Science.gov

Sample records for arterioso permeable con

  1. Crustal Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingebritsen, S.; Gleeson, T.

    2014-12-01

    Existing data and models support a distinction between the hydrodynamics of the brittle upper crust, where topography, permeability contrasts, and magmatic heat sources dominate patterns of flow and externally derived (meteoric) fluids are common, and the ductile lower crust, dominated by devolatilization reactions and internally derived fluids. The permeability structure of the uppermost (~<1 km) crust is highly heterogeneous, and controls include primary lithology, porosity, rheology, geochemistry, and tectonic and time-temperature histories of the rocks. Systematic permeability differences among original lithologies persist to contact-metamorphic depths of 3-10 km, but are not evident at regional-metamorphic depths of 10-30+ km - presumably because, at such depths, metamorphic textures become largely independent of the original lithology. Permeability can vary in time as well as space, and its temporal evolution may be gradual or abrupt: streamflow responses to moderate to large earthquakes demonstrate that dynamic stresses can instantaneously change permeability by factors of up to 20 on a regional scale, whereas a 10-fold decrease in the permeability of a package of shale in a compacting basin may require 107years. Temporal variation is enhanced by strong chemical and thermal disequilibrium; thus lab experiments involving hydrothermal flow in crystalline rocks under pressure, temperature, and chemistry gradients often result in 10-fold permeability decreases over daily to sub-annual time scales. Recent research on enhanced geothermal reservoirs, ore-forming systems, and the hydrologic effects of earthquakes consistently shows that shear dislocation caused by tectonic forcing or fluid injection can increase near-to intermediate-field permeability by factors of 100 to 1000. Nonetheless, considering permeability as static parameter is often a reasonable assumption for low-temperature hydrogeologic investigations with time scales of days to decades.

  2. EPA Permeable Surface Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  3. Permeability of Clay Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the effect of clay addition on water permeability and air permeability of concretes. Clay concrete mixes consisted of 0 to 40% clay content incorporated as cement replacement. Flow methods using triaxial cells and air permeameters were used for measuring the injected water and air flows under pressure. It was found that the higher the clay content in the mixture, the greater the permeability. At higher water-cement ratios (w/c), the paste matrix is less dense and easily allows water to ingress into concrete. But at high clay contents of 30 to 40% clay, the variation in permeability was significantly diminished among different concrete mixtures. It was confirmed that air permeability results were higher than the corresponding water permeability values when all permeability coefficients were converted to intrinsic permeability values.

  4. Permeability and relative permeability in rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, S.C.; Berryman, J.G.

    1990-10-01

    Important features of the topology of the pore space of rocks can be usefully quantified by analyzing digitized images of rock cross sections. One approach computes statistical correlation functions using modern image processing techniques. These correlation functions contain information about porosity, specific surface area, tortuosity, formation factor, and elastic constants, as well as the fluid permeability and relative permeability. The physical basis of this approach is discussed and examples of the results for various sandstones are presented. The analysis shows that Kozeny-Carman relations and Archie's empirical laws must be modified to account for finite percolation thresholds in order to avoid unphysical behavior in the calculated relative permeabilities. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Permeability of Dentine

    PubMed Central

    Ghazali, Farid Bin Che

    2003-01-01

    This is an update on the present integrated knowledge regarding dentine permeability that assumed a role in dentine sensitivity and contribute clinically to the effective bonding properties of restorative dental materials. This paper will attempt to refer to in vivo and in vitro studies of dentine permeability and the various interrelated factors governing it. PMID:23365497

  6. Seismic waves increase permeability.

    PubMed

    Elkhoury, Jean E; Brodsky, Emily E; Agnew, Duncan C

    2006-06-29

    Earthquakes have been observed to affect hydrological systems in a variety of ways--water well levels can change dramatically, streams can become fuller and spring discharges can increase at the time of earthquakes. Distant earthquakes may even increase the permeability in faults. Most of these hydrological observations can be explained by some form of permeability increase. Here we use the response of water well levels to solid Earth tides to measure permeability over a 20-year period. At the time of each of seven earthquakes in Southern California, we observe transient changes of up to 24 degrees in the phase of the water level response to the dilatational volumetric strain of the semidiurnal tidal components of wells at the Piñon Flat Observatory in Southern California. After the earthquakes, the phase gradually returns to the background value at a rate of less than 0.1 degrees per day. We use a model of axisymmetric flow driven by an imposed head oscillation through a single, laterally extensive, confined, homogeneous and isotropic aquifer to relate the phase response to aquifer properties. We interpret the changes in phase response as due to changes in permeability. At the time of the earthquakes, the permeability at the site increases by a factor as high as three. The permeability increase depends roughly linearly on the amplitude of seismic-wave peak ground velocity in the range of 0.21-2.1 cm s(-1). Such permeability increases are of interest to hydrologists and oil reservoir engineers as they affect fluid flow and might determine long-term evolution of hydrological and oil-bearing systems. They may also be interesting to seismologists, as the resulting pore pressure changes can affect earthquakes by changing normal stresses on faults. PMID:16810253

  7. The Permeable Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandy, Leo R.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the concept of permeability as knowledge flow into and out of the classroom and applies it to three college courses taught by the author at Plymouth State College (New Hampshire). Experiential knowledge comes into the classroom through interviews, guest speakers, and panel presentations, and flows out through service-learning students…

  8. Scales of rock permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéguen, Y.; Gavrilenko, P.; Le Ravalec, M.

    1996-05-01

    Permeability is a transport property which is currently measured in Darcy units. Although this unit is very convenient for most purposes, its use prevents from recognizing that permeability has units of length squared. Physically, the square root of permeability can thus be seen as a characteristic length or a characteristic pore size. At the laboratory scale, the identification of this characteristic length is a good example of how experimental measurements and theoretical modelling can be integrated. Three distinct identifications are of current use, relying on three different techniques: image analysis of thin sections, mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption. In each case, one or several theoretical models allow us to derive permeability from the experimental data (equivalent channel models, statistical models, effective media models, percolation and network models). Permeability varies with pressure and temperature and this is a decisive point for any extrapolation to crustal conditions. As far as pressure is concerned, most of the effect is due to cracks and a model which does not incorporate this fact will miss its goal. Temperature induced modifications can be the result of several processes: thermal cracking (due to thermal expansion mismatch and anisotropy, or to fluid pressure build up), and pressure solution are the two main ones. Experimental data on pressure and temperature effects are difficult to obtain but they are urgently needed. Finally, an important issue is: up to which point are these small scale data and models relevant when considering formations at the oil reservoir scale, or at the crust scale? At larger scales the identification of the characteristic scale is also a major goal which is examined.

  9. EPA Permeable Surface Research - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  10. Liquid-permeable electrode

    DOEpatents

    Folser, George R.

    1980-01-01

    Electrodes for use in an electrolytic cell, which are liquid-permeable and have low electrical resistance and high internal surface area are provided of a rigid, porous, carbonaceous matrix having activated carbon uniformly embedded throughout. The activated carbon may be catalyzed with platinum for improved electron transfer between electrode and electrolyte. Activated carbon is mixed with a powdered thermosetting phenolic resin and compacted to the desired shape in a heated mold to melt the resin and form the green electrode. The compact is then heated to a pyrolyzing temperature to carbonize and volatilize the resin, forming a rigid, porous structure. The permeable structure and high internal surface area are useful in electrolytic cells where it is necessary to continuously remove the products of the electrochemical reaction.

  11. Glutathione permeability of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P; Hanrahan, J W

    1998-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) forms an ion channel that is permeable both to Cl- and to larger organic anions. Here we show, using macroscopic current recording from excised membrane patches, that the anionic antioxidant tripeptide glutathione is permeant in the CFTR channel. This permeability may account for the high concentrations of glutathione that have been measured in the surface fluid that coats airway epithelial cells. Furthermore, loss of this pathway for glutathione transport may contribute to the reduced levels of glutathione observed in airway surface fluid of cystic fibrosis patients, which has been suggested to contribute to the oxidative stress observed in the lung in cystic fibrosis. We suggest that release of glutathione into airway surface fluid may be a novel function of CFTR. PMID:9688865

  12. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  13. Bovine colostrum supplementation during running training increases intestinal permeability.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Jonathan D; Butler, Ross N; Southcott, Emma; Brinkworth, Grant D

    2009-02-01

    Endurance exercise training can increase intestinal permeability which may contribute to the development of gastrointestinal symptoms in some athletes. Bovine colostrum (BC) supplementation reduces intestinal permeability induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This study aimed to determine whether BC could also reduce intestinal permeability induced by endurance exercise. Thirty healthy adult males (25.0 ± 4.7 yr; mean ± SD) completed eight weeks of running three times per week for 45 minutes at their lactate threshold while consuming 60 g/day of BC, whey protein (WP) or control (CON). Intestinal permeability was assessed at baseline and after eight weeks by measuring the ratio of urinary lactulose (L) and rhamnose (R) excretion. After eight weeks the L/R ratio increased significantly more in volunteers consuming BC (251 ± 140%) compared with WP (21 ± 35%, P < 0.05) and CON (-7 ± 13%, P < 0.02). The increase in intestinal permeability with BC may have been due to BC inducing greater leakiness of tight junctions between enterocytes or by increasing macromolecular transport as it does in neonatal gut. Further research should investigate the potential for BC to increase intestinal macromolecular transport in adults. PMID:22253980

  14. Relative permeability through fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Diomampo, Gracel, P.

    2001-08-01

    The mechanism of two-phase flow through fractures is of importance in understanding many geologic processes. Currently, two-phase flow through fractures is still poorly understood. In this study, nitrogen-water experiments were done on both smooth and rough parallel plates to determine the governing flow mechanism for fractures and the appropriate methodology for data analysis. The experiments were done using a glass plate to allow visualization of flow. Digital video recording allowed instantaneous measurement of pressure, flow rate and saturation. Saturation was computed using image analysis techniques. The experiments showed that gas and liquid phases flow through fractures in nonuniform separate channels. The localized channels change with time as each phase path undergoes continues breaking and reforming due to invasion of the other phase. The stability of the phase paths is dependent on liquid and gas flow rate ratio. This mechanism holds true for over a range of saturation for both smooth and rough fractures. In imbibition for rough-walled fractures, another mechanism similar to wave-like flow in pipes was also observed. The data from the experiments were analyzed using Darcy's law and using the concept of friction factor and equivalent Reynold's number for two-phase flow. For both smooth- and rough-walled fractures a clear relationship between relative permeability and saturation was seen. The calculated relative permeability curves follow Corey-type behavior and can be modeled using Honarpour expressions. The sum of the relative permeabilities is not equal one, indicating phase interference. The equivalent homogeneous single-phase approach did not give satisfactory representation of flow through fractures. The graphs of experimentally derived friction factor with the modified Reynolds number do not reveal a distinctive linear relationship.

  15. Permeability across lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Wataru

    2016-10-01

    Molecular permeation through lipid membranes is a fundamental biological process that is important for small neutral molecules and drug molecules. Precise characterization of free energy surface and diffusion coefficients along the permeation pathway is required in order to predict molecular permeability and elucidate the molecular mechanisms of permeation. Several recent technical developments, including improved molecular models and efficient sampling schemes, are illustrated in this review. For larger penetrants, explicit consideration of multiple collective variables, including orientational, conformational degrees of freedom, are required to be considered in addition to the distance from the membrane center along the membrane normal. Although computationally demanding, this method can provide significant insights into the molecular mechanisms of permeation for molecules of medical and pharmaceutical importance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:27085977

  16. Electrokinetic effects and fluid permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G. Berryman, James

    2003-10-01

    Fluid permeability of porous media depends mainly on connectivity of the pore space and two physical parameters: porosity and a pertinent length-scale parameter. Electrical imaging methods typically establish connectivity and directly measure electrical conductivity, which can then often be related to porosity by Archie's law. When electrical phase measurements are made in addition to the amplitude measurements, information about the pertinent length scale can then be obtained. Since fluid permeability controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the subsurface, inexpensive maps of permeability could improve planning strategies for remediation efforts. Detailed knowledge of fluid permeability is also important for oil field exploitation, where knowledge of permeability distribution in three dimensions is a common requirement for petroleum reservoir simulation and analysis, as well as for estimates on the economics of recovery.

  17. Water permeability of elastomers.

    PubMed

    Held, H R; Landi, S

    1977-01-01

    In a previous study it has been shown that the free moisture content in freeze-dried BCG vaccine dispensed in vials sealed with rubber stoppers increased during storage. The search for the source of this increase led us to explore the possibility that this additional moisture could originate from the rubber stoppers themselves. Therefore, the water permeability of various rubber stoppers has been studied, and the water content of grey butyl stoppers during some operations (autoclaving, oven-drying, freeze-drying, storage) used in the manufacturing of BCG vaccine has been determined. Our experiments showed: rapid water uptake during steam-autoclaving and rapid water release during subsequent oven-drying of the stoppers; a slow water uptake of the stoppers during freeze-drying and a slow water permeation through the stoppers when vials containing Indicating Drierite were stored in a water-saturated atmosphere. Among 12 types of rubber stoppers tested, the grey butyl stoppers and the silicone stoppers showed the lowest water uptake. Moisture-resistant wrappings decreased significantly the moisture uptake of Drierite. To delay moisture from reaching the vaccine it is recommended that the stoppers employed be as dry as possible. PMID:881425

  18. Permeable membrane experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, Thomas J.; Cao, Tuan Q.; Kliss, Mark H.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Permeable Membrane Experiment is to gather flight data on three areas of membrane performance that are influenced by the presence of gravity. These areas are: (1) Liquid/gas phase separation, (2) gas bubble interference with diffusion through porous membranes and (3) wetting characteristics of hydrophilic membrane surfaces. These data are important in understaning the behavior of membrane/liquid/gas interfaces where surface tension forces predominate. The data will be compared with 1-g data already obtained and with predicted micrograviity behavior. The data will be used to develop designs for phase separation and plant nutrient delivery systems and will be available to the life support community for use in developing technologies which employ membranes. A conceptual design has been developed to conduct three membrane experiments, in sequence, aboard a single Complex Autonomous Payload (CAP) carrier to be carried in the Shuttle Orbiter payload bay. One experiment is conducted for each of the three membrane performance areas under study. These experiments are discussed in this paper.

  19. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  20. Respiratory mucosal permeability in asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Elwood, R.K.; Kennedy, S.; Belzberg, A.; Hogg, J.C.; Pare, P.D.

    1983-09-01

    The permeability of respiratory mucosa to technetium-labeled diethylenetriamine pentacetic acid (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA) was measured in 10 clinically stable chronic asthmatics and the results were compared with those in 9 nonasthmatic control subjects. Nonspecific bronchial reactivity was measured using methacholine, and the PC20 was calculated. The intrapulmonary distribution and dose of the inhaled /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA was determined by a gamma camera and the half-life of the aerosolized label in the lung was calculated. The accumulation of radioactivity in the blood was monitored and a permeability index was calculated at 10, 25, and 60 min after aerosolization. Despite marked differences in airway reactivity, no differences in either parameter of permeability could be detected between the asthmatics and the control group. It is concluded that clinically stable asthmatics do not demonstrate increase mucosal permeability to small solutes when compared with normal subjects.

  1. Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Beall; Mark Walters

    2009-06-30

    The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.

  2. Permeability of soils in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Hara, Charles G.

    1994-01-01

    The permeability of soils in Mississippi was determined and mapped using a geographic information system (GIS). Soil permeabilities in Mississippi were determined to range in value from nearly 0.0 to values exceeding 5.0 inches per hour. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service's State Soil Geographic Data Base (STATSGO) was used as the primary source of data for the determination of area-weighted soil permeability. STATSGO provides soil layer properties that are spatially referenced to mapped areas. These mapped areas are referred to as polygons in the GIS. The polygons arc boundaries of soils mapped as a group and are given unique Map Unit Identifiers (MUIDs). The data describing the physical characteristics of the soils within each polygon are stored in a tabular data base format and are referred to as attributes. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service developed STATSGO to be primarily used as a guide for regional resource planning, management, and monitoring. STATSGO was designed so that soil information could be extracted from properties tables at the layer level, combined by component, and statistically expanded to cover the entire map unit. The results of this study provide a mapped value for permeability which is representative of the vertical permeability of soils in that area. The resultant permeability map provides a representative vertical soil permeability for a given area sufficient for county, multi- county, and area planning, and will be used as the soil permeability data component in the evaluation of the susceptibility of major aquifers to contami- nation in Mississippi.

  3. Permeability within basaltic oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Andrew T.

    1998-05-01

    Water-rock interactions within the seafloor are responsible for significant energy and solute fluxes between basaltic oceanic crust and the overlying ocean. Permeability is the primary hydrologic property controlling the form, intensity, and duration of seafloor fluid circulation, but after several decades of characterizing shallow oceanic basement, we are still learning how permeability is created and distributed and how it changes as the crust ages. Core-scale measurements of basaltic oceanic crust yield permeabilities that are quite low (generally 10-22 to 10-17 m²), while in situ measurements in boreholes suggest an overlapping range of values extending several orders of magnitude higher (10-18 to 10-13 m²). Additional indirect estimates include calculations made from borehole temperature and flow meter logs (10-16 to 10-11 m²), numerical models of coupled heat and fluid flow at the ridge crest and within ridge flanks (10-16 to 10-9 m²), and several other methods. Qualitative indications of permeability within the basaltic oceanic crust come from an improved understanding of crustal stratigraphy and patterns of alteration and tectonic modification seen in ophiolites, seafloor samples and boreholes. Difficulties in reconciling the wide range of estimated permeabilities arise from differences in experimental scale and critical assumptions regarding the nature and distribution of fluid flow. Many observations and experimental and modeling results are consistent with permeability varying with depth into basement and with primary basement lithology. Permeability also seems to be highly heterogeneous and anisotropic throughout much of the basaltic crust, as within crystalline rocks in general. A series of focused experiments is required to resolve permeability in shallow oceanic basement and to directly couple upper crustal hydrogeology to magmatic, tectonic, and geochemical crustal evolution.

  4. Permeability extraction: A sonic log inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Akbar, N.; Kim, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the authors provide the missing important link between permeability and acoustic velocities by generating a permeability-dependent synthetic sonic log in a carbonate reservoir. The computations are based on Akbar`s theory that relates wave velocity to frequency, rock properties (e.g., lithology, permeability, and porosity), and fluid saturation and properties (viscosity, density, and compressibility). An inverted analytical expression of the theory is used to extract permeability from sonic velocity. The synthetic sonic and the computed permeability are compared with the observed sonic log and with plug permeability, respectively. The results demonstrate, as predicted by theory, that permeability can be related directly to acoustic velocities.

  5. Fibrinogen induces endothelial cell permeability

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Neetu; Roberts, Andrew M.; Dean, William L.; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2010-01-01

    Many cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders are accompanied by an increased blood content of fibrinogen (Fg), a high molecular weight plasma adhesion protein. Fg is a biomarker of inflammation and its degradation products have been associated with microvascular leakage. We tested the hypothesis that at pathologically high levels, Fg increases endothelial cell (EC) permeability through extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling and by inducing F-actin formation. In cultured ECs, Fg binding to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and to α5β1 integrin, caused phosphorylation of ERK. Subsequently, F-actin formation increased and coincided with formation of gaps between ECs, which corresponded with increased permeability of ECs to albumin. Our data suggest that formation of F-actin and gaps may be the mechanism for increased albumin leakage through the EC monolayer. The present study indicates that elevated un-degraded Fg may be a factor causing microvascular permeability that typically accompanies cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disorders. PMID:17849175

  6. Measuring Vascular Permeability In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Eelco F J; Baish, James W; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, in vivo vascular permeability measurements have provided significant insight into vascular functions in physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as the response to pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling, abnormality of tumor vasculature and its normalization, and delivery and efficacy of therapeutic agents. Different approaches for vascular permeability measurements have been established. Here, we describe and discuss a conventional 2D imaging method to measure vascular permeability, which was originally documented by Gerlowski and Jain in 1986 (Microvasc Res 31:288-305, 1986) and further developed by Yuan et al. in the early 1990s (Microvasc Res 45:269-289, 1993; Cancer Res 54:352-3356, 1994), and our recently developed 3D imaging method, which advances the approach originally described by Brown et al. in 2001 (Nat Med 7:864-868, 2001). PMID:27581015

  7. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  8. PERMEABILITY OF BACTERIAL SPORES I.

    PubMed Central

    Black, S. H.; Gerhardt, Philipp

    1961-01-01

    Black, S. H. (The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) and Philipp Gerhardt. Permeability of bacterial spores. I. Characterization of glucose uptake. J. Bacteriol. 82:743–749. 1961.—The total uptake of glucose by masses of clean, dormant spores was measured to assess their permeability. After correction for intercellular space, packed spores of Bacillus cereus strain terminalis were found in 87 determinations to be permeated by glucose to 40% of their weight. The glucose uptake was relatively independent of environmental variables, and thus was concluded to occur principally through a process of passive diffusion. PMID:13869665

  9. Permeability of compacting porous lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwell, P. A.; Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Kennedy, B. M.; Hess, K.-U.; Aulock, F. W.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Vasseur, J.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-03-01

    The highly transient nature of outgassing commonly observed at volcanoes is in part controlled by the permeability of lava domes and shallow conduits. Lava domes generally consist of a porous outer carapace surrounding a denser lava core with internal shear zones of variable porosity. Here we examine densification using uniaxial compression experiments on variably crystalline and porous rhyolitic dome lavas from the Taupo Volcanic Zone. Experiments were conducted at 900°C and an applied stress of 3 MPa to 60% strain, while monitoring acoustic emissions to track cracking. The evolution of the porous network was assessed via X-ray computed tomography, He-pycnometry, and relative gas permeability. High starting connected porosities led to low apparent viscosities and high strain rates, initially accompanied by abundant acoustic emissions. As compaction ensued, the lavas evolved; apparent viscosity increased and strain rate decreased due to strain hardening of the suspensions. Permeability fluctuations resulted from the interplay between viscous flow and brittle failure. Where phenocrysts were abundant, cracks had limited spatial extent, and pore closure decreased axial and radial permeability proportionally, maintaining the initial anisotropy. In crystal-poor lavas, axial cracks had a more profound effect, and permeability anisotropy switched to favor axial flow. Irrespective of porosity, both crystalline samples compacted to a threshold minimum porosity of 17-19%, whereas the crystal-poor sample did not achieve its compaction limit. This indicates that unconfined loading of porous dome lavas does not necessarily form an impermeable plug and may be hindered, in part by the presence of crystals.

  10. High membrane permeability for melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haijie; Dickson, Eamonn J.; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Koh, Duk-Su

    2016-01-01

    The pineal gland, an endocrine organ in the brain, synthesizes and secretes the circulating night hormone melatonin throughout the night. The literature states that this hormone is secreted by simple diffusion across the pinealocyte plasma membrane, but a direct quantitative measurement of membrane permeability has not been made. Experiments were designed to compare the cell membrane permeability to three indoleamines: melatonin and its precursors N-acetylserotonin (NAS) and serotonin (5-HT). The three experimental approaches were (1) to measure the concentration of effluxing indoleamines amperometrically in the bath while cells were being dialyzed internally by a patch pipette, (2) to measure the rise of intracellular indoleamine fluorescence as the compound was perfused in the bath, and (3) to measure the rate of quenching of intracellular fura-2 dye fluorescence as indoleamines were perfused in the bath. These measures showed that permeabilities of melatonin and NAS are high (both are uncharged molecules), whereas that for 5-HT (mostly charged) is much lower. Comparisons were made with predictions of solubility-diffusion theory and compounds of known permeability, and a diffusion model was made to simulate all of the measurements. In short, extracellular melatonin equilibrates with the cytoplasm in 3.5 s, has a membrane permeability of ∼1.7 µm/s, and could not be retained in secretory vesicles. Thus, it and NAS will be “secreted” from pineal cells by membrane diffusion. Circumstances are suggested when 5-HT and possibly catecholamines may also appear in the extracellular space passively by membrane diffusion. PMID:26712850

  11. High membrane permeability for melatonin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haijie; Dickson, Eamonn J; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Koh, Duk-Su; Hille, Bertil

    2016-01-01

    The pineal gland, an endocrine organ in the brain, synthesizes and secretes the circulating night hormone melatonin throughout the night. The literature states that this hormone is secreted by simple diffusion across the pinealocyte plasma membrane, but a direct quantitative measurement of membrane permeability has not been made. Experiments were designed to compare the cell membrane permeability to three indoleamines: melatonin and its precursors N-acetylserotonin (NAS) and serotonin (5-HT). The three experimental approaches were (1) to measure the concentration of effluxing indoleamines amperometrically in the bath while cells were being dialyzed internally by a patch pipette, (2) to measure the rise of intracellular indoleamine fluorescence as the compound was perfused in the bath, and (3) to measure the rate of quenching of intracellular fura-2 dye fluorescence as indoleamines were perfused in the bath. These measures showed that permeabilities of melatonin and NAS are high (both are uncharged molecules), whereas that for 5-HT (mostly charged) is much lower. Comparisons were made with predictions of solubility-diffusion theory and compounds of known permeability, and a diffusion model was made to simulate all of the measurements. In short, extracellular melatonin equilibrates with the cytoplasm in 3.5 s, has a membrane permeability of ∼1.7 µm/s, and could not be retained in secretory vesicles. Thus, it and NAS will be "secreted" from pineal cells by membrane diffusion. Circumstances are suggested when 5-HT and possibly catecholamines may also appear in the extracellular space passively by membrane diffusion. PMID:26712850

  12. Quantifying Evaporation in a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies quantifying evaporation from permeable pavement systems are limited to a few laboratory studies and one field application. This research quantifies evaporation for a larger-scale field application by measuring the water balance from lined permeable pavement sections. Th...

  13. Permeable Pavement Research - Edison, New Jersey

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides the background and summary of results collected at the permeable pavement parking lot monitored at the EPA facility in Edison, NJ. This parking lot is surfaced with permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete, and porous asphalt. ...

  14. Review of hydrogen isotope permeability through materials

    SciTech Connect

    Steward, S.A.

    1983-08-15

    This report is the first part of a comprehensive summary of the literature on hydrogen isotope permeability through materials that do not readily form hydrides. While we mainly focus on pure metals with low permeabilities because of their importance to tritium containment, we also give data on higher-permeability materials such as iron, nickel, steels, and glasses.

  15. Novel additives to retard permeable flow

    SciTech Connect

    Golombok, Michael; Crane, Carel; Ineke, Erik; Welling, Marco; Harris, Jon

    2008-09-15

    Low concentrations of surfactant and cosolute in water, can selectively retard permeable flow in high permeability rocks compared to low permeability ones. This represents a way forward for more efficient areal sweep efficiency when water flooding a reservoir during improved oil recovery. (author)

  16. Vapor-liquid phase separator permeability results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1981-01-01

    Continued studies are described in the area of vapor-liquid phase separator work with emphasis on permeabilities of porous sintered plugs (stainless steel, nominal pore size 2 micrometer). The temperature dependence of the permeability has been evaluated in classical fluid using He-4 gas at atmospheric pressure and in He-2 on the basis of a modified, thermosmotic permeability of the normal fluid.

