of correlation with pulmonary function tests and arterial blood gas values

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.C.; Willing, S.; Bretz, R.; Harty, M.; Lane, E.; Anderson, W.H. )

    1993-10-01

    We examined 21 miners by means of standard chest radiography, high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT), pulmonary function tests, and resting arterial blood gas levels. Using the ILO/UC classification of pneumoconiosis, 7 miners had category 1/0 or 2/1 simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP). By HRCT, nodules were identified in 12 miners; 4 of 9 were classified as category 0/0 CWP; 2 of 5, 0/1 CWP; 5 of 6, 1/0 CWP; and 1 of 1, 2/1 CWP by chest radiograph. Focal emphysema was identified by HRCT in 7 miners; 4 of 9 were classified as 0/0 CWP; 2 of 5, 0/1 CWP; and 1 of 6, 1/0 CWP by standard chest radiography. Four miners with definite nodules confirmed by HRCT had focal emphysema, while three without nodules had focal emphysema. Pulmonary function testing was not different between miners with or without CWP by standard chest radiography, nor was it different between miners with or without definite nodules evidenced by HRCT. No difference in resting oxygenation was found between any group of miners. The presence of focal emphysema confirmed by HRCT did not significantly affect pulmonary function tests on resting arterial blood gas values. There was, however, a significantly lower FEV1 and mean forced expiratory flow during the middle half of forced vital capacity with lifetime nonsmoking miners. The presence of CWP on chest radiography was significantly correlated with smoking cigarettes but not the years of mining. The presence of nodules on HRCT approached a significant correlation with cigarette smoking, but focal emphysema did not. For detecting evidence of coal dust accumulation in lung parenchyma and identifying focal emphysema, HRCT was more sensitive than standard chest radiography. However, despite earlier detection of parenchymal abnormalities, abnormal pulmonary function attributable to coal dust could not be identified.

  13. Using ultrasound radio frequency technology to assess regression of the structure and function of the carotid artery by radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism patients

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to investigate the structure and function of the carotid artery in patients with hyperthyroidism by ultrasound radio frequency data technology (RF data) and the effect of 131I on them. Material and methods Seventy patients with primary hyperthyroidism and 74 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. Structural and functional parameters of the common carotid artery were measured in every patient before and after 131I treatment through the RF data, such as intima media thickness (IMT), functional compliance coefficient (CC), stiffness index (β), and pulse wave velocity (PWV). We also analyzed the correlation between these parameters and patients’ age, body mass index, hemodynamic parameters (blood pressure, heart rate), thyroid hormone levels and other risk factors. Results There was a significant difference in IMT between hyperthyroid patients and the control group at baseline (483.6 vs. 443.3 µm, p < 0.01); after treatment, the IMT decreased significantly (428.7 vs. 483.6 µm, p < 0.001). Furthermore, the IMT was correlated with patients’ age and systolic blood pressure (r = 0.525, p < 0.01 and r = 0.289, p < 0.05, respectively). The β and PWV were also higher than the control group (7.26 vs.5.87, 6.27 vs. 5.57 m/s, respectively; all p < 0.001); CC was lower than the control group (0.98 vs. 1.19 mm2/KPa, p < 0.01); after treatment, PWV and β were lower than baseline (5.66 vs. 6.27, 5.81 vs. 7.26 m/s, respectively; all p < 0.01), and CC was higher than baseline. In addition, they were significantly correlated with age (r = 0.525, p < 0.01 and r = 0.289, p < 0.05, respectively). However, these parameters were not correlated with the level of thyroid hormones. Conclusions Six-month 131I treatment for patients with hyperthyroidism reverses the structural and functional damage in the carotid artery, which is sensitively evaluated by the RF data technique. PMID:26788085

  14. Arterial Tortuosity Syndrome reveals function of dehydroascorbic acid in collagen and elastin synthesis: Implications for skin care.

    PubMed

    Kitt, Douglas Q

    2016-02-01

    Some investigations in Arterial Tortuosity Syndrome (ATS) suggest that impaired intracellular transport of the oxidized form of vitamin C (dehydroascorbic acid, DHAA) is at the core of the pathogenesis. Lack of vitamin C for lysyl- and prolyl-hydroxylase activity may explain the defects in collagen and elastin formation found in ATS, and draws strong parallels between ATS and scurvy. Topically applied vitamin C has a well-established basis in the field of skin care, and part of its benefit is attributed to proper collagen formation in the skin. The ATS studies suggest that DHAA transport is necessary for normal skin collagen formation, and this has implications as to the forms of vitamin C best-suited for topical skin care. PMID:26826631

  15. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  16. Impaired Renal Function Further Increases Odds of 6-Year Coronary Artery Calcification Progression in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Maahs, David M.; Jalal, Diana; Chonchol, Michel; Johnson, Richard J.; Rewers, Marian; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) independently predict coronary artery calcification (CAC) progression, and to determine how eGFR changes over 6 years in adults with type 1 diabetes compared with nondiabetic adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study participants (n = 1,066) with complete data for eGFR assessment at baseline and 6 years were included. Three Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equations (serum creatinine, cystatin C, and both) were used to estimate eGFR. The association of baseline ACR and eGFR with CAC progression was analyzed using multiple logistic regression. RESULTS Increasing categorical baseline ACR (<10, 10–30, and >30 µg/mg) predicted CAC progression in participants with type 1 diabetes (odds ratio [OR], 2.15; 95% CI, 1.50–3.09; 7.19 [3.90–13.26]; and 18.09 [8.48–38.62]), respectively, compared with nondiabetic subjects. Baseline eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 also predicted CAC progression (OR, 5–7, compared with nondiabetic participants). ORs for CAC progression were higher in women than in men when using the cystatin C–based Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equations. Participants with type 1 diabetes had greater eGFR decreases over 6 years than nondiabetic participants using cystatin C–based equations. CONCLUSIONS Although increasing ACR or decreasing eGFR predicts CAC progression, coronary atherosclerosis progresses faster in people with type 1 diabetes even in the absence of diabetic kidney disease. These findings emphasize the interaction between kidney disease and cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes and highlight the public health importance of lowering cardiorenal risk in people with type 1 diabetes. PMID:23835686

  17. Verification of a semi-automated MRI-guided technique for non-invasive determination of the arterial input function in 15O-labeled gaseous PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iguchi, Satoshi; Hori, Yuki; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Morita, Naomi; Yamamoto, Akihide; Koshino, Kazuhiro; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Enmi, Jun-ichiro; Iida, Hidehiro

    2013-02-01

    A semi-automated MR-guided technique has been evaluated for non-invasive estimation of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) using the sequential administration of 15O oxygen (O2) and 15O carbon dioxide (CO2) during a single PET scan. Two mathematical models, which assess the arterial input function (AIF) from time-activity curves (TAC) in the internal carotid artery region, were tested, namely one with a simple correction for the recovery coefficient (RC) and another with corrections for RC and spillover from surrounding tissues. RC was determined from MRA and black-blood image. RC was also determined from C15O blood volume images as a reference. RC agreed between MR-based and C15O-PET based methods, suggesting validity of MR-based methods. Area-under-the-curve (AUC) of the early portion of estimated AIF agreed with that of measured AIF in both models. AUC of the delayed phase of estimated AIF was largely overestimated in the first model, but was sufficiently improved by the spillover correction implemented in the second model.

  18. Image-derived and arterial blood sampled input functions for quantitative PET imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Tao; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Li, Xin; Vranesic, Melin; Lodge, Martin A.; Gulaldi, Nedim C. M.; Szabo, Zsolt

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The radioligand {sup 11}C-KR31173 has been introduced for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney in vivo. To study the biokinetics of {sup 11}C-KR31173 with a compartmental model, the input function is needed. Collection and analysis of arterial blood samples are the established approach to obtain the input function but they are not feasible in patients with renal diseases. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative technique that can provide an accurate image-derived input function (ID-IF) to replace the conventional invasive arterial sampling and test the method in pigs with the goal of translation into human studies. Methods: The experimental animals were injected with [{sup 11}C]KR31173 and scanned up to 90 min with dynamic PET. Arterial blood samples were collected for the artery derived input function (AD-IF) and used as a gold standard for ID-IF. Before PET, magnetic resonance angiography of the kidneys was obtained to provide the anatomical information required for derivation of the recovery coefficients in the abdominal aorta, a requirement for partial volume correction of the ID-IF. Different image reconstruction methods, filtered back projection (FBP) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM), were investigated for the best trade-off between bias and variance of the ID-IF. The effects of kidney uptakes on the quantitative accuracy of ID-IF were also studied. Biological variables such as red blood cell binding and radioligand metabolism were also taken into consideration. A single blood sample was used for calibration in the later phase of the input function. Results: In the first 2 min after injection, the OS-EM based ID-IF was found to be biased, and the bias was found to be induced by the kidney uptake. No such bias was found with the FBP based image reconstruction method. However, the OS-EM based image reconstruction was found to reduce variance in the subsequent

  19. Effect of imatinib as add-on therapy on echocardiographic measures of right ventricular function in patients with significant pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amil M.; Campbell, Patricia; Rocha, Gabriela Querejeta; Peacock, Andrew; Barst, Robyn J.; Quinn, Debbie; Solomon, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Imatinib mesylate, as add-on therapy in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) who remain inadequately treated despite receiving at least two PAH-specific drugs, improves exercise capacity and haemodynamics. We evaluated whether 24 weeks of add-on therapy with imatinib compared with placebo also improves right ventricular (RV) function assessed by echocardiography. Methods and results Echocardiograms were obtained at baseline, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks in 74 patients randomized to imatinib or placebo in the Imatinib in Pulmonary arterial hypertension, a Randomized Efficacy Study (IMPRES) trial. Right ventricular function was assessed by tissue Doppler tricuspid annular peak systolic velocity (TA S′), tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), RV Tei index, and RV fractional area change. Between-treatment-group differences in the changes from baseline to week-24 were assessed using an ANCOVA with the last observation carried forward. At week-24 patients randomized to imatinib demonstrated greater improvements in TA S′ (1.6 ± 2.3 imatinib vs. 0.5 ± 2.4 cm/s placebo, P = 0.007) and RV Tei index (−0.11 ± 0.18 imatinib vs. 0.05 ± 0.18 placebo, P = 0.005) compared with placebo, but not in TAPSE (0.07 ± 0.44 imatinib vs. 0.03 ± 0.32 cm placebo, P = 0.08). Imatinib therapy was also associated with significant reduction in peak tricuspid regurgitation velocity, increase in LV size, and improvement in LV early diastolic relaxation velocity. Conclusions Among patients with advanced PAH who remain symptomatic on at least two PAH-specific drugs, treatment with imatinib compared with placebo is associated with significant improvements in echocardiographic measures of RV function, in addition to LV size and LV early diastolic relaxation. Clinical trial registration NCT00902174 (Clinicaltrials.gov). PMID:24566799

  20. Effects of estrogen on cerebrovascular function: age-dependent shifts from beneficial to detrimental in small cerebral arteries of the rat.

