Science.gov

Sample records for artery catheter complications

  1. Complications Encountered with a Transfemorally Placed Port-Catheter System for Hepatic Artery Chemotherapy Infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroiwa, Toshiro; Honda, Hiroshi; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Irie, Hiroyuki; Aibe, Hitoshi; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Shinozaki, Kenji; Masuda, Kouji

    2001-03-15

    A port-catheter system was implanted via femoral artery access for hepatic artery chemotherapy infusion. Implantation was attempted in 90 patients and was successful in 88. Blood flow redistribution was performed using embolization coils. In the first ten patients a soft heparin-coated infusion catheter was used. For the following 78 patients we used a stiffer catheter coated with fluorine-acryl-styrene-urethane-silicone (FASUS) copolymer. The catheter was connected to a port implanted subcutaneously below the level of the inguinal ligament. Complications during the procedure and after placement were observed in 7 of 90 patients and 24 of 88 patients, respectively. These included catheter obstruction (11%), dislocation of the catheter tip (10%), drug toxicity (5.7%), and catheter infection (3.4%). In 6 of 10 patients with catheter obstruction, recanalization of the port system was achieved. In 7 of 9 patients with dislocation of the indwelling catheter tip, replacement of the port system was successful. Our complications appear to be comparable with those encountered with the subclavian/brachial approach when the new catheter coating is used. Notable is the avoidance of cerebral infarcts.

  2. Pulmonary artery rupture as a complication of Swan-Ganz catheter application. Diagnosis and endovascular treatment: a single centre's experience

    PubMed Central

    Henzel, Jan; Dzielińska, Zofia; Lubiszewska, Barbara M.; Michałowska, Ilona; Szymański, Piotr; Pracoń, Radosław; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Demkow, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The placement of a Swan-Ganz catheter into the pulmonary artery may lead to a number of complications (2–17%). In less than 0.2% of cases Swan-Ganz catheterization results in serious vascular damage – pulmonary artery rupture (PAR). This paper presents two distinct forms of iatrogenic PAR treated endovascularly using different vascular devices. Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of endovascular treatment and the application of different types of vascular devices in the management of pulmonary artery rupture caused by Swan-Ganz catheterization. Material and methods In this retrospective study we evaluated 2 patients in whom Swan-Ganz catheter application was used for perioperative monitoring and resulted in pulmonary artery rupture. This complication was treated endovascularly by means of interventional cardiology. Results We report the cases of 2 patients with a pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm formed in the perioperative period. In case 1, a single, 4-loop, 3 mm diameter coil was implanted. In case 2, a 5 mm Amplatzer Vascular Plug IV was applied. In both cases, the endovascular approach resulted in total occlusion of the feeding artery and reduced further extravasation of the blood. Conclusions Despite its extremely low incidence, iatrogenic PAR is a serious, life-threatening complication of Swan-Ganz catheterization that requires urgent attention. Among available methods of treatment, percutaneous embolization is a relatively quick, safe, accurate and highly effective alternative to traumatizing surgery. PMID:27279873

  3. Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment in cardiac surgery: a simple percutaneous solution.

    PubMed

    Divakaran, Vijay; Caldera, Angel; Stephens, Jack; Gonzalez, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary artery catheter entrapment is a reported complication after cardiac surgery from inadvertent suturing of the catheter to the vena-caval wall during surgery. This article reports a simple percutaneous technique to retrieve the trapped catheter. PMID:25547257

  4. Patency and Complications of Translumbar Dialysis Catheters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fanna; Bennett, Stacy; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse; Heyka, Robert; McLennan, Gordon; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-01-01

    Translumbar tunneled dialysis catheter (TLDC) is a temporary dialysis access for patients exhausted traditional access for dialysis. While few small studies reported successes with TLDC, additional studies are warranted to understand the short- and long-term patency and safety of TLDC. We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult patients who received TLDC for hemodialysis access from June 2006 to June 2013. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, dialysis details, catheter insertion procedures and associated complications, catheter patency, and patient survival data were collected. Catheter patency was studied using Kaplan-Meier curve; catheter functionality was assessed with catheter intervals and catheter-related complications were used to estimate catheter safety. There were 84 TLDCs inserted in 28 patients with 28 primary insertions and 56 exchanges. All TLDC insertions were technically successful with good blood flow during dialysis (>300 ml/minute) and no immediate complications (major bleeding or clotting) were noted. The median number of days in place for initial catheter, secondary catheter, and total catheter were 65, 84, and 244 respectively. The catheter patency rate at 3, 6, and 12 months were 43%, 25%, and 7% respectively. The main complications were poor blood flow (40%) and catheter-related infection (36%), which led to 30.8% and 35.9% catheter removal, respectively. After translumbar catheter, 42.8% of the patients were successfully converted to another vascular access or peritoneal dialysis. This study data suggest that TLDC might serve as a safe, alternate access for dialysis patients in short-term who have exhausted conventional vascular access. PMID:25800550

  5. Closure Using a Surgical Closure Device of Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Punctures During Central Venous Catheter Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Berlet, Matthew H.; Steffen, Diana; Shaughness, George; Hanner, James

    2001-03-15

    Severe complications can and do occur when central venous catheters are inadvertently placed into subclavian arteries. Two cases are discussed that describe how these inadvertent arterial punctures can be closed using the Perclose device (Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA, USA)

  6. Diagnosis and Rescue of a Kinked Pulmonary Artery Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Mouawad, Nicolas J.; Stein, Erica J.; Moran, Kenneth R.; Go, Michael R.; Papadimos, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive hemodynamic monitoring with a pulmonary catheter has been relatively routine in cardiovascular and complex surgical operations as well as in the management of critical illnesses. However, due to multiple potential complications and its invasive nature, its use has decreased over the years and less invasive methods such as transesophageal echocardiography and hemodynamic sensors have gained widespread favor. Unlike these less invasive forms of hemodynamic monitoring, pulmonary artery catheters require an advanced understanding of cardiopulmonary physiology, anatomy, and the potential for complications in order to properly place, manage, and interpret the device. We describe a case wherein significant resistance was encountered during multiple unsuccessful attempts at removing a patient's catheter secondary to kinking and twisting of the catheter tip. These attempts to remove the catheter serve to demonstrate potential rescue options for such a situation. Ultimately, successful removal of the catheter was accomplished by simultaneous catheter retraction and sheath advancement while gently pulling both objects from the cannulation site. In addition to being skilled in catheter placement, it is imperative that providers comprehend the risks and complications of this invasive monitoring tool. PMID:26075106

  7. Lymphatic Leak Complicating Central Venous Catheter Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnacle, Alex M. Kleidon, Tricia M.

    2005-12-15

    Many of the risks associated with central venous access are well recognized. We report a case of inadvertent lymphatic disruption during the insertion of a tunneled central venous catheter in a patient with raised left and right atrial pressures and severe pulmonary hypertension, which led to significant hemodynamic instability. To our knowledge, this rare complication is previously unreported.

  8. How to manage an arterial catheter.

    PubMed

    Parry, Andrew; Higginson, Ray

    2016-03-16

    Rationale and key points This article provides nurses with information on the safe and effective use and management of arterial catheters, the gold standard for accurate blood pressure measurement and routine serial blood gas sampling in critical care. Arterial catheters are used when real-time blood pressure monitoring is required, such as when there is a risk of significant blood loss. ▶ Arterial catheters provide real-time blood pressure monitoring, enabling rapid identification of changes in blood pressure and guiding fluid resuscitation. ▶ Arterial catheters can be used to take blood samples without having to perform multiple arterial or venous punctures. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How this article will change your practice when managing a patient with an arterial catheter. 2. Any further learning needs you have identified. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26982866

  9. [Pulmonary complications during parenteral feeding via percutaneous silicon catheters].

    PubMed

    Closa, R M; Coroleu, W; Natal, A; Gómez-Papí, A; Ainsa Abos, E; Sánchez Galiana, A

    1998-07-01

    Percutaneous fine bore silicone central catheters are frequently used in sick full term newborns and in low birth weight premature infants; although their use has some risks. We report two cases of pleural effusion in two prematures of 34 and 33 weeks gestation and birth weight of 1,510 and 1,650 g, respectively; and one case neumonitis in a newborn of a 38 weeks gestation and 2,730 g birth weight. All of them have in common same initial clinical sign: increase mucus secretion of the upper airway a few hours after the beginning of parenteral nutrition using the type of catheter mentioned with the tip abnormally located in pulmonary artery. These complications are probably related to endothelial injury of very slow flow vessels due to the high osmolarity and low pH of the parenteral solutions used; which probably, in turn, produce thrombosis and vascular perforation, and/or extravasation. We suggest to suspect a pulmonary artery abnormally located catheter in patients receiving parenteral nutrition who increase upper airway mucus secretion. The rapid correction of the position would prevent major complications. PMID:12602026

  10. Comparison of Standard Catheters Versus Radial Artery-Specific Catheter in Patients Who Underwent Coronary Angiography Through Transradial Access.

    PubMed

    Chen, On; Goel, Sunny; Acholonu, Michael; Kulbak, Guy; Verma, Shivani; Travlos, Efstratios; Casazza, Richard; Borgen, Elliot; Malik, Bilal; Friedman, Michael; Moskovits, Norbert; Frankel, Robert; Shani, Jacob; Ayzenberg, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    In this prospective, randomized controlled study, we aim to compare the performance outcomes of standard catheters with the radial artery-specific catheter. Over the past decade, transradial cardiac catheterization has gained widespread popularity because of its low complication rates compared with transfemoral access. Operators have the choice of using either standard catheters (used for both transfemoral and transradial approach, with need for separate catheter use for either right or left coronary artery engagement) or a dedicated radial artery catheter, which is specifically designed to engage both coronary arteries through radial artery access. A total of 110 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography at our institution from March 2015 to April 2015 were prospectively randomized to either radial artery-specific Tiger catheter (5Fr; Terumo Interventional Systems, Somerset, New Jersey) versus standard Judkins left and right catheters (5Fr R4, L4; Cordis Corporation, Miami, Florida). The end points of the study included fluoroscopy time, dose-area product, contrast volume used, and total procedure time for the coronary angiography. A total of 57 patients (52%) were randomized to radial artery-specific catheter and 53 (48%) to the standard catheter. Tiger catheter was associated with significantly lower fluoroscopy time (184 ± 91 vs 238 ± 131 seconds, p = 0.015), which was statistically significant. Other outcome measures such as dose-area product (2,882.4 ± 1,471.2 vs 3,524.6 ± 2,111.7 Gy·cm(2), p = 0.07), total contrast volume (48.1 ± 16.1 vs 53.4 ± 18.5 ml, p = 0.114), and total procedure time (337 ± 382 vs 434 ± 137 seconds, p = 0.085) were also lower in single-catheter group, but it did not reach statistical significance. A total of 8 patients (14%) were crossed over from radial-specific catheter arm to standard catheter arm because of substandard image quality and difficulty in coronary engagement. Six patients had to be

  11. Causes and nursing countermeasures in pediatric PICC catheter complications.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Mingli; Li, Na; Yi, Lan; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the complications and nursing countermeasures of PICC (Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter) catheters using children PICC catheter technique 40 cases, complications were observed, and analyze the original causes, in order to propose a solution. There were 10 cases of catheter blockage, 5 cases of catheter infection, 6 cases of phlebitis, 5 cases of puncture difficulties, 2 cases of poor feeding tube, 2 cases of bleeding puncture site with the continuous exploration and research of nursing intervention, the production of clinical complications from PICC has been used in children were greatly reduced. PMID:27005500

  12. Complications of Transfemoral Removal of Percutaneous Transfemorally Implanted Port-Catheter Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yahiro, Yoshiyuki; Toyota, Naoyuki Kakizawa, Hideaki; Hieda, Masashi; Hirai, Nobuhiko; Naito, Akira; Ito, Katsuhide

    2006-10-15

    Our purpose is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of the withdrawal procedure of percutaneous transfemorally implanted port-catheter systems. Thirty-seven patients (17.7%) underwent the withdrawal procedure of this port-catheter system among 209 patients. The reasons for withdrawal were as follows: termination of intra-arterial chemotherapy (n = 7), obstruction of hepatic artery (n = 5), port infection (n = 4), catheter infection (n = 4), catheter obstruction (n = 4), lower-limb palsy and pain (n = 2), exposure of the port due to skin defect (n = 2), patient's desire (n = 2), side effect of chemotherapy (n = 1), no effectiveness of chemotherapy (n = 1), hematoma at the puncture site (n = 1), duodenum perforation by the catheter (n = 1), intermittent claudication due to severe stenosis of right common iliac artery (n = 1), dissection of common hepatic artery (n = 1), and broken catheter (n = 1). In thirty-four of the 37 cases, the port-catheter system was successfully withdrawn without any complications. Clinical success rate was 91.9%. Complications occurred in three cases (8.1%), which were a pseudoaneurysm, thromboembolism of the right common iliac artery, and continuous bleeding from the subcutaneous pocket where the port system was placed for 1 month. In 15 cases, correction of the catheter tip or exchange for dislocation of the tip had to be done without withdrawal. It is not rare to withdraw port-catheter systems in cases of infection or hematoma around the system. Although withdrawal of a percutaneous transfemorally implanted port-catheter system is a relatively safe procedure, the port-catheter system should not be removed unless absolutely indicated.

  13. Percutaneous Retrieval of a Pulmonary Artery Catheter Knot in Pacing Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Valenzuela-Garcia, Luis Felipe Almendro-Delia, Manuel; Gonzalez-Valdayo, Miguel; Munoz-Campos, Juan; Dorado-Garcia, Jose C.; Gomez-Rosa, Francisco; Vazquez-Garcia, Rafael; Calderon-Leal, Jose M.

    2007-09-15

    To illustrate a successful approach to resolving a pulmonary artery catheter knot in the pacing leads of a cardiac resynchronization device. When planning invasive monitoring for patients having right chamber electrodes, fluoroscopic-guided catheter insertion and extraction is advisable. In the event of coiling or knotting, an interventional radiologist should be contacted as soon as possible to avoid serious complications.

  14. Experience of on table modified standard catheters for directed arterial and venous thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Ram, Bhavin; Baliga, Kapil; Rajesh, S; George, Robbie K

    2016-07-01

    To describe an on-table modification of standard angiography catheters for use in directed arterial and venous thrombolysis. An angiogram is performed and the length of thrombosed vessel (artery or vein) is measured. A 5 or 6 Fr catheter (preferably straight/multi- purpose/vertebral catheter) is modified on table for use by making multiple holes with 23 G needle. After testing ex vivo with saline injection, the on table modified catheter is placed over a wire into the thrombosed segment of the vessel and thrombolytic agent infusion is commenced utilizing a syringe driver after giving a bolus dose of thrombolytic agent. Median duration of thrombolysis was 24 h in our study. We have utilized this method in twenty thrombosed vessels, without any catheter related complications. In our experience, this modification of a standard catheter as a multi-hole catheter is a readily available, simple, cheap, versatile and effective device for directed thrombolysis. PMID:26719163

  15. Minimizing the complications associated with migrating catheters.

    PubMed

    Billington, A; Crane, C; Jownally, S; Kirkwood, L; Roodhouse, A

    2008-11-01

    This article seeks to explore the clinical practice of urinary catheter fixation. Traditionally, this area of practice has been neglected and nurses are familiar with tension lesions and dermal problems associated with inappropriate or incorrect urinary catheter fixation. A novel solution to this problem is a catheter fixation device. This device secures the catheter safely, making clinical practice safer and the experience of catheterization more tolerable for the patient. An example of a urinary catheter fixation device available in the UK is Bard's StatLock. PMID:18981965

  16. Malposition of Subclavian Venous Catheter Leading to Chest Complications

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amarjit; Sidhu, Kuldeep Singh; Kaur, Avleen

    2016-01-01

    Although Central Venous Catheter (CVC) placement is a relatively simple procedure but its insertion and maintenance are associated with significant risks. Malposition (defined as any CVC tip position outside the superior vena cava) may be associated with catheter insertion and may require immediate intervention. It may result in complications like haemothorax, pleural effusions, pneumothorax, sepsis, thrombosis and cardiac tamponade. This case report presents timely detection of the complication after placement of CVC. Everyone should be aware of the complications and monitor consistently appropriate position of catheter tips.

  17. [A rare complication of permanent venous access: constriction, fracture and embolization of the catheter].

    PubMed

    Groebli, Y; Wuthrich, P; Tschantz, P; Beguelin, P; Piguet, D

    1998-01-01

    The pinch off syndrome due to squeezing of the implanted catheter is a rare complication of permanent venous access devices (0.1 to 1% of the cases). The cause is a mechanical catheter's compression in the costo-clavicular space, when implanted too medially in the subclavian vein. In case of lack of venous reflux or injection difficulties, sometimes complicated by local pain, a radiological control must be obtained to demonstrate signs of compression or beginning of fracture. Significant damage to the system is shown be extravasation of radioopaque contrast medium. The suspicion of catheter damage justifies early replacement of the system to avoid right heart or pulmonary artery embolism. The electron microscopic scanning tends to prove that the catheter's rupture is caused by a fatigue process. PMID:9655009

  18. Successful Image-Guided Retrieval of an Embolized Fragment of a Fractured Haemodialysis Catheter Tip from the Pulmonary Artery

    PubMed Central

    Teoh, Chia Wei; Thakor, Avnesh S.; Amaral, Joao G.; Parra, Dimitri A.; Harvey, Elizabeth A.; Noone, Damien G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cuffed, double-lumen, tunneled haemodialysis catheters are a common means of vascular access in paediatric haemodialysis, particularly in infants. Haemodialysis catheter fracture with distal embolization is a rare complication. Case Report A 2-year-old boy was receiving chronic haemodialysis via a right internal jugular cuffed, double-lumen, tunneled haemodialysis catheter, inserted 3 months previously. He was asymptomatic and was incidentally found to have had embolization of a fractured catheter tip into a segmental branch of the left pulmonary artery. The catheter was replaced and the embolized fragment successfully retrieved, non-surgically, using an image-guided endovascular approach with a loop snare device. Conclusion Haemodialysis catheter fracture with distal embolization is a rare complication in both adults and children and is usually associated with prolonged use and catheter fatigue. Retrieval of the embolized fragment should always be attempted to prevent possible complications. Awareness of this potential complication is important to facilitate diagnosis and management. PMID:26998477

  19. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters Complicated by Vascular Erosion in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Blackwood, Brian P; Farrow, Kathryn N; Kim, Stan; Hunter, Catherine J

    2016-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are widely used in the pediatric population, and their use continues to grow in popularity. These catheters provide a reliable source of venous access to neonatal patients but can also be the cause of life-threatening complications. There are several well-documented complications such as infections, catheter thrombosis, vascular extravasations, and fractured catheters. However, the complication of vascular erosion into the pleural space using both small and silicone-based catheters is rarely described. After obtaining institutional review board approval, we identified 4 cases to review of PICCs complicated by vascular erosions in the past 2 years. Herein, we also review the current literature of PICC complications. Getting the catheter tip as close to the atrial-caval junction as possible and confirmation of this placement are of the utmost importance. The thick wall of the vena cava near the atrium seems to be less likely to perforate; in addition, this position provides increased volume and turbulence to help dilute the hyperosmolar fluid, which seems to also be a factor in this complication. A daily screening chest x-ray in patients with upper extremity PICCs and ongoing parenteral nutrition (PN) are not necessary at this time given the overall low rate of vascular erosion and concerns regarding excessive radiation exposure in pediatric populations. However, a low threshold for chest x-ray imaging in patients with even mild respiratory symptoms in the setting of upper extremity PN is recommended. PMID:25700180

  20. Influence of catheter insertion on the hemodynamic environment in coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiaopeng; Sun, Anqiang; Liu, Xiao; Pu, Fang; Deng, Xiaoyan; Kang, Hongyan; Fan, Yubo

    2016-09-01

    Intravascular stenting is one of the most commonly used treatments to restore the vascular lumen and flow conditions, while perioperative complications such as thrombosis and restenosis are still nagging for patients. As the catheter with crimped stent and folded balloon is directly advanced through coronary artery during surgery, it is destined to cause interference as well as obstructive effect on blood flow. We wonder how the hemodynamic environment would be disturbed and weather these disturbances cause susceptible factors for those complications. Therefore, a realistic three-dimensional model of left coronary artery was reconstructed and blood flow patterns were numerically simulated at seven different stages in the catheter insertion process. The results revealed that the wall shear stress (WSS) and velocity in left anterior descending (LAD) were both significantly increased after catheter inserted into LAD. Besides, the WSS on the catheter, especially at the ending of the catheter, was also at high level. Compared with the condition before catheter inserted, the endothelial cells of LAD was exposed to high-WSS condition and the risk of platelet aggregation in blood flow was increased. These influences may make coronary arteries more vulnerable for perioperative complications. PMID:27394085

  1. [Local vascular complications after iatrogenic femoral artery puncture].

    PubMed

    Fruhwirth, J; Pascher, O; Hauser, H; Amann, W

    1996-01-01

    Over a period of 5 years 81 vascular complications after 15,460 catheterizations of the femoral artery for diagnostic (n = 11,883) or therapeutic (n = 3577) procedures were registered. The following complications were observed in declining frequency: 1. False aneurysm (n = 65), 2. arterial occlusion (dissection, embolia, thrombosis) (n = 8), 3. vascular lesion causing profuse bleeding (n = 7), 4. AV-fistula (n = 1). The total complication rate was 0.52%. The complication rate was significantly higher in therapeutical procedures (1,03%) than in diagnostic investigations (0.37%). Pseudoaneurysms were complicated by thrombosis of the femoral vein (n = 3), lymphatic fistula (n = 3) and deep wound infection (n = 9); secondary complication rate 18.5%. Risk factors for local vascular complications are old age, female gender, high grade arteriosclerosis at the puncture site, overweight, manifest arterial hypertension and medication with cumarin, acetylsalicylic acid or heparin. Further complicating factors are connected with technical risks such as duration of the procedure. French size of the catheter, the catheter sheath and multiple punctures. Vascular repair was performed by simple angiography in most cases, but in 14.8% more extensive surgical procedures were required. In patients with signs of occlusive vascular disease the external iliac artery was replaced by a PTFE-vascular access graft in 4 cases and an arterioplasty of the deep femoral artery was performed in 2 patients. 36% of the operations were undertaken as emergencies. Reintervention was necessary for a postoperative bleeding complication in 1 case (surgical complication rate 1.2%). A female patient suffering from aortic valve stenosis died during emergency operation due to massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage after cardiac catheterization (mortality rate 1.2%). Over a median follow-up period of 37 months no late complications of the intervention were recorded, nor recurrences of peripheral arterial occlusive

  2. Renal Infarction Caused by Spontaneous Renal Artery Dissection: Treatment with Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis and Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Yong Sun Cho, Soon Gu; Hong, Ki Cheon

    2009-03-15

    Spontaneous renal artery dissection (SRAD) is rare and presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. We report a case of a 36-year-old man who had an SRAD-complicated renal infarction. The patient experienced severe unilateral flank pain. Enhanced abdominal computed axial tomography scan showed renal infarction, and urinalysis showed no hematuria. Selective renal angiography was essential to evaluate the extent of dissection and suitability for repair. The patient was treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis and frenal artery stenting.

  3. Complications of indwelling pleural catheter use and their management

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Macy M S; Thomas, Rajesh; Lee, Y C Gary

    2016-01-01

    The growing utilisation of indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) has put forward a new era in the management of recurrent symptomatic pleural effusions. IPC use is safe compared to talc pleurodesis, though complications can occur. Pleural infection affects <5% of patients, and is usually responsive to antibiotic treatment without requiring catheter removal or surgery. Pleural loculations develop over time, limiting drainage in 10% of patients, which can be improved with intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy. Catheter tract metastasis can occur with most tumours but is more common in mesothelioma. The metastases usually respond to analgaesics and/or external radiotherapy. Long-term intermittent drainage of exudative effusions or chylothorax can potentially lead to loss of nutrients, though no data exist on any clinical impact. Fibrin clots within the catheter lumen can result in blockage. Chest pain following IPC insertion is often mild, and adjustments in analgaesics and drainage practice are usually all that are required. As clinical experience with the use of IPC accumulates, the profile and natural course of complications are increasingly described. We aim to summarise the available literature on IPC-related complications and the evidence to support specific strategies. PMID:26870384

  4. Intra-Arterial Hepatic Chemotherapy: A Comparison of Percutaneous Versus Surgical Implantation of Port-Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Deschamps, F.; Elias, D. Goere, D.; Malka, D. Ducreux, M. Boige, V.; Auperin, A.; Baere, T. de

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To compare retrospectively the safety and efficacy of percutaneous and surgical implantations of port-catheters for intra-arterial hepatic chemotherapy (IAHC). Materials and Methods: Between January 2004 and December 2008, 126 consecutive patients (mean age 58 years) suffering from liver colorectal metastases were referred for intra-arterial hepatic chemotherapy (IAHC). Port-catheters were percutaneously implanted (P) through femoral access with the patient under conscious sedation when no other surgery was planned or were surgically implanted (S) when laparotomy was performed for another purpose. We report the implantation success rate, primary functionality, functionality after revision, and complications of IAHC. Results: The success rates of implantation were 97% (n = 65 of 67) for P and 98% (n = 58 of 59) for S. One hundred eleven patients received IAHC in our institution (n = 56P and n = 55S). Primary functionality was the same for P and S (4.80 vs. 4.82 courses), but functionality after revision was significantly higher for P (9.18 vs. 5.95 courses, p = 0.004) than for S. Forty-five complications occurred during 516 courses for P and 28 complications occurred during 331 courses for S. The rates of discontinuation of IAHC linked to complications of the port-catheters were 21% (n = 12 of 56) for P and 34% (n = 19 of 55) for S. Conclusion: Overall, significantly better functionality and similar complication rates occurred after P versus S port-catheters.

  5. A comparison of the priming properties of two central venous catheters and one pulmonary artery catheter.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, P M

    1995-01-01

    The time taken to prime the individual lumina of two multilumen central venous catheters (Viggo-Spectramed 14G 20 cm Hydrocath and Vialon 14G 20 cm Deltacath) and one pulmonary artery catheter (Viggo-Spectramed 110 cm 7.5F Pentacath) at flows between 5 ml.h-1 and 99 ml.h-1 is reported. The catheters supplied by different manufacturers but of identical length and gauge have significantly different priming times (p < 0.001). A protocol which may be used to prime the individual lumina of the three catheters studied is described. By means of an in vitro test the accuracy of this protocol is validated. PMID:7702147

  6. Pneumothorax as a complication of central venous catheter insertion

    PubMed Central

    Tsotsolis, Nikolaos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Baka, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Barbetakis, Nikos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Kuhajda, Ivan; Andjelkovic, Dejan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    The central venous catheter (CVC) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the neck [internal jugular vein (IJV)], chest (subclavian vein or axillary vein) or groin (femoral vein). There are several situations that require the insertion of a CVC mainly to administer medications or fluids, obtain blood tests (specifically the “central venous oxygen saturation”), and measure central venous pressure. CVC usually remain in place for a longer period of time than other venous access devices. There are situations according to the drug administration or length of stay of the catheter that specific systems are indicated such as; a Hickman line, a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line or a Port-a-Cath may be considered because of their smaller infection risk. Sterile technique is highly important here, as a line may serve as a port of entry for pathogenic organisms, and the line itself may become infected with organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci. In the current review we will present the complication of pneumothorax after CVC insertion. PMID:25815301

  7. Pneumothorax as a complication of central venous catheter insertion.

    PubMed

    Tsotsolis, Nikolaos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Baka, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Barbetakis, Nikos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Kuhajda, Ivan; Andjelkovic, Dejan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The central venous catheter (CVC) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the neck [internal jugular vein (IJV)], chest (subclavian vein or axillary vein) or groin (femoral vein). There are several situations that require the insertion of a CVC mainly to administer medications or fluids, obtain blood tests (specifically the "central venous oxygen saturation"), and measure central venous pressure. CVC usually remain in place for a longer period of time than other venous access devices. There are situations according to the drug administration or length of stay of the catheter that specific systems are indicated such as; a Hickman line, a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line or a Port-a-Cath may be considered because of their smaller infection risk. Sterile technique is highly important here, as a line may serve as a port of entry for pathogenic organisms, and the line itself may become infected with organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci. In the current review we will present the complication of pneumothorax after CVC insertion. PMID:25815301

  8. Efficacy of Intra-Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy for Head and Neck Cancers Using Coaxial Catheter Technique: Initial Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurumaru, Daisuke Kuroiwa, Toshiro; Yabuuchi, Hidetake; Hirata, Hideki; Higaki, Yuichiro; Tomita, Kichinobu

    2007-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for head and neck cancers using a coaxial catheter technique: the superficial temporal artery (STA)-coaxial catheter method. Thirty-one patients (21 males and 10 females; 37-83 years of age) with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (maxilla, 2; epipharynx, 4; mesopharynx, 8; oral floor, 4; tongue, 10; lower gingiva, 1; buccal mucosa, 2) were treated by intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy. Four patients were excluded from the tumor-response evaluation because of a previous operation or impossibility of treatment due to catheter trouble. Forty-eight sessions of catheterization were performed. A guiding catheter was inserted into the STA and a microcatheter was advanced into the tumor-feeding artery via the guiding catheter under angiographic guidance. When the location of the tumor or its feeding artery was uncertain on angiography, computed tomographic angiography was performed. The anticancer agent carboplatin (CBDCA) was continuously injected for 24 h through the microcatheter from a portable infusion pump attached to the patient's waist. The total administration dose was 300-1300 mg per body. External radiotherapy was administered during intra-arterial chemotherapy at a total dose of 21-70.5 Gy.The initial response was complete response in 15 patients, partial response in 7 patients, and no change in 5 patients; the overall response rate was 81.5% (22/27). Complication-related catheter maintenance was observed in 15 of 48 sessions of catheterization. Injury and dislocation of the microcatheter occurred 10 times in 7 patients. Catheter infection was observed three times in each of two patients, and catheter occlusion and vasculitis occurred in two patients. Intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy via the STA-coaxial catheter method could have potential as a favorable treatment for head and neck tumors.

  9. A unique complication of the GuideZilla guide extension support catheter and the risk of stent stripping in interventional & endovascular interventions.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, Thomas; Desai, Harit; Sanghvi, Kintur

    2015-01-01

    Supporting catheters in percutaneous stenting of anatomically difficult coronary lesions are utilized by interventional cardiologists. The GuideZilla guide extension catheter is designed for deep seating in coronary arteries to provide extra guidance support for equipment delivery during difficult coronary interventions or for coaxial alignment in tortuous vessels. There are limited GuideZilla-related complications reported in the literature. We present a challenging case of a left main and left anterior descending artery dissection, complicated with stent stripping off the delivery balloon by the GuideZilla support catheter. PMID:26304575

  10. A unique complication of the GuideZilla guide extension support catheter and the risk of stent stripping in interventional & endovascular interventions

    PubMed Central

    Waggoner, Thomas; Desai, Harit; Sanghvi, Kintur

    2015-01-01

    Supporting catheters in percutaneous stenting of anatomically difficult coronary lesions are utilized by interventional cardiologists. The GuideZilla guide extension catheter is designed for deep seating in coronary arteries to provide extra guidance support for equipment delivery during difficult coronary interventions or for coaxial alignment in tortuous vessels. There are limited GuideZilla-related complications reported in the literature. We present a challenging case of a left main and left anterior descending artery dissection, complicated with stent stripping off the delivery balloon by the GuideZilla support catheter. PMID:26304575

  11. Isolated Disruption of the Right Coronary Artery Following a Steam Pop during Cavotricuspid Linear Ablation with a Contact Force Catheter.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Michele; Frommhold, Markus; Back, Dieter; Mierzwa, Marco; Lauer, Bernard; Geller, J Christoph

    2016-07-01

    A 70-year-old woman with persistent atrial fibrillation underwent pulmonary vein isolation and linear ablation with a contact sensor catheter. During cavotricuspid isthmus ablation, a steam pop resulted in cardiac tamponade, and the patient developed severe hypotension despite successful pericardial puncture and minimal residual pericardial effusion. Right coronary artery angiography revealed extravasal contrast medium accumulation posterior of the Crux Cordis. Emergent cardiac surgery confirmed isolated disruption of the artery in the absence of additional heart perforation. Although contact sensor catheters may reduce complications, steam pops can still occur and result in dramatic complications. PMID:27378561

  12. [Arterial complications of hydatic disease].

    PubMed

    Mayoussi, C; El Mesnaoui, A; Lekehal, B; Sefiani, Y; Benosman, A; Bensaid, Y

    2002-04-01

    We report two cases of hydatic cyst with rupture into the aorta in two young patients cared for at the Ibn Sina hospital in Rabat, Morocco. In the first patient, a false hydatic aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta was discovered at surgery performed for suspected hydatic cyst of the lower lobe of the left lung. Despite reconstruction with a prosthetic graft, the patient died peroperatively due to exsanguination via uncontrollable bleeding through the aneurysmal sac. The second case was a 20-year-old woman whose false hydatic aneurysm of the thoracoabdominal aorta was disclosed by embolic ischemia of the lower limbs. Aorto-aortic reconstruction was followed by medical treatment with albendazol. During follow-up, the patient developed a hydatic cyst of the kidney and a parietal cyst. Both were treated surgically. An analysis of these two cases and 9 others reported in the literature concerning arterial involvement in hydatic disease revealed the characteristic clinical, radiological and therapeutic features of this rare but serious complication. PMID:12015489

  13. Management of Liver Hemangioma Using Trans-Catheter Arterial Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Firouznia, Kavous; Ghanaati, Hossein; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Nassiri Toosi, Mohssen; Ebrahimi Daryani, Nasser; Jalali, Amir Hossein; Shakiba, Madjid; Hosseinverdi, Sima

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hemangioma, a congenital vascular malformation, is the most common benign liver lesion that is usually remain stable subsequently requiring not treatment; however, complications such as abdominal pain or fullness, coagulation disturbances, and inflammatory syndrome may occur, demanding a specific treatment of hemangioma. Objectives: To assess the safety, feasibility and efficacy of trans-catheter arterial embolization (TAE) for the treatment of Liver hemangioma Patients and Methods: TAE was performed on 20 patients with liver hemangioma. The embolic agent used was polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles (300-400 micron, Jonson and Johnson Cordis, USA). All patients were followed up for 6 months. Imaging was carried out and patients were also evaluated symptomatically through telephone interview by a physician. Results: Twenty patients aged from 21 to 63 years (mean: 46.8, SD: 10.26) were included in this study. Post embolization syndrome, including abdominal pain, fever, and leukocytosis occurred in one patient 1 week after TAE and lasted for 3 days. No serious adverse event and TAE-related death was observed. None of the patient underwent another intervention including surgery. During follow up interval, decreased episode of abdominal pain was documented in all patients who had pain. Tumor enlargement was also stopped during the follow up. The average diameter of tumors was 97.00 mm (range: 25-200 SD: 47.85) and 88.95 mm (range: 23-195 SD: 43.27) before and after embolization, respectively. Comparison of images before and after TAE revealed statistically significant decrease in the size of lesion (P value: 0.004, t: 3.31). Conclusions: Our findings indicate that TAE is a safe and efficient procedure for the treatment of liver hemangioma. Further studies with larger sample sizes are required to support therapeutic effects of TAE. PMID:25737731

  14. Neonatal PICC: one unit's six-year experience with limiting catheter complications.

    PubMed

    Corzine, Marie; Willett, Lynne D

    2010-01-01

    Safe dressing techniques for neonatal peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) remain controversial in the literature. This article describes one unit's experience with the placement and management of 491 PICCs during a six-year period with more than 5,600 catheter days. The dressing technique described in this article differs from that seen in the literature with the addition of a protective base layer. Catheter complication rates are low, and catheter dressing changes are minimized with this dressing technique. PMID:20472533

  15. [Indications and complications of central venous catheters in hematologic oncology: report of 81 cases].

    PubMed

    Abdelkefi, A; Ladeb, S; Ben Othman, T; Torjman, L; Jeddi, R; Ben Hassen, A; Ben Abdeladhim, A

    2000-11-01

    From february 1998 to july 1999, 81 central venous catheters were placed in 41 patients 28 years old (5 to 51 years). We used the subclavicular anatomic way (Aubaniac) in all cases. The total duration of catheter placement was 2905 days (median of 31 days, range 1 to 165 days). We observed 1 pneumothorax (1.2%), 3 venous thrombosis (3.7%) and 1 arterial puncture (1.2%). Catheter-related infections were seen in 8 catheters (2.7 per 1000 catheter-days). Candida was encountered in 4 cases (50%), Gram-positive cocci in 2 cases (25%), and Gram-negative bacilli in 2 cases (25%). The improvement of preventive ways, diagnosis techniques (simultaneous quantitative cultures, differential positivity time), and therapeutic methods (treatment without removal of the catheter, antibiotic lock technique, catheter exchange by guidewire) should allow a better treatment of catheter-related infections. PMID:11155387

  16. Neonatal peripherally inserted central catheters: recommendations for prevention of insertion and postinsertion complications.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Pamela R; Miller, Kellee M

    2008-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) continue to be necessary in neonatal care. They benefit many premature infants and those needing long-term intravenous access. An experienced inserter, early recognition of PICC candidates, early PICC placement, knowledge of anatomy, and correct choice of vein all increase placement success. As with any invasive procedure, there are risks. These include pain, difficulty advancing the catheter, damage to vessels, catheter malposition, and bleeding. Utilizing assessment skills, following the product manufacturer's instructions, and carefully placing the catheter should minimize most of these risks. Additional risks include postinsertion complications such as occlusions, thrombosis, catheter failure, infection, and catheter malposition. Proper nursing care--which includes controlling infection, properly securing the catheter, and changing the dressing as needed--is key to preventing complications and maintaining the PICC until treatment has been completed. PMID:18697655

  17. Endovascular Treatment of Complications of Femoral Arterial Access

    SciTech Connect

    Tsetis, Dimitrios

    2010-06-15

    Endovascular repair of femoral arterial access complications is nowadays the treatment of choice in a group of patients who cannot tolerate vascular reconstruction and bleeding due to advanced cardiovascular disease. Endovascular procedures can be performed under local anesthesia, are well tolerated by the patient, and are associated with a short hospitalization time. Ninitinol stent technology allows for safe stent and stent-graft extension at the common femoral artery (CFA) level, due to increased resistance to external compression and bending stress. Active pelvic bleeding can be insidious, and prompt placement of a stent-graft at the site of leakage is a lifesaving procedure. Percutaneous thrombin injection under US guidance is the treatment of choice for femoral pseudoaneurysms (PAs); this can theoretically be safer with simultaneous balloon occlusion across the entry site of a PA without a neck or with a short and wide neck. In a few cases with thrombin failure due to a large arterial defect or accompanying arteriovenous fistula (AVF), a stent-graft can be deployed. The vast majority of catheter-induced AVFs can be treated effectively with stent-graft implantation even if they are located very close to the femoral bifurcation. Obstructive dissection flaps localized in the CFA are usually treated with prolonged balloon inflation; however, in more extensive dissections involving iliac arteries, self-expanding stents should be deployed. Iliofemoral thrombosis can be treated effectively with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) followed by prolonged balloon inflation or stent placement. Balloon angioplasty and CDT can occasionally be used to treat stenoses and occlusions complicating the use of percutaneous closure devices.