  17. Structure/Permeability Relationships Of Polyimide Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; Yamamoto, H.; Mi, Y.; Stern, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of permeabilities, by each of five gases, of membranes made of four different polyimides. Conducted to gain understanding of effects of molecular structures of membranes on permeabilities and to assess potential for exploitation of selective permeability in gas-separation processes. Gases used: H2, O2, N2, CO2, and CH4.

  18. Permeability enhancement using explosive techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.F.; Schmidt, S.C.; Carter, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    In situ recovery methods for many of our hydrocarbon and mineral resources depend on the ability to create or enhance permeability in the resource bed to allow uniform and predictable flow. To meet this need, a new branch of geomechanics devoted to computer prediction of explosive rock breakage and permeability enhancement has developed. The computer is used to solve the nonlinear equations of compressible flow, with the explosive behavior and constitutive properties of the medium providing the initial/boundary conditions and material response. Once the resulting computational tool has been verified and calibrated with appropriate large-scale field tests, it can be used to develop and optimize commercially useful explosive techniques for in situ resource recovery.

  19. Scale-dependent permeability of fractured andesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Kennedy, Ben

    2016-04-01

    Extension fractures in volcanic systems exist on all scales, from microscopic fractures to large fissures. They play a fundamental role in the movement of fluids and distribution of pore pressure, and therefore exert considerable influence over volcanic eruption recurrence. We present here laboratory permeability measurements for porous (porosity = 0.03-0.6) andesites before (i.e. intact) and after failure in tension (i.e., the samples host a throughgoing tensile fracture). The permeability of the intact andesites increases with increasing porosity, from 2 × 10-17 to 5 × 10-11 m2. Following fracture formation, the permeability of the samples (the effective permeability) falls within a narrow range regardless of their initial porosity: 2-6 × 10-11 m2. However, laboratory measurements of fractured samples likely overestimate the effective permeability due to the inherent scale-dependence of permeability. To better understand this scale-dependence, we first determined the permeability of the tensile fractures using a two-dimensional model that considers flow in parallel layers. Our calculations highlight that tensile fractures in low-porosity samples are more permeable (as high as 2.3 × 10-9 m2) than those in high-porosity samples (as low as 3.0 × 10-10 m2), a difference that can be explained by an increase in fracture tortuosity with porosity. We then use our fracture permeability data to model the effective permeability of rock with different host rock permeabilities (10-17 to 10-11 m2) populated by tensile fractures over a wide range of lengthscale. We find that the effective permeability of fractured andesite depends heavily on the initial host rock permeability and the scale of interest. At a given lengthscale, the effective permeability of high-permeability rock (10-12 to 10-11 m2) is essentially unaffected by the presence of numerous tensile fractures. By contrast, a single tensile fracture increases the effective permeability of low-permeability rock

  20. Steam-water relative permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Ambusso, W.; Satik, C.; Home, R.N.

    1997-12-31

    A set of relative permeability relations for simultaneous flow of steam and water in porous media have been measured in steady state experiments conducted under the conditions that eliminate most errors associated with saturation and pressure measurements. These relations show that the relative permeabilities for steam-water flow in porous media vary approximately linearly with saturation. This departure from the nitrogen/water behavior indicates that there are fundamental differences between steam/water and nitrogen/water flows. The saturations in these experiments were measured by using a high resolution X-ray computer tomography (CT) scanner. In addition the pressure gradients were obtained from the measurements of liquid phase pressure over the portions with flat saturation profiles. These two aspects constitute a major improvement in the experimental method compared to those used in the past. Comparison of the saturation profiles measured by the X-ray CT scanner during the experiments shows a good agreement with those predicted by numerical simulations. To obtain results that are applicable to general flow of steam and water in porous media similar experiments will be conducted at higher temperature and with porous rocks of different wetting characteristics and porosity distribution.

  1. Vortex rings impinging on permeable boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujal-Colilles, Anna; Dalziel, Stuart B.; Bateman, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Experiments with vortex rings impinging permeable and solid boundaries are presented in order to investigate the influence of permeability. Utilizing Particle Image Velocimetry, we compared the behaviour of a vortex ring impinging four different reticulated foams (with permeability k ˜ 26 - 85 × 10-8 m2) and a solid boundary. Results show how permeability affects the stretching phenomena of the vortex ring and the formation and evolution of the secondary vortex ring with opposite sign. Moreover, permeability also affects the macroscopic no-slip boundary condition found on the solid boundary, turning it into an apparent slip boundary condition for the most permeable boundary. The apparent slip-boundary condition and the flux exchange between the ambient fluid and the foam are jointly responsible for both the modified formation of the secondary vortex and changes on the vortex ring diameter increase.

  2. Permeability and corrosion behavior of phenoxy coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tiburcio, A.C.; Manson, J.A.

    1993-12-31

    The corrosion behavior of a glass-bead-filled phenoxy coating system was studied by correlating permeability and electrochemical measurements with actual corrosion performance. The study emphasized the effects of filler and filler/polymer matrix interactions on corrosion behavior. Water vapor permeability, dissolved oxygen permeability and conductivity measurements were made to determine the rate of transport of the three key ingredients in cathodic delamination and corrosion process (H{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, and cation). The glass bead filler had a greater effect on both cathodic delamination and corrosion behavior than filler/polymer matrix interaction. Overall, the permeability behavior controlled the delamination and corrosion performance.

  3. Relating P-wave attenuation to permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Akbar, N.; Dvorkin, J.; Nur, A. . Dept. of Geophysics)

    1993-01-01

    To relate P-wave attenuation to permeability, the authors examine a three-dimensional (3-D) theoretical model of a cylindrical pore filled with viscous fluid and embedded in an infinite isotropic elastic medium. They calculate both attenuation and permeability as functions of the direction of wave propagation. Attenuation estimates are based on the squirt flow mechanism; permeability is calculated using the Kozeny-Carmen relation. They find that in the case when a plane P-wave propagates parallel to this orientation (Q[sup [minus]1][delta] = 90[degree]), attenuation is always higher than when a wave propagates parallel to this orientation (Q[sup [minus]1][delta] = 0[degree]). The ratio of these two attenuation values Q[sup [minus]1][delta] = 90[degree]/Q[sup [minus]1] = 0[degree] increases with an increasing pore radius and decreasing frequency and saturation. By changing permeability, varying the radius of the pore, they find that the permeability-attenuation relation is characterized by a peak that shifts toward lower permeabilities as frequency decreases. Therefore, the attenuation of a low-frequency wave decreases with increasing permeability. They observe a similar trend on relations between attenuation and permeability experimentally obtained on sandstone samples.

  4. Permeability-porosity data sets for sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, P.H.

    2004-01-01

    Due to the variable nature of permeability-porosity relations, core should be obtained and permeability (k) and porosity (??) should be determined on core plugs in the laboratory for the formation of interest. A catalog of k versus (??) data sets is now available on the Web. Examples from the catalog are considered to illustrate some aspects of k versus ?? dependencies in siliciclastic reservoirs.

  5. Pressure sensitivity of low permeability sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilmer, N.H.; Morrow, N.R.; Pitman, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed core analysis has been carried out on 32 tight sandstones with permeabilities ranging over four orders of magnitude (0.0002 to 4.8 mD at 5000 psi confining pressure). Relationships between gas permeability and net confining pressure were measured for cycles of loading and unloading. For some samples, permeabilities were measured both along and across bedding planes. Large variations in stress sensitivity of permeability were observed from one sample to another. The ratio of permeability at a nominal confining pressure of 500 psi to that at 5000 psi was used to define a stress sensitivity ratio. For a given sample, confining pressure vs permeability followed a linear log-log relationship, the slope of which provided an index of pressure sensitivity. This index, as obtained for first unloading data, was used in testing relationships between stress sensitivity and other measured rock properties. Pressure sensitivity tended to increase with increase in carbonate content and depth, and with decrease in porosity, permeability and sodium feldspar. However, scatter in these relationships increased as permeability decreased. Tests for correlations between pressure sensitivity and various linear combinations of variables are reported. Details of pore structure related to diagenetic changes appears to be of much greater significance to pressure sensitivity than mineral composition. ?? 1987.

  6. Intestinal permeability and contractility in murine colitis.

    PubMed Central

    van Meeteren, M E; van Bergeijk, J D; van Dijk, A P; Tak, C J; Meijssen, M A; Zijlstra, F J

    1998-01-01

    We developed an in vitro organ bath method to measure permeability and contractility simultaneously in murine intestinal segments. To investigate whether permeability and contractility are correlated and influenced by mucosal damage owing to inflammation, BALB/c mice were exposed to a 10% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) solution for 8 days to induce colitis. The effect of pharmacologically induced smooth muscle relaxation and contraction on permeability was tested in vitro. Regional permeability differences were observed in both control and 10% DSS-treated mice. Distal colon segments were less permeable to 3H-mannitol and 14C-PEG 400 molecules compared with proximal colon and ileum. Intestinal permeability in control vs. 10% DSS mice was not altered, although histologic inflammation score and IFN-gamma pro-inflammatory cytokine levels were significantly increased in proximal and distal colon. IL-1beta levels were enhanced in these proximal and distal segments, but not significantly different from controls. Any effect of pharmacologically induced contractility on intestinal permeability could not be observed. In conclusion, intestinal permeability and contractility are not correlated in this model of experimentally induced colitis in mice. Although simultaneous measurement in a physiological set-up is possible, this method has to be further validated. PMID:9705603

  7. Influence of fiber packing structure on permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Zhong; Berdichevsky, Alexander L.

    1993-01-01

    The study on the permeability of an aligned fiber bundle is the key building block in modeling the permeability of advanced woven and braided preforms. Available results on the permeability of fiber bundles in the literature show that a substantial difference exists between numerical and analytical calculations on idealized fiber packing structures, such as square and hexagonal packing, and experimental measurements on practical fiber bundles. The present study focuses on the variation of the permeability of a fiber bundle under practical process conditions. Fiber bundles are considered as containing openings and fiber clusters within the bundle. Numerical simulations on the influence of various openings on the permeability were conducted. Idealized packing structures are used, but with introduced openings distributed in different patterns. Both longitudinal and transverse flow are considered. The results show that openings within the fiber bundle have substantial effect on the permeability. In the longitudinal flow case, the openings become the dominant flow path. In the transverse flow case, the fiber clusters reduce the gap sizes among fibers. Therefore the permeability is greatly influenced by these openings and clusters, respectively. In addition to the porosity or fiber volume fraction, which is commonly used in the permeability expression, another fiber bundle status parameter, the ultimate fiber volume fraction, is introduced to capture the disturbance within a fiber bundle.

  8. Accurate determination of characteristic relative permeability curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Michael H.; Benson, Sally M.

    2015-09-01

    A recently developed technique to accurately characterize sub-core scale heterogeneity is applied to investigate the factors responsible for flowrate-dependent effective relative permeability curves measured on core samples in the laboratory. The dependency of laboratory measured relative permeability on flowrate has long been both supported and challenged by a number of investigators. Studies have shown that this apparent flowrate dependency is a result of both sub-core scale heterogeneity and outlet boundary effects. However this has only been demonstrated numerically for highly simplified models of porous media. In this paper, flowrate dependency of effective relative permeability is demonstrated using two rock cores, a Berea Sandstone and a heterogeneous sandstone from the Otway Basin Pilot Project in Australia. Numerical simulations of steady-state coreflooding experiments are conducted at a number of injection rates using a single set of input characteristic relative permeability curves. Effective relative permeability is then calculated from the simulation data using standard interpretation methods for calculating relative permeability from steady-state tests. Results show that simplified approaches may be used to determine flowrate-independent characteristic relative permeability provided flow rate is sufficiently high, and the core heterogeneity is relatively low. It is also shown that characteristic relative permeability can be determined at any typical flowrate, and even for geologically complex models, when using accurate three-dimensional models.

  9. A method of determination of permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, S.V.; Trofimov, V.A.

    2007-11-15

    A method is proposed for determining permeability of coals under conditions of steady-state deformation and stationary filtration mode by employing a reference core made of gas-non-sorbing material with a known permeability. The approach has been developed to assess the time of transition to the stable filtration.

  10. Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.S.

    2003-02-21

    Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

  11. Compact rock material gas permeability properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huanling; Xu, Weiya; Zuo, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Natural compact rocks, such as sandstone, granite, and rock salt, are the main materials and geological environment for storing underground oil, gas, CO2, shale gas, and radioactive waste because they have extremely low permeabilities and high mechanical strengths. Using the inert gas argon as the fluid medium, the stress-dependent permeability and porosity of monzonitic granite and granite gneiss from an underground oil storage depot were measured using a permeability and porosity measurement system. Based on the test results, models for describing the relationships among the permeability, porosity, and confining pressure of rock specimens were analyzed and are discussed. A power law is suggested to describe the relationship between the stress-dependent porosity and permeability; for the monzonitic granite and granite gneiss (for monzonitic granite (A-2), the initial porosity is approximately 4.05%, and the permeability is approximately 10-19 m2; for the granite gneiss (B-2), the initial porosity is approximately 7.09%, the permeability is approximately 10-17 m2; and the porosity-sensitivity exponents that link porosity and permeability are 0.98 and 3.11, respectively). Compared with moderate-porosity and high-porosity rocks, for which φ > 15%, low-porosity rock permeability has a relatively lower sensitivity to stress, but the porosity is more sensitive to stress, and different types of rocks show similar trends. From the test results, it can be inferred that the test rock specimens' permeability evolution is related to the relative particle movements and microcrack closure.

  12. Permeability of naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Teufel, L.W. )

    1991-03-01

    Hydraulic fracture stress data collected from carbonate and clastic reservoirs show that the minimum horizontal in situ stress decreases with reservoir depletion and pore pressure drawdown. The reduction in minimum horizontal stress is, in part, a poro-elastic effect that is linear with pore pressure drawdown and can be approximated by an unlaxial compaction model. The observed change in horizontal stress is equal to 40% to 80% of the net change in pore pressure. This type of stress behavior has important implications for reservoir management of naturally fractured reservoirs, because conductivity of fractures is highly stress sensitive. Laboratory studies clearly demonstrate that with increasing effective normal stress fracture apertures close and conductivity decreases. Accordingly, in sharp contrast to the standard procedure, predictions of changes in fracture permeability during reservoir depletion should not be made simply as a function of pore pressure drawdown, but more importantly should be based on how the effective in situ stresses change during drawdown and the orientation of natural fractures relative to the in situ stress field. The increase in the effective overburden stress will be the largest and equal to the magnitude of the pore pressure decline because the overburden stress is constant and does not change with drawdown. However, the increase in the effective minimum horizontal stress will be much smaller. Accordingly, for a reservoir with several sets of fractures with similar morphology, the reduction in fracture conductivity during drawdown will be greatest for horizontal fractures and least for vertical fractures aligned with the maximum horizontal stress direction.

  13. A Poroelastic Description of Permeability Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadegan, Alireza; Zimmermann, Günter

    2014-07-01

    Pore pressure changes in a geothermal reservoir, as a result of injection and/or production of water, result in changes of stress acting on the reservoir rock and, consequently, changes in the mechanical and transport properties of the rock. Bulk modulus and permeability were measured at different pressures and temperatures. An outcropping equivalent of Rotliegend reservoir rock in the North German Basin (Flechtinger sandstone) was used to perform hydrostatic tests and steady state fluid flow tests. Permeability measurements were conducted while cycling confining pressure; the dependence of permeability on stress was determined at a constant downstream pressure of 1 MPa. Also, temperature was increased stepwise from 30 to 140 °C and crack porosity was calculated at different temperatures. Although changes in the volumes of cracks are not significant, the cracks control fluid flow pathways and, consequently, the permeability of the rock. A new model was derived which relates microstructure of porosity, the stress-strain curve, and permeability. Porosity change was described by the first derivative of the stress-strain curve. Permeability evolution was ascribed to crack closure and was related to the second derivative of the stress-strain curve. The porosity and permeability of Flechtinger sandstone were reduced by increasing the effective pressure and decreased after each pressure cycle.

  14. Fluid permeability of deformable fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.R.; Bruhn, R.L.

    1997-04-01

    The authors consider the problem of defining the fracture permeability tensor for each grid lock in a rock mass from maps of natural fractures. For this purpose they implement a statistical model of cracked rock due to M. Oda [1985], where the permeability tensor is related to the crack geometry via a volume average of the contribution from each crack in the population. In this model tectonic stress is implicitly coupled to fluid flow through an assumed relationship between crack aperture and normal stress across the crack. The authors have included the following enhancements to the basic model: (1) a realistic model of crack closure under stress has been added along with the provision to apply tectonic stresses to the fracture system in any orientation, the application of stress results in fracture closure and consequently a reduction in permeability; (2) the fracture permeability can be superimposed onto an arbitrary anisotropic matrix permeability; (3) the fracture surfaces are allowed to slide under the application of shear stress, causing fractures to dilate and result in a permeability increase. Through an example, the authors demonstrate that significant changes in permeability magnitudes and orientations are possible when tectonic stress is applied to a fracture system.

  15. Permeable Gas Flow Influences Magma Fragmentation Speed.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, D.; Scheu, B.; Spieler, O.; Dingwell, D.

    2008-12-01

    Highly viscous magmas undergo fragmentation in order to produce the pyroclastic deposits that we observe, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. The overpressure required to initiate fragmentation depends on a number of physical parameters, such as the magma's vesicularity, permeability, tensile strength and textural properties. It is clear that these same parameters control also the speed at which a fragmentation front travels through magma when fragmentation occurs. Recent mathematical models of fragmentation processes consider most of these factors, but permeable gas flow has not yet been included in these models. However, it has been shown that permeable gas flow through a porous rock during a sudden decompression event increases the fragmentation threshold. Fragmentation experiments on natural samples from Bezymianny (Russia), Colima (Mexico), Krakatau (Indonesia) and Augustine (USA) volcanoes confirm these results and suggest in addition that high permeable flow rates may increase the speed of fragmentation. Permeability from the investigated samples ranges from as low as 5 x 10-14 to higher than 9 x 10- 12 m2 and open porosity ranges from 16 % to 48 %. Experiments were performed for each sample series at applied pressures up to 35 MPa. Our results indicate that the rate of increase of fragmentation speed is higher when the permeability is above 10-12 m2. We confirm that it is necessary to include the influence of permeable flow on fragmentation dynamics.

  16. Using magnetic permeability bits to store information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerwilke, John; Petrie, J. R.; Wieland, K. A.; Mencia, Raymond; Liou, Sy-Hwang; Cress, C. D.; Newburgh, G. A.; Edelstein, A. S.

    2015-10-01

    Steps are described in the development of a new magnetic memory technology, based on states with different magnetic permeability, with the capability to reliably store large amounts of information in a high-density form for decades. The advantages of using the permeability to store information include an insensitivity to accidental exposure to magnetic fields or temperature changes, both of which are known to corrupt memory approaches that rely on remanent magnetization. The high permeability media investigated consists of either films of Metglas 2826 MB (Fe40Ni38Mo4B18) or bilayers of permalloy (Ni78Fe22)/Cu. Regions of films of the high permeability media were converted thermally to low permeability regions by laser or ohmic heating. The permeability of the bits was read by detecting changes of an external 32 Oe probe field using a magnetic tunnel junction 10 μm away from the media. Metglas bits were written with 100 μs laser pulses and arrays of 300 nm diameter bits were read. The high and low permeability bits written using bilayers of permalloy/Cu are not affected by 10 Mrad(Si) of gamma radiation from a 60Co source. An economical route for writing and reading bits as small at 20 nm using a variation of heat assisted magnetic recording is discussed.

  17. Permeability Barrier Generation in the Martian Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schools, Joe; Montési, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Permeability barriers develop when a magma produced in the interior of a planet rises into the cooler lithosphere and crystallizes more rapidly than the lithosphere can deform (Sparks and Parmentier, 1991). Crystallization products may then clog the porous network in which melt is propagating, reducing the permeability to almost zero, i.e., forming a permeability barrier. Subsequent melts cannot cross the barrier. Permeability barriers have been useful to explain variations in crustal thickness at mid-ocean ridges on Earth (Magde et al., 1997; Hebert and Montési, 2011; Montési et al., 2011). We explore here under what conditions permeability barriers may form on Mars.We use the MELTS thermodynamic calculator (Ghiorso and Sack, 1995; Ghiorso et al., 2002; Asimow et al., 2004) in conjunction with estimated Martian mantle compositions (Morgan and Anders, 1979; Wänke and Dreibus, 1994; Lodders and Fegley, 1997; Sanloup et al., 1999; Taylor 2013) to model the formation of permeability barriers in the lithosphere of Mars. In order to represent potential past and present conditions of Mars, we vary the lithospheric thickness, mantle potential temperature (heat flux), oxygen fugacity, and water content.Our results show that permeability layers can develop in the thermal boundary layer of the simulated Martian lithosphere if the mantle potential temperature is higher than ~1500°C. The various Martian mantle compositions yield barriers in the same locations, under matching variable conditions. There is no significant difference in barrier location over the range of accepted Martian oxygen fugacity values. Water content is the most significant influence on barrier development as it reduces the temperature of crystallization, allowing melt to rise further into the lithosphere. Our lower temperature and thicker lithosphere model runs, which are likely the most similar to modern Mars, show no permeability barrier generation. Losing the possibility of having a permeability

  18. Effective permeabilities for model heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Otevo, C.; Rusinek, I. ); Saez, A.E. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a technique to evaluate effective absolute permeabilities for heterogeneous porous media. The technique is based on a perturbation analysis of the equations of motion of a slightly compressible fluid in a homogeneous porous medium at low Reynolds numbers. The effective permeabilities can be calculated once the local geometry of the heterogeneous medium is specified. The technique is used to evaluate two- and three-dimensional effective vertical permeabilities in porous media with shale intercalations, including the case in which the porous matrix is anisotropic.

  19. Gas Permeable Chemochromic Compositions for Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokerman, Gary (Inventor); Mohajeri, Nahid (Inventor); Muradov, Nazim (Inventor); Tabatabaie-Raissi, Ali (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A (H2) sensor composition includes a gas permeable matrix material intermixed and encapsulating at least one chemochromic pigment. The chemochromic pigment produces a detectable change in color of the overall sensor composition in the presence of H2 gas. The matrix material provides high H2 permeability, which permits fast permeation of H2 gas. In one embodiment, the chemochromic pigment comprises PdO/TiO2. The sensor can be embodied as a two layer structure with the gas permeable matrix material intermixed with the chemochromic pigment in one layer and a second layer which provides a support or overcoat layer.

  20. Specific surface area model for foam permeability.

    PubMed

    Pitois, O; Lorenceau, E; Louvet, N; Rouyer, F

    2009-01-01

    Liquid foams were recognized early to be porous materials, as liquid flowed between the gas bubbles. Drainage theories have been established, and foam permeability has been modeled from the microscopic description of the equivalent pores geometry, emphasizing similarities with their solid counterparts. But to what extent can the theoretical work devoted to the permeability of solid porous materials be useful to liquid foams? In this article, the applicability of the Carman-Kozeny model on foam is investigated. We performed measurements of the permeability of foams with nonmobile surfactants, and we show that, in introducing an equivalent specific surface area for the foam, the model accurately describes the experimental data over two orders of magnitude for the foam liquid fraction, without any additional parameters. Finally, it is shown that this model includes the previous permeability models derived for foams in the dry foams limit. PMID:19032030

  1. Flexible Sandwich Diaphragms Are Less Permeable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalovic, John G.; Vassallo, Franklin A.

    1993-01-01

    Diaphragms for use in refrigerator compressors made as laminates of commercially available elastomers and metals. Diaphragms flexible, but less permeable by chlorofluorocarbon refrigerant fluids than diaphragms made of homogeneous mixtures of materials.

  2. Variability of permeability with diameter of conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegoke, J. A.; Olowofela, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    An entry length is always observed before laminar flow is achieved in fluid flowing in a conduit. This depends on the Reynolds number of the flow and the degree of smoothness of the conduit. This work examined this region and the point where laminar flow commences in the context of flow through conduit packed with porous material like beads, of known porosity. Using some theoretical assumptions, it is demonstrated that permeability varies from zero at wall-fluid boundary to maximum at mid-stream, creating a permeability profile similar to the velocity profile. An equation was obtained to establish this. We also found that peak values of permeability increase with increasing porosity, and therefore entry length increases with increasing porosity with all other parameters kept constant. A plot of peak permeability versus porosity revealed that they are linearly related.

  3. Method for determining permeability in hydrocarbon wells

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, D.E.

    1990-10-09

    This patent describes a method of determining at the earth's surface the permeability of a subsurface earth formation having a known nominal hydrocarbon pore saturation value. The formation is tranversed by a borehole resulting from drilling with a drill bit.

  4. NASA In-step: Permeable Membrane Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the Permeable Membrane Experiment are presented. An experiment overview is given. The Membrane Phase Separation Experiment, Membrane Diffusion Interference Experiment, and Membrane Wetting Experiment are described. Finally, summary and conclusions are discussed.

  5. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, Alan T.

    2003-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  6. Permeability After Impact Testing of Composite Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A.T.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since composite laminates are beginning to be identified for use in reusable launch vehicle propulsion systems, an understanding of their permeance is needed. A foreign object impact event can cause a localized area of permeability (leakage) in a polymer matrix composite and it is the aim of this study to assess a method of quantifying permeability-after-impact results. A simple test apparatus is presented and variables that could affect the measured values of permeability-after-impact were assessed. Once it was determined that valid numbers were being measured, a fiber/resin system was impacted at various impact levels and the resulting permeability measured, first with a leak check solution (qualitative) then using the new apparatus (quantitative). The results showed that as the impact level increased, so did the measured leakage. As the pressure to the specimen was increased, the leak rate was seen to increase in a non-linear fashion for almost all of the specimens tested.

  7. Measuring Permeability of Composite Cryotank Laminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, Stanley T.; Selvidge, Shawn; Watwood, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a test method developed to identify whether certain materials and material systems are suitable candidates for large pressurized reusable cryogenic tanks intended for use in current and future manned launch systems. It provides a quick way to screen numerous candidate materials for permeability under anticipated loading environments consistent with flight conditions, as well as addressing reusability issues. cryogenic tank, where the major design issue was hydrogen permeability. It was successfully used to evaluate samples subjected to biaxial loading while maintaining test temperatures near liquid hydrogen. After each sample was thermally preconditioned, a cyclic pressure load was applied to simulate the in-plane strain. First permeability was measured while a sample was under load. Then the sample was unloaded and allowed to return to ambient temperature. The test was repeated to simulate reusability, in order to evaluate its effects on material permeability.