    PubMed

    Deer, Rachel R; Stallone, John N

    2016-05-15

    In the present study, interactions of age and estrogen in the modulation of cerebrovascular function were examined in small arteries <150 μM. The hypothesis tested was that age enhances deleterious effects of exogenous estrogen by augmenting constrictor prostanoid (CP)-potentiated reactivity of the female (F) cerebrovasculature. F Sprague-Dawley rats approximating key stages of "hormonal aging" in humans were studied: perimenopausal (mature multi-gravid, MA, cyclic, 5-6 mo of age) and postmenopausal (reproductively senescent, RS, acyclic 10-12 mo of age). Rats underwent bilateral ovariectomy and were given estrogen replacement therapy (E) or placebo (O) for 14-21 days. Vasopressin reactivity (VP, 10(-12)-10(-7) M) was measured in pressurized middle cerebral artery segments, alone or in the presence of COX-1- (SC560, 1 μM) or COX-2- (NS398, 10 μM) selective inhibitors. VP-stimulated release of prostacyclin (PGI2) and thromboxane (TXA2) were assessed by radioimmunoassay of 6-keto-PGF1α and TXB2 (stable metabolites). VP-induced vasoconstriction was attenuated in ovariectomized + estrogen-replaced, multigravid adult rats (5-6 mo; MAE) but potentiated in older ovariectomized + estrogen-replaced, reproductively senescent rats (12-14 mo; RSE). SC560 and NS398 reduced reactivity similarly in ovariectomized multigravid adult rats (5-6 mo; MAO) and ovariectomized reproductively senescent rat (12-14 mo; RSO). In MAE, reactivity to VP was reduced to a greater extent by SC560 than by NS398; however, in RSE, this effect was reversed. VP-stimulated PGI2 was increased by estrogen, yet reduced by age. VP-stimulated TXA2 was increased by estrogen and age in RSE but did not differ in MAO and RSO. Taken together, these data reveal that the vascular effects of estrogen are distinctly age-dependent in F rats. In younger MA, beneficial and protective effects of estrogen are evident (decreased vasoconstriction, increased dilator prostanoid function). Conversely, in older RS

  1. Free tissue transfer in patients with severe peripheral arterial disease: functional outcome in reconstruction of chronic lower extremity defects.

    PubMed

    Kolbenschlag, Jonas; Hellmich, Susanne; Germann, Günter; Megerle, Kai

    2013-11-01

    Chronic wounds of the lower extremity are difficult to treat, especially in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). This patient population frequently suffers from multiple comorbidities, which further impairs wound healing. Local flaps are often not available, or are insufficient to cover these defects, and limbs are frequently amputated, although they could possibly be salvaged by free tissue transplantation. Although there is a growing evidence that free tissue transfer may be feasible in these patients with otherwise doomed extremities, previous studies have mostly focused on short-term flap survival, but not long-term ambulatory status and independence. Therefore, we investigated the long-term results of limb salvage, ambulatory status, and social independence in patients with PAD who underwent free tissue transfer for chronic wounds of the lower extremities.In this study we retrospectively reviewed 38 patients who underwent free tissue transfer because of nontraumatic, chronic wounds of the lower extremities at our institution. All patients suffered from a nontraumatic occlusion of at least one major lower leg artery verified by angiography. After a mean time period of 34 months we assessed flap survival and limb preservation as well as pre- and postoperative ambulatory status and social independence. A subgroup of 14 patients with a "single-vessel-leg" was evaluated separately.It was observed that anterolateral thigh and latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flaps were most often used to cover the defects. Overall 29 out of the 38 flaps healed completely (9 flap failures) and 34 extremities were salvaged, including 12 out of 14 single-vessel-legs. One patient had to be amputated despite a vital free flap because of persistent calcaneal osteomyelitis. After failure of free tissue transfer, six extremities could still be salvaged by secondary procedures (two secondary free flaps, two local flaps, and two skin grafts). Total 22 out of 34 patients with

  2. The control of the circulation in skeletal muscle during arterial hypoxia in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, J. P.; Korner, P. I.; White, S. W.

    1966-01-01

    1. The effects of arterial hypoxia on muscle blood flow were examined in normal unanaesthetized rabbits in relation to simultaneously determined changes in cardiac output, arterial pressure and heart rate. Muscle blood flow was estimated from the difference between total limb flow (local thermodilution) and the estimated skin flow (using a calibrated heat conductivity method). The role of the arterial chemoreceptors and baro-receptors in the control of muscle blood flow was examined and the nature of the sympathetic efferent discharge analysed. 2. In mild hypoxia (PO2 > 35 mm Hg) in the rabbit, muscle blood flow did not change, although cardiac output increased. During moderate hypoxia (PO2 30-35 mm Hg) there was initial vasoconstriction in muscle, followed by a return to control values paralleling the changes in cardiac output. In severe arterial hypoxia (PO2 < 30 mm Hg) the initial vasoconstriction was less marked, and during the `steady state' there was a large vasodilatation and increase in muscle blood flow, at a time when the cardiac output was not elevated. 3. The early vasoconstriction in arterial hypoxia is mediated mainly through sympathetic vasoconstrictor nerves as a result of strong arterial chemoreceptor stimulation. 4. Increased secretion of adrenaline is an important factor in restoring muscle blood flow to control values during moderate arterial hypoxia, and in elevating the muscle blood flow above these values in severe hypoxia. The peripheral dilator (β-) effects of adrenaline oppose the peripheral constrictor (α-) effects resulting from increased activation of sympathetic constrictor nerves during arterial hypoxia. PMID:5963740

  3. Step‐Monitored Home Exercise Improves Ambulation, Vascular Function, and Inflammation in Symptomatic Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andrew W.; Parker, Donald E.; Montgomery, Polly S.; Blevins, Steve M.

    2014-01-01

    Background This prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial compared changes in primary outcome measures of claudication onset time (COT) and peak walking time (PWT), and secondary outcomes of submaximal exercise performance, daily ambulatory activity, vascular function, inflammation, and calf muscle hemoglobin oxygen saturation (StO2) in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) following new exercise training using a step watch (NEXT Step) home‐exercise program, a supervised exercise program, and an attention‐control group. Methods and Results One hundred eighty patients were randomized. The NEXT Step program and the supervised exercise program consisted of intermittent walking to mild‐to‐moderate claudication pain for 12 weeks, whereas the controls performed light resistance training. Change scores for COT (P<0.001), PWT (P<0.001), 6‐minute walk distance (P=0.028), daily average cadence (P=0.011), time to minimum calf muscle StO2 during exercise (P=0.025), large‐artery elasticity index (LAEI) (P=0.012), and high‐sensitivity C‐reactive protein (hsCRP) (P=0.041) were significantly different among the 3 groups. Both the NEXT Step home program and the supervised exercise program demonstrated a significant increase from baseline in COT, PWT, 6‐minute walk distance, daily average cadence, and time to minimum calf StO2. Only the NEXT Step home group had improvements from baseline in LAEI, and hsCRP (P<0.05). Conclusions NEXT Step home exercise utilizing minimal staff supervision has low attrition, high adherence, and is efficacious in improving COT and PWT, as well as secondary outcomes of submaximal exercise performance, daily ambulatory activity, vascular function, inflammation, and calf muscle StO2 in symptomatic patients with PAD. Clinical Trial Registration URL: ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique Identifier: NCT00618670. PMID:25237048

  4. A novel effective method for the assessment of microvascular function in male patients with coronary artery disease: a pilot study using laser speckle contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Borges, J P; Lopes, G O; Verri, V; Coelho, M P; Nascimento, P M C; Kopiler, D A; Tibirica, E

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of microvascular endothelial function is essential for investigating the pathophysiology and treatment of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although laser speckle contrast imaging technology is well accepted as a noninvasive methodology for assessing microvascular endothelial function, it has never been used to compare male patients with coronary artery disease with male age-matched healthy controls. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether laser speckle contrast imaging could be used to detect differences in the systemic microvascular functions of patients with established cardiovascular disease (n=61) and healthy age-matched subjects (n=24). Cutaneous blood flow was assessed in the skin of the forearm using laser speckle contrast imaging coupled with the transdermal iontophoretic delivery of acetylcholine and post-occlusive reactive hyperemia. The maximum increase in skin blood flow induced by acetylcholine was significantly reduced in the cardiovascular disease patients compared with the control subjects (74 vs 116%; P<0.01). With regard to post-occlusive reactive hyperemia-induced vasodilation, the patients also presented reduced responses compared to the controls (0.42±0.15 vs 0.50±0.13 APU/mmHg; P=0.04). In conclusion, laser speckle contrast imaging can identify endothelial and microvascular dysfunctions in male individuals with cardiovascular disease. Thus, this technology appears to be an efficient non-invasive technique for evaluating systemic microvascular and endothelial functions, which could be valuable as a peripheral marker of atherothrombotic diseases in men. PMID:27599202

  5. Effects of bosentan on peripheral endothelial function in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Shiro; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Kamimura, Yoshihiro; Shimokata, Shigetake; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Murohara, Toyoaki; Kondo, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) have been shown to improve the prognosis of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the effect of the oral dual ERA bosentan on peripheral endothelial dysfunction (PED), as assessed by flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD), in patients with pulmonary hypertension is not well characterized. We investigated the effect of bosentan on PED in patients with PAH or inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). A total of 18 patients with PAH and 8 with CTEPH were treated with bosentan. All patients underwent FMD assessment before and after 3 months of bosentan treatment. Whereas FMD increased from 6.01% ± 2.42% at baseline to 8.07% ± 3.18% after 3 months (P < 0.0001) in patients with PAH, those with CTEPH showed no change in FMD after bosentan therapy. In addition, FMD at baseline showed no correlation with pulmonary vascular resistance (r = 0.09) or plasma brain natriuretic peptide levels (r = −0.23) in patients with PAH. Bosentan treatment ameliorated PED in patients with PAH but not in those with inoperable CTEPH. In addition, FMD did not correlate with PAH severity. PMID:27252842

  6. [Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sauguet, A; Honton, B

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis can cause ischaemic nephropathy and arterial hypertension. Renal artery stenosis (RAS) continues to be a problem for clinicians, with no clear consensus on how to investigate and assess the clinical significance of stenotic lesions and manage the findings. RAS caused by fibromuscular dysplasia is probably commoner than previously appreciated, should be actively looked for in younger hypertensive patients and can be managed successfully with angioplasty. Atheromatous RAS is associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular events and increased cardiovascular mortality, and is likely to be seen with increasing frequency. Many patients with RAS may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the cardiovascular outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of RAS for cardiologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials. There is now interest in looking more closely at patient selection for intervention, with focus on intervening only in patients with the highest-risk presentations such as flash pulmonary edema, rapidly declining renal function and severe resistant hypertension. PMID:25450992

  7. Epigenetics and Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Jonathan; Biros, Erik; Bingley, John; Iyer, Vikram; Krishna, Smriti M

    2016-04-01

    The term epigenetics is usually used to describe inheritable changes in gene function which do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. These typically include non-coding RNAs, DNA methylation and histone modifications. Smoking and older age are recognised risk factors for peripheral artery diseases, such as occlusive lower limb artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm, and have been implicated in promoting epigenetic changes. This brief review describes studies that have associated epigenetic factors with peripheral artery diseases and investigations which have examined the effect of epigenetic modifications on the outcome of peripheral artery diseases in mouse models. Investigations have largely focused on microRNAs and have identified a number of circulating microRNAs associated with human peripheral artery diseases. Upregulating or antagonising a number of microRNAs has also been reported to limit aortic aneurysm development and hind limb ischemia in mouse models. The importance of DNA methylation and histone modifications in peripheral artery disease has been relatively little studied. Whether circulating microRNAs can be used to assist identification of patients with peripheral artery diseases and be modified in order to improve the outcome of peripheral artery disease will require further investigation. PMID:26888065