  18. Disconnection of chamber and catheter as a complication of central venous catheter type port-a-cath.

    PubMed

    Kostic, S; Kovcin, V; Granić, M; Jevdic, D; Stanisavljevic, N

    2011-12-01

    The use of a central vein catheter (CVC) type port-a-cath (VPS), apart from the comfort it provides to the patient undergoing chemotherapy, also carries certain complications. In this study, our patient was subjected to chemotherapy after a radical breast cancer operation and was given a CVC type VPS. After further care, a rare complication was verified--disconnection of the chamber and catheter, which one was visually identified in the right heart chamber. As the patient was vitally endangered, she was immediately hospitalized and the catheter was removed by catheterization of the right femoral vein, with scopic imaging. Early diagnosis and localization of the problem prevented more severe complications and mortality. PMID:20607455

  19. Robotic-assisted placement of a hepatic artery infusion catheter for regional chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hellan, Minia; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2008-02-01

    Hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy can be of value to patients with metastatic liver disease from colorectal cancer. Arterial infusion therapy requires surgical placement of a catheter into the gastroduodenal artery connected to a subcutaneous infusion pump or port, a procedure involving major abdominal surgery. Placement of chemotherapy infusion catheters by conventional laparoscopic techniques has been described, but is a technically challenging procedure. The purpose of this report is to introduce a new, minimally invasive approach for hepatic artery catheter placement using the DaVinci robotic system with the potential to minimize surgical trauma, pain, and hospital stay, and to render this minimal access procedure more feasible and widely applicable. PMID:17704873

  20. Hemiballismus as a complication of an intratumoral chemotherapy catheter.

    PubMed

    Zuccarelli, Britton; Aalbers, Brian; Grabb, Paul

    2016-08-01

    We report an unusual case of delayed bilateral, right greater than left hemiballismus in a 15-year-old female patient with a history of a craniopharyngioma 2years following the insertion of a right intratumoral chemotherapy catheter. Following cyst decompression, the catheter was found to have changed position, traversing the basal ganglia structures, namely the right subthalamic nucleus. Her movement disorder near-completely resolved immediately following removal of the catheter. A review of the current literature and proposed pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed. PMID:26964474

  1. Patients with Life-Threatening Arterial Renal Hemorrhage: CT Angiography and Catheter Angiography with Subsequent Superselective Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M. Stampfl, U.; Bellemann, N.; Ramsauer, S.; Loenard, B. M.; Haferkamp, A.; Hallscheidt, P.; Richter, G. M.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical and clinical success of superselective embolization in patients with life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage undergoing preinterventional CT angiography. Forty-three patients with clinical signs of life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage underwent CT angiography and catheter angiography. Superselective embolization was indicated in the case of a positive catheter angiography. Primary study goals were technical and clinical success of superselective embolization. Secondary study goals were CT angiographic and catheter angiographic image findings and clinical follow-up. The mean time interval between CT angiography and catheter angiography was 8.3 {+-} 10.3 h (range, 0.2-34.1 h). Arterial renal hemorrhage was identified with CT angiography in 42 of 43 patients (98%) and catheter angiography in 39 of 43 patients (91%) (overview angiography in 4 of 43 patients [9%], selective angiography in 16 of 43 patients [37%], and superselective angiography in 39 of 43 patients [91%]). Superselective embolization was performed in 39 of 43 patients (91%) and technically successful in 37 of 39 patients (95%). Therefore, coil embolization was performed in 13 of 37 patients (35%), liquid embolization in 9 of 37 patients (24%), particulate embolization in 1 of 37 patients (3%), and a combination in 14 of 37 patients (38%). Clinical failure occurred in 8 of 39 patients (21%) and procedure-related complications in 2 of 39 patients (5%). The 30-day mortality rate was 3%. Hemoglobin decreased significantly prior to intervention (P < 0.001) and increased significantly after intervention (P < 0.005). In conclusion, superselective embolization is effective, reliable, and safe in patients with life-threatening arterial renal hemorrhage. In contrast to overview and selective angiography, only superselective angiography allows reliable detection of arterial renal hemorrhage. Preinterventional CT angiography is excellent for detection

  2. A rare instructive complication of balloon catheter fracture during percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Tetsuya; Higuchi, Yusuke; Kato, Taku; Keira, Natsuya; Tatsumi, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    The entrapment, fracture, and dislodgement of catheterization devices during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are rare complications, for which cardiac surgery is sometimes required. Here, we encountered a rare but instructive case of balloon catheter fracture during PCI. Although there have been some reports of guidewire fracture in PCI, reports on balloon catheter fracture are very rare to our knowledge. A simulation test to examine the mechanism of balloon catheter fracture revealed that overuse of the balloon catheter, both for kissing balloon inflation and balloon anchor, was highly likely to have been the cause of the fracture. PMID:25708708

  3. Novel treatment of coronary artery fistulae concealing severe coronary artery lesion: using thrombus aspiration catheter as a delivery guide.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Levent; Acar, Zeydin; Dursun, Ihsan; Akyüz, Ali Rıza; Korkmaz, Ayca Ata

    2014-03-01

    In this case report, we present the occlusion of multiple coronary artery fistulae originating from proximal left anterior descending (LAD) and right sinus valsavla and empting to the pulmonary artery at the same place. We occluded LAD fistulae by using thrombus aspiration catheter as a delivery guide. To the best of our knowlege, this is the first case of occlusion of coronary fistulae with the help of thrombus aspiration catheter. Our experience may suggest that thrombus aspiration catheters can be used in treating coronary artery fistulae with difficult anotomy. PMID:24748888

  4. Novel treatment of coronary artery fistulae concealing severe coronary artery lesion: using thrombus aspiration catheter as a delivery guide

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Levent; Acar, Zeydin; Dursun, İhsan; Akyüz, Ali Rıza; Korkmaz, Ayca Ata

    2014-01-01

    In this case report, we present the occlusion of multiple coronary artery fistulae originating from proximal left anterior descending (LAD) and right sinus valsavla and empting to the pulmonary artery at the same place. We occluded LAD fistulae by using thrombus aspiration catheter as a delivery guide. To the best of our knowlege, this is the first case of occlusion of coronary fistulae with the help of thrombus aspiration catheter. Our experience may suggest that thrombus aspiration catheters can be used in treating coronary artery fistulae with difficult anotomy. PMID:24748888

  5. Cohort Study: Central Venous Catheter-Related Complications in Children with Hematologic Diseases at a Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Pektaş, Ayhan; Kara, Ateş; Gurgey, Aytemiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to document and analyze the central venous catheter (CVC)-related complications in children with hematological diseases who were treated within a single institution. Materials and Methods: A retrospective investigation was conducted in 106 pediatric patients in whom 203 CVCs were inserted. A total of 175 catheter-related complications occurred in 5 years. Results: The rates of clinical catheter infections, local catheter infections, venous thromboembolism, bleeding, and mechanical complications were 2.6, 1.1, 0.2, 0.2, and 0.2 per 1000 catheter days. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis was the predominant infectious organism in blood and catheter cultures. The children with leukemia had a significantly higher frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.046). The children who underwent bone marrow transplantation had a significantly lower frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.043) and higher frequency of local catheter infections (p=0.003). The children with implanted catheters had a significantly lower frequency of clinical catheter infections (p=0.048). The children with thrombocytopenia had significantly fewer local catheter infections and significantly more clinical catheter infections and catheter-related bleeding (respectively p=0.001, p=0.042, and p=0.024). Conclusion: Leukemia, bone marrow transplantation, and thrombocytopenia are risk factors for CVC-associated complications. The relatively higher number of interventions performed via permanent catheters may be responsible for the significantly increased incidence of systemic infections and mechanical injury. PMID:26316482

  6. Local arterial wall drug delivery using balloon catheter system.

    PubMed

    Tesfamariam, Belay

    2016-09-28

    Balloon-based drug delivery systems allow localized application of drugs to a vascular segment to reduce neointimal hyperplasia and restenosis. Drugs are coated onto balloons using excipients as drug carriers to facilitate adherence and release of drug during balloon inflation. Drug-coated balloon delivery system is characterized by a rapid drug transfer that achieves high drug concentration along the vessel wall surface, intended to correspond to the balloon dilation-induced vascular injury and healing processes. The balloon catheter system allows homogenous drug delivery to the vessel wall, such that the drug release per unit surface area is kept constant along balloons of different lengths. Optimization of the balloon coating matrix is essential for efficient drug transfer and tissue retention until the artery remodels to a normal set point. Challenges in the development of balloon-based drug delivery to the arterial wall include finding suitable excipients for drug formulation to enable drug release to a targeted lesion site effectively, maintain coating integrity during transit, prolong tissue retention and reduce particulate generation. This review highlights various factors involved in the successful design of balloon-based delivery systems, including drug release kinetics, matrix coating transfer, transmural drug partitioning, dissolution rate and release of unbound active drug. PMID:27473765

  7. Endovascular Repair Using Suture-Mediated Closure Devices and Balloon Tamponade following Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Catheterization with Large-Caliber Hemodialysis Catheter.

    PubMed

    Park, Taek Kyu; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Seung-Hyuk

    2016-07-01

    Accidental subclavian artery cannulation is an uncommon but potentially serious complication of central venous catheterization. Removal of a catheter inadvertently placed in the subclavian artery can lead to substantial bleeding, as achieving hemostasis in this area through manual compression presents considerable difficulty. Additionally, surgical treatment might be unsuitable for high-risk patients due to comorbidities. Here, we report a case of an inadvertently-inserted 11.5-French hemodialysis catheter in the subclavian artery during internal jugular venous catheterization. We performed percutaneous closure of the subclavian artery using three 6-French Perclose Proglide® devices with a balloon tamponade in the proximal part of the subclavian artery. Closure was completed without embolic neurological complications. PMID:27482271

  8. Endovascular Repair Using Suture-Mediated Closure Devices and Balloon Tamponade following Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Catheterization with Large-Caliber Hemodialysis Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Park, Taek Kyu; Yang, Jeong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Accidental subclavian artery cannulation is an uncommon but potentially serious complication of central venous catheterization. Removal of a catheter inadvertently placed in the subclavian artery can lead to substantial bleeding, as achieving hemostasis in this area through manual compression presents considerable difficulty. Additionally, surgical treatment might be unsuitable for high-risk patients due to comorbidities. Here, we report a case of an inadvertently-inserted 11.5-French hemodialysis catheter in the subclavian artery during internal jugular venous catheterization. We performed percutaneous closure of the subclavian artery using three 6-French Perclose Proglide® devices with a balloon tamponade in the proximal part of the subclavian artery. Closure was completed without embolic neurological complications. PMID:27482271

  9. Safety and Complications of Double-Lumen Tunnelled Cuffed Central Venous Dialysis Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Rana S.; Kakaria, Anupam K.; Khan, Saif A.; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Sukaiti, Rashid; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the technical success, safety and immediate and delayed complications of double-lumen tunnelled cuffed central venous catheters (TVCs) at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective study took place between January 2012 and October 2013. The clinical records and radiological data of all patients who underwent ultrasound- and fluoroscopy-guided TVC placement at SQUH during the study period were reviewed. Demographic data and information regarding catheter placement, technical success and peri- and post-procedure complications (such as catheter-related infections or thrombosis) were collected. Results: A total of 204 TVCs were placed in 161 patients. Of these, 68 were female (42.2%) and 93 were male (57.8%). The mean age of the patients was 54.4 ± 17.3 years. The most common reason for catheter placement was the initiation of dialysis (63.4%). A total of 203 procedures were technically successful (99.5%). The right internal jugular vein was the most common site of catheter placement (74.9%). Mild haemorrhage which resolved spontaneously occurred in 11 cases (5.4%). No other complications were observed. Subsequent follow-up data was available for 132 catheters (65.0%); of these, thrombosis-related catheter malfunction was observed in 22 cases (16.7%) and catheter-related infection in 29 cases (22.0%). Conclusion: Radiological-guided placement of tunnelled haemodialysis catheters can be performed safely with excellent technical success. The success rate of catheter insertion at SQUH was favourable in comparison with other studies reported in the literature. PMID:26629377

  10. Management of nonocclusive hepatic artery complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Saad, Wael E A

    2007-09-01

    Nonocclusive arterial disease represents less than 5% of posttransplant arterial complications. Nonocclusive arterial complications are classified into (1) nonocclusive diminished flow in the hepatic artery, (2) arteriovenous fistulae, (3) pseudoaneurysms, and (4) arterial rupture. Due to the rarity of these complications, particularly when considering them individually, many of the opinions and managements of these complications are anecdotal. Transcatheter embolization is the main mode of minimal invasive management of these uncommon complications. Other minimal invasive methods have been described such as stent placement or direct percutaneous embolization/thrombosis. The article discusses the presentation, etiology, types, treatment indications, and various modes of minimal invasive therapy used to manage these complications. PMID:18086427

  11. Surgical Treatment of a Catheter-Induced Iatrogenic Dissection of the Right Coronary Artery following Cardiac Catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Artemiou, Panagiotis; Lukacin, Stefan; Kirsch, Peter; Ignac, Jan; Bily, Boris; Tohatyova, Alzbeta; Bilecova-Rabajdova, Miroslava; Sabol, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic dissections of the ascending aorta are an uncommon and severe complication during cardiac catheterization. A 68-year-old female patient underwent diagnostic cardiac catheterization due to non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction. During the procedure, a catheter-induced 360° Class I dissection of the right coronary artery occurred. The patient developed severe bradycardia, which was treated with a temporary pacemaker. She underwent an emergency operation with ligation and a saphenous vein graft in the right coronary artery. The postoperative course was uneventful; and on postoperative day 6, she was discharged home. PMID:27403187

  12. Distal end of the atrioventricular nodal artery predicts the risk of atrioventricular block during slow pathway catheter ablation of atrioventricular nodal re-entrant tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, J; Huang, S; Lai, L; Lin, L; Chen, J; Tseng, Y; Lien, W

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To search for a reliable anatomical landmark within Koch's triangle to predict the risk of atrioventricular (AV) block during radiofrequency slow pathway catheter ablation of AV nodal re-entrant tachycardia (AVNRT).
PATIENTS AND METHODS—To test the hypothesis that the distal end of the AV nodal artery represents the anatomical location of the AV node, and thus could be a useful landmark for predicting the risk of AV block, 128 consecutive patients with AVNRT receiving slow pathway catheter ablation were prospectively studied in two phases. In phase I (77 patients), angiographic demonstration of the AV nodal artery and its ending was performed at the end of the ablation procedure, whereas in the subsequent phase II study (51 patients), the angiography was performed immediately before catheter ablation to assess the value of identifying this new landmark in reducing the risk of AV block. Multiple electrophysiologic and anatomical parameters were analysed. The former included the atrial activation sequence between the His bundle recording site (HBE) and the coronary sinus orifice or the catheter ablation site, either during AVNRT or during sinus rhythm. The latter included the spatial distances between the distal end of the AV nodal artery and the HBE and the final catheter ablation site, and the distance between the HBE and the tricuspid border at the coronary sinus orifice floor.
RESULTS—In phase I, nine of the 77 patients had complications of transient (seven patients) or permanent (two patients) complete AV block during stepwise, anatomy guided slow pathway catheter ablation. These nine patients had a wider distance between the HBE and the distal end of the AV nodal artery, and a closer approximation of the catheter ablation site to the distal end of the AV nodal artery, which independently predicted the risk of AV block. In contrast, none of the available electrophysiologic parameters were shown to be reliable. When the distance between

  13. Retrieval of a detached transseptal sheath tip from a right pulmonary artery branch following catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Schricker, Amir A; Feld, Gregory K; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2015-11-15

    Transseptal introducer sheaths are being used with increasing frequency for left-sided arrhythmia ablations and structural heart disease interventions. Sheath tip detachment and embolization is an uncommon but known complication, and several sheaths have been recalled due to such complications. We report a unique case of a fractured transseptal sheath tip that embolized to a branch of the right pulmonary artery in a patient who had undergone ablation of a left-sided atypical atrial flutter. During final removal of one of the two long 8.5-French SL1 transseptal sheaths used routinely as part of the ablation, the radiopaque tip of the sheath fractured and first embolized to the right atrium and subsequently to a secondary right pulmonary artery branch. Using techniques derived from percutaneous interventional approaches, including a multipurpose catheter, coronary guidewire, and monorail angioplasty balloon, the sheath tip was successfully wired through its inner lumen, trapped from the inside with the balloon, and removed from the body via a large femoral vein sheath, without complications. The approach detailed in this case may guide future cases and circumvent urgent surgical intervention. PMID:25913843

  14. Initial Results of Catheter-Directed Ultrasound-Accelerated Thrombolysis for Thromboembolic Obstructions of the Aortofemoral Arteries: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schrijver, A. Marjolein; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.; Oostayen, Jacques A. van; Hoksbergen, Arjan W. J.; Lely, Rutger J.; Leersum, Marc van; Vries, Jean-Paul P. M. de

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: This article reports the 30-day technical and clinical outcome of ultrasound (US)-accelerated thrombolysis in patients with aortofemoral arterial thromboembolic obstructions. Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted from December 2008 to December 2009 of patients who were treated with US-accelerated thrombolysis for thromboembolic obstructions of aortofemoral arteries or bypasses. Urokinase was infused in a dosage of 100,000 IU per hour. Twice daily, a control angiography was performed. Thirty-day follow-up consisted of duplex scanning, combined with magnetic resonance angiography. Results: The study included 21 consecutive patients (20 men; median age, 66 (range, 52-80) years) with 24% artery versus 76% bypass occlusions. Median duration of symptoms was 11 (range, 7-140) days. Median occlusion length was 32 (range, 6-80) cm. In 20 patients (95%), an US-accelerated thrombolysis catheter could be successfully placed. In one patient, placement of an US-accelerated thrombolysis catheter was technically not feasible, and therefore a standard catheter was placed. Median thrombolysis time was 26.5 (range, 8.5-72) hours. Complete thrombolysis (>95% lysis of thrombus) was achieved in 20 patients; in 9 patients within 24 hours. Median ankle-brachial index (ABI) increased from 0.28 (range, 0-0.85) to 0.91 (range, 0.58-1.35). One patient had a thromboembolic complication and needed surgical intervention. No hemorrhagic complications, and no deaths occurred. At 30-day follow-up, 17 of 21 patients (81%) had a patent artery or bypass. Conclusions: This feasibility study showed a high technical success rate of US-accelerated thrombolysis for aortofemoral arterial obstructions. US-accelerated thrombolysis led to complete lysis within 24 hours in almost half of patients, with a low 30-day major complication rate.

  15. Fibroepithelial polyp of the prepuce: A rare complication of long-term condom catheter usage

    PubMed Central

    Banerji, John S.; Shah, Sanjeev; Kekre, Nitin S.

    2008-01-01

    External urinary drainage devices are in wide clinical uses. There are only a few reports of complications from improper use of condom catheters. We present a case of fibroepithelial polyp of the penis, due to long-term usage of condom catheter. The lesion affected the ventral aspect of the penis. He was successfully treated with wide local excision. The histopathological diagnosis was a fibroepithelial polyp. PMID:19468410

  16. Pleural effusion with parenteral nutrition solution: an unusual complication of an "appropriately" placed umbilical venous catheter.

    PubMed

    Pabalan, Maria Janina U; Wynn, Ralph J; Reynolds, Anne Marie; Ryan, Rita M; Youssfi, Mostafa; Manja, Veena; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan

    2007-11-01

    Pleural effusion is not an uncommon complication of percutaneous intravenous catheters in neonates. Umbilical venous catheters (UVCs) are associated with pleural effusion following abnormal placement in the left atrium or pulmonary veins due to venous obstruction. We report for the first time a case of right-sided pleural effusion with parenteral nutrition solution following a UVC that appeared to be positioned appropriately in the inferior vena cava. PMID:17972230

  17. Postoperative Life-Threatening Recurrent Ventricular Arrhythmia Triggered by the Swan-Ganz Catheter in a Patient Undergoing Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jooncheol; Choi, Jae-Sung; Oh, Se Jin; Seong, Yong Won; Moon, Hyun Jong; Lee, Jeong Sang

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent ventricular arrhythmia can be fatal and cause serious complications, particularly when it is caused immediately after an operation. Incorrect placement of a Swan-Ganz catheter can trigger life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia, but even intensive care specialists tend to miss this fact. Here, we report a case of recurrent ventricular arrhythmia causing a severe hemodynamic compromise; the arrhythmia was induced by a severely angulated Swan-Ganz catheter. The recurrent ventricular arrhythmia was not controlled by any measures including repositioning of the catheter, until the complete removal of the Swan-Ganz catheter. It is necessary to keep in mind that the position of the pulmonary artery catheter should be promptly checked if there is intractable recurrent ventricular arrhythmia. PMID:25207256

  18. Complications of Lower-Extremity Outpatient Arteriography via Low Brachial Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Chatziioannou, A.; Ladopoulos, C.; Mourikis, D.; Katsenis, K.; Spanomihos, G.; Vlachos, L.

    2004-01-15

    We retrospectively evaluated low brachial artery puncture for arteriography and its complications as an alternative approach route for bilateral lower extremity run-off. Using the Seldinger technique and catheterization with a sheathless 4-F multiple side-hole pigtail catheter, we performed 2250 low brachial artery punctures in outpatients.The right brachial artery (RBA) was successfully punctured in 2039 patients; the left brachial artery (LBA) in 200. The transfemoral approach was used in 11 patients when catheterizing either of brachial arteries failed. Ten major or moderate complications (2 pseudoaneurysms, 2 thrombosis, 1 dissection and 5 hematomas) were encountered. Surgical intervention was necessary in three cases. There were no transient ischemic attacks. Twenty-one patients suffered temporary loss of radial pulse which returned spontaneously in less than 1 hour. One patient demonstrated prolonged loss of pulse which required heparin. Low brachial artery puncture and catheterization at the antecubital fossa is a very safe and cost-effective alternative to the femoral artery approach for lower extremity intra-arterial arteriography in the hands of experienced operators. The success rate in catheterizing one of the brachial arteries was 99.52% with a low significant complications rate of 0.44%. The transbrachial approach should be used as a standard method for lower extremity IA - DSA in an outpatient setting.

  19. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Adults: Novel Drugs and Catheter Ablation Techniques Show Promise? Systematic Review on Pharmacotherapy and Interventional Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Gaudio, Carlo; Greco, Cesare; Keylani, Abdul M.; D'Agostino, Darrin C.

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review aims to provide an update on pharmacological and interventional strategies for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension in adults. Currently US Food and Drug Administration approved drugs including prostanoids, endothelin-receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors, and soluble guanylate-cyclase stimulators. These agents have transformed the prognosis for pulmonary arterial hypertension patients from symptomatic improvements in exercise tolerance ten years ago to delayed disease progression today. On the other hand, percutaneous balloon atrioseptostomy by using radiofrequency perforation, cutting balloon dilatation, or insertion of butterfly stents and pulmonary artery catheter-based denervation, both associated with very low rate of major complications and death, should be considered in combination with specific drugs at an earlier stage rather than late in the progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension and before the occurrence of overt right-sided heart failure. PMID:25013799

  20. Epidemiology of haemodialysis catheter complications: a survey of 865 dialysis patients from 14 haemodialysis centres in Henan province in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Wang, Pei; Liang, Xianhui; Lu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Zhangsuo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the incidence rates and risk factors for catheter-related complications in different districts and populations in Henan Province in China. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Fourteen hospitals in Henan Province. Participants 865 patients with renal dysfunction undergoing dialysis using catheters between October 2013 and October 2014. Main outcome measures The main outcome measures were complications, risk factors and patient characteristics. Catheter-related complications included catheter-related infection (catheter exit-site infection, catheter tunnel infection and catheter-related bloodstream infection), catheter dysfunction (thrombosis, catheter malposition or kinking, and fibrin shell formation) and central vein stenosis. Results The overall incidence rate was 7.74/1000 catheter-days, affecting 38.61% of all patients, for catheter infections, 10.58/1000 catheter-days, affecting 56.65% of all patients, for catheter dysfunction, and 0.68/1000 catheter-days, affecting 8.79% of all patients, for central vein stenosis. Multivariate analysis showed that increased age, diabetes, primary educational level or below, rural residence, lack of a nephropathy visit before dialysis and pre-established permanent vascular access, not taking oral drugs to prevent catheter thrombus, lower serum albumin levels and higher ferritin levels were independently associated with catheter infections. Rural residence, not taking oral drugs to prevent thrombus, lack of an imaging examination after catheter insertion, non-tunnel catheter type, lack of medical insurance, lack of nephropathy visit before dialysis and pre-established permanent vascular access, left-sided catheter position, access via the femoral vein and lower haemoglobin level were independently associated with catheter dysfunction. Diabetes, lack of nephropathy visit before dialysis and pre-established permanent vascular access, lack of oral drugs to prevent catheter thrombus, left-sided catheter

  1. Minimally Invasive Catheter Procedures to Assist Complicated Pacemaker Lead Extraction and Implantation in the Operating Room

    SciTech Connect

    Kroepil, Patric; Lanzman, Rotem S. Miese, Falk R.; Blondin, Dirk; Winter, Joachim; Scherer, Axel; Fuerst, Guenter

    2011-04-15

    We report on percutaneous catheter procedures in the operating room (OR) to assist complicated manual extraction or insertion of pacemaker (PM) and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads. We retrospectively reviewed complicated PM revisions and implantations performed between 2004 and 2009 that required percutaneous catheter procedures performed in the OR. The type of interventional procedure, catheter and retrieval system used, venous access, success rates, and procedural complications were analyzed. In 41 (12 female and 29 male [mean age 62 {+-} 17 years]) of 3021 (1.4%) patients, standard manual retrieval of old leads or insertion of new leads was not achievable and thus required percutaneous catheter intervention for retrieval of misplaced leads and/or recanalisation of occluded central veins. Thirteen of 18 (72.2%) catheter-guided retrieval procedures for misplaced (right atrium [RA] or ventricle [RV; n = 3], superior vena cava [n = 2], brachiocephalic vein [n = 5], and subclavian vein [n = 3]) lead fragments in 16 patients were successful. Percutaneous catheter retrieval failed in five patients because there were extremely fixed or adhered lead fragments. Percutaneous transluminal angiography (PTA) of central veins for occlusion or high-grade stenosis was performed in 25 patients. In 22 of 25 patients (88%), recanalization of central veins was successful, thus enabling subsequent lead replacement. Major periprocedural complications were not observed. In the case of complicated manual PM lead implantation or revision, percutaneous catheter-guided extraction of misplaced lead fragments or recanalisation of central veins can be performed safely in the OR, thus enabling subsequent implantation or revision of PM systems in the majority of patients.

  2. Emergent Right Coronary Artery Thrombectomy with a Jet Aspiration Thrombectomy Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Teiyu; Furui, Shigeru; Isshiki, Takaaki; Toyoizumi, Hideki; Kohtake, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Kohji; Suzuki, Shigeru; Harasawa, Arimi; Sasaki, Yasushi

    1999-07-15

    A saline-jet aspiration thrombectomy (JAT) catheter was used in a patient with acute myocardial infarction. A right coronary arteriogram showed complete thrombotic occlusion at the proximal segment. With this catheter the thrombus was removed without complications in 5 sec. The patient underwent percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and placement of a Palmaz-Schatz stent after successful thrombectomy. Thrombectomy with a JAT catheter was very useful in this patient.0.

  3. Clinical complications of urinary catheters caused by crystalline biofilms: something needs to be done.

    PubMed

    Stickler, D J

    2014-08-01

    This review is largely based on a previous paper published in the journal Spinal Cord. The care of many patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterization is complicated by encrustation and blockage of their Foley catheters. This problem stems from infection by urease-producing bacteria, particularly Proteus mirabilis. These organisms colonize the catheter forming an extensive biofilm; they also generate ammonia from urea, thus elevating the pH of urine. As the pH rises, crystals of calcium and magnesium phosphates precipitate in the urine and in the catheter biofilm. The continued development of this crystalline biofilm blocks the flow of urine through the catheter. Urine then either leaks along the outside of the catheter and the patient becomes incontinent or is retained causing painful distension of the bladder and reflux of urine to the kidneys. The process of crystal deposition can also initiate stone formation. Most patients suffering from recurrent catheter encrustation develop bladder stones. P. mirabilis establishes stable residence in these stones and is extremely difficult to eliminate from the catheterized urinary tract by antibiotic therapy. If blocked catheters are not identified and changed, serious symptomatic episodes of pyelonephritis, septicaemia and endotoxic shock can result. All types of Foley catheters including silver- or nitrofurazone-coated devices are vulnerable to this problem. In this review, the ways in which biofilm formation on Foley catheters is initiated by P. mirabilis will be described. The implications of understanding these mechanisms for the development of an encrustation-resistant catheter will be discussed. Finally, the way forward for the prevention and control of this problem will be considered. PMID:24635559

  4. Cross-sectional imaging of thoracic and abdominal complications of cerebrospinal fluid shunt catheters.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Ferdia; Fardanesh, Reza; Morgan, Tara; Katz, Douglas S; Daly, Barry

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to review the imaging findings of distal (thoracic and abdominal) complications related to ventriculo-peritoneal (VP), ventriculo-pleural (VPL), and ventriculo-atrial (VA) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt catheter placement. Institution review board-approved single-center study of patients with thoracic and abdominal CSF catheter-related complications on cross-sectional imaging examinations over a 14-year period was performed. Clinical presentation, patient demographics, prior medical history, and subsequent surgical treatment were recorded. The presence or absence of CSF catheter-related infection and/or acute hydrocephalus on cross-sectional imaging was also recorded. There were 81 distal CSF catheter-related complications identified on 47 thoracic or abdominal imaging examinations in 30 patients (age 5-80 years, mean 39.3 years), most often on CT (CT = 42, MRI = 1, US = 4). Complications included 38 intraperitoneal and 11 extraperitoneal fluid collections. Extraperitoneal collections included nine abdominal wall subcutaneous (SC) pseudocysts associated with shunt migration and obesity, an intrapleural pseudocyst, and a breast pseudocyst. There were also two large VPL-related pleural effusions, a fractured catheter in the SC tissues, and a large VA shunt thrombus within the right atrium. Ten patients (33.3 %) had culture-positive infection from CSF or shunt catheter samples. Ten patients (33.3 %) had features of temporally related acute or worsening hydrocephalus on neuroimaging. In four of these patients, the detection of thoracic and abdominal complications on CT preceded and predicted the findings of acute hydrocephalus on cranial imaging. Thoracic and abdominal complications of CSF shunts, as can be identified on CT,  include shunt infection and/or obstruction, may be both multiple and recurrent, and may be predictive of concurrent acute intracranial problems. PMID:26610766

  5. Complications of central venous catheter in patients transplanted with hematopoietic stem cells in a specialized service

    PubMed Central

    Barretta, Lidiane Miotto; Beccaria, Lúcia Marinilza; Cesarino, Cláudia Bernardi; Pinto, Maria Helena

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the model, average length of stay on site and complications of central venous catheter in patients undergoing transplant of hematopoietic stem cells and verify the corresponding relationship between the variables: age, gender, medical diagnosis, type of transplant, implanted catheter and insertion site. Method: a retrospective and quantitative study with a sample of 188 patients transplanted records between 2007 and 2011. Results: the majority of patients used Hickman catheter with an average length of stay on site of 47.6 days. The complication fever/bacteremia was significant in young males with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma undergoing autologous transplant, which remained with the device for a long period in the subclavian vein. Conclusion: nurses should plan with their team the minimum waiting time, recommended between the catheter insertion and start of the conditioning regimen, as well as not to extend the length of time that catheter should be on site and undertake their continuing education, focusing on the prevention of complications. PMID:27276021

  6. Umbilical catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... pregnancy. Two arteries and one vein in the umbilical cord carry blood back and forth. If the ... catheter is a long, soft, hollow tube. An umbilical artery catheter (UAC) allows blood to be taken ...

  7. A novel approach using Neuron 6F guiding catheter for the embolization of intracranial aneurysm with coiling of the parent internal carotid artery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Donghai; Wang, Ying; Su, Wandong; Wang, Yunyan; Li, Gang; Li, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    To describe our initial experience and early outcomes with distal placement of the Neuron 6F guiding catheter through coiled ICA for aneurysmal EVT. We examined the utility of the Neuronf 70 6F guiding catheter for the embolization procedure in such cases, fourteen cases of aneurysm with coiling of the parent ICA are presented via traditional guiding catheters. With the support of 8F ENVOY guiding catheter as a shuttle sheath, the NeuronTM 70 6F guiding catheter was successfully placed through coiled extracranial ICA, so the mirocatheter could be delivered to a more strategic position for embolization of the aneurysm. Coiling of extracranial ICA was found as parent artery on angiogram in all patients with ruptured aneurysms. Even where there were two curvatures of more than 360° in the coiled segment of the ICA, NeuronTM 70 6F guiding catheter could be placed through the coiling to a distal position and enabled EVT of intracranial aneurysms with no related neurological complications. Neuron guiding catheter is a useful device for embolization of aneurysm where there is coiling of parent ICA, easily placed through the coiling of the ICA and provided robust anatomical support via enhanced catheter-to-vessel wall engagement. PMID:25785169

  8. A novel approach using Neuron 6F guiding catheter for the embolization of intracranial aneurysm with coiling of the parent internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Donghai; Wang, Ying; Su, Wandong; Wang, Yunyan; Li, Gang; Li, Xingang

    2015-01-01

    To describe our initial experience and early outcomes with distal placement of the Neuron 6F guiding catheter through coiled ICA for aneurysmal EVT. We examined the utility of the Neuronf 70 6F guiding catheter for the embolization procedure in such cases, fourteen cases of aneurysm with coiling of the parent ICA are presented via traditional guiding catheters. With the support of 8F ENVOY guiding catheter as a shuttle sheath, the Neuron(TM) 70 6F guiding catheter was successfully placed through coiled extracranial ICA, so the mirocatheter could be delivered to a more strategic position for embolization of the aneurysm. Coiling of extracranial ICA was found as parent artery on angiogram in all patients with ruptured aneurysms. Even where there were two curvatures of more than 360° in the coiled segment of the ICA, Neuron(TM) 70 6F guiding catheter could be placed through the coiling to a distal position and enabled EVT of intracranial aneurysms with no related neurological complications. Neuron guiding catheter is a useful device for embolization of aneurysm where there is coiling of parent ICA, easily placed through the coiling of the ICA and provided robust anatomical support via enhanced catheter-to-vessel wall engagement. PMID:25785169

  9. [A Case of Delayed Vascular Injury as a Complication Related to Implanted Central Venous Port Catheter].

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Tetsuya; Kondo, Tomohiro; Fujii, Ryoji; Minagawa, Takeyoshi; Fujie, Shinya; Kimura, Tomohiro; Ihara, Hideyuki; Yoshizaki, Naohito; Kondo, Hitoshi; Kitayama, Hiromitsu; Sugiyama, Junko; Hirayama, Michiaki; Tsuji, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawarada, You; Okushiba, Shunichi; Nishioka, Noriko; Shimizu, Tadashi

    2015-12-01

    A 74-year-old woman with advanced gastric cancer was admitted to our hospital. A central venous (CV) port catheter was implanted into the right subclavian vein for preoperative chemotherapy and parenteral nutritional management. On the 35th day after implantation, she complained of diarrhea, fever and dyspnea. The chest radiograph showed a right-sided massive pleural effusion. As the patient progressively fell into severe respiratory distress, endotracheal intubation was performed for management of respiration by mechanical ventilation. Initially, given the patient's symptoms, she was diagnosed with septic shock. Therefore, after placement of a CV catheter through the right femoral vein, in consideration of the possibility of a port infection, she was treated with thoracentesis and infusion of antibiotics. The patient gradually recovered, and again received parenteral nutrition through the CV port catheter. After the infusion was administered, she complained of dyspnea. A CT scan of the chest revealed a right pleural effusion and displacement of the tip of the CV port catheter out of the wall of the superior vena cava. We diagnosed delayed vascular injury (DVI), and the CV port catheter was removed. She soon recovered with conservative treatment. We speculated that the initial respiratory symptoms such as the pleural effusion were caused by DVI. DVI should therefore be recognized as a complication related to implanted CV port catheters. PMID:26809313

  10. Complicated Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections Due to Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, S. M.; Stickler, D. J.; Mobley, H. L. T.; Shirtliff, M. E.

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) represent the most common type of nosocomial infection and are a major health concern due to the complications and frequent recurrence. These infections are often caused by Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis. Gram-negative bacterial species that cause CAUTIs express a number of virulence factors associated with adhesion, motility, biofilm formation, immunoavoidance, and nutrient acquisition as well as factors that cause damage to the host. These infections can be reduced by limiting catheter usage and ensuring that health care professionals correctly use closed-system Foley catheters. A number of novel approaches such as condom and suprapubic catheters, intermittent catheterization, new surfaces, catheters with antimicrobial agents, and probiotics have thus far met with limited success. While the diagnosis of symptomatic versus asymptomatic CAUTIs may be a contentious issue, it is generally agreed that once a catheterized patient is believed to have a symptomatic urinary tract infection, the catheter is removed if possible due to the high rate of relapse. Research focusing on the pathogenesis of CAUTIs will lead to a better understanding of the disease process and will subsequently lead to the development of new diagnosis, prevention, and treatment options. PMID:18202436

  11. Inadvertent subclavian artery cannulation with a central venous catheter; successful retrieval using a minimally invasive technique.

    PubMed

    Redmond, C E; O'Donohoe, R; Breslin, D; Brophy, D P

    2014-10-01

    A 48-year-old lady was referred to our department as an emergency following an unsuccessful attempt at central venous catheter insertion, resulting in cannulation of the subclavian artery. She underwent angiography with removal of the catheter and closure of the arteriotomy using an Angio-Seal device. While the optimal management of this scenario has yet to be defined, the use of this minimally invasive technique warrants consideration. PMID:25507120

  12. Inadvertent subclavian artery cannulation with a central venous catheter; successful retrieval using a minimally invasive technique.

    PubMed

    Redmond, C E; O'Donohoe, R; Breslin, D; Brophy, D P

    2014-10-01

    A 48-year-old lady was referred to our department as an emergency following an unsuccessful attempt at central venous catheter insertion, resulting in cannulation of the subclavian artery. She underwent angiography with removal of the catheter and closure of the arteriotomy using an Angio-Seal device. While the optimal management of this scenario has yet to be defined, the use of this minimally invasive technique warrants consideration. PMID:25417392

  13. An analysis of the factors influencing pulmonary artery catheter placement in anesthetized patients

    PubMed Central

    Hakata, Saya; Ota, Chiho; Kato, Yoshiko; Fujino, Yuji; Kamibayashi, Takahiko; Hayashi, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary artery catheters are usually placed by resident anesthesiologists with pressure wave monitoring from educational point of view. In some cases, the placement needs longer time or is difficult only by observing the pressure waves. Aims: We sought to examine the time required for the catheter placement in adult patients and determine factors influencing the placement. Settings and Designs: Prospective, observational, cohort study. Methods: We examined the time required for the catheter placement. If the catheter is placed in longer than 5 min, this could be a difficult placement. We examined the effect of the patient's age, body mass index, cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) and tricuspid regurgitation, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and training duration of a resident on the difficult catheter placement. Next, we excluded the difficult cases from the analysis and examined the effect of these factors on the placement time. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed by logistic regression analysis to assess factors for the difficult catheter placement and multiple linear regression analysis to evaluate the factors to increase the placement time after univariate analyses. Results: The difficult placement occurred in 6 patients (5.7%). The analysis showed that LVEF was a significant factor to hinder the catheter placement (P = 0.02) while CTR was a significant factor to increase the placement time (P = 0.002). Conclusion: LVEF and CTRs are significant factors to be associated with the difficult catheter placement and to increase the placement time, respectively. PMID:26440231

  14. An Indwelling Urethral Catheter Knotted Around a Double-J Ureteral Stent: An Unusual Complication after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Warmerdam, E. G.; Toorop, R. J.; Abrahams, A. C.; Berger, P.

    2011-01-01

    Urethral catheterization is a common procedure with a relatively low complication rate. Knotting of an indwelling urethral catheter is a very rare complication, and there are only a few case reports on knotted catheters, most of them concerning children. We report an especially rare case where a urethral catheter formed a knot around a double-J ureteral stent after a kidney transplantation. We will discuss the various risk factors for knotting of a catheter and the methods to untangle a knot. PMID:24533194

  15. A Case of Gastro-Duodenal Artery Aneurism: Treatment and Complications.

    PubMed

    Gassend, Jean-Loup; Dimitrief, Maria; Chan, Hon Lai; Roulet, Daniel; Trachsel, Lysiane; Doenz, Francesco; Cherbanyk, Floryn

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 75-year-old patient with asymptomatic gastro-duodenal artery aneurism (GAA) that was coiled through the left femoral artery. The gastro-duodenal artery (GDA) was then embolized. Following the intervention, the patient'™s left foot became cold. A sub-acute ischemia caused by a stenotic effect in the left external iliac artery and by lower limb embolic phenomena caused by the introductor, was diagnosed. A thromboembolectomy of the popliteal, anterior and posterior tibial and peroneal arteries was performed with a Fogarty catheter with good results. Aneurisms of the GDA are rare. Rupture is a severe and unpredictable complication that complicates management and darkens prognosis. Though endovascular treatment for splanchnic aneurisms are used more and more often and offers numerous advantages compared to surgery, it is not without risk. A multidisciplinary approach with careful collaboration between the surgeon and the radiologist is recommended. Abbreviattions: GAA: gastro-duodenal artery aneurism, GDA: gastro-duodenal artery. PMID:27604672

  16. Infectious Complications of Radiologically Inserted Hickman Catheters in Patients with Hematologic Disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, Jeannette; Overhagen, Hans van; Wielenga, Jenne; Marie, Siem de; Nouwen, Jan; Ridder, Marie A.J. de; Lameris, Johan S.

    1998-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of infections and its influence on the survival of radiologically inserted Hickman catheters (HCs) in patients with hematologic disorders and to determine factors associated with premature HC removal. Methods: Survival and complications of 175 HCs in 115 patients were studied retrospectively. To describe the data the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test were used, using the date of HC removal due to HC-related infection as endpoint. A stratified Cox regression model was used to determine explanatory factors. Results: Seventy (40%) HCs were removed prematurely because of proven or probable HC-related infections. The incidence of infection leading to HC removal was 4.78 per 1000 catheter-days for proven HC infections. Univariate analysis revealed that acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphocytic leukemia, or treatment for these diseases, gender, each subsequent catheter in the same patient and insertion site increased the risk of premature removal of the catheter due to infection. Conclusion: Infection is a major problem in patients with HCs. Unfortunately, the factors associated with increased infection rates that were found in this study cannot be influenced. Further studies are necessary to determine the role of environmental conditions in a radiology suite in relation to the risk of developing a catheter-related infection.