  8. Permeability of rayon based polymer composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, E. H.

    1992-01-01

    Several types of anomalous rayon based phenolic behavior have been observed in post-fired nozzles and exit cones. Many of these events have been shown to be related to the development of internal gas pressure within the material. The development of internal gas pressure is a function of the amount of gas produced within the material and the rate at which that gas is allowed to escape. The latter property of the material is referred to as the material's permeability. The permeability of two dimensional carbonized rayon based phenolic composites is a function of material direction, temperature, and stress/strain state. Recently significant differences in the permeability of these materials has been uncovered which may explain their inconsistent performance. This paper summarizes what is known about the permeability of these materials to date and gives possible implications of these finding to the performance of these materials in an ablative environment.

  9. Lunar electrical conductivity and magnetic permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.; Daily, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Improved analytical techniques are applied to a large Apollo magnetometer data set to yield values of electroconductivity, temperature, magnetic permeability, and iron abundance. Average bulk electroconductivity of the moon is calculated to be .0007 mho/m; a rapid increase with depth to about .003 mho/m within 250 km is indicated. The temperature profile, obtained from the electroconductivity profile for olivine, indicates high lunar temperatures at relatively shallow depths. Magnetic permeability of the moon relative to its environment is calculated to be 1.008 plus or minus .005; a permeability relative to free space of 1.012 plus 0.011, minus 0.008 is obtained. Lunar iron abundances corresponding to this permeability value are 2.5 plus 2.3, minus 1.7 wt% free iron and 5.0-13.5 wt% total iron for a moon composed of a combination of free iron, olivine, and orthopyroxene.

  10. PERMEABILITY OF POLYMERIC MEMBRANE LINING MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeabilities to three gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrogen), water vapor, and five solvents (methanol, acetone, cyclohexane, xylene, and chloroform) are reported for a broad range of commercial polymeric membranes. Gas and water vapor transmission (WVT) data were determ...

  11. Vascular permeability, vascular hyperpermeability and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Janice A.; Benjamin, Laura; Zeng, Huiyan; Dvorak, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    The vascular system has the critical function of supplying tissues with nutrients and clearing waste products. To accomplish these goals, the vasculature must be sufficiently permeable to allow the free, bidirectional passage of small molecules and gases and, to a lesser extent, of plasma proteins. Physiologists and many vascular biologists differ as to the definition of vascular permeability and the proper methodology for its measurement. We review these conflicting views, finding that both provide useful but complementary information. Vascular permeability by any measure is dramatically increased in acute and chronic inflammation, cancer, and wound healing. This hyperpermeability is mediated by acute or chronic exposure to vascular permeabilizing agents, particularly vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF, VEGF-A). We demonstrate that three distinctly different types of vascular permeability can be distinguished, based on the different types of microvessels involved, the composition of the extravasate, and the anatomic pathways by which molecules of different size cross-vascular endothelium. These are the basal vascular permeability (BVP) of normal tissues, the acute vascular hyperpermeability (AVH) that occurs in response to a single, brief exposure to VEGF-A or other vascular permeabilizing agents, and the chronic vascular hyperpermeability (CVH) that characterizes pathological angiogenesis. Finally, we list the numerous (at least 25) gene products that different authors have found to affect vascular permeability in variously engineered mice and classify them with respect to their participation, as far as possible, in BVP, AVH and CVH. Further work will be required to elucidate the signaling pathways by which each of these molecules, and others likely to be discovered, mediate the different types of vascular permeability. PMID:18293091

  12. Pneumatic fracturing of low permeability media

    SciTech Connect

    Schuring, J.R.

    1996-08-01

    Pneumatic fracturing of soils to enhance the removal and treatment of dense nonaqueous phase liquids is described. The process involves gas injection at a pressure exceeding the natural stresses and at a flow rate exceeding the permeability of the formation. The paper outlines geologic considerations, advantages and disadvantages, general technology considerations, low permeability media considerations, commercial availability, efficiency, and costs. Five case histories of remediation using pneumatic fracturing are briefly summarized. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Hormonal Regulation of Nuclear Permeability*◆

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Elizabeth M.; Gomes, Dawidson A.; Sehgal, Sona; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Transport into the nucleus is critical for regulation of gene transcription and other intranuclear events. Passage of molecules into the nucleus depends in part upon their size and the presence of appropriate targeting sequences. However, little is known about the effects of hormones or their second messengers on transport across the nuclear envelope. We used localized, two-photon activation of a photoactivatable green fluorescent protein to investigate whether hormones, via their second messengers, could alter nuclear permeability. Vasopressin other hormones that increase cytosolic Ca2+ and activate protein kinase C increased permeability across the nuclear membrane of SKHep1 liver cells in a rapid unidirectional manner. An increase in cytosolic Ca2+ was both necessary and sufficient for this process. Furthermore, localized photorelease of caged Ca2+ near the nuclear envelope resulted in a local increase in nuclear permeability. Neither activation nor inhibition of protein kinase C affected nuclear permeability. These findings provide evidence that hormones linking to certain G protein-coupled receptors increase nuclear permeability via cytosolic Ca2+. Short term regulation of nuclear permeability may provide a novel mechanism by which such hormones permit transcription factors and other regulatory molecules to enter the nucleus, thereby regulating gene transcription in target cells. PMID:17158097

  14. Fracture-permeability behavior of shale

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, J. William; Lei, Zhou; Rougier, Esteban; Mori, Hiroko; Viswanathan, Hari

    2015-05-08

    The fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale, an important play for shale gas and oil, was investigated using a triaxial coreflood device and X-ray tomography in combination with finite-discrete element modeling (FDEM). Fractures generated in both compression and in a direct-shear configuration allowed permeability to be measured across the faces of cylindrical core. Shale with bedding planes perpendicular to direct-shear loading developed complex fracture networks and peak permeability of 30 mD that fell to 5 mD under hydrostatic conditions. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with peak permeability as high as 900 mD. In addition to the large anisotropy in fracture permeability, the amount of deformation required to initiate fractures was greater for perpendicular layering (about 1% versus 0.4%), and in both cases activation of existing fractures are more likely sources of permeability in shale gas plays or damaged caprock in CO₂ sequestration because of the significant deformation required to form new fracture networks. FDEM numerical simulations were able to replicate the main features of the fracturing processes while showing the importance of fluid penetration into fractures as well as layering in determining fracture patterns.

  15. Simulating perforation permeability damage and cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J P; Lomov, I N; Glenn, L A

    2000-12-15

    Completion of cased and cemented wells by shaped charge perforation causes its own damage to the formation, potentially reducing well productivity. In practice it is found that underbalance conditions clean up the damaged zone to some extent, however, the mechanisms of these processes are poorly understood. Most hydrocodes typically used to simulate rock response to shaped charge penetration do not provide permeability estimates. Furthermore, the time scales for formation clean up are potentially much longer than the period of jet penetration. We have developed a simple, yet accurate model for the evolution of porosity and permeability which can easily be incorporated into existing hydrocodes using information from the history of each cell. In addition, we have developed a code that efficiently simulates fines migration during the post-shot surge period using initial conditions taken directly from hydrocode simulations of jet penetration. Results from a one-dimensional model simulation are in excellent agreement with measured permeability distributions. We also present two-dimensional numerical results which qualitatively reproduce experimentally obtained permeability maps for different values of underbalance. Although initial results have been promising, further comparison with experiment is essential to tune the coupling between the hydrocode and fines migration simulator. Currently the permeability model is most appropriate for high permeability sandstones (such as Berea), but with little effort, the model can be extended to other rock types, given sufficient experimental data.

  16. Simulating Perforation Permeability Damage and Cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.P.; Lomov, I.N.; Glenn, L.A.

    2000-09-01

    Completion of cased and cemented wells by shaped charge perforation causes its own damage to the formation, potentially reducing well productivity. In practice it is found that underbalance conditions clean up the damaged zone to some extent, however, the mechanisms of these processes are poorly understood. Most hydrocodes typically used to simulate rock response to shaped charge penetration do not provide permeability estimates. Furthermore, the time scales for formation clean up are potentially much longer than the period of jet penetration. We have developed a simple, yet accurate model for the evolution of porosity and permeability which can easily be incorporated into existing hydrocodes using information from the history of each cell. In addition, we have developed a code that efficiently simulates fines migration during the post-shot surge period using initial conditions taken directly from hydrocode simulations of jet penetration. Results from a one-dimensional model simulation are in excellent agreement with measured fines and permeability distributions. We also present two-dimensional numerical results which qualitatively reproduce experimentally obtained permeability maps for different values of underbalance. Although initial results have been promising, further comparison with experiment is essential to tune the coupling between the hydrocode and fines migration simulator. Currently the permeability model is most appropriate for high permeability sandstones (such as Berea), but with little effort, the model can be extended to other rock types, given sufficient experimental data.

  17. Fracture-permeability behavior of shale

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carey, J. William; Lei, Zhou; Rougier, Esteban; Mori, Hiroko; Viswanathan, Hari

    2015-05-08

    The fracture-permeability behavior of Utica shale, an important play for shale gas and oil, was investigated using a triaxial coreflood device and X-ray tomography in combination with finite-discrete element modeling (FDEM). Fractures generated in both compression and in a direct-shear configuration allowed permeability to be measured across the faces of cylindrical core. Shale with bedding planes perpendicular to direct-shear loading developed complex fracture networks and peak permeability of 30 mD that fell to 5 mD under hydrostatic conditions. Shale with bedding planes parallel to shear loading developed simple fractures with peak permeability as high as 900 mD. In addition tomore » the large anisotropy in fracture permeability, the amount of deformation required to initiate fractures was greater for perpendicular layering (about 1% versus 0.4%), and in both cases activation of existing fractures are more likely sources of permeability in shale gas plays or damaged caprock in CO₂ sequestration because of the significant deformation required to form new fracture networks. FDEM numerical simulations were able to replicate the main features of the fracturing processes while showing the importance of fluid penetration into fractures as well as layering in determining fracture patterns.« less

  18. Cell permeability beyond the rule of 5.

    PubMed

    Matsson, Pär; Doak, Bradley C; Over, Björn; Kihlberg, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Drug discovery for difficult targets that have large and flat binding sites is often better suited to compounds beyond the "rule of 5" (bRo5). However, such compounds carry higher pharmacokinetic risks, such as low solubility and permeability, and increased efflux and metabolism. Interestingly, recent drug approvals and studies suggest that cell permeable and orally bioavailable drugs can be discovered far into bRo5 space. Tactics such as reduction or shielding of polarity by N-methylation, bulky side chains and intramolecular hydrogen bonds may be used to increase cell permeability in this space, but often results in decreased solubility. Conformationally flexible compounds can, however, combine high permeability and solubility, properties that are keys for cell permeability and intestinal absorption. Recent developments in computational conformational analysis will aid design of such compounds and hence prediction of cell permeability. Transporter mediated efflux occurs for most investigated drugs in bRo5 space, however it is commonly overcome by high local intestinal concentrations on oral administration. In contrast, there is little data to support significant impact of transporter-mediated intestinal absorption in bRo5 space. Current knowledge of compound properties that govern transporter effects of bRo5 drugs is limited and requires further fundamental and comprehensive studies. PMID:27067608

  19. Permeability properties of erythrocyte ghosts.

    PubMed

    TEORELL, T

    1952-05-01

    1. Erythrocyte ghosts from human blood were produced by gentle water hemolysis. The ghost-containing hemolysate (about 20 mN) was added to media of different composition (KCl, NaCl, glucose, sucrose, etc.) and varying concentration ranging from 8 to 840 mN. The volume changes of the ghost cells were followed by a light absorption method. The potassium and sodium concentrations were also analyzed in some representative cases. 2. The ghosts shrank, or swelled, in two stages. An initial phase with a momentary expulsion, or uptake, of water leading to an osmotic equilibrium, was followed by a second phase in which a slow swelling or shrinking proceeded toward a final constant volume. 3. The ghosts were semipermeable in the sense that water always passed rapidly in either direction so as to maintain isotonicity with the external medium. The relation between ghost cell volumes (V) and the total concentration (C(e)) of the suspension medium can be expressed by a modified van't Hoff-Mariotte law: (C(e) + a)(V - b) = constant. Here a is a term correcting for an internal pressure and b is the non-solvent volume of the ghost cells. This means that the ghosts behave as perfect osmometers. 4. On the other hand appreciable concentration differences of the K and Na ions could be maintained across the intact ghost cell membranes for long periods. Whether this phenomenon is due simply to very low cation permeability or to active transport processes cannot be decided, although the first assumption appears more probable. 5. When the ghosts were treated with small concentrations of a lytic substance like Na oleate, the alkali ion transfer was greatly increased. This seems to be a simple exchange diffusion process with simultaneous, continued maintenance of osmotic equilibrium (= the second phase). A simplified theory is also given for the kinetics of the volume variations and ion exchange during the second phase (cf. the Appendix). 6. Miscellaneous observations on the effects of p

  20. Comparative field permeability measurement of permeable pavements using ASTM C1701 and NCAT permeameter methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Kayhanian, Masoud; Harvey, John T

    2013-03-30

    Fully permeable pavement is gradually gaining support as an alternative best management practice (BMP) for stormwater runoff management. As the use of these pavements increases, a definitive test method is needed to measure hydraulic performance and to evaluate clogging, both for performance studies and for assessment of permeability for construction quality assurance and maintenance needs assessment. Two of the most commonly used permeability measurement tests for porous asphalt and pervious concrete are the National Center for Asphalt Technology (NCAT) permeameter and ASTM C1701, respectively. This study was undertaken to compare measured values for both methods in the field on a variety of permeable pavements used in current practice. The field measurements were performed using six experimental section designs with different permeable pavement surface types including pervious concrete, porous asphalt and permeable interlocking concrete pavers. Multiple measurements were performed at five locations on each pavement test section. The results showed that: (i) silicone gel is a superior sealing material to prevent water leakage compared with conventional plumbing putty; (ii) both methods (NCAT and ASTM) can effectively be used to measure the permeability of all pavement types and the surface material type will not impact the measurement precision; (iii) the permeability values measured with the ASTM method were 50-90% (75% on average) lower than those measured with the NCAT method; (iv) the larger permeameter cylinder diameter used in the ASTM method improved the reliability and reduced the variability of the measured permeability. PMID:23434738

  1. Permeability reduction in granite under hydrothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.A.; Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of impermeable fault seals between earthquake events is a feature of many models of earthquake generation, suggesting that earthquake recurrence may depend in part on the rate of permeability reduction of fault zone materials under hydrothermal conditions. In this study, permeability measurements were conducted on intact, fractured, and gouge-bearing Westerly granite at an effective pressure of 50 MPa and at temperatures from 150?? to 500??C, simulating conditions in the earthquake-generating portions of fault zones. Pore fluids were cycled back and forth under a 2 MPa pressure differential for periods of up to 40 days. Permeability of the granite decreased with time t, following the exponential relation k = c(10-rt). For intact samples run between 250?? and 500??C the time constant for permeability decrease r was proportional to temperature and ranged between 0.001 and 0.1 days-1 (i.e., between 0.4 and 40 decades year-1 loss of permeability). Values of r for the lower-temperature experiments differed little from the 250??C runs. In contrast, prefractured samples showed higher rates of permeability decrease at a given temperature. The surfaces of the fractured samples showed evidence of dissolution and mineral growth that increased in abundance with both temperature and time. The experimentally grown mineral assemblages varied with temperature and were consistent with a rock-dominated hydrothermal system. As such mineral deposits progressively seal the fractured samples, their rates of permeability decrease approach the rates for intact rocks at the same temperature. These results place constraints on models of precipitation sealing and suggest that fault rocks may seal at a rate consistent with earthquake recurrence intervals of typical fault zones.

  2. Strain-dependent permeability of volcanic rocks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Heap, Michael; Baud, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    We explore permeability evolution during deformation of volcanic materials using a suite of rocks with varying compositions and physical properties (such as porosity ϕ). 40 mm × 20 mm cylindrical samples were made from a range of extrusive rocks, including andesites from Colima, Mexico (ϕ˜0.08; 0.18; 0.21), Kumamoto, Japan (ϕ˜0.13), and Ruapehu, New Zealand (ϕ˜0.15), and basalt from Mt Etna, Italy (ϕ˜0.04). Gas permeability of each sample was measured before and after triaxial deformation using a steady-state benchtop permeameter. To study the strain-dependence of permeability in volcanic rocks, we deformed samples to 2, 3, 4, 6, and 12 % axial strain at a constant strain rate of 10‑5 s‑1. Further, the influence of failure mode - dilatant or compactant - on permeability was assessed by repeating experiments at different confining pressures. During triaxial deformation, porosity change of the samples was monitored by a servo-controlled pore fluid pump. Below an initial porosity of ˜0.18, and at low confining pressures (≤ 20 MPa), we observe a dilatant failure mode (shear fracture formation). With increasing axial strain, stress is accommodated by fault sliding and the generation of ash-sized gouge between the fracture planes. In higher-porosity samples, or at relatively higher confining pressures (≥ 60 MPa), we observe compactant deformation characterised by a monotonous decrease in porosity with increasing axial strain. The relative permeability k' is given by the change in permeability divided by the initial reference state. When behaviour is dilatant, k' tends to be positive: permeability increases with progressive deformation. However, results suggest that after a threshold amount of strain, k' can decrease. k' always is negative (permeability decreases during deformation) when compaction is the dominant behaviour. Our results show that - in the absence of a sealing or healing process - the efficiency of a fault to transmit fluids is

  3. Gastrointestinal permeability in patients with irritable bowel syndrome assessed using a four probe permeability solution

    PubMed Central

    Del Valle-Pinero, Arseima Y.; Van Deventer, Hendrick E.; Fourie, Nicolaas H.; Martino, Angela C.; Patel, Nayan S.; Remaley, Alan T.; Henderson, Wendy A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Abnormal gastrointestinal permeability has been linked to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The lactulose-to-mannitol ratio is traditionally used to assess small intestine permeability while sucralose and sucrose are used to assess colonic and gastric permeability respectively. We used a single 4-probe test solution to assess permeability throughout the gastrointestinal tract in IBS patients and healthy controls by measuring the recovery of the probes in urine after ingestion using a modified liquid chromatography mass spectrometry protocol. Methods Fasting participants (N = 59) drank a permeability test solution (100 ml: sucralose, sucrose, mannitol, and lactulose). Urine was collected over a 5-h period and kept frozen until analysis. Urinary sugar concentrations were measured using an liquid chromatography/triple quadruple mass spectrometer. Results Colonic permeability was significantly lower in IBS patients when compared to healthy controls (p = 0.011). Gastric and small intestinal permeability did not significantly differ between the groups. Conclusions The study demonstrates the clinical potential of this non-invasive method for assessing alterations in gastrointestinal permeability in patients with IBS. PMID:23328210

  4. Quantitative Permeability Prediction for Anisotropic Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Q.; Thompson, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    Pore-scale modeling as a predictive tool has become an integral to both research and commercial simulation in recent years. Permeability is one of the most important of the many properties that can be simulated. Traditionally, permeability is determined using Darcy's law, based on the assumption that the pressure gradient is aligned with the principal flow direction. However, a wide variety of porous media exhibit anisotropic permeability due to particle orientation or laminated structure. In these types of materials, the direction of fluid flow is not aligned with the pressure gradient (except along the principal directions). Thus, it is desirable to predict the full permeability tensor for anisotropic materials using a first-principles pore-scale approach. In this work, we present a fast method to determine the full permeability tensor and the principal directions using a novel network modeling algorithm. We also test the ability of network modeling (which is an approximate method) to detect anisotropy in various structures. Both computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods and network modeling have emerged as effective techniques to predict rock properties. CFD models are more rigorous but computationally expensive. Network modeling involves significant approximations but can be orders-of-magnitude more efficient computationally, which is important for both speed and the ability to model larger scales. This work uses network modeling, with simulations performed on two types of anisotropic materials: laminated packings (with layers of different sized particles) and oriented packings (containing particles with preferential orientation). Pore network models are created from the porous media data, and a novel method is used to determine the permeability tensor and principal flow direction using pore network modeling. The method is verified by comparing the calculated principal directions with the known anisotropy and also by comparing permeability with values from CFD

  5. Changes in permeability caused by earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manga, Michael; Wang, Chi-Yuen; Shi, Zheming

    2016-04-01

    Earthquakes induce a range of hydrological responses, including changes in streamflow and changes in the water level in wells. Here we show that many of these responses are caused the changes in permeability produced by the passage of seismic waves. First we analyze streams that were dry or nearly dry before the 2014 M6 Napa, California, earthquake butstarted to flow after the earthquake. We show that the new flows were meteoric in origin and originate in the nearby mountains. Responses are not correlated with the sign of static strains implying seismic waves liberated this water, presumably by changing permeability. We also analyze a large network of wells in China that responded to 4 large earthquakes. We monitor permeability changes through their effect on the water level response to solid Earth tides. We find that when earthquakes produce sustained changes in water level, permeability also changes. Wells with water level changes that last for only days show no evidence for changes in aquifer permeability.

  6. Gas Permeability in Rubbery Polyphosphazene Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart; Christopher J. Orme; John R. Klaehn; Mason K. Harrup; Thomas A. Luther; Eric S. Peterson

    2006-09-01

    The synthesis, characterization, and gas permeability of ten new polyphosphazenes has been studied. Additionally, the first gas permeation data has been collected on hydrolytically unstable poly[bis-(chloro)phosphazene]. Gases used in this study include CO2, CH4, O2, N2, H2, and Ar. CO2 was the most permeable gas through any of the phosphazenes and a direct correlation between the Tg of the polymer and CO2 transport was noted with permeability increasing with decreasing polymer Tg. To a lesser degree, permeability of all the other gases studied also yielded increases with decreasing polymer Tg. The trend observed for these new polymers was further supported by published data for other phosphazenes. Furthermore, permeability data for all gases were found to correlate to the gas condensability and the gas critical pressures, except for hydrogen, suggesting that the nature of the gas is also a significant factor for permeation through rubbery phosphazene membranes. Ideal separation factors (á) for the CO2/H2 and CO2/CH4 gas pairs were calculated. For CO2/CH4, no increase in á was observed with decreasing Tg, however increases in á were noted for the CO2/H2 pair.

  7. Honeycomb Core Permeability Under Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Raman, V. V.; Venkat, Venki S.; Sankaran, Sankara N.

    1997-01-01

    A method for characterizing the air permeability of sandwich core materials as a function of applied shear stress was developed. The core material for the test specimens was either Hexcel HRP-3/16-8.0 and or DuPont Korex-1/8-4.5 and was nominally one-half inch thick and six inches square. The facesheets where made of Hercules' AS4/8552 graphite/epoxy (Gr/Ep) composites and were nominally 0.059-in. thick. Cytec's Metalbond 1515-3M epoxy film adhesive was used for co-curing the facesheets to the core. The permeability of the specimens during both static (tension) and dynamic (reversed and non-reversed) shear loads were measured. The permeability was measured as the rate of air flow through the core from a circular 1-in2 area of the core exposed to an air pressure of 10.0 psig. In both the static and dynamic testing, the Korex core experienced sudden increases in core permeability corresponding to a core catastrophic failure, while the URP core experienced a gradual increase in the permeability prior to core failure. The Korex core failed at lower loads than the HRP core both in the transverse and ribbon directions.

  8. Permeability of Rigid Fibrous Refractory Insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marschall, J.; Milos, F. S.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Rigid fibrous refractory insulations (TPS tiles) are integral components of many spacecraft thermal protection systems. These materials are composed of refractory fibers With diameters on the order of 1 to 15 micrometers. They are lightweight and have an open, highly porous microstructure. Typical densities are less than 500 kilograms per cubic meters, and porosities generally exceed 0.8. Because of their open porosity, these materials are permeable to gas glow. There are numerous instances in which internal gas transport in a thermal protection system could be important; examples include the penetration of hot boundary-layer gases into the insulation, the flow of decomposition (pyrolysis) products from the interior, the use of convective flows to mitigate ice formation caused by cryopumping, and the design of refractory vents for pressure equilibration during atmospheric entry. Computational analysis of gas flow through porous media requires values of permeability which have not previously been available for the rigid fibrous insulations used in thermal protection systems. This paper will document measurements of permeability for a variety of insulations from NASA's LI, FRCI, and AETB families of lightweight ceramic ablators. The directional anisotropy of permeability and its dependence on gas pressure and material density will be presented. It will be shown that rarified-flow effects are significant in the flow through such materials. Connections will be drawn between the insulation microstructure and permeability. The paper will also include representative computations of flow through rigid fibrous insulations.

  9. Comparison of Steady State Method and Transient Methods for Water Permeability Measurement in Low Permeability Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulin, P. F.; Bretonnier, P.; Gland, N.

    2010-12-01

    Very low permeability geomaterials (order of nanoDarcy (10-21 m2)), such as clays rocks, are studied for many industrial applications such as production from unconventional reserves of oil and gas, CO2 geological storage and deep geological disposal of high-level long-lived nuclear wastes. For these last two applications, clay efficiency as barrier relies mainly on their very low permeability. Laboratory measurement of low permeability to water (below 10-19 m2) remains a technical challenge. Some authors argue that steady state methods are irrelevant due to the time required to stabilize water fluxes in such low permeability media. Most of the authors measuring low permeabilities use a transient technique called pulse decay. This study aims to compare objectively these different types of permeability tests performed on a single clay sample. For the steady state method, a high precision pump was used to impose a pressure gradient and to measure the small resulting water flow rate at steady state. We show that with a suitable set-up, the steady state method enables to measure a very low permeability of 8 10-22 m2 in a period of three days. For a comparable duration, the pulse decay test, most commonly used for such low permeability measurements, provides only an average estimate of the permeability. Permeability measurements by pulse decay require to perform simulations to interpret the pressure relaxation signals. Many uncertainties remain such as the determination of the reservoirs storage factor, micro leakage effect, or the determination of the initial pulse pressure. All these uncertainties have a very significant impact on the determination of sample permeability and specific storage. Opposite to the wide-spread idea that transient techniques are required to measure very low permeability, we show that direct steady state measurement of water permeability with suitable equipments can be much faster and more accurate than measurement by pulse decay, especially in

  10. GROUNDWATER FLOW IN LOW-PERMEABILITY ENVIRONMENTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    Certain geologic media are known to have small permeability; subsurface environments composed of these media and lacking well developed secondary permeability have groundwater flow systems with many distinctive characteristics. Moreover, groundwater flow in these environments appears to influence the evolution of certain hydrologic, geologic, and geochemical systems, may affect the accumulation of petroleum and ores, and probably has a role in the structural evolution of parts of the crust. Such environments are also important in the context of waste disposal. This review attempts to synthesize the diverse contributions of various disciplines to the problem of flow in low-permeability environments. Problems hindering analysis are enumerated together with suggested approaches to overcoming them. A common thread running through the discussion is the significance of size- and time-scale limitations of the ability to directly observe flow behavior and make significance of size- and time-scale limitations of the ability to directly observe flow behavior and make measurements of parameters.