  8. Serum N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels Are Associated With Functional Capacity in Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jin; Jouni, Hayan; Khaleghi, Mahyar; Bailey, Kent R.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that higher serum levels of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) are associated with lower functional capacity in patients with peripheral arterial disease ([PAD] n = 481, mean age 67, 68% men). Functional capacity was quantified as distance walked on a treadmill for 5 minutes. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the distance walked: >144 yards (group I, n = 254); 60 to 144 yards (group 2, n = 80); <60 yards or did not walk (group 3, n = 147). The association between NT-pro-BNP levels and the ordinal 3-level walking distance was assessed using multivariable ordinal logistic regression analyses that adjusted for several possible confounding variables. Higher levels of NT-pro-BNP were associated with a lower ordinal walking category independent of possible confounders (odds ratio [OR] 1.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28-1.77; P < .001). In conclusion, higher levels of NT-pro-BNP are independently associated with lower functional capacity in patients with PAD and may be a marker of hemodynamic stress in these patients. PMID:22096207

  9. Functional Outcomes of Decompressive Craniectomy in Patients with Malignant Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction and Their Association with Preoperative Thalamus Deformation: An Analysis of 12 Patients.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Takuya; Hayashi, Takeshi; Ohira, Masayuki; Kato, Yuji; Deguchi, Ichiro; Maruyama, Hajime; Abe, Tetsuya; Sano, Hiroyasu; Mizuno, Satoko; Nagamine, Yuito; Kurita, Hiroki; Takao, Masaki; Tanahashi, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Objective Decompressive craniectomy (DC) in patients with malignant middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction is known to decrease the mortality rate. However, the functional outcomes (communication and oral intake) of this procedure remain unclear. Most patients with malignant MCA infarction exhibit a loss of consciousness, which may be principally governed by the thalamus. We herein investigated the functional outcomes of DC at 90 days after the onset of malignant MCA infarction and their association with preoperative thalamus deformation, which can occur due to pressure and edema. Methods Twelve of 2,692 patients with acute cerebral infarction were diagnosed with malignant MCA infarction and underwent DC. We evaluated preoperative thalamus damage using brain computed tomography and its association with communication and oral intake abilities and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and Barthel index scores at 90 days after stroke onset. Results The mRS score at 90 days was 0-4 in five patients. Seven patients could communicate immediately after surgery, while five could do so by 90 days. Five patients were able to resume the oral intake of food at 90 days. All patients with preoperative thalamus deformation showed a poor recovery, while those with absent or slight preoperative thalamus deformation showed a good recovery. Conclusion Patients with preoperative thalamus deformation caused by pressure and edema show a poor oral intake and communication abilities after DC, suggesting that preoperative thalamus deformation is a predictor of poor functional outcomes after DC in patients with malignant MCA infarction. PMID:27477404

  10. Comprehensive Population-Averaged Arterial Input Function for Dynamic Contrast–Enhanced vMagnetic Resonance Imaging of Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Onxley, Jennifer D.; Yoo, David S.; Muradyan, Naira; MacFall, James R.; Brizel, David M.; Craciunescu, Oana I.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To generate a population-averaged arterial input function (PA-AIF) for quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data in head and neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI during concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Imaging consisted of 2 baseline scans 1 week apart (B1/B2) and 1 scan after 1 week of chemoradiation therapy (Wk1). Regions of interest (ROIs) in the right and left carotid arteries were drawn on coronal images. Plasma concentration curves of all ROIs were averaged and fit to a biexponential decay function to obtain the final PA-AIF (AvgAll). Right-sided and left-sided ROI plasma concentration curves were averaged separately to obtain side-specific AIFs (AvgRight/AvgLeft). Regions of interest were divided by time point to obtain time-point-specific AIFs (AvgB1/AvgB2/AvgWk1). The vascular transfer constant (K{sub trans}) and the fractional extravascular, extracellular space volume (V{sub e}) for primaries and nodes were calculated using the AvgAll AIF, the appropriate side-specific AIF, and the appropriate time-point-specific AIF. Median K{sub trans} and V{sub e} values derived from AvgAll were compared with those obtained from the side-specific and time-point-specific AIFs. The effect of using individual AIFs was also investigated. Results: The plasma parameters for AvgAll were a{sub 1,2} = 27.11/17.65 kg/L, m{sub 1,2} = 11.75/0.21 min{sup −1}. The coefficients of repeatability (CRs) for AvgAll versus AvgLeft were 0.04 min{sup −1} for K{sub trans} and 0.02 for V{sub e}. For AvgAll versus AvgRight, the CRs were 0.08 min{sup −1} for K{sub trans} and 0.02 for V{sub e}. When AvgAll was compared with AvgB1/AvgB2/AvgWk1, the CRs were slightly higher: 0.32/0.19/0.78 min{sup −1}, respectively, for K{sub trans}; and 0.07/0.08/0.09 for V{sub e}. Use of a PA-AIF was not significantly different from use of individual AIFs. Conclusion: A PA-AIF for head and neck cancer

  11. Exploring Heart and Lung Function in Space: ARMS Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuipers, Andre; Cork, Michael; LeGouic, Marine

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Respiratory Monitoring System (ARMS) is a suite of monitoring instruments and supplies used to study the heart, lungs, and metabolism. Many experiments sponsored by the European Space Agency (ESA) will be conducted using ARMS during STS-107. The near-weightless environment of space causes the body to undergo many physiological adaptations, and the regulation of blood pressure is no exception. Astronauts also experience a decrease in blood volume as an adaptation to microgravity. Reduced blood volume may not provide enough blood pressure to the head during entry or landing. As a result, astronauts often experience light-headedness, and sometimes even fainting, when they stand shortly after returning to Earth. To help regulate blood pressure and heart rate, baroreceptors, sensors located in artery walls in the neck and near the heart, control blood pressure by sending information to the brain and ensuring blood flow to organs. These mechanisms work properly in Earth's gravity but must adapt in the microgravity environment of space. However, upon return to Earth during entry and landing, the cardiovascular system must readjust itself to gravity, which can cause fluctuation in the control of blood pressure and heart rate. Although the system recovers in hours or days, these occurrences are not easily predicted or understood - a puzzle investigators will study with the ARMS equipment. In space, researchers can focus on aspects of the cardiovascular system normally masked by gravity. The STS-107 experiments using ARMS will provide data on how the heart and lungs function in space, as well as how the nervous system controls them. Exercise will also be combined with breath holding and straining (the Valsalva maneuver) to test how heart rate and blood pressure react to different stresses. This understanding will improve astronauts' cardiopulmonary function after return to Earth, and may well help Earthbound patients who experience similar effects after long

  12. Influence of Vascular Variant of the Posterior Cerebral Artery (PCA) on Cerebral Blood Flow, Vascular Response to CO2 and Static Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Emmert, Kirsten; Zöller, Daniela; Preti, Maria Giulia; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon; Haller, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The fetal origin of the posterior cerebral artery (fPCA) is a frequent vascular variant in 11–29% of the population. For the fPCA, blood flow in the PCA originates from the anterior instead of the posterior circulation. We tested whether this blood supply variant impacts the cerebral blood flow assessed by arterial spin labeling (ASL), cerebrovascular reserve as well as resting-state static functional connectivity (sFC) in the sense of a systematic confound. Methods The study included 385 healthy, elderly subjects (mean age: 74.18 years [range: 68.9–90.4]; 243 female). Participants were classified into normal vascular supply (n = 296, 76.88%), right fetal origin (n = 23, 5.97%), left fetal origin (n = 16, 4.16%), bilateral fetal origin (n = 4, 1.04%), and intermediate (n = 46, 11.95%, excluded from further analysis) groups. ASL-derived relative cerebral blood flow (relCBF) maps and cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) maps derived from a CO2 challenge with blocks of 7% CO2 were compared. Additionally, sFC between 90 regions of interest (ROIs) was compared between the groups. Results CVR was significantly reduced in subjects with ipsilateral fPCA, most prominently in the temporal lobe. ASL yielded a non-significant trend towards reduced relCBF in bilateral posterior watershed areas. In contrast, conventional atlas-based sFC did not differ between groups. Conclusions In conclusion, fPCA presence may bias the assessment of cerebrovascular reserve by reducing the response to CO2. In contrast, its effect on ASL-assessed baseline perfusion was marginal. Moreover, fPCA presence did not systematically impact resting-state sFC. Taken together, this data implies that perfusion variables should take into account the vascularization patterns. PMID:27532633

  13. Quantitative pharmacokinetic analysis of prostate cancer DCE-MRI at 3T: comparison of two arterial input functions on cancer detection with digitized whole mount histopathological validation.

    PubMed

    Fennessy, Fiona M; Fedorov, Andriy; Penzkofer, Tobias; Kim, Kyung Won; Hirsch, Michelle S; Vangel, Mark G; Masry, Paul; Flood, Trevor A; Chang, Ming-Ching; Tempany, Clare M; Mulkern, Robert V; Gupta, Sandeep N

    2015-09-01

    Accurate pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) in prostate cancer (PCa) requires knowledge of the concentration time course of the contrast agent in the feeding vasculature, the so-called arterial input function (AIF). The purpose of this study was to compare AIF choice in differentiating peripheral zone PCa from non-neoplastic prostatic tissue (NNPT), using PK analysis of high temporal resolution prostate DCE-MRI data and whole-mount pathology (WMP) validation. This prospective study was performed in 30 patients who underwent multiparametric endorectal prostate MRI at 3.0T and WMP validation. PCa foci were annotated on WMP slides and MR images using 3D Slicer. Foci ≥0.5cm(3) were contoured as tumor regions of interest (TROIs) on subtraction DCE (early-arterial - pre-contrast) images. PK analyses of TROI and NNPT data were performed using automatic AIF (aAIF) and model AIF (mAIF) methods. A paired t-test compared mean and 90th percentile (p90) PK parameters obtained with the two AIF approaches. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis determined diagnostic accuracy (DA) of PK parameters. Logistic regression determined correlation between PK parameters and histopathology. Mean TROI and NNPT PK parameters were higher using aAIF vs. mAIF (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in DA between AIF methods: highest for p90 volume transfer constant (K(trans)) (aAIF differences in the area under the ROC curve (Az) = 0.827; mAIF Az=0.93). Tumor cell density correlated with aAIF K(trans) (p=0.03). Our results indicate that DCE-MRI using both AIF methods is excellent in discriminating PCa from NNPT. If quantitative DCE-MRI is to be used as a biomarker in PCa, the same AIF method should be used consistently throughout the study. PMID:25683515

  14. Anthocyanin Bioavailability from Acute Cranberry Juice Consumption and Evidence of Effects on Endothelial Function in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidemiologic studies suggest an inverse correlation between intake of flavonoidcontaining foods and cardiovascular risk. Multiple health beneficial effect of flavonoids have been proposed to account for this observation, including effects on endothelial function. Cranberries contain relatively high...