  17. Screening for carotid artery stenosis and renal artery stenosis in patients undergoing tunneled cuffed hemodialysis catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Roy; Hingorani, Anil; Marks, Natalie; Ascher, Enrico; Jimenez, Robert; Aboian, Ed; McIntyre, Thom; Jacob, Theresa

    2012-07-01

    In this study, we noted the common risk factors with atherosclerosis and chronic renal disease. We, therefore, hypothesized that the placement of a dialysis catheter would be a useful marker in identifying populations at increased risk of vascular disease (carotid, renal, and aortic). To further explore this issue, we examined the results of duplex scanning of the carotid arteries and aortorenal arteries in patients undergoing dialysis catheter placement. Over 49 months, each of the 123 patients who underwent permanent tunneled dialysis catheter placement received a carotid duplex study. Twelve patients (9.8%) had ≥ 60% stenosis and 8 patients (6.5%) had 70% to 99% stenosis. Furthermore, 109 patients who underwent a aortorenal artery duplex study were also analyzed. The study population demonstrated a prevalence rate of 3.7% for abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA) and 4.6% for renal artery stenosis (RAS). Based upon these data, we suggest performing routine carotid duplex scans in patients who will also receive dialysis catheter placement. However, the data did not support routine screening of AAA or RAS. PMID:22730399

  18. Steam-deformed Judkins-left guiding catheter with use of the GuideLiner® catheter to deliver stents for anomalous right coronary artery

    PubMed Central

    Kuno, Toshiki; Fujisawa, Taishi; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Motoda, Hiroyuki; Kodaira, Masaki; Numasawa, Yohei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Percutaneous coronary intervention for anomalous right coronary artery (RCA) originating from the left coronary cusp is challenging because of our current inability to coaxially engage the guiding catheter. Methods: We report a case of an 88-year-old woman with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, with an anomalous RCA origin. Using either the Judkins-Left catheter or Amplatz-Left catheter was difficult because of RCA ostium tortuosity. Thus, we used steam to deform the Judkins-Left catheter, but back-up support was insufficient to deliver the stent. Results: We used GuideLiner®, a novel pediatric catheter with rapid exchange/monorail systems, to enhance back-up support. Conclusions: We were able to successfully stent with both the deformed Judkins-Left guiding catheter and GuideLiner® for an anomalous RCA origin. PMID:27489700

  19. Is Acute Carotid Artery Stent Thrombosis an Avoidable Complication?

    PubMed

    Köklü, Erkan; Yüksel, İsa Öner; Bayar, Nermin; Arslan, Şakir

    2015-10-01

    The most serious complication of carotid artery stenting (CAS) is acute carotid artery stent thrombosis (ACAST). ACAST is a very rare complication, but it may lead to dramatic and catastrophic consequences. The most important cause is inadequate or ineffective antiaggregant therapy. It is very important to identify, before CAS, those patients who might be candidates for ACAST and to start antiplatelet therapy for them. Testing patients who are candidates for CAS for acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel resistance may prevent this complication. PMID:26303788

  20. Modified dual guide catheter ("ping-pong") technique to treat left internal mammary artery graft perforation.

    PubMed

    Assad-Kottner, Christian; Hakeem, Abdul; Uretsky, Barry F

    2015-07-01

    Perforation of a left internal mammary artery (LIMA) graft during percutaneous coronary intervention is a rare event. We report a case of mid-LIMA perforation treated by a polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent using a modification of the dual catheter ("ping pong") technique. We propose that use of this modification when possible will further improve safety of treating a perforation. PMID:25044448

  1. Association between Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Insertion Site and Complication Rates in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Rani A; Swarnam, Kamala; Vayalthrikkovil, Sakeer; Yee, Wendy; Soraisham, Amuchou S

    2016-08-01

    Objective To examine whether there is an association between peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) insertion site and complication rates among preterm infants. Design We performed a retrospective analysis of the first PICCs placed in preterm infants in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit between January 2006 and December 2010. The PICC-related complications resulting in catheter removal were compared based on site of insertion. Results Of the 827 PICCs, 593 (72%) were inserted in upper extremity. Lower extremity PICC group infants had higher illness severity (SNAP-II) score and more likely to be inserted later as compared with the upper extremity group. There was no significant difference in the total PICC-related complications between upper and lower extremity PICCs (31.3 vs. 26%; p > 0.05). Logistic regression analysis after adjusting for gestational age, day of line insertion, and SNAP-II score revealed that upper extremity PICCs were associated with increased risk of line infiltration (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-4.29) but not the total PICC complication (aOR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.91-1.83). Conclusion There is no difference in total PICC-related complication between upper and lower extremity PICCs; however, the PICC-related mechanical complications vary depending on the site of insertion in preterm infants. PMID:27057766

  2. Periprocedural anticoagulation of patients undergoing pericardiocentesis for cardiac tamponade complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Bai, Rong; Chen, Ying-wei; Yu, Rong-hui; Tang, Ri-bo; Sang, Cai-hua; Li, Song-nan; Ma, Chang-sheng; Dong, Jian-zeng

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation of patients with cardiac tamponade (CT) complicating catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) is an ongoing problem. The aim of this study was to survey the clinical practice of periprocedural anticoagulation in such patients. This study analyzed the periprocedural anticoagulation of 17 patients with CT complicating AF ablation. Emergent pericardiocentesis was performed once CT was confirmed. The mean drained volume was 410.0 ± 194.1 mL. Protamine sulfate was administered to neutralize heparin (1 mg neutralizes 100 units heparin) in 11 patients with persistent pericardial bleeding and vitamin K1 (10 mg) was given to reverse warfarin in 3 patients with supratherapeutic INR (INR > 2.1). Drainage catheters were removed 12 hours after echocardiography confirmed absence of intrapericardial bleeding and anticoagulation therapy was restored 12 hours after removing the catheter. Fifteen patients took oral warfarin and 10 of them were given subcutaneous injection of LMWH (1 mg/kg, twice daily) as a bridge to resumption of systemic anticoagulation with warfarin. Two patients with a small amount of persistent pericardial effusion were given LMWH on days 5 and 13, and warfarin on days 6 and 24. The dosage of warfarin was adjusted to keep the INR within 2-3 in all patients. After 12 months of follow-up, all patients had no neurological events and no occurrence of delayed CT. The results showed that it was effective and safe to resume anticoagulation therapy 12 hours after removal of the drainage catheter. This may help to prevent thromboembolic events following catheter ablation of AF. PMID:25503659

  3. Catheter fragmentation of acute massive pulmonary thromboembolism: distal embolisation and pulmonary arterial pressure elevation.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, K; Tajima, H; Murata, S; Kumita, S-I; Yamamoto, T; Tanaka, K

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between pulmonary arterial pressure and distal embolisation during catheter fragmentation for the treatment of acute massive pulmonary thromboembolism with haemodynamic impairment. 25 patients with haemodynamic impairment (8 men and 17 women; aged 27-82 years) were treated by mechanical thrombus fragmentation with a modified rotating pigtail catheter. After thrombus fragmentation, all patients received local fibrinolytic therapy, followed by manual clot aspiration using a percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) guide catheter. Pulmonary arterial pressure was continuously recorded during the procedure. The Friedman test and Wilcoxon test were applied for statistical analysis. Distal embolisation was confirmed by digital subtraction angiography in 7 of the 25 patients. A significant rise in mean pulmonary arterial pressure occurred after thrombus fragmentation (before: 34.1 mmHg; after: 37.9 mmHg; p<0.05), and this group showed a significant decrease in mean pulmonary arterial pressure after thrombus aspiration (25.7 mmHg; p<0.05). No distal embolisation was seen in 18 of the 25 patients, and a significant decrease in mean pulmonary arterial pressure was confirmed after thrombus fragmentation (before: 34.2 mmHg; after: 28.1 mmHg: p<0.01), and after thrombus aspiration (23.3 mmHg; p<0.01). In conclusion, distal embolisation and a rise in pulmonary arterial pressure can occur during mechanical fragmentation using a rotating pigtail catheter for the treatment of life-threatening acute massive pulmonary thromboembolism; thrombolysis and thrombus aspiration can provide partial recanalization and haemodynamic stabilization. Continuous monitoring of pulmonary arterial pressure may contribute to the safety of these interventional procedures. PMID:18941044

  4. Pulmonary artery--bronchial fistula: a new complication of Swan-Ganz catheterization.

    PubMed

    Rubin, S A; Puckett, R P

    1979-04-01

    A patient with a Swan-Ganz catheter developed massive hemoptysis. Injection of radiographic contrast media through the catheter revealed rapid filling of the tracheo-bronchial tree, consistent with direct pulmonary artery-bronchial communication. Development of hemoptysis in a patient with a Swan-Ganz catheter should alert the clinician to this possibility. PMID:446146

  5. [Bilateral popliteal artery complications of multiple hereditary exostosis].

    PubMed

    Chaouch, N; Alimi, F; Kortas, C; Limayem, F; Braham, A; Mlika, Sinan; Jerbi, S; Ennabli, K

    2011-04-01

    The osseous exostose is a rare benign tumor of the bone from which the vascular complications can be of venous or arterial order, are translated in various boards. We report the case of a young adult who presents a forgery aneurysm of the right popliteal artery with the popliteal artery booby-trapped to the left. The patient benefited from surgical treatment with good clinical and radiological evolution. PMID:21277562

  6. Neurological Complications Comparing Endoscopically vs. Open Harvest of the Radial Artery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Complications Due to Coronary Artery Bypass Graft; Coronary Artery Disease; Myocardial Ischemia; Coronary Disease; Heart Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Arteriosclerosis; Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Vascular Diseases

  7. An ultrastructural study of the intimal injury induced by an indwelling umbilical artery catheter.

    PubMed

    Chidi, C C; King, D R; Boles, E T

    1983-04-01

    In an experimental study, catheterization of the abdominal aorta with small umbilical artery catheters consistently produced significant intimal injury. The duration of catheterization varied from 1 hr to 7 days, and recovery periods following catheter removal varied from 1-150 days. Endothelial disruption was observed in all animals sacrificed within 24 hr of catheter removal. Healing progressed rapidly when the duration of catheterization was short, but was protracted with longer periods of catheterization. Thrombi were frequently found adhering to the exposed subendothelial surface. Routine light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated consistent cellular changes, which depended upon the duration of catheterization and the length of recovery periods. A consistent relationship between the degree of intimal injury and the duration of catheterization was observed. PMID:6854485

  8. [Time-delay to avoid: delayed recovery of a percutaneous central venous catheter fractured and embolized in the pulmonary artery].

    PubMed

    Sauro, Luigi; Sauro, Rosario; Manganelli, Fiore; Rotondi, Francesco

    2011-11-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old man with a fracture of the catheter of a port-a-cath, dislodged into the right atrium. Two days after the diagnosis, the fragment embolized into the lobar artery of the left lower lung lobe. The catheter was removed using a gooseneck snare. PMID:22120781

  9. Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Complications in Children Receiving Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy (OPAT).

    PubMed

    Kovacich, Amanda; Tamma, Pranita D; Advani, Sonali; Popoola, Victor O; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Gosey, Leslie; Milstone, Aaron M

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify the frequency of and risk factors associated with complications necessitating removal of the peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in patients receiving outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) and to determine the appropriateness of OPAT in children with OPAT-related complications. METHODS A retrospective cohort of children who had a PICC inserted at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2013, and were discharged from the hospital on OPAT was assembled. RESULTS A total of 1,465 PICCs were used to provide antibiotic therapy for 955 children after hospital discharge. Among these, 117 PICCs (8%) required removal due to a complication (4.6 of 1,000 catheter days). Children discharged to a long-term care facility were at increased risk of adverse PICC events (incidence risk ratio [IRR], 3.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.79-6.17). For children receiving OPAT, age of the child (adjusted IRR [aIRR], 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98), noncentral PICC tip location (aIRR, 2.82; 95% CI, 1.66-4.82), and public insurance (aIRR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.10-2.40) were associated with adverse PICC events. In addition, 34 patients (32%) with adverse events may not have required intravenous antibiotics at the time of hospital discharge. CONCLUSIONS Of children discharged with PICCs on OPAT during the study period, 8% developed a complication necessitating PICC removal. Children discharged to a long-term care facility had an increased rate of complication compared with children who were discharged home. With improved education regarding appropriate duration of antibiotic therapy and situations in which early conversion to enteral therapy should be considered, PICC-related complications may have been avoided in 32% of children. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(4):420-424. PMID:26961677

  10. Transcatheter arterial embolization - major complications and their prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, F.J. Jr.; Mineau, D.E.

    1983-08-01

    A thorough account is given of the complications of embolization techniques in nonneurovascular areas, including hepatic infarction, renal and splenic abscess formation. Infarction of the urinary bladder, gallbladder, stomach, and bowel are discussed. Suggestions are offered to prevent complications from embolization where possible. Specific agents for embolization are detailed and their relative merits are compared; ethyl alcohol has recently gained popularity for treating esophageal varices and infarcting renal tumors. Care is advocated when using alcohol in the renal arteries; employing this agent is currently contraindicated in the celiac and mesenteric arteries. Coils and balloon systems are also described along with their potential complications.

  11. Impact of Multislice CT Angiography on Planning of Radiological Catheter Placement for Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sone, Miyuki Kato, Kenichi; Hirose, Atsuo; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Tomabechi, Makiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Hanari, Takao

    2008-01-15

    The objective of this study was to assess prospectively the role of multislice CT angiography (MSCTA) on planning of radiological catheter placement for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC). Forty-six patients with malignant liver tumors planned for HAIC were included. In each patient, both MSCTA and intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were performed, except one patient who did not undergo DSA. Comparison of MSCTA and DSA images was performed for the remaining 45 patients. Detectability of anatomical variants of the hepatic artery, course of the celiac trunk, visualization scores of arterial branches and interobserver agreement, presence of arterial stenosis, and technical outcome were evaluated. Anatomical variations of the hepatic artery were detected in 19 of 45 patients (42%) on both modalities. The course of the celiac trunk was different in 12 patients. The visualization scores of celiac arterial branches on MSCTA/DSA were 3.0 {+-} 0/2.9 {+-} 0.2 in the celiac trunk, 3.0 {+-} 0/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the common hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.2/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the proper hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.3/2.9 {+-} 0.4 in the right hepatic artery, 2.8 {+-} 0.4/2.9 {+-} 0.4 in the left hepatic artery, 2.9 {+-} 0.2/2.9 {+-} 0.3 in the gastroduodenal artery, 2.1 {+-} 0.8/2.2 {+-} 0.9 in the right gastric artery, and 2.7 {+-} 0.8/2.6 {+-} 0.8 in the left gastric artery. No statistically significant differences exist between the two modalities. Interobserver agreement for MSCTA was equivalent to that for DSA. Two patients showed stenosis of the celiac trunk on both modalities. Based on these imaging findings, technical success was accomplished in all patients. In conclusion, MSCTA is accurate in assessing arterial anatomy and abnormalities. MSCTA can provide adequate information for planning of radiological catheter placement for HAIC.

  12. Clinical Application of a New Indwelling Catheter with a Side-Hole and Spirally Arranged Shape-Memory Alloy for Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yagihashi, Kunihiro Takizawa, Kenji; Ogawa, Yukihisa; Okamoto, Kyoko; Yoshimatsu, Misako; Fujikawa, Atsuko; Shimamoto, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2010-12-15

    A new indwelling catheter, G-spiral (GSP), was developed for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) by way of an implanted catheter-port system (CPS). Here we evaluated its physical properties and the outcomes of its clinical use. The GSP vessel-fixing power and its ability to follow a guidewire were determined with a vascular in vitro model, and Student t test was used to determine statistical significance (P < 0.05). A retrospective analysis was performed to evaluate the technical success rate and to identify the clinical complications associated with radiologic CPS implantation with GSP in 65 patients with unresectable hepatic tumors. The mean vessel-fixing power of the GSP (14.4 g) significantly differed from that of a GSP with a cut shape-memory alloy (3.3 g). The mean resistance to following the guidewire displayed by the GSP (88.5 g) was significantly less than that for a 5F W-spiral (106.3 g) or 4F Cobra-type angiographic catheter (117.8 g). The CPS was placed successfully in 64 of 65 cases (98.5%). Hepatic artery occlusion was observed in one case. Occlusion, cracking, and infection of CPS were observed in one, two, and one case, respectively. The GSP is a highly useful indwelling catheter that can be used for HAIC.

  13. Evaluation of a New Balloon Catheter for Difficult Calcified Lesions in Infrainguinal Arterial Disease: Outcome of a Multicenter Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Spaargaren, G. J.; Lee, M. J.; Reekers, J. A.; Overhagen, H. van; Schultze Kool, L. J.; Hoogeveen, Y. L.

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the technical performance and immediate procedure outcome of a new balloon catheter in the treatment of calcified lesions in infrainguinal arterial disease. Seventy-five patients with infrainguinal arterial disease were prospectively entered into the registry. The catheter (ReeKross Clearstream, Ireland) is a 5- to 6-Fr balloon catheter with a rigid shaft intended for enhanced pushability. Only technical procedural outcome was recorded. Treated calcified lesions (range: 5-30 cm), assessed angiographically, were located in the superficial femoral, popliteal, and crural arteries. In 67 patients the lesion was an occlusion. Guidewire passage occurred subintimally in 68 patients. In 24 patients a standard balloon catheter was chosen as first treatment catheter: 5 failed to cross the lesion, 8 balloons ruptured, and in 11 patients there was an inadequate dilatation result. In only one of the five patients did subsequent use of the ReeKross catheter also fail in lesion crossing. The ReeKross was successful as secondary catheter in the other 23 cases. In 50 patients the ReeKross was used as primary catheter. In total the ReeKross crossed the lesions in 74 patients. After passage and dilatation with this catheter in 73 patients (1 failed true-lumen reentry), 19 had >30% residual lesions, of which 11 were not treated and 8 were successfully stented. No ReeKross balloons ruptured. We conclude that in the treatment of difficult calcified lesions in arterial stenotic or occlusive disease, the choice of a high-pushability angioplasty catheter, with more calcification-resistant balloon characteristics, like the ReeKross, warrants consideration.

  14. Inferior phrenic artery pseudoaneurysm complicating drug-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Salem, Jean F; Haydar, Ali; Hallal, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Inferior phrenic artery (IPA) pseudoaneurysm is an extremely rare complication of chronic pancreatitis with only three cases reported in the literature so far. It is a serious condition that can be life-threatening if not diagnosed promptly. Recent advances in endovascular interventions made angiography with embolisation the modality of choice for diagnosis and treatment. We presented the first report of a case of ruptured IPA pseudoaneurysm complicating a drug-induced acute pancreatitis that was successfully treated by transcatheter arterial embolisation. Despite its rarity, rupture of pseudoaneurysm due to drug-induced pancreatitis should be suspected and included in the differential diagnosis when associated with haemodynamic instability. PMID:24385392

  15. Cervical carotid pseudoaneurysm: A carotid artery stenting complication

    PubMed Central

    Raso, Jair; Darwich, Rogerio; Ornellas, Carlos; Cariri, Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    Background: As carotid artery stenting becomes increasingly used, more complications are likely to occur. We present a case of Staphylococcus septicemia and pseudoaneurysm arising in the neck portion of the carotid artery after stenting. Case Description: A 51-year-old man was admitted with mild left hemiparesis. CT and MRI showed right hemisphere ischemia. Duplex Scan and MRA showed bilateral severe stenosis of the carotid arteries in the neck. A percutaneous angioplasty with stenting of the left carotid artery was performed. Two weeks after the procedure, he developed fever and swelling in the right leg and shoulder. An abscess, near where the groin had been punctured for the angioplasty was surgically drained. Blood samples were positive for S. aureus. After treatment the patient complained of a painful bulky pulsatile left cervical mass. Duplex scan and MRA showed a pseudoaneurysm of the left carotid artery. We excised the pseudoaneurysm and rebuilt the carotid artery with a saphenous vein graft. The postoperative period was uneventful, and the MRA revealed a patent saphenous graft. Conclusion: Mycotic pseudoaneurysm of the carotid artery is a rare complication of percutaneous angioplasty and stenting. Surgical treatment with saphenous vein graft is the treatment of choice. PMID:21748038

  16. A prospective randomised trial comparing insertion success rate and incidence of catheterisation-related complications for subclavian venous catheterisation using a thin-walled introducer needle or a catheter-over-needle technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, E; Kim, B G; Lim, Y J; Jeon, Y T; Hwang, J W; Kim, H C; Choi, Y H; Park, H P

    2016-09-01

    In clinical practice, both a thin-walled introducer needle and catheter-over-needle technique can be used to allow insertion of a guidewire during central venous catheterisation using the Seldinger technique. We compared the incidence of catheterisation-related complications (arterial puncture, haemothorax, pneumothorax, haematoma and catheter tip malposition) and insertion success rate for these two techniques in patients requiring right-sided subclavian central venous catheterisation. A total of 414 patients requiring infraclavicular subclavian venous catheterisation were randomly allocated to either a thin-walled introducer needle (needle group, n = 208) or catheter-over-needle technique (catheter group, n = 206). The catheterisation-related complication rate was lower in the needle group compared with the catheter group (5.8% vs. 15.5%; p = 0.001). Overall insertion success rates were similar (97.1% and 92.7% in the needle and catheter groups respectively; p = 0.046), although the first-pass success rate was higher in the needle group (62.0% vs. 35.4%; p < 0.001). We recommend the use of a thin-walled introducer needle technique for right-sided infraclavicular subclavian venous catheterisation. PMID:27396474

  17. Complete rupture of the popliteal artery complicating high tibial osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Attinger, Marc C.; Behrend, Henrik; Jost, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    We present two cases of high tibial osteotomies performed at our institution. Both cases were complicated with the immediate postoperative occurrence of an ischaemic syndrome of the lower leg. Urgent diagnostics revealed a complete rupture of the popliteal artery that required re-operation and a vascular repair. Although neurovascular complications during high tibial osteotomies are rare the awareness of this potentially catastrophic complication should be present when performing this common procedure. All precautions to minimize the harm to the neurovascular bundle should be put into practice. A summary of the surgical precautions is presented and discussed in this paper. PMID:25561756

  18. Pulmonary capillary pressure measured with a pulmonary arterial double port catheter in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Y; Komatsu, K; Suzukawa, M; Chinzei, M; Chinzei, T; Suwa, K; Numata, K; Hanaoka, K

    1993-12-01

    We developed a pulmonary artery (PA) double port catheter technique for reliable clinical measurements of pulmonary capillary pressure (Ppc). In seven elective surgical patients, the PA double port catheter with the second PA port 1 cm proximal to the balloon was inserted. The two PA ports, connected to identical pressure measuring systems, provided the pulmonary arterial pressures (Ppa) distal and proximal to the balloon. After general anesthesia was stabilized, the two Ppas were measured simultaneously during a PA occlusion maneuver during 10 s of apnea. The instant of occlusion was determined precisely as the time when the two Ppa traces sharply diverged. A single exponential equation was fitted to the segment of distal Ppa tracing starting 0.3 s after the instant of occlusion. Ppc was determined as the value of the exponential fit extrapolated to time 0. In six of seven patients, PA occlusion occurred consistently in the early systolic phase regardless of the timing of balloon inflation. Mean Ppa, Ppc, and pulmonary arterial wedge pressure were 16.6, 11.8, and 7.6 torr. The ratio of venous to total resistance ranged from 0.37 to 0.54 (mean:0.46). We conclude that this technique is clinically feasible and valuable in precise definition of the instant of PA occlusion. By defining PA occlusion consistently, this technique can provide reliable Ppc estimation in the clinical settings. PMID:8250302

  19. Images of arterial tissues using catheter swept source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Youxin; Flueraru, Costel; Chang, Shoude; Popescu, Dan P.; Sowa, M. G.

    2010-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography images of arterial samples harvested from asymptomatic pigs and from lipid-rich Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits were acquired using a fiber catheter-based swept-source optical coherence tomography system (OCT). A quadrature Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on multi-port fiber couplers and a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) were employed in the swept-source optical coherence tomography system. The improvement of signal to noise ratio as a result of incorporating the SOA into the configuration translated in an increase of the penetration depth. A fiber probe ending in a fiber ball lens was developed for the arterial imaging. The images acquired by this system offer the possibility to investigate anatomical details located under the surface of the artery such as the intima, media, and adventitia layers (from lumen side) of the blood vessel wall , as well as morphological features specific to artherosclerotic plaques such as lipid pools, fibrous caps, macrophage accumulations and calcified. This report indicates that our improved catheter-based swept source OCT is a potential tool for in vivo intravascular imaging.

  20. Risk factors, management and primary prevention of thrombotic complications related to the use of central venous catheters.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Birgit; Lindhoff-Last, Edelgard

    2012-09-01

    An adequate vascular access is of importance for the treatment of patients with cancer and complex illnesses in the intensive, perioperative or palliative care setting. Deep vein thrombosis and thrombotic occlusion are the most common complications attributed to central venous catheters in short-term and, especially, in long-term use. In this review we will focus on the risk factors, management and prevention strategies of catheter-related thrombosis and occlusion. Due to the lack of randomised controlled trials, there is still controversy about the optimal treatment of catheter-related thrombotic complications, and therapy has been widely adopted using the evidence concerning lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. Given the increasing use of central venous catheters in patients that require long-term intravenous therapy, the problem of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis can be expected to increase in the future. We provide data for establishing a more uniform strategy for preventing, diagnosing and treating catheter-related thrombotic complications. PMID:22915529

  1. Recanalization of Acute and Subacute Femoropopliteal Artery Occlusions with the Rotarex Catheter: One Year Follow-up, Single Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Duc, Sylvain R. Schoch, Eric; Pfyffer, Markus; Jenelten, Regula; Zollikofer, Christoph L.

    2005-06-15

    Purpose:To assess the efficacy and safety of a new rotational catheter for percutaneous removal of fresh and organized thrombi in the femoropopliteal artery.Methods:Forty-one limbs in 38 patients (age 56-90 years, mean 75.6 years) with acute, subacute or chronic femoropopliteal occlusions of 1-180 days' duration (mean 31.6 days) were treated with the Rotarex device. The Fontaine stage was mainly IIB (Rutherford 2-3, 22 patients) or III (Rutherford 4, 14 patients). The length of occlusion varied from 2 to 35 cm (mean 13.1 cm). After recanalization percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was performed if there was a residual stenosis of >25%. Patients were followed up with color Doppler ultrasound at 48 hr and clinically with Doppler pressures and oscillometry at 3, 6, and 12 months.Results:After an average of two passages with the Rotarex catheter all but two limbs required PTA for residual stenosis >25%. Five patients needed additional stenting. Major complications were one groin hematoma requiring blood transfusion and one arteriovenous fistula spontaneously thrombosing after unsuccessful primary prolonged balloon dilation. Distal embolizations occurred in 10 patients; 6 clinically relevant emboli were aspirated. All occlusions were technically successfully recanalised there were 2 early reocclusions after 1 day and two at 2 weeks. Brachial-ankle indices improved from an average of 0.41 before to 0.93 after recanalization. Primary and secondary patency rates were 62% / 84% after 6 months and 39% / 68% after 1 year. The amputation-free survival at 12 months was 100%.Conclusion:The Rotarex mechanical thrombectomy device is an efficient, quick, easy to handle, and safe tool for the treatment of acute, subacute or even chronic peripheral arterial thromboembolic occlusions. It can be used for short or long occlusions with equal success, provided the obstruction is not heavily calcified and has been safely passed with a guidewire first.

  2. Recanalization of a Heavily Calcified Chronic Total Occlusion in a Femoropopliteal Artery Using a Wingman Crossing Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Naoto; Tanaka, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    We present a 77-year-old female with heavily calcified chronic total occlusions (CTO) in a superficial femoral artery treated by endovascular therapy using a Wingman crossing catheter, which is an over-the-wire catheter with a metallic blade, controlled manually. The blade could probe and track the calcified cap of CTO, wherein any hydrophilic guidewires or looped wires could not penetrate. Moreover, the Wingman could proceed through the occlusion and introduce a guidewire into distal intramedial lumen as a support catheter. Finally, wire crossing was achieved using a bi-directional approach. The Wingman can be a simple solution for crossing calcified peripheral CTO. PMID:27375810

  3. Continuous ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure monitoring. A new method using a transducer tipped catheter and a simple recording system.

    PubMed

    Levy, R D; Cunningham, D; Shapiro, L M; Wright, C; Mockus, L; Fox, K M

    1986-04-01

    A transducer tipped catheter and simple recording system were used for the continuous measurement of ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure. The pulmonary artery pressure was recorded on a miniaturised tape recorder and replayed via an optical writer. Pulmonary arterial systolic and diastolic pressures can be analysed on a beat to beat basis. Continuous ambulatory monitoring was performed for a total 288 hours in 13 patients who were undergoing routine investigation for coronary artery disease. There was less than 1% zero drift and 0.25% linearity error per full scale pressure. The frequency response of the entire system was flat to 8 Hz with a linear phase delay. The transducer tipped catheter and a conventional fluid-filled system were used to measure left ventricular and pulmonary artery end diastolic pressures in eight patients. The correlation between the results obtained by the two methods was excellent. This method could be used at any centre equipped for ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring. PMID:3964499

  4. Pulmonary vein stenosis complicating radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Edriss, Hawa; Denega, Tatiana; Test, Victor; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become a widely used intervention in the treatment of atrial fibrillation. Pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) is one of the most serious complications associated with this procedure; the degree of stenosis ranges from mild (<50%) to complete venous occlusion. The natural history of PVS and the risk of progression of existing PVS are uncertain. Symptomatic and/or severe PVS is a serious medical problem and can be easily misdiagnosed since it is an uncommon and relatively new medical problem, often has low clinical suspicion among clinicians, and has a non-specific presentation that mimics other more common respiratory or cardiac diseases. The estimated incidence varies in literature reports from 0% to 42% of ablation procedures, depending on technical aspects of the procedure and operator skill. Most patients with significant PVS remain asymptomatic or have few symptoms. Symptomatic patients usually present with dyspnea, chest pain, or hemoptysis and are usually treated with balloon angioplasty and/or stent placement. Little is known about the long term effect of PV stenosis/occlusion on the pulmonary circulation and the development of pulmonary hypertension. Evolving technology may reduce the frequency of this complication, but long term studies are needed to understand the effect of therapeutic atrial injury and adverse outcomes. This review summarizes the current literature and outlines an approach to the evaluation and management of these patients. PMID:27492534

  5. Measurement of arterial pressure using catheter-transducer systems. Improvement using the Accudynamic.

    PubMed

    Allan, M W; Gray, W M; Asbury, A J

    1988-03-01

    The dynamic performance of arterial manometers depends upon the values of the natural frequency fo and the damping factor beta. Satisfactory reproduction of all arterial waveforms requires that fo should be greater than about 13 Hz; for an fo of 13 Hz, beta should have a value of 0.5, but, as fo increases, an increasing range of beta values is permissible. We measured fo and beta for two pressure transducers (Gould P23 Statham and Gould Disposable) in combination with Portex or Gould catheter tubing of lengths varying from 100 cm to 300 cm. All combinations were considerably underdamped, with the best having an fo of 30 Hz and a beta of 0.1. We also investigated the performance of a commercial device, the Accudynamic, designed to allow beta to be increased without affecting fo. We found that the Accudynamic worked well, allowing acceptable performance to be obtained from the Gould Disposable transducer with catheters up to 200 cm in length. PMID:3355737

  6. OUTBACK catheter for treatment of superficial femoral and iliac artery chronic total occlusion: Experience from two centers

    PubMed Central

    Husainy, Mohammad Ali; Suresh, Balla; Fang, Cheng; Ammar, Thoraya; Botchu, Rajesh; Thava, V

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The OUTBACK® catheter is a reentry device that enables reentry into a vessel lumen from the subintimal space during subintimal angioplasty. It is reserved for cases where reentry has not been possible using conventional wire and catheter techniques. We report a two-center experience in recanalization of the chronic total occlusions of the common iliac (CIA) and the superficial femoral artery (SFA) using the OUTBACK® catheter in cases where other techniques were unsuccessful. Material and Methods: All cases where recanalization was performed using the OUTBACK® reentry catheter between January 2010 to January 2015 were retrospectively identified and included in this study. 21 patients were identified. The indication for intervention in these cases included claudication and critical leg ischemia. In all cases, conventional recanalization could not be successfully achieved. Results: The OUTBACK® catheter was used to recanalize 10 SFA occlusion and 9 CIA occlusions. In 19 patients (90%), reentry into true arterial lumen was successfully achieved. 17 patients had their recanalization through the transfemoral approach whereas 2 patients had a transpopliteal artery approach. In 2 patients, reentry into the true lumen could not be achieved using the OUTBACK® catheter due to patient's intolerability for the procedure and severe atherosclerotic calcified plaques. There was 100% patency of the vessel intervened on Duplex ultrasound at 24 months of follow up. 16 patients (84%) remained asymptomatic and 2 patients (10.5%) reported worsening of their symptoms due to the development of new lesions within the arterial system. Conclusion: The OUTBACK® catheter is an effective and safe technique for reentry into the vessel lumen when conventional techniques fail. PMID:27413275

  7. Induction of kinin B1 receptor-dependent vasoconstriction following balloon catheter injury to the rabbit carotid artery.

    PubMed Central

    Pruneau, D.; Luccarini, J. M.; Robert, C.; Bélichard, P.

    1994-01-01

    1. Balloon catheter injury to the rabbit carotid artery damaged the endothelium and induced neointima formation over 7 days. The area of intima, expressed as a percentage of the media, was 16.2 +/- 4.2% and 8.2 +/- 0.1% in balloon catheter-injured and sham-operated arteries. 2. Seven days after arterial injury, carotid arteries were isolated and set up as ring preparations in organ baths for isometric tension measurements. Balloon catheter-injured arteries first contracted with noradrenaline (0.01-0.1 microM), contracted further in a concentration-dependent manner to bradykinin (BK; pD2, 5.98 +/- 0.22; Emax, 41.3 +/- 5.2% of KCl) and to des-Arg9-BK (pD2, 7.12 +/- 0.36; Emax, 46.0 +/- 9.9% of KCl). In contrast, vessel segments with endothelium either intact or acutely removed were unresponsive to both BK receptor agonists. 3. The concentration-contraction curves for BK and for des-Arg9-BK were shifted to the right by the B1 receptor antagonist, [Leu8]des-Arg9-BK (3 microM), but not by the selective B2 receptor antagonist, Hoe 140 (1 microM). 4. Thus, BK and its metabolite, des-Arg9-BK act as vasoconstrictor agents following balloon catheter injury. These effects appear to be mediated by activation of B1 receptors. Images Figure 4 PMID:8032586

  8. [Surgical technics for implantation of hepatic intra-arterial catheters for local chemotherapy. Experience with 42 cases].

    PubMed

    Elias, D; Lasser, P

    1985-10-01

    Based on the experience of 42 cases of surgical implantation of hepatic intra-arterial catheters (HIAC) for local chemotherapy, the techniques used are analyzed principally as a function of anatomical variations of the hepatic artery. A conventional procedure (HIAC implanted into gastroduodenal artery) was performed in 60% of cases, while in 26% of patients this was possible only after section of a right and/or left hepatic artery. Atypical implantation was necessary in 14% of cases to ensure complete perfusion of liver. The different methods employed and the reasons for their choice are discussed. PMID:4066801

  9. Complications and Follow-up after Unprotected Carotid Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Hauth, Elke A.M. Drescher, Robert; Jansen, Christian; Gissler, H. Martin; Schwarz, Michael; Forsting, Michael; Jaeger, Horst J.; Mathias, Klaus D.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. This prospective study was undertaken to determine the success rate, complications, and outcome of carotid artery stenting (CAS) without the use of cerebral protection devices. Methods. During 12 months, 94 high-grade stenoses of the carotid artery in 91 consecutive patients were treated. Sixty-six (70%) of the stenoses were symptomatic and 28 (30%) were asymptomatic. Results. In all 94 carotid stenoses CAS was successfully performed. During the procedure and within the 30 days afterwards, there were 2 deaths and 3 major strokes in the 66 symptomatic patients, resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 5 of 66 (7%). Only one of these complications, a major stroke, occurred during the procedure. In the 6-month follow-up, one additional major stroke occurred in a originally symptomatic patient resulting in a combined death and stroke rate of 6 of 66 (10%) for symptomatic patients at 6 months. No major complications occurred in asymptomatic patients during the procedure or in the 6-month follow-up period. At 6 months angiographic follow-up the restenosis rate with a degree of >50% was 3 of 49 (6%) and the rate with a degree of {>=}70% was 1 of 49 (2%). Conclusions. Cerebral embolization during CAS is not the only cause of the stroke and death rate associated with the procedure. The use of cerebral protection devices during the procedure may therefore not prevent all major complications following CAS.

  10. Mechanical Recanalization of Subacute Vessel Occlusion in Peripheral Arterial Disease with a Directional Atherectomy Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Massmann, Alexander Katoh, Marcus; Shayesteh-Kheslat, Roushanak; Buecker, Arno

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively examine the technical feasibility and safety of directional atherectomy for treatment of subacute infrainguinal arterial vessel occlusions. Methods: Five patients (one woman, four men, age range 51-81 years) with peripheral arterial disease who experienced sudden worsening of their peripheral arterial disease-related symptoms during the last 2-6 weeks underwent digital subtraction angiography, which revealed vessel occlusion in native popliteal artery (n = 4) and in-stent occlusion of the superficial femoral artery (n = 1). Subsequently, all patients were treated by atherectomy with the SilverHawk (ev3 Endovascular, USA) device. Results: The mean diameter of treated vessels was 5.1 {+-} 1.0 mm. The length of the occlusion ranged 2-14 cm. The primary technical success rate was 100%. One patient experienced a reocclusion during hospitalization due to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. There were no further periprocedural complications, in particular no peripheral embolizations, until hospital discharge or during the follow-up period of 1 year. Conclusion: The recanalization of infrainguinal arterial vessel occlusions by atherectomy with the SilverHawk device is technically feasible and safe. In our limited retrospective study, it was associated with a high technical success rate and a low procedure-related complication rate.

  11. [Cost-effectiveness analysis on the reutilization of coronary artery catheters in a public hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Veras, Bruna Medeiros Gonçalves de; Simões e Senna, Kátia Marie; Correia, Marcelo Goulart; Santos, Marisa Silva

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness ratio of new versus reprocessed coronary artery catheters in a Federal public hospital. This was an analytical decision-making model prepared to estimate the cost-effectiveness ratio between two strategies in the use of materials in coronary artery catheterization, with pyrogenic reaction as the clinical outcome. Costs were estimated using direct data collection in the respective catheterization services and expressed in Brazilian Reais (R$), with 2012 as the reference year. The decision-making tree was constructed with the probabilities of pyrogenic reaction as described in a clinical trial. The cost per catheter for reuse was R$ 109.84, as compared to R$ 283.43 for a new catheter. The reutilization strategy proved to be cost cost-effective, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio indicated that R$ 13,561.75 would be spent to avoid one case of pyrogenic reaction. The study identified reuse of coronary artery catheters as a lower cost strategy compared to the exclusive use of new catheters, thus potentially assisting decision-making by health administrators. PMID:25402240

  12. Use of Arterial Catheters in the Management of Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Ruszala, Michael W.; Reimer, Andrew P.; Hickman, Ronald L.; Clochesy, John M.; Hustey, Fredric M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the use of invasive arterial blood pressure (IBP) monitoring and reaching established aggressive medical management goals in acute aortic dissection. Methods Data were collected through a retrospective chart review of patients diagnosed with acute aortic syndromes of the thoracic cavity who required transport to tertiary care over a 28-month period. The 2010 American Heart Association medical management goals of thoracic aortic disease were used as hemodynamic end points. Results A total of 208 patients were included, with 113 (54%) diagnosed at least in part with acute Stanford Type A aortic dissections and the remaining 95 (46%) having isolated Stanford Type B dissections. Emergency departments made up 158 (76%) of transfer departments; 129 (62%) patients had IBP catheters placed. The highest mean systolic blood pressures (SBPs) recorded were 165 mm Hg in the IBP group versus 151 mm Hg when noninvasive blood pressure (NIBP) cuffs were used (P < .01). The mean decrease in SBP during transport was 51 mm Hg in the IBP group versus 34 mm Hg in the NIBP group (P < .001). The difference between the last reported NIBP and the first IBP was noted as 19 mm Hg higher. The IBP group met the SBP goal more frequently than the NIBP group (P < .05) when the SBP was noted as greater than 140 mm Hg during transport. Bedside time increased only 6 minutes with IBP placement (P < .007). Conclusion Patients with IBP catheters were noted to be more aggressively managed with antihypertensive medications, met hemodynamic goals more frequently, and had only 6 minutes longer bedside times. These findings support the placement of IBP catheters by emergency departments and critical care transport (CCT) teams in patients with acute aortic syndromes requiring interfacility transport to definitive care. PMID:25441531

  13. [Catheter-associated complications in the horse - diagnosis and treatment in practice].