  11. Permeability of Hollow Microspherical Membranes to Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinoviev, V. N.; Kazanin, I. V.; Pak, A. Yu.; Vereshchagin, A. S.; Lebiga, V. A.; Fomin, V. M.

    2016-01-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the sorption characteristics of various hollow microspherical membranes to reveal particles most suitable for application in the membrane-sorption technologies of helium extraction from a natural gas. The permeability of the investigated sorbents to helium and their impermeability to air and methane are shown experimentally. The sorption-desorption dependences of the studied sorbents have been obtained, from which the parameters of their specific permeability to helium are calculated. It has been established that the physicochemical modification of the original particles exerts a great influence on the coefficient of the permeability of a sorbent to helium. Specially treated cenospheres have displayed high efficiency as membranes for selective extraction of helium.

  12. The effect of heat on skin permeability

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Yeu-Chun; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    Although the effects of long exposure (≫ 1 s) to moderate temperatures (≤ 100 °C) have been well characterized, recent studies suggest that shorter exposure (< 1 s) to higher temperatures (> 100 °C) can dramatically increase skin permeability. Previous studies suggest that by keeping exposures short, thermal damage can be localized to the stratum corneum without damaging deeper tissue. Initial clinical trials have progressed to Phase II (see http://clinicaltrials.gov), which indicates the procedure can be safe. Because the effect of heating under these conditions has received little systematic or mechanistic study, we heated full-thickness skin, epidermis and stratum corneum samples from human and porcine cadavers to temperatures ranging from 100°C to 315°C for times ranging from 100 ms to 5 s. Tissue samples were analyzed using skin permeability measurements, differential scanning calorimetry, thermomechanical analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis, brightfield and confocal microscopy, and histology. Skin permeability was shown to be a very strong function of temperature and a less strong function of the duration of heating. At optimal conditions used in this study, transdermal delivery of calcein was increased up to 760-fold by rapidly heating the skin at high temperature. More specifically, skin permeability was increased (I) by a few fold after heating to approximately 100°C – 150°C, (II) by one to two orders of magnitude after heating to approximately 150°C – 250°C and (III) by three orders of magnitude after heating above 300°C. These permeability changes were attributed to (I) disordering of stratum corneum lipid structure, (II) disruption of stratum corneum keratin network structure and (III) decomposition and vaporization of keratin to create micron-scale holes in the stratum corneum, respectively. We conclude that heating the skin with short, high temperature pulses can increase skin permeability by orders of magnitude due to structural

  13. In-situ permeability determining method

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, D.J.; Arnold, D.M.; Richter, A.P. Jr.; Warren, W.F.

    1985-01-29

    A method of determining the permeability of a particular stratum in an earth formation traversed by a borehole includes injecting a liquid into the borehole at a first pressure thereby causing liquid flow into the stratum. A first flow rate of the liquid is determined at the first pressure. The pressure of the liquid being injected into the borehole is then changed to a second pressure level and a second flow rate of the liquid flowing into the stratum is determined at the second pressure. An indication of the permeability of the stratum is then derived in accordance with the two pressures, the two flow rates and known characteristics of the stratum.

  14. Development of an Improved Permeability Modification Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.W.; Elphnick, J.

    1999-03-09

    This report describes the development of an improved permeability modification simulator performed jointly by BDM Petroleum Technologies and Schlumberger Dowell under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with the US Department of Energy. The improved simulator was developed by modifying NIPER's PC-GEL permeability modification simulator to include a radial model, a thermal energy equation, a wellbore simulator, and a fully implicit time-stepping option. The temperature-dependent gelation kinetics of a delayed gel system (DGS) is also included in the simulator.

  15. Lunar magnetic permeability studies and magnetometer sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1977-01-01

    A regression of quiet magnetic field components simultaneously measured by the two Explorer 35 magnetometers reveals uncertainties in effective sensitivity factors of up to a few percent in one or both of these instruments. Given this, the validity of previous lunar permeability studies based on Explorer 35/ALSEP regressions, wherein inferences are drawn from regression line slopes differing from unity by the order of one percent, is called into question. We emphasize the need to critically address the question of small deviations in magnetometer sensitivity factors from nominal values as a part of any two-magnetometer lunar permeability study.

  16. Magnetic permeability measurements and a lunar core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, B. E.; Phillips, R. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of the magnetic field induced in the moon while it is in the geomagnetic tail lobes have been interpreted in terms of lunar magnetic permeability due to free iron content; such studies ignored the possibility that a highly conducting lunar core (Fe or FeS) would exclude magnetic fields with an apparent diamagnetic effect. Using lunar chemical and thermal models to determine plausible limits of magnetic permeability, we interpret measurements of the induced moment. The maximum likely radius of a lunar core is 580 km. Subsatellite and ALSEP measurements of the induced field are in disagreement. Resolving the differences is critical to determining whether a core could or does exist.

  17. Water Permeability of Asymmetric Planar Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Krylov, Andrey V.; Pohl, Peter; Zeidel, Mark L.; Hill, Warren G.

    2001-01-01

    To understand how plasma membranes may limit water flux, we have modeled the apical membrane of MDCK type 1 cells. Previous experiments demonstrated that liposomes designed to mimic the inner and outer leaflet of this membrane exhibited 18-fold lower water permeation for outer leaflet lipids than inner leaflet lipids (Hill, W.G., and M.L. Zeidel. 2000. J. Biol. Chem. 275:30176–30185), confirming that the outer leaflet is the primary barrier to permeation. If leaflets in a bilayer resist permeation independently, the following equation estimates single leaflet permeabilities: 1/PAB = 1/PA + 1/PB (Eq. l), where PAB is the permeability of a bilayer composed of leaflets A and B, PA is the permeability of leaflet A, and PB is the permeability of leaflet B. Using for the MDCK leaflet–specific liposomes gives an estimated value for the osmotic water permeability (Pf) of 4.6 × 10−4 cm/s (at 25°C) that correlated well with experimentally measured values in intact cells. We have now constructed both symmetric and asymmetric planar lipid bilayers that model the MDCK apical membrane. Water permeability across these bilayers was monitored in the immediate membrane vicinity using a Na+-sensitive scanning microelectrode and an osmotic gradient induced by addition of urea. The near-membrane concentration distribution of solute was used to calculate the velocity of water flow (Pohl, P., S.M. Saparov, and Y.N. Antonenko. 1997. Biophys. J. 72:1711–1718). At 36°C, Pf was 3.44 ± 0.35 × 10−3 cm/s for symmetrical inner leaflet membranes and 3.40 ± 0.34 × 10−4 cm/s for symmetrical exofacial membranes. From , the estimated permeability of an asymmetric membrane is 6.2 × 10−4 cm/s. Water permeability measured for the asymmetric planar bilayer was 6.7 ± 0.7 × 10−4 cm/s, which is within 10% of the calculated value. Direct experimental measurement of Pf for an asymmetric planar membrane confirms that leaflets in a bilayer offer independent and additive resistances to

  18. Predicting the permeability of sediments entering subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Hugh; Screaton, Elizabeth J.

    2015-07-01

    Using end-member permeabilities defined by a worldwide compilation of sediment permeabilities at convergent margins, we compare permeability predictions using a geometric mean and a two-component effective medium theory (EMT). Our implementation of EMT includes a threshold fraction of the high-permeability component that determines whether flow occurs dominantly in the high- or low-permeability component. We find that this threshold fraction in most cases is equal to the silt + sand-sized fraction of the sediment. This suggests that sediments undergoing primary consolidation tend to exhibit flow equally distributed between the high- and low-permeability components. We show that the EMT method predicts permeability better than the weighted geometric mean of the end-member values for clay fractions <0.6. This work provides insight into the microstructural controls on permeability in subducting sediments and valuable guidance for locations which lack site-specific permeability results but have available grain-size information.

  19. Permeable pavement research – Edison, New Jersey

    EPA Science Inventory

    These are the slides for the New York City Concrete Promotional Council Pervious Concrete Seminar presentation. The basis for the project, the monitoring design and some preliminary monitoring data from the permeable pavement parking lot at the Edison Environmental Center are pre...

  20. Vascular Permeability and Drug Delivery in Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Sandy; Hebda, Jagoda K.; Gavard, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial barrier strictly maintains vascular and tissue homeostasis, and therefore modulates many physiological processes such as angiogenesis, immune responses, and dynamic exchanges throughout organs. Consequently, alteration of this finely tuned function may have devastating consequences for the organism. This is particularly obvious in cancers, where a disorganized and leaky blood vessel network irrigates solid tumors. In this context, vascular permeability drives tumor-induced angiogenesis, blood flow disturbances, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tumor cell extravasation. This can directly restrain the efficacy of conventional therapies by limiting intravenous drug delivery. Indeed, for more effective anti-angiogenic therapies, it is now accepted that not only should excessive angiogenesis be alleviated, but also that the tumor vasculature needs to be normalized. Recovery of normal state vasculature requires diminishing hyperpermeability, increasing pericyte coverage, and restoring the basement membrane, to subsequently reduce hypoxia, and interstitial fluid pressure. In this review, we will introduce how vascular permeability accompanies tumor progression and, as a collateral damage, impacts on efficient drug delivery. The molecular mechanisms involved in tumor-driven vascular permeability will next be detailed, with a particular focus on the main factors produced by tumor cells, especially the emblematic vascular endothelial growth factor. Finally, new perspectives in cancer therapy will be presented, centered on the use of anti-permeability factors and normalization agents. PMID:23967403

  1. A microdevice for parallelized pulmonary permeability studies.

    PubMed

    Bol, Ludivine; Galas, Jean-Christophe; Hillaireau, Hervé; Le Potier, Isabelle; Nicolas, Valérie; Haghiri-Gosnet, Anne-Marie; Fattal, Elias; Taverna, Myriam

    2014-04-01

    We describe a compartmentalized microdevice specifically designed to perform permeability studies across a model of lung barrier. Epithelial cell barriers were reproduced by culturing Calu-3 cells at the air-liquid interface (AIC) in 1 mm² microwells made from a perforated glass slide with an embedded porous membrane. We created a single basolateral reservoir for all microwells which eliminated the need to renew the growth medium during the culture growth phase. To perform drug permeability studies on confluent cell layers, the cell culture slide was aligned and joined to a collection platform consisting in 35 μL collection reservoirs connected at the top and bottom with microchannels. The integrity and functionality of the cell barriers were demonstrated by measurement of trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), confocal imaging and permeability assays of ¹⁴C-sucrose. Micro-cell barriers were able to form confluent layers in 1 week, demonstrating a similar bioelectrical evolution as the Transwell systems used as controls. Tight junctions were observed throughout the cell-cell interfaces, and the low permeability coefficients of ¹⁴C-sucrose confirmed their functional presence, creating a primary barrier to the diffusion of solutes. This microdevice could facilitate the monitoring of biomolecule transport and the screening of formulations promoting their passage across the pulmonary barrier, in order to select candidates for pulmonary administration to patients. PMID:24337430

  2. EVALUATION OF PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology represents a passive option for long-term treatment of ground-water contamination. PRBs are a potentially more cost-effective treatment option for a variety of dissolved contaminants, such as certain types of chlorinated solvents, ...

  3. A permeable rotating-wheel solvent extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, D. R.; Nady, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    Column-type device reported employs circular permeable structures of wire mesh screen for extracting solvents from systems with low density differences and low interfacial tensions. Rotating screen wheels of structure fasten to shaft; stationary screen structures are supported by circular bands connected by radial metal arms.

  4. PRECISION AND RELIABILITY OF LABORATORY PERMEABILITY MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A limited set of laboratory test data on clay liner permeabilities was gathered from six sources to create a data bank suitable for a preliminary statistical analysis. The collected data were also used to survey the most commonly used permeameters and testing methods for clay lin...

  5. Reduced hydrogen permeability at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Klopp, W. D.; Misencik, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    CO and CO2 reduce hydrogen loss through iron, nickel, and cobalt based alloy tubes. Method is based on concept that oxide film on metal surface reduces hydrogen permeability through metal; adding CO or CO2 forms oxide films continuously during operation, and hydrogen containment is improved. Innovation enhances prospects for Stirling engine system utilization.

  6. Permeability Measurements in Carbon-Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdenek, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    To determine the permeability of the composite feedline, that is proposed to be used in the X-33 Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), three 8 x 8-in. coupons were constructed. Two of the coupons were layed-up with 4 plies of plain weave prepreg [0/90, plus or minus 45, plus or minus 45, 0/90] and the other one layed-up with 4 plies of unidirectional prepreg [0, 90, 90, 0]. The coupons were vacuumed bagged and cured to manufactures specifications. The coupons were then placed in an apparatus to test for permeability. Nitrogen gas was used to permeate through the coupons at a pressure of 5 psig. A manometer was placed on the opposite side of the coupons and was used to measure the height of the fluid with respect to time. From this data the mass flow rate of the gas could be calculated since the area of the manometer and the density of the gas is known. The results of the test are given. The permeability constant was calculated using Darcy's law, which related the pressure drop, flow rate of the permeating gas and resistance to flow through the coupon created. To put the results into prospective the permeability of sand stone and granite is 1E-15 and 1E-20 respectively.

  7. Pump and treat in low permeability media

    SciTech Connect

    Mackay, D.M.

    1996-08-01

    Pump and Treat (P&T) is a commonly applied technology whose primary promise for the low permeability environments of interest to these technology reviews is almost certainly containment of the problem. Conventional P&T would be expected to offer little promise of complete restoration in such environments, unless very long time frames (decades or centuries) are considered. A variety of approaches have been proposed to enhance the efficiency of P&T; some appear to offer little promise in low or mixed permeability environments, while others may offer more promise (e.g. hydro- or pneumatic-fracturing, which are described elsewhere in this document, and application of vacuum to the extraction well(s), which is a proprietary technology whose promise is currently difficult to assess objectively). Understanding the potential advantages and means of optimizing these enhancement approaches requires more understanding of the basic processes limiting P&T performance in low or mixed permeability media. These efforts are probably also necessary to understand the advantages and means of optimizing many of the very different remedial technologies that may be applicable to low or mixed permeability environments. Finally, since a reasonably certain capability of P&T is containment (i.e. prevention of further migration of contaminants), P&T may generally be required as a sort of safety net around sites at which the alternative technologies are being tested or applied. 23 refs.

  8. SINGLE-INTERVAL GAS PERMEABILITY ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Single-interval, steady-steady-state gas permeability testing requires estimation of pressure at a screened interval which in turn requires measurement of friction factors as a function of mass flow rate. Friction factors can be obtained by injecting air through a length of pipe...

  9. Estimating Plastic Film Permeability Under Field Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumigant emission is an important air quality and human health concern. Plastic films are used to reduce emissions. Laboratory tests have shown large differences in permeability between various films, including the typical polyethylene films (PEs), virtually impermeable films (VIFs), and semi-impe...

  10. Tailoring wall permeabilities for enhanced filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herterich, J. G.; Vella, D.; Field, R. W.; Hankins, N. P.; Griffiths, I. M.

    2015-05-01

    The build-up of contaminants at the wall of cross-flow membrane filtration systems can be detrimental to the operation of such systems because of, amongst other things, the osmotic backflow it may induce. In this paper, we propose a strategy to avoid the negative effects of backflow due to osmosis by using 2D channels bounded by walls with a combination of permeable and impermeable segments. We show that preventing flow through the final portion of the channel can increase the efficiency of filtration and we determine the optimal fraction occupied by the permeable wall that maximizes efficiency. Our analysis uses a combination of numerical techniques and asymptotic analysis in the limit of low wall permeabilities. Finally, we consider how the energy cost of filtration depends on the Péclet number and show that the energy cost per unit of filtered water may be minimized by appropriately choosing both the Péclet number and the permeable-region fraction.

  11. Connexin channel permeability to cytoplasmic molecules.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andrew L

    2007-01-01

    Connexin channels are known to be permeable to a variety of cytoplasmic molecules. The first observation of second messenger junctional permeability, made approximately 30 years ago, sparked broad interest in gap junction channels as mediators of intercellular molecular signaling. Since then, much has been learned about the diversity of connexin channels with regard to isoform diversity, tissue and developmental distribution, modes of channel regulation, assembly, expression, biochemical modification and permeability, all of which appear to be dynamically regulated. This information has expanded the potential roles of connexin channels in development, physiology and disease, and made their elucidation much more complex--30 years ago such an orchestra of junctional dynamics was unanticipated. Only recently, however, have investigators been able to directly address, in this more complex framework, the key issue: what specific biological molecules, second messengers and others, are able to permeate the various types of connexin channels, and how well? An important related issue, given the ever-growing list of connexin-related pathologies, is how these permeabilities are altered by disease-causing connexin mutations. Together, many studies show that a variety of cytoplasmic molecules can permeate the different types of connexin channels. A few studies reveal differences in permeation by different molecules through a particular type of connexin channel, and differences in permeation by a particular molecule through different types of connexin channels. This article describes and evaluates the various methods used to obtain these data, presents an annotated compilation of the results, and discusses the findings in the context of what can be inferred about mechanism of selectivity and potential relevance to signaling. The data strongly suggest that highly specific interactions take place between connexin pores and specific biological molecular permeants, and that those

  12. Permeability during densification of viscous droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, Fabian; Vasseur, Jérémie; Llewellin, Ed; Dobson, Katherine; Schauroth, Jenny; Heap, Michael; Farquharson, Jamie; Scheu, Bettina; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; von Aulock, Felix; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    Fragmentation of magma can yield a transiently granular material, which can subsequently weld back to a fluid-continuum. This process results in dramatic changes in the porosity of the material, which impacts its fluid permeability. We collate published data for the porosity and permeability of volcanic and synthetic materials which have undergone this process to different amounts. By discriminating data for which good microstructural information are provided, we use simple scaling arguments to collapse the data in both the still-granular, high porosity region, and the fluid-continuum low porosity region, such that a universal description can be provided. This allows us to describe the microstructural meaning of permeability scaling, and to infer the controls on the position of this transition between dominantly granular (dispersion) and dominantly fluid-continuum materials. Fractures in coherent magmas are thought to be a primary degassing pathway in high viscosity systems. As a specific application, we consider transiently granular magma being transported through and deposited in these fractures. We finally present a physical model for the kinetics of porosity changes in arrays of viscous droplets and compare this with our experimental data. The combination of the physical model for the evolution of porosity with the scaling between porosity and permeability permits us to describe the evolution of permeability during densification. We anticipate that this will be a useful tool for predicting the longevity of degassing pathways in granular filled cracks, both in conduits and shallow lava domes, as well as during the sedimentation of exceptionally hot ignimbrites undergoing compaction and welding.

  13. A new quasi-steady method to measure gas permeability of weakly permeable porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannot, Yves; Lasseux, Didier

    2012-01-01

    A new quasi-steady method for the determination of the apparent gas permeability of porous materials is presented in this paper along with the corresponding interpretative physical model derived from the unsteady flow equations. This method is mainly dedicated to the measurement of very low permeability of thin porous media, although thicker but more permeable samples may also be analyzed. The method relies on quasi-steady flow resulting from a (quasi) constant pressure maintained at the inlet face of the sample. Gas flow-rate, as low as 3 × 10-10 m3/s, is determined from the record of pressure increase in a reservoir connected to the outlet face of the sample. An estimate of the characteristic time, tc, to reach quasi-steady flow after imposing a constant pressure at the inlet is derived. It is validated by direct numerical simulations of the complete unsteady flow, clearly defining the required experimental duration for the method to apply. Experimental results obtained on rather permeable and thick rock samples are reported showing an excellent agreement of the measured permeability with that determined independently on the same sample whereas the experimental value of tc is also in very good agreement with the predicted one. The method is further employed on a composite material sheet allowing the identification of an apparent gas permeability of about 10-23 m2.

  14. Moisture Durability of Vapor Permeable Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    In this project, Building America team Building Science Corporation researched some of the ramifications of using exterior, vapor permeable insulation on retrofit walls with vapor permeable cavity insulation. Retrofit strategies are a key factor in reducing exterior building stock consumption.

  15. Neutrophils, nitric oxide, and microvascular permeability in severe sepsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Alterations in microvascular permeability are prevalent in patients with sepsis; a recent study reported that patients with septic shock had increased capillary filtration coefficient (Kf), a noninvasive index of microvascular permeability. We aimed to determine whether patients wi...

  16. Permeability-porosity relationships in sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    1994-01-01

    In many consolidated sandstone and carbonate formations, plots of core data show that the logarithm of permeability (k) is often linearly proportional to porosity (??). The slope, intercept, and degree of scatter of these log(k)-?? trends vary from formation to formation, and these variations are attributed to differences in initial grain size and sorting, diagenetic history, and compaction history. In unconsolidated sands, better sorting systematically increases both permeability and porosity. In sands and sandstones, an increase in gravel and coarse grain size content causes k to increase even while decreasing ??. Diagenetic minerals in the pore space of sandstones, such as cement and some clay types, tend to decrease log(k) proportionately as ?? decreases. Models to predict permeability from porosity and other measurable rock parameters fall into three classes based on either grain, surface area, or pore dimension considerations. (Models that directly incorporate well log measurements but have no particular theoretical underpinnings from a fourth class.) Grain-based models show permeability proportional to the square of grain size times porosity raised to (roughly) the fifth power, with grain sorting as an additional parameter. Surface-area models show permeability proportional to the inverse square of pore surface area times porosity raised to (roughly) the fourth power; measures of surface area include irreducible water saturation and nuclear magnetic resonance. Pore-dimension models show permeability proportional to the square of a pore dimension times porosity raised to a power of (roughly) two and produce curves of constant pore size that transgress the linear data trends on a log(k)-?? plot. The pore dimension is obtained from mercury injection measurements and is interpreted as the pore opening size of some interconnected fraction of the pore system. The linear log(k)-?? data trends cut the curves of constant pore size from the pore-dimension models

  17. Permeability Changes in Reaction Induced Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulven, Ole Ivar; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Kalia, Rajiv

    2013-04-01

    The process of fracture formation due to a volume increasing chemical reaction has been studied in a variety of different settings, e.g. weathering of dolerites by Røyne et al.[4], serpentinization and carbonation of peridotite by Rudge et al.[3] and replacement reactions in silica-poor igneous rocks by Jamtveit et al.[1]. It is generally assumed that fracture formation will increase the net permeability of the rock, and thus increase the reactant transport rate and subsequently the total reaction rate, as summarised by Kelemen et al.[2]. Røyne et al.[4] have shown that transport in fractures will have an effect on the fracture pattern formed. Understanding the feedback process between fracture formation and permeability changes is essential in assessing industrial scale CO2 sequestration in ultramafic rock, but little is seemingly known about how large the permeability change will be in reaction-induced fracturing under compression, and it remains an open question how sensitive a fracture pattern is to permeability changes. In this work, we study the permeability of fractures formed under compression, and we use a 2D discrete element model to study the fracture patterns and total reaction rates achieved with different permeabilities. We achieve an improved understanding of the feedback processes in reaction-driven fracturing, thus improving our ability to decide whether industrial scale CO2 sequestration in ultramafic rock is a viable option for long-term handling of CO2. References [1] Jamtveit, B, Putnis, C. V., and Malthe-Sørenssen, A., "Reaction induced fracturing during replacement processes," Contrib. Mineral Petrol. 157, 2009, pp. 127 - 133. [2] Kelemen, P., Matter, J., Streit, E. E., Rudge, J. F., Curry, W. B., and Blusztajn, J., "Rates and Mechanisms of Mineral Carbonation in Peridotite: Natural Processes and Recipes for Enhanced, in situ CO2 Capture and Storage," Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 2011. 39:545-76. [3] Rudge, J. F., Kelemen, P. B., and

  18. Nam Con Son Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tin, N.T.; Ty, N.D.; Hung, L.T.

    1994-07-01

    The Nam Con Son basin is the largest oil and gas bearing basin in Vietnam, and has a number of producing fields. The history of studies in the basin can be divided into four periods: Pre-1975, 1976-1980, 1981-1989, and 1990-present. A number of oil companies have carried out geological and geophysical studies and conducted drilling activities in the basin. These include ONGC, Enterprise Oil, BP, Shell, Petro-Canada, IPL, Lasmo, etc. Pre-Tertiary formations comprise quartz diorites, granodiorites, and metamorphic rocks of Mesozoic age. Cenozoic rocks include those of the Cau Formation (Oligocene and older), Dua Formation (lower Miocene), Thong-Mang Cau Formation (middle Miocene), Nam Con Son Formation (upper Miocene) and Bien Dong Formation (Pliocene-Quaternary). The basement is composed of pre-Cenozoic formations. Three fault systems are evident in the basin: north-south fault system, northeast-southwest fault system, and east-west fault system. Four tectonic zones can also be distinguished: western differentiated zone, northern differentiated zone, Dua-Natuna high zone, and eastern trough zone.

  19. Exploring the scale-dependent permeability of fractured andesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael J.; Kennedy, Ben M.

    2016-08-01

    Extension fractures in volcanic systems exist on all scales, from microscopic fractures to large fissures. They play a fundamental role in the movement of fluids and distribution of pore pressure, and therefore exert considerable influence over volcanic eruption recurrence. We present here laboratory permeability measurements for porous (porosity = 0.03-0.6) andesites before (i.e., intact) and after failure in tension (i.e., the samples host a throughgoing tensile fracture). The permeability of the intact andesites increases with increasing porosity, from 2 ×10-17 to 5 ×10-11 m2. Following fracture formation, the permeability of the samples (the equivalent permeability) falls within a narrow range, 2- 6 ×10-11 m2, regardless of their initial porosity. However, laboratory measurements on fractured samples likely overestimate the equivalent permeability due to the inherent scale-dependence of permeability. To explore this scale-dependence, we first determined the permeability of the tensile fractures using a two-dimensional model that considers flow in parallel layers. Our calculations highlight that tensile fractures in low-porosity samples are more permeable (as high as 3.5 ×10-9 m2) than those in high-porosity samples (as low as 4.1 ×10-10 m2), a difference that can be explained by an increase in fracture tortuosity with porosity. We then use our fracture permeability data to model the equivalent permeability of fractured rock (with different host rock permeabilities, from 10-17 to 10-11 m2) with increasing lengthscale. We highlight that our modelling approach can be used to estimate the equivalent permeability of numerous scenarios at andesitic stratovolcanoes in which the fracture density and width and host rock porosity or permeability are known. The model shows that the equivalent permeability of fractured andesite depends heavily on the initial host rock permeability and the scale of interest. At a given lengthscale, the equivalent permeability of high-permeability

  20. 46 CFR 172.240 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.240 Section 172.240 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 172.225, (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery or cargo space, must be assumed as listed in Table 172.240;...

  1. 46 CFR 172.140 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.140 Section 172.140 Shipping... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.140 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.130, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as listed in...

  2. 46 CFR 174.090 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 174.090 Section 174.090 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 174.065— (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery space, must be as listed in Table 174.090; and (b) Calculations in which...

  3. 46 CFR 172.185 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.185 Section 172.185 Shipping... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.185 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.170, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as...