  15. Right and Left Ventricular Myocardial Perfusion Reserves Correlate with Right Ventricular Function and Pulmonary Hemodynamics in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension1

    PubMed Central

    Skrok, Jan; Shehata, Monda L.; Singh, Sukhminder; Sibley, Christopher T.; Boyce, Danielle M.; Lechtzin, Noah; Girgis, Reda E.; Mathai, Steven C.; Goldstein, Thomas A.; Zheng, Jie; Lima, João A. C.; Bluemke, David A.; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationships of right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) myocardial perfusion reserves with ventricular function and pulmonary hemodynamics in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by using adenosine stress perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods: This HIPAA-compliant study was institutional review board approved. Twenty-five patients known or suspected to have PAH underwent right heart catheterization and adenosine stress MR imaging on the same day. Sixteen matched healthy control subjects underwent cardiac MR imaging only. RV and LV perfusion values at rest and at adenosine-induced stress were calculated by using the Fermi function model. The MR imaging–derived RV and LV functional data were calculated by using dedicated software. Statistical testing included Kruskal-Wallis tests for continuous data, Spearman rank correlation tests, and multiple linear regression analyses. Results: Seventeen of the 25 patients had PAH: 11 with scleroderma-associated PAH, and six with idiopathic PAH. The remaining eight patients had scleroderma without PAH. The myocardial perfusion reserve indexes (MPRIs) in the PAH group (median RV MPRI, 1.7 [25th–75th percentile range, 1.3–2.0]; median LV MPRI, 1.8 [25th–75th percentile range, 1.6–2.1]) were significantly lower than those in the scleroderma non-PAH (median RV MPRI, 2.5 [25th–75th percentile range, 1.8–3.9] [P = .03]; median LV MPRI, 4.1 [25th–75th percentile range, 2.6–4.8] [P = .0003]) and control (median RV MPRI, 2.9 [25th–75th percentile range, 2.6–3.6] [P < .01]; median LV MPRI, 3.6 [25th–75th percentile range, 2.7–4.1] [P < .01]) groups. There were significant correlations between biventricular MPRI and both mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) (RV MPRI: ρ = −0.59, Bonferroni P = .036; LV MPRI: ρ = −0.79, Bonferroni P < .002) and RV stroke work index (RV MPRI: ρ = −0.63, Bonferroni P = .01; LV MPRI: ρ =

  16. Brachial artery pseudoaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Katie; Radwan, Rami; Shingler, Guy; Davies, Chris

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of an elderly man who presented with an upper arm swelling that had developed following a humeral fracture 8 months previously. The swelling was painless but associated with significantly diminished motor function of his right hand and concurrent paraesthaesia. On examination, a large pulsatile mass was identified and CT angiography confirmed the presence of an 11×7 cm brachial artery pseudoaneurysm. The patient underwent surgical repair in which a fragment of the humerus was found to have punctured the brachial artery resulting in a pseudoaneurysm. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative period and was discharged 2 days later having regained some motor function in his right hand. PMID:24859555

  17. Ankle-brachial index and inter-artery blood pressure differences as predictors of cognitive function in overweight and obese older adults with diabetes: Results from the Action for Health in Diabetes Movement and Memory Study

    PubMed Central

    Espeland, Mark A; Beavers, Kristen M; Gibbs, Bethany Barone; Johnson, Karen C; Hughes, Timothy M; Baker, Laura D; Jakicic, John; Korytkowski, Mary; Miller, Marsha; Bray, George A

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ankle-brachial index (ABI) and inter-artery systolic blood pressure differences, as markers of vascular disease, are plausible risk factors for deficits in cognitive function among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods ABI and maximum inter-artery differences (MIAD) in systolic blood pressures were assessed annually for five years among 479 participants assigned to the control condition in a randomized clinical trial of a behavioral weight loss intervention. A battery of standardized cognitive function tests was administered four to five years later. Analyses of covariance were used to assess relationships that ABI, MIAD, and progression of ABI and MIAD had with cognitive function. Results There was a curvilinear relationship between ABI and a composite index of cognitive function (p=0.03), with lower ABI being associated with poorer function. In graded fashions, both greater MIAD and increases in MIAD over time also had modest relationships with poorer verbal memory (both p≤0.05), processing speed (both p≤0.05), and composite cognitive function (both p≤0.04). These relationships were independent of each other and remained evident after extensive covariate adjustment. Conclusions In overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes, lower ABI and larger inter-artery systolic blood pressure differences have modest, independent, graded relationships with poorer cognitive function 4–5 year later. PMID:25546032

  18. Effects of verapamil and propranolol on left ventricular systolic function and diastolic filling in patients with coronary artery disease: radionuclide angiographic studies at rest and during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Bonow, R.O.; Leon, M.B.; Rosing, D.R.; Kent, K.M.; Lipson, L.C.; Bacharach, S.L.; Green, M.V.; Epstein, S.E.

    1982-06-01

    To determine the effects of verapamil on left ventricular (LV) systolic function and diastolic filling in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), researchers performed gated radionuclide angiography at rest and during exercise in 16 symptomatic patients before and during oral verapamil therapy (480 mg/day). Twelve patients were also studied during oral propranolol. LV ejection fraction at rest was normal in 13 patients, but abnormal diastolic filling at rest, defined as peak filling rate (PFR) less than 2.5 end-diastolic volumes (EDV)/sec or time to PFR greater than 180 msec, was present in 15. During verapamil, resting ejection fraction decreased, but resting diastolic filling improved: PFR increased and time to PFR decreased. Exercise ejection fraction did not change during verapamil, but exercise PFR increased, and exercise time to PFR decreased. In contrast, propranolol did not alter ejection fraction, PFR, or time to PFR at rest or during exercise. Thus, LV ejection fraction is decreased by verapamil at rest but is unchanged during exercise. While LV systolic function is not improved by verapamil, LV diastolic filling is enhanced by verapamil, both at rest and during exercise. These mechanisms may account in part for the symptomatic improvement in many patients during verapamil therapy.

  19. Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klooster, N J; Kitslaar, P; Janevski, B K

    1988-06-01

    Two patients with unilateral popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) are reported. The importance of diligence in angiographic diagnosis and recognition of the so-called "functional" PAES group as a separate entity are stressed. It is inferred from our material that a surgical approach for PAES is to be advocated since surgical release of the entrapment can lead to complete resolution of symptoms regardless of aetiology. PMID:2837797

  20. The Effects of Acutely Administered 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine on Spontaneous Brain Function in Healthy Volunteers Measured with Arterial Spin Labeling and Blood Oxygen Level–Dependent Resting State Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Carhart-Harris, Robin L.; Murphy, Kevin; Leech, Robert; Erritzoe, David; Wall, Matthew B.; Ferguson, Bart; Williams, Luke T.J.; Roseman, Leor; Brugger, Stefan; De Meer, Ineke; Tanner, Mark; Tyacke, Robin; Wolff, Kim; Sethi, Ajun; Bloomfield, Michael A.P.; Williams, Tim M.; Bolstridge, Mark; Stewart, Lorna; Morgan, Celia; Newbould, Rexford D.; Feilding, Amanda; Curran, H. Val; Nutt, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The compound 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a potent monoamine releaser that produces an acute euphoria in most individuals. Methods In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced-order study, MDMA was orally administered to 25 physically and mentally healthy individuals. Arterial spin labeling and seed-based resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) were used to produce spatial maps displaying changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and RSFC after MDMA administration. Participants underwent two arterial spin labeling and two blood oxygen level–dependent scans in a 90-minute scan session; MDMA and placebo study days were separated by 1 week. Results Marked increases in positive mood were produced by MDMA. Decreased CBF only was observed after MDMA, and this was localized to the right medial temporal lobe (MTL), thalamus, inferior visual cortex, and the somatosensory cortex. Decreased CBF in the right amygdala and hippocampus correlated with ratings of the intensity of global subjective effects of MDMA. The RSFC results complemented the CBF results, with decreases in RSFC between midline cortical regions, the medial prefrontal cortex, and MTL regions, and increases between the amygdala and hippocampus. There were trend-level correlations between these effects and ratings of intense and positive subjective effects. Conclusions The MTLs appear to be specifically implicated in the mechanism of action of MDMA, but further work is required to elucidate how the drug’s characteristic subjective effects arise from its modulation of spontaneous brain activity. PMID:24495461

  1. The role of point-of-care assessment of platelet function in predicting postoperative bleeding and transfusion requirements after coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Thekkudan, Joyce; Sahajanandan, Raj; Gravenor, Mike; Lakshmanan, Suresh; Fayaz, Khazi Mohammed; Luckraz, Heyman

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Objective platelet function assessment after cardiac surgery can predict postoperative blood loss, guide transfusion requirements and discriminate the need for surgical re-exploration. We conducted this study to assess the predictive value of point-of-care testing platelet function using the Multiplate® device. Methods: Patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting were prospectively recruited (n = 84). Group A (n = 42) patients were on anti-platelet therapy until surgery; patients in Group B (n = 42) stopped anti-platelet treatment at least 5 days preoperatively. Multiplate® and thromboelastography (TEG) tests were performed in the perioperative period. Primary end-point was excessive bleeding (>2.5 ml/kg/h) within first 3 h postoperative. Secondary end-points included transfusion requirements, re-exploration rates, intensive care unit and in-hospital stays. Results: Patients in Group A had excessive bleeding (59% vs. 33%, P = 0.02), higher re-exploration rates (14% vs. 0%, P < 0.01) and higher rate of blood (41% vs. 14%, P < 0.01) and platelet (14% vs. 2%, P = 0.05) transfusions. On multivariate analysis, preoperative platelet function testing was the most significant predictor of excessive bleeding (odds ratio [OR]: 2.3, P = 0.08), need for blood (OR: 5.5, P < 0.01) and platelet transfusion (OR: 15.1, P < 0.01). Postoperative “ASPI test” best predicted the need for transfusion (sensitivity - 0.86) and excessive blood loss (sensitivity - 0.81). TEG results did not correlate well with any of these outcome measures. Conclusions: Peri-operative platelet functional assessment with Multiplate® was the strongest predictor for bleeding and transfusion requirements in patients on anti-platelet therapy until the time of surgery. Study registration: ISRCTN43298975 (http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN43298975/). PMID:25566711

  2. The Effects of Levosimendan and Sodium Nitroprusside Combination on Left Ventricular Functions After Surgical Ventricular Reconstruction in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Patients

    PubMed Central

    Temizturk, Zeki; Azboy, Davut; Atalay, Atakan; Atalay, Hakan; Dogan, Omer Faruk

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to research the effects of levosimendan (LS) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) combination on systolic and diastolic ventricular function after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) who required endoventricular patch repair (EVPR). Patients and Methods: We studied 70 patients with ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. LS and SNP combination was administered in 35 patients (study group, SG). In the remaining patients, normal saline solution was given (placebo group, PG). Levosimendan (10µgr/kg) started 4 h prior to operation and we stopped LS before the initiation of extracorporeal circulation (ECC). During the rewarming period, we started again levosimendan (10µgr/kg) in combination with SNP (0.1-0.2 µgr/kg/min). If mean blood pressure decreased by more than 25% compared with pre-infusion values, for corrected of mean arterial pressure, the volume loading was performed using a 500 ml ringer lactate. Hemodynamic variables, inotrophyc requirement, and laboratory values were recorded. Results: Five patients died (7.14%) post-surgery (one from SG and 4 from PG) due to low cardiac out-put syndrome (LOS). At the postoperative period, cardiac output and stroke volume index was higher in SG (mean±sd;29.1±6.3 vs. 18.4±4.9 mL/min−1/m−2 (P<0.0001)). Stroke volume index (SVI) decreased from 29±10mL/m2 preoperatively to 22±14mL/m2 in the early postoperative period in group 1. This difference was statistically significant (P=0.002). Cardiac index was higher in SG (320.7±37.5 vs. 283.0±83.9 mL/min−1/m−2 (P=0.009)). The postoperative inotrophyc requirement was less in SG (5.6±2.7 vs. 10.4±2.0 mg/kg, P< 0.008), and postoperative cardiac enzyme levels were less in SG (P< 0.01). Ten patients (28.5%) in SG and 21 patients (60%) in PG required inotrophyc support (P<0.001). We used IABP in eight patients (22.8%) in SG and 17 patients (48.5%) in CG (P=0.0001). Conclusion: This study showed that LS and SNP combination impressive increase in