    PubMed

    Müller, Carolin; Gehlen, Heidrun

    2016-06-16

    Venous diseases due to venous catheters have variable symptoms and clinical progress. They comprise perivenous hematoma, periphlebitis, endophlebitis, phlebothrombosis or septic thrombophlebitis. To diagnose venous disease, a clinical examination (possibillity to distend the vein, swelling, pain, increased skin temperature, and any exudation around the injection site) and an ultrasonographic examination (perivenous tissue, venous wall, venous content) of the vein are performed. Treatment of venous diseases depends on the etiology and pathogenesis and combines the use of anticoagulants (heparin, phenprocoumon), anti-inflammatory and analgesic substances (non-steroidal inflammatory drugs) as well as the application of antibiotics depending on the case. For prevention of venous diseases a careful catheter management is important. This includes in particular the adequate selection of the catheter system (long-term catheter made of polyurethane), catheter care and intensive monitoring. This article reviews the different venous diseases, diagnosis and therapeutic measures in a practical manner. PMID:27224936

  14. Solid Tumor Embolotherapy in Hepatic Arteries with an Anti-reflux Catheter System.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zelin; Jernigan, Shaphan; Kleinstreuer, Clement; Buckner, Gregory D

    2016-04-01

    Unresectable hepatoma accounts for the majority of malignant liver tumor cases for which embolization therapy is considered a viable treatment option. However, the potential risk of aberrant particle deposition in non-target regions could cause severe side-effects, alongside diminished efficacy. A computational model has been developed to analyze the particle-hemodynamics before and after deployment of an FDA-approved anti-reflux catheter. The catheter features a retractable, porous cone-like tip designed to allow forward blood flow while preventing microsphere reflux. A patient-specific hepatic artery system, with different daughter branches connected to a liver tumor, was chosen as a representative test bed. In vitro as well as in vivo measurements were used to validate the computer simulation model. The model captures the effect of tip-deployment on blood perfusion and pressure drop in an interactive manner under physiologically realistic conditions. A relationship between the pressure drop and embolization level was established, which can be used to provide clinicians with real-time information on the best infusion-stop point. However, the results show that the present procedure for embolization of downstream vessels which feed a tumor is quite arbitrary. Nevertheless, a method to recycle aberrant particles captured by the deployed tip was proposed to minimize side-effects. PMID:26265458

  15. Cerebral air embolism and subsequent transient neurologic abnormalities in a liver transplant recipient following the removal of the pulmonary artery catheter from the central venous access device: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Key; Jun, In-Gu; Jang, Dong-Min; Lim, Jinwook; Hwang, Gyu-Sam

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral air embolism is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. We experienced a living-donor liver transplant recipient who presented with unexpected cerebral air embolism and transient neurologic abnormalities that subsequently developed just after the removal of the pulmonary artery catheter from the central venous access device. One day after the initial event, the patient's neurologic status gradually improved. The patient was discharged 30 days after liver transplantation without neurologic sequelae. PMID:26885308

  16. Spontaneous arterial hemorrhage as a complication of dengue

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shoma Vinay; Jacob, Gijoe George; Raju, Nithin Abraham; Ancheri, Sneha Ann

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding complications of dengue hemorrhagic fever such as epistaxis, gum bleeding, gastrointestinal bleeding, hypermenorrhea, hematuria, and thrombocytopenia have been documented. A 49-year-old female presented with complaints of intermittent high-grade fever for the past 4 days, lower abdominal pain and altered sensorium for 1 day. Laboratory investigations revealed severe anemia, mild thrombocytopenia, hypofibrinogenemia, and positive dengue serology. Emergency ultrasound examination of the abdomen revealed a possible rapidly expanding hematoma from the inferior epigastric artery and suggested urgent computed tomography (CT) angiogram for confirmation of the same. CT angiogram was confirmatory, and patient underwent emergency embolization of the right inferior epigastric artery. We report the first case of inferior epigastric hemorrhage and rectus sheath hematoma as a consequence of dengue. PMID:27275081

  17. Two Serious Complications of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters Indicating the Need to Formalize Training for Placing Central Venous Vascular Access Devices.

    PubMed

    Gerling, Volker; Feenstra, Nico

    2016-02-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheters are being used in increasing numbers. Common (thrombosis, infection, phlebitis, malfunction, or disconnection) and rare complications (pericardial tamponade) have been well explored. We describe 2 serious complications that resolved without sequelae. Both complications occurred in the context of limited provider competence. We conclude that vascular access is more than "just" placing a catheter; it can have serious clinical impact and has evolved into a specialist skill. With increasing use of intravascular catheters, the need for a formalized training becomes urgent. PMID:26517231

  18. Differentiation of abnormal blood flow patterns in coronary arteries based on Doppler catheter recordings.

    PubMed

    Denardo, S J; Yock, P G; Hargrave, V K; Srebro, J P; Ports, T A; Talbot, L

    1991-09-01

    Abnormal arterial blood flow patterns have been implicated as etiologic factors in thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Intravascular pulsed Doppler ultrasound techniques with fast-Fourier transform analysis offer the opportunity to measure these abnormalities. The authors hypothesized that statistical analysis of radial-directed beam spectra could be used to distinguish disturbed from non-disturbed flow and that analysis of conventional axial-directed beam spectra could then be used to distinguish laminar high-shear from laminar low-shear flow. They developed a scaled-up in-vitro model of coronary flow consisting of a glycerol/H2O test fluid flowing through an acrylic cylinder at Reynolds numbers spanning the typical physiologic range within the coronary arteries. A scaled-up Doppler catheter with the capacity for 90 degrees reflection of the beam was placed centrally. Disturbed flow was created by introducing a flow screen, and altered shear rates were produced by changing the Reynolds number. For the radial-directed beam studies, the coefficients of variation of the Doppler spectra for the disturbed flow states were significantly greater than for the nondisturbed flow states (p less than 0.01). For the axial-directed beam studies, the coefficients of variation of the Doppler spectra for the laminar high-shear flow states were significantly greater than for the laminar low-shear flow states (p less than 0.01). They conclude that abnormal blood flow patterns can be differentiated by the selective use of radial-directed and axial-directed Doppler catheter recordings. PMID:1928812

  19. [Percutaneous transluminal laser angioplasty in peripheral arterial occlusive disease--development of a new laser catheter system].

    PubMed

    Neubaur, T; Klepzig, M; Strauer, B E

    1988-04-01

    Percutaneous laser angioplasty in arterial occlusive disease has lately been performed clinically for the first time. Perforation of the arterial wall and formation of aneurysms are serious risks. Two novel laser catheters for laser angioplasty with minimized perforation risk are presented. Catheter I (5F) and II (6.3F) are designed in the same manner. The distal tip of these catheters is ovally formed and marked by a small X-ray dense metal ring. The silica fiber has a core diameter of 400 micron (I) respectively 600 micron (II). Its tip is also marked X-ray densely and therefore the position of the fiber tip can be controlled exactly during laser angioplasty. Using a guide wire and applicating short laser pulses the perforation risk can be minimized. In a total of 132 atherosclerotic stenosed or obstructed human arteries laser angioplasty was performed in vitro using a Nd:YAG laser. There were two perforations (1.5%). The degree of stenosis was reduced from 87 (90)% to 54 (52)%. Using the 600-micron-fiber (catheter II) the velocity of laser angioplasty was increased 2.5 times compared to laser angioplasty using the 400-micron-fiber. PMID:2968724

  20. A very unusual anatomical variation and complication of common iliac artery and ureter in retroperitonoscopic ureterolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Huri, Emre; Akgül, Turgay; Karakan, Tolga; Sargon, Mustafa; Germiyanoğlu, Cankon

    2011-01-01

    Anatomical localization of theureter comes along psoas major muscle and crosses over common iliac artery bifurcation. Common iliac artery aneurysm and impacted atherosclerosis are a rare condition that should be differed from the impacted ureter stone to avoid from undesirable complication. In this case, we present a very unusual anatomical variation and complication of common iliac artery and ureter in retroperitonoscopic ureterolithotomy. PMID:21523238

  1. Combined Use of an Occlusion Balloon Catheter and a Microcatheter for Embolization of the Unselectable Right Inferior Phrenic Artery Supplying Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Matsui, Osamu; Taki, Keiichi; Minami, Tetsuya; Ito, Chiharu; Shinmura, Rieko; Takamatsu, Shigeyuki; Kobayashi, Miki; Notsumata, Kazuo

    2004-11-15

    We report the combined use of an occlusion balloon catheter and a microcatheter for transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) fed by the unselectable right inferior phrenic artery (IPA). In one case, HCC was fed by the reconstructed right IPA via a small branch arising from the proximate portion of the celiac artery. In another, the tumor was fed by the right IPA that had been previously embolized with coils. TAE was successfully performed through a microcatheter placed in the celiac artery immediately proximal to the occluding balloon catheter of the celiac trunk and coil embolization of the left gastric artery.

  2. Azygos catheter placement as a cause of failure of dialysis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, G D; Jackson, A; Beards, S C

    1993-11-01

    Common complications of venous dialysis catheters include sepsis and accidental removal. Angiographic demonstration of dialysis lines is only rarely requested usually to confirm the presence of clot or stenosis as a cause for poor dialysis flow. Poor flow can also be due to inadvertent placement of the catheter in the azygos system. The use of dialysis catheters with a long venous limb which extends beyond the arterial port may predispose to such placement as their lumen is lateral to the central axis of the catheter. In those patients with poor venous access catheter placement under angiographic control may be helpful. PMID:8258225

  3. Efficacy of Proximal Aspiration Thrombectomy for Using Balloon-Tipped Guide Catheter in Acute Intracranial Internal Carotid Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Won; Hwang, Yang-Ha; Park, Jaechan; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mechanical thrombectomy (MT) for acute intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion is often complicated by difficult revascularization and non-involved territory embolization possibly related with larger clot-burden. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of proximal aspiration thrombectomy (PAT) using a balloon-tipped guide catheter for clot-burden reduction in such cases with period-to-period analysis (period 1 : standard MT without PAT; period 2 : PAT first, then standard MT for the remaining occlusion). Methods Eighty-six patients who underwent MT for acute intracranial ICA occlusion were included in this analysis from the prospectively maintained stroke registry (33 patients in period 1 and 53 in period 2). In period 2, 'responder' was defined as a case where some amount of clot was retrieved by PAT and the following angiography showed partial or full recanalization. Results Fifteen of fifty-three patients in period 2 (28.3%) were 'responders' to PAT. There was a significantly higher incidence of atrial fibrillation in the 'responder' subgroup. Period 2 showed a significantly shorter puncture-to-reperfusion time (94.5 minutes vs. 56.0 minutes; p=0.002), a significantly higher Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction of 2b-3 reperfusion (45.5% vs. 73.6%; p=0.009), but only a trend for better 3-month favorable outcome (mRS 0–2; 36.4% vs. 54.7%; p=0.097). There was no increase in the incidence of procedure-related complications or intracranial hemorrhage in period 2. Conclusion A strategy of PAT before standard MT may result in shorter puncture-to-reperfusion time and better angiographic outcome than a strategy of standard MT for acute intracranial ICA occlusion. PMID:27446520

  4. Technetium-99m labelled macroaggregated albumin arterial catheter perfusion scintigraphy: prediction of gastrointestinal toxicity in hepatic arterial chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, E; Masaneo, I; Clara, R; Valetto, M R; Bellò, M; Zanon, C; Chiappino, I; Grosso, M; Mussa, A; Bisi, G

    2000-06-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity from hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of floxuridine in patients with liver metastases is probably due to extrahepatic perfusion or to partial escape of the drug from first-pass liver extraction. The aim of this study was to verify the role of technetium-99m-labelled macroaggregated albumin (99mTc-MAA) arterial catheter perfusion scintigraphy at the beginning of each chemotherapy cycle in decreasing or preventing gastrointestinal toxicity. We studied 167 consecutive patients. On the basis of the scintigraphic follow-up and the presence or absence of an intrahepatic arteriovenous shunt (IHAVS), we classified our patients into the following groups: (1) FU+ hepatic distribution pattern (DP), comprising 29 patients with regular scintigraphic follow-up who showed the expected distribution pattern at each control or a distribution pattern with transient alterations (extrahepatic escape) promptly reversed by the replacement of the catheter. Among these 29 patients there was one case of gastrointestinal toxicity. (2) FU- hepatic DP, comprising 128 patients who were evaluated with 99mTc-MAA only at the beginning of the first chemotherapy cycle, showed the expected distribution pattern and underwent HAI with no further scintigraphic evaluation. Among these 128 patients there were 28 cases of gastrointestinal toxicity. (3) FU+ pulmonary DP, comprising three patients with abnormally elevated pulmonary uptake (higher than 5%) and with regular scintigraphic follow-up. There were two cases of gastrointestinal toxicity among these three patients. (4) FU- pulmonary DP, comprising seven patients with abnormally elevated pulmonary uptake and without regular scintigraphic follow-up. There were four cases of gastrointestinal toxicity among these seven patients. The incidence of toxicity was significantly higher in group FU- hepatic DP than in group FU+ hepatic DP (21.9% vs 3.4%, P<0.05). In both the FU+ pulmonary DP and FU- pulmonary DP groups, the incidence of

  5. Minimally invasive catheter implantation for regional chemotherapy of the liver: A new percutaneous transsubclavian approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wacker, Frank K.; Boese-Landgraf, Jochen; Wagner, Armin; Albrecht, Dirk; Wolf, Karl-Juergen; Fobbe, Franz

    1997-03-15

    Purpose. Development of a percutaneously implantable catheter system for regional chemotherapy of liver metastases and its application in patients with surgically implanted but dislocated catheters. Methods. Thirty-three patients with liver metastases of colorectal tumors were submitted to percutaneous puncture of the subclavian artery and insertion of a catheter whose tip was placed in the proper hepatic artery and whose end was subcutaneously connected with an infusion pump. Results. The mean duration of therapy via the percutaneously inserted catheter was 27 weeks ({+-}14 weeks). The most frequent complication was disconnection of the therapy catheter from the tube of the infusion pump. Eighty percent of all complications were corrected by reintervention. The therapy drop-out rate due to catheter-associated complications was 9%. Conclusion. Percutaneous insertion of a catheter for regional chemotherapy of the liver is a relatively uncomplicated method with high patient acceptance and simple access for reintervention.

  6. A Large Posttraumatic Subclavian Artery Aneurysm Complicated by Artery Occlusion and Arteriobronchial Fistula Successfully Treated Using a Covered Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Czeczotka, Jaroslaw; Elgalal, Marcin; Sapieha, Michal; Rowinski, Olgierd

    2011-02-15

    The treatment of posttraumatic aneurysms of peripheral arteries using covered stents is increasingly commonplace. We present the case of a 10-year-old girl with a pseudoaneurysm of the subclavian artery complicated by an arteriobronchial fistula with hemorrhaging into the bronchial tree and distal subclavian artery occlusion. Despite the lack of artery patency, endovascular stent graft implantation was successful. Pseudoaneurysm exclusion and involution was achieved, together with a patent implant and maintained collateral circulation patency.

  7. Diverticula of Kommerell and Aberrant Subclavian Arteries Complicated by Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R. G. Whigham, C. J.; Trinh, C.

    2005-06-15

    This is a retrospective evaluation of the incidence of aberrant subclavian arteries (ASAs) and diverticula of Kommerell, as well as the occurrence and significance of associated aneurysms. Thoracic aortograms obtained during a 12.5-year period were reviewed, seeking the presence of aberrant right and left subclavian arteries (ARSAs/ALSAs), diverticula of Kommerell, and the incidence of associated aortic aneurysms. Several cases were evaluated with computed tomography concomitantly. Results were correlated with a literature review. Twenty-two ASAs were identified. Nineteen were on the right (ARSAs) and three were on the left (ALSAs). A diverticulum of Kommerell (DOK) was also present on the right in seven and on the left in three. Five of these patients had complicating aneurysms. Four of these were associated with ARSAs and their diverticula. Two were atherosclerotic; one was a limited dissection and one of uncertain etiology was ruptured. One additional aneurysm (atherosclerotic) involved an ALSA/DOK. The patient with the ruptured aneurysm died in surgery; three were managed conservatively because of concomitant disease; and one is being followed because of the small size (2.5 cm) of the aneurysm. ARSAs are relatively uncommon and ALSAs are rare. Both ARSA and ALSA are frequently associated with a DOK. Aneurysms rarely involve ASAs (with or without a DOK), but they are associated with a high mortality rate if they are not discovered before rupture. Early diagnosis plus surgical and/or endovascular management can be lifesaving.

  8. Early and late complications related to central venous catheters in hematological malignancies: a retrospective analysis of 1102 patients.

    PubMed

    Morano, Salvatore Giacomo; Coppola, Lorenzo; Latagliata, Roberto; Berneschi, Paola; Chistolini, Antonio; Micozzi, Alessandra; Girmenia, Corrado; Breccia, Massimo; Brunetti, Gregorio; Massaro, Fulvio; Rosa, Giovanni; Guerrisi, Pietro; Mandelli, Franco; Foà, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-01-01

    Several severe complications may be associated with the use of central venous catheters (CVC). We retrospectively evaluated on a large cohort of patients the incidence of CVC-related early and late complications. From 7/99 to 12/2005, 1102 CVC have been implanted at our Institution in 881 patients with hematological malignancies (142,202 total day number of implanted CVC). Early mechanic complications were 79 (7.2% - 0.55/1,000 days/CVC). Thirty-nine episodes of early infective complications (<1 week from CVC implant) occurred (3.5% - 0.3/1000 days/CVC): furthermore, 187 episodes of CVC-related sepsis (17% - 1.3/1000 days/CVC) were recorded. There were 29 episodes (2.6%) of symptomatic CVC-related thrombotic complications, with a median interval from CVC implant of 60 days (range 7 - 395). The rate of CVC withdrawal due to CVC-related complications was 26%. The incidence of CVC-related complications in our series is in the range reported in the literature notwithstanding cytopenia often coexisting in hematological patients. PMID:24678388

  9. Early and Late Complications Related to Central Venous Catheters in Hematological Malignancies: a Retrospective Analysis of 1102 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morano, Salvatore Giacomo; Coppola, Lorenzo; Latagliata, Roberto; Berneschi, Paola; Chistolini, Antonio; Micozzi, Alessandra; Girmenia, Corrado; Breccia, Massimo; Brunetti, Gregorio; Massaro, Fulvio; Rosa, Giovanni; Guerrisi, Pietro; Mandelli, Franco; Foà, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-01-01

    Several severe complications may be associated with the use of central venous catheters (CVC). We retrospectively evaluated on a large cohort of patients the incidence of CVC-related early and late complications. From 7/99 to 12/2005, 1102 CVC have been implanted at our Institution in 881 patients with hematological malignancies (142,202 total day number of implanted CVC). Early mechanic complications were 79 (7.2% - 0.55/1,000 days/CVC). Thirty-nine episodes of early infective complications (<1 week from CVC implant) occurred (3.5% - 0.3/1000 days/CVC): furthermore, 187 episodes of CVC-related sepsis (17% - 1.3/1000 days/CVC) were recorded. There were 29 episodes (2.6%) of symptomatic CVC-related thrombotic complications, with a median interval from CVC implant of 60 days (range 7 – 395). The rate of CVC withdrawal due to CVC-related complications was 26%. The incidence of CVC-related complications in our series is in the range reported in the literature notwithstanding cytopenia often coexisting in hematological patients. PMID:24678388

  10. The Wiley Spinal Catheter-Over-Needle System for Continuous Spinal Anesthesia: A Case Series of 5 Cesarean Deliveries Complicated by Paresthesias and Headaches.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Christine P; Carvalho, Brendan; Riley, Edward T

    2016-01-01

    Intrathecal catheter devices using a catheter-over-needle design and softer flexible material have been introduced to clinical practice with the aim of reducing some of the complications such as postdural puncture headaches and paresthesias seen with previous versions of intrathecal catheters. We present a case series of 5 cesarean deliveries using the Wiley Spinal intrathecal system (Epimed, Johnstown, New York), which was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. The intrathecal catheter system consists of a flexible 23-gauge intrathecal cannula over a 27-gauge pencil-point spinal needle. The placement of the intrathecal catheter was successful in all 5 cases; however, paresthesias in 3 cases and postdural puncture headaches in 2 cases complicated the placement and use of the device. Although the unique catheter-over-needle design facilitates the use of smaller-gauge spinal needles for dural puncture and larger-gauge catheters for medication administration, this case series using the Wiley Spinal suggests that paresthesias and postdural puncture headaches may still limit its widespread utilization. Future studies are needed to determine the true incidence of complications and to determine the role of continuous spinal anesthesia in the obstetric population. PMID:26909488

  11. Internal jugular vein thrombosis presenting as a painful neck mass due to a spontaneous dislocated subclavian port catheter as long-term complication: a case report.

    PubMed

    Binnebösel, Marcel; Grommes, Jochen; Junge, Karsten; Göbner, Sonja; Schumpelick, Volker; Truong, Son

    2009-01-01

    Central venous access devices are extensively used for long-term chemotherapy and parenteral nutrition. However, there are some possible immediate, early, and late complications related to the implantation technique, care, and maintenance. We present the uncommon occurrence of a thrombosis of the internal jugular vein due to a spontaneous migration of a Port-A-Cath catheter into the ipsilateral internal jugular vein as a delayed complication of a central venous access catheter implanted for chemotherapy delivery. A review of the literature is given, and the factors responsible for this unusual complication will be discussed. PMID:19830037

  12. Obstructive jaundice as a complication of a right hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chih-Yang; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Yang, Ching-Yao; Tien, Yu-Wen

    2015-01-01

    A hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare, but a potentially life-threatening complication after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Obstructive jaundice owing to a hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm after LC has never been reported. We report a patient with a hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm after LC who presented with tarry stools, bloody drainage and obstructive jaundice. PMID:25883462

  13. [Arterial complications following surgery or sclerotherapy of varices].

    PubMed

    Mellière, D; Almou, M; Lellouche, D; Becquemin, J P; Hoehne, M

    1986-01-01

    Surgical treatment of varicose veins occasionally can be followed by severe limb ischemia either after surgery or sclerotherapy. We report here two cases with the clinical features and the therapeutic strategy. The first case concerned a woman operated by venous stripping. A post-operative acute ischemia occurred and was treated by femoro-femoral bypass and lumbar sympathectomy. However this procedure did not avoid persistent chronic ischemia, sciatica paralysis and equinus ankle blockage. A secondary arterial procedure associated with intensive physiotherapy and ankle arthrodesis led to a poor functional result, partly because of an irreversible algodystrophia. The second case concerned a woman treated by sclerotherapy. An injection of the drug in the retro-malleolar area was immediately followed by an acute foot ischemia. Heparin, xylocaine and sodium nitroprusside perfusion avoided a foot amputation, however osteoporosis and algodystrophia occurred. A sympathectomy was necessary two years later. These dramatic complications although unusual, may occur even with experienced physicians. Therefore a great attention is always necessary during these simple procedures. In case of acute ischemia, early diagnosis and aggressive treatment are necessary, but prevention remains more secure. PMID:3944517

  14. [Pericardial tamponade due to malpositioned cooling catheter].

    PubMed

    Löwer, C; Niedeggen, A; Janssens, U

    2016-05-01

    The case of a 60-year-old woman who received prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation for cardiopulmonary arrest is reported. In the hospital, coronary angiography was performed including percutaneous coronary intervention of the left anterior descending artery and placement of a cooling catheter. After approximately 30 min, severe hypotension progressively developed. Pericardial tamponade was identified and treated by pericardial puncture. Clear fluid was drained. Transesophageal echocardiography detected a perforation of the right atrial roof by the cooling catheter. Open surgery was performed immediately and the catheter was removed. The patient was discharged from the hospital without any further complication 10 days later. PMID:26065384

  15. Systematic review of catheter-based intra-arterial therapies in hepatocellular carcinoma: state of the art and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Duran, R; Chapiro, J; Schernthaner, R E

    2015-01-01

    Intra-arterial therapies (IATs) play a pivotal role in the management of patients with primary and secondary liver malignancies. The unique advantages of these treatments are their ability to selectively deliver a high dose of anticancer treatment while preserving healthy liver tissue. The proven efficacy of these catheter-based locoregional therapies in a highly systemic chemoresistant cancer such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), along with the minimally invasive nature of these treatments, quickly yielded wide acceptance in the medical community and revolutionized the field of Interventional Oncology. In this article, we describe the clinical rationale and background of catheter-based IATs. We provide an overview of clinical achievements of these treatments alone and in combination with sorafenib in patients with HCC. PMID:25978585

  16. High MICs for Vancomycin and Daptomycin and Complicated Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections with Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    San-Juan, Rafael; Viedma, Esther; Chaves, Fernando; Lalueza, Antonio; Fortún, Jesús; Loza, Elena; Pujol, Miquel; Ardanuy, Carmen; Morales, Isabel; de Cueto, Marina; Resino-Foz, Elena; Morales-Cartagena, Alejandra; Rico, Alicia; Romero, María P; Orellana, María Ángeles; López-Medrano, Francisco; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Aguado, José María

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the prognostic role of high MICs for antistaphylococcal agents in patients with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus catheter-related bloodstream infection (MSSA CRBSI). We prospectively reviewed 83 episodes from 5 centers in Spain during April 2011-June 2014 that had optimized clinical management and analyzed the relationship between E-test MICs for vancomycin, daptomycin, oxacillin, and linezolid and development of complicated bacteremia by using multivariate analysis. Complicated MSSA CRBSI occurred in 26 (31.3%) patients; MICs for vancomycin and daptomycin were higher in these patients (optimal cutoff values for predictive accuracy = 1.5 μg/mL and 0.5 μg/mL). High MICs for vancomycin (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-5.5) and daptomycin (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.1-5.9) were independent risk factors for development of complicated MSSA CRBSI. Our data suggest that patients with MSSA CRBSI caused by strains that have high MICs for vancomycin or daptomycin are at increased risk for complications. PMID:27192097

  17. High MICs for Vancomycin and Daptomycin and Complicated Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections with Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Viedma, Esther; Chaves, Fernando; Lalueza, Antonio; Fortún, Jesús; Loza, Elena; Pujol, Miquel; Ardanuy, Carmen; Morales, Isabel; de Cueto, Marina; Resino-Foz, Elena; Morales-Cartagena, Alejandra; Rico, Alicia; Romero, María P.; Orellana, María Ángeles; López-Medrano, Francisco; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Aguado, José María

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the prognostic role of high MICs for antistaphylococcal agents in patients with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus catheter-related bloodstream infection (MSSA CRBSI). We prospectively reviewed 83 episodes from 5 centers in Spain during April 2011–June 2014 that had optimized clinical management and analyzed the relationship between E-test MICs for vancomycin, daptomycin, oxacillin, and linezolid and development of complicated bacteremia by using multivariate analysis. Complicated MSSA CRBSI occurred in 26 (31.3%) patients; MICs for vancomycin and daptomycin were higher in these patients (optimal cutoff values for predictive accuracy = 1.5 μg/mL and 0.5 μg/mL). High MICs for vancomycin (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.2–5.5) and daptomycin (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.1–5.9) were independent risk factors for development of complicated MSSA CRBSI. Our data suggest that patients with MSSA CRBSI caused by strains that have high MICs for vancomycin or daptomycin are at increased risk for complications. PMID:27192097

  18. Initial experience with a steerable intravascular ultrasound catheter in the aorta and pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Görge, G; Ge, J; Haude, M; Baumgart, D; Buck, T; Erbel, R

    1995-07-01

    The aim of this protocol was to test the feasibility and safety of a prototype steerable intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) catheter (Boston Scientific, Waterton, MA) in comparison with standard IVUS catheters. A 3.5F, 20-MHz mechanical echo transducer was incorporated into a bendable sheath with a blunt tip. The flexible IVUS catheter was compared with a standard IVUS catheter in 13 patients. Seven patients underwent catheterization of the left side of the heart, and six patients had catheterization of the right side of the heart for suspected recurrent pulmonary embolism. In the aorta, three lumen area measurements were made: (1) midway between the aortic arch and the aortic root, (2) at the most cranial part of the aorta, and (3) in the descending aorta at the level of the diaphragm. Evaluation of the accuracy of luminal dimension measurements by both types of catheters in perpendicular positions to the vessel wall was evaluated in a hollow rubber cast of an human aorta and its side branches, representing luminal diameters from 3 to 26 mm. We performed 20 measurements with each type of catheter. The results were compared with ruler measurements, after the cast had been cut in slices. The equation for the standard 3.5F IVUS catheter was: y = 0.89x + 0.15; SE = 0.17; r = .97; for the 4.8F 20-MHz standard IVUS catheter: y = 0.97x + 0.05; SE = 0.18; r = .98; and for the steerable catheter, y = 0.94x + 0.09; SE = 0.12; r = 0.97.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7549358

  19. Guide catheter-induced aortic dissection complicated by pericardial effusion with pulsus paradoxus: a case report of successful medical management.

    PubMed

    Fiddler, Magdalene; Avadhani, Sriya A; Marmur, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Aortic dissection is a rare but potentially fatal complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Management strategies of PCI induced dissection are not clearly identified in literature; such occurrences often mandate surgical repair of the aortic root with reimplantation of the coronary arteries. Another trend seen in case reports is the use of coronary-aortic stenting if such lesions permit. Several factors impact the management decision including the hemodynamic stability of the patient; mechanism of aortic injury; size, severity, and direction of propagation of the dissection; presence of an intimal flap; and preexisting atherosclerotic disease. We describe a case of a 65-year-old woman who underwent PCI for a chronic right coronary artery (RCA) occlusion, which was complicated by aortic dissection and pericardial effusion. Our case report suggests that nonsurgical management may also be appropriate for PCI induced dissections, and potentially even those associated with new pericardial effusion. PMID:25685153

  20. Posterior Circulation Stroke After Bronchial Artery Embolization. A Rare but Serious Complication

    SciTech Connect

    Laborda, Alicia; Tejero, Carlos; Fredes, Arturo; Cebrian, Luis; Guelbenzu, Santiago; Gregorio, Miguel Angel de

    2013-06-15

    Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) is the treatment of choice for massive hemoptysis with rare complications that generally are mild and transient. There are few references in the medical literature with acute cerebral embolization as a complication of BAE. We report a case of intracranial posterior territory infarctions as a complication BAE in a patient with hemoptysis due to bronchiectasis.

  1. Successful Embolization of an Ovarian Artery Pseudoaneurysm Complicating Obstetric Hysterectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Rathod, Krantikumar R Deshmukh, Hemant L; Asrani, Ashwin; Salvi, Vinita S; Prabhu, Santoshi

    2005-01-15

    Transcatheter arterial embolization is becoming the therapy of choice for controlling obstetric hemorrhage, affording the ability to control persistent bleeding from pelvic vessels while avoiding the morbidity of surgical exploration. The clinicians are left with little choice if pelvic hemorrhage continues after hysterectomy and ligation of anterior division of both internal iliac arteries. We present one such case of intractable post-obstetric hysterectomy hemorrhage in which an ovarian artery pseudoaneurysm was diagnosed angiographically and successfully embolized, highlighting the role of transcatheter embolization.

  2. Renal Artery Stent Placement Complicated by Development of a Type B Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Haesemeyer, Scott W.; Vedantham, Suresh Braverman, Alan

    2005-01-15

    Percutaneous renal artery angioplasty and stent placement have demonstrated safety and effectiveness in the treatment of selected patients with renovascular hypertension and ischemic nephropathy. Major complications have been predominantly confined to the affected renal artery and kidneys, including renal artery dissection and/or thrombosis, distal embolization, and contrast-related nephropathy. We report a case in which treatment of an ostial renal artery lesion with placement of a balloon-expandable stent was complicated by the development of an acute Type B aortic dissection.

  3. Thrombotic complications in children from short-term percutaneous central venous catheters: what can we do?

    PubMed

    Latham, Gregory J; Thompson, Douglas R

    2014-09-01

    The reported incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in children has increased dramatically over the past decade, and the primary risk factor for VTE in neonates and infants is the presence of a central venous catheter (CVC). Although the associated morbidity and mortality are significant, very few trials have been conducted in children to guide clinicians in the prophylaxis, diagnosis, and treatment of CVC-related VTE. Furthermore, pediatric guidelines for prophylaxis and management of VTE are largely extrapolated from adult data. How then should the anesthesiologist approach central access in children of different ages to lessen the risk of CVC-related VTE or in children with prior thrombosis and vessel occlusion? A comprehensive review of the pediatric and adult literature is presented with the goal of assisting anesthesiologists with point-of-care decision-making regarding the risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment of CVC-related VTE. Illustrative cases are also provided to highlight decision-making in varying situations. The only risk factor strongly associated with CVC-related VTE formation in children is the duration of the indwelling CVC. Several other factors show a trend toward altering the incidence of CVC-related VTE formation and may be under the control of the anesthesiologist placing and managing the catheter. In particular, because children with VTE may live decades with its sequelae and chronic vein thrombosis, careful consideration of lessening the risk of VTE is warranted in every child. Further studies are needed to form a clearer understanding of the risk factors, prophylaxis, and management of CVC-related VTE in children and to guide the anesthesiologist in lessening the risk of VTE. PMID:24814351

  4. The Polar Fluid Model for Blood Flow through a Tapered Artery with Overlapping Stenosis: Effects of Catheter and Velocity Slip

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, J. V. Ramana; Srikanth, D.

    2015-01-01

    The blood flow through an overlapping clogged tapered artery in the presence of catheter is discussed. Since cholesterol deposition is resulting in the stenosis formation, velocity slip at the arterial wall is considered. The equations governing the fluid flow have been solved analytically under the assumption of the mild stenosis. The analysis with respect to various parameters arising out of fluid and geometry considered, on physiological parameters such as impedance and wall shear stress at the maximum height of the stenosis as well as across the entire length of the stenosis has been reported. A table summarizing the locations of extreme heights and the corresponding annular radii is provided. It is observed that the wall shear stress is the same at both the locations corresponding to the maximum height of the stenosis in case of nontapered artery while it varies in case of tapered artery. It is also observed that slip velocity and diverging tapered artery facilitate the fluid flow. Shear stress at the wall is increasing as micropolar parameter is decreasing and the trend is reversed in case of coupling number. The results obtained are validated by comparing them with the experimental and theoretical results. PMID:27018180

  5. Deep Circumflex Iliac Artery Pseudoaneurysm as a Complication of Paracentesis

    PubMed Central

    Satija, Bhawna; Kumar, Sanyal; Duggal, Ramnik K.; Kohli, Supreethi

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a pseudoaneurysm arising from the deep circumflex iliac artery, in an end-stage renal disease patient with gross ascitis, presenting with an anterior abdominal wall hematoma following paracentesis. Duplex Doppler sonography confirmed the presence of the pseudoaneurysm and multidetector computed tomography angiography delineated the detailed arterial anatomy. PMID:22779062

  6. Complications of Umbilical Artery Catheterization in a Model of Extreme Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    McAdams, Ryan M.; Winter, Vicki T.; McCurnin, Don C.; Coalson, Jacqueline J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Umbilical artery catheter (UAC) use is common in the management of critically ill neonates; however, little information exists regarding the anatomic and vascular effects of UAC placement in premature newborns. Methods and Results Baboons were delivered at 125 d of gestation (term = 185 d), treated with surfactant, had UACs placed, and were ventilated for either 6 d or 14 d. Animals were assigned to short-term (6 d, n = 6) and long-term (14 d, n = 30) UAC placement. At necropsy, aortas were removed with UACs still in place. Histological examination of upper, middle, and lower aorta specimens stained with hematoxylin and eosin and immunolabelled to detect smooth muscle (α-actin) was done in a blinded manner. Controls were delivered at 125d, 140d, and 185d and the aortas acquired immediately after birth. None of the non-catheterized control animals (125 d, n = 4; 140 d, n = 5; 185 d, n = 5) had aortic vessel thrombi or vascular wall abnormalities. All 6 animals with short-term (6/6, 100%) and 18 animals with long-term (18/30, 60%) UAC placement displayed aortic thrombi and neointimal proliferation of the vascular wall. The majority (60%) of analyzed animals with UAC placement displaying neointimal hyperplasia were immunopositive for α-actin, indicating the presence of smooth muscle in these lesions. Conclusion Our findings suggest that both short- and long-term UAC use is associated with aortic wall pathological abnormalities compared to control animals. This study emphasizes the judicious use and early removal of UACs if possible in order to potentially prevent significant hemostatic and aortic wall vascular complications. PMID:19554012

  7. Complications after selective embolization in the bilateral internal iliac arteries and the median sacral artery with gelfoam particles in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yetian; Wang, Wei; Wang, Guangye; Yin, Zongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The study aimed to observe the complications after the bilateral internal iliac arteries and the median sacral artery embolization by different severity and combinations of gelfoam particles. Methods: Sixteen healthy adult dogs were randomly divided into five groups. Under the monitoring of digital subtraction angiography (DSA), gelfoam particles with diameter of 50-150 μm were applied. In group A, embolization was performed up to the trunk of bilateral internal iliac arteries and the median sacral artery; in group B, embolization was up to the trunk of bilateral internal iliac arteries; in group C, embolization was up to the first branch of bilateral internal iliac arteries and the median sacral artery; in group D, embolization was up to the trunk of unilateral internal iliac artery and the median sacral artery; in group E embolization was performed up to the trunk of unilateral internal iliac artery. Results: Seven dogs died within 48 hours after embolization. In the dead animals of groups A, C and D, there were rectum necrosis and lamellar obfuscation and hemorrhage edema in bladder. In the histological examination, there are rectum and bladder cell dissociation, inflammatory cell infiltration and epithelial cell ablating in the dead animals. The embolization mainly presented in arterioles with a diameter of 100-200 μm. Conclusion: When gelfoam particles of 50-150 μm in diameter were applied for embolization in the internal iliac artery and median sacral artery, at least unilateral internal iliac artery should be preserved when embolization is performed in the proximal artery and the trunk. PMID:25356191

  8. Transcatheter Embolization of a Renal Arteriovenous Fistula Complicated by an Aneurysm of the Feeding Renal Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Kensella, Denise; Kakani, Nirmal Pocock, Richard; Thompson, John; Cowan, Andrew; Watkinson, A.

    2008-03-15

    Renal arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is rare. Renal AVF complicated by aneurysm of the feeding artery presents a technical challenge for endovascular treatment. We report a case managed by covered stenting of the renal artery aneurysm, coil embolization of the fistula, and bare stenting of the aorta.

  9. Steroid anabolic drugs and arterial complications in an athlete--a case history.

    PubMed

    Laroche, G P

    1990-11-01

    Serious side effects and complications have been attributed to anabolic and androgenic steroids when used for medical reasons or when taken in sports in hopes of increasing strength and, hence, performance. The author presents a case of an athlete who experienced two metachronous arterial complications after taking these drugs: a cerebrovascular accident caused by a carotid artery thrombus that partially embolized to the brain and, later, a severe ischemic episode in a lower limb caused by a diffused distal arterial thrombosis. This patient represents the first reported case of vascular events in an otherwise healthy athlete taking androgens to increase his skeletal muscle mass. PMID:2244701

  10. Intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm complicating corrosive acid poisoning: Diagnosis with CT and treatment with transarterial embolisation

    PubMed Central

    Chalapathi Rao, MV; Rathi, Abhishek A; Reddy, Sharath P; Sahu, Sambit

    2014-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of intercostal artery are very rare. All the published cases have been caused by trauma, either iatrogenic or otherwise. They can cause hemothorax, retroperitoneal hemorrhage or can present as pulsatile chest mass. Doppler ultrasound, contrast-enhanced CT and conventional angiogram can accurately diagnose this condition. All the reported cases have been treated by embolisation, stenting or surgery. We report an unusual case of intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm arising as a complication of corrosive poisoning presenting with hematemesis and treated by glue embolisation. The authors believe this to be the first case of intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm that is non-traumatic, complicating corrosive poisoning and presenting with hematemesis. PMID:25024522

  11. Percutaneous removal of a nonopaque silastic catheter from the pulmonary artery in two premature infants

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang Betau; Hsieng, J.-H.; Lee, B.-C.; Lu, J.-H.; Soong, W.-J.; Chen, S.-J.; Meng, C. C. Laura

    1997-07-15

    A modified snare was made from a 0.016'' guidewire and a 0.1-mm fishing string to remove a nonopaque Silastic catheter via a femoral vein approach in 2 premature infants at the 44th and 120th day of life, respectively. A foldover guidewire loop snare had failed in 1 infant before this technique was successfully applied.

  12. Major complications of cryoballoon catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation and their management.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Tariq; Baydoun, Hassan; Asti, Deepak; Rijal, Jharendra; Teli, Sumaya; Tantray, Mohmad; Bhat, Hilal; Kowalski, Marcin

    2014-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common symptomatic and sustained cardiac arrhythmia. It affects approximately 2-3 million people in the USA alone with an increased incidence and prevalence worldwide. It is associated, in addition to worsening quality of life, with increased morbidity and mortality especially in poorly controlled AF, affecting mostly those older than 65 years of age. Radiofrequency ablation was found to be a good strategy for focal isolation of pulmonary veins triggering from the vulnerable atrial substrate but is a time-consuming procedure and carries the risk of multiple complications like tamponade which could be fatal, atrioesophageal fistula and local thrombus formation at the site of ablation. Cryoballoon ablation with pulmonary vein isolation has emerged in the past few years as a breakthrough novel technology for the treatment of drug-refractory AF. It is a relatively simple alternative for point-by-point radiofrequency ablation of paroxysmal AF and is associated with fewer incidences of fatal complications such as cardiac perforation. As experience with this new tool accumulates, the field faces new challenges in the form of rare compilations including gastroparesis, phrenic nerve palsy, atrioesophageal fistula, pulmonary vein stenosis, thromboembolism pericardial effusion, and tamponade. PMID:25115140

  13. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension-A Deadly Complication of Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pankey, Edward A; Epps, Matthew; Nossaman, Bobby D; Hyman, Albert L; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease with limited therapeutic options. Moreover, when PAH occurs in patients diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, worse outcomes are observed. The purpose of this review is to discuss the etiologies of PAH found in the systemic sclerosis patient, limitations of current medical therapies, and, finally, potential therapies for patients with this combination. PMID:23626904

  14. Port-a-cath embolisation to pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Vijaya Raj; Gupta, Shilpi; Lowry, Joseph; Dhar, Meekoo

    2011-01-01

    Intravascular embolisation of catheter, a relatively uncommon event associated with the use of totally implanted port devices, can have serious cardiovascular, pulmonary and septic complications with an overall mortality of 1.8%. Here, the authors report an asymptomatic patient with pulmonary artery catheter embolisation diagnosed incidentally in a positron emission tomography scan who underwent successful percutaneous extraction of the catheter in an attempt to avoid the possible dreadful complications. PMID:22689667

  15. Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation Elicited "Jackhammer Esophagus": A New Complication Due to Vagal Nerve Stimulation?