  4. Studying the Variation in Gas Permeability of Porous Building Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, L.; Savidge, C. R.; Hu, L.; Rizzo, D. M.; Hayden, N. J.; Dewoolkar, M.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding permeability of building materials is important for problems involving studies of contaminant transport. Examples include contamination from fire, acid rain, and chemical and biological weapons. Our research investigates the gas permeability of porous building substrates such as concretes, limestones, sandstones, and bricks. Each sample was cored to produce 70 mm (2.75”) diameter cores approximately 75-130 mm (3-5”) tall. The surface gas permeability was measured on the top surface of these specimens using the AutoScan II device manufactured by New England Research, Inc. The measurements were taken along a 3 mm grid producing a map of surface gas permeability. An example map is shown in Figure 1. The macroscopic measurements were performed along the entire cored specimen. A second set of measurements were made on a 5 mm thick slice cut from the top of each specimen to examine whether these measurements compare better with the surface measurements. The macroscopic gas permeability was measured for all specimens using ASTM D 4525. The results are summarized in Table 1. In general, the surface and macroscopic gas permeability measurements (Table 1) compare reasonably well (within one order of magnitude). The permeability of the 5 mm slices is not significantly different from the entire core for the specimens tested. Figure 1. Results of surface permeability mappingof Ohio Sandstone using the AutoScan II device. a) Map of gas permeability b) Range of gas permeability c) Density function of permeability. Table 1. Gas permeability values (mD)

  5. 46 CFR 172.140 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.140 Section 172.140 Shipping... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.140 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.130, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as listed in...

  6. 46 CFR 172.185 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.185 Section 172.185 Shipping... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.185 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.170, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as...

  7. 46 CFR 172.185 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.185 Section 172.185 Shipping... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.185 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.170, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as...

  8. 46 CFR 174.090 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 174.090 Section 174.090 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 174.065— (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery space, must be as listed in Table 174.090; and (b) Calculations in which...

  9. 46 CFR 172.140 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.140 Section 172.140 Shipping... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.140 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.130, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as listed in...

  10. 46 CFR 172.185 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.185 Section 172.185 Shipping... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.185 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.170, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as...

  11. 46 CFR 172.240 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.240 Section 172.240 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 172.225, (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery or cargo space, must be assumed as listed in Table 172.240;...

  12. 46 CFR 172.240 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.240 Section 172.240 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 172.225, (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery or cargo space, must be assumed as listed in Table 172.240;...

  13. 46 CFR 174.090 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 174.090 Section 174.090 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 174.065— (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery space, must be as listed in Table 174.090; and (b) Calculations in which...

  14. 46 CFR 174.090 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 174.090 Section 174.090 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 174.065— (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery space, must be as listed in Table 174.090; and (b) Calculations in which...

  15. 46 CFR 172.240 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.240 Section 172.240 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 172.225, (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery or cargo space, must be assumed as listed in Table 172.240;...

  16. 46 CFR 172.140 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.140 Section 172.140 Shipping... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.140 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.130, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as listed in...

  17. 46 CFR 172.185 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.185 Section 172.185 Shipping... Under Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.185 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.170, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as...

  18. 46 CFR 172.140 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.140 Section 172.140 Shipping... Subchapter O of This Chapter § 172.140 Permeability of spaces. (a) When doing the calculations required in § 172.130, the permeability of a floodable space other than a machinery space must be as listed in...

  19. 46 CFR 174.090 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 174.090 Section 174.090 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 174.065— (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery space, must be as listed in Table 174.090; and (b) Calculations in which...

  20. 46 CFR 172.240 - Permeability of spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permeability of spaces. 172.240 Section 172.240 Shipping... Permeability of spaces. When doing the calculations required in § 172.225, (a) The permeability of a floodable space, other than a machinery or cargo space, must be assumed as listed in Table 172.240;...

  1. Electrostatically gated membrane permeability in inorganic protocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mei; Harbron, Rachel L.; Weaver, Jonathan V. M.; Binks, Bernard P.; Mann, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    Although several strategies are now available to produce functional microcompartments analogous to primitive cell-like structures, little progress has been made in generating protocell constructs with self-controlled membrane permeability. Here we describe the preparation of water-dispersible colloidosomes based on silica nanoparticles and delineated by a continuous semipermeable inorganic membrane capable of self-activated, electrostatically gated permeability. We use crosslinking and covalent grafting of a pH-responsive copolymer to generate an ultrathin elastic membrane that exhibits selective release and uptake of small molecules. This behaviour, which depends on the charge of the copolymer coronal layer, serves to trigger enzymatic dephosphorylation reactions specifically within the protocell aqueous interior. This system represents a step towards the design and construction of alternative types of artificial chemical cells and protocell models based on spontaneous processes of inorganic self-organization.

  2. Electrostatically gated membrane permeability in inorganic protocells.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Harbron, Rachel L; Weaver, Jonathan V M; Binks, Bernard P; Mann, Stephen

    2013-06-01

    Although several strategies are now available to produce functional microcompartments analogous to primitive cell-like structures, little progress has been made in generating protocell constructs with self-controlled membrane permeability. Here we describe the preparation of water-dispersible colloidosomes based on silica nanoparticles and delineated by a continuous semipermeable inorganic membrane capable of self-activated, electrostatically gated permeability. We use crosslinking and covalent grafting of a pH-responsive copolymer to generate an ultrathin elastic membrane that exhibits selective release and uptake of small molecules. This behaviour, which depends on the charge of the copolymer coronal layer, serves to trigger enzymatic dephosphorylation reactions specifically within the protocell aqueous interior. This system represents a step towards the design and construction of alternative types of artificial chemical cells and protocell models based on spontaneous processes of inorganic self-organization. PMID:23695636

  3. Control of vascular permeability by adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Sarelius, Ingrid H; Glading, Angela J

    2015-01-01

    Vascular permeability is a vital function of the circulatory system that is regulated in large part by the limited flux of solutes, water, and cells through the endothelial cell layer. One major pathway through this barrier is via the inter-endothelial junction, which is driven by the regulation of cadherin-based adhesions. The endothelium also forms attachments with surrounding proteins and cells via 2 classes of adhesion molecules, the integrins and IgCAMs. Integrins and IgCAMs propagate activation of multiple downstream signals that potentially impact cadherin adhesion. Here we discuss the known contributions of integrin and IgCAM signaling to the regulation of cadherin adhesion stability, endothelial barrier function, and vascular permeability. Emphasis is placed on known and prospective crosstalk signaling mechanisms between integrins, the IgCAMs- ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, and inter-endothelial cadherin adhesions, as potential strategic signaling nodes for multipartite regulation of cadherin adhesion. PMID:25838987

  4. Selective gel system for permeability profile control

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, P.

    1990-02-27

    This patent describes a process for closing pores in a more permeable zone of a formation. It comprises: placing into an aqueous solution a first composition sufficient to form ex-situ a size selective, shear thinning first gel which comprises a xanthan biopolymer, and a transitional metal ion; placing into the aqueous solution a second composition sufficient to form thermally a second in-situ gel which is substantially more resistant to formation conditions than the first gel. The composition comprises an aldehyde, and a phenolic compound; allowing the aqueous solution sufficient time to form the ex-situ gel; and injecting the aqueous solution containing the gel into the permeable zone where it reheals, is heated by the formation and thereafter forms a solid gel substantially more resistant to formation conditions than the first gel.

  5. Selective gel system for permeability profile control

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, P.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a selective gel for closing pores in a more permeable zone of a formation. It comprises: an aqueous solution of a first composition sufficient to form ex-situ a size selective, shear thinning first gel which comprises a xanthan biopolymer, and a transitional metal ion; and an aqueous solution of a second composition sufficient to form thermally a second in-situ gel that which comprises and aldehyde, and a phenolic compound which solutions are combined and allowed to form a shearable, rehealable ex-situ gel which can be injected into the permeable zone where it reheals when heated by the formation and thereafter forms a solid gel substantially more resistant to formation conditions than the first gel.

  6. Permeability of cork for water and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana Luisa; Brazinha, Carla; Pereira, Helena; Crespo, Joao G; Teodoro, Orlando M N D

    2013-10-01

    Transport properties of natural (noncompressed) cork were evaluated for water and ethanol in both vapor and liquid phases. The permeability for these permeants has been measured, as well as the sorption and diffusion coefficients. This paper focuses on the differences between the transport of gases' relevant vapors and their liquids (water and ethanol) through cork. A transport mechanism of vapors and liquids is proposed. Experimental evidence shows that both vapors and liquids permeate not only through the small channels across the cells (plasmodesmata), as in the permeation of gases, but also through the walls of cork cells by sorption and diffusion as in dense membranes. The present study also shows that cork permeability for gases was irreversibly and drastically decreased after cork samples were exposed to ethanol or water in liquid phase. PMID:24001097

  7. Monitoring pulmonary vascular permeability using radiolabeled transferrin

    SciTech Connect

    Basran, G.S.; Hardy, J.G.

    1988-07-01

    A simple, noninvasive technique for monitoring pulmonary vascular permeability in patients in critical care units is discussed. High vascular permeability is observed in patients with clinically defined adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but not in patients with hydrostatic pulmonary edema or in patients with minor pulmonary insults who are considered to be at risk of developing ARDS. The technique has been used in the field of therapeutics and pharmacology to test the effects of the putative antipermeability agents methylprednisolone and terbutaline sulfate. There appears to be a good correlation between the acute inhibitory effect of either drug on transferrin exudation and patient prognosis. Thus, a byproduct of such drug studies may be an index of survival in patients with established ARDS.

  8. Nonlinear effective pressure law for permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Xiao, W.-L.; Bernabé, Y.; Zhao, J.-Z.

    2014-01-01

    The permeability k of porous rocks is known to vary with confining pressure pc and pore fluid pressure pf. But it is, in principle, possible to replace the two-variable function k(pf, pc) by a function k(peff) of a single variable, peff(pf, pc), called the effective pressure. Our goal in this paper is to establish an experimental method for determining a possibly nonlinear, effective pressure law (EPL) for permeability, i.e., find the function κs(pf, pc) such that the effective pressure is given by peff = pc - κs(pf, pc) pf. We applied this method to a set of 26 sandstone cores from various hydrocarbon reservoirs in China. We found that κs greatly varied, from sample to sample, in magnitude and range, sometimes even reaching theoretically prohibited values (i.e., greater than 1 or lower than porosity). One interesting feature of κs(pf, pc) is that it could be approximately described in all rocks but one as a decreasing function κs(pc - pf) of Terzaghi's differential pressure. We also investigated the dependence of permeability on peff for each of our samples. Three models from the literature, i.e., exponential (E), power law (P), and the Walsh model (W), were tested. The (W) model was more likely to fit the experimental data of cores with a high pressure dependence of permeability whereas (E) occurred more frequently in low-pressure-sensitive rocks. Finally, we made various types of two- and three-dimensional microstructural observations that generally supported the trend mentioned above.

  9. Methods of determining permeability, transmissibility and drawdown

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bentall, Ray

    1964-01-01

    If the Theis graphical method is used for determining the hydraulic constants of an aquifer under water-table conditions, the observed drawdowns should be corrected for the decrease in saturated thickness. This is especially true if the drawdown is a large fraction of the original saturated thickness, for then the computed coefficient of permeability is highly inaccurate if based on observed, rather than corrected, water levels. Wenzel's limiting formula, a modification of the Theis graphical method, is useful where u=r2s/4Tt is less than about 0.01. However, a shorter procedure for determination of the coefficient of transmissibility, as well as the coefficient of storage, consists of plotting the values of the corrected drawdowns against the values of the logarithm of r. Wenzel (1942) suggested that observation wells be situated on lines that extend upgradient and downgradient from the pumped well. However, a detailed analysis of aquifer-test results indicates that such a restriction is unnecessary. The gradient method for determining permeability should yield the same results as the Thies method. The former, when applied for a distance within the range of applicability of the latter, is merely a duplication of effort or, at best, a crude check. Because of the limitations of accuracy in plotting, the gradient method is much less satisfactory. That Wenzel (1942) obtained identical results from the two methods is regarded as a coincidence. Failure to take into consideration the fact that the pumped well does not tap the full thickness of the aquifer leads to an apparent coefficient of permeability that is much too low, especially if the aquifer consists of stratified sediments. The average coefficient of permeability computed from uncorrected drawdowns may be only a little more than half of the true value.

  10. Anisotropic Hydraulic Permeability Under Finite Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    The structural organization of biological tissues and cells often produces anisotropic transport properties. These tissues may also undergo large deformations under normal function, potentially inducing further anisotropy. A general framework for formulating constitutive relations for anisotropic transport properties under finite deformation is lacking in the literature. This study presents an approach based on representation theorems for symmetric tensor-valued functions and provides conditions to enforce positive semi-definiteness of the permeability or diffusivity tensor. Formulations are presented which describe materials that are orthotropic, transversely isotropic, or isotropic in the reference state, and where large strains induce greater anisotropy. Strain-induced anisotropy of the permeability of a solid-fluid mixture is illustrated for finite torsion of a cylinder subjected to axial permeation. It is shown that, in general, torsion can produce a helical flow pattern, rather than the rectilinear pattern observed when adopting a more specialized, unconditionally isotropic spatial permeability tensor commonly used in biomechanics. The general formulation presented in this study can produce both affine and non-affine reorientation of the preferred directions of material symmetry with strain, depending on the choice of material functions. This study addresses a need in the biomechanics literature by providing guidelines and formulations for anisotropic strain-dependent transport properties in porous-deformable media undergoing large deformations. PMID:21034145

  11. Polymer nanocomposites: permeability, chain dynamics, mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Laxmi

    2005-03-01

    Polymer nanocomposites based on dispersion of surfactant treated expandable smectite clays such as montmorillonite layered silicates (MLS) have shown promise as organic-inorganic hybrids with the potential to improve barrier properties. Separately, flexible displays based on plastic substrates have reduced lifetimes tied to the low barrier properties. While there has been a general attribution of improved barrier properties to the tortuous path, this does not consider the influence the introduction of a secondary filler has on the morphology of the host polymer. Here we examine the influence of MLS nanoplatelets on the barrier properties and chain dynamics of polymers. We investigate the potential for host polymer modification by comparing two crystallizable polymers nylon and PET and resulting well dispersed nanocomposites. We study mechanical, cyclic fatigue and permeability of films. Permeability of the biaxially stretched film and when the film undergoes fatigue of 50 and 10000 cycles are also measured. Chain dynamics were modeled based on the Burger model fit to creep-recovery data. A systematic approach to predict the permeability considering amorphous, crystalline and MLS content and comparison with experimental values were done. We also conducted water absorption measurements to highlight the water absorption differences in the two polymers. Dimensional stability of PET was studied by measuring coefficient of thermal expansion of thin film on Si substrate by ellipsometry method.

  12. Patterns of permeability in eolian deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Goggin, D.J.; Chandler, M.A.; Kocurek, G.; Lake, L.W.

    1988-06-01

    The eolian, Jurassic Page sandstone of northeastern Arizona is marked by a highly ordered heterogeneity. The heterogeneity is expressed by the intricate association of stratification types, which are a direct result of the depositional processes. The dominant stratification types in eolian reservoirs are grainflow, grainfall, and wind-ripple deposits, which form on the lee faces of migrating dunes; interdune deposits, which form between migrating dunes; and extra-erg deposits, which occur sporadically when other depositional environments encroach upon an eolian system. These stratification types each have a unique permeability range, which implies that the fluid migration routes in eolian reservoirs will be dictated by the geometry and types of stratification present. One of the most important aspects of this study is the correlation of qualitative geologic descriptions with quantitative variables such as permeability. About 2,000 measurements were made with a field minipermeameter on an outcrop of the Page sandstone. These data show that three distinct permeability modes directly relate to the different stratification types.

  13. Effect of peptide conformation on membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Boguslavsky, V; Hruby, V J; O'Brien, D F; Misicka, A; Lipkowski, A W

    2003-06-01

    The effect of peptide conformational constraint on the peptide permeation across the model membranes was examined by determining the permeability of pairs of cyclic and acyclic peptides related to c[d-Pen2, d-Pen5] enkephalin (DPDPE). The peptides were cyclized by formation of an intramolecular disulfide bridge between the second and fifth residues composed of either d-penicillamine or cysteine. In each case the acyclic peptide was three to seven times more permeable than corresponding cyclic peptide. The possibility that the differences in permeability of cyclic and acyclic peptides is based on the greater conformational freedom of the acyclic peptides in the presence of membrane was examined in more detail by isothermal titration calorimetric studies of Trp6-DPDPE and its acyclic analog. The membrane binding of the acyclic peptide is a more exothermic process than binding of its cyclic Trp6-DPDPE. The transfer of acyclic peptide from water to membrane is an enthalpy driven process, whereas the transfer of the cyclic peptide is driven by entropy. PMID:12753376

  14. Porosity and Permeability of Chondritic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Corrigan, Catherine M.; Dahl, Jason; Long, Michael

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the porosity of a large number of chondritic interplanetary dust particles and meteorites by three techniques: standard liquid/gas flow techniques, a new, non-invasive ultrasonic technique, and image processing of backscattered images . The latter technique is obviously best suited to sub-kg sized samples. We have also measured the gas and liquid permeabilities of some chondrites by two techniques: standard liquid/gas flow techniques, and a new, non-destructive pressure release technique. We find that chondritic IDP's have a somewhat bimodal porosity distribution. Peaks are present at 0 and 4% porosity; a tail then extends to 53%. These values suggest IDP bulk densities of 1.1 to 3.3 g/cc. Type 1-3 chondrite matrix porosities range up to 30%, with a peak at 2%. The bulk porosities for type 1-3 chondrites have the same approximate range as exhibited by matrix, indicating that other components of the bulk meteorites (including chondrules and aggregates) have the same average porosity as matrix. These results reveal that the porosity of primitive materials at scales ranging from nanogram to kilogram are similar, implying similar accretion dynamics operated through 12 orders of size magnitude. Permeabilities of the investigated chondrites vary by several orders of magnitude, and there appears to be no simple dependence of permeability with degree of aqueous alteration, or chondrite type.

  15. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockette, Warren; Brennaman, Bruce

    1990-01-01

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). In this study, it was determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of (I-125)-albumin and (C-14)-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored, and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 microg/kg per min ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of (I-125)-albumin, but not (C-14)-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness.

  16. Effect of water on hydrogen permeability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulligan, David; Tomazic, William A.

    1987-01-01

    Doping of hydrogen with CO and CO2 was developed to reduce hydrogen permeation in Stirling engines by forming a low permeability oxide coating on the inner surface of the heater head tubes. Although doping worked well, under certain circumstances the protective oxide could be chemically reduced by the hydrogen in the engine. Some oxygen is required in the hydrogen to prevent reduction. Eventually, all the oxygen in the hydrogen gas - whatever its source - shows up as water. This is the result of hydrogen reducing the CO, CO2, or the protective inner surface oxides. This water can condense in the engine system under the right conditions. If the concentration of water vapor is reduced to a low enough level, the hydrogen can chemically reduce the oxide coating, resulting in an increase in permeability. This work was done to define the minimum water content required to avoid this reduction in the oxide coating. The results of this testing show that a minimum of approximately 750 ppm water is required to prevent an increase in permeability of CG-27, a high temperature metal alloy selected for Stirling engine heater tubes.

  17. Gravity filtration of suspensions: permeability effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soori, Tejaswi; Wang, Mengyu; Ward, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    This paper examines the filtration rates of mono-modal suspensions as a function of time and a cake layer builds up through theory and experimentation. Darcy's Law, which describes fluid flow through porous media, was applied along with the Kynch theory of sedimentation, which provides the basis for analyzing low concentration (ϕ <=20%) cake formation. Experiments were performed to study the effects of varying particle sizes (45 μm <= d <= 1400 μm) and total solid concentration ϕ on both the formation rate of the cake layer and its flow permeability (k) in conjunction with the filter media. A CCD camera was used to capture images of the cake formation and fluid drainage processes, and subsequent image and theoretical analysis found the fluid flow experienced a constant pressure loss due to the permeability of the filter media, whereas the experienced pressure loss due to the cake formation varies as a function of time, ϕ and d. The rate of cake formation was also found to be independent of ϕ but dependent on d which can be attributed to a change in porosity affecting permeability. Studies on similar systems with multi-modal suspensions are in-progress.

  18. Atrial natriuretic factor increases vascular permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lockette, W.; Brennaman, B. )

    1990-12-01

    An increase in central blood volume in microgravity may result in increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF). Since elevations in plasma ANF are found in clinical syndromes associated with edema, and since space motion sickness induced by microgravity is associated with an increase in central blood volume and facial edema, we determined whether ANF increases capillary permeability to plasma protein. Conscious, bilaterally nephrectomized male rats were infused with either saline, ANF + saline, or hexamethonium + saline over 2 h following bolus injections of 125I-albumin and 14C-dextran of similar molecular size. Blood pressure was monitored and serial determinations of hematocrits were made. Animals infused with 1.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 ANF had significantly higher hematocrits than animals infused with saline vehicle. Infusion of ANF increased the extravasation of 125I-albumin, but not 14C-dextran from the intravascular compartment. ANF also induced a depressor response in rats, but the change in blood pressure did not account for changes in capillary permeability to albumin; similar depressor responses induced by hexamethonium were not accompanied by increased extravasation of albumin from the intravascular compartment. ANF may decrease plasma volume by increasing permeability to albumin, and this effect of ANF may account for some of the signs and symptoms of space motion sickness.

  19. Endothelial cell permeability to water and antipyrine

    SciTech Connect

    Garrick, R.A.

    1986-03-05

    The endothelium provides a structural barrier between plasma constituents and the tissues. The permeability characteristics of the the endothelial cells regulate the transcellular movement of materials across this barrier while other movement is paracellular. In this study the permeability of the endothelial cells to tritiated water (/sup 3/HHO) and /sup 14/C-labeled antipyrine (AP) was investigated. The cells were isolated non-enzymatically from calf pulmonary artery and were maintained in culture and used between the seventh and fifteenth passage. The cells were removed from the T-flasks with a rubber policeman, titurated with a 22g needle and centrifuged. The cells were mixed with an extracellular marker, drawn into polyethylene tubing and packed by centrifugation for use in the linear diffusion technique. All measurements were made at 37 C. The diffusion coefficients for /sup 3/HHO through the packed cells (D), the intracellular material (D/sub 2/), and the extracellular material (D/sub 1/) were 0.682, 0.932 and 2.45 x 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ and for AP were 0.273, 0.355 and 1.13 x 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ respectively. The permeability coefficient calculated by the series-parallel pathway model for /sup 3/HHO was higher than that for AP and for both /sup 3/HHO and AP were lower than those calculated for isolated lung cells and erythrocytes.

  20. Changes in rock salt permeability due to nearby excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Stormont, J C; Howard, C L

    1991-07-01

    Changes in brine and gas permeability of rock salt as a result of nearby excavation (mine-by) have been measured from the underground workings of the WIPP facility. Prior to the mine-by, the formation responds as a porous medium with a very low brine permeability, a significant pore (brine) pressure and no measurable gas permeability. The mine-by excavation creates a dilated, partially saturated zone in the immediate vicinity of the excavation with an increased permeability to brine and a measurable permeability to gas. The changes in hydrologic properties are discussed in the context of pore structure changes.

  1. Phase behavior and permeability properties of phospholipid bilayers containing a short-chain phospholipid permeability enhancer.

    PubMed

    Risbo, J; Jørgensen, K; Sperotto, M M; Mouritsen, O G

    1997-10-01

    The thermodynamic phase behavior and trans-bilayer permeability properties of multilamellar phospholipid vesicles containing a short-chain DC10PC phospholipid permeability enhancer have been studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy. The calorimetric scans of DC14PC lipid bilayer vesicles incorporated with high concentrations of DC10PC demonstrate a distinct influence on the lipid bilayer thermodynamics manifested as a pronounced freezing-point depression and a narrow phase coexistence region. Increasing amounts of DC10PC lead to a progressive lowering of the melting enthalpy, implying a mixing behavior of the DC10PC in the bilayer matrix similar to that of a substitutional impurity. The phase behavior of the DC10PC-DC14PC mixture is supported by fluorescence polarization measurements which, furthermore, in the low-temperature gel phase reveal a non-monotonic concentration-dependent influence on the structural bilayer properties; small concentrations of DC10PC induce a disordering of the acyl chains, whereas higher concentrations lead to an ordering. Irreversible fluorescence quench measurements demonstrate a substantial increase in the trans-bilayer permeability over broad temperature and composition ranges. At temperatures corresponding to the peak positions of the heat capacity, a maximum in the trans-bilayer permeability is observed. The influence of DC10PC on the lipid bilayer thermodynamics and the associated permeability properties is discussed in terms of microscopic effects on the lateral lipid organization and heterogeneity of the bilayer. PMID:9370247

  2. Evaluating Permeability Enchancement Using Electrical Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    John W. Pritchett

    2008-09-01

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) development projects involve the artificial stimulation of relatively impermeable high-temperature underground regions (at depths of 2-4 kilometers or more) to create sufficient permeability to permit underground fluid circulation, so that hot water can be withdrawn from production wells and used to generate electric power. Several major research projects of this general type have been undertaken in the past in New Mexico (Fenton Hill), Europe, Japan and Australia. Recent U.S. activities along these lines focus mainly on stimulating peripheral areas of existing operating hydrothermal fields rather than on fresh 'greenfield' sites, but the long-term objective of the Department of Energy's EGS program is the development of large-scale power projects based on EGS technology (MIT, 2006; NREL, 2008). Usually, stimulation is accomplished by injecting water into a well at high pressure, enhancing permeability by the creation and propagation of fractures in the surrounding rock (a process known as 'hydrofracturing'). Beyond just a motivation, low initial system permeability is also an essential prerequisite to hydrofracturing. If the formation permeability is too high, excessive fluid losses will preclude the buildup of sufficient pressure to fracture rock. In practical situations, the actual result of injection is frequently to re-open pre-existing hydrothermally-mineralized fractures, rather than to create completely new fractures by rupturing intact rock. Pre-existing fractures can often be opened using injection pressures in the range 5-20 MPa. Creation of completely new fractures will usually require pressures that are several times higher. It is preferable to undertake development projects of this type in regions where tectonic conditions are conducive to shear failure, so that when pre-existing fractures are pressurized they will fail by shearing laterally. If this happens, the fracture will often stay open afterwards even if

  3. Membrane stress increases cation permeability in red cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R M

    1994-11-01

    The human red cell is known to increase its cation permeability when deformed by mechanical forces. Light-scattering measurements were used to quantitate the cell deformation, as ellipticity under shear. Permeability to sodium and potassium was not proportional to the cell deformation. An ellipticity of 0.75 was required to increase the permeability of the membrane to cations, and flux thereafter increased rapidly as the limits of cell extension were reached. Induction of membrane curvature by chemical agents also did not increase cation permeability. These results indicate that membrane deformation per se does not increase permeability, and that membrane tension is the effector for increased cation permeability. This may be relevant to some cation permeabilities observed by patch clamping. PMID:7858123

  4. Permeability-porosity relationships of subduction zone sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gamage, K.; Screaton, E.; Bekins, B.; Aiello, I.