  3. [The hyperiricosuria as an indicator of derangement of biologic functions of endoecology and adaptation, biologic reactions of excretion, inflammation and arterial tension].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Oshchepkova, E V; Dmitriev, V A; Gushchina, O V; Shiriaeva, Iu K; Iashin, A Ia

    2012-04-01

    --initiator of inflammation. The uric acid in the form of ion-capturers of active forms of oxygen is involved into in the formation of syndrome of compensatory anti-inflammatory defense. It may be assumed that simultaneously with post-secretory reabsorption of ions of urates in proximal tubules of nephron occurs intensification of philogenetically late post-secretory reabsorption of ions of sodium and activation of of biologic reaction of hydrodynamic and hydraulic pressure in local pool of intravascular medium i.e. arterial tension. The uric acid simultaneously participates in realization of biologic function of endoecology and adaptation, biologic reactions of excretion, inflammation and arterial tension. PMID:22768707

  4. Developing crash modification functions to assess safety effects of adding bike lanes for urban arterials with different roadway and socio-economic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Park, Juneyoung; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Lee, Jaeyoung; Lee, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Although many researchers have estimated crash modification factors (CMFs) for specific treatments (or countermeasures), there is a lack of studies that explored the heterogeneous effects of roadway characteristics on crash frequency among treated sites. Generally, the CMF estimated by before-after studies represents overall safety effects of the treatment in a fixed value. However, as each treated site has different roadway characteristics, there is a need to assess the variation of CMFs among the treated sites with different roadway characteristics through crash modification functions (CMFunctions). The main objective of this research is to determine relationships between the safety effects of adding a bike lane and the roadway characteristics through (1) evaluation of CMFs for adding a bike lane using observational before-after with empirical Bayes (EB) and cross-sectional methods, and (2) development of simple and full CMFunctions which are describe the CMF in a function of roadway characteristics of the sites. Data was collected for urban arterials in Florida, and the Florida-specific full SPFs were developed. Moreover, socio-economic parameters were collected and included in CMFunctions and SPFs (1) to capture the effects of the variables that represent volume of bicyclists and (2) to identify general relationship between the CMFs and these characteristics. In order to achieve better performance of CMFunctions, data mining techniques were used. The results of both before-after and cross-sectional methods show that adding a bike lane on urban arterials has positive safety effects (i.e., CMF<1) for all crashes and bike crashes. It was found that adding a bike lane is more effective in reducing bike crashes than all crashes. It was also found that the CMFs vary across the sites with different roadway characteristics. In particular, annual average daily traffic (AADT), number of lanes, AADT per lane, median width, bike lane width, and lane width are significant

  5. Proinflammation: The Key to Arterial Aging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingyi; Jiang, Liqun; Monticone, Robert E.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial aging is the major contributing factor to increases in the incidence and prevalence of cardiovascular disease, due mainly to the presence of chronic, low-grade, “sterile” arterial inflammation. Inflammatory signaling driven by the angiotensin II cascade perpetrates adverse age-associated arterial structural and functional remodeling. The aged artery is characterized by endothelial disruption, enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, elastin fracture, and matrix calcification/amyloidosis/glycation. Importantly, the molecular mechanisms of arterial aging are also relevant to the pathogenesis of hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Age-associated arterial proinflammation is, to some extent, mutable, and interventions to suppress or delay it may have the potential to ameliorate or retard age-associated arterial diseases. PMID:24365513

  6. Netrin-1 controls sympathetic arterial innervation

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Isabelle; Gordon, Emma; Han, Jinah; Cristofaro, Brunella; Broqueres-You, Dong; Liu, Chun; Bouvrée, Karine; Zhang, Jiasheng; del Toro, Raquel; Mathivet, Thomas; Larrivée, Bruno; Jagu, Julia; Pibouin-Fragner, Laurence; Pardanaud, Luc; Machado, Maria J.C.; Kennedy, Timothy E.; Zhuang, Zhen; Simons, Michael; Levy, Bernard I.; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger; Eichmann, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic sympathetic nerves innervate peripheral resistance arteries, thereby regulating vascular tone and controlling blood supply to organs. Despite the fundamental importance of blood flow control, how sympathetic arterial innervation develops remains largely unknown. Here, we identified the axon guidance cue netrin-1 as an essential factor required for development of arterial innervation in mice. Netrin-1 was produced by arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) at the onset of innervation, and arterial innervation required the interaction of netrin-1 with its receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), on sympathetic growth cones. Function-blocking approaches, including cell type–specific deletion of the genes encoding Ntn1 in SMCs and Dcc in sympathetic neurons, led to severe and selective reduction of sympathetic innervation and to defective vasoconstriction in resistance arteries. These findings indicate that netrin-1 and DCC are critical for the control of arterial innervation and blood flow regulation in peripheral organs. PMID:24937433

  7. You're Only as Old as Your Arteries: Translational Strategies for Preserving Vascular Endothelial Function with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kaplon, Rachelle E.; Gioscia-Ryan, Rachel A.; LaRocca, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction develops with age and increases the risk of age-associated vascular disorders. Nitric oxide insufficiency, oxidative stress, and chronic low-grade inflammation, induced by upregulation of adverse cellular signaling processes and imbalances in stress resistance pathways, mediate endothelial dysfunction with aging. Healthy lifestyle behaviors preserve endothelial function with aging by inhibiting these mechanisms, and novel nutraceutical compounds that favorably modulate these pathways hold promise as a complementary approach for preserving endothelial health. PMID:24985329

  8. A comparison of platelet function tests and thromboxane metabolites to evaluate aspirin response in healthy individuals and patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Johnsen, Helle Ladefoged; Hedegaard, Sofie Sommer; Pedersen, Susanne Bendesgaard; Mortensen, Jette; Kristensen, Steen Dalby

    2010-06-01

    Individualised antiplatelet therapy and platelet function testing have attracted considerable clinical interest, but several aspects of test performance have not been thoroughly evaluated. We investigated repeatability and concordance of light transmission aggregometry (LTA) induced with arachidonic acid (AA) 1.0 mM, PFA-100 induced with collagen/epinephrine, multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) induced with AA 0.5 or 0.75 mM and VerifyNow Aspirin. Patients with stable coronary artery disease (n=43) and healthy individuals (n=21) were included. All tests were performed in duplicate at baseline in healthy individuals and in duplicate for four days in all study participants during aspirin treatment. Serum and urinary thromboxane metabolites were measured several times to evaluate cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition by aspirin. MEA was most sensitive for aspirin as treatment induced a 12-fold difference in AA-induced platelet aggregation. Coefficients of variation for duplicate measurements at baseline (0.4-12%), during aspirin treatment (3-46%) and for day-to-day variability (3-37%) differed markedly between tests and were lowest for VerifyNow. The prevalence of aspirin low-responsiveness also differed between tests (0-9%) and the agreement was low: kappafunction test, whereas serum thromboxane correlated with VerifyNow Aspirin (r=0.41, p=0.001). Overall, repeatability was moderate and the correlation between tests was low. VerifyNow Aspirin proved most reproducible, and this was the only assay showing a significant positive correlation with serum thromboxane. This study demonstrated that conclusions based on platelet function testing strongly depend on the assay used. PMID:20352155

  9. Algisyl-LVR™ with coronary artery bypass grafting reduces left ventricular wall stress and improves function in the failing human heart☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lik Chuan; Wall, Samuel T.; Klepach, Doron; Ge, Liang; Zhang, Zhihong; Lee, Randall J.; Hinson, Andy; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.; Guccione, Julius M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Left ventricular (LV) wall stress reduction is a cornerstone in treating heart failure. Large animal models and computer simulations indicate that adding non-contractile material to the damaged LV wall can potentially reduce myofiber stress. We sought to quantify the effects of a novel implantable hydrogel (Algisyl-LVR™) treatment in combination with coronary artery bypass grafting (i.e. Algisyl-LVR™+CABG) on both LV function and wall stress in heart failure patients. Methods and results Magnetic resonance images obtained before treatment (n=3), and at 3 months (n=3) and 6 months (n=2) afterwards were used to reconstruct the LV geometry. Cardiac function was quantified using end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), regional wall thickness, sphericity index and regional myofiber stress computed using validated mathematical modeling. The LV became more ellipsoidal after treatment, and both EDV and ESV decreased substantially 3 months after treatment in all patients; EDV decreased from 264±91 ml to 146±86 ml and ESV decreased from 184±85 ml to 86±76 ml. Ejection fraction increased from 32±8% to 47±18% during that period. Volumetric-averaged wall thickness increased in all patients, from 1.06±0.21 cm (baseline) to 1.3±0.26 cm (3 months). These changes were accompanied by about a 35% decrease in myofiber stress at end-of-diastole and at end-of-systole. Post-treatment myofiber stress became more uniform in the LV. Conclusions These results support the novel concept that Algisyl-LVR™+CABG treatment leads to decreased myofiber stress, restored LV geometry and improved function. PMID:23394895

  10. Interhemispheric Cerebral Blood Flow Balance during Recovery of Motor Hand Function after Ischemic Stroke—A Longitudinal MRI Study Using Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Missimer, John; Schroth, Gerhard; Hess, Christian W.; Sturzenegger, Matthias; Wang, Danny J. J.; Weder, Bruno; Federspiel, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background Unilateral ischemic stroke disrupts the well balanced interactions within bilateral cortical networks. Restitution of interhemispheric balance is thought to contribute to post-stroke recovery. Longitudinal measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes might act as surrogate marker for this process. Objective To quantify longitudinal CBF changes using arterial spin labeling MRI (ASL) and interhemispheric balance within the cortical sensorimotor network and to assess their relationship with motor hand function recovery. Methods Longitudinal CBF data were acquired in 23 patients at 3 and 9 months after cortical sensorimotor stroke and in 20 healthy controls using pulsed ASL. Recovery of grip force and manual dexterity was assessed with tasks requiring power and precision grips. Voxel-based analysis was performed to identify areas of significant CBF change. Region-of-interest analyses were used to quantify the interhemispheric balance across nodes of the cortical sensorimotor network. Results Dexterity was more affected, and recovered at a slower pace than grip force. In patients with successful recovery of dexterous hand function, CBF decreased over time in the contralesional supplementary motor area, paralimbic anterior cingulate cortex and superior precuneus, and interhemispheric balance returned to healthy control levels. In contrast, patients with poor recovery presented with sustained hypoperfusion in the sensorimotor cortices encompassing the ischemic tissue, and CBF remained lateralized to the contralesional hemisphere. Conclusions Sustained perfusion imbalance within the cortical sensorimotor network, as measured with task-unrelated ASL, is associated with poor recovery of dexterous hand function after stroke. CBF at rest might be used to monitor recovery and gain prognostic information. PMID:25191858