    PubMed

    Tolone, Salvatore; Savarino, Edoardo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-10-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is a potentially curative method for treatment of highly symptomatic and drug-refractory atrial fibrillation (AF). However, this technique can provoke esophageal and nerve lesion, due to thermal injury. To our knowledge, there have been no reported cases of a newly described motor disorder, the Jackhammer esophagus (JE) after RFCA, independently of GERD. We report a case of JE diagnosed by high-resolution manometry (HRM), in whom esophageal symptoms developed 2 weeks after RFCA, in absence of objective evidence of GERD. A 65-year-old male with highly symptomatic, drug-refractory paroxysmal AF was candidate to complete electrical pulmonary vein isolation with RFCA. Prior the procedure, the patient underwent HRM and impedance-pH to rule out GERD or hiatal hernia presence. All HRM parameters, according to Chicago classification, were within normal limits. No significant gastroesophageal reflux was documented at impedance pH monitoring. Patient underwent RFCA with electrical disconnection of pulmonary vein. After two weeks, patient started to complain of dysphagia for solids, with acute chest-pain. The patient repeated HRM and impedance-pH monitoring 8 weeks after RFCA. HRM showed in all liquid swallows the typical spastic hypercontractile contractions consistent with the diagnosis of JE, whereas impedance-pH monitoring resulted again negative for GERD. Esophageal dysmotility can represent a possible complication of RFCA for AF, probably due to a vagal nerve injury, and dysphagia appearance after this procedure must be timely investigated by HRM. PMID:26351090

  16. Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation Elicited “Jackhammer Esophagus”: A New Complication Due to Vagal Nerve Stimulation?

    PubMed Central

    Tolone, Salvatore; Savarino, Edoardo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is a potentially curative method for treatment of highly symptomatic and drug-refractory atrial fibrillation (AF). However, this technique can provoke esophageal and nerve lesion, due to thermal injury. To our knowledge, there have been no reported cases of a newly described motor disorder, the Jackhammer esophagus (JE) after RFCA, independently of GERD. We report a case of JE diagnosed by high-resolution manometry (HRM), in whom esophageal symptoms developed 2 weeks after RFCA, in absence of objective evidence of GERD. A 65-year-old male with highly symptomatic, drug-refractory paroxysmal AF was candidate to complete electrical pulmonary vein isolation with RFCA. Prior the procedure, the patient underwent HRM and impedance-pH to rule out GERD or hiatal hernia presence. All HRM parameters, according to Chicago classification, were within normal limits. No significant gastroesophageal reflux was documented at impedance pH monitoring. Patient underwent RFCA with electrical disconnection of pulmonary vein. After two weeks, patient started to complain of dysphagia for solids, with acute chest-pain. The patient repeated HRM and impedance-pH monitoring 8 weeks after RFCA. HRM showed in all liquid swallows the typical spastic hypercontractile contractions consistent with the diagnosis of JE, whereas impedance-pH monitoring resulted again negative for GERD. Esophageal dysmotility can represent a possible complication of RFCA for AF, probably due to a vagal nerve injury, and dysphagia appearance after this procedure must be timely investigated by HRM. PMID:26351090

  17. Aspects of Hyperglycemia Contribution to Arterial Stiffness and Cardiovascular Complications in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gordin, Daniel; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2016-09-01

    Controlling the blood glucose level is of outmost importance for the prevention of the micro- and macrovascular diabetic complications observed in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Although the pathogenesis behind the complex cascade of complications is far from solved, one possible mechanism could be a negative effect of glucose on the arteries resulting in a stiffening of the arteries and ultimately in vascular complications. Intriguingly, patients with T1D have been shown to suffer from premature arterial aging compared to nondiabetic subjects-an association that is even more evident in the presence of diabetic complications such as diabetic nephropathy. Arterial stiffness has in several patient populations been shown to independently predict cardiovascular disease. However, interventional studies aimed at attenuating arterial stiffness to reduce cardiovascular disease in T1D are yet to come. Moreover, most of the data on pharmacological treatments of arterial stiffening are directed toward pathophysiological pathways other than hyperglycemia. Interestingly, the sodium-glucose transport-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor empagliflozin was recently shown to reduce both blood pressure and arterial stiffness in patients with type 2 diabetes. Whether, these effects can also be replicated in patients with T1D is an intriguing question. Tight metabolic and antihypertensive control are still of central importance for the prevention and the treatment of diabetic complications. However, the need for a noninvasive intermediate marker to identify at risk patients for aggressive treatment is evident. One such tool might be arterial stiffness linking diabetes to increased cardiovascular risk. Future research efforts exploring large-scale databases will play a key role in the identification of other clinically useful markers. PMID:26956240

  18. Complications from long-term indwelling central venous catheters in hematologic patients with special reference to infection.

    PubMed

    Kappers-Klunne, M C; Degener, J E; Stijnen, T; Abels, J

    1989-10-15

    Forty-three evaluable patients with hematologic malignancies, mainly acute leukemia, were prospectively randomized to receive a double lumen central venous catheter or a totally implantable venous access system. The mean catheter stay was 166 days (median, 104 days) for the 23 double lumen catheters and 164 days (median, 65 days) for implanted systems. Exit site infections were not encountered in double lumen catheters, but there were two proven infections around the injection port of implanted devices. Tunnel infections did not occur. Seven double lumen catheters and four implanted systems were removed because of infection. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the predominant microorganism cultured from these catheters. Five of nine patients with double lumen catheters and catheter-related S. epidermidis infection and the two patients with implanted systems in whom S. epidermidis was cultured were on selective gut decontamination. The pattern of infection did not seem to be influenced by this regimen. Totally implantable systems proved to be as safe as double lumen central venous lines. PMID:2790689

  19. Association of pre and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications in coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, Camila; Barrile, Silvia Regina; Martinelli, Bruno; Ronchi, Carlos Fernando; Arca, Eduardo Aguilar; Gimenes, Rodrigo; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Okoshi, Katashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To associate the pre- and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Methods The pre- and intraoperative risk factors of individuals of both genders with diagnosis of coronary insufficiency undergoing coronary artery bypass graft have been studied. Results Fifty-eight individuals with median age 62 ± 10 year-old were included in the study, 67% of whom were male. Fourteen (24.1%) patients were smokers, 39 (67.2%) had previous myocardial infarction history, 11 (19%) had undergone coronary angioplasty, 74% had hypertension, 27% had diabetes mellitus, 64% had dyslipidemia and 15.5% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Eighteen (31%) patients presented postoperative complications, most frequent being: infection in surgical incision, difficulties in deambulation, dyspnea, urinary infection and generalized weakness. Male patients had fewer complications than females (P=0.005). Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remained hospitalized for longer time periods (P=0.019). Postoperative complications occurred in 50% of the patients with creatinine increased, while only 27.1% of the patients with normal value of creatinine had complications (P=0.049). In addition, complications occurred in 50% of the patients with diabetes mellitus, while only 23.8% of patients without diabetes mellitus had complications (P=0.032). The intraoperative factors showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusion The preoperative factors are associated with postoperative complications in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:24598958

  20. Coil Embolization of an Arteriobiliary Fistula Caused by Hepatic Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, Hidemasa Doi, Ippei; Makita, Kohzoh; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2005-12-15

    Arteriobiliary fistula is a rare complication of hepatic intra-arterial chemotherapy. We report successful coil embolization of an arteriobiliary fistula. An 80-year-old woman underwent percutaneous placement of an indwelling catheter into the replaced right hepatic artery for intra-arterial chemotherapy of liver metastases. Coil embolization of the left hepatic artery was not performed. The patient complained of abdominal pain during intra-arterial chemotherapy. Angiography revealed a fistula between the replaced right hepatic artery and the common bile duct. The fistula was successfully treated by coil embolization via the indwelling catheter, and the indwelling catheter was removed. Although such complications usually herald the termination of intra-arterial chemotherapy, the patient underwent percutaneous implantation of a new catheter-port system, and intra-arterial chemotherapy was restarted.

  1. Brachial plexus injury as an unusual complication of coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chong, A; Clarke, C; Dimitri, W; Lip, G

    2003-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury is an unusual and under-recognised complication of coronary artery bypass grafting especially when internal mammary artery harvesting takes place. It is believed to be due to sternal retraction resulting in compression of the brachial plexus. Although the majority of cases are transient, there are cases where the injury is permanent and may have severe implications as illustrated in the accompanying case history. PMID:12612322

  2. Uncommon Complication of Uterine Artery Embolization: Expulsion of Infarcted Myoma and Uterine Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Juliana G.; Gaudenti, Dawn; Crespo, Frank; Ganesh, Dervi; Verma, Usha

    2016-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are the most common benign tumors in young females and leading cause of hysterectomy. Uterine artery embolization is a safe option for women who wish to retain their uterus. Several complications have been reported including expulsion and sepsis. MRI is a useful pretreatment tool to predict results and outcomes. We report a case of a 44-year-old female with a history of uterine fibroids with the largest one being intracavitary. Patient underwent uterine artery embolization that was complicated by endomyometritis that failed antibiotics, leading to sepsis and hysterectomy. PMID:27073705

  3. Arterial embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... the artery (arterial bypass) to create a second source of blood supply Clot removal through a balloon catheter placed into the affected artery or through open surgery on the artery (embolectomy) Opening of the ...

  4. Bilateral Giant Coronary Artery Aneurysms Complicated by Acute Coronary Syndrome and Cardiogenic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Peter; Lynch, Donald; Jahanayar, Jama; Rogers, Ian S; Tremmel, Jennifer; Boyd, Jack

    2016-04-01

    Giant coronary aneurysms are rare. We present a 25-year-old woman with a known history of non-Kawasaki/nonatherosclerotic bilateral coronary aneurysms. She was transferred to our facility with acute coronary syndrome complicated by cardiogenic shock. Angiography demonstrated giant bilateral coronary aneurysms and complete occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. Emergent coronary artery bypass grafting was performed. Coronary artery bypass grafting is the preferred approach for addressing giant coronary aneurysms. Intervention on the aneurysm varies in the literature. Aggressive revascularization is recommended in the non-Kawasaki/nonatherosclerotic aneurysm patient, and ligation should be performed in patients with thromboembolic phenomena. PMID:27000621

  5. Retroperitoneal hematoma: an unexpected complication during intervention on an occluded superficial femoral artery via a retrograde popliteal artery approach.

    PubMed

    Akkus, Nuri I; Beedupalli, Jagan; Varma, Jai

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease involvement of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) is common. Different endovascular techniques are used successfully for revascularization of this artery. A retrograde approach to chronic total occlusion (CTO) of the SFA through the ipsilateral popliteal artery has been used occasionally if an antegrade approach is not feasible or has failed. Some of the known complications encountered during this approach are arteriovenous fistula formation at the access site, occlusion of the popliteal artery if closure devices are used, and bleeding. There are no reports of perforation or bleeding of the SFA or the external iliac artery (EIA) during a popliteal approach, probably due to lack of flow in the occluded segment of the SFA. We report a case in which a retroperitoneal hematoma occurred due to retrograde blood flow through the established true channel in the proximal SFA and subsequently to the dissection plane with a wire tip perforation in the EIA, which was treated by stopping retrograde filling with prolonged balloon inflation in the distal SFA before the CTO. PMID:23890758

  6. Perforation of Transverse Colon: A Catastrophic Complication of Uterine Artery Embolization for Fibroids

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Jyotsna Bancroft, Karen; Lay, James

    2012-12-15

    We report a case of a 43-year-old woman who underwent uterine artery embolization (UAE) for a symptomatic large fibroid uterus and had spontaneous perforation of the transverse colon 3 months after embolisation with near-fatal consequences. We believe this is the first reported case in the literature of this serious complication of UAE. We briefly review the literature on bowel complications after UAE and discuss lessons to be learned regarding patient selection and postprocedure follow-up.

  7. Technique, Complication, and Long-Term Outcome for Endovascular Treatment of Iliac Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkan, Ugur Oguzkurt, Levent; Tercan, Fahri

    2010-02-15

    The aim of this study was to report technical details, procedure-related complications, and results of endovascular treatment in chronic iliac artery occlusion. Between 2001 and 2008, endovascular treatments of 127 chronic iliac artery occlusions in 118 patients (8 women and 110 men; mean age, 59 years) were retrospectively reviewed. The study was based on Ad Hoc Committee on Reporting Standards (Society for Vascular Surgery/International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery Standards). All occlusions were treated with stent placement with or without preliminary balloon angioplasty. Kaplan-Meier estimators were used to determine patency rates. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine variables affecting successful recanalization, major complications, early stent thrombosis ({<=}30 days), and primary and secondary patency rates. Initial technical success was achieved in 117 (92%) procedures. Successful recanalization was obtained by antegrade approach in 69 of 77 (90%) procedures and by retrograde approach in 52 of 105 (50%) procedures (p < 0.001). Complications were encountered in 28 (24%) patients [minor in 7 patients (6%) and major in 22 patients (19%)]. One death occurred in the operative period secondary to iliac artery rupture. Early stent thrombosis was seen in eight (7%) patients. Presence of critical limb ischemia (p = 0.03), subintimal recanalization (p = 0.03), and major complication (p = 0.02) were the independent predictors of early stent thrombosis on multivariate analysis. Primary and secondary patency rates at 5 years were 63 and 93%, respectively. Presence of critical limb ischemia, TASC type C iliac lesions, combined occlusions of both common and external iliac arteries, and major complications were associated with decreased patency rates on univariate analysis, whereas these factors were not independent predictors of stent patency on multivariate analysis. In conclusion, endovascular treatment of iliac artery occlusion has a

  8. Complications of chemoport in children with cancer: Experience of 54,100 catheter days from a tertiary cancer center of Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Aparna, S.; Ramesh, S.; Appaji, L.; Srivatsa, Kavitha; Shankar, Gowri; Jadhav, Vinay; Babu, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chemoport is an essential part of the management of children with cancer and provides long-term venous access. There are few studies from resource poor countries reporting complications of chemoport. Aims: This study was aimed at describing the complications of chemoport in patients with cancer. Materials and Methods: This retrospective observational study analyzed 200 patients <15 years of age who underwent chemoport insertion. The medical records of these patients were reviewed for the patient characteristics, diagnosis, nature of port use, port-related complications and their management. Results: A total of 209 ports were implanted in 200 patients and 24 ports were removed due to port-related complications. There were 122 boys and 78 girls whose ages ranged from 4 months to 13 years (median age 2.5 years). About72% of patients were <2 years old. The cumulative duration of catheterization was 54,100 days. Of 209 ports, there were 36 complications that led to the removal of 21 ports. Port-related infection was the most common infection observed in our study (0.66/1000 catheter days and 11.9%). Mechanical complications were seen in 9 patients. Venous thrombosis and skin necrosis occurred in one patient each. Conclusions: Use of chemoport is safe and is a boon for children with cancer in developing countries with incidence of complications similar to Western countries. Although use of chemoport is associated with complications, they are easily managed. With stringent catheter care by trained personnel, some complications can be prevented. PMID:26942147

  9. Visceral and Renal Artery Complications of Suprarenal Fixation during Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Choke, Edward; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria; Dawson, Joseph; Loftus, Ian M.; McFarland, Robert; Loosemore, Thomas; Thompson, Matthew M.

    2007-07-15

    Background. The effect of suprarenal fixation of endovascular grafts on renal and visceral artery function remains undefined. This study aimed to determine renal and visceral artery complications following suprarenal fixation during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVR). Methods. Prospectively collected data from 112 patients who received suprarenal fixation (group SF) and 36 patients who received infrarenal fixation (group IF) in a single institution from December 1997 to April 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Median follow-up was 26 months (range 0.1-101 months). Results. Stent struts extended to or above the level of 106 (94.6%) right renal arteries, 104 (92.9%) left renal arteries, 49 (43.8%) superior mesenteric arteries (SMA), and 7 (6.3%) celiac arteries in group SF. This group had 2 (1.8%) unintentional main renal artery occlusions, of which 1 was successfully treated at the first procedure with a renal stent. There was 1 (0.9%) SMA occlusion which resulted in bowel infarction and death. Group IF had no renal or visceral artery complications. There were no late-onset occlusions or infarcts. There was no significant difference in median serum creatinine between groups SF and IF at 1 month (p = 0.18) and 6 months to 12 months (p 0.22) follow-up. The change in serum creatinine over time was also not significantly different within each group (SF, p = 0.09; IF, p 0.38). Conclusions. In this study, suprarenal fixation was associated with a very small incidence of immediate renal and visceral artery occlusion. There did not appear to be any medium-term sequelae of suprarenal fixation.

  10. A new catheter system for coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J B; Baim, D S; Robert, E W; Harrison, D C

    1982-04-01

    A new catheter system has been designed for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. An independently movable, flexible-tipped guide wire within the balloon dilation catheter facilitates selection of the involved vessel. This guide wire can be passed slowly and carefully beyond the coronary stenosis, permitting safe advancement of the balloon catheter. After testing in animal and cadaver hearts, this system was used in 53 patients (56 stenoses) with single vessel coronary artery disease, with an overall primary success rate of 64 percent. In the last 41 of these 56 cases, use of a balloon catheter with a smaller deflated diameter increased the success rate to 73 percent. In patients with lesions of the left anterior descending coronary artery, the success rate was 89 percent. Three (6 percent) of the 53 patients had complications during coronary arterial dilation that necessitated emergency coronary arterial bypass graft surgery. There were no procedure-related or late cardiac deaths. During the mean follow-up period of 8 months (range 1 to 21), there were one late death (of noncardiac causes) and no late myocardial infarctions. Clinical status was persistently improved in 31 of the 36 patients who had successful dilation. The remaining five patients experienced restenosis at the angioplasty site and return of angina pectoris within 3 months of dilation. Two of these patients had repeat coronary angioplasty with restoration of asymptomatic status, and three had elective coronary bypass graft surgery. PMID:6461241

  11. Numerical simulation of RF catheter ablation for the treatment of arterial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuemei; Nan, Qun; Qiao, Aike

    2015-01-01

    Considering the blood coagulation induced by the heating of radio frequency ablation (RFA) and the mechanism of aneurysm embolization, we proposed that RFA may be used to treat arterial aneurysm. But the safety of this method should be investigated. A finite element method (FEM) was used to simulate temperature and pressure distribution in aneurysm with different electrode position, electric field intensity and ablation time. When the electrode is in the middle of the artery aneurysm sac, temperature rose clearly in half side of artery aneurysm, which is not suitable for RFA. Temperature rose in the whole aneurysm when the electrode is under the artery aneurysm orifice, which is suitable for the ablation therapy. And in this way, the highest temperature was 69.585°C when power was 5.0 V/mm with 60 s. It can promote the coagulation and thrombosis generation in the aneurysm sac while the outside tissue temperature rises a little. Meanwhile, the pressure (10 Pa) at the top of aneurysm sac with electrode insertion is less than that (60 Pa) without electrode, so electrode implant may protect the aneurysm from rupture. The results can provide a theoretical basis for interventional treatment of aneurysm with RFA. PMID:26406013

  12. The 10-year Trend of Periprocedural Complication Following Carotid Artery Stenting; Single Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Jeong-Ho; Kang, Jihoon; Yeo, Min-Ju; Kim, Beom Joon; Jang, Min Uk; Bae, Hee-Joon; Kwon, O-Ki; Hwang, Gyo Jun; Oh, Chang Wan; Jung, Cheolkyu; Lee, Ji Sung; Han, Moon-Ku

    2015-04-15

    PurposeCarotid endarterectomy and stenting are used to treat carotid stenosis, with the volume of carotid artery procedures increasing over the past decade. We investigated the 10-year trend of periprocedural complications with an increasing procedure volume of carotid stenting at a single tertiary hospital.MethodsWe collected 416 consecutive cases (384 patients) of carotid artery stenting performed for either symptomatic (231 cases, 55.5 %) or asymptomatic (185 cases, 44.5 %) internal carotid artery stenosis at a single center. Periprocedural complication was defined as any stroke, myocardial infarction, or death. Procedure-related outcome included any dissection, hemodynamic event, or periprocedural complication.ResultsThe mean age was 68.8 years (82.8 % males; range of 20–89 years); 23.9 % were older than 75 years. Before the procedure, 99.3 and 56.0 % of patients received antiplatelet and lipid-lowering medication, respectively. The overall periprocedural complication rate was 3.6 % (1.6 and 5.2 % in the asymptomatic and symptomatic group, respectively). The composite outcome of any stroke or death was 3.4 %. Periprocedural complication and procedure-related outcome showed a decremental trend with increasing procedure volume, and this trend remained after adjusting for confounders.ConclusionsOur study suggests that carotid stenting at an experienced center might reduce the periprocedural complications. Our periprocedural complication rate of carotid artery stenting may be comparable to, or somewhat lower than, that reported in other clinical trials.

  13. Combined tracheoinnominate artery fistula and tracheoesophageal fistula: A very rare complication of indwelling tracheostomy tube

    PubMed Central

    Dalouee, Marziyeh Nouri; Masuom, Seyed Hossein Fattahi; Rahnama, Ali; Rajai, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Tracheoinnominate artery fistula (TIF) is a serious complication of tracheostomy. If untreated, it could be life-threatening. The emergency approach to the condition that includes prompt diagnosis, rapid control of bleeding with a clear airway, and operation with or without interruption of the innominate artery are the most important factors influencing patient outcome. Tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is another complication of tracheostomy. In association with compromised quality of life, this condition is really hard to be treated. We report a case of combined TIF and TEF in a 27-year-old man with quadriplegia who suffered a car accident but was successfully managed with interruption and ligature of the innominate artery repair of trachea. PMID:27051118

  14. Combined tracheoinnominate artery fistula and tracheoesophageal fistula: A very rare complication of indwelling tracheostomy tube.

    PubMed

    Dalouee, Marziyeh Nouri; Masuom, Seyed Hossein Fattahi; Rahnama, Ali; Rajai, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Tracheoinnominate artery fistula (TIF) is a serious complication of tracheostomy. If untreated, it could be life-threatening. The emergency approach to the condition that includes prompt diagnosis, rapid control of bleeding with a clear airway, and operation with or without interruption of the innominate artery are the most important factors influencing patient outcome. Tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is another complication of tracheostomy. In association with compromised quality of life, this condition is really hard to be treated. We report a case of combined TIF and TEF in a 27-year-old man with quadriplegia who suffered a car accident but was successfully managed with interruption and ligature of the innominate artery repair of trachea. PMID:27051118

  15. Post-traumatic internal mammary artery pseudoaneurysm: A rare complication of pericardiocentesis

    PubMed Central

    Mehra, Sanjay; Buch, Ashesh; Truong, Crystal N; Moshiri, Mariam; Shriki, Jabi E.; Bhargava, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    Before the advent of ultrasound, percutaneous pericardiocentesis was associated with relatively high mortality and complication rates (6% and 20–50%, respectively) [1–3]. Ultrasound (US)-guided pericardiocentesis has dramatically decreased the incidence of complications by direct visualization of the heart and other adjacent vital structures. US helps localize the size and location of the pericardial effusion, measure the distance from the chest wall, localize adjacent, vital organs, and determine the optimal access site to the effusion. We report a case of posttraumatic internal mammary artery pseudoaneurysm, a rare complication of pericardiocentesis. PMID:27141247

  16. Lack of difference between continuous versus intermittent heparin infusion on maintenance of intra-arterial catheter in postoperative pediatric surgery: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Maria Carolina; de Moraes, Maria Antonieta P.; Firpo, Cora Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare two systems of arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery using intermittent or continuous infusion of heparin solution and to analyze adverse events related to the site of catheter insertion and the volume of infused heparin solution. METHODS: Randomized control trial with 140 patients selected for continuous infusion group (CIG) and intermittent infusion group (IIG). The variables analyzed were: type of heart disease, permanence time and size of the catheter, insertion site, technique used, volume of heparin solution and adverse events. The descriptive variables were analyzed by Student's t-test and the categorical variables, by chi-square test, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: The median age was 11 (0-22) months, and 77 (55%) were females. No significant differences between studied variables were found, except for the volume used in CIG (12.0±1.2mL/24 hours) when compared to IIG (5.3±3.5mL/24 hours) with p<0.0003. CONCLUSIONS: The continuous infusion system and the intermittent infusion of heparin solution can be used for intra-arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery, regardless of patient's clinical and demographic characteristics. Adverse events up to the third postoperative day occurred similarly in both groups. However, the intermittent infusion system usage in underweight children should be considered, due to the lower volume of infused heparin solution [ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01097031]. PMID:24473958

  17. A new catheter for tumor-targeting with radioactive microspheres in representative hepatic artery systems--part II: solid tumor-targeting in a patient-inspired hepatic artery system.

    PubMed

    Childress, E M; Kleinstreuer, C; Kennedy, A S

    2012-05-01

    In this second part, the methodology for optimal tumor-targeting is further explored, employing a patient-inspired hepatic artery system which differs significantly from the idealized configuration discussed in Part I. Furthermore, the fluid dynamics of a microsphere supply apparatus is also analyzed. The best radial catheter positions and particle-release intervals for tumor targeting were determined for both the idealized and patient-inspired configurations. This was accomplished by numerically analyzing generated particle release maps (PRMs) for ten equally spaced intervals throughout the pulse. As in Part I, the effects of introducing a catheter were also investigated. In addition to the determination of micro-catheter positioning and, hence, optimal microsphere release, a microsphere-supply apparatus (MSA) was analyzed, which transports the particles to the catheter-nozzle, considering different axial particle injection functions, i.e., step, ramp, and S-curve. A refined targeting methodology was developed which demonstrates how the optimal injection region and interval can be determined with the presence of a catheter for any geometric configuration. Additionally, the less abrupt injection functions (i.e., ramp and S-curve) were shown to provide a more compact particle stream, making them better choices for targeting. The results of this study aid in designing the smart micro-catheter (SMC) in conjunction with the MSA, bringing this innovative treatment procedure one step closer to implementation in clinical practice. PMID:22757493

  18. [Experiences with intra-arterial tumor chemotherapy of malignant liver tumors via totally implantable catheter systems].

    PubMed

    Matthias, M; Ridwelski, K; Wolff, H; Preiss, R; Sperling, P; Lüning, M

    1989-01-01

    Locoregional chemotherapy was applied to 30 patients for isolated, surgically not removable liver tumours (13 colorectal carcinomas, 17 carcinomas on different sites). Ten patients were in Stage I, 16 in Stage II, and four in Stage III. Cytostatics were administered through totally implantable catheter systems. The following therapeutic protocol was mainly used: 5-flourouracil 800-1,000 mg/m2/3hr/die X 5 in 22 days, adriamycin 30 mg/m2/3 hr/die X 2 in 22 days. The average time of treatment amounted to ten months. Cytotoxis side effects were of minor importance. Hepatic side effects, such as chemical hepatitis or sclerosing cholangitis, were not recordable. Reduction of tumour size by 50 percent or more was recorded by computed tomography from 14 cases (46.6 percent). The objectivated rate of responsiveness in patients with colorectal carcinoma was 61.5 percent. The average period up to progression amounted to 12.1 months. Premortal spreading of the disease beyond the liver was recorded from six patients. PMID:2750352

  19. Inverse thermodilution with conventional pulmonary artery catheters for the assessment of cerebral, hepatic, renal, and femoral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Ganter, Christoph C; Buser, Christof; Haenggi, Matthias; Mattes, Hanswilly; Takala, Jukka; Jakob, Stephan M

    2009-08-01

    Assessment of regional blood flow changes is difficult in the clinical setting. We tested whether conventional pulmonary artery catheters (PACs) can be used to measure regional venous blood flows by inverse thermodilution (ITD). Inverse thermodilution was tested in vitro and in vivo using perivascular ultrasound Doppler (USD) flow probes as a reference. In anesthetized pigs, PACs were inserted in jugular, hepatic, renal, and femoral veins, and their measurements were compared with simultaneous USD flow measurements from carotid, hepatic, renal, and femoral arteries and from portal vein. Fluid boluses were injected through the PAC's distal port, and temperature changes were recorded from the proximally located thermistor. Injectates of 2 and 5 mL at 22 degrees C and 4 degrees C were used. Flows were altered by using a roller pump (in vitro), and infusion of dobutamine and induction of cardiac tamponade, respectively. In vitro: At blood flows between 400 mL . min-1 and 700 mL . min-1 (n = 50), ITD and USD correlated well (r = 0.86, P < 0.0001), with bias and limits of agreement of 3 +/- 101 mL . min-1. In vivo: 514 pairs of measurements had to be excluded from analysis for technical reasons, and 976 were analyzed. Best correlations were r = 0.87 (P < 0.0001) for renal flow and r = 0.46 (P < 0.0001) for hepatic flow. No significant correlation was found for cerebral and femoral flows. Inverse thermodilution using conventional PAC compared moderately well with USD for renal but not for other flows despite good in vitro correlation in various conditions. In addition, this method has significant technical limitations. PMID:19033887

  20. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  1. Tips and tricks to avoid periprocedural neurological complications in carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Setacci, C; de Donato, G; Setacci, F; Sirignano, P; Galzerano, G; Kamargianni, V; Cappelli, A

    2013-02-01

    Execution of carotid artery stenting (CAS) requires not only excellent manual dexterity, and a high level of competence, but also in-depth knowledge of the carotid pathology, of the materials available on the market and of the different techniques to apply in given situations. Actually each individual moment of the procedure can be determining for the final result. This review describes each individual step of CAS, including arterial access, carotid engagement, pre-dilatation, the characteristics and use of cerebral protection devices, stent selection and deployment, and post-dilatation. Technical notes and some suggestions are provided on how to minimize the event of periprocedural neurological complications. PMID:23296411

  2. Effects of total thoracoscopic surgery on coronary artery fistulae complicated with ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongbin; Zhang, Liping; Han, Xiuli; Wang, Zhongyu; Xu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of thoracotomy and total thoracoscopic surgery on coronary artery fistulae complicated with ectasia. Methods: Forty-six patients with coronary artery fistulae complicated with ectasia were randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group (n=23) which were given totally thoracoscopic surgery and thoracotomy respectively. Both groups were followed up. Results: All patients survived the surgeries and were discharged from the hospital. The treatment group had significantly less intraoperative blood loss, earlier postoperative ambulation and shorter postoperative hospitalization stay more than those of the control group (P<0.05). The two groups had similar plasm cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels one day before and after surgery. These levels peaked on the postoperative 3rd day, but those of the treatment group were significantly lower (P<0.05). The two groups had similar left and right atrial diameters as well as left ventricular ejection fractions (LVEFs) before surgery, but the treatment group had significantly higher postoperative LVEF (P<0.05) as well as significantly smaller left and right atrial diameters in the postoperative 1st and 3rd months (P<0.05). The treatment group was significantly less prone to postoperative complications such as chest pain, atelectasis and pulmonary infection than the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Total thoracoscopic surgery promoted the recovery of coronary artery fistulae complicated with ectasia, improved cardiac remodeling and cardiac function, and alleviated stress reaction, with well-proved safety. PMID:27022370

  3. Urinary catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider's office. An indwelling catheter has a small balloon inflated on the end of it. This prevents ... When the catheter needs to be removed, the balloon is deflated. CONDOM CATHETERS Condom catheters can be ...

  4. Drug-eluting balloon catheters for lower limb peripheral arterial disease: the evidence to date

    PubMed Central

    Barkat, Mohamed; Torella, Francesco; Antoniou, George A

    2016-01-01

    A significant proportion of patients with severe lower limb peripheral arterial disease require revascularization. Over the past decade, an endovascular-first approach even for complex disease has gained widespread use among vascular specialists. An important limitation of percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty or stenting remains the occurrence of restenosis. Drug-coated balloons have emerged as an exciting technology developed to overcome the limitations of standard balloon angioplasty and stenting. Drug-eluting devices inhibit neointimal growth of vascular smooth muscle cells with the potential of preventing restenosis. This review provides a synopsis of the up-to-date evidence on the role of drug-coated balloons in the treatment of lower limb peripheral arterial disease. Bibliographic searches were conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library electronic database. Eleven randomized clinical trials, two systematic reviews, and a published registry providing the best available evidence were identified. Current evidence suggests that angioplasty with drug-coated balloon is reliable, safe, and efficient in increasing patency rates and reducing target lesion revascularization and restenosis. However, it remains unknown whether these improved results can translate into beneficial clinical outcomes, as current randomized clinical trials have failed to demonstrate a significant benefit in limb salvage and mortality. Further randomized trials focusing on clinical and functional outcomes of drug-eluting balloons and on cost versus clinical benefit are required. PMID:27274265

  5. New developments in the clinical use of drug-coated balloon catheters in peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Naghi, Jesse; Yalvac, Ethan A; Pourdjabbar, Ali; Ang, Lawrence; Bahadorani, John; Reeves, Ryan R; Mahmud, Ehtisham; Patel, Mitul

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) involving the lower extremity is a major source of morbidity and mortality. Clinical manifestations of PAD span the spectrum from lifestyle limiting claudication to ulceration and gangrene leading to amputation. Advancements including balloon angioplasty, self-expanding stents, drug-eluting stents, and atherectomy have resulted in high technical success rates for endovascular therapy in patients with PAD. However, these advances have been limited by somewhat high rates of clinical restenosis and clinically driven target lesion revascularization. The recent introduction of drug-coated balloon technology shows promise in limiting neointimal hyperplasia induced by vascular injury after endovascular therapies. This review summarizes the contemporary clinical data in the emerging area of drug-coated balloons. PMID:27418859

  6. A retrospective review of leg wound complications after coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    East, Susan A; Lorenz, Rebecca A; Armbrecht, Eric S

    2013-10-01

    Little research or attention has been paid to finding out whether wound closure with sutures or staples attains the best outcomes after saphenous vein harvest for coronary artery bypass grafting. We undertook a quality improvement project to compare the prevalence of leg wound complications (eg, infection, seroma, hematoma, dehiscence) between two types of skin closure (ie, staples, subcuticular sutures) after conventional open surgery with bridging between incisions and vein harvesting during coronary revascularization to determine the need for practice changes. We found no significant differences between patients with wound complications and those without. However, in this project, the risk for infections was greater for patients with diabetes whose wounds were closed by using subcuticular sutures. These findings have led to practice changes for reducing leg wound complications within our institution: clinicians now assess patients for increased risk of leg wound complications preoperatively and opt to close wounds with staples for patients who have diabetes. PMID:24075335

  7. Angiographic Characteristics of Catheter-Induced Spasm of the Left Main Coronary Artery.

    PubMed

    Ilia, Reuben; Shimony, Avi; Cafri, Carlos; Weinstein, Jean Marc

    2016-02-15

    Spasm of the left main coronary artery (LM) is considered to be rare. We investigated the angiographic characteristics of the LM in patients with combined LM and disease involving additional vessels, who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and underwent repeat coronary angiography within 5 years of the CABG, to examine the apparent frequency of spasm of the LM on initial angiography and its possible predictors. A retrospective analysis was performed of patients who underwent coronary angiography in our institute, who were found to have significant LM stenosis and disease involving additional vessels, underwent CABG and repeat coronary angiography within 5 years of the CABG. Data on angiographic characteristics of the LM on the initial angiogram were investigated. Of 84 patients, 17 (20%) were found to have a normal LM on repeat angiography (group A), and 67 (80%) demonstrated significant stenosis (group B). The degree of LM stenosis was milder in the initial angiogram in group A than in group B (64 ± 15% vs 72 ± 14%, p = 0.047). Most patients in group A demonstrated tubular LM stenosis at initial catheterization in comparison to group B (71% vs 18%). Using multivariate analysis, the only predictor for a normal LM at repeat catheterization was found to be tubular stenosis at initial catheterization (odds ratio 123, 95% confidence interval 4.0 to 3696). In conclusion, LM coronary spasm is a common finding, particularly in those with the appearance of tubular stenosis, and it should be excluded even in patients with additional coronary disease in certain instances to prevent unnecessary CABG. PMID:26721654

  8. Left Atrial Anatomy Relevant to Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, Damián; Cabrera, José Angel; Saremi, Farhood

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of interventional procedures for the treatment of arrhythmias in humans, especially the use of catheter ablation techniques, has renewed interest in cardiac anatomy. Although the substrates of atrial fibrillation (AF), its initiation and maintenance, remain to be fully elucidated, catheter ablation in the left atrium (LA) has become a common therapeutic option for patients with this arrhythmia. Using ablation catheters, various isolation lines and focal targets are created, the majority of which are based on gross anatomical, electroanatomical, and myoarchitectual patterns of the left atrial wall. Our aim was therefore to review the gross morphological and architectural features of the LA and their relations to extracardiac structures. The latter have also become relevant because extracardiac complications of AF ablation can occur, due to injuries to the phrenic and vagal plexus nerves, adjacent coronary arteries, or the esophageal wall causing devastating consequences. PMID:25057427

  9. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Postpartum Hemorrhage: Indications, Technique, Results, and Complications

    SciTech Connect

    Soyer, Philippe Dohan, Anthony Dautry, Raphael Guerrache, Youcef; Ricbourg, Aude; Gayat, Etienne; Boudiaf, Mourad Sirol, Marc Ledref, Olivier

    2015-10-15

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a potentially life-threatening condition, which needs multidisciplinary management. Uterine atony represents up to 80 % of all causes of PPH. Transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) has now a well-established role in the management of severe PPH. TAE allows stopping the bleeding in 90 % of women with severe PHH, obviating surgery. Pledgets of gelatin sponge as torpedoes are commonly used for safe TAE, and coils, glue, and microspheres have been primarily used in specific situations such as arterial rupture, pseudoaneurysm, and arteriovenous fistula. TAE is a minimally invasive procedure with a low rate of complications, which preserves future fertility. Knowledge of causes of PPH, potential risks, and limitations of TAE is essential for a timely decision, optimizing TAE, preventing irreversible complications, avoiding hysterectomy, and ultimately preserving fertility.

  10. Mycotic pulmonary artery aneurysm: an unusual complication of ventriculo-atrial shunt

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Elliot T.; Callaghan, John C.

    1981-01-01

    A 23-year-old man with a previous ventriculo-atrial shunt for a pinealoma developed a febrile illness and heart murmur. The condition was thought to be caused by subacute bacterial endocarditis. Further investigation, however, revealed a mycotic left pulmonary artery aneurysm, which was treated by means of a left pneumonectomy with cardiopulmonary bypass. Such an aneurysm represents yet another complication of ventriculo-atrial shunting for hydrocephalus. Images PMID:15216218

  11. Does a skeletonized internal thoracic artery give fewer postoperative complications than a pedicled artery for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting?

    PubMed

    Fouquet, Olivier; Tariel, François; Desulauze, Pierre; Mével, Gwenaël

    2015-05-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'Does a skeletonized internal thoracic artery (ITA) give fewer postoperative complications than a pedicled artery for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting?' Altogether, 98 papers were found using the reported search, of which 11 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. Papers about patency of skeletonized versus pedicled internal thoracic artery were excluded. The analysed complications were essentially mediastinitis, superficial sternal infection, wound infection, chest pain and pulmonary function. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Grafts used were either single ITA (LITA or RITA, left or right, respectively) or bilateral ITAs (BITAs). One prospective randomized controlled trial was identified, which found that benefits of skeletonized harvesting included increased graft length, increased graft flow and decreased incidence of mediastinitis. All of the six studies concerning wound infection demonstrate fewer complications when ITA is skeletonized. One of the three papers describing postoperative mortality demonstrated lower 30-day mortality, but there was no long-term analysis. Three studies describing postoperative chest pain reported a lower score on the visual analogue scale (VAS) within 30 days. One of them indicates that the pedicled group has a significantly greater VAS, pain disability index and short-form McGill Pain questionnaire score at 1 and 3 months. The hospital stay was shorter for three studies conducted on this subject. One study about pulmonary function reported a better ratio of pre- versus postoperative values of forced vital capacity. Despite longer operating times, skeletonization leads to fewer wound infections, reduced chest pain, allows a shorter hospital stay and better

  12. Successful Percutaneous Coronary Intervention through a Severely Bent Artificial Ascending Aorta Using the DIO Thrombus Aspiration Catheter.