    2011-01-01

    Permeability-porosity relationships for sediments from the northern Barbados, Costa Rica, Nankai, and Peru subduction zones were examined based on sediment type, grain size distribution, and general mechanical and chemical compaction history. Greater correlation was observed between permeability and porosity in siliciclastic sediments, diatom oozes, and nannofossil chalks than in nannofossil oozes. For siliciclastic sediments, grouping of sediments by percentage of clay-sized material yields relationships that are generally consistent with results from other marine settings and suggests decreasing permeability as percentage of clay-sized material increases. Correction of measured porosities for smectite content improved the correlation of permeability-porosity relationships for siliciclastic sediments and diatom oozes. The relationship between permeability and porosity for diatom oozes is very similar to the relationship in siliciclastic sediments, and permeabilities of both sediment types are related to the amount of clay-size particles. In contrast, nannofossil oozes have higher permeability values by 1.5 orders of magnitude than siliciclastic sediments of the same porosity and show poor correlation between permeability and porosity. More indurated calcareous sediments, nannofossil chalks, overlap siliciclastic permeabilities at the lower end of their measured permeability range, suggesting similar consolidation patterns at depth. Thus, the lack of correlation between permeability and porosity for nannofossil oozes is likely related to variations in mechanical and chemical compaction at shallow depths. This study provides the foundation for a much-needed global database with fundamental properties that relate to permeability in marine settings. Further progress in delineating controls on permeability requires additional carefully documented permeability measurements on well-characterized samples. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Permeability development during compaction of pumiceous dome lavas: testing the permeable foam collapse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwell, P.; Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallee, Y.; kennedy, B.; Hess, K.; von Aulock, F. W.; Cole, J. W.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    The evolution of the porous network during lava dome extrusions is commonly perceived as the key control on the permeability which regulates the pore pressure, thereby challenging the stability of the dome. Here, we present experimental results of porosity and permeability evolution during compaction of aphiric and crystal-bearing rhyolitic, pumiceous (porosity ~60 %) lavas from Tarawera and Ngongotaha volcanoes (Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand), respectively. The The Ngongotaha sample is from the crystal-free dome carapace (erupted ~200 ka following caldera collapse at Rotorua Caldera), while the Tarawera sample is a crystalline, pumiceous clast from a dome-collapse generated block and ash flow (at Okataina Caldera ~1314 AD). This study tests the validity of the 'permeable foam' model by comparing properties of the experimentally compacted pumice to denser material seen in the exposed cores of Tarawera and Ngongotaha. Cylindrical samples were deformed under an axial stress of 2.8 MPa at 650-750°C (above their calorimetric glass transition temperature) up a total axial strain of 50 %. The porosity and permeability of the samples were characterized at strain increments of 10 %. The samples exhibit strain hardening during compaction. A rapid reduction in permeability along the primary axis occurs during the initial stage of compression and continues to decrease with increasing strain and densification of the lava. Development of permeability of each lava differs as the crystallinity affects the compaction process. The development of textures and microstructures is characterised using petrographic analysis and neutron computed tomography. The findings from the study are then put into the context of lava dome growth at Tarawera and Ngongotaha volcanoes.

  6. EPA/ITRC-RTDF permeable reactive barrier short course. Permeable reactive barriers: Application and deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This report focuses on the following: Permeable Reactive Barriers: Application and Deployment; Introduction to Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) for Remediating and Managing Contaminated Groundwater in Situ; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 1: Site Characterization for PRBs; Reactive Materials: Zero-Valent Iron; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 2: Laboratory and Pilot Scale Tests; Design Calculations; Compliance Monitoring, Performance Monitoring and Long-Term Maintenance for PRBs; PRB Emplacement Techniques; PRB Permitting and Implementation; Treatment of Metals; Non-Metallic Reactive Materials; Economic Considerations for PRB Deployment; and Bibliography.

  7. EPA/ITRC-RTDF permeable reactive barrier short course. Permeable reactive barriers: Application and deployment

    SciTech Connect

    1999-11-01

    This report focuses on the following: Permeable Reactive Barriers: Application and Deployment; Introduction to Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) for Remediating and Managing Contaminated Groundwater in Situ; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 1: Site Characterization for PRBs; Reactive Materials: Zero-Valent Iron; Collection and Interpretation of Design Data 2: Laboratory and Pilot Scale Tests; Design Calculations; Compliance Monitoring, Performance Monitoring and Long-Term Maintenance for PRBs; PRB Emplacement Techniques; PRB Permitting and Implementation; Treatment of Metals; Non-Metallic Reactive Materials; Economic Considerations for PRB Deployment; and Bibliography.

  8. Clamshell excavation of a permeable reactive barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molfetta, Antonio Di; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2006-06-01

    Nowadays, permeable reactive barriers (PRB) are one of the most widespread techniques for the remediation of contaminated aquifers. Over the past 10 years, the use of iron-based PRBs has evolved from innovative to accepted standard practice for the treatment of a variety of groundwater contaminants (ITRC in: Permeable reactive barriers: lessons learned/new directions. The Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council, Permeable Reactive Barriers Team 2005). Although, a variety of excavation methods have been developed, backhoe excavators are often used for the construction of PRBs. The aim of this study is to describe the emplacement of a full-scale PRB and the benefits deriving from the use of a crawler crane equipped with a hydraulic grab (also known as clamshell excavator) in the excavation phases. The studied PRB was designed to remediate a chlorinated hydrocarbons plume at an old industrial landfill site, in Avigliana, near the city of Torino, in Italy. The continuous reactive barrier was designed to be 120 m long, 13 m deep, and 0.6 m thick. The installation of the barrier was accomplished using a clamshell for the excavation of the trench and a guar-gum slurry to support the walls. The performance of this technique was outstanding and allowed the installation of the PRB in 7 days. The degree of precision of the excavation was very high because of the intrinsic characteristics of this excavation tool and of the use of a concrete curb to guide the hydraulic grab. Moreover, the adopted technique permitted a saving of bioslurry thus minimizing the amount of biocide required.

  9. Small intestinal permeability in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Luzia; Ramminger, Sara; Haas, Verena; Postrach, Elisa; Werich, Martina; Fischer, André; Koller, Michael; Swidsinski, Alexander; Bereswill, Stefan; Lochs, Herbert; Schulzke, Jörg‐Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract It is not yet clear whether intestinal mucosal permeability changes with advancing age in humans. This question is of high importance for drug and nutrition approaches for older adults. Our main objective was to answer the question if small intestinal barrier integrity deteriorates with healthy aging. We conducted a cross‐sectional study including the pooled data of 215 nonsmoking healthy adults (93 female/122 male), 84 of whom were aged between 60 and 82 years. After a 12‐h fast, all participants ingested 10 g of lactulose and 5 g of mannitol. Urine was collected for 5 h afterwards and analyzed for test sugars. The permeability index (PI = lactulose/mannitol) was used to assess small intestinal permeability. Low‐grade inflammation defined by high‐sensitivity C‐reactive protein ≥1 mL/L and kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate) were determined in the older age group. The PI was similar in older compared to younger adults (P =0.887). However, the urinary recovery of lactulose and mannitol was lower in the older adults and this change was neither associated with urinary volume nor glomerular filtration rate. The PI was not significantly correlated with low‐grade inflammation or presence of noninsulin‐dependent type 2 diabetes. However, it significantly deteriorated in the copresence of both conditions compared to low‐grade inflammation alone (P =0.043) or type 2 diabetes alone (P =0.015). Small intestinal mucosal barrier does not deteriorate with age per se. But low‐grade inflammation coupled with minor disease challenges, such as type 2 diabetes, can compromise the small intestinal barrier. PMID:24771689

  10. Engineered Trehalose Permeable to Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abazari, Alireza; Meimetis, Labros G.; Budin, Ghyslain; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Weissleder, Ralph; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Trehalose is a naturally occurring disaccharide which is associated with extraordinary stress-tolerance capacity in certain species of unicellular and multicellular organisms. In mammalian cells, presence of intra- and extracellular trehalose has been shown to confer improved tolerance against freezing and desiccation. Since mammalian cells do not synthesize nor import trehalose, the development of novel methods for efficient intracellular delivery of trehalose has been an ongoing investigation. Herein, we studied the membrane permeability of engineered lipophilic derivatives of trehalose. Trehalose conjugated with 6 acetyl groups (trehalose hexaacetate or 6-O-Ac-Tre) demonstrated superior permeability in rat hepatocytes compared with regular trehalose, trehalose diacetate (2-O-Ac-Tre) and trehalose tetraacetate (4-O-Ac-Tre). Once in the cell, intracellular esterases hydrolyzed the 6-O-Ac-Tre molecules, releasing free trehalose into the cytoplasm. The total concentration of intracellular trehalose (plus acetylated variants) reached as high as 10 fold the extracellular concentration of 6-O-Ac-Tre, attaining concentrations suitable for applications in biopreservation. To describe this accumulation phenomenon, a diffusion-reaction model was proposed and the permeability and reaction kinetics of 6-O-Ac-Tre were determined by fitting to experimental data. Further studies suggested that the impact of the loading and the presence of intracellular trehalose on cellular viability and function were negligible. Engineering of trehalose chemical structure rather than manipulating the cell, is an innocuous, cell-friendly method for trehalose delivery, with demonstrated potential for trehalose loading in different types of cells and cell lines, and can facilitate the wide-spread application of trehalose as an intracellular protective agent in biopreservation studies. PMID:26115179

  11. The kinetics of denitrification in permeable sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Victor; Glud, Ronnie N.; Cook, Perran L. M.

    2013-04-01

    Permeable sediments comprise the majority of shelf sediments, yet the rates of denitrification remain highly uncertain in these environments. Computational models are increasingly being used to understand the dynamics of denitrification in permeable sediments, which are complex environments to study experimentally. The realistic implementation of such models requires reliable experimentally derived data on the kinetics of denitrification. Here we undertook measurements of denitrification kinetics as a function of nitrate concentration and in the presence and absence of oxygen, in carefully controlled flow through reactor experiments on sediments taken from six shallow coastal sites in Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, Australia. The results showed that denitrification commenced rapidly (within 30 min) after the onset of anoxia and the kinetics could be well described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with half saturation constants (apparent Km) ranging between 1.5 and 19.8 μM, and maximum denitrification rate (Vmax) were in the range of 0.9-7.5 nmol mL-1 h-1. The production of N2 through anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) was generally found to be less than 10% that of denitrification. Vmax were in the same range as previously reported in cohesive sediments despite organic carbon contents one order of magnitude lower for the sediments studied here. The ratio of sediment O2 consumption to Vmax was in the range of 0.02-0.09, and was on average much lower than the theoretical ratio of 0.8. The most likely explanation for this is that the microbial community is not able to instantaneously shift or optimally use a particular electron acceptor in the highly dynamic redox environment experienced in permeable sediments. Consistent with this explanation, subsequent longer-term experiments over 5 days showed that denitrification rates increased by a factor of 10 within 3 days of the permanent onset of anoxia. In contrast to previous studies, we did not observe any significant

  12. Antibiotic Treatment Affects Intestinal Permeability and Gut Microbial Composition in Wistar Rats Dependent on Antibiotic Class

    PubMed Central

    Tulstrup, Monica Vera-Lise; Christensen, Ellen Gerd; Carvalho, Vera; Linninge, Caroline; Ahrné, Siv; Højberg, Ole; Licht, Tine Rask; Bahl, Martin Iain

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics are frequently administered orally to treat bacterial infections not necessarily related to the gastrointestinal system. This has adverse effects on the commensal gut microbial community, as it disrupts the intricate balance between specific bacterial groups within this ecosystem, potentially leading to dysbiosis. We hypothesized that modulation of community composition and function induced by antibiotics affects intestinal integrity depending on the antibiotic administered. To address this a total of 60 Wistar rats (housed in pairs with 6 cages per group) were dosed by oral gavage with either amoxicillin (AMX), cefotaxime (CTX), vancomycin (VAN), metronidazole (MTZ), or water (CON) daily for 10–11 days. Bacterial composition, alpha diversity and caecum short chain fatty acid levels were significantly affected by AMX, CTX and VAN, and varied among antibiotic treatments. A general decrease in diversity and an increase in the relative abundance of Proteobacteria was observed for all three antibiotics. Additionally, the relative abundance of Bifidobacteriaceae was increased in the CTX group and both Lactobacillaceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae were increased in the VAN group compared to the CON group. No changes in microbiota composition or function were observed following MTZ treatment. Intestinal permeability to 4 kDa FITC-dextran decreased after CTX and VAN treatment and increased following MTZ treatment. Plasma haptoglobin levels were increased by both AMX and CTX but no changes in expression of host tight junction genes were found in any treatment group. A strong correlation between the level of caecal succinate, the relative abundance of Clostridiaceae 1 family in the caecum, and the level of acute phase protein haptoglobin in blood plasma was observed. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced changes in microbiota may be linked to alterations in intestinal permeability, although the specific interactions remain to be elucidated as changes in permeability did

  13. Laser Additive Manufacturing of Gas Permeable Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klahn, C.; Bechmann, F.; Hofmann, S.; Dinkel, M.; Emmelmann, C.

    Laser additive manufacturing offers a variety of new design possibilities. In mold making laser additive manufactured inserts with conformal cooling channels are already state of the art. Pneumatic ejectors for injection molds are a new application for laser additive manufacturing. The pneumatic ejectors require a durable gas permeable material. This material is produced by placing the scan vectors for the laser additive manufacturing process in a defined pattern. Trials with different plastics proofed the function and reliability of the pneumatic ejector concept in the injection molding cycle.

  14. Gas permeable electrode for electrochemical system

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, Frank A.; Townsend, Carl W.

    1989-01-01

    An electrode apparatus adapted for use in electrochemical systems having an anode compartment and a cathode compartment in which gas and ions are produced and consumed in the compartments during generation of electrical current. The electrode apparatus includes a membrane for separating the anode compartment from the cathode compartment wherein the membrane is permeable to both ions and gas. The cathode and anode for the assembly are provided on opposite sides of the membrane. During use of the membrane-electrode apparatus in electrochemical cells, the gas and ions generated at the cathode or anode migrate through the membrane to provide efficient transfer of gas and ions between the anode and cathode compartments.

  15. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, G.M.; Kollie, T.G.; Watkin, D.C.; Walton, D.G.

    1998-05-12

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the ``body-filled panel.`` Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials. 4 figs.

  16. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Watkin, David C.; Walton, David G.

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the "body-filled panel". Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials.

  17. Nerve impulses increase glial intercellular permeability.

    PubMed

    Marrero, H; Orkand, R K

    1996-03-01

    Coordinating the activity of neurons and their satellite glial cells requires mechanisms by which glial cells detect neuronal activity and change their properties as a result. This study monitors the intercellular diffusion of the fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow (LY), following its injection into glial cells of the frog optic nerve, and demonstrates that nerve impulses increase the permeability of interglial gap junctions. Consequently, the spatial buffer capacity of the neuroglial cell syncytium for potassium, other ions, and small molecules will be enhanced; this may facilitate glial function in maintaining homeostasis of the neuronal microenvironment. PMID:8833199

  18. Method for decreasing permeability around a wellbore

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, W.C.; Whittington, L.E.; Morrow, L.R.

    1988-01-26

    A method for decreasing formation permeability in an underground formation around a wellbore is described comprising: injecting an aqueous solution having a pH of about 0.9 to about 3.5 into the formation surrounding a wellbore, the aqueous solution comprising about 2% to about 20% by weight of lignosulfonate, about 2% to about 20% by weight of monomer of acrylic acid, a sufficient amount of an initiator of persulfate to copolymerize the lignosulfonate and the monomer, and about 0% to about 3.0% by weight of a metal slat having a cation of iron, titanium, vanadium, chromium or molybdenum.

  19. PERMEABILITY OF SALTSTONE MEASUREMENT BY BEAM BENDING

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Tommy Edwards, T; Vickie Williams, V

    2008-01-30

    One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify (and, quantify the impact of) the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone mixes. A performance property for Saltstone mixes that is important but not routinely measured is the liquid permeability or saturated hydraulic conductivity of the cured Saltstone mix. The value for the saturated hydraulic conductivity is an input into the Performance Assessment for the SRS Z-Area vaults. Therefore, it is important to have a method available that allows for an accurate and reproducible measurement of permeability quickly and inexpensively. One such method that could potentially meet these requirements for the measurement of saturated hydraulic conductivity is the technique of beam bending, developed by Professor George Scherer at Princeton University. In order to determine the feasibility of this technique for Saltstone mixes, a summer student, David Feliciano, was hired to work at Princeton under the direction of George Scherer. This report details the results of this study which demonstrated the feasibility and applicability of the beam bending method to measurement of permeability of Saltstone samples. This research effort used samples made at Princeton from a Modular Caustic side solvent extraction Unit based simulant (MCU) and premix at a water to premix ratio of 0.60. The saturated hydraulic conductivities for these mixes were measured by the beam bending technique and the values determined were of the order of 1.4 to 3.4 x 10{sup -9} cm/sec. These values of hydraulic conductivity are consistent with independently measured values of this property on similar MCU based mixes by Dixon and Phifer. These values are also consistent with the hydraulic conductivity of a generic Saltstone mix measured by Langton in 1985. The high water to premix ratio used for Saltstone along with the relatively low degree of hydration for

  20. Experimental Observations of Permeability Enhancements by Dynamic Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhoury, J. E.; Niemeijer, A.; Brodsky, E. E.; Marone, C.

    2008-12-01

    Shaking produced by seismic faulting often triggers distant and nearby earthquakes. Seismic waves are also known to increase stream flow and spring discharge and enhance oil production; in some cases tripling the effective permeability of the natural system. These observations have been attributed to shaking-induced increases in permeability. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here we present experimental evidence of permeability enhancement in fractured rock samples subject to dynamic stresses. We use Berea sandstone samples under triaxial stresses with confining pressure of 9 MPa and 20 MPa of normal stress. We flow deionized water through a fracture produced in-situ and find that oscillations in pore pressure, of 20 second period and 120 second duration, induce transient increases in permeability. Permeability increases scale with the amplitude of pore pressure oscillations. The maximum value of the permeability enhancement is 5x10-16 m2 over a background permeability of 1x10-15 m2. After the oscillations, permeability recovers as the inverse square root of time. The recovery indicates a reversible mechanism, such as clogging/unclogging of fractures, as opposed to an irreversible one, like micro-fracturing. Our result has clear consequences for earthquake triggering mediated by permeability enhancement. Moreover, our data point at the feasibility of dynamically controlling permeability of fractured systems with applications to hydrology and oil reservoir engineering.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow with permeable walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Seonghyeon; Je, Jongdoo; Choi, Haecheon

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives of this study are to suggest a proper boundary condition at the interface between a permeable block and turbulent channel flow and to investigate the characteristics of turbulent channel flow with permeable walls. The boundary condition suggested is an extended version of that applied to laminar channel flow by Beavers & Joseph (1967) and describes the behaviour of slip velocities in the streamwise and spanwise directions at the interface between the permeable block and turbulent channel flow. With the proposed boundary condition, direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow that is bounded by the permeable wall are performed and significant skin-friction reductions at the permeable wall are obtained with modification of overall flow structures. The viscous sublayer thickness is decreased and the near-wall vortical structures are significantly weakened by the permeable wall. The permeable wall also reduces the turbulence intensities, Reynolds shear stress, and pressure and vorticity fluctuations throughout the channel except very near the wall. The increase of some turbulence quantities there is due to the slip-velocity fluctuations at the wall. The boundary condition proposed for the permeable wall is validated by comparing solutions with those obtained from a separate direct numerical simulation using both the Brinkman equation for the interior of a permeable block and the Navier Stokes equation for the main channel bounded by a permeable block.

  2. Reservoir permeability from seismic attribute analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Dmitriy; Goloshubin, G.; Silin, D.; Vingalov, V.; Takkand, G.; Latfullin, M.

    2008-02-15

    In case of porous fluid-saturated medium the Biot's poroelasticity theory predicts a movement of the pore fluid relative to the skeleton on seismic wave propagation through the medium. This phenomenon opens an opportunity for investigation of the flow properties of the hydrocarbon-saturated reservoirs. It is well known that relative fluid movement becomes negligible at seismic frequencies if porous material is homogeneous and well cemented. In this case the theory predicts an underestimated seismic wave velocity dispersion and attenuation. Based on Biot's theory, Helle et al. (2003) have numerically demonstrated the substantial effects on both velocity and attenuation by heterogeneous permeability and saturation in the rocks. Besides fluid flow effect, the effects of scattering (Gurevich, et al., 1997) play very important role in case of finely layered porous rocks and heterogeneous fluid saturation. We have used both fluid flow and scattering effects to derive a frequency-dependent seismic attribute which is proportional to fluid mobility and applied it for analysis of reservoir permeability.

  3. Modeling of microvascular permeability changes after electroporation.

    PubMed

    Corovic, Selma; Markelc, Bostjan; Dolinar, Mitja; Cemazar, Maja; Jarm, Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelium selectively controls the transport of plasma contents across the blood vessel wall. The principal objective of our preliminary study was to quantify the electroporation-induced increase in permeability of blood vessel wall for macromolecules, which do not normally extravasate from blood into skin interstitium in homeostatic conditions. Our study combines mathematical modeling (by employing pharmacokinetic and finite element modeling approach) with in vivo measurements (by intravital fluorescence microscopy). Extravasation of fluorescently labeled dextran molecules of two different sizes (70 kDa and 2000 kDa) following the application of electroporation pulses was investigated in order to simulate extravasation of therapeutic macromolecules with molecular weights comparable to molecular weight of particles such as antibodies and plasmid DNA. The increase in blood vessel permeability due to electroporation and corresponding transvascular transport was quantified by calculating the apparent diffusion coefficients for skin microvessel wall (D [μm2/s]) for both molecular sizes. The calculated apparent diffusion coefficients were D = 0.0086 μm2/s and D = 0.0045 μm2/s for 70 kDa and 2000 kDa dextran molecules, respectively. The results of our preliminary study have important implications in development of realistic mathematical models for prediction of extravasation and delivery of large therapeutic molecules to target tissues by means of electroporation. PMID:25793292

  4. Blood-ocular barrier permeability in monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, A; Ishiko, S; Kojima, M; Lipsky, S N

    1992-01-01

    The permeability of the blood-ocular barrier was investigated in five monkeys using vitreous fluorophotometry (VFP). Inward permeability (Pin) of the blood-retinal barrier was calculated by a computer simulation method. Kinetic VFP was performed after intravitreal injection of fluorescein (F) or fluorescein monoglucuronide (FG). The estimated mean value of Pin (x10(-6) cm/min) was 4.8 (SD 1.2). The mean rates of loss (per hour) of F from the anterior chamber (Ka) and the vitreous (Kv) were 0.11 (SD 0.01) and 0.13 (SD 0.03), respectively, which were approximately three and four times greater than those of FG (0.04 (SD 0.01) and 0.03 (SD 0.01), respectively). Probenecid administered intraperitoneally decreased both the Ka and the Kv of F significantly but had no effect on the Ka or the Kv of FG, suggesting that F was excreted from the eye with the aid of the active transport mechanism. The results of comparative studies of the rates of loss of F from the anterior chamber (Ka) and from the vitreous (Kv) suggested that active transport was more predominant in the blood-retinal barrier than in the blood-aqueous barrier. PMID:1739721

  5. Salt-saturated concrete strength and permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifle, T.W.

    1996-11-01

    Laboratory-scale experiments applicable to the use of salt-saturated concrete as a seal material for a transuranic waste repository have been completed. Nitrogen gas permeability measurements were made using a flexible-wall permeameter, a confining pressure of 1 MPa, and gas pressure gradients ranging from 0.3 MPa to 0.75 MPa. Results show that salt-saturated concrete has very low intrinsic permeability with values ranging from 9.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}22} m{sup 2} to 9.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}17} m{sup 2}. Strength and deformation characteristics were investigated under conditions of triaxial compression with confining pressures ranging from 0 to 15 MPa using either axial strain-rate or axial stress-rate control and show that the failure strength of concrete increases with confining pressure which can be adequately described through pressure-sensitive failure criteria. Axial, radial, and volumetric strains were also measured during each test and these data were used to determine elastic properties. Experimental results are applicable in the design and analysis of scale-related functions and apply to other concrete structures subjected to compressive loadings such as dams and prestressed structural members.

  6. Vortex Ring Interaction with Multiple Permeable Screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musta, Mustafa N.; Krueger, Paul S.

    2008-11-01

    Previous experiments on the interaction of a vortex ring impinging on single thin permeable screen demonstrated the formation of secondary vortices and a transmitted vortex ring. The present work concerns experimental investigation of the interaction of a vortex ring with multiple permeable screens. Vortex rings are formed by piston-cylinder type vortex ring generator and impinge on an array of parallel, transparent screens. The screens have an open ratio of 84% and the spacing between screens is variable. The vortex rings were formed with an approximate jet Reynolds number of 1300 and a piston stroke-to-jet diameter ratio (L/D) of approximately 4. Dye visualization of the vortex rings shows that they break into multiple vortices after impinging on first screen The vortices subsequently disintegrate, but the total distance required for disintegration is relatively unaffected by the number of screens through with the vortices pass due to the regular structure of the screens. It is also observed that the location of the initial vortex ring axis relative to the screen rods has a significant effect on the vortex breakup and disintegration process.

  7. Air sparging in low permeability soils

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, M.C.

    1996-08-01

    Sparging technology is rapidly growing as a preferred, low cost remediation technique of choice at sites across the United States. The technology is considered to be commercially available and relatively mature. However, the maturity is based on the number of applications of the technology as opposed to the degree of understanding of the mechanisms governing the sparging process. Few well documented case studies exist on the long term operation of the technology. Sparging has generally been applied using modified monitoring well designs in uniform, coarse grained soils. The applicability of sparging for the remediation of DNAPLs in low permeability media has not been significantly explored. Models for projecting the performance of sparging systems in either soils condition are generally simplistic but can be used to provide general insight into the effects of significant changes in soil and fluid properties. The most promising sparging approaches for the remediation of DNAPLs in low permeability media are variations or enhancements to the core technology. Recirculatory sparging systems, sparging/biosparging trenches or curtains and heating or induced fracturing techniques appear to be the most promising technology variants for this type of soil. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Tight junction, selective permeability, and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Krug, Susanne M; Schulzke, Jörg D; Fromm, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The tight junction forms a barrier against unlimited paracellular passage but some of the tight junction proteins just do the opposite, they form extracellular channels zigzagging between lateral membranes of neighboring cells. All of these channel-forming proteins and even some of the barrier formers exhibit selectivity, which means that they prefer certain substances over others. All channel formers exhibit at least one of the three types of selectivity: for cations (claudin-2, -10b, -15), for anions (claudin-10a, -17) or for water (claudin-2). Also some, but not all, barrier-forming claudins are charge-selective (claudin-4, -8, -14). Moreover, occludin and tricellulin turned out to be relevant for barrier formation against macromolecule passage. Tight junction proteins are dysregulated or can be genetically defective in numerous diseases, which may lead to three effects: (i) impaired paracellular transport e.g. causing magnesium loss in the kidney, (ii) increased paracellular transport of solutes and water e.g. causing leak-flux diarrhea in the intestine, and (iii) increased permeability to large molecules e.g. unwanted intestinal pathogen uptake fueling inflammatory processes. This review gives an overview on the properties of tight junction proteins featuring selective permeability, and in this context explains how these proteins induce or aggravate diseases. PMID:25220018

  9. Efficient high-permeability fracturing offshore

    SciTech Connect

    Phillipi, M.; Farabee, M.