  11. [Significance of functional tests in investigation of arterial wall rigidity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Gel'tser, B I; Brodskaia, T A; Nevzorova, V A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to study mechanical properties of the aorta in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using functional tests. 60 patients with COPD and 25 healthy volunteers of comparable age were examined by non-invasive arteriography (Tensio Clinic TL 1 arteriograph, Tensiomed, Hungary) with physical exercise (PE) and nitroglycerin test (NT). Oxygen saturation and the basal serum concentration of nitric oxide were measured. The study found a significant decrease in aortal reactivity after PE in patients with II to III stage COPD vs. healthy persons. The degree of this decrease correlates with the duration and severity of the disease, the degree of ventilatory disturbances, hypoxemia and hyponitrooxidemia. According to non-invasive arteriography, the relative coronary perfusion index during NT was most sensitive to COPD severity when PE test was performed. It was 10 times worse in patients with COPD III vs. healthy persons. The degree of a decrease in the velocity of the spread of pulse wave in the aorta (VSPW) and augmentation index during NT was the same in COPD patients and healthy persons, while in COPD II the sensitivity of these parameters was higher. Study of the mechanic properties of aorta using functional tests substantially complements possibilities provided by conventional arteriography. For instance, some of COPD patients with "optimal" VSPW at rest display a significantly decreased response to PE. PMID:18494284

  12. Changes in right ventricular structure and function assessed using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in bosentan-treated patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chin, Kelly M; Kingman, Martha; de Lemos, James A; Warner, John J; Reimold, Sharon; Peshock, Ron; Torres, Fernando

    2008-06-01

    Patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) usually show improvements in symptoms, exercise capacity, and hemodynamics after treatment with approved medical therapies. This study sought to determine whether improvement in right-sided cardiac function measured using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging would also be seen and whether these changes would correlate with improvement in exercise capacity. Sixteen patients with PAH underwent evaluation at baseline and after 12 months of treatment with bosentan. After treatment, cardiac index, pulmonary vascular resistance, and 6-minute walk distance improved, and there was a trend toward improvement in right ventricular (RV) stroke volume (70 +/- 27 to 81 +/- 30 ml; p = 0.08), but no change in RV ejection fraction (RVEF) or RV end-diastolic volume. Six-minute walk distance improved by 59 m (p <0.05) in the overall cohort and improved more in patients in whom RVEF increased compared with those with stable or decreased RVEF (+98 vs -37 m, respectively; p = 0.01). Three patients died during follow-up, and these patients had significantly lower RVEF and left ventricular end-diastolic volume indexes than surviving patients. In conclusion, these results suggest that cardiac magnetic resonance imaging may have value in determining response to therapy and prognosis in patients with PAH. PMID:18489949

  13. Evaluating the Feasibility of an Agglomerative Hierarchy Clustering Algorithm for the Automatic Detection of the Arterial Input Function Using DSC-MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jiandong; Yang, Jiawen; Guo, Qiyong

    2014-01-01

    During dynamic susceptibility contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI), it has been demonstrated that the arterial input function (AIF) can be obtained using fuzzy c-means (FCM) and k-means clustering methods. However, due to the dependence on the initial centers of clusters, both clustering methods have poor reproducibility between the calculation and recalculation steps. To address this problem, the present study developed an alternative clustering technique based on the agglomerative hierarchy (AH) method for AIF determination. The performance of AH method was evaluated using simulated data and clinical data based on comparisons with the two previously demonstrated clustering-based methods in terms of the detection accuracy, calculation reproducibility, and computational complexity. The statistical analysis demonstrated that, at the cost of a significantly longer execution time, AH method obtained AIFs more in line with the expected AIF, and it was perfectly reproducible at different time points. In our opinion, the disadvantage of AH method in terms of the execution time can be alleviated by introducing a professional high-performance workstation. The findings of this study support the feasibility of using AH clustering method for detecting the AIF automatically. PMID:24932638

  14. Quantitative spatial comparison of diffuse optical imaging with blood oxygen level-dependent and arterial spin labeling-based functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huppert, Theodore J.; Hoge, Rick D.; Dale, Anders M.; Franceschini, Maria A.; Boas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Akin to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), diffuse optical imaging (DOI) is a noninvasive method for measuring localized changes in hemoglobin levels within the brain. When combined with fMRI methods, multimodality approaches could offer an integrated perspective on the biophysics, anatomy, and physiology underlying each of the imaging modalities. Vital to the correct interpretation of such studies, control experiments to test the consistency of both modalities must be performed. Here, we compare DOI with blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) and arterial spin labeling fMRI-based methods in order to explore the spatial agreement of the response amplitudes recorded by these two methods. Rather than creating optical images by regularized, tomographic reconstructions, we project the fMRI image into optical measurement space using the optical forward problem. We report statistically better spatial correlation between the fMRI-BOLD response and the optically measured deoxyhemoglobin (R=0.71, p=1 × 10−7) than between the BOLD and oxyhemoglobin or total hemoglobin measures (R=0.38, p=0.04|0.37, p=0.05, respectively). Similarly, we find that the correlation between the ASL measured blood flow and optically measured total and oxyhemoglobin is stronger (R=0.73, p=5 × 10−6 and R=0.71, p=9 × 10−6, respectively) than the flow to deoxyhemoglobin spatial correlation (R=0.26, p=0.10). PMID:17212541

  15. Apparent arterial compliance.

    PubMed

    Quick, C M; Berger, D S; Noordergraaf, A

    1998-04-01

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in estimating total arterial compliance. Because it cannot be measured directly, a lumped model is usually applied to derive compliance from aortic pressure and flow. The archetypical model, the classical two-element windkessel, assumes 1) system linearity and 2) infinite pulse wave velocity. To generalize this model, investigators have added more elements and have incorporated nonlinearities. A different approach is taken here. It is assumed that the arterial system 1) is linear and 2) has finite pulse wave velocity. In doing so, the windkessel is generalized by describing compliance as a complex function of frequency that relates input pressure to volume stored. By applying transmission theory, this relationship is shown to be a function of heart rate, peripheral resistance, and pulse wave reflection. Because this pressure-volume relationship is generally not equal to total arterial compliance, it is termed "apparent compliance." This new concept forms the natural counterpart to the established concept of apparent pulse wave velocity. PMID:9575945

  16. Hardening of the arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis; Arteriosclerosis; Plaque buildup - arteries; Hyperlipidemia - atherosclerosis; Cholesterol - atherosclerosis ... Hardening of the arteries often occurs with aging. As you grow older, ... narrows your arteries and makes them stiffer. These changes ...

  17. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... ischemia is often seen in people who have hardening of the arteries in other parts of the ... long-term (chronic) mesenteric artery ischemia caused by hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ): Abdominal pain after eating ...

  18. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  19. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a ...

  20. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease is a disease in ... blood to your face, scalp, and neck. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows the location of the right ...

  1. Efficacy of folic acid supplementation on endothelial function and plasma homocysteine concentration in coronary artery disease: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    YI, XIN; ZHOU, YANLI; JIANG, DINGSHENG; LI, XIAOYAN; GUO, YI; JIANG, XUEJUN

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to conduct an updated meta-analysis of relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in order to estimate the effect of folic acid supplementation on endothelial function and the concentration of plasma homocysteine in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). An extensive search of PubMed was conducted to identify RCTs that compared folic acid with placebo therapy. The mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used as a measure of the correlation between folic acid supplementation and endothelial function/plasma homocysteine concentration. Of the 377 patients included in this analysis, 191 patients underwent folic acid supplementation and 186 individuals underwent placebo treatment. Compared with the use of a placebo, folic acid supplementation alone exhibited significant efficacy on increasing flow-mediated dilation (FMD; MD, 57.72 μm; 95% CI, 50.14–65.31; P<0.05) and lowering the concentration of plasma homocysteine (MD, −3.66 μmol/l; 95% CI, −5.44–−1.87; P<0.05; I2, 87%). There was no significant change in the response to end diastolic diameter, glyceryl-trinitrate diameter, heart rate, baseline and peak hyperemic flow and systolic and diastolic blood pressure between the folic acid and placebo groups (P>0.05). Therefore, the meta-analysis indicated that 5 mg folic acid daily supplementation for >4 weeks significantly improved FMD and lowered the concentration of plasma homocysteine in patients with CAD. However, more RCTs are required in order to confirm these observations. PMID:24940394

  2. Functional and Prognostic Implications of the Main Pulmonary Artery Diameter to Aorta Diameter Ratio from Chest Computed Tomography in Korean COPD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyung Soo; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Kim, Ha Yan; Lee, Sang Min; Seo, Joon Beom; Oh, Yeon Mok

    2016-01-01

    Background The ratio of the diameter of the main pulmonary artery (mPA) to the diameter of the aorta (Ao) on chest computed tomography is associated with diverse clinical conditions. Herein, we determined the functional and prognostic implications of the mPA/Ao ratio in Korean chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Methods The study population comprised 226 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients from the Korean Obstructive Lung Disease cohort who underwent chest computed tomography. We analyzed the relationships between the clinical characteristics, including pulmonary function, echocardiography findings, St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire, 6-minute walking (6MW) distance, and exacerbation with the mPA, Ao, and mPA/Ao ratio. Results The mean age was 65.8 years, and 219 (96.9%) patients were male. The mean FEV1% predicted and FEV1/FVC ratio were 61.2% and 47.3%, respectively. The mean mPA and Ao were 23.7 and 36.4 mm, respectively, and the mPA/Ao ratio was 0.66. The mPA/Ao ratio correlated negatively with the 6MW distance (G = -0.133, P = 0.025) and positively with the right ventricular pressure (G = 0.323, P = 0.001). After adjustment for potential confounders, the mPA/Ao ratio was significantly associated with 6MW distance (β = -107.7, P = 0.017). Moreover, an mPA/Ao ratio >0.8 was a significant predictor of exacerbation at the 1-year (odds ratio 2.12, 95% confidence interval 1.27–3.52) and 3-year follow-ups (odds ratio 2.04, 95% confidence interval 1.42–2.90). Conclusions The mPA/Ao ratio is an independent predictor of exercise capacity and an mPA/Ao ratio >0.8 is a significant risk factor of COPD exacerbation. PMID:27152915

  3. Quantitative Functional Arterial Spin Labeling (fASL) MRI – Sensitivity and Reproducibility of Regional CBF Changes Using Pseudo-Continuous ASL Product Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Steketee, Rebecca M. E.; Mutsaerts, Henri J. M. M.; Bron, Esther E.; van Osch, Matthias J. P.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; van der Lugt, Aad; Nederveen, Aart J.; Smits, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly used to quantify task-related brain activation. This study assessed functional ASL (fASL) using pseudo-continuous ASL (pCASL) product sequences from two vendors. By scanning healthy participants twice with each sequence while they performed a motor task, this study assessed functional ASL for 1) its sensitivity to detect task-related cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes, and 2) its reproducibility of resting CBF and absolute CBF changes (delta CBF) in the motor cortex. Whole-brain voxel-wise analyses showed that sensitivity for motor activation was sufficient with each sequence, and comparable between sequences. Reproducibility was assessed with within-subject coefficients of variation (wsCV) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Reproducibility of resting CBF was reasonably good within (wsCV: 14.1–15.7%; ICC: 0.69–0.77) and between sequences (wsCV: 15.1%; ICC: 0.69). Reproducibility of delta CBF was relatively low, both within (wsCV: 182–297%; ICC: 0.04–0.32) and between sequences (wsCV: 185%; ICC: 0.45), while inter-session variation was low. This may be due to delta CBF’s small mean effect (0.77–1.32 mL/100g gray matter/min). In conclusion, fASL seems sufficiently sensitive to detect task-related changes on a group level, with acceptable inter-sequence differences. Resting CBF may provide a consistent baseline to compare task-related activation to, but absolute regional CBF changes are more variable, and should be interpreted cautiously when acquired with two pCASL product sequences. PMID:26172381