    PubMed

    Fujikake, Akinori; Komatsu, Takaaki; Taguchi, Isao

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old man was admitted to our institute because of chest pain. He had undergone replacement of the ascending aorta due to aortic dissection 9 years previously. We made a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome, and coronary artery angiography was performed. Although the right coronary artery was successfully cannulated, a severe bend of the artificial aorta made it very difficult to advance the catheter into the left coronary artery. Ultimately, a DIO thrombus aspiration catheter was used to enter the left coronary artery, and a stent was implanted successfully. The DIO catheter is very useful when the selection of a guiding catheter is complicated, such as in the case of severe vessel tortuosity or a bend of the ascending aorta. PMID:27516912

  13. Successful Percutaneous Coronary Intervention through a Severely Bent Artificial Ascending Aorta Using the DIO Thrombus Aspiration Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Fujikake, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old man was admitted to our institute because of chest pain. He had undergone replacement of the ascending aorta due to aortic dissection 9 years previously. We made a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome, and coronary artery angiography was performed. Although the right coronary artery was successfully cannulated, a severe bend of the artificial aorta made it very difficult to advance the catheter into the left coronary artery. Ultimately, a DIO thrombus aspiration catheter was used to enter the left coronary artery, and a stent was implanted successfully. The DIO catheter is very useful when the selection of a guiding catheter is complicated, such as in the case of severe vessel tortuosity or a bend of the ascending aorta. PMID:27516912

  14. Acute embolic occlusion of the right common iliac artery after revision total hip arthroplasty treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis and balloon angioplasty: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongqi; Chen, Song; Chen, Li; Li, Yuefeng; Chai, Yasheng; Wei, Ping; Xu, Shunchi; Liu, Tangyou; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Methods: A 63-year-old woman with atrial fibrillation presented clinical symptoms and signs of acute ischemia in the right lower extremity on the 17th postoperative day after revision total hip arthroplasty of the left hip for aseptic loosening of femoral component. Aspirin was discontinued 7 days before surgery. Both computed tomography angiography and digital subtraction angiography demonstrated complete occlusion of the right common iliac artery. An emergency catheter-directed thrombolysis with urokinase combined with balloon angioplasty was performed to obtain complete patency of the right common iliac artery. Results: The patient received anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy postoperatively and was fine at the 2-year follow-up. Conclusions: This case demonstrated that catheter-directed thrombolysis combined with balloon angioplasty could be an efficacious, minimally invasive approach for the treatment of acute embolic occlusion of the common iliac artery. Preoperative anticoagulation for patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty with long-term use of aspirin for atrial fibrillation needs further investigation.

  15. Urinary retention and acute kidney injury in a tetraplegic patient using condom catheter after partying: a preventable complication

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Selmi, Fahed; Hughes, Peter L; Singh, Gurpreet; Soni, Bakul M

    2015-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injury patients, who manage their bladder using a condom catheter, are at risk of developing urine retention when they consume large volumes of alcoholic drinks within a short period of time. Case presentation A male tetraplegic patient had been managing satisfactorily penile sheath drainage for 8 years. He went out socializing during which he consumed large volumes of alcohol but did not take any recreational drugs. The following morning, he noticed distension of the lower abdomen and passed urine in dribbles. He then developed a temperature and became unwell. He was seen by district nurses and a doctor, who prescribed antibiotics. He continued to feel unwell. After 8 days, he referred himself to a spinal unit at Regional Spinal Injuries Centre, Southport. The blood test results showed the following: blood urea: 19.8 mmol/L; creatinine: 172 μmol/L; and C-reactive protein: 336.4 mg/L. Urethral catheterization led to immediate drainage of 1,400 mL of urine. A computed tomography scan revealed an enlarged, swollen left kidney, indicating acute bacterial nephritis. He was prescribed intravenous fluids and Meropenem. Creatinine decreased to 46 μmol/L. Conclusion Spinal cord injury patients using condom catheters should be made aware of the risk of urine retention when they consume large amounts of alcoholic drinks in a short period of time. Patients and caregivers should be informed to consider intermittent catheterizations for 24–48 hours or insert indwelling urethral catheter when planning for an evening out. PMID:26508892

  16. Multiple Coaxial Catheter System for Reliable Access in Interventional Stroke Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcsar, Zsolt Yilmaz, Hasan; Bonvin, Christophe; Lovblad, Karl O.; Ruefenacht, Daniel A.

    2010-12-15

    In some patients with acute cerebral vessel occlusion, navigating mechanical thrombectomy systems is difficult due to tortuous anatomy of the aortic arch, carotid arteries, or vertebral arteries. Our purpose was to describe a multiple coaxial catheter system used for mechanical revascularization that helps navigation and manipulations in tortuous vessels. A triple or quadruple coaxial catheter system was built in 28 consecutive cases presenting with acute ischemic stroke. All cases were treated by mechanical thrombectomy with the Penumbra System. In cases of unsuccessful thrombo-aspiration, additional thrombolysis or angioplasty with stent placement was used for improving recanalization. The catheter system consisted of an outermost 8-Fr and an intermediate 6-Fr guiding catheter, containing the inner Penumbra reperfusion catheters. The largest, 4.1-Fr, reperfusion catheter was navigated over a Prowler Select Plus microcatheter. The catheter system provided access to reach the cerebral lesions and provided stability for the mechanically demanding manipulations of thromboaspiration and stent navigation in all cases. Apart from their mechanical role, the specific parts of the system could also provide access to different types of interventions, like carotid stenting through the 8-Fr guiding catheter and intracranial stenting and thrombolysis through the Prowler Select Plus microcatheter. In this series, there were no complications related to the catheter system. In conclusion, building up a triple or quadruple coaxial system proved to be safe and efficient in our experience for the mechanical thrombectomy treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

  17. Valve-Like and Protruding Calcified Intimal Flap Complicating Common Iliac Arteries Kissing Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, George S.; Georgakarakos, Efstratios I.; Schoretsanitis, Nikolaos; Argyriou, Christos C.; Antoniou, George A.; Lazarides, Miltos K.

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular therapy for iliac artery chronic total occlusions is nowadays associated with low rates of procedure-related complications and improved clinical outcomes, and it is predominantly used as first-line therapy prior to aortobifemoral bypass grafting. Herein, we describe the case of a patient presenting with an ischemic left foot digit ulcer and suffering complex aortoiliac lesions, who received common iliac arteries kissing stents, illustrating at final antegrade and retrograde angiograms the early recognition of a blood flow obstructing valve-like calcified intimal flap protruding through the stent struts, which was obstructing antegrade but not retrograde unilateral iliac arterial axis blood flow. The problem was resolved by reconstructing the aortic bifurcation at a more proximal level. Completion angiogram verified normal patency of aorta and iliac vessels. Additionally, a severe left femoral bifurcation stenosis was also corrected by endarterectomy-arterioplasty with a bovine patch. Postintervention ankle brachial pressure indices were significantly improved. At the 6-month and 2-year follow-up, normal peripheral pulses were still reported without intermittent claudication suggesting the durability of the procedure. Through stent-protruding calcified intimal flap, is a very rare, but existing source of antegrade blood flow obstruction after common iliac arteries kissing stents. PMID:26783493

  18. Hepatic artery and biliary complications in liver transplant recipients undergoing pretransplant transarterial chemoembolization.

    PubMed

    Goel, Aparna; Mehta, Neil; Guy, Jennifer; Fidelman, Nicholas; Yao, Francis; Roberts, John; Terrault, Norah

    2014-10-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is the treatment of choice for patients with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) not amenable to resection. Locoregional therapies for HCC are often used to reduce tumor burden, bridge patients to LT, and down-stage HCC so that patients are eligible for LT. We hypothesized that prior endovascular antitumor therapy may increase the risk of hepatic artery (HA) and biliary complications after LT. The aim of this study was to compare HA and biliary complications in LT recipients with HCC who received transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) before LT with complications in LT recipients with HCC who did not receive TACE before LT. This was a retrospective cohort study of HCC patients at two transplant centers. The prevalence of HA complications (HA thrombosis, stenosis, or pseudoaneurysm) and biliary complications (nonanastomotic stricture, bile leak, and diffuse injury) were compared between patients treated with or without TACE. There were 456 HCC patients with a median age of 61 years (77% were male, and 63% had hepatitis C virus), and 328 (72%) received TACE before LT. The overall prevalence of HA complications was 4.7% in the no-TACE group and 7.9% in the TACE group (P = 0.22). All HA stenosis complications (n = 14) occurred in the TACE group (P = 0.018 versus the no-TACE group). An older donor age and a lower albumin level significantly increased the odds of HA complications. There was a nonstatistically significant increased odds of HA complications in the TACE group versus the no-TACE group according to an adjusted analysis (odds ratio = 2.02, 95% confidence interval = 0.79-5.16, P = 0.14). The overall prevalence of biliary complications was 16.4% in the no-TACE group and 19.8% in the TACE group (P = 0.40). In conclusion, a lower pre-LT albumin level and an older donor age were significantly associated with higher odds of HA complications after LT. TACE was not associated with higher odds of overall

  19. Limb salvage following iatrogenic arterial injury: complications of cardiac support using intra-aortic balloon pumps.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Adam; Waldin, Owen; Slim, Hani; Brar, Ranjeet

    2016-01-01

    This is a unique case report describing complex limb salvage in a patient who experienced acute limb ischaemia due to a complication of intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) counterpulsation. This case focuses on a patient who had an IABP counterpulsation device inserted following myocardial infarction, requiring urgent coronary artery bypass grafting for acute coronary syndrome. Postoperatively, the IABP could not be removed, with consequent iliac thrombosis and acute limb ischaemia. Emergency femoral-to-femoral crossover bypass was performed using a polytetrafluoroethylene graft. A portion of the IABP balloon tip was entrapped and retained, however, and became the focus of delayed septicaemia, resulting in graft infection and wound breakdown 6 weeks later. Explantation of the residual balloon tip, ligation of the right external iliac artery and redo femoral-femoral crossover using the great saphenous vein were successfully performed. PMID:27268290

  20. Radiocephalic Fistula Complicated by Distal Ischemia: Treatment by Ulnar Artery Dilatation

    SciTech Connect

    Raynaud, Alain; Novelli, Luigi Rovani, Xavier; Carreres, Thierry; Bourquelot, Pierre; Hermelin, Alain; Angel, C.; Beyssen, B.

    2010-02-15

    Hand ischemic steal syndrome due to a forearm arteriovenous fistula is a rare occurrence. However, its frequency is increasing with the rise in numbers of elderly and diabetic patients. This complication, which is more common for proximal than for distal accesses, can be very severe and may cause loss of hand function, damage to fingers, and even amputation of fingers or the hand. Its treatment is difficult and often leads to access loss. We report here a case of severe hand ischemia related to a radiocephalic fistula successfully treated by ulnar artery dilatation.

  1. Tuberculous pseudoaneurysm of the femoral artery complicated by cutaneous tuberculosis of the foot: a case report.

    PubMed

    Leccese, Kathryn; Ferreira, José; Delorme, Jocelyn; Montreuil, Bernard

    2006-09-01

    An infected pseudoaneurysm of the right common femoral artery in a 69-year-old patient receiving methotrexate therapy was confirmed to have been caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. After surgical excision of the aneurysm and revascularization using femoral vein, cutaneous manifestations of M tuberculosis infection in the foot complicated the course. We hypothesized that methotrexate may have triggered the reactivation of dormant tuberculosis in this patient. Because extrapulmonary tuberculous pseudoaneurysms are clinically similar to other types of infected pseudoaneurysm, M tuberculosis infection should always be suspected during the initial diagnosis. We propose that mycobacterial cultures should be routine when initial cultures and Gram stain are negative. PMID:16950450

  2. Immediate- and short-term outcome following recanalization of long chronic total occlusions (> 50 mm) of native coronary arteries with the Frontrunner catheter.

    PubMed

    Loli, Akil; Liu, Rex; Pershad, Ashish

    2006-06-01

    Thirty percent of diagnostic angiograms have at least 1 chronic total occlusion (CTO). The 10-year survival of patients with a CTO is improved if they have the CTO successfully recanalized. The success of recanalization with conventional wires is 50% and the impact of new technology on recanalization is unknown. This abstract reports a single center experience with one such new device, the Lumend Frontrunner catheter in revascularization of this difficult lesion subset. A consecutive series of 18 patients with CTO's of native coronary arteries were enrolled in this single center, single operator series. The mean age of the CTO was 5.3 years. The indication for attempt at recanalization was ischemia in the territory of the CTO on SPECT imaging. Success was defined as TIMI flow restoration and < 40% residual stenosis. Primary success (defined as TIMI 3 Flow restoration and < 40% residual stenosis) was achieved in 77% of patients. At 30 days and out to 6 months, clinical TVR was 11% (2/18) in this difficult lesion subset. Conventional predictors of failure to recanalize CTOs do not appear to hold true with the use of the Frontrunner catheter. In this small series, dual cusp injections and use of the Microglide catheter appears to correlate with favorable outcomes. Fluoroscopy times and contrast use are high when attempting recanalization of CTOs with this technology. PMID:16775901

  3. [Pilote strategy to optimize an individual treatment of arterial hypertention and algorithm of the prophylactics of vascular complications].

    PubMed

    Tolstopiatov, S M

    2006-12-01

    Ischemic stroke (IS) and myocardial infarction are very serious complications of arterial hypertention (AH). To prevent such complications it is important to control the level of arterial pressure, state of lipid spectre and to reveal hypercoagulation in blood which is a predictor to the formation of thrombi and after its severity degree to find clinical homeostatic risk factor, individual dose of an antiaggregant medication and its application. 146 patients with II-III stage arterial hypertention were observed using "Koaguloscop-TC" apparatus. 36 parameters reflecting the formation of all phases of coagulation cascade and the fibrinolysis system of these patients have been studied. To optimize individual treatment of arterial hypertention and prophylactics of vascular complications is necessary to prescribe a complex treatment including antihypertensive, hypolypidemic and antiagragative agents. PMID:17427421

  4. Permcath Catheter Embolization: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yousefshahi, Hadi; Bina, Payvand; Yousefshahi, Fardin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, many types of intravascular devices and catheters are used in order to diagnose and treat diseases. Complications related to these instruments are the costs that doctors and patients have to pay to benefit from their advantages. Catheter embolization is one of these side effects. Patients with devices in their cardiopulmonary system are at risk for severe complications such as arrhythmias, pulmonary embolism, myocardial injuries, hemoptysis, thrombosis and perforation. Case Presentation: A 50-years-old woman, with a history of breast cancer, had a PermCath emplacement in right subclavian vein for a course of chemotherapy. The treatment for cancer seemed to be successful and the PermCath had remained in its position without complication, for a couple of years however, the catheter was founded broken and embolized to the right ventricle and the main left pulmonary artery, diagnosed by a chest X-ray study incidentally. Conclusions: It is better to remove the unused devices safely to prevent and decrease their possible complications. PMID:25964881

  5. Anatomical features of the vertebral artery for transbrachial direct cannulation of a guiding catheter to perform coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms in the posterior cerebral circulation

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Tomonori; Miyazaki, Yuichi; Tanno, Yuhei; Kasakura, Shigen; Aoyagi, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Background Transbrachial approach is an alternative technique for coil embolization of posterior circulation aneurysms. The purpose of our study was to investigate the anatomical features of the vertebral artery (VA) for transbrachial direct VA cannulation of a guiding catheter (GC) to perform coil embolization of posterior circulation aneurysms. Methods Included in retrospective analysis were patients who underwent transbrachial coil embolization of cerebral aneurysms in the posterior cerebral circulation by direct VA cannulation of a GC from 2007 to 2013. Investigated were patient characteristics, preoperative sizes of aneurysms, aneurysms location, the angle formed by the target VA and the subclavian artery (AVS), and the VA diameter at the level of the fourth cervical vertebral body (VAD) in the side of the transbrachial access route. Results Thirty-one patients with 32 aneurysms met our criteria. The locations of aneurysms were the VA (n = 16), basilar artery (BA) tip (n = 10), BA trunk (n = 3), BA superior cerebellar artery (n = 1), BA anterior inferior cerebellar artery (n = 1), and VA posterior inferior cerebellar artery (n = 1). The right brachial artery was punctured in 27 cases with 28 aneurysms as transbrachial direct cannulation of a GC, and left was in 4 cases with 4 aneurysms. The average AVS, ranging from 45° to 95°, was 77°, and the average VAD, ranging from 3.18 to 4.45 mm, was 3.97 mm. Conclusion For transbrachial direct cannulation of a GC, it seems required that the AVS is about 45° or more and the VAD is about 3.18 mm or more. PMID:25964434

  6. Profunda Femoris Artery Perforator Propeller Flap: A Valid Method to Cover Complicated Ischiatic Pressure Sores.

    PubMed

    Scalise, Alessandro; Tartaglione, Caterina; Bolletta, Elisa; Pierangeli, Marina; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old paraplegic man with a complicated grade III/IV ischiatic pressure sore treated with a propeller flap based on the first perforator of the profunda femoris artery. Our aim was to surgically reconstruct an ischiatic pressure sore in a patient with ankylosis using a fasciocutaneous perforator propeller flap obtained from the posterior region of the thigh. Our decision to perform a profunda femoris artery perforator propeller flap reconstruction was mainly due to the anatomical contiguity of the flap with the site of the lesion and the good quality of the skin harvested from the posterior region of the thigh. The use of the perforator fasciocutaneous flap represents a muscle-sparing technique, providing a better long-term result in surgical reconstruction. The choice of the 180-degree propeller flap was due to its ability to provide a good repair of the pressure ulcer and to pass over the ischiatic prominence in the patient in the forced decubitus position. The operatory course did not present any kind of complication. Using this reconstructive treatment, we have obtained complete coverage of the ischiatic pressure sore. PMID:26495200

  7. Profunda Femoris Artery Perforator Propeller Flap: A Valid Method to Cover Complicated Ischiatic Pressure Sores

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglione, Caterina; Bolletta, Elisa; Pierangeli, Marina; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We report the case of a 50-year-old paraplegic man with a complicated grade III/IV ischiatic pressure sore treated with a propeller flap based on the first perforator of the profunda femoris artery. Our aim was to surgically reconstruct an ischiatic pressure sore in a patient with ankylosis using a fasciocutaneous perforator propeller flap obtained from the posterior region of the thigh. Our decision to perform a profunda femoris artery perforator propeller flap reconstruction was mainly due to the anatomical contiguity of the flap with the site of the lesion and the good quality of the skin harvested from the posterior region of the thigh. The use of the perforator fasciocutaneous flap represents a muscle-sparing technique, providing a better long-term result in surgical reconstruction. The choice of the 180-degree propeller flap was due to its ability to provide a good repair of the pressure ulcer and to pass over the ischiatic prominence in the patient in the forced decubitus position. The operatory course did not present any kind of complication. Using this reconstructive treatment, we have obtained complete coverage of the ischiatic pressure sore. PMID:26495200

  8. Another late complication after endovascular aneurysm repair: aneurysmal degeneration at the iliac artery landing site.

    PubMed

    Agu, Obekieze; Boardley, Dee; Adiseshiah, Mohan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a hitherto underreported late complication of infrarenal endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), namely type Ib endoleakage resulting from aneurysmal degeneration at the iliac artery landing site. In a prospectively recorded audit, between 1994 and 2007, 297 patients underwent EVAR. All cases that developed iliac artery aneurysm (IAA) were studied. Ten cases of IAA in seven patients (2.4% of the cohort) developed 5 to 9 years after EVAR. Eight of the 10 involved the lower landing site of the stent graft. Landing site diameter before EVAR was 12 mm (range 10-15 mm). Three IAAs presented as emergencies with rapidly expanding sacs and impending rupture. All cases underwent further endovascular intervention with no < 30-day mortality. Iliac artery landing site aneurysm formation after EVAR occurs uncommonly after 5 or more years. It should be regarded as an indication for intervention prior to type Ib endoleakage development. The need for lifelong surveillance is highlighted. PMID:19344588

  9. Predictive value of arterial ammonia for complications and outcome in acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, V; Singh, R; Acharya, S K

    2006-01-01

    Background and aim In acute liver failure (ALF), the brain is exposed to high levels of ammonia. Human studies defining the clinical significance of ammonia in ALF are lacking. This prospective study evaluated the relationship of arterial ammonia levels at admission to complications and survival among patients with ALF. Methods Eighty consecutive ALF patients admitted from March 2001 to December 2003 were followed up until death or complete recovery. All had arterial ammonia estimation at admission (enzymatic method). Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of mortality. Results Forty two (52.5%) patients died. Non‐survivors had significantly higher median ammonia levels than survivors (174.7 v 105.0 μmol/l; p<0.001). An arterial ammonia level of ⩾ 124 μmol/l was found to predict mortality with 78.6% sensitivity and 76.3% specificity, and had 77.5% diagnostic accuracy. Patients with higher ammonia levels also developed more complications, including deeper encephalopathy (p = 0.055), cerebral oedema (p = 0.020), need for ventilation (p<0.001), and seizures (p = 0.006). Logistic regression analysis showed that pH, presence of cerebral oedema, and arterial ammonia at admission were independent predictors of mortality (odds ratios 6.6, 12.6, and 10.9, respectively). Incorporating these variables, a score predicting mortality risk at admission was derived: 2.53 + 2.91 ammonia + 2.41 oedema + 1.40 pH, where ammonia is scored as 0 (if <124 μmol/l) or 1 (if ⩾124 μmol/l); oedema is scored as 0 (absent) or 1(present); and pH is scored as 1 (if ⩽7.40) or 0 (if >7.40). Levels of partial pressure of ammonia were equally correlated with outcome. Conclusion Arterial ammonia at presentation is predictive of outcome and can be used for risk stratification. Ammonia lowering therapies in patients with ALF should be evaluated. PMID:16024550

  10. Failure rate and complications associated with the use of spinal catheters for the management of inadvertent dural puncture in the parturient: a retrospective comparison with re-sited epidural catheters.

    PubMed

    Tien, Michael; Peacher, Dionne F; Franz, Amber M; Jia, Shawn Y; Habib, Ashraf S

    2016-05-01

    Objective To report on the failure rate of spinal catheters placed following inadvertent dural puncture (IDP) compared with re-sited epidural catheters in the obstetric population. Research design and methods Patients who experienced IDP during epidural or combined spinal epidural placement with 17 or 18 gauge Tuohy needles for labor analgesia between 2003 and 2014 were identified using our post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) database. Patients were categorized into two groups: those who had spinal catheters inserted and those who had epidural catheters re-sited. Main outcome measure Failure rate associated with spinal or re-sited epidural catheters (defined as need for repeat block or alternative analgesic modality). Secondary outcomes were incidence of PDPH, need for epidural blood patch (EBP), and adverse events. Results A total of 109 patients were included in the final analysis; 79 ultimately had spinal catheters and 30 ultimately had re-sited epidural catheters. There were no differences between spinal catheters and re-sited epidural catheters in failure rate (22% vs. 13%, P = 0.33), incidence of PDPH (73% vs. 60%, P = 0.24), need for EBP (42% vs. 30%, P = 0.28), number of headache days, or maximum headache scores. There was also no difference in the rate of adverse events including high block levels, hypotension, and fetal bradycardia (9% vs. 7%, P = 1.0) between the two groups. Conclusions There were no differences in failure rates, PDPH outcomes, or adverse events between spinal catheters and re-sited epidural catheters following IDP in parturients receiving labor analgesia. Limitations of the study include its single-center retrospective non-randomized design, and the uneven number of patients in the two groups with a relatively small number in the re-sited epidural catheter group. PMID:26818623

  11. Catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Goede, Matthew R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are a common, frequently preventable complication of central venous catheterization. CR-BSIs can be prevented by strict attention to insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters and removing unneeded catheters as soon as possible. Antiseptic- or antibiotic-impregnated catheters are also an effective tool to prevent infections. The diagnosis of CR-BSI is made largely based on culture results. CR-BSIs should always be treated with antibiotics, and except in rare circumstances the infected catheter needs to be removed. PMID:19281894

  12. Late Complication after Superficial Femoral Artery (SFA) Aneurysm: Stent-graft Expulsion Outside the Skin

    SciTech Connect

    Pecoraro, Felice Sabatino, Ermanno R.; Dinoto, Ettore; Rosa, Giuliana La; Corte, Giuseppe; Bajardi, Guido

    2015-10-15

    A 78-year-old man presented with a 7-cm aneurysm in the left superficial femoral artery, which was considered unfit and anatomically unsuitable for conventional open surgery for multiple comorbidities. The patient was treated with stent-graft [Viabhan stent-graft (WL Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ)]. Two years from stent-graft implantation, the patient presented a purulent secretion and a spontaneous external expulsion through a fistulous channel. No claudication symptoms or hemorrhagic signs were present. The pus and device cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus sensitive to piperacillin/tazobactam. Patient management consisted of fistula drainage, systemic antibiotic therapy, and daily wound dressing. At 1-month follow-up, the wound was closed. To our knowledge, this is the first case of this type of stent-graft complication presenting with external expulsion.

  13. From arterial hypertension complications to von Hippel-Lindau syndrome diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kozaczuk, Sylwia; Ben-Skowronek, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome is a rare, genetically based, autosomal dominant disorder. Its course is accompanied by the development of multiple neoplasms with the following tumours diagnosed most commonly in the central nervous system haemangioblastoma, clear cell renal cell carcinoma, phaeochromocytomas, pancreatic islet tumours, and endolymphatic sac tumours. Additionally, renal and pancreatic cystadenomas and epididymal cystadenomas have been diagnosed in males and cystadenomas of the broad ligament of the uterus have been diagnosed in females.The following paper presents the diagnostic way in a boy with vision disorders as the first symptom. Hypertension retinopathy and extremely elevated blood pressure were observed during ophthalmologic consultation. Complications of arterial hypertension were confirmed by echocardiography, which diagnosed hypertension cardiomyopathy. Hypertension retinopathy was confirmed by optical coherence tomography. Examinations performed in the neurology, cardiology, and finally endocrinology indicated a bilateral phaeochromocytoma as the cause of arterial hypertension. Moreover, some genetic investigations showed a mutation in the VHL ex.1 p.Y112 C gene responsible for the hereditary form of phaeochromocytoma which confirmed von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. After surgical treatment of phaeochromocytoma the patient needed careful management according to the surveillance protocol for von Hippel-Lindau disease. PMID:26268347

  14. Left lateral free wall pathway ablation complicated by plaque rupture and acute occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Bekir Serhat; Alihanoglu, Yusuf Izzettin; Kilic, Ismail Dogu; Evrengul, Harun

    2014-06-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation of accessory bypass tracts associated with the Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome has become the treatment of choice for many arrhythmias. Complications are unusual and acute coronary artery occlusion is very rare. We here present a 38-year-old male patient with an acute occlusion of proximal left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery after RF ablation of a left free wall accessory pathway. An interesting feature is the site of the coronary artery occlusion which is remote from the RF application site. The occlusion was successfully treated with the placement of an intracoronary stent. PMID:25029886

  15. The Effects of Catheter-Based Radiofrequency Renal Denervation on Renal Function and Renal Artery Structure in Patients With Resistant Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Yang, Kan; Jiang, Feng-Lin; Zeng, Li-Xiong; Jiang, Wei-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Yan

    2014-01-01

    There are no clinical studies on the effects of catheter-based radiofrequency renal denervation (RDN) on renal artery structure using 64-detector computed tomography (CT). A total of 39 patients with resistant hypertension received RDN and 38 patients received drug treatment. Mean systolic pressure and diastolic pressure in the RDN group decreased after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of procedure (P<.05) and urinary protein level significantly decreased after 6 and 12 months (P<.05). The diameter, length, and sectional area of the renal artery; number of cases of atherosclerosis; and plaque burden of 64-detector CT renal arteriography did not change at 12 months of follow-up (P<.05), whereas the plaque burden increased significantly in the control group (P<.05). RDN significantly and persistently reduced blood pressure and decreased urinary protein excretion rate in patients with resistant hypertension and did not exhibit any adverse effect on renal function and renal artery structure. PMID:25039997

  16. Perforation of the Right Ventricle Induced by Pulmonary Artery Catheter at Induction of Anesthesia for the Surgery for Liver Transplantation: A Case Report and Reviewed of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria; Apinagés dos Santos, Erick; Adans Wenzinger, Daniel; Alkmim-Teixeira, Gil Cezar; Neto, Gerardo Cristino de M.; Sankarankutty, Ajith Kumar; de Castro e Silva, Orlando; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Basile-Filho, Anibal

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a 45-year-old male patient diagnosed with liver cirrhosis by hepatitis C and alcohol, with a Child-Pugh score C and a model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score of 27, and submitted to liver transplantation. The subject underwent insertion of the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) in the right internal jugular vein, with technical difficulty concerning catheter advance. There was sudden hypotension, increase in central venous pressure (CVP), and decrease in SvO2 15 minutes after the PAC had been inserted, followed by cardiorespiratory arrest in pulseless electrical activity (PEA), which was promptly assisted with resuscitation. Pericardiocentesis was performed without success, so the individual was subjected to a subxiphoid pericardial window, which led to output of large amounts of blood as well as PEA reversal to sinus rhythm. Sternotomy was performed; rupture of the apex of the right ventricle (RV) was detected, and suture of the site was accomplished. After hemodynamic stabilization, the patient was transferred to the ICU, where he developed septic shock and, despite adequate therapy, died on the eighteenth day after ICU admission. PMID:20066172

  17. Clinical Efficacy and Complications of Uterine Artery Embolization in Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Mohammadgharib; Jalilian, Nasrin; Salehi, Ayoub; Ayazi, Mojgan

    2016-01-01

    We decided to evaluate the efficacy and complications of uterine artery embolization (UAE) in patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids. Sixty-five premenopausal patients, without considering the fibroids size and its location, were treated by bilateral UAE. At baseline and after 3, 6, and 12 months MRI was obtained to determine the uterine length and fibroid diameter. In addition, symptoms of the patients were documented at these follow-up schedules. UAE was successful in 62 (95.4%) cases. Complete infarction rate of the fibroid was 83.1%. After 12 months, the uterine length showed a decrease of 55.7% (mean of 9.4 cm) and the diameter of the dominant fibroid revealed a decrease of 52.1% (mean of 3.4 cm). Menorrhagia improved in 45 cases (91.8%), abdominal mass in 24 cases (82.28%), urinary symptoms in 17 cases (85%), pelvic pain in 21 cases (84%), and dysmenorrhea in 25 cases (80.6%). At final follow-up performed after one year, complete infarction of the fibroma was demonstrated in 49 patients (83.1%). Two cases achieved successful pregnancy in the one year follow-up period. Five patients developed post-embolization syndrome which necessitated admission to the hospital. Twenty-two patients presented and complained of pain for which outpatient pain management was done. UAE was a successful treatment for uterine fibroids that preserved the uterus, had minimal complications, and required short hospitalization and recovery. PMID:26925914

  18. Clinical Efficacy and Complications of Uterine Artery Embolization in Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Mohammadgharib; Jalilian, Nasrin; Salehi, Ayoub; Ayazi, Mojgan

    2016-01-01

    We decided to evaluate the efficacy and complications of uterine artery embolization (UAE) in patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids. Sixty-five premenopausal patients, without considering the fibroids size and its location, were treated by bilateral UAE. At baseline and after 3, 6, and 12 months MRI was obtained to determine the uterine length and fibroid diameter. In addition, symptoms of the patients were documented at these follow-up schedules. UAE was successful in 62 (95.4%) cases. Complete infarction rate of the fibroid was 83.1%. After 12 months, the uterine length showed a decrease of 55.7% (mean of 9.4 cm) and the diameter of the dominant fibroid revealed a decrease of 52.1% (mean of 3.4 cm). Menorrhagia improved in 45 cases (91.8%), abdominal mass in 24 cases (82.28%), urinary symptoms in 17 cases (85%), pelvic pain in 21 cases (84%), and dysmenorrhea in 25 cases (80.6%). At final follow-up performed after one year, complete infarction of the fibroma was demonstrated in 49 patients (83.1%). Two cases achieved successful pregnancy in the one year follow-up period. Five patients developed post-embolization syndrome which necessitated admission to the hospital. Twenty-two patients presented and complained of pain for which outpatient pain management was done. UAE was a successful treatment for uterine fibroids that preserved the uterus, had minimal complications, and required short hospitalization and recovery. PMID:26925914

  19. Use of an Intravascular Warming Catheter during Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in a Patient with Severe Cold Hemagglutinin Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bracey, Arthur W.; Baker, Kelty R.; Reul, Ross M.; Chen, Alice J.

    2016-01-01

    Cold hemagglutinin disease with broad thermal amplitude and high titers presents challenges in treating cardiac-surgery patients. Careful planning is needed to prevent the activation of cold agglutinins and the agglutination of red blood cells as the patient's temperature drops during surgery. We describe our approach to mitigating cold agglutinin formation in a 77-year-old man with severe cold hemagglutinin disease who underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery without the use of preoperative plasmapheresis. This experience shows that the use of an intravascular warming catheter can maintain normothermia and prevent the activation and subsequent formation of cold agglutinins. To our knowledge, this is the first reported use of this technique in a patient with cold hemagglutinin disease. The chief feature in this approach is the use of optimal thermal maintenance—rather than the more usual decrease in cold-agglutinin content by means of therapeutic plasma exchange. PMID:27547154

  20. Use of an Intravascular Warming Catheter during Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in a Patient with Severe Cold Hemagglutinin Disease.

    PubMed

    Tholpady, Ashok; Bracey, Arthur W; Baker, Kelty R; Reul, Ross M; Chen, Alice J

    2016-08-01

    Cold hemagglutinin disease with broad thermal amplitude and high titers presents challenges in treating cardiac-surgery patients. Careful planning is needed to prevent the activation of cold agglutinins and the agglutination of red blood cells as the patient's temperature drops during surgery. We describe our approach to mitigating cold agglutinin formation in a 77-year-old man with severe cold hemagglutinin disease who underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery without the use of preoperative plasmapheresis. This experience shows that the use of an intravascular warming catheter can maintain normothermia and prevent the activation and subsequent formation of cold agglutinins. To our knowledge, this is the first reported use of this technique in a patient with cold hemagglutinin disease. The chief feature in this approach is the use of optimal thermal maintenance-rather than the more usual decrease in cold-agglutinin content by means of therapeutic plasma exchange. PMID:27547154

  1. Risk Factors and Complications Associated with Difficult Retrieval of Embolic Protection Devices in Carotid Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Lian Xuegan; Liu Wenhua; Li Min; Lin Min; Zhu Shuanggen; Sun Wen; Yin Qin; Xu Gelin; Zhang Renliang; Liu Xinfeng

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the risk factors and complications of difficult retrieval (DR) of embolic protection devices (EPDs) in carotid artery stenting (CAS). Methods: A total of 195 consecutive patients who underwent CAS between December 2007 and March 2010 in a general hospital were enrolled and divided into two groups: with DR and without DR. The risk factors of DR were analyzed with univariate and multivariate analyses. The complications of DR were recorded and analyzed. Results: A total of 30 (15.4%) patients with DR of EPDs were observed, of whom EPDs were successfully retrieved in 29, and in 1 was it taken out by surgical treatment. The retrieval time was significantly longer in patients with DR (490.5 {+-} 143.9 s) than in patients without DR (157.2 {+-} 15.7 s, p = 0.000). Vasospasm was observed more frequently in patients with DR than in patients without DR (55.2% vs. 14.5%, p = 0.000). Intracranial compilations were more frequent in patients with DR than in those without DR (17.2% vs. 0.6%, p = 0.000). Calcified plaques, degree of residual stenosis, types of the stents, and tortuosity index (TI > 80 Degree-Sign) were all associated with DR. A logistic regression analysis indicated that calcified plaques (odds ratio (OR) = 6.5; p = 0.000) and TI > 80 Degree-Sign (OR = 18.8; p = 0.000) were independent predictors of DR. Conclusions: Calcified plaques and TI > 80 Degree-Sign may be related to DR in patients with CAS. DR may lengthen the retrieving time and increase the complications of the procedure.

  2. Femoral Arteriovenous Fistula Associated With Leg Swelling 6 Months After Removal of a Hemodialysis Catheter: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lie; Wang, Jian; Wu, Chuifen; Shao, Chuxiao; Yu, Xueping; Lei, Wenhui

    2015-10-01

    Double-lumen catheters have been used widely to obtain temporary access in patients who are in need of acute hemodialysis (HD) because of acute renal failure. Several complications are associated with the insertion of these catheters, including bleeding, infection, injuries to arteries, and deep venous thrombosis. An arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is a rare but significant complication following catheterization for temporary HD. Herein, we present a case of AVF associated with leg swelling 6 months after the removal ofa double-lumen HD catheter. We describe a special case of a 42-year-old man who experienced acute renal failure secondary to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). A 12-Fr dialysis catheter was inserted in the right femoral vein. Six months after catheter removal, the patient was admitted for pain and swelling in the right leg. Color Doppler ultrasound and three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) revealed an AVF between the right femoral vein and the right femoral superficial artery. The fistula was repaired successfully by vascular surgeons. This case highlights that an AVF is a rare but significant complication after catheterization for temporary HD. The nephrologist should be wary of the potential of this complication and perform clinical and medical examinations at the insertion and removal of temporary HD catheters. PMID:26448032

  3. A comprehensive approach to the prevention of central venous catheter complications: results of 10-year prospective surveillance in pediatric hematology-oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Simone; Cavaliere, Mara; Pegoraro, Anna; Gamba, Piergiorgio; Zadra, Nicola; Tridello, Gloria

    2016-04-01

    We report our decennial experience with 1161 newly-placed long-term central venous catheters inserted in 919 hematology-oncology patients for a total of 413,901 CVC-days of observation. Most of the CVCs were partially-implanted, open-ended, Broviac-Hickman type of CVC (95 %). One thousand and twenty-four complications were recorded equal to 2.47 per 1000 CVC-days. The frequency of complications per CVC, the rate of episodes per 1000 CVC-days, and removal rate were malfunction/occlusion 42 %, 1.18/1000, and 2.3 %; mechanical (dislodgement/rupture/kinking) 18.3 %, 0.51/1000, and 77.4 %; bacteremia 14.8 %, 0.42/1000, and 18.6 %; exit-site/tunnel infection 11.5 %, 0.32/1000, and 9.7 %; thrombosis 0.86 %, 0.02/1000, and 30 %; pneumothorax 0.52 %, 0.01/1000, and 0. In multivariate analysis, the risk factors were for mechanical complications, a younger age <6.1 years at CVC insertion (HR 1.8, p = 0.0006); for bacteremia, a double lumen CVC (HR 3.1, p < 0.0001) and the surgical modality of CVC insertion (HR 1.5, p = 0.03); for exit-site/tunnel infection, a double lumen CVC (HR 2.1, p = 0.0003) and a diagnosis of leukemia or lymphoma (HR 1.8, p = 0.01); for malfunction/occlusion, an age <6.1 years (HR 1.6, p = 0.0003), the diagnosis of leukemia or lymphoma (HR 1.9, p < 0.0001) and double lumen CVC (HR 1.33, p = 0.023). The cumulative incidence of premature CVC removal was 29.2 % and the risk factors associated with this event were the surgical modality of CVC insertion (HR 1.4, p = 0.0153) and an age at CVC positioning less than 6.1 years (HR 1.6, p = 0.0025). We conclude that a best-practice set of rules resulted in reduced CVC complications. PMID:26961934

  4. Tegaderm CHG IV Securement Dressing for Central Venous and Arterial Catheter Insertion Sites: A NICE Medical Technology Guidance.

    PubMed

    Jenks, Michelle; Craig, Joyce; Green, William; Hewitt, Neil; Arber, Mick; Sims, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Catheters are widely used for vascular access and for the administration of drugs or fluids in critically ill patients. This exposes patients to an infection risk. Tegaderm chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) (developed by 3M)-a transparent securement dressing-covers and protects catheter sites and secures devices to the skin. It comprises a transparent adhesive dressing to act as a barrier against external contamination and an integrated gel pad containing an antiseptic agent. The Medical Technologies Advisory Committee (MTAC) at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) selected Tegaderm CHG for evaluation. One study was identified by the sponsor as relevant to the decision problem. From this, the sponsor concluded that compared with standard dressings, Tegaderm CHG is associated with lower rates of catheter-related infection, but increased dermatitis incidence. The External Assessment Centre (EAC) identified four paired comparative studies between Tegaderm CHG, other CHG dressings or standard dressings. The EAC agreed with the sponsor's conclusion, finding that CHG dressings reduce infections compared with standard dressings. The sponsor constructed a de novo costing model. Tegaderm CHG generated cost savings of £77.26 per patient compared with standard dressings and was cost saving in 98.5 % of a sample of sets of inputs (2013 prices). The EAC critiqued and updated the model's inputs, yielding similar results to those the sponsor estimate. The MTAC reviewed the evidence and decided to support the case for adoption, issuing a positive draft recommendation. After a public consultation, NICE published this as Medical Technology Guidance 25. PMID:26458938

  5. Postoperative Complications After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chung-Han; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chu, Chin-Chen; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Liao, Kuang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Coronary artery disease is common in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Previous studies have shown that patients with COPD have a higher risk of mortality than those without COPD after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, most of the previous studies were small, single-center studies with limited case numbers (or their only focus was mortality). The aim of our study was to focus on readmission, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), acute respiratory failure (ARF), cerebrovascular accident, and venous thromboembolism rates after CABG in an Asian COPD population. We conducted a nationwide case–control study in Taiwan using the claims database of hospitalization between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. Patients with COPD before CABG were defined as the case groups. Each case was propensity score-matched by age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease, with 2 controls selected from CABG patients without COPD. The outcomes of interest were mortality, wound infection, and the readmission rate over 30 days for the following diseases: AMI, pneumonia, ARF, cerebrovascular accident, and venous thromboembolism. There were 14,858 patients without COPD and 758 patients with COPD who underwent CABG. After propensity score matching, the 30-day mortality and 30-day readmission rates and AMI were higher in the non-COPD group. The incidences of pneumonia and ARF after CABG were higher in the COPD group. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease does not necessarily lead to mortality, readmission, or AMI after CABG, and the major respiratory complications associated with CABG in patients with COPD were pneumonia and ARF. PMID:26937939

  6. [Treatment with the placement of carotid stent of jugular-carotid fistula after the insertion of hemodialysis catheter].