    1996-12-31

    Offshore operators can more efficiently and effectively perform high-permeability and conventional hydraulic fracture treatments by blending treatment slurries under microprocessor control, adding undiluted acid on-the-fly, and altering sand concentrations and other slurry properties instantaneously. A two-skid system has been designed with these considerations in mind. The system, which can be shipped efficiently in ISO containers, has been tested on fluids up to 210-cp viscosity and can step or ramp sand concentrations up to a maximum of 20 lb/gal. All additives, including acid treatments, are added on-the-fly; leftover additives and acids may be stored for future jobs. The system may be applied in most conditions, including offshore wells requiring conventional or high-permeability fracture treatments and certain land-based wells in remote areas where a compact skid is needed. Three significant benefits have resulted from using the compact-skid system: offshore operators have been able to ship the skid system at 20% of shipping costs of non-ISO equipment; on-the-fly mixing has prevented material waste associated with batch-mixing; and volumes pumped on actual jobs have closely matched job designs. Data have been collected from several Gulf of Mexico jobs run with the two-part skid system that has been designed for conducting hydraulic fracture treatments from offshore rigs.

  10. Modeling of Microvascular Permeability Changes after Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Corovic, Selma; Markelc, Bostjan; Dolinar, Mitja; Cemazar, Maja; Jarm, Tomaz

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelium selectively controls the transport of plasma contents across the blood vessel wall. The principal objective of our preliminary study was to quantify the electroporation-induced increase in permeability of blood vessel wall for macromolecules, which do not normally extravasate from blood into skin interstitium in homeostatic conditions. Our study combines mathematical modeling (by employing pharmacokinetic and finite element modeling approach) with in vivo measurements (by intravital fluorescence microscopy). Extravasation of fluorescently labeled dextran molecules of two different sizes (70 kDa and 2000 kDa) following the application of electroporation pulses was investigated in order to simulate extravasation of therapeutic macromolecules with molecular weights comparable to molecular weight of particles such as antibodies and plasmid DNA. The increase in blood vessel permeability due to electroporation and corresponding transvascular transport was quantified by calculating the apparent diffusion coefficients for skin microvessel wall (D [μm2/s]) for both molecular sizes. The calculated apparent diffusion coefficients were D = 0.0086 μm2/s and D = 0.0045 μm2/s for 70 kDa and 2000 kDa dextran molecules, respectively. The results of our preliminary study have important implications in development of realistic mathematical models for prediction of extravasation and delivery of large therapeutic molecules to target tissues by means of electroporation. PMID:25793292

  11. What about temperature? Measuring permeability at magmatic conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, Alexandra R. L.; Martel, Caroline; Champallier, Rémi; Reuschlé, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    The explosive potential of volcanoes is intimately linked to permeability, which is governed by the connectivity of the porous structure of the magma and surrounding edifice. As magma ascends, volatiles exsolve from the melt and expand, creating a gas phase within the conduit. In the absence of a permeable structure capable of dissipating these gases, the propulsive force of an explosive eruption arises from the gas expansion and the build up of subsurface overpressures. Thus, characterizing the permeability of volcanic rocks under in-situ conditions (high temperature and pressure) allows us to better understand the outgassing potential and explosivity of volcanic systems. Current studies of the permeabilities of volcanic rocks generally measure permeability at room temperature using gas permeameters or model permeability using analytic imaging. Our goal is to perform and assess permeability measurements made at high temperature and high pressure in the interest of approaching the permeability of the samples at magmatic conditions. We measure the permeability of andesitic samples expelled during the 2010 Mt. Merapi eruption. We employ and compare two protocols for measuring permeability at high temperature and under high pressure using argon gas in an internally heated Paterson apparatus with an isolated pore fluid system. We first use the pulse decay method to measure the permeability of our samples, then compare these values to permeability measurements performed under steady state flow. We consider the steady state flow method the more rigorous of the two protocols, as we are more capable of accounting for the temperature gradient within the entire pore fluid system. At temperatures in excess of 700°C and pressures of 100 MPa, permeability values plummet by several orders of magnitude. These values are significantly lower than those commonly reported for room temperature permeameter measurements. The reduction in permeability at high temperature is a

  12. Experimental Investigation on Sandstone Rock Permeability of Pakistan Gas Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Arshad; Bing, Chua Han; Nagarajan, Ramasamy; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-04-01

    Permeability is the ability of formation to produce hydrocarbon which is affected by compaction, pore size, sorting, cementation, layering and clay swelling. The effect of texture on permeability in term of grain size, sorting, sphericity, degree of cementing has been reported in literature. Also, the effect of permeability on capillary pressure, irreducible water saturation, displacement pressure and pore geometry constant has been studied separately. This preliminary study presents the experimental results of eight samples to understand the effect of similar factors of texture on permeability. With the knowledge of the results, it can be said that the effect of grain size, cementation, texture material, sphericity, and porosity can't be observed on permeability except sorting when less than ten samples are considered from different depositional environment. The results also show the impact of permeability on capillary pressure, irreducible water saturation, and displacement pressure and pore geometry index as similar as published in the literature.

  13. Calculation of large scale relative permeabilities from stochastic properties of the permeability field and fluid properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lenormand, R.; Thiele, M.R.

    1997-08-01

    The paper describes the method and presents preliminary results for the calculation of homogenized relative permeabilities using stochastic properties of the permeability field. In heterogeneous media, the spreading of an injected fluid is mainly sue to the permeability heterogeneity and viscosity fingering. At large scale, when the heterogeneous medium is replaced by a homogeneous one, we need to introduce a homogenized (or pseudo) relative permeability to obtain the same spreading. Generally, is derived by using fine-grid numerical simulations (Kyte and Berry). However, this operation is time consuming and cannot be performed for all the meshes of the reservoir. We propose an alternate method which uses the information given by the stochastic properties of the field without any numerical simulation. The method is based on recent developments on homogenized transport equations (the {open_quotes}MHD{close_quotes} equation, Lenormand SPE 30797). The MHD equation accounts for the three basic mechanisms of spreading of the injected fluid: (1) Dispersive spreading due to small scale randomness, characterized by a macrodispersion coefficient D. (2) Convective spreading due to large scale heterogeneities (layers) characterized by a heterogeneity factor H. (3) Viscous fingering characterized by an apparent viscosity ration M. In the paper, we first derive the parameters D and H as functions of variance and correlation length of the permeability field. The results are shown to be in good agreement with fine-grid simulations. The are then derived a function of D, H and M. The main result is that this approach lead to a time dependent . Finally, the calculated are compared to the values derived by history matching using fine-grid numerical simulations.

  14. Method for plugging high permeability zones in subterranean reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Clauset, A.O. Jr.; Christopher, C.A. Jr.

    1980-07-01

    An aqueous solution comprising fresh water and a pectic substance selected from the group consisting of pectins, pectates, polygalacturonic acids, and mixtures thereof is injected into a subterranean petroleum reservoir containing high permeability areas within the reservoirs. Upon entering these high permeability areas the injected aqueous solution contacts a brine which causes the pectate substance to form a gel, thereby effectively plugging the high permeability areas within the reservoir. 13 claims.

  15. Characterizing average permeability in oil and gas formations

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, J.B. ); Holditch, S.A.; Lee, W.J. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper reports that permeability in a formation frequently follows a unimodal probability distribution. In many formations, particularly sedimentary ones, the permeability distribution is similar to the log-normal distribution. Theoretical considerations, field cases, and a reservoir simulation example show that the median, rather than the arithmetic mean, is the appropriate measure of central tendency or average value of the permeability distribution in a formation. Use of the correct estimate of average permeability is of particular importance in the classification of tight gas formations under statues in the 1978 Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA).

  16. Increased Vascular permeability produced by human platelet granule cationic extract

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, Ralph L.; Weksler, Babette; Ferris, Barbara

    1970-01-01

    A cationic protein extract obtained from isolated human platelet granules increased vascular permeability in mouse and rabbit skin. The permeability-enhancing effect was not inhibited by soybean trypsin and pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, methylsergide maleate, carboxypeptidase B, and C[unk]1 inactivator. Permeability-enhancing activity was blocked by prior treatment of challenged animals with antihistamine. The nondializable relatively heat-stable cationic granule protein extract possessed potent mastocytolytic activity. The experiments described suggest that human platelets exert a permeability-enhancing effect by lysosomal release of cationic proteins which cause histamine release from adjacent tissue mast cells. Images PMID:4391559

  17. Permeability of stemming materials for prompt gas sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Beiriger, J.; Trimmer, D.

    1982-01-01

    The permeability and porosity of a suite of man-made granular aggregates and stemming materials currently in use at NTS was measured in 1-D loading as a function of stress. In all cases, the gas permeability was measured at 22 MPa after cycling up and down from 100 to 1200 MPa. Depending on stress and material, permeability decreased up to three orders of magnitude, porosity up to 63% and the sample compacted by as much as 35%. Steel ball bearings were found to retain the highest permeability of all the materials tested. The enhancement of prompt gas sampling through alternate stemming material in the column above the nuclear device is discussed.

  18. Stress induced permeability anisotropy of Resedimented Boston Blue Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Amy L.; Germaine, John T.; Flemings, Peter B.; Day-Stirrat, Ruarri J.

    2013-10-01

    In Resedimented Boston Blue Clay (RBBC), a low-plasticity glacio-marine illitic mudrock, the ratio of the horizontal to vertical permeability (the permeability anisotropy, rk) increases from 1.2 to 1.9 as the porosity decreases from 0.5 to 0.37 and the permeability decreases by more than 1 order of magnitude. Backscattered Scanning Electron Microscope (BSEM) images taken at formation stress levels reveal that particles rotate perpendicular to the axial loading direction by ˜22°, with larger particles rotating more significantly and achieving more uniform alignment than smaller particles. We show experimentally that preferred platy particle orientation can explain our permeability anisotropy measurements. The permeability anisotropy of mechanically compressed mudrocks is minimal, <2.5. We use a novel approach (cubic specimens) to measure the evolution of permeability anisotropy in different directions on the same specimen, unlike most other methods. Modified analytic techniques allow calculation of the permeability anisotropy for a specimen using directional constant head permeability methods. A better understanding of the evolution of permeability anisotropy during sediment burial is important for modeling subsurface transport processes, including hydrocarbon migration and contaminant transport, as well as estimating in situ conditions such as pore pressure, overpressure, and effective stress.

  19. Cutaneous thermal injury alters macromolecular permeability of rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Carter, E A; Tompkins, R G; Schiffrin, E; Burke, J F

    1990-03-01

    The intestinal epithelium normally provides a barrier function that prevents absorption of potentially harmful materials from the intestinal lumen. It has been postulated but never demonstrated that a cutaneous thermal injury will result in increased small-intestinal permeability. In a standardized 20% body surface area full-thickness scald injury, with polyethylene glycol 3350 and horseradish peroxidase used as permeability probes, small-intestinal permeability was examined regionally in an everted intestinal sac model. In the normal animals, the upper (proximal) and lower (distal) small intestine were less permeable to these probes than the middle segment. Within 6 hours after the injury, an increase in the mucosal uptake and transmural permeability was seen in all three small-intestinal segments; the most dramatic increase in permeability occurred in the ileum, p less than 0.01. The maximum increase in permeability was seen at 18 hours, and permeability was normal by 72 hours after the injury. This increase in intestinal permeability may represent a transient failure of the intestinal barrier function and may allow absorption of potentially toxic macromolecules from the intestinal lumen into the portal circulation early after thermal injury. Absorption of these macromolecules, such as endotoxin, may be potentially harmful by direct toxic actions or potentially helpful by activation of the immune system. PMID:2309150

  20. Permeability of continental crust influenced by internal and external forcing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rojstaczer, S.A.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Hayba, D.O.

    2008-01-01

    The permeability of continental crust is so highly variable that it is often considered to defy systematic characterization. However, despite this variability, some order has been gleaned from globally compiled data. What accounts for the apparent coherence of mean permeability in the continental crust (and permeability-depth relations) on a very large scale? Here we argue that large-scale crustal permeability adjusts to accommodate rates of internal and external forcing. In the deeper crust, internal forcing - fluxes induced by metamorphism, magmatism, and mantle degassing - is dominant, whereas in the shallow crust, external forcing - the vigor of the hydrologic cycle - is a primary control. Crustal petrologists have long recognized the likelihood of a causal relation between fluid flux and permeability in the deep, ductile crust, where fluid pressures are typically near-lithostatic. It is less obvious that such a relation should pertain in the relatively cool, brittle upper crust, where near-hydrostatic fluid pressures are the norm. We use first-order calculations and numerical modeling to explore the hypothesis that upper-crustal permeability is influenced by the magnitude of external fluid sources, much as lower-crustal permeability is influenced by the magnitude of internal fluid sources. We compare model-generated permeability structures with various observations of crustal permeability. ?? 2008 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. 21 CFR 876.5860 - High permeability hemodialysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., hematocrit, urea, etc.). (3) The high permeability hemodialysis system accessories include, but are not..., hematocrit, and blood recirculation monitors). (b) Classification. Class II. The special controls for...

  2. 21 CFR 876.5860 - High permeability hemodialysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., hematocrit, urea, etc.). (3) The high permeability hemodialysis system accessories include, but are not..., hematocrit, and blood recirculation monitors). (b) Classification. Class II. The special controls for...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5860 - High permeability hemodialysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., hematocrit, urea, etc.). (3) The high permeability hemodialysis system accessories include, but are not..., hematocrit, and blood recirculation monitors). (b) Classification. Class II. The special controls for...

  4. 21 CFR 876.5860 - High permeability hemodialysis system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., hematocrit, urea, etc.). (3) The high permeability hemodialysis system accessories include, but are not..., hematocrit, and blood recirculation monitors). (b) Classification. Class II. The special controls for...

  5. Signal Transduction to the Permeability Transition Pore

    PubMed Central

    Rasola, Andrea; Sciacovelli, Marco; Pantic, Boris; Bernardi, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The permeability transition pore (PTP) is an inner mitochondrial membrane channel that has been thoroughly characterized functionally, yet remains an elusive molecular entity. The best characterized PTP-regulatory component, cyclophilin (CyP) D, is a matrix protein that favors pore opening. CyP inhibitors, CyPD null animals, and in situ PTP readouts have established the role of PTP as an effector mechanism of cell death, and the growing definition of PTP signaling mechanisms. This review briefly covers the functional features of the PTP and the role played by its dysregulation in disease pathogenesis. Recent progress on PTP modulation by kinase/phosphatase signal transduction is discussed, with specific emphasis on hexokinase and on the Akt-ERK-GSK3 axis, which might modulate the PTP through CyPD phosphorylation. PMID:20153328

  6. Osmotic flow through fully permeable nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Cottin-Bizonne, C; Biance, A-L; Joseph, P; Bocquet, L; Ybert, C

    2014-06-20

    Osmosis across membranes is intrinsically associated with the concept of semipermeability. Here, however, we demonstrate that osmotic flow can be generated by solute gradients across nonselective, fully permeable nanochannels. Using a fluorescence imaging technique, we are able to measure the water flow rate inside single nanochannels to an unprecedented sensitivity of femtoliters per minute flow rates. Our results indicate the onset of a convective liquid motion under salinity gradients, from the higher to lower electrolyte concentration, which is attributed to diffusio-osmotic transport. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence and quantitative investigation of this subtle interfacially driven transport, which need to be accounted for in nanoscale dynamics. Finally, diffusio-osmotic transport under a neutral polymer gradient is also demonstrated. The experiments highlight the entropic depletion of polymers that occurs at the nanochannel surface, resulting in convective flow in the opposite direction to that seen for electrolytes. PMID:24996091

  7. Osmotic water permeability in glycoprotein containing liposomes.

    PubMed

    Neitchev, V Z; Kostadinov, A P

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of osmotic water permeability in proteoliposomes containing alpha 1-acid glycoprotein was investigated by means of stopped-flow spectrophotometry. A biphasic time-course of scattered light with time was registered. The rate constants calculated from fits to an exponential function in the first phase were proportional to the final medium osmolarity. The apparent second order rate constants Kapp (Osm-1 sec-1) were determined at different glycoprotein concentrations in the original mixture for preparation of proteoliposomes. The value of Kapp at lipid:glycoprotein weight ratio = 1 was plotted in Arrhenius coordinates. The calculated activation energy for water permeation through the lipid bilayer suggests that eventual channel mechanism may be involved due to the presence of glycoprotein molecule in the liposomes. PMID:3431542

  8. Biomimetic Hybrid Nanocontainers with Selective Permeability.

    PubMed

    Messager, Lea; Burns, Jonathan R; Kim, Jungyeon; Cecchin, Denis; Hindley, James; Pyne, Alice L B; Gaitzsch, Jens; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Howorka, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Chemistry plays a crucial role in creating synthetic analogues of biomacromolecular structures. Of particular scientific and technological interest are biomimetic vesicles that are inspired by natural membrane compartments and organelles but avoid their drawbacks, such as membrane instability and limited control over cargo transport across the boundaries. In this study, completely synthetic vesicles were developed from stable polymeric walls and easy-to-engineer membrane DNA nanopores. The hybrid nanocontainers feature selective permeability and permit the transport of organic molecules of 1.5 nm size. Larger enzymes (ca. 5 nm) can be encapsulated and retained within the vesicles yet remain catalytically active. The hybrid structures constitute a new type of enzymatic nanoreactor. The high tunability of the polymeric vesicles and DNA pores will be key in tailoring the nanocontainers for applications in drug delivery, bioimaging, biocatalysis, and cell mimicry. PMID:27560310

  9. Fluid permeability measurement system and method

    DOEpatents

    Hallman, Jr., Russell Louis; Renner, Michael John

    2008-02-05

    A system for measuring the permeance of a material. The permeability of the material may also be derived. The system provides a liquid or high concentration fluid bath on one side of a material test sample, and a gas flow across the opposing side of the material test sample. The mass flow rate of permeated fluid as a fraction of the combined mass flow rate of gas and permeated fluid is used to calculate the permeance of the material. The material test sample may be a sheet, a tube, or a solid shape. Operational test conditions may be varied, including concentration of the fluid, temperature of the fluid, strain profile of the material test sample, and differential pressure across the material test sample.

  10. Composite binders for concrete with reduced permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediuk, R.; Yushin, A.

    2016-02-01

    Composite binder consisting of cement (55%), acid fly ash (40%) and limestone (5%) has been designed. It is obtained by co-milling to a specific surface of 550 kg/m2, it has an activity of 77.3 MPa and can produce a more dense cement stone structure. Integrated study revealed that the concrete on the composite binder basis provides an effective diffusion coefficient D. So we can conclude that the concrete layer protects buildings from toxic effects of expanded polystyrene. Low water absorption of the material (2.5% by weight) is due to the structure of its cement stone pore space. Besides lime powder prevents the penetration of moisture, reduces water saturation of the coverage that has a positive effect on useful life period. It also explains rather low water vapor permeability of the material - 0.021 mg/(m- hour-Pa).

  11. Gas permeable electrode for electrochemical system

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, F.A.; Townsend, C.W.

    1989-09-12

    An electrode apparatus is described which is adapted for use in electrochemical systems having an anode compartment and a cathode compartment in which gas and ions are produced and consumed in the compartments during generation of electrical current. The electrode apparatus includes a membrane for separating the anode compartment from the cathode compartment wherein the membrane is permeable to both ions and gas. The cathode and anode for the assembly are provided on opposite sides of the membrane. During use of the membrane-electrode apparatus in electrochemical cells, the gas and ions generated at the cathode or anode migrate through the membrane to provide efficient transfer of gas and ions between the anode and cathode compartments. 3 figs.

  12. Composite Crew Module (CCM) Permeability Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) to form an Agency team to design and build a composite crew module in 18 months in order to gain hands-on experience in anticipation that future exploration systems may be made of composite materials. One of the conclusions from this Composite Crew Module Primary Structure assessment was that there was a lack of understanding regarding the ability for composite pressure shells to contain consumable gases, which posed a technical risk relative to the use of a metallic design. After the completion of the Composite Crew Module test program, the test article was used in a new program to assess the overall leakage/permeability and identify specific features associated with high leak rates. This document contains the outcome of the leakage assessment.

  13. Osmotic Flow through Fully Permeable Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Cottin-Bizonne, C.; Biance, A.-L.; Joseph, P.; Bocquet, L.; Ybert, C.

    2014-06-01

    Osmosis across membranes is intrinsically associated with the concept of semipermeability. Here, however, we demonstrate that osmotic flow can be generated by solute gradients across nonselective, fully permeable nanochannels. Using a fluorescence imaging technique, we are able to measure the water flow rate inside single nanochannels to an unprecedented sensitivity of femtoliters per minute flow rates. Our results indicate the onset of a convective liquid motion under salinity gradients, from the higher to lower electrolyte concentration, which is attributed to diffusio-osmotic transport. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence and quantitative investigation of this subtle interfacially driven transport, which need to be accounted for in nanoscale dynamics. Finally, diffusio-osmotic transport under a neutral polymer gradient is also demonstrated. The experiments highlight the entropic depletion of polymers that occurs at the nanochannel surface, resulting in convective flow in the opposite direction to that seen for electrolytes.

  14. Hormonal regulation of hepatocyte tight junctional permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, P.J.; Miyai, K.; Steinbach, J.H.; Hardison, W.G.M. Univ. of California, San Diego )

    1988-10-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of hormones on the permeability of the hepatocyte tight junction to two probes, ({sup 14}C)sucrose and horseradish peroxidase, using one-pass perfused rat livers. Using a single injection of horseradish peroxidase the authors have demonstrated that this probe can enter bile by two pathways that are kinetically distinct, a fast pathway, which corresponds to the passage of the probe through the hepatocyte tight junctions, and a slow pathway, which corresponds to the transcytotic entry into bile. The passage of horseradish peroxidase through the hepatocyte tight junctions was confirmed by electron microscopic histochemistry. Vasopressin, epinephrine, and angiotensin II, hormones that act in the hepatocyte through the intracellular mediators calcium, the inositol polyphosphates, and diacylglycerol, increased the bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio of ({sup 14}C)sucrose and the rapid entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile, indicating that the permeability of the tight junctions to these probes was increased. The effect of these hormones was dose dependent and in the cases of angiotensin II and epinephrine was inhibited by the specific inhibitors (Sar{sup 1},Thr{sup 8})angiotensin II and prazosin, respectively. Dibutyryl adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate did not affect the ({sup 14}C)sucrose bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio or the fast entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile. These results suggest that the hepatocyte tight junction can no longer be considered a static system of pores separating blood from bile. It is rather a dynamic barrier potentially capable of influencing the composition of the bile.

  15. Back diffusion from thin low permeability zones.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minjune; Annable, Michael D; Jawitz, James W

    2015-01-01

    Aquitards can serve as long-term contaminant sources to aquifers when contaminant mass diffuses from the aquitard following aquifer source mass depletion. This study describes analytical and experimental approaches to understand reactive and nonreactive solute transport in a thin aquitard bounded by an adjacent aquifer. A series of well-controlled laboratory experiments were conducted in a two-dimensional flow chamber to quantify solute diffusion from a high-permeability sand into and subsequently out of kaolinite clay layers of vertical thickness 15 mm, 20 mm, and 60 mm. One-dimensional analytical solutions were developed for diffusion in a finite aquitard with mass exchange with an adjacent aquifer using the method of images. The analytical solutions showed very good agreement with measured breakthrough curves and aquitard concentration distributions measured in situ by light reflection visualization. Solutes with low retardation accumulated more stored mass with greater penetration distance in the aquitard compared to high-retardation solutes. However, because the duration of aquitard mass release was much longer, high-retardation solutes have a greater long-term back diffusion risk. The error associated with applying a semi-infinite domain analytical solution to a finite diffusion domain increases as a function of the system relative diffusion length scale, suggesting that the solutions using image sources should be applied in cases with rapid solute diffusion and/or thin clay layers. The solutions presented here can be extended to multilayer aquifer/low-permeability systems to assess the significance of back diffusion from thin layers. PMID:25478850

  16. Turbulent structures and budgets behind permeable ribs

    SciTech Connect

    Panigrahi, P.K.; Schroeder, A.; Kompenhans, J.

    2008-02-15

    Different rib geometries are traditionally used to improve heat transfer and enhance mixing in different industrial applications, i.e. heat exchangers, cooling passages of gas turbine blades and fuel elements of nuclear reactors, etc. Permeable ribs have been proposed in literature for passive control of the reattaching flow past surface mounted ribs leading to superior performance. The flow past different surface mounted permeable rib geometries, i.e. solid, slit, split-slit and inclined split-slit ribs have been investigated in this study. Both two components and stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) have been used in streamwise and cross stream planes to study the underlying flow structures. The detailed turbulent statistics, i.e. mean and rms velocity, higher order moments, quadrant decomposition of turbulent shear stress producing motions, skewness and components of the turbulent kinetic energy budgets have been compared for different rib geometries. Coherent structures are identified based on the invariant of velocity gradient tensor invariant and wavelet transform. The skewness results demonstrate the intermittency of quadrant motions. The reattachment length of the inclined split-slit rib is lowest among all rib geometries. The average Reynolds stresses and the production of turbulent kinetic energy are highest for the inclined split-slit rib. The pressure transport calculated as residual of the turbulent kinetic energy budget equation is highest for the inclined split-slit rib. This is attributed to the smaller reattachment length leading to greater adverse pressure gradient for the inclined split-slit rib. The quadrant motions, turbulent fluxes, skewness and kinetic energy budgets at post reattachment region compares well with that of flat plate turbulent boundary layer from hot wire measurements in literature. Overall, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of PIV technique for the detailed turbulent structures characterization of complex flows

  17. Turbulent Hyporheic Exchange in Permeable Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, K. R.; Aubeneau, A. F.; Li, A.; Packman, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    Solute delivery from the water column into a streambed strongly influences metabolism in rivers. Current hydrological models simplify surface-subsurface (hyporheic) exchange by treating each domain separately, constraining turbulent flows to the water column. Studies have shown, however, that turbulence penetrates into permeable sediments. Evidence is lacking for how this highly coupled flow regime influences hyporheic exchange. We characterized the dynamics of turbulent exchange between surface and porewaters in a 2.5 m recirculating flume. The channel was packed with 3.8 cm PVC spheres to form a coarse gravel bed, with a total depth of 21 cm. We implanted microsensors onto an array of spheres to measure in situsalt concentrations within the streambed. Water was recirculated in the channel, and concentrated salt solution was continuously injected upstream of the sensor array. We observed solute exchange increased with free-stream Reynolds number and decreased with depth in the sediment bed. Mass of injected solute remaining in the bed decreased rapidly in all cases, with only 10-30% of mass recovered 50 cm downstream of the injection point at Re = 25,000. We observed high-frequency (1-10 Hz) concentration fluctuations at bed depths of at least 4.75 cm, and sporadic low-frequency fluctuations at depths of 12.5 cm. Spectral analysis revealed increased filtering of high frequencies with depth. We used particle-tracking simulations to fit depth-dependent turbulent diffusion profiles to experimental results. These results demonstrate that free-stream turbulence impacts hyporheic mixing deep into permeable streambeds, and mixing is strongly influenced by the coupled surface-subsurface flow field.

  18. Consolidation and permeability of salt in brine

    SciTech Connect

    Shor, A.J.; Baes, C.F. Jr.; Canonico, C.M.

    1981-07-01

    The consolidation and loss of permeability of salt crystal aggregates, important in assessing the effects of water in salt repositories, has been studied as a function of several variables. The kinetic behavior was similar to that often observed in sintering and suggested the following expression for the time dependence of the void fraction: phi(t) = phi(0) - (A/B)ln(1 + Bt/z(0)/sup 3/), where A and B are rate constants and z(0) is initial average particle size. With brine present, A and phi(0) varied linearly with stress. The initial void fraction was also dependent to some extent on the particle size distribution. The rate of consolidation was most rapid in brine and least rapid in the presence of only air as the fluid. A brine containing 5 m MgCl/sub 2/ showed an intermediate rate, presumably because of the greatly reduced solubility of NaCl. A substantial wall effect was indicated by an observed increase in the void fraction of consolidated columns with distance from the top where the stress was applied and by a dependence of consolidation rate on the column height and radius. The distance through which the stress fell by a factor of phi was estimated to change inversely as the fourth power of the column diameter. With increasing temperature (to 85/sup 0/C), consolidation proceeded somewhat more rapidly and the wall effect was reduced. The permeability of the columns dropped rapidly with consolidation, decreasing with about the sixth power of the void fraction. In general, extrapolation of the results to repository conditions confirms the self-sealing properties of bedded salt as a storage medium for radioactive waste.

  19. Parallel artificial membrane permeability assay for blood-brain permeability determination of illicit drugs and synthetic analogues.

    PubMed

    Clemons, Kristina; Kretsch, Amanda; Verbeck, Guido

    2014-09-01

    With the number of designer drugs on the streets rampantly on the rise, it's becoming more and more important to be able to rapidly characterize them in a biologically relevant way. Using a parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) to assess the blood brain barrier permeability has shown to be a high throughput way to compare new drugs with currently controlled substances via their effective permeability values. This combined with direct infusion electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry creates a rapid technique for characterization of new designer drugs. PAMPA has successfully determined the effective permeabilities of cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin, MDMA, and several tryptamine derivatives. PMID:25278197

  20. Hydraulic Permeability of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Paul Allen

    2010-01-01

    An ion exchange process using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin is the baseline process for removing cesium from the dissolved salt solution in the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site, using large scale columns as part of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The RF resin is also being evaluated for use in the proposed small column ion exchange (SCIX) system, which is an alternative treatment option at Hanford and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A recirculating test loop with a small ion exchange column was used to measure the effect of oxygen uptake and radiation exposure on the permeability of a packed bed of the RF resin. The lab-scale column was designed to be prototypic of the proposed Hanford columns at the WTP. Although the test equipment was designed to model the Hanford ion exchange columns, the data on changes in the hydraulic permeability of the resin will also be valuable for determining potential pressure drops through the proposed SCIX system. The superficial fluid velocity in the lab-scale test (3.4-5.7 cm/s) was much higher than is planned for the full-scale Hanford columns to generate the maximum pressure drop expected in those columns (9.7 psig). The frictional drag from this high velocity produced forces on the resin in the lab-scale tests that matched the design basis of the full-scale Hanford column. Any changes in the resin caused by the radiation exposure and oxygen uptake were monitored by measuring the pressure drop through the lab-scale column and the physical properties of the resin. Three hydraulic test runs were completed, the first using fresh RF resin at 25 C, the second using irradiated resin at 25 C, and the third using irradiated resin at 45 C. A Hanford AP-101 simulant solution was recirculated through a test column containing 500 mL of Na-form RF resin. Known amounts of oxygen were introduced into the primary recirculation loop by saturating measured volumes of the simulant solution with oxygen and reintroducing

  1. Hepatic Injury in Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Contributes to Altered Intestinal Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Luther, Jay; Garber, John J.; Khalili, Hamed; Dave, Maneesh; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Jindal, Rohit; Motola, Daniel L.; Luther, Sanjana; Bohr, Stefan; Jeoung, Soung Won; Deshpande, Vikram; Singh, Gurminder; Turner, Jerrold R.; Yarmush, Martin L.; Chung, Raymond T.; Patel, Suraj J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Emerging data suggest that changes in intestinal permeability and increased gut microbial translocation contribute to the inflammatory pathway involved in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) development. Numerous studies have investigated the association between increased intestinal permeability and NASH. Our meta-analysis of this association investigates the underlying mechanism. METHODS A meta-analysis was performed to compare the rates of increased intestinal permeability in patients with NASH and healthy controls. To further address the underlying mechanism of action, we studied changes in intestinal permeability in a diet-induced (methionine-and-choline-deficient; MCD) murine model of NASH. In vitro studies were also performed to investigate the effect of MCD culture medium at the cellular level on hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, and intestinal epithelial cells. RESULTS Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) patients, and in particular those with NASH, are more likely to have increased intestinal permeability compared with healthy controls. We correlate this clinical observation with in vivo data showing mice fed an MCD diet develop intestinal permeability changes after an initial phase of liver injury and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) induction. In vitro studies reveal that MCD medium induces hepatic injury and TNFα production yet has no direct effect on intestinal epithelial cells. Although these data suggest a role for hepatic TNFα in altering intestinal permeability, we found that mice genetically resistant to TNFα-myosin light chain kinase (MLCK)–induced intestinal permeability changes fed an MCD diet still develop increased permeability and liver injury. CONCLUSIONS Our clinical and experimental results strengthen the association between intestinal permeability increases and NASH and also suggest that an early phase of hepatic injury and inflammation contributes to altered intestinal permeability in a fashion independent of TNF

  2. Permeability evolution in quartz fault gouges under hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giger, Silvio B.; Tenthorey, Eric; Cox, Stephen F.; Fitz Gerald, John D.

    2007-07-01

    The permeability (k) of fine-grained quartz aggregates were measured in situ during hot pressing (HPing) experiments to explore the evolution of fluid transport properties of fault zones during the interseismic period. Experiments were conducted at temperatures of 150°C and between 700 and 850°C, with confining and pore water pressures of 250 and 150 MPa, respectively. Significant permeability reduction was observed between 700 and 850°C, with permeability reduction rates (r = (1/t) ln (kto/kt)), ranging from approximately 6 × 10-5 s-1 at 700°C to a maximum of approximately 7.4 × 10-4 s-1 at 850°C. Permeability decreased exponentially with time, and the permeability reduction rate increased with increasing temperature, increasing differential stress, and decreasing grain size. Analysis of the permeability-porosity relationships indicates that permeability in the simulated gouge at high temperature shuts off at a critical porosity of 0.045 ± 0.004. The presence of microstructures, such as grain interpenetration, grain shape truncation, arrays of fluid inclusions, and development of quartz overgrowths on grains, indicate that k reduction was controlled by dissolution-precipitation creep processes. Extrapolation of the permeability reduction rates, measured in this study, to temperatures typical of the continental seismogenic regime highlights the strongly time-dependent nature of permeability in natural fault wear products at depths of nucleation of major earthquakes. Within the recurrence time of large earthquakes, quartz-rich fault zones in the fluid-active midcrustal to lower continental crustal regimes can evolve from high-permeability conduits to low-permeability seals. Episodic changes in the fluid transport properties of faults during the interseismic period are likely to impact on the pore pressure evolution of fault wear products.

  3. Paracellular and transcellular pathways facilitate insulin permeability in rat gut.

    PubMed

    Lane, Majella E; Corrigan, Owen I

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic investigation of the absorption of insulin in the rat intestine in the presence of permeation enhancers and protease inhibitors. An in-situ perfused rat gut model was used for the co-perfusion of insulin and PEG 4000 in the presence or absence of bile salts, bile salt:fatty acid surfactant systems and protease inhibitors. Perfusion experiments were conducted for 180 min with perfusate and blood collection at regular intervals. Permeability coefficients for insulin were calculated from plasma insulin and PEG 4000 permeability coefficients were calculated from lumenal disappearance data. In the absence of enzyme inhibitors, insulin permeability was consistently lower than PEG 4000, but increased in proportion to PEG 4000 permeability. Large increases in insulin permeability were obtained for mixed micellar systems and protease inhibitors. In the presence of protease inhibitors and simple micelle systems, PEG 4000 permeability was three-fold greater than insulin permeability. In the presence of absorption enhancers, PEG 4000 permeability increased up to a maximum value of 3.63 x 10(-6)cm s(-1), a value five-fold less than that of the estimated aqueous boundary layer permeability for PEG 4000. This suggests that PEG 4000 permeability is primarily membrane controlled. Insulin permeability is enhanced to a maximum value of 9.17 x 10(-6)cm s(-1), suggesting that paracellular transport routes do not account exclusively for insulin permeation across the intestinal epithelium. The results add support to suggestions that routes other than the paracellular route may contribute to insulin absorption in rat gut. PMID:16451757

  4. Porosity and permeability evolution of clay faults: in situ experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, P.; Guglielmi, Y.; Seguy, S.; Lefevre, M.; Ghani, I.; Gent, G.; Castilla, R.; Gout, C.; Dick, P.; Nussbaum, C.; Durand, J.

    2015-12-01

    Fault models associating low permeability cores with high permeability damage zones are widely accepted, however, constitutive laws relating permeability with fault structure, stress, and strain remain poorly constrained. We here present preliminary results of hydromechanical experiments performed at the 10 m scale in fault zones in Toarcian and Aalenian black shale formations. Intact formations have a very low permeability (10-19 to 10-22 m2). One case (in IRSN's Tournemire Underground Research Laboratory) displays a porosity increase in and around the fault core and abundant veins and calcite cemented small faults in the damage zone. The other case (Mont Terri Swisstopo Underground Research Laboratory) displays a porosity decrease in the fault core zone and few veins. However, under the present stress state, the static permeability of the fractured zones at both locations is higher than that of the intact formation by up to 3 orders of magnitude. During borehole pressurization tests three regimes of permeability variations are observed. (1) Fracture permeability first increases progressively as a function of fluid pressure (2) When a threshold is reached, permeability further increases by 100 or more, but strain as well as permeability variations remain in most part reversible. (3) When a steady pressure is maintained in the injection borehole (from 20 minutes to several days) flow rate tends to decrease with time. These results show that high transient permeability may locally occur in a fault zone under conditions when most of the deformation is reversible, opening the possibility of transient fluid migration decoupled from slip along faults that are not favorably oriented. However, during one test, more than 1 mm of irreversible slip occurred along one of the main interfaces, associated with a sudden increase in flow rate (from 11 to more than 40 l/min). This suggests that when slip occurs, it could result in permeability variations that may remain difficult

  5. Further investigations of why gels reduce water permeability more than oil permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, J.T.; Seright, R.S.

    1997-11-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate why some gels can reduce the permeability to water much more than to oil. This property is critical to the success of chemical-based water-shutoff treatments in production wells if hydrocarbon-productive zones cannot be protected during placement. The authors first briefly review previous findings and the validity of several possible explanations for this disproportionate permeability reduction. Next, they describe experiments that test the validity of a promising mechanism--the segregated pathway theory. This theory speculates that on a microscopic scale, aqueous gelants follow water pathways more than oil pathways. Experimental results in cores support this mechanism for oil-based gels, but not for water-based gels. They also explore another interesting mechanism that involves a balance between capillary and elastic forces. Results from experiments support this mechanism for flow in tubes and micromodels, but not in porous rock. Other mechanisms are also discussed.

  6. Nanochannel flow past permeable walls via molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jian-Fei; Cao, Bing-Yang

    2016-07-01

    The nanochannel flow past permeable walls with nanopores is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, including the density distribution, velocity field, molecular penetration mechanism and surface friction coefficient. A low density distribution has been found at the gas-wall interface demonstrating the low pressure region. In addition, there exists a jump of the gas density on the permeable surface, which indicates the discontinuity of the density distribution across the permeable surface. On the other hand, the nanoscale vortices are observed in nanopores of the permeable wall, and the reduced mass flux of the flow in nanopores results in a shifted hydrodynamic boundary above the permeable surface. Particularly the slip length of the gas flow on the permeable surface is pronounced a non-linear function of the molecular mean free path, which produces a large value of the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC) and a big portion of the diffusive refection. Moreover, the gas-gas interaction and multi-collision among gas molecules may take place in nanopores, which contribute to large values of TMAC. Consequently the boundary friction coefficient on the permeable surface is increased because of the energy dissipation consumed by the nanoscale vortices in nanopores. The molecular boundary condition provides us with a new picture of the nanochannel flow past the permeable wall with nanopores.

  7. Permeability of hydrogen isotopes through nickel-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Edge, E.M.; Mitchell, D.J.

    1983-04-01

    Permeabilities and diffusivities of deuterium in several nickel-based alloys were measured in this investigation. Measurements were made by the gas-phase breakthrough technique in the temperature range 200 to 450/sup 0/C with applied pressures ranging from 1 to 100 kPa. The results were extrapolated to predict the permeabilities (K) of the alloys at room temperature. The alloy with the smallest deuterium permeability is Carpenter 49, for which K = 4.3 x 10/sup -18/ mol s/sup -1/ m/sup -1/ Pa/sup -//sup 1/2/ at 22/sup 0/C. The permeability of deuterium in Kovar or Ceramvar is about 80% greater than that for Carpenter 49. Premeabilities of Inconel 625, Inconel 718, Inconel 750 and Monel K-500 are all equal to about 5 x 10/sup -17/ mol m/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ Pa/sup -//sup 1/2/ at 22/sup 0/C. The validity (from a statistical standpoint) of the extrapolation of the permeabilities to room temperature is considered in detail. Published permeabilities of stainless steels and nickel-iron alloys are also reviewed. The greatest differences in permeabilities among the nickel-based alloys appear to be associated with the tendency for some alloys to form protective oxide layers. Permeabilities of deuterium through laminates containing copper are smaller than for any of the iron-nickel alloys.

  8. Nitrogen Transformations in Three Types of Permeable Pavement

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2009, USEPA constructed a 0.4-ha (1-ac) parking lot at the Edison Environmental Center in Edison, NJ, that incorporated three different permeable pavement types - permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA). The driving lanes...

  9. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  10. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  11. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  12. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  13. 21 CFR 886.5916 - Rigid gas permeable contact lens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rigid gas permeable contact lens. 886.5916 Section 886.5916 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lens. (a) Identification. A rigid gas permeable contact lens is a device intended to be worn...

  14. Determination of Coal Permeability Using Pressure Transient Methods

    SciTech Connect

    McLendon, T.R.; Siriwardane, H.; Haljasmaa, I.V.; Bromhal, G.S.; Soong, Y.; Irdi, G.A.

    2007-05-01

    Coalbed methane is a significant natural resource in the Appalachian region. It is believed that coalbed methane production can be enhanced by injection of carbon dioxide into coalbeds. However, the influence of carbon dioxide injection on coal permeability is not yet well understood. Competitive sorption of carbon dioxide and methane gases onto coal is a known process. Laboratory experiments and limited field experience indicate that coal will swell during sorption of a gas and shrink during desorption of a gas. The swelling and shrinkage may change the permeability of the coal. In this study, the permeability of coal was determined by using carbon dioxide as the flowing fluid. Coal samples with different dimensions were prepared for laboratory permeability tests. Carbon dioxide was injected into the coal and the permeability was determined by using pressure transient methods. The confining pressure was variedto cover a wide range of depths. The permeability was also determined as a function of exposure time of carbon dioxide while the confining stress was kept constant. CT scans were taken before and after the introduction of carbon dioxide. Results show that the porosity and permeability of the coal matrix was very low. The paper presents experimental data and theoretical aspects of the flow of carbon dioxide through a coal sample during pressure transient tests. The suitability of the pressure transient methods for determining permeability of coal during carbon dioxide injection is discussed in the paper.

  15. The structure of turbulence overlying impermeable and permeable rough walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Blois, G.; Best, J.; Christensen, K. T.

    2014-11-01

    Turbulent flow overlying complex topographies, both impermeable and permeable, occur across a broad range of scales in both natural and engineering environments. Permeability of the wall introduces a higher degree of both structural and conceptual complexity, with previous studies suggesting that interactions between the turbulent free flow and pore flow occur along the permeable interface and play a defining role in momentum exchange across the interface. Here we employ a Refractive-Index-Matching (RIM) technique in order to access the flow across the permeable interface with the particle image velocimetry (PIV) method, resulting in unimpeded optical access to the fluid flow at and within a permeable bed. Cubic-packed hemispheres are studied in both impermeable and permeable configurations, with models cast by an acrylic resin whose refractive index matched that of the working fluid (aqueous sodium iodide). The statistical and structural features of the flow in the near-wall region of the impermeable case and the interfacial region of the permeable case are compared to understand the role of permeability in driving momentum exchange processes as a function of Reynolds number. Comparisons to recent numerical simulations are also made.

  16. Permeable Pavement Research at the Edison Environmental Center

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are few detailed studies of full-scale, replicated, actively-used permeable pavement systems. Practitioners need additional studies of permeable pavement systems in its intended application (parking lot, roadway, etc.) across a range of climatic events, daily usage conditio...

  17. Predicting permeability from porosity using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, S.J.; Fang, J.H.; Chen, H.C. Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.

    1995-12-01

    Permeability values in a borehole are predicted by an artificial neural network from the porosity values at the same depths. THe network used in this study employs an architecture called backpropagation that is good at making predictions. The traditional approach for permeability prediction is regression analysis, the relationship between porosity and permeability is assumed to be known. In reality, the functional form of this relationship, i.e., the model equation, is unknown. In contrast, the neural-network approach assumes no functional relationship. Six wells from Big Escambia Creek (Jurassic Smackover carbonate) field in southern Alabama were used to test predicting permeability from porosity using a neural network. Porosity and spatial data alone were used to predict permeability because these data are readily available from any hydrocarbon field. Three scenarios were performed; in each one, a subset of the six wells was used for a training set, one well for calibration, and one or two wells were used for prediction. For each scenario, simple linear regression was also used to predict permeability from porosity. The neural net predicted permeability much better than did regression in one scenario; in the other two scenarios the two methods performed equally well. The neural net predicted permeability accurately using minimal data, but other kinds of information (e.g., log- or core-derived lithologic information) are easily incorporated if available. In addition, compartmentalization of carbonate reservoirs may be recognizable by this approach.

  18. PREFERENTIAL RADON TRANSPORT THROUGH HIGHLY PERMEABLE CHANNELS IN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses preferential radon transport through highly permeable channels in soils. Indoor radon levels (that can pose a serious health risk) can be dramatically increased by air that is drawn into buildings through pipe penetrations that connect to permeable channels in...

  19. Hydrogen-permeable composite metal membrane and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.

    1993-06-08

    Various hydrogen production and hydrogen sulfide decomposition processes are disclosed that utilize composite metal membranes that contain an intermetallic diffusion barrier separating a hydrogen-permeable base metal and a hydrogen-permeable coating metal. The barrier is a thermally stable inorganic proton conductor.

  20. Determination of hydrogen permeability in uncoated and coated superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Vesely, E. J., Jr.; Hill, V. L.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen permeability, diffusivity, and solubility data were obtained for eight wrought and cast high temperature alloys over the range 650 to 815 C. Data were obtained for both uncoated alloys and wrought alloys coated with four commercially available coatings. Activation energies for permeability, diffusivity and solubility were calculated.

  1. The Permeability of Territorial Space: Some Evidence from Military Warfare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoury, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated military invasions (N=58) of the territorial boundaries of nation-states, and attempted to document empirically the territorial space permeability function. Results showed that the function relating intrusion to discomfort was found to be conspicuously similar to the personal space permeability function described by Hayduk (1981).…

  2. Selective permeability of PVA membranes. I - Radiation-crosslinked membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, M. G.; Wydeven, T., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The water and salt transport properties of ionizing radiation crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes were investigated. The studied membranes showed high permeabilities and low selectivities for both water and salt. The results were found to be in accord with a modified solution-diffusion model for transport across the membranes, in which pressure-dependent permeability coefficients are employed.

  3. Mapping permeability over the surface of the Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleeson, Tom; Smith, Leslie; Moosdorf, Nils; Hartmann, Jens; Durr, Hans H.; Manning, Andrew H.; van Beek, Ludovicus P. H.; Jellinek, A. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Permeability, the ease of fluid flow through porous rocks and soils, is a fundamental but often poorly quantified component in the analysis of regional-scale water fluxes. Permeability is difficult to quantify because it varies over more than 13 orders of magnitude and is heterogeneous and dependent on flow direction. Indeed, at the regional scale, maps of permeability only exist for soil to depths of 1-2 m. Here we use an extensive compilation of results from hydrogeologic models to show that regional-scale (>5 km) permeability of consolidated and unconsolidated geologic units below soil horizons (hydrolithologies) can be characterized in a statistically meaningful way. The representative permeabilities of these hydrolithologies are used to map the distribution of near-surface (on the order of 100 m depth) permeability globally and over North America. The distribution of each hydrolithology is generally scale independent. The near-surface mean permeability is of the order of -5 x 10-14 m2. The results provide the first global picture of near-surface permeability and will be of particular value for evaluating global water resources and modeling the influence of climate-surface-subsurface interactions on global climate change.

  4. Mapping permeability over the surface of the Earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleeson, T.; Smith, L.; Moosdorf, N.; Hartmann, J.; Durr, H.H.; Manning, A.H.; Van Beek, L. P. H.; Jellinek, A. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Permeability, the ease of fluid flow through porous rocks and soils, is a fundamental but often poorly quantified component in the analysis of regional-scale water fluxes. Permeability is difficult to quantify because it varies over more than 13 orders of magnitude and is heterogeneous and dependent on flow direction. Indeed, at the regional scale, maps of permeability only exist for soil to depths of 1-2 m. Here we use an extensive compilation of results from hydrogeologic models to show that regional-scale (>5 km) permeability of consolidated and unconsolidated geologic units below soil horizons (hydrolithologies) can be characterized in a statistically meaningful way. The representative permeabilities of these hydrolithologies are used to map the distribution of near-surface (on the order of 100 m depth) permeability globally and over North America. The distribution of each hydrolithology is generally scale independent. The near-surface mean permeability is of the order of ???5 ?? 10-14 m2. The results provide the first global picture of near-surface permeability and will be of particular value for evaluating global water resources and modeling the influence of climate-surface-subsurface interactions on global climate change. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Permeable Textual Discussion in Tracked Language Arts Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gritter, Kristine

    2012-01-01

    Permeable textual discussion occurs when the unofficial texts and discursive practices and personal histories that are already recognized and valued in students' cultures are scaffolds to academically sanctioned literacies. Ideally, permeable textual discussions are safe havens where students' identities (racial, gender, world views) are…

  6. Unsaturated and Saturated Permeabilities of Fiber Reinforcement: Critics and Suggestions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chung Hae; Krawczak, Patricia

    2015-04-01

    In general, permeability measurement results show a strong scattering according to the measurement method, the type of test fluid and the fluid injection condition, even though permeability is regarded as a unique property of porous medium. In particular, the discrepancy between the unsaturated and saturated permeabilities for the same fabric has been widely reported. In the literature, relative permeability has been adopted to model the unsaturated flow. This approach has some limits in the modeling of double-scale porosity medium. We address this issue of permeability measurement by rigorously examining the mass conservation condition. Finally, we identify that the pressure gradient is non-linear with positive curvature in the unsaturated flow and a misinterpretation of pressure gradient is the main reason for the difference between the saturated and unsaturated permeabilities of the same fiber reinforcement. We propose to use a fixed value of permeability and to modify the mass conservation equation if there are air voids which are entrapped inside the fiber tow. Finally, we also suggest some guidelines and future perspectives to obtain more consistent permeability measurement results.

  7. Selective Permeability of PVA Membranes. I: Radiation-Crosslinked Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Moshe G.; Wydeven, Theodore, Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The water and salt transport properties of ionizing radiation crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes were investigated. The studied membranes showed high permeabilities and low selectivities for both water and salt. The results were found to be in accord with a modified solution-diffusion model for transport across the membranes, in which pressure-dependent permeability coefficients are employed.

  8. Modeling the Hydrologic Processes of a Permeable Pavement System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A permeable pavement system can capture stormwater to reduce runoff volume and flow rate, improve onsite groundwater recharge, and enhance pollutant controls within the site. A new unit process model for evaluating the hydrologic performance of a permeable pavement system has be...

  9. Effect of dengue virus-induced cytotoxin on capillary permeability.

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, R.; Khanna, M.; Chaturvedi, U. C.; Mathur, A.

    1990-01-01

    Capillary permeability is increased in cases of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) but its genesis is not known. Dengue type 2 virus (DV) induces production of a cytokine (CF2) by mouse macrophages. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of CF2 on capillary permeability. It was observed that intraperitoneal inoculation of CF2 in mice increased the capillary permeability in a dose-dependent manner, as shown by leakage of intravenously injected radioactive iodine (125I) or Evan's blue dye in the peritoneal cavity. Peak leakage occurred at 30 min and the vascular integrity was restored by 1-2 h. The increase in capillary permeability was abrogated by pretreatment of mice with avil (H1 receptor blocker) but not by ranitidine (H2 receptor blocker). The findings thus show that DV-induced CF2 increases the capillary permeability via release of histamine. PMID:2310617

  10. Permeability of mono- and bi-dispersed porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byon, C.; Kim, S. J.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the permeability of mono- and bi-dispersed porous media is considered. The effects of the particle size distribution and the packing structure of particles on the permeability are investigated experimentally and analytically. Both experimental and analytic results suggest that the particlesize distribution is close to the log-normal distribution, and the permeability of the mono-dispersed porous media quasi-linearly decreases as the range of the particle size distribution increases. On the other hand, the effect of packing structure of particles on the permeability is shown to be negligible.The permeability of the bidispersed porous media quasi-linearly decreases as the range of cluster size increases, and nearly independent of the particle size distribution. The present model is valid over the range of parameters typically found in heat transfer applications.