  4. Ischemia reperfusion of the hepatic artery induces the functional damage of large bile ducts by changes in the expression of angiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Mancinelli, Romina; Glaser, Shannon; Francis, Heather; Carpino, Guido; Franchitto, Antonio; Vetuschi, Antonella; Sferra, Roberta; Pannarale, Luigi; Venter, Julie; Meng, Fanyin; Alpini, Gianfranco; Onori, Paolo; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2015-12-01

    Liver transplantation and cholangiocarcinoma induce biliary dysfunction following ischemia reperfusion (IR). The function of the intrahepatic biliary tree is regulated by both autocrine and paracrine factors. The aim of the study was to demonstrate that IR-induced damage of cholangiocytes is associated with altered expression of biliary angiogenic factors. Normal and bile duct ligation rats underwent 24-h sham or hepatic reperfusion after 30 min of transient occlusion of the hepatic artery (HAIR) or portal vein (PVIR) before collecting liver blocks and cholangiocyte RNA or protein. We evaluated liver histology, biliary apoptosis, proliferation and expression of VEGF-A/C, VEGFR-2/3, Ang-1/2, and Tie-1/2 in liver sections and isolated small and large cholangiocytes. Normal rat intrahepatic cholangiocyte cultures (NRICC) were maintained under standard conditions in normoxic or under a hypoxic atmosphere for 4 h and then transferred to normal conditions for selected times. Subsequently, we measured changes in biliary proliferation and apoptosis and the expression of VEGF-A/C and VEGFR-2/3. In vivo, HAIR (but not PVIR) induced damage of large bile ducts and decreased proliferation and secretin-stimulated cAMP levels. HAIR-induced damage of large bile ducts was associated with increased expression of VEGF-A/C, VEGFR-2/3, Ang-1/2, and Tie-1/2. In vitro, under hypoxic conditions, there was increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation of NRICC concomitant with enhanced expression of VEGF-A/C and VEGFR-2/3. The functional damage of large bile ducts by HAIR and hypoxia is associated with increased expression of angiogenic factors in small cholangiocytes, presumably due to a compensatory mechanism in response to biliary damage. PMID:26451003

  5. Gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: A potential utility for the evaluation of regional liver function impairment following transcatheter arterial chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    XIAO, YU-DONG; PAUDEL, RAMCHANDRA; LIU, HUAN; ZHANG, BIN; MA, CONG; ZHOU, SHUN-KE

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate regional liver function impairment following transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE), assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhanced by gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA). Additionally, this study evaluated the associations between signal intensity and various clinical factors. A prospective study was conducted between March 2012 and May 2013 with a total of 35 patients. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI was performed 3–5 days after TACE therapy. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) was subsequently calculated for healthy liver tissue regions and peritumoral regions, prior to and 20 min after Gd-EOB-DTPA administration. The correlation between clinical factors and relative SNR was assessed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient or Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. Prior to Gd-EOB-DTPA administration, the SNR values showed no significant difference (t=1.341, P=0.191) in healthy liver tissue regions (50.53±15.99; range, 11.25–83.46) compared with peritumoral regions (49.81±15.85; range, 12.34–81.53). On measuring at 20 min following Gd-EOB-DTPA administration, the SNR in healthy liver tissue regions (82.55±33.33; range, 31.45–153.02) was significantly higher (t=3.732, P<0.001) compared with that in peritumoral regions (75.77±27.41; range, 31.42–144.49). The relative SNR in peritumoral regions correlated only with the quantity of iodized oil used during TACE therapy (r=0.528, P=0.003); the age, gender, diameter and blood supply of the tumor, or Child-Pugh class of the patient did not correlate with relative SNR. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI may be an effective way to evaluate regional liver function impairment following TACE therapy. PMID:25663880

  6. Noninvasive measurement of regional cerebral blood flow change with H[sub 2][sup 15]O and positron and emission tomography using a mechanical injector and a standard arterial input function

    SciTech Connect

    Sadato, Norihiro; Magata, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Matoba, Naoki; Tsuchida, Tatsuro; Tamaki, Nagara; Konishi, Junji . Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Shibasaki, Hiroshi . Dept. of Brain Pathophysiology); Senda, Michio )

    1993-12-01

    To estimate changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) without arterial sampling in the study of functional-anatomical correlations in the human brain, using [sup 15]O-labeled water and PET, a standard arterial input function was generated from the input function in 10 normal volunteers with dose calibration and peak time normalization. The speed and volume of injection were precisely controlled with a mechanical injector. After global normalization of each tissue activity image, the standard arterial input function was applied to obtain estimated CBF images. Relative changes in estimated rCBF to whole brain mean CBF([delta]Fest) and those in regional tissue activity ([delta]C) were compared with true relative rCBF changes ([delta]F) in 40 pairs of images obtained from 6 normal volunteers. [delta]Fest correlated well with [delta]F, whereas [delta]C consistently underestimated [delta]F. This noninvasive method simplifies the activation studies and provides the accurate estimation of relative flow changes.

  7. The effects of knockdown of rho-associated kinase 1 and zipper-interacting protein kinase on gene expression and function in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jing-Ti; Wang, Xiu-Ling; Chen, Yong-Xiang; O'Brien, Edward R; Gui, Yu; Walsh, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) have been implicated in diverse physiological functions. ROCK1 phosphorylates and activates ZIPK suggesting that at least some of these physiological functions may require both enzymes. To test the hypothesis that sequential activation of ROCK1 and ZIPK is commonly involved in regulatory pathways, we utilized siRNA to knock down ROCK1 and ZIPK in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC). Microarray analysis using a whole-transcript expression chip identified changes in gene expression induced by ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. ROCK1 knockdown affected the expression of 553 genes, while ZIPK knockdown affected the expression of 390 genes. A high incidence of regulation of transcription regulator genes was observed in both knockdowns. Other affected groups included transporters, kinases, peptidases, transmembrane and G protein-coupled receptors, growth factors, phosphatases and ion channels. Only 76 differentially expressed genes were common to ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified five pathways shared between the two knockdowns. We focused on cytokine signaling pathways since ROCK1 knockdown up-regulated 5 and down-regulated 4 cytokine genes, in contrast to ZIPK knockdown, which affected the expression of only two cytokine genes (both down-regulated). IL-6 gene expression and secretion of IL-6 protein were up-regulated by ROCK1 knockdown, whereas ZIPK knockdown reduced IL-6 mRNA expression and IL-6 protein secretion and increased ROCK1 protein expression, suggesting that ROCK1 may inhibit IL-6 secretion. IL-1β mRNA and protein levels were increased in response to ROCK1 knockdown. Differences in the effects of ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown on cell cycle regulatory genes suggested that ROCK1 and ZIPK regulate the cell cycle by different mechanisms. ROCK1, but not ZIPK knockdown reduced the viability and inhibited proliferation of vascular SMC. We conclude that ROCK1 and

  8. The Effects of Knockdown of Rho-Associated Kinase 1 and Zipper-Interacting Protein Kinase on Gene Expression and Function in Cultured Human Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jing-Ti; Wang, Xiu-Ling; Chen, Yong-Xiang; O’Brien, Edward R.; Gui, Yu; Walsh, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) have been implicated in diverse physiological functions. ROCK1 phosphorylates and activates ZIPK suggesting that at least some of these physiological functions may require both enzymes. To test the hypothesis that sequential activation of ROCK1 and ZIPK is commonly involved in regulatory pathways, we utilized siRNA to knock down ROCK1 and ZIPK in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC). Microarray analysis using a whole-transcript expression chip identified changes in gene expression induced by ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. ROCK1 knockdown affected the expression of 553 genes, while ZIPK knockdown affected the expression of 390 genes. A high incidence of regulation of transcription regulator genes was observed in both knockdowns. Other affected groups included transporters, kinases, peptidases, transmembrane and G protein-coupled receptors, growth factors, phosphatases and ion channels. Only 76 differentially expressed genes were common to ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified five pathways shared between the two knockdowns. We focused on cytokine signaling pathways since ROCK1 knockdown up-regulated 5 and down-regulated 4 cytokine genes, in contrast to ZIPK knockdown, which affected the expression of only two cytokine genes (both down-regulated). IL-6 gene expression and secretion of IL-6 protein were up-regulated by ROCK1 knockdown, whereas ZIPK knockdown reduced IL-6 mRNA expression and IL-6 protein secretion and increased ROCK1 protein expression, suggesting that ROCK1 may inhibit IL-6 secretion. IL-1β mRNA and protein levels were increased in response to ROCK1 knockdown. Differences in the effects of ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown on cell cycle regulatory genes suggested that ROCK1 and ZIPK regulate the cell cycle by different mechanisms. ROCK1, but not ZIPK knockdown reduced the viability and inhibited proliferation of vascular SMC. We conclude that ROCK1 and

  9. Chronoecological health watch of arterial stiffness and neuro-cardio-pulmonary function in elderly community at high altitude (3524 m), compared with Japanese town.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, K; Norboo, T; Otsuka, Y; Higuchi, H; Hayajiri, M; Narushima, C; Sato, Y; Tsugoshi, T; Murakami, S; Wada, T; Ishine, M; Okumiya, K; Matsubayashi, K; Yano, S; Chogyal, T; Angchuk, D; Ichihara, K; Cornélissen, G; Halberg, F

    2005-10-01

    Effects of high altitude on arterial stiffness and neuro-cardio-pulmonary function were studied. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were measured in a sitting position on resting Ladakhis, living at an altitude of 3250-4647 m (Phey village, 3250 m: 17 men and 55 women; Chumathang village, 4193 m: 29 men and 47 women; Sumdo village, 4540 m: 38 men and 57 women; and Korzok village, 4647 m: 84 men and 70 women). The neuro-cardio-pulmonary function, including the Kohs block design test, the Up and Go, the Functional Reach and the Button tests, was examined in 40 elderly subjects (19 men and 21 women, mean age: 74.7 +/- 3.3 years) in Leh, Ladakh (altitude: 3524 m), for comparison with 324 elderly citizens (97 men and 227 women, mean age: 80.7 +/- 4.7 years) of Tosa, Japan (altitude: 250 m). Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index (CAVI) was measured as the heart-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) in these subjects using a VaSera CAVI instrument (Fukuda Denshi, Tokyo). SpO(2) decreased while Hb and diastolic BP increased with increasing altitude. At higher altitude, residents were younger and leaner. Women in Leh vs. Tosa had a poorer cognitive function, estimated by the Kohs block design test (3.7 +/- 3.6 vs. 16.4 +/- 9.6 points, P < 0.0001) and poorer ADL functions (Functional Reach: 13.7 +/- 7.0 cm vs. 25.3 +/- 8.7 cm, P < 0.0001; Button test: 22.5 +/- 4.8 vs. 14.8 +/- 5.7 s, P < 0.0001). Time estimation was shorter at high altitude (60-s estimation with counting: 41.1% shorter in men and 23.0% shorter in women). A higher voltage of the QRS complex was observed in the ECG of Leh residents, but two times measurement of CAVI showed no statistically significant differences between Leh and Tosa (two times of CAVI measures; 9.49 vs. 10.01 m/s and 9.41 vs. 10.05 m/s, respectively), suggesting that most residents succeed to adapt sufficiently to the high-altitude environment. However, correlation of CAVI with age shows several cases who show an extreme increase in CAVI. Thus, for the