    PubMed

    Vera, M; Quintana, L; Blasco, J; Real, M; Macho, J M

    2005-01-01

    The use of jugular temporary catheters as vascular access for hemodialysis, entails a risk of various complications. The most frequent problems are the arterial puncture and haematoma. However, there are other less frequent potentially serious complications, which constitute a therapeutic and diagnostic challenge for the nephrologists. We present a case of a patient that developed an acute renal failure in the context of cellulites for E. Coli treated with aminoglycosid, who required renal treatment with haemodialysis. After the placement of a polyurethane double-lumen catheter with ultrasound guidance at the level of the internal jugular vein, arterial blood streaming was observed through the lumen of the catheter. The angiographic study showed the tipo of the catheter placed at the level of the aortic arch. Ultrasound exam clearly despicted the track between the internal jugular vein and the internal carotid artery. An effective closing of the fistula was achieved with the placement of a covered stent-graft with the simultaneous withdrawal of the catheter. Reviewing the literature this is the first reported case of an iatrogenic jugulo-carotid fistula secundary to placement of hemodialysis catheter resolved by the implantation of carotid stent-graft. PMID:16392309

  7. Vascular Access System for Continuous Arterial Infusion of a Protease Inhibitor in Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ganaha, Fumikiyo; Yamada, Tetsuhisa; Yorozu, Naoya; Ujita, Masuo; Irie, Takeo; Fukuda, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kunihiko; Tada, Shimpei

    1999-09-15

    We used a vascular access system (VAS) for continuous arterial infusion (CAI) of a protease inhibitor in two patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The infusion catheter was placed into the dorsal pancreatic artery in the first patient and into the gastroduodenal artery in the second, via a femoral artery approach. An implantable port was then connected to the catheter and was secured in a subcutaneous pocket prepared in the right lower abdomen. No complications related to the VAS were encountered. This system provided safe and uncontaminated vascular access for successful CAI for acute pancreatitis.

  8. The role of endogenous cardiotonic steroids in pathogenesis of cardiovascular and renal complications of arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Paczula, Aneta; Więcek, Andrzej; Piecha, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous cardiotonic steroids (CTS), also called digitalis-like factors, are a group of steroid hormones linking high salt intake and elevated blood pressure and in part responsible for target organ damage in arterial hypertension. CTS act primarily through their ability to inhibit the ubiquitous transport enzyme sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase). A portion of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase does not seem to actively "pump" sodium and potassium but is closely associated with other key signaling proteins. Plasma concentration and urine excretion of CTS are increased in experimental models with volume expansion and on a high salt diet. Elevated plasma concentration of marinobufagenin has been shown in volume-expanded states such as essential hypertension, primary aldosteronism, chronic renal failure, congestive heart failure and pregnancy. In experimental models marinobufagenin induces heart and kidney fibrosis to the same extent as observed in uremia. Neutralization of marinobufagenin with antibodies prevents such heart remodeling. Expanding our understanding of this new class of hormones may lead to development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies in hypertensive patients with renal and cardiovascular complications. PMID:27117099

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of a Transparent Antimicrobial Dressing for Managing Central Venous and Arterial Catheters in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Bernatchez, Stéphanie F.; Ruckly, Stéphane; Timsit, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Objective To model the cost-effectiveness impact of routine use of an antimicrobial chlorhexidine gluconate-containing securement dressing compared to non-antimicrobial transparent dressings for the protection of central vascular lines in intensive care unit patients. Design This study uses a novel health economic model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of using the chlorhexidine gluconate dressing versus transparent dressings in a French intensive care unit scenario. The 30-day time non-homogeneous markovian model comprises eight health states. The probabilities of events derive from a multicentre (12 French intensive care units) randomized controlled trial. 1,000 Monte Carlo simulations of 1,000 patients per dressing strategy are used for probabilistic sensitivity analysis and 95% confidence intervals calculations. The outcome is the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections avoided. Costs of intensive care unit stay are based on a recent French multicentre study and the cost-effectiveness criterion is the cost per catheter-related bloodstream infections avoided. The incremental net monetary benefit per patient is also estimated. Patients 1000 patients per group simulated based on the source randomized controlled trial involving 1,879 adults expected to require intravascular catheterization for 48 hours. Intervention Chlorhexidine Gluconate-containing securement dressing compared to non-antimicrobial transparent dressings. Results The chlorhexidine gluconate dressing prevents 11.8 infections /1,000 patients (95% confidence interval: [3.85; 19.64]) with a number needed to treat of 85 patients. The mean cost difference per patient of €141 is not statistically significant (95% confidence interval: [€-975; €1,258]). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is of €12,046 per catheter-related bloodstream infection prevented, and the incremental net monetary benefit per patient is of €344.88. Conclusions According to the base case scenario, the

  10. The Effects That Cardiac Motion has on Coronary Hemodynamics and Catheter Trackability Forces for the Treatment of Coronary Artery Disease: An In Vitro Assessment.

    PubMed

    Morris, Liam; Fahy, Paul; Stefanov, Florian; Finn, Ronan

    2015-12-01

    The coronary arterial tree experiences large displacements due to the contraction and expansion of the cardiac muscle and may influence coronary haemodynamics and stent placement. The accurate measurement of catheter trackability forces within physiological relevant test systems is required for optimum catheter design. The effects of cardiac motion on coronary flowrates, pressure drops, and stent delivery has not been previously experimentally assessed. A cardiac simulator was designed and manufactured which replicates physiological coronary flowrates and cardiac motion within a patient-specific geometry. A motorized delivery system delivered a commercially available coronary stent system and monitored the trackability forces along three phantom patient-specific thin walled compliant coronary vessels supported by a dynamic cardiac phantom model. Pressure drop variation is more sensitive to cardiac motion than outlet flowrates. Maximum pressure drops varied from 7 to 49 mmHg for a stenosis % area reduction of 56 to 90%. There was a strong positive linear correlation of cumulative trackability force with the cumulative curvature. The maximum trackability forces and curvature ranged from 0.24 to 0.87 N and 0.06 to 0.22 mm(-1) respectively for all three vessels. There were maximum and average percentage differences in trackability forces of (23-49%) and (1.9-5.2%) respectively when comparing a static pressure case with the inclusion of pulsatile flow and cardiac motion. Cardiac motion with pulsatile flow significantly altered (p value <0.001) the trackability forces along the delivery pathways with high local percentage variations and pressure drop measurements. PMID:26577477

  11. Acute necrotising pancreatitis: a late and fatal complication of pancreaticoduodenal arterial embolisation

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Abhishek; Tandra, Pavan Kumar; Cichowski, Erica; Reddymasu, Savio Charan

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old man was diagnosed with a massive bleeding duodenal ulcer which was refractory to emergency endoscopic management. Angiogram of the coeliac and superior mesenteric arteries revealed bleeding from the superior and inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries. Transcatheter arterial embolisation of superior and inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries along with the gastroduodenal artery was performed. Two weeks later he developed severe necrotising pancreatitis of the pancreatic head probably due to ischaemia, which was managed conservatively. Three months later the patient experienced another episode of pancreatitis which progressed into multiorgan dysfunction and the patient passed away. PMID:24879731

  12. A gastric artery aneurysm complicated by a dissection of gastric and hepatic arteries: possible role of adventitial inflammation and disruption of internal elastic lamina in splanchnic artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masahiko; Mellen, Paul F

    2008-06-01

    A 77-year-old woman was found deceased at home. An autopsy examination revealed a hemoperitoneum due to a ruptured false aneurysm of a branch of the left gastric artery. A long dissection extending from the aneurysm involved splanchnic arteries including the left gastric, common hepatic, right and left branches of proper hepatic, and intrahepatic arteries. An intimal tear was identified in the common hepatic artery. Neutrophils infiltrating in the adventitia may have been reactive and may have triggered the adventitial rupture of aneurysm or development of the dissection. Disruption of the internal elastic lamina, which has been proposed to cause dissection of intracranial arteries, was seen in the dissected arteries. Little is currently known about aneurysms or dissections of splanchnic arteries; however, observation of adventitial inflammation and internal elastic lamina may help disclose the etiology and pathogenesis. PMID:18520493

  13. Isolated Calyx Mistaken for a Cyst: Inappropriately Performed Catheter-Directed Sclerotherapy and Safe Removal of the Catheter After Selective Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Gwak, Jng Won Lee, Seung Hwa Chung, Hwan Hoon Je, Bo Kyung Yeom, Suk kyu; Sung, Deuk Jae

    2015-02-15

    We present a case of isolated calyx that was mistaken for a large cyst. A 47-year-old woman was referred for sclerotherapy of a large cystic lesion on her left kidney. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound showed that the cystic lesion was a large cyst. We noticed that the cystic lesion was not a typical simple cyst, even after two sessions of catheter-mediated sclerotherapy. Isolated calyx was presumed by medical history review and was confirmed by aspirated fluid analysis and far delayed-phase CT after intravenous contrast injection. We performed meticulous selective arterial embolization for an isolated calyx and inserted a catheter that could be removed without complication.

  14. Catheter associated urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection attributed to the use of an indwelling urinary catheter is one of the most common infections acquired by patients in health care facilities. As biofilm ultimately develops on all of these devices, the major determinant for development of bacteriuria is duration of catheterization. While the proportion of bacteriuric subjects who develop symptomatic infection is low, the high frequency of use of indwelling urinary catheters means there is a substantial burden attributable to these infections. Catheter-acquired urinary infection is the source for about 20% of episodes of health-care acquired bacteremia in acute care facilities, and over 50% in long term care facilities. The most important interventions to prevent bacteriuria and infection are to limit indwelling catheter use and, when catheter use is necessary, to discontinue the catheter as soon as clinically feasible. Infection control programs in health care facilities must implement and monitor strategies to limit catheter-acquired urinary infection, including surveillance of catheter use, appropriateness of catheter indications, and complications. Ultimately, prevention of these infections will require technical advances in catheter materials which prevent biofilm formation. PMID:25075308

  15. [Urinary catheter biofilm infections].

    PubMed

    Holá, V; Růzicka, F

    2008-04-01

    Urinary tract infections, most of which are biofilm infections in catheterized patients, account for more than 40% of hospital infections. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters causes not only infection but also other complications such as catheter blockage by bacterial encrustation, urolithiasis and pyelonephritis. About 50% of long-term catheterized patients face urinary flow obstruction due to catheter encrustation, but no measure is currently available to prevent it. Encrustation has been known either to result from metabolic dysfunction or to be of microbial origin, with urease positive bacterial species implicated most often. Infectious calculi account for about 15-20% of all cases of urolithiasis and are often associated with biofilm colonization of a long-term indwelling urinary catheter or urethral stent. The use of closed catheter systems is helpful in reducing such problems; nevertheless, such a system only delays the inevitable, with infections emerging a little later. Various coatings intended to prevent the bacterial adhesion to the surface of catheters and implants and thus also the emergence of biofilm infections, unfortunately, do not inhibit the microbial adhesion completely and permanently and the only reliable method for biofilm eradication remains the removal of the foreign body from the patient. PMID:18578409

  16. A novel guide catheter enabling intracranial placement.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Michael C; Sherma, Arun K; Surdell, Daniel; Shaibani, Ali; Bendok, Bernard R

    2009-11-15

    We describe use of a novel guide, catheter with a soft and pliable, 6-cm or 12-cm distal segment that enables distal, including intracranial, placement--the Neuron guide catheter (Penumbra, San Leandro, CA)--in the treatment of 11 cases with a range of neuroendovascular lesions. We were able to advance the Neuron guide catheter to the intended level in each case and suffered no complications related to catheter spasm, dissection, thrombosis or thromboembolism. PMID:19670314

  17. Atrial tachyarrhythmias after atrial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries: Treating old surgery with new catheters.

    PubMed

    Houck, Charlotte A; Teuwen, Christophe P; Bogers, Ad J J C; de Groot, Natasja M S

    2016-08-01

    The arterial switch operation has been the procedure of first choice for correction of transposition of the great arteries (TGA) for several decades now. However, a large number of adult patients with TGA nowadays were palliated previously by either a Mustard or a Senning procedure. Atrial tachyarrhythmias (ATs) are frequently observed during long-term follow-up of patients with TGA after these atrial switch corrections and are associated with both morbidity and mortality. Because of the complex postoperative anatomy in these patients, ablative therapy for these tachyarrhythmias can be challenging. The goals of this review are to discuss the most prevalent ATs in patients after the Mustard or Senning procedure and to summarize (long-term) outcomes of ablative therapy. In addition, recent developments in ablative therapy for ATs in this patient population are outlined. PMID:27018378

  18. Liver Transplantation for Acute Intermittent Porphyria is Complicated by a High Rate of Hepatic Artery Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Dowman, Joanna K; Gunson, Bridget K; Mirza, Darius F; Bramhall, Simon R; Badminton, Mike N; Newsome, Philip N

    2012-01-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal-dominant condition resulting from a partial deficiency of the ubiquitously expressed enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase. Although its clinical expression is highly variable, a minority of patients suffer recurrent life-threatening neurovisceral attacks despite optimal medical therapy. Because the liver is the major source of excess precursor production, liver transplantation (LT) represents a potentially effective treatment for severely affected patients. Using data from the UK Transplant Registry, we analyzed all transplants performed for AIP in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Between 2002 and 2010, 10 patients underwent LT for AIP. In all cases, the indication for transplantation was recurrent, biochemically proven, medically nonresponsive acute attacks of porphyria resulting in significantly impaired quality of life. Five patients had developed significant neurological morbidities such as paraplegia before transplantation. The median follow-up time was 23.4 months, and there were 2 deaths from multiorgan failure at 98 days and 26 months. Eight recipients were alive for 3.2 to 109 months after transplantation. Complete biochemical and symptomatic resolution was observed in all patients after transplantation. However, there was a high rate of hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT; 4/10), with 1 patient requiring regrafting. The effects of previous neuronal damage such as joint contractures were not improved by transplantation. Thus, impaired quality of life in the surviving patients was usually a result of preoperative complications. Refractory AIP is an excellent indication for LT, and long-term outcomes for carefully selected patients are good. There is, however, an increased incidence of HAT in these patients, and we recommend routine antiplatelet therapy after transplantation. Liver Transpl 18:195–200, 2012. © 2011 AASLD. PMID:21618697

  19. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: the most devastating vascular complication of systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, V; Humbert, M; Coghlan, G; Nash, P; Steen, V

    2009-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating vascular complication of a number of CTDs. In patients with SSc, PAH has a dramatic impact on prognosis and survival and is the single most common cause of disease-related death.Yearly echocardiographic screening for PAH is recommended in patients with SSc. If suspected, confirmation of PAH diagnosis by right heart catheterization is necessary. Treatment goals for patients with PAH associated with SSc (PAH-SSc) aim to slow disease progression and improve quality of life. Some measures used to gauge the effect of treatment in patients with PAH-SSc remain to be fully validated; the 6-min walk distance, for example, is a simple and reproducible means of assessing exercise capacity, but there exists a need to understand what constitutes a clinically relevant change in this specific patient population. Currently, pharmacological intervention in PAH-SSc may target one or more of three pathophysiological pathways in PAH. The prostacyclin analogue epoprostenol has been shown to improve exercise capacity and haemodynamics in PAH-SSc patients and similar data are available from smaller studies on trepostinil and iloprost. The dual endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan has been shown to improve exercise capacity and haemodynamics in PAH-SSc, and similar data have been obtained in small numbers of patients treated with the endothelin receptor A antagonists sitaxsentan and ambrisentan. Impaired production of nitric oxide may be addressed by inhibiting phosphodiesterase type-5 with sildenafil or possibly tadalafil. Combinations of multiple targeted therapies may be beneficial to this patient population. PMID:19487219

  20. Long-term follow-up of renal arteries after radio-frequency catheter-based denervation using optical coherence tomography and angiography.

    PubMed

    Roleder, Tomasz; Skowerski, Mariusz; Wiecek, Andrzej; Adamczak, Marcin; Czerwienska, Beata; Wanha, Wojciech; Jadczyk, Tomasz; Partyka, Lukasz; Smolka, Grzegorz; Kuczmik, Wacław; Ochała, Andrzej; Dudek, Dariusz; Tendera, Michał; Gasior, Zbigniew; Wojakowski, Wojciech

    2016-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging at the time of renal denervation (RDN) showed that procedure might cause spasm, intimal injury or thrombus formation. In the present study, we assessed the healing of renal arteries after RDN using OCT and renal angiography in long-term follow-up. OCT and renal angiography were performed in 12 patients (22 arteries) 18.41 ± 5.83 months after RNS. There were no adverse events or complications during the long-term follow-up. In ten patients (83 %), significant reductions of blood pressure was achieved without a change of the antihypertensive medications. We demonstrated the presence of 26 areas of focal intimal thickening identified by OCT in 10 (83 %) patients and in 14 (63 %) arteries. The mean area of focal intimal thickening was 0.054 ± 0.033 mm(2). No vessel dissection, thrombus, intimal tear or acute vasospasm were observed during the OCT analysis. Also, the quantitative angiography analysis revealed a significant reduction of the minimal and proximal lumen diameters at follow-up as compared to measurements obtained before RDN. Renal arteries have a favorable "long-term" vessel healing response after RDN. Focal intimal thickening and a modest reduction of the minimal lumen diameter may be observed after RF denervation. Further studies are needed to determine whether intravascular imaging may be helpful in evaluating the vessel healing of RF RDN. PMID:26883432

  1. Using DynaCT for the assessment of ilio-femoral arterial calibre, calcification and tortuosity index in patients selected for trans-catheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Crowhurst, James A; Campbell, Douglas; Raffel, Owen C; Whitby, Mark; Pathmanathan, Pavthrun; Redmond, Stanley; Incani, Alexander; Poon, Karl; James, Christopher; Aroney, Constantine; Clarke, Andrew; Walters, Darren L

    2013-10-01

    Adequate vascular access for femoral trans-catheter aortic valve replacement is fundamental to the success of the procedure. Assessment of vascular calibre, tortuosity and calcification is performed by angiography and multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT). Can DynaCT provide the same information as MSCT? 15 Patients underwent MSCT, angiography and DynaCT. Vessel diameter measurements were taken in three positions of the left and right ilio-femoral arteries. Tortuosity was assessed using an index of the direct distance and the distance taken by the artery between two points. Calcification was assessed in MSCT and DynaCT using a simple scoring system. Concordance correlation coefficient of arterial calibre between angiography and MSCT was 0.96 (95 % CI 0.94-0.97). DynaCT and angiography was 0.94 (95 % CI 0.91-0.96) and Dyna CT and MSCT, 0.95 (95 % CI 0.92-0.97). Bland-Altman tests demonstrate a mean difference between the angiogram and the MSCT of 0.06 mm (+0.97, -1.42), angiogram and DynaCT, 0.13 mm, (+1.00, -0.87), DynaCT and MSCT, 0.2 mm, (+1.15, -0.76). Tortuosity comparisons gave a median tortuosity index for MSCT 1.29 and DynaCT 1.23 (p = 0.472). Calcification comparisons of MSCT and DynaCT using correlation coefficients demonstrate a correlation of 0.245 (p = 0.378). Effective radiation doses were: DynaCT; 3.63 ± 0.65 mSv and angiography; 0.57 ± 0.72 mSv, MSCT; 7.15 ± 2.58 mSv. DynaCT is equal to MSCT and angiography in assessing femoral artery calibre. Like MSCT, it can assess tortuosity and can produce 3D images but is inferior in the assessment of calcification. PMID:23925712

  2. Complications and Reinterventions in Uterine Artery Embolization for Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids: A Literature Review and Meta Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jason Bhanot, Kunal; Athreya, Sriharsha

    2013-04-15

    To perform a literature review of the spectrum of complications associated with UAE relative to surgery and compare the risk of reintervention as well as minor, major, and overall complications. Literature review was conducted in PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane, and CINAHL databases, and meta-analysis was performed. In randomized clinical trials, common complications were discharge and fever (4.00 %), bilateral uterine artery embolization (UAE) failure (4.00 %), and postembolization syndrome (2.86 %). Two trials showed a significantly decreased risk in major complications with UAE, with odds ratios (ORs) of 0.07143 (0.009426-0.5413) and 0.5196 (0.279-0.9678). None of the trials showed a significant difference in OR for minor complications of UAE. None of the trials showed a significant difference in risk for overall complications of UAE. Three trials showed a significantly increased risk for reintervention with UAE with ORs of 10.45 (2.654-41.14), 2.679 (1.289-5.564), and 9.096 (1.269-65.18). In 76 nonrandomized studies, common complications were amenorrhea (4.26 %), pain (3.59 %), and discharge and fever (3.37 %). In 41 case studies, common complications were discharge and fever (n = 22 cases), repeat UAE (n = 6 cases), and fibroid expulsion (n = 5 cases). Overall, UAE has a significantly lower rate of major complications relative to surgery, but it comes at the cost of increased risk of reintervention in the future. Educating patients about the rate and types of complications of UAE versus surgery, as well as the potential for reintervention, should help the patient and clinician come to a reasoned decision.

  3. A catheter-based near-infrared scanning spectroscopy system for imaging lipid-rich plaques in human coronary arteries in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Craig M.; Lisauskas, Jennifer; Hull, Edward L.; Tan, Huwei; Sum, Stephen; Meese, Thomas; Jiang, Chunsheng; Madden, Sean; Caplan, Jay; Muller, James E.

    2007-09-01

    Although heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the industrialized world, there is still no method, even under cardiac catheterization, to reliably identify those atherosclerotic lesions most likely to lead to heart attack and death. These lesions, which are often non-stenotic, are frequently comprised of a necrotic, lipid-rich core overlaid with a thin fibrous cap infiltrated with inflammatory cells. InfraReDx has developed a scanning, near-infrared, optical-fiber-based, spectroscopic cardiac catheter system capable of acquiring NIR reflectance spectra from coronary arteries through flowing blood under automated pullback and rotation in order to identify lipid-rich plaques (LRP). The scanning laser source and associated detection electronics produce a spectrum in 5 ms at a collection rate of 40 Hz, yielding thousands of spectra in a single pullback. The system console analyzes the spectral data with a chemometric model, producing a hyperspectral image (a Chemogram, see figure below) that identifies LRP encountered in the region interrogated by the system. We describe the system architecture and components, explain the experimental procedure by which the chemometric model was constructed from spectral data and histology-based reference information collected from autopsy hearts, and provide representative data from ongoing ex vivo and clinical studies.

  4. Correlation between congenital heart disease complicated with pulmonary artery hypertension and circulating endothelial cells as well as endothelin-1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofei; Qiu, Jun; Pan, Min; Zheng, Dongdong; Su, Yamin; Wei, Meifang; Kong, Xiangqing; Sun, Wei; Zhu, Jiahua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate changes in the level of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) in peripheral venous blood of the patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) complicated with pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH), and research on their effects in the onset and progress of CHD complicated with PAH. Methods: A case-control study including 30 cases of healthy controls, 15 cases of left-to-right shunt CHD without PAH, 26 cases of CHD complicated with mild PAH, and 17 cases of CHD complicated with moderate-severe PAH was performed. We used flow cytometry to measure the percentage of CECs accounting for nucleated cells in whole blood, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure the level of ET-1 in serum. The differences of above-mentioned biomarkers between different groups were compared. Results: (1) The level of CECs and ET-1in the group of moderate-severe PAH was significantly higher than those in the group of mild PAH and the group of CHD without PAH. Significantly difference was also observed between the level of CECs and ET-1 in the group of mild PAH and those in the group of CHD without PAH and the control group. Meanwhile, the level of CECs and ET-1 in the group of large shunt was significantly higher than those in the group few shunt and few-medium shunt. (2) Strong positive correlations were observed between pulmonary artery systolic pressure and percentage of CECs as well as ET-1 production. Mean pulmonary artery pressure also positively correlated with percentage of CECs as well as ET-1 production. (3) Arterial partial pressure of oxygen as well as arterial oxygen saturation negatively correlated with the level of CECs, whereas the volume of left-to-right shunt positively correlated with the level of ET-1. (4) The level of CECs and ET-1 were positively correlated as well in CHD patients. Conclusions: CHD complicated with PAH is associated with increased CEC counts and ET-1 production. This study suggests that CECs

  5. Pseudoaneurysm of the Right Internal Mammary Artery Post Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy: A Rare Complication and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Datta, Subir; Manoly, Imthiaz; Karangelis, Dimos; Hasan, Ragheb

    2016-02-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the management of sternal wound infection post cardiac surgery has gained popularity since last decade. It is very cost effective and has survival benefit compared with conventional management. Although there are few complications associated with VAC therapy including right ventricular free wall rupture and infectious erosion to aorta, there are now isolated reports of vein graft pseudoaneurysm associated with it. We describe an extremely rare complication of right internal mammary artery pseudoaneurysm post VAC therapy in a 56-year-old man which was successfully managed surgically. We also did a literature review on the possible complications of VAC therapy post cardiac surgery and its management. PMID:26597235

  6. [The risks involved in the heart catheter examination. A retrospective evaluation of the complications after 700 examinations. I. Method, patients, diagnoses (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hammerer, I

    1979-01-01

    A retrospective study is undertaken in order to assess the kind and frequency of complications which occurred in 700 heart catheterizations performed in 539 infants and children. This paper deals with the distribution of age groups and diagnoses. The percentages of the different age groups resemble closely those of the "Cooperative Study" of Braunwald and ass. (1968) with the exception that newborns and infants are represented in greater number. This id due to a more active approach to investigation of cardiac malformations in infancy. With regard to the diagnoses those malformations are highly represented which are susceptible to low-risk surgery (Ductus Botalli, atrial septal defect, coarctation, pulmonic and aortic stenosis) and those where surgery is inevitable (tetralogy, transposition of great arteries). Aortic stenosis, too, shows a higher than real incidence because the exact degree of severity can be ascertained only by use of invasive methods. On the other hand there are relatively few ventricular septal defects, because many of them diminish spontaneously in size and do not need catheterization. The rare anomalies are represented in small numbers. PMID:530725

  7. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and efficacy continues to be studied in several medical centers. This procedure involves the placement of a small flexible tube (catheter) into an artery from the groin. The catheter is then directed to the neck to reach the carotid artery blockage. A balloon pushes open the artery wall and a stent ( ...

  8. A Device for Performing Automated Balloon Catheter Inflation Ischemia Studies

    PubMed Central

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Ledkins, Whitley; Rocic, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Coronary collateral growth (arteriogenesis) is a physiological adaptive response to transient and repetitive occlusion of major coronary arteries in which small arterioles (native collaterals) with minimal to no blood flow remodel into larger conduit arteries capable of supplying adequate perfusion to tissue distal to the site of occlusion. The ability to reliably and reproducibly mimic transient, repetitive coronary artery occlusion (ischemia) in animal models is critical to the development of therapies to restore coronary collateral development in type II diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Current animal models for repetitive coronary artery occlusion implement a pneumatic occluder (balloon) that is secured onto the surface of the heart with the suture, which is inflated manually, via a catheter connected to syringe, to effect occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). This method, although effective, presents complications in terms of reproducibility and practicality. To address these limitations, we have designed a device for automated, transient inflation of balloon catheters in coronary artery occlusion models. This device allows repeated, consistent inflation (to either specified pressure or volume) and the capability for implementing very complex, month-long protocols. This system has significantly increased the reproducibility of coronary collateral growth studies in our laboratory, resulting in a significant decrease in the numbers of animals needed to complete each study while relieving laboratory personnel from the burden of extra working hours and enabling us to continue studies over periods when we previously could not. In this paper, we present all details necessary for construction and operation of the inflator. In addition, all of the components for this device are commercially available and economical (Table S1). It is our hope that the adoption of automated balloon catheter inflation protocols will improve the experimental

  9. Late hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm: a rare complication after resection of hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Briceño, Javier; Naranjo, Alvaro; Ciria, Ruben; Sánchez-Hidalgo, Juan-Manuel; Zurera, Luis; López-Cillero, Pedro

    2008-10-14

    We report an unusual pathological entity of a pseudoaneurysm of the right hepatic artery, which developed two years after the resection of a type II hilar cholangiocarcinoma and secondary to an excessive skeletonization for regional lymphadenectomy and neoadjuvant external-beam radiotherapy. After a sudden and massive hematemesis, a multidetector computed tomographic angiography (MDCTA) showed a hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm. Angiography with embolization of the pseudoaneurysm was attempted using microcoils with adequate patency of the hepatic artery and the occlusion of the pseudoaneurysm. A new episode of hematemesis 3 wk later revealed a partial revascularization of the pseudoaneurysm. A definitive interventional radiological treatment consisting of transarterial embolization (TAE) of the right hepatic artery with stainless steel coils and polyvinyl alcohol particles was effective and well-tolerated with normal liver function tests and without signs of liver infarction. PMID:18855995

  10. The relationship between occupational exposure to lead and manifestation of cardiovascular complications in persons with arterial hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Poreba, Rafal; Gac, Pawel; Poreba, Malgorzata; Andrzejak, Ryszard

    2010-11-15

    The chronic exposure to lead represents a risk factor of arterial hypertension development. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is the most prognostically reliable method of measuring of arterial blood pressure. The study is aimed at evaluating the relationship between occupational exposure to lead and manifestation of cardiovascular complications in patients with arterial hypertension. The studies included 73 men (mean age, 54.26 {+-} 8.17 years) with arterial hypertension, treated with hypotensive drugs: group I-persons occupationally exposed to lead (n = 35) and group II-individuals not exposed to lead (n = 38). An analysis of results obtained during ambulatory blood pressure monitoring disclosed significantly higher values of mean systolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, pulse pressure, and variability of systolic blood pressure in the group of hypertensive patients occupationally exposed to lead as compared to patients with arterial hypertension but not exposed to lead. The logistic regression showed that a more advanced age, higher concentration of blood zinc protoporphyrin, and a higher mean value of pulse pressure represented independent risk factors of left ventricular hypertrophy in the group of persons with arterial hypertension and chronically exposed to lead (OR{sub age} = 1.11; OR{sub ZnPP} = 1.32; OR{sub PP} = 1,43; p < 0.05). In view of the above data demonstration that occupational exposure to lead represents an independent risk factor of increased pulse pressure may be of key importance in the process of shaping general social awareness as to harmful effects of lead compounds on human health.

  11. Urinary catheters

    MedlinePlus

    ... that you use a catheter if you have: Urinary incontinence (leaking urine or being unable to control when ... Surgery Bladder Diseases Spinal Cord Injuries Urethral Disorders Urinary Incontinence Urine and Urination Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  12. Catheter Angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Angiography uses one of three imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection ...

  13. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement.

    PubMed

    Bonasso, Patrick C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Khan, Uzer

    2016-07-01

    Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection. PMID:27335801

  14. A Rare Case of Streptococcus alactolyticus Infective Endocarditis Complicated by Septic Emboli and Mycotic Left Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Railsback, Jaclyn

    2016-01-01

    To date, S. alactolyticus endocarditis complicated by middle cerebral artery aneurysm has not been reported. We describe the case of a 65-year-old female with a history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction presenting with confusion and a apical holosystolic murmur. Angiography of the brain identified new bilobed left middle cerebral artery aneurysm. Serial blood cultures grew S. alactolyticus, and aortic and mitral valve vegetation were discovered on transesophageal echocardiography. The patient was treated with antimicrobial therapy, mitral and aortic valve replacements, and microsurgical clipping of cerebral aneurysm. This case serves to highlight the pathogenicity of a sparsely described bacterium belonging to the heterogenous S. bovis complex. PMID:27525136

  15. A Rare Case of Streptococcus alactolyticus Infective Endocarditis Complicated by Septic Emboli and Mycotic Left Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Patricia; Railsback, Jaclyn; Gleason, James Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    To date, S. alactolyticus endocarditis complicated by middle cerebral artery aneurysm has not been reported. We describe the case of a 65-year-old female with a history of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction presenting with confusion and a apical holosystolic murmur. Angiography of the brain identified new bilobed left middle cerebral artery aneurysm. Serial blood cultures grew S. alactolyticus, and aortic and mitral valve vegetation were discovered on transesophageal echocardiography. The patient was treated with antimicrobial therapy, mitral and aortic valve replacements, and microsurgical clipping of cerebral aneurysm. This case serves to highlight the pathogenicity of a sparsely described bacterium belonging to the heterogenous S. bovis complex. PMID:27525136

  16. [Catheter-related infections: microbiology].

    PubMed

    Timsit, J F

    2005-03-01

    Coagulase negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas sp. are the most frequent microorganisms responsible for catheter-related infections. A relative frequency of microorganisms varies according to the countries, microenvironment and outbreaks of multiresistant bacterias. Infections due to fungi, S. aureus and Pseudomonas sp. are associated with the more severe complications. Recent data suggest that chlorhexidine, either used for cutaneous antisepsis or for catheter impregnation decreases infections due to gram positive cocci. Ecological data should be taken into account when deciding a probabilistic treatment in case of suspicion of catheter-related infection. PMID:15792563

  17. Carotid stent infection: a rare but potentially fatal complication of carotid artery stenting.

    PubMed

    Son, Seungnam; Choi, Nack-Cheon; Choi, Dae Seob; Cho, Oh Hyun

    2015-04-01

    Infections involving endovascular devices are rare and, to our knowledge, only three cases of infection with an inserted carotid stent have ever been reported. A 68-year-old man underwent carotid artery stenting (CAS) of the left proximal internal carotid artery. Two days after CAS the patient developed a high fever and investigation showed that the inserted carotid stent was infected. The infection could not be controlled despite adequate antibiotic therapy. Eventually a rupture of the carotid artery occurred and the patient underwent emergency resection of the left carotid bifurcation in addition to stent removal and reconstruction with a saphenous vein interposition graft. The patient recovered fully without any neurological sequelae. PMID:24688061

  18. New Method of Parent Catheter Advancement in the Balloon Anchor Technique during Balloon-Occluded Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shibuya, Kei; Tahara, Hiroki; Takeuchi, Suguru; Koyama, Yoshinori; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Balloon-occluded transarterial chemoembolization (B-TACE) using a microballoon catheter is a promising method for improvement of lipiodol emulsion accumulation and local control relative to conventional transarterial chemoembolization. This method has been referred to as the balloon anchor technique in previous reports. We report a new technique for successful parent catheter advancement for achievement of stable backup for the selective insertion of a microballoon catheter during B-TACE using the microballoon as an anchor, even in patients with tortuous anatomy of the hepatic and celiac arteries. Deep cannulation of parent catheters was accomplished in all three cases and complications such as vascular injury were not observed in the postprocedure angiograms. PMID:27340582

  19. Transient Ischemic Rectitis as a Potential Complication after Prostatic Artery Embolization: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Airton Mota; Marques, Carlos Frederico Sparapan; Antunes, Alberto Azoubel; Nahas, Caio Sergio Rizkallah Nahas, Sergio Carlos; Gregorio Ariza, Miguel Angel de; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar

    2013-12-15

    Prostatic artery embolization (PAE) is an alternative treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Complications are primarily related to non-target embolization. We report a case of ischemic rectitis in a 76-year-old man with significant lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia, probably related to nontarget embolization. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an 85.5-g prostate and urodynamic studies confirmed Inferior vesical obstruction. PAE was performed bilaterally. During the first 3 days of follow-up, a small amount of blood mixed in the stool was observed. Colonoscopy identified rectal ulcers at day 4, which had then disappeared by day 16 post PAE without treatment. PAE is a safe, effective procedure with a low complication rate, but interventionalists should be aware of the risk of rectal nontarget embolization.

  20. Internal Hernia Underneath an Elongated External Iliac Artery: A Complication After Extended Pelvic Lymphadenectomy and Robotic-assisted Laparoscopic Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Viktorin-Baier, Pascal; Randazzo, Marco; Medugno, Cristoforo; John, Hubert

    2016-09-01

    Small bowel herniation underneath the iliac vessel after transperitoneal pelvic lymphadenectomy is a rare complication. This report describes the first case of bowel incarceration behind the external iliac artery after transperitoneal robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy with extended lymph node dissection in a patient with prostate cancer 1 year after surgery. After diagnosis on CT scan, an open resection of the ischemic bowel was performed. Because of thrombosis, the external iliac artery was opened, the clot was removed and the elongated artery was resected with end-to-end anastomosis. In case of a meandering iliac artery, a retroperitonealization after pelvic lymphadenectomy might be discussed. PMID:27313985

  1. Retained Urethral Catheter Secondary to Placement in Proximal Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Sharda, Rajan

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual complication secondary to indwelling urethral catheter placement. Routine catheter placement by the obstetrics team in a postpartum female leads to retention of the catheter and inability of its removal by both the obstetrics and urology teams. Although a retained urinary catheter is relatively common, inability to remove a catheter secondary to placement inadvertently into a ureter is extremely rare. In this paper we will discuss the options in removing a retained catheter and present our case of a retained catheter secondary to placement within the right proximal ureter. PMID:27144050

  2. Spontaneous Rupture of an Ovarian Artery Aneurysm: A Rare Postpartum Complication.

    PubMed

    Enakpene, Christopher A; Stern, Toni; Barzallo Salazar, Marco J; Mukherjee, Pradip

    2016-01-01

    Background. Spontaneous rupture of an ovarian artery aneurysm is a rare but usually life-threatening event. It is most often associated with pregnancy or fibroids. Our case followed a normal vaginal delivery and then a delayed presentation with features similar to other less life-threatening postpartum conditions. The diagnosis could have been missed but for the meticulous and timely interventions which avoided catastrophic outcome. Case. This is a case of a multiparous woman with rupture of a left ovarian artery aneurysm, causing massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage and hematoma that required a combination of arterial embolization, percutaneous CT scan guided drainage, and surgical evacuation of the hematoma. Conclusion. Spontaneous rupture of ovarian artery should be considered as one of the differential diagnoses in the immediate postpartum period especially when the clinical symptoms do not correlate with the amount of blood loss. A high index of suspicion, prompt diagnosis, intervention, and a multidisciplinary approach in the management were the elements of a successful outcome in this case. PMID:27034862

  3. Spontaneous Rupture of an Ovarian Artery Aneurysm: A Rare Postpartum Complication

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Toni; Barzallo Salazar, Marco J.; Mukherjee, Pradip

    2016-01-01

    Background. Spontaneous rupture of an ovarian artery aneurysm is a rare but usually life-threatening event. It is most often associated with pregnancy or fibroids. Our case followed a normal vaginal delivery and then a delayed presentation with features similar to other less life-threatening postpartum conditions. The diagnosis could have been missed but for the meticulous and timely interventions which avoided catastrophic outcome. Case. This is a case of a multiparous woman with rupture of a left ovarian artery aneurysm, causing massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage and hematoma that required a combination of arterial embolization, percutaneous CT scan guided drainage, and surgical evacuation of the hematoma. Conclusion. Spontaneous rupture of ovarian artery should be considered as one of the differential diagnoses in the immediate postpartum period especially when the clinical symptoms do not correlate with the amount of blood loss. A high index of suspicion, prompt diagnosis, intervention, and a multidisciplinary approach in the management were the elements of a successful outcome in this case. PMID:27034862

  4. First-Trimester Uterine Artery Doppler Analysis in the Prediction of Later Pregnancy Complications

    PubMed Central

    Khong, Su Lynn; Kane, Stefan C.; Brennecke, Shaun P.; da Silva Costa, Fabrício

    2015-01-01

    Uterine artery Doppler waveform analysis has been extensively studied in the second trimester of pregnancy as a predictive marker for the later development of preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction. The use of Doppler interrogation of this vessel in the first trimester has gained momentum in recent years. Various measurement techniques and impedance indices have been used to evaluate the relationship between uterine artery Doppler velocimetry and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Overall, first-trimester Doppler interrogation of the uterine artery performs better in the prediction of early-onset than late-onset preeclampsia. As an isolated marker of future disease, its sensitivity in predicting preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction in low risk pregnant women is moderate, at 40–70%. Multiparametric predictive models, combining first-trimester uterine artery pulsatility index with maternal characteristics and biochemical markers, can achieve a detection rate for early-onset preeclampsia of over 90%. The ideal combination of these tests and validation of them in various patient populations will be the focus of future research. PMID:25972623

  5. Bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting during David procedure complicated with coronary insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ohira, Suguru; Doi, Kiyoshi; Yaku, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 47-year-old woman diagnosed with Marfan syndrome underwent valve-sparing aortic root replacement for aortic regurgitation and annulo-aortic ectasia. Her cardiac function was normal. Preoperative coronary angiography did not demonstrate any stenosis. The David reimplantation procedure with a 28-mm Valsalva graft was performed. Both coronary orifices were reconstructed in a button fashion with Teflon felt reinforcement. After aortic declamping, marked bleeding was noted from the left coronary button, requiring a second pump run. Graft interposition using the great saphenous vein was performed for left coronary artery reconstruction. The reconstructed right coronary button was also damaged due to the fragile tissue, and interposed by the vein graft in the same fashion. After the aorta was declamped, the global left ventricular wall motion was significantly impaired, and did not improve with time. Coronary insufficiency was considered. Beating-heart coronary artery bypass grafting with the in-situ bilateral internal thoracic arteries was performed. After revascularization, the left ventricular function was improved. In certain emergent situations compromised with coronary insufficiency, this procedure could be an option to revascularize the coronary arteries. PMID:26412900

  6. Stent-assisted coil embolization of coronary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Terasawa, Akihiro; Yokoi, Tuyoshi; Kondo, Keita

    2013-08-01

    Coronary artery aneurysms are uncommon diseases with potential complications including rupture and ischemia from embolic events or thrombosis. No consensus has been established regarding the optimal therapy for coronary artery aneurysms. Percutaneous catheter-based treatments using membrane-covered stents and coil embolization have been described. However, only few reports of stent-assisted coil embolization for coronary artery aneurysms have been published to date. Therefore, we report a case of coronary artery aneurysm successfully treated with stent-assisted coil embolization. PMID:23913616

  7. Specific complications of monochorionic twin pregnancies: twin-twin transfusion syndrome and twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence.

    PubMed

    Chalouhi, G E; Stirnemann, J J; Salomon, L J; Essaoui, M; Quibel, T; Ville, Y

    2010-12-01

    Monochorionic twins are subjected to specific complications which originate in either imbalance or abnormality of the single placenta serving two twins. This unequal placental sharing can cause complications including twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS), twin anemia-polycythemia sequence (TAPS), selective intrauterine growth restriction or twin reversed arterial perfusion sequence (TRAP). Monochorionicity also makes the management of these specific complications as well as that of a severe malformation in one twin hazardous since the spontaneous death of one twin exposes the co-twin to a risk of exsanguination into the dead twin and its placenta. The latter is responsible for the death of the co-twin in up to 20% of the cases and in ischemic sequelae in about the same proportions in the survivors. Although the symptoms of all these complications are very different, the keystone of their management comes down to either surgical destruction of the inter-twin anastomoses on the chorionic plate when aiming at dual survival or selective and permanent occlusion of the cord of a severely affected twin aiming at protecting the normal co-twin. This can be best achieved by fetoscopic selective laser coagulation and bipolar forceps cord coagulation respectively. PMID:20855238

  8. A Novel Approach for the Retrieval of Broken Catheter Fragment – Using Balloon Dilatation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Padmakumar; Reddy, Rohith Poondru; Jayaram, Ashwal Adamane

    2016-01-01

    In this era of an ever increasing number of interventions in cardiology, there is a parallel increase in the number of complications associated with these interventions, such as broken catheter tip and guide wire embolisation. The most commonly used and effective method for the percutaneous retrieval of such broken fragments is a goose neck snare. However in cases where this technique has been a failure, newer and novel innovations have been implemented for the retrieval of such broken fragments. We present a case of seven-year-old female child with a 3mm peri-membranous ventricular septal defect who was taken up for device closure. During the procedure the internal mammary catheter was broken in the left ventricle and subsequently the broken fragment was embolised to the left common carotid artery. The broken fragment was snared down upto the common iliac but could not be retrieved out of the sheath. A novel approach was used, consisting of negotiating a coronary guide wire across the broken catheter and inflating a balloon in the catheter fragment which helped to achieve a co-axial alignment with the arterial sheath and hence by which it was possible to retrieve the broken catheter fragment out of the circulatory system. PMID:27134917

  9. A Novel Approach for the Retrieval of Broken Catheter Fragment - Using Balloon Dilatation Technique.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Padmakumar; Reddy, Rohith Poondru; Rao, M Sudhakar; Jayaram, Ashwal Adamane

    2016-03-01

    In this era of an ever increasing number of interventions in cardiology, there is a parallel increase in the number of complications associated with these interventions, such as broken catheter tip and guide wire embolisation. The most commonly used and effective method for the percutaneous retrieval of such broken fragments is a goose neck snare. However in cases where this technique has been a failure, newer and novel innovations have been implemented for the retrieval of such broken fragments. We present a case of seven-year-old female child with a 3mm peri-membranous ventricular septal defect who was taken up for device closure. During the procedure the internal mammary catheter was broken in the left ventricle and subsequently the broken fragment was embolised to the left common carotid artery. The broken fragment was snared down upto the common iliac but could not be retrieved out of the sheath. A novel approach was used, consisting of negotiating a coronary guide wire across the broken catheter and inflating a balloon in the catheter fragment which helped to achieve a co-axial alignment with the arterial sheath and hence by which it was possible to retrieve the broken catheter fragment out of the circulatory system. PMID:27134917

  10. Interventional Radiological Procedures in Impaired Function of Surgically Implanted Catheter-Port Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Karin Anna; Waggershauser, Tobias; Heinemann, Volker; Reiser, Maximilian

    2001-01-15

    Purpose: System-related complications in surgically implanted catheter-port systems (CPS) for intraarterial (i.a.) chemotherapy are well known. In most cases of complications, the treatment must be interrupted and the catheter-port system must be repaired surgically. We describe microinvasive interventional radiological procedures to correct some dysfunctions of CPS.Methods: Five patients with repetitive dysfunction of CPS were treated with interventional techniques. Two patients presented with perfusion impairment, one patient had a pseudoaneurysm of the hepatic artery, and two patients presented with catheter displacement. Radiological interventions included mechanical recanalization with a guidewire, vascular stenting, and correction of catheter dislocation with a goose-neck snare.Results: In all cases, correct function of the CPS was restored. No intervention-related complications occurred and surgery was avoided. Chemotherapy could be continued for a period of 4-10 months.Conclusion: For some system-related complications, minimally invasive radiological interventions can be used to restore the function of CPS for i.a. chemotherapy.

  11. Phrenic Arterial Injury Presenting as Delayed Hemothorax Complicating Simple Rib Fracture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Delayed hemothorax after blunt torso injury is rare, but might be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present a case of delayed hemothorax bleeding from phrenic artery injury in a 24-year-old woman. The patient suffered from multiple rib fractures on the right side, a right hemopneumothorax, thoracic vertebral injury and a pelvic bone fracture after a fall from a fourth floor window. Delayed hemothorax associated with phrenic artery bleeding, caused by a stab injury from a fractured rib segment, was treated successfully by a minimally invasive thoracoscopic surgery. Here, we have shown that fracture of a lower rib or ribs might be accompanied by delayed massive hemothorax that can be rapidly identified and promptly managed by thoracoscopic means. PMID:27051252

  12. [Late complication of selective renal arterial embolization after percutaneous surgery: renal "colic"].

    PubMed

    Savoie, Pierre-Henri; Lafolie, Trévor; Gabaudan, Charline; Biance, Nicolas; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; André, Marc; Bertrand, Serge; Balandraud, Paul

    2007-06-01

    Authors report a case of a 31 years old patient who eliminate a urinary stone which contains a platinium coil. Five years ago, this patient had a percutaneous nephrolithotomy. A persistent hematuria was successfully managed with angioembolization of a lower polar artery branch. One of the coils was deployed too distally. It was not efficient, it rolled itself up in the pseudoaneurysm cavity. Different physio pathological hypothesis are developed to explain this expulsion. PMID:17634005

  13. Translumbar placement of paired hemodialysis catheters (Tesio Catheters) and follow-up in 10 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, Rajiv; Nosher, John L.; Siegel, Randall L.; Bodner, Leonard J.

    2000-01-15

    For lack of other suitable access, 10 consecutive patients received paired hemodialysis catheters for long-term hemodialysis using a translumbar approach to the inferior vena cava (IVC). All attempts were successful. Five paired catheters were placed using the single-puncture technique, and five using the dual-puncture technique. Catheters were in place for a total of 2252 catheter days. The average duration of catheter placement was 250 days (range 30-580 days). All catheters were functioning up to the time the study was completed or the patient died. The most common complication was partial dislodgment of the catheter in 3 of 23 catheters (13%), all occurring in obese patients. One episode of retroperitoneal hemorrhage was noted in a patient having the single-access technique. There were no episodes of infection or IVC thrombosis.

  14. Tracheo-innominate artery erosion: Successful surgical management of a devastating complication.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J W; Reynolds, M; Hewitt, R L; Drapanas, T

    1976-01-01

    Successful management of a patient with tracheo-innominate artery erosion requires the rapid institution of specific resuscitative and operative measures. Ten patients seen at the Charity Hospital of Louisiana in New Orleans and 127 documented cases from the world literature were analyzed regarding predisposing factors, diagnostic features, resuscitative measures and operative treatment. Diagnoses associated with abnormal neck positioning were seen in 48% of patients with tracheo-innominate erosions. In 69% of 96 instances, the site of erosion was located at the cannula end and implicates excessive anterior pressure. Caution is recommended in those patients with abnormal neck positions, low placed tracheostomy stomas and individuals with asthenic habitus. Resuscitative measures were highly successful when the tracheal ballon was inflated or when the method of retrosternal finger pressure was used. All personnel providing care for patients with tracheostomies should be aware of the initial measure of ballon inflation. Operative measures which permanently interrupted the innominate artery in the area of possible future erosion were the most successful. Of the 22 cases in which the innominate artery was sacrificed, only one had evidence of cerebral ischemia. Timely institution of proper measures can result in salvage of an unexpected number of these otherwise dramatic fatalities. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. PMID:782389

  15. Innominate artery injury: a catastrophic complication of tracheostomy, operative procedure revisited

    PubMed Central

    Maruti Pol, Manjunath; Gupta, Amit; Kumar, Subodh; Mishra, Biplab

    2014-01-01

    A patient presented with profuse bleeding from the oronasal cavity following orofaciomaxillary trauma associated with tracheolaryngeal injury and suspected cervical-spine injury due to collapse of a wall on the face, neck and upper chest. The patient was gasping, coughing blood and was unable to speak. Threatened airway was diagnosed. Inability to maintain oxygenation on cricothyroidotomy, forced emergency department surgeons to shift the patient to the operating room for definitive airway. During tracheostomy a major vessel was injured. Application of vascular clamp in the event of achieving haemostasis resulted in disappearance of saturation and pulse in the right upper limb, thus we suspected innominate artery (IA) injury. High tracheostomy performed and endotracheal tube passed into the trachea after removing clot and overcoming compromised narrow tracheal lumen. The injured IA was repaired and the patient survived for 14 days. On postoperative day 14 he died following profound bleeding into the tracheobronchial tree and asphyxia/apnoea. Tracheoinnominate artery fistula was detected at autopsy. PMID:24700033

  16. Coronary artery stent (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open. ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open.

  17. Spontaneous Intravesical Knotting of Urethral Catheter

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Infant feeding tubes (IFT) have been universally used as urethral catheters in neonates and children for several decades. Though generally a safe procedure, it may cause significant morbidity if the catheter spontaneously knots inside the bladder. We report this complication in three children including a neonate. PMID:22953288

  18. Late Thromboembolic Complication from a Palmaz Stent in the Common Iliac Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckelhuber, Beate M.; Szeimies, Ulrike; Spengel, Florentin A.; Kueffer, Georg

    1996-05-15

    A 56-year-old smoker presented with rest pain in his left leg and hyperfibrinogenemia. He was found to have a high-grade stenosing thrombus in a Palmaz stent which had been placed 4 years ago across a stenosing ulcerating plaque in the left common iliac artery. Systemic thrombolysis was successful but the patient refused long-term anticoagulation. He presented 2 months later with recurrent stent thrombosis and an embolus to the tibioperoneal trunk. Systemic lysis was successfully performed for the stent reobstruction but the distal embolic occlusion responded neither to systemic nor to local thrombolysis. This case suggests that patients with vascular stents and hyperfibrinogenemia and/or nicotine abuse should be considered candidates for long-term anticoagulation.

  19. Fatal diffuse pulmonary arterial thrombosis as a complication of nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Akiko; Tsuchiya, Ken; Yabuki, Yasuko; Naito, Masayo; Koike, Minako; Yumura, Wako; Nitta, Kosaku

    2007-12-01

    A 21-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of leg edema. Because laboratory findings revealed massive proteinuria and hypoproteinemia, he was diagnosed as having nephritic syndrome caused by minimal change disease. He was given a continuous heparin infusion and intravenous steroid therapy, at a prednisolone dose of 1 mg/kg per day, and his condition gradually improved. Five months after discharge, the patient's proteinuria relapsed. He was readmitted to our hospital and we restarted anticoagulant treatment with intravenous heparin and 60 mg prednisolone. On the third hospital day, he complained of chest pain with sudden onset and dyspnea. He quickly developed shock and died. The findings of an autopsy confirmed the presence of diffuse fibrin thrombi in bilateral pulmonary arteries, and we diagnosed the cause of death as diffuse pulmonary artery thrombosis. A coagulation test for activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) had already shown that aPTT was prolonged before the initiation of treatment. There may have been a deficit of antithrombin III (ATIII) - a cofactor of heparin - because of the proteinuria; thus, the continuous heparin treatment might not have been effective for the prevention of thrombosis. Alternatives to heparin treatment that do not suppress AT III, such as nafamostat mesilate or argatroban, which do not require the presence of AT III for their anticoagulant action, should be considered in cases similar to the that in the patient reported here. In patients with nephrotic syndrome who exhibit altered coagulation test results, the choice of anticoagulation therapy for treatment of the hypercoagulabilty status associated with nephrotic syndrome should be carefully considered. PMID:18085394

  20. Cerebral Lipiodol Embolism: A Complication of Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Koichi Nojiri, Junichi; Takase, Yukinori; Egashira, Yoshikazu; Azama, Shinichi; Kato, Akira; Kitahara, Kenji; Miyazaki, Koji; Kudo, Sho

    2007-06-15

    We report a case of cerebral lipiodol embolism following transcatheter chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma. A 70-year-old woman with a large unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma underwent TACE. Her level of consciousness deteriorated after the procedure, and magnetic resonance imaging and non-contrast computed tomography revealed a cerebral lipiodol embolism. Despite intensive care, the patient died 2 weeks later. The complication might have been due to systemic-pulmonary shunts caused by previous surgeries and/or direct invasion of the recurrent tumor.

  1. An aberrant carotid artery in the temporal bone with fatal complication.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yurika; Makino, Nao; Kobayashi, Hitome; Kitamura, Ken

    2016-06-01

    We report the case of an 84-year-old female presenting with an aberrant ICA with cerebral air embolization caused by Eustachian tube air inflation (ETAI). High pressure of air inflation developed because of an aberrant ICA blocking the tympanic orifice of the Eustachian tube, with release of the high-pressure air into the aberrant ICA. It must be kept in mind that complications may occur not only during transtympanic treatment, but also in any treatment, such as ETAI, in aberrant ICA cases. PMID:26602434

  2. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of the atrioventricular junction from the left ventricle

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, J.; el-Atassi, R.; Rosenheck, S.; Calkins, H.; Langberg, J.; Morady, F. )

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a new technique for catheter ablation of the atrioventricular junction using radiofrequency energy delivered in the left ventricle. Catheter ablation of the atrioventricular (AV) junction using a catheter positioned across the tricuspid annulus was unsuccessful in eight patients with a mean {plus minus} SD age of 51 {plus minus} 19 years who had AV nodal reentry tachycardia (three patients), orthodromic tachycardia using a concealed midseptal accessory pathway, atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter (two patients), or atrial fibrillation. Before attempts at catheter ablation of the AV junction, each patient had been refractory to pharmacological therapy, and four had failed attempts at either catheter modification of the AV node using radiofrequency energy or surgical and catheter ablation of the accessory pathway. Conventional right-sided catheter ablation of the AV junction using radiofrequency energy in six patients and both radiofrequency energy and direct current shocks in two patients was ineffective. The mean amplitude of the His bundle potential recorded at the tricuspid annulus at the sites of unsuccessful AV junction ablation was 0.1 {plus minus} 0.08 mV, with a maximum His amplitude of 0.03-0.28 mV. A 7F deflectable-tip quadripolar electrode catheter with a 4-mm distal electrode was positioned against the upper left ventricular septum using a retrograde aortic approach from the femoral artery. Third-degree AV block was induced in each of the eight patients with 20-36 W applied for 15-30 seconds. The His bundle potential at the sites of successful AV junction ablation ranged from 0.06 to 0.99 mV, with a mean of 0.27 {plus minus} 0.32 mV. There was no rise in the creatine kinase-MB fraction and no complications occurred. An intrinsic escape rhythm of 30-60 beats/min was present in seven of the eight patients.

  3. Tandem balloon catheter for coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Finci, L; Meier, B; Steffenino, G; Rutishauser, W

    1986-01-01

    The Tandem balloon catheter is a triple lumen steerable catheter for coronary angioplasty with two separately inflatable balloons of different diameters. Indications and results of 26 consecutive patients treated with a Tandem balloon catheter are reviewed. Adequate distal pressure measurements were obtained in 71% of the cases. In ten patients, the Tandem balloon catheter was selected for two stenoses in different segments of the same coronary artery. Angioplasty was successful for all lesions in five and for at least the strategic lesions in five patients (in one only after changing to a single-balloon catheter). In the seven patients with stenoses in two different coronary arteries of various calibers, angioplasty was successful for both vessels in three and for one vessel in four patients. In the six patients with a very tight stenosis, where the Tandem balloon catheter was selected to predilate with the small balloon, the procedure was technically successful in all, but there was a myocardial infarction in one patient. In the three patients with a chronic total occlusion, where the stiffness of the Tandem balloon was the reason for selection, one recanalization was successful. The Tandem balloon catheter provides a handy tool for complex coronary angioplasty. It offers comparable ease in manipulation and pressure transmission and may save time, money, and radiation exposure by avoiding catheter exchanges. PMID:2949848

  4. Successful Management of Atrio-Esophageal Fistula after Cardiac Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Hun Bo; Kim, Chilsung; Kim, Hong-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    An increase in cardiac radiofrequency catheter ablation for treating refractory atrial fibrillation has resulted in an increased prevalence of complications. Among numerous complications of radiofrequency catheter ablation, atrio-esophageal fistula, although rare, is known to have fatal results. We report a case of successful management of an atrio-esophageal fistula as a complication of cardiac radiofrequency catheter ablation. PMID:23614102

  5. Catheter tip cultures on open-heart surgery patients: associations with site of catheter and age of patients.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, R; Hjersing, N; Burridge, A

    1981-01-01

    The results of culture of 668 catheter tips from 422 patients are analysed with relation to the site of the catheter and the age of the patient. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most common bacterial isolate, but Gram-negative bacilli were found in the venous lines, femoral artery lines, and peripheral lines. Isolations of Gram-negative bacilli were associated with age, being found mainly in those under 1 year and those over 40 years of age. Typing of coagulase-negative staphylococci revealed that Staphylococcus epidermidis is the only variety found in peripheral lines and in lines inserted after operation for complications (central venous, sub-clavian, and long lines), whereas other types occur (along with Staphylococcus epidermidis) in the other lines (left atrial, arterial, and venous). Use of extra lines for the management of postoperative complications thereby increases the risk of Staphylococcus epidermidis gaining access to the circulation. A subgroup of venous lines used to administer inotropic agents was found to be sterile on culture, and this was the result of the anti-oxidant (sodium metabisulphite) in the inotrope solution acting as an antiseptic. PMID:7314004

  6. Tensile set behavior of Foley catheter balloons.

    PubMed

    Joseph, R; Ramesh, P; Sivakumar, R

    1999-01-01

    The removal of indwelling urinary balloon catheters from patients is usually associated with many problems. The problems such as balloon deflation failure; encrustations on balloons, eyes, and lumen; and catheter associated infections are widely discussed in the literature. The tensile set exhibited by the catheter balloon material could also play a role and further complicate the removal process. This article addresses this issue by comparing the tensile set behavior of the balloon material from three commercially available Foley catheters. The balloon materials were subjected to aging in synthetic urine at 37 degrees C for 28 days to simulate clinical conditions. The deflation time of catheter balloons aged in similar conditions were also measured. It was found that different brands of catheters exhibited statistically significant differences in their properties. The tensile set data of the aged samples could be correlated with the deflation time of the balloons. The clinical significance of the tensile set is also highlighted. PMID:10029146

  7. Atrial Fibrillation Increases the Risk of Peripheral Arterial Disease With Relative Complications and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Jung; Chen, Yen-Ting; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF), an increasing prevalent cardiac arrhythmia due to aging general population, has many common risk factors with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). However, it is unclear whether AF is associated with a risk of PAD. We investigated the prevalence of AF and PAD in the general population and the risk of PAD among the AF population. This longitudinal, nationwide, population-based cohort study was conducted using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database recorded during 2000 to 2011. In total, 3814 and 15,364 patients were included in the AF and non-AF cohorts, respectively. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models were used for examining the effects of AF on the risk of outcomes. The average follow-up periods of PAD were 4.96 ± 3.28 and 5.29 ± 3.35 years for the AF and non-AF cohorts, respectively. Overall, the risk of PAD showed a significantly higher risk in the AF cohort (adjusted HR=1.31, 95% CI=1.19–1.45) compared with the non-AF cohort. Similar results were observed for heart failure and stroke, where the AF cohort had a 1.83-fold and 2.53-fold higher risk of developing heart failure and stroke. The AF cohort also had a significant increased risk for mortality (adjusted HR=1.66, 95% CI=1.49–1.84). The present study indicated that the incidence of PAD, heart failure, stroke, and overall mortality is higher in patients with AF than in those without it. PMID:26945422

  8. [Catheter-associated urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Liedl, B

    2015-09-01

    In patients with indwelling urethral catheters significant bacteriuria develops within 4 weeks of indwelling time in practically 100% of the cases. Catheter encrustation and obstruction can occur in approximately 40% of patients. Symptomatic ascending urinary tract infections, urethral complications and urolithiasis can occur in significant numbers in the long term. Regular educational and surveillance programs in nursing homes, hospitals and in home care are important to instruct personnel in hygiene procedures, to learn the indications for catheterization, to keep the indwelling time of catheters as short as possible, to detect any complications early and to initiate appropriate diagnostics and therapy by the urologist. PMID:26275988

  9. Renal Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Sauk, Steven; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Renal artery embolization (RAE) is an effective minimally invasive alternative procedure for the treatment of a variety of conditions. Since the 1970s when RAE was first developed, technical advances and growing experience have expanded the indications to not only include treatment of conditions such as symptomatic hematuria and palliation for metastatic renal cancer, but also preoperative infarction of renal tumors, treatment of angiomyolipomas, vascular malformations, medical renal disease, and complications following renal transplantation. With the drastically improved morbidity associated with this technique in part due to the introduction of more precise embolic agents and smaller delivery catheters, RAE continues to gain popularity for various urologic conditions. The indications and techniques for renal artery embolization are reviewed in the following sections. PMID:23204638

  10. Image-Guided Thromboembolectomy of Acute Arterial Occlusion in Children.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Han, Ahram; Choi, Chanjoong; Min, Sang-Il; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Ha, Jongwon; Min, Seung-Kee

    2016-07-01

    Acute arterial thromboembolism (ATE) is rare in childhood, but this medical emergency requires immediate treatment. Described herein are separate instances of lower extremity ATE in 2 children, both of whom were successfully managed through image-guided thromboembolectomy (IGT). One patient, a 34-month-old female child with nephrotic syndrome, developed bilateral iliac and popliteal thromboembolic arterial occlusions after high-dose steroid therapy. Another 9-year-old girl suffered an embolism of left popliteal artery due to infectious endocarditis. Both patients underwent IGT using over-the-wire Fogarty catheters. During follow-up, presenting symptoms resolved without significant complications. PMID:27177711

  11. The predictive value of multiple electrode platelet aggregometry for postoperative bleeding complications in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Karolina; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Kruk, Mariusz; Różański, Jacek; Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative bleeding is one of the most serious complications of cardiac surgery and requires transfusion of blood or blood products. Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and clopidogrel (CLO) are the two most commonly used antiplatelet agents; when used in combination (i.e., as dual antiplatelet therapy [DAPT]), they exert a synergistic effect. Dual antiplatelet therapy, however, significantly increases the risk of postoperative bleeding. The effect of antiplatelet therapy can be monitored by platelet aggregation testing. One of the most commonly methods used for assessing platelet reactivity is multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) which can be performed with the use of Multiplate analyzer. Although the method has long been used in interventional cardiology to assess the effect of antiplatelet therapy, it is not available at cardiac surgery departments as a standard diagnostic procedure. The aim of the study was to establish the frequency of bleeding complications following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in patients on single antiplatelet therapy (SAPT) and patients on DAPT and to determine the usefulness of routine measurement of platelet responsiveness before CABG surgery in patients receiving antiplatelet therapy. Material and methods A consecutive cohort of 200 patients referred for elective surgical treatment of stable coronary artery disease was enrolled (100 consecutive patients on SAPT [ASA 75 mg/day] and 100 consecutive patients on DAPT [ASA 75 mg/day + CLO 75 mg/day]). All subjects continued their antiplatelet therapy until the day before surgery. For each subject, platelet aggregation testing in the form of an ASPI test and an ADP test was performed on the Multiplate analyzer. Each subject underwent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. For the primary and secondary endpoints in our study we adopted the definition provided in ‘Standardised Bleeding Definitions for Cardiovascular Clinical Trials: A Consensus Report from the

  12. Transcutaenous electrical nerve stimulation to manage a lower extremity wound complicated by peripheral arterial disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yarboro, Douglas D; Smith, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is used to alleviate muscle pain, and there is some evidence it may affect healing in chronic wounds. An 80-year-old male patient with a chronic left lower extremity wound and a history of peripheral arterial disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer presented for treatment. Previous protocols of care, mainly consisting of sharp debridement and daily dressing changes, had not resulted in a decrease in wound size. The patient had right and left iliac artery stenosis - not amenable to surgical intervention - and an ankle brachial index (ABI) of 0.63 on the left and 0.59 on the right lower extremities. On presentation, the wound measured 3.0 cm x 2.0 cm with a depth of 0.3 cm and a 0.5-cm tract at the 5 o'clock position. Treatment was changed to application of an ionic silver-containing Hydrofiber™ dressing and low-frequency TENS. Electrodes were applied 2 cm superior and inferior to the wound margin at a frequency of 2 Hz with a pulse width of 250 microseconds and amplitude of 33 mA. Treatment time was 45 minutes, twice daily, for 3 months, performed at home by the patient and his caregiver. After 4 weeks, wound dimensions decreased by 1.51% per day, and the wound was completely healed (100% epithelialized) after 12 weeks. At that time, the ABI of the left (treated) leg had increased to 0.71. Research is needed to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of low-frequency TENS to help clinicians provide evidenced-based treatment for wounds complicated by decreased blood flow. PMID:25019248

  13. Radiofrequency catheter ablation in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, R K; Klein, G J; Yee, R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report on the experience with radiofrequency catheter ablation of accessory atrioventricular pathways in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome in terms of the duration of fluoroscopy exposure to the patient and the operator and the effect of accessory-pathway location and operator experience on the success rate. DESIGN: Retrospective review. SETTING: Tertiary care university hospital. PATIENTS: Two hundred consecutive patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome who underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation between September 1990 and June 1992. INTERVENTIONS: Electrophysiologic study and radiofrequency catheter ablation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Success rate, duration of fluoroscopy, complications and long-term follow-up. RESULTS: Of the 224 accessory pathways in the 200 patients 135 were left free wall, 47 posteroseptal, 32 right free wall and 10 anteroseptal. The overall success rate increased from 53% in the first 3 months of the study period to 96% in the last 3 months. The success rate depended on the location of the accessory pathway. The duration of fluoroscopic exposure decreased from 50 (standard deviation [SD] 21) minutes in the first 3 months to 40 (SD 15) minutes in the last 3 months (p < 0.05). Complications occurred in 3.5% of the patients; they included hemopericardium, cerebral embolism, perforation of the right atrial wall, air embolism in a coronary artery and hematoma at the arterial perforation site. None of the complications resulted in death. CONCLUSIONS: With experience, radiofrequency catheter ablation of accessory pathways can have an overall success rate of more than 95% and a complication rate of less than 4%. Such rates make this procedure suitable for first-line therapy for patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8087753

  14. Internal carotid artery dissection after anterior cervical disc replacement: first case report and literature review of vascular complications of the approach.

    PubMed

    Loret, Jean-Edouard; Francois, Patrick; Papagiannaki, Chrysanthi; Cottier, Jean-Philippe; Terrier, Louis-Marie; Zemmoura, Ilyess

    2013-07-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman who underwent cervical total disc replacement at C4C5 and C5C6 levels and fusion at C6C7 level through an anterior right-side approach. After anesthesia recovery, the patient presented left hemiparesia and facial palsy due to large right hemispheric stroke. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed as soon as the patient developed neurologic symptoms of stroke and revealed a right internal carotid artery dissection. Digital substraction angiography, endovascular stenting, angioplasty and thrombectomy were performed. Six months after treatment, clinical examination showed mild left-arm spasticity. To the best of our knowledge, only two cases of internal carotid artery stroke without dissection or thrombosis are reported. In conclusion, although vascular complications are rare after anterior cervical spine procedure, internal carotid artery dissection can occur. Suspected risk factors are prolonged retraction of the carotid artery and neck extension. PMID:23728441

  15. Unusual Severe Complication Following Transarterial Chemoembolization for Metastatic Malignant Melanoma: Giant Intrahepatic Cyst and Fatal Hepatic Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Ataergin, Selmin; Tasar, Mustafa; Solchaga, Luis; Ozet, Ahmet; Arpaci, Fikret

    2009-03-15

    We describe a 45-year-old male patient with malignant melanoma who underwent hepatic arterial chemoembolization due to liver metastases. Four months after the procedure, the patient developed a giant cystic cavity in the liver. Cytologic examination of the cystic fluid retention revealed necrotic tumor material. The fluid was drained by percutaneous catheter, but the patient developed hepatic failure. This case represents another rare complication of transarterial chemoembolization and shows that transarterial chemoembolization may have rare fatal complications.

  16. [The role of the interventional radiologist in central venous catheter dysfunction (pictorial essay)].

    PubMed

    Altunel, Ekrem; Oran, Ismail; Parildar, Mustafa; Memiş, Ahmet

    2004-03-01

    Failure to aspirate blood from the lumen of venous catheters, inadequate blood flow and/or high resistance pressures during hemodialysis were accepted as catheter dysfunction. Other correctable problems such as residual lumen thrombus, external fibrin catheter sheath or malpositioned catheter tip were identified by contrast injection. Catheter malpositions were corrected by snare-mediated catheter repositioning or by exchange of the catheter over a guidewire. Catheters of inadequate length were exchanged over a guidewire to the appropriate position or replaced. Treatment of fibrin sheath formation included fibrin sheath stripping, guidewire catheter exchange, and urokinase infusion. Early catheter dysfunction is frequently due to mechanical problems such as inadequate positioning, kinking, or constriction. Delayed dysfunction usually results from thrombus formation, either within the lumen, around the catheter ("fibrin sleeve"), or in the host vein. In the management of catheter malfunctions and complications, interventional radiological techniques are safe and effective alternatives to standard surgical techniques. PMID:15054708

  17. Massive right coronary air embolism in the right coronary artery during left coronary angiography: A case report

    PubMed Central

    PARK, CHANG-BUM; HWANG, HUI-JEONG; CHO, JIN-MAN; JO, BYUNG-HYUN; KIM, CHONG-JIN

    2013-01-01

    Coronary air embolism is one of the inadvertent complications of coronary angiography. We report a case of unexpected massive right coronary air embolism during left coronary angiography with a JL4 diagnostic catheter. This report demonstrates that air embolism may occur in the contralateral coronary artery and therefore complete air aspiration must be ensured during coronary angiography. PMID:23596473

  18. Selective Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Treatment of Bleeding Complications or Reduction of Tumor Mass of Hepatocellular Adenomas

    SciTech Connect

    Erdogan, Deha; Delden, Otto M. van; Busch, Olivier R. C.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Gulik, Thomas M. van

    2007-11-15

    Hepatocellular adenomas (HCAs) are benign liver lesions which may be complicated by spontaneous intratumoral bleeding, with or without rupture into the abdominal cavity, or malignant degeneration. Recent advances in radiological interventional techniques now offer selective transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) as an alternative approach to surgery as the initial treatment to stop the bleeding or as an elective treatment to reduce the tumor mass of the HCA. Herein, we report our initial experience using TAE in the management of HCA. Five female patients and one male patient presented with spontaneous hemorrhage of HCA. Four patients were initially treated with selective TAE to stop the bleeding. In two patients in whom the bleeding stopped spontaneously, TAE was electively undertaken 1 year after presentation to reduce the tumor mass of HCAs >5 cm. Selective TAE as initial treatment in patients with spontaneous bleeding of HCA with or without rupture is effective and will change the need for urgent laparotomy to control bleeding. Selective TAE may also be used as an elective treatment to reduce the tumor mass of larger HCAs.

  19. Pigtail assisted tracking of guide catheter for navigating the difficult radial: Overcoming the "razor effect".

    PubMed

    Garg, Naveen; Sahoo, Dhabaleswar; Goel, Praveen Kumar

    2016-01-01

    During transradial procedures, sharp edge of the guide catheter tip may act like a "razor-blade" and can prevent the catheter navigation. It is especially common with radial artery loop, tortuous radial artery and radial artery spasm. We describe a cost effective and easy technique which overcomes this "razor-blade" effect and helps in tracking the guide catheter in complex radial anatomy for the easy and successful completion of procedure. PMID:27316490

  20. Intrapleural migration of a percutaneous transhepatic hemodialysis catheter.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Sharon W; Kerlan, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic catheters are a form of nonconventional access for patients requiring hemodialysis. We report a complication of these catheters which has not been previously described in the literature. The mechanism for intrapleural migration and a way to avoid this potential complication are discussed. PMID:21786242

  1. Case of Behçet's disease complicated by oculomotor nerve palsy associated with internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Toshifumi; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a relapsing systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology involving systemic vasculitis. Vasculitis in BD results from the involvement of arteries, veins and blood vessels of all sizes, which leads to the three major manifestations of this condition: venous occlusion, arterial occlusion and aneurysm formation. Therefore, whole-body vascular involvement should always be considered in BD patients. Here, we describe the first appearance of an internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm, resulting in complete oculomotor nerve palsy in a BD patient. A 44-year-old Japanese man suffered from recurrent episodes of erythema nodosum that had presented on the lower extremities for the past 2 years. His condition was diagnosed as an incomplete type of BD based on relapsing oral and genital ulcers, skin eruptions, such as erythema nodosum and folliculitis, a positive pathergy test and systemic arthralgia. Ten years after his initial clinical presentation, he had manifestations of right-sided ptosis and cyclic dull pain in his right temporal region. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography revealed a right internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm. Although oculomotor nerve palsy associated with internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm in a BD patient has not been reported previously, our report highlights the fact that this abnormal manifestation should be considered in those with vasculo-BD. PMID:25573207

  2. Reduced intravascular catheter-related infection by routine use of antibiotic-bonded catheters in a surgical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kamal, G D; Divishek, D; Kumar, G C; Porter, B R; Tatman, D J; Adams, J R

    1998-03-01

    We report a comparative analysis of intravascular catheter-related infection before and after routine use of antibiotic-bonded catheters in an intensive care unit. Cefazolin-bonded catheters were placed in patients requiring catheterization for at least 3 days, or with remote infection, standard catheters at other times. One thousand forty-five catheters (259 patients) over 6 months were compared with 801 (236 antibiotic-bonded, 565 standard) catheters (239 patients) the next 6 months. After use of antibiotic-bonded catheters, we found: 1.7% catheters infected versus 3.7% (p = 0.01); catheter-associated bacteremia 0.1% versus 1.3% (p < 0.005); catheter-related infection rate 4.39 versus 10.73 per 1000 patient days (p < 0.005), and 5.06 versus 11.47 per 1000 catheter days (p < 0.01); and cumulative risk of infection decreased (p < 0.005). Antibiotic-bonded catheters were used with more remote infections (52% versus 27%, p < 0.001), had longer indwelling time (4.4 versus 3.1 days, p = 0.0001), and more were inserted over a guide wire (66% vs. 28%, p < 0.001). In conclusion routine use of antibiotic-bonded catheters was associated with a significant reduction in infectious complications. PMID:9572020

  3. Comparison of 7 and 8 French guiding catheters for elective PTCA: results of a prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Talley, J D; Wilkins, C; Ciccone, J; Hattel, L J

    1994-11-01

    A prospective randomized trial was performed to detect technical and clinical differences of 7F compared to 8F guiding catheters (GC) used in elective coronary angioplasty (PTCA). One hundred and fifteen patients undergoing elective PTCA with standard balloon dilatation catheters were randomized to 7F (55 pts) or 8F (58 pts) guiding catheters. The endpoints were primarily coronary artery and peripheral vascular complications; and secondarily, technical details and quantitative and qualitative angiographic quality. There was no difference between 7F or 8F GC for development of coronary or peripheral vascular complications. With 7F GC there was less blood loss (Hct, 3.5 +/- 3.4% vs. 6.5 +/- 9.6%, P = .033), and less contrast medium (160 +/- 88 mL vs. 200 +/- 119 mL, P = .049) used. Angiographic quality was similar, although visualization of lesions in the left anterior descending coronary artery in the left anterior oblique projection was improved with the 8F GC. There is no advantage of 7F GC for the prevention of coronary or peripheral vascular complications, although there was less blood loss and contrast medium used with the 7F systems. PMID:7874712

  4. Right atrial indwelling catheter for patients requiring long-term intravenous therapy.

    PubMed

    Ivey, M F; Adam, S M; Hickman, R O; Gibson, D L

    1978-12-01

    The use of a central venous catheter for long-term intravenous therapy is described. The catheter's history, physical description, and uses are discussed. Also reviewed are complications from use of the catheter, the pharmacist's role in patient teaching, and the procedure for administering medications through the catheter. A listing of drugs administered through the catheter, incompatibility data and patient teaching instructions are also included. PMID:717409

  5. External Iliac Artery-Appendicular Fistula due to Antegrade Unusual Migration of K-Wire from Hip to Pelvis: An Unreported Complication

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nagmani; Pandey, Chakra Raj; Pant, Bhaskar Raj; Shrestha, Uttam Krishna; Bista, Biraj

    2015-01-01

    Background. K-wires are thought to be extremely safe implants and complications as a result of direct insertion or migration are very rare. Complications may be life-threatening in some instances where migration results in injury to vital organs. We report one such case where antegrade migration of K-wire from the hip resulted in injury to external iliac artery and formation of external iliac artery-appendicular fistula. No such complication due to migration has ever been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 15-year-old boy presented with lower abdominal pain, right lower limb swelling and pain, inability to walk, and rectal bleeding for 1 month after 2 K-wires had been inserted in his right hip joint for treatment of slipped capital femoral epiphysis the previous year. On investigation, he was diagnosed to have external iliac artery-appendicular fistula for which he was surgically treated. Clinical Relevance. Antegrade migration of K-wire from hip joint may lead to life-threatening injuries which can be minimized by bending the end of the K-wire, keeping the tip protruding outside the skin wherever possible and by early removal of K-wire once its purpose has been achieved. PMID:26146579

  6. Innominate vein repair after iatrogenic perforation with central venous catheter via mini-sternotomy—Case report

    PubMed Central

    Siordia, Juan A.; Ayers, Georganne R.; Garlish, Amanda; Subramanian, Sreekumar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Iatrogenic damage of the innominate vein is a possible complication with extracorporeal central venous line catheter insertion techniques. When perforation occurs, the catheter is left in place and surgery is required for careful removal and repair of other possible complications, including hemothorax and cardiac tamponade. The traditional approach for innominate vein repair is via a complete median sternotomy. Presentation of case A 75-year-old female patient with hypertension, diabetes mellitus type two and end stage renal failure, coronary artery disease presenting with iatrogenic innominate vein perforation and pulmonary effusion status post placement of a tunneled hemodialysis catheter through the left subclavian vein. Discussion The patient underwent a partial upper sternotomy into the right fourth intercostal space. Ministernotomy and endovascular techniques provide similar outcomes to those of traditional surgical approaches. However, with minimal access and trauma, these new methods provide better post-operative outcomes for patients. Conclusion The case presented in this report suggests a new approach to replace the traditional complete median sternotomy in attempts to repair the innominate vein. The mini-sternotomy approach provides sufficient visualization of the vessel and surrounding structures with minimal post-operative complications and healing time. PMID:25956040

  7. Delayed massive hemorrhage due to external iliac artery pseudo-aneurysm and uretero-iliac artery fistula following robotic radical cystectomy and intracorporeal Studer pouch reconstruction: Endovascular management of an unusual complication

    PubMed Central

    Atmaca, Ali Fuat; Canda, Abdullah Erdem; Gumus, Mehmet; Asil, Erem; Balbay, Mevlana Derya

    2013-01-01

    We report a very unusual complication of uretero-iliac artery fistula that developed following robotic radical cystectomy (RARC), bilateral extended pelvic lymph node dissection and intracorporeal Studer pouch reconstruction. Our patient was a 54-year-old male who was admitted 1 month after undergoing robotic surgery due to intermittently occurring massive transurethral bleeding necessitating blood transfusion that stopped by itself. Angiography showed a right external iliac artery pseudo-aneurysm and a fistula tract between the pseudo-aneurysm and Wallace type ureteral anostomosis that was successfully treated by an angiographic endovascular stent insertion at this level. Uretero-iliac artery fistula might occur following RARC, bilateral extended pelvic lymph node dissection and intracorporeal Studer pouch reconstruction leading to intermittently massive transurethral bleeding. Angiography and stenting are important for diagnosis and successful treatment of this rare entity. PMID:24069106

  8. Does Size Really Matter? Analysis of the Effect of Large Fibroids and Uterine Volumes on Complication Rates of Uterine Artery Embolisation

    SciTech Connect

    Parthipun, A. A. Taylor