  10. Early High-dosage Atorvastatin Treatment Improved Serum Immune-inflammatory Markers and Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Strokes Classified as Large Artery Atherosclerotic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Di Raimondo, Domenico; Pecoraro, Rosaria; Maida, Carlo; Arnao, Valentina; Corte, Vittoriano Della; Simonetta, Irene; Corpora, Francesca; Di Bona, Danilo; Maugeri, Rosario; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo; Pinto, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Statins have beneficial effects on cerebral circulation and brain parenchyma during ischemic stroke and reperfusion. The primary hypothesis of this randomized parallel trial was that treatment with 80 mg/day of atorvastatin administered early at admission after acute atherosclerotic ischemic stroke could reduce serum levels of markers of immune-inflammatory activation of the acute phase and that this immune-inflammatory modulation could have a possible effect on prognosis of ischemic stroke evaluated by some outcome indicators. We enrolled 42 patients with acute ischemic stroke classified as large arteries atherosclerosis stroke (LAAS) randomly assigned in a randomized parallel trial to the following groups: Group A, 22 patients treated with atorvastatin 80 mg (once-daily) from admission day until discharge; Group B, 20 patients not treated with atorvastatin 80 mg until discharge, and after discharge, treatment with atorvastatin has been started. At 72 hours and at 7 days after acute ischemic stroke, subjects of group A showed significantly lower plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, whereas no significant difference with regard to plasma levels of IL-10, E-Selectin, and P-Selectin was observed between the 2 groups. At 72 hours and 7 days after admission, stroke patients treated with atorvastatin 80 mg in comparison with stroke subjects not treated with atorvastatin showed a significantly lower mean National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and modified Rankin scores. Our findings provide the first evidence that atorvastatin acutely administered immediately after an atherosclerotic ischemic stroke exerts a lowering effect on immune-inflammatory activation of the acute phase of stroke and that its early use is associated to a better functional and prognostic profile. PMID:27043681

  11. The effects of high- and low-risk environments on cognitive function in rats following 2-vessel occlusion of the carotid arteries: a behavioral study.

    PubMed

    Winocur, Gordon; Thompson, Charlie; Hakim, Antoine; Greenwood, Carol

    2013-09-01

    In a prospective study of environmental factors affecting cognitive recovery from stroke, adult male rats were reared for 3 months in a high-risk (relatively isolated, low activity, high-fat diet, high-stress) or low-risk (social, healthy diet, low-stress, physically active) environment. They then received cognitive testing to assess various aspects of learning and memory before undergoing 2-vessel occlusion (2VO) of the carotid arteries, or sham surgery. Rats were returned to their respective environments post-operatively. Relative to pre-operative levels, 2VO rats exhibited significant cognitive losses that were consistently greater in the high-risk group than its low-risk counterpart. As well, the high-risk 2VO group was impaired, relative to the low-risk 2VO group on tests of new learning introduced post-operatively. At 3-month follow-up testing, rats that had undergone 2VO surgery exhibited further decline on some tests but recovery on others, with recovery generally slower in the high-risk 2VO group. The high-risk environment also affected rats' pre-operative cognitive performance and, to a lesser extent, their performance following sham surgery. Overall, the study shows that rats experiencing cerebral ischemia are more likely to experience severe cognitive deficits if exposed to a high-risk environment and recover more slowly than ischemic rats in a more favorable environment. The results underscore the importance of lifestyle factors with respect to the impact of stroke on cognition and in assessing prospects for recovery of function. PMID:23742800

  12. Carotid artery anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are four carotid arteries, two on each side of the neck: right and left internal carotid arteries, and right and left external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the head and brain.

  13. A Biomechanical Model of Artery Buckling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hai-Chao

    2010-01-01

    The stability of arteries under blood pressure load is essential to the maintenance of normal arterial function and the loss of stability can lead to tortuosity and kinking that are associated with significant clinical complications. However, mechanical analysis of arterial bent buckling is lacking. To address this issue, this paper presents a biomechanical model of arterial buckling. Using a linear elastic cylindrical arterial model, the mechanical equations for arterial buckling were developed and the critical buckling pressure was found to be a function of the wall stiffness (Young’s modulus), arterial radius, length, wall thickness, and the axial strain. Both the model equations and experimental results demonstrated that the critical pressure is related to the axial strain. Arteries may buckle and become tortuous due to reduced (sub-physiological) axial strain, hypertensive pressure, and a weakened wall. These results are in accordance with, and provide a possible explanation to the clinical observations that these changes are the risk factors for arterial tortuosity and kinking. The current model is also applicable to veins and ureters. PMID:17689541

  14. Vapor resistant arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor); Dussinger, Peter M. (Inventor); Buchko, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A vapor block resistant liquid artery structure for heat pipes. A solid tube artery with openings is encased in the sintered material of a heat pipe wick. The openings are limited to that side of the artery which is most remote from the heat source. The liquid in the artery can thus exit the artery through the openings and wet the sintered sheath, but vapor generated at the heat source is unlikely to move around the solid wall of the artery and reverse its direction in order to penetrate the artery through the openings. An alternate embodiment uses finer pore size wick material to resist vapor entry.

  15. Morphological variation of carotid artery bifurcation level in digital angiography.

    PubMed

    Kurkcuoglu, A; Aytekin, C; Oktem, H; Pelin, C

    2015-01-01

    Knowing of the level of carotid artery bifurcation (CB) is important for vascular surgery in the neck, radical neck dissections, carotid sinus baroreceptor stimulation, catheterisations, and aneurysms. The aim of this study was to determine the CB level in relation with the cervical vertebral levels, compare them on the right and the left sides, and investigate the relation of CB level with the length of neck. In this study, 100 conventional carotid angiographies were performed. The CB level was determined in relation with 10 different levels which were the levels of the cervical vertebrae and intervertebral disks, and the relation of CB level with the length of neck was investigated. The right and left CB levels of the patients were also determined, and compared. The highest level of CB was at the level of C2 vertebra, and the lowest level of CB was at the level of C6-C7 intervertebral disk in both male and female. When all patients were taken into consideration, CB level was most frequently seen at the level of C4-C5 (29%) on the right side, and at the level of C4 (26%) on the left side. The CB levels were not symmetrical in 10 female and 23 male. Knowing of the anatomical variations of CB level is important in surgical procedures. The anatomical differences must be taken into consideration since the neighbouring structures of CB change in case of variations. We believe that the results of this study will shed light to planning of all interventional methods concerning common carotid artery and its branches as well as surgery in the neck, and will help to minimise the complications. PMID:26050808

  16. The Global Burden of Cardiovascular Disease: The Role of Endothelial Function and Arterial Elasticity in Cardiovascular Disease as Novel and Emerging Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Stephen P; Dudenbostel, Tanja

    2011-04-01

    Some consider the measurements of arterial elasticity and flow-mediated dilation to be an indirect "biomarker" of endothelial dysfunction. As such, we describe the various uses of these techniques in the evaluation of the natural history of vascular disease. These measures are potential markers of disease, as abnormalities reflect changes in the integrity of vascular structure but occur prior to the manifestation of symptomatic cardiovascular events. In this review, the natural history of arterial elasticity is discussed, and the effects of aging and inflammation are reviewed. The role that arterial elasticity and flow-mediated dilation have in predicting future cardiovascular disease, and the effects of pharmacologic agents on these measures, is also reviewed. PMID:24000308

  17. Engineering of arteries in vitro.

    PubMed

    Huang, Angela H; Niklason, Laura E

    2014-06-01

    This review will focus on two elements that are essential for functional arterial regeneration in vitro: the mechanical environment and the bioreactors used for tissue growth. The importance of the mechanical environment to embryological development, vascular functionality, and vascular graft regeneration will be discussed. Bioreactors generate mechanical stimuli to simulate biomechanical environment of arterial system. This system has been used to reconstruct arterial grafts with appropriate mechanical strength for implantation by controlling the chemical and mechanical environments in which the grafts are grown. Bioreactors are powerful tools to study the effect of mechanical stimuli on extracellular matrix architecture and mechanical properties of engineered vessels. Hence, biomimetic systems enable us to optimize chemo-biomechanical culture conditions to regenerate engineered vessels with physiological properties similar to those of native arteries. In addition, this article reviews various bioreactors designed especially to apply axial loading to engineered arteries. This review will also introduce and examine different approaches and techniques that have been used to engineer biologically based vascular grafts, including collagen-based grafts, fibrin-gel grafts, cell sheet engineering, biodegradable polymers, and decellularization of native vessels. PMID:24399290

  18. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion and pulmonary arterial systolic pressure relationship in heart failure: an index of right ventricular contractile function and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Guazzi, M; Bandera, F; Pelissero, G; Castelvecchio, S; Menicanti, L; Ghio, S; Temporelli, P L; Arena, R

    2013-11-01

    Echo-derived pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) and right ventricular (RV) tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE; from the end of diastole to end-systole) are of basic relevance in the clinical follow-up of heart failure (HF) patients, carrying two- to threefold increase in cardiac risk when increased and reduced, respectively. We hypothesized that the relationship between TAPSE (longitudinal RV fiber shortening) and PASP (force generated by the RV) provides an index of in vivo RV length-force relationship, with their ratio better disclosing prognosis. Two hundred ninety-three HF patients with reduced (HFrEF, n = 247) or with preserved left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (HFpEF, n = 46) underwent echo-Doppler studies and N-terminal pro-brain-type natriuretic peptide assessment and were tracked for adverse events. The median follow-up duration was 20.8 mo. TAPSE vs. PASP relationship showed a downward regression line shift in nonsurvivors who were more frequently presenting with higher PASP and lower TAPSE. HFrEF and HFpEF patients exhibited a similar distribution along the regression line. Given the TAPSE, PASP, and TAPSE-to-PASP ratio (TAPSE/PASP) collinearity, separate Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed: one with TAPSE and PASP as individual measures, and the other combining them in ratio form. Hazard ratios for variables retained in the multivariate regression were as follows: TAPSE/PASP functional class function evaluation and

  19. Noninvasive Assessment of Vascular Function in Postoperative Cardiovascular Disease (Coarctation of the Aorta, Tetralogy of Fallot, and Transposition of the Great Arteries).

    PubMed

    Mivelaz, Yvan; Leung, Mande T; Zadorsky, Mary Terri; De Souza, Astrid M; Potts, James E; Sandor, George G S

    2016-08-15

    Using noninvasive techniques, we sought to assess arterial stiffness, impedance, hydraulic power, and efficiency in children with postoperative tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), coarctation of the aorta (COA), and transposition of the great arteries (TGAs). Results were compared with those of healthy peers. Fifty-five children with repaired congenital heart disease (24 TOFs, 20 COAs, and 11 TGAs) were compared with 55 age-matched control subjects (CTRL). Echocardiographic Doppler imaging and carotid artery applanation tonometry were preformed to measure aortic flow, dimensions, and calculate pulse wave velocity, vascular impedance and arterial stiffness indexes, hydraulic power (mean and total), and hydraulic efficiency (HE) which were calculated using standard fluid dynamics equations. All congenital heart disease subgroups had higher pulse wave velocity than CTRL. Only the COA group had higher characteristic impedance. Mean power was higher in TGA than in CTRL and TOF, and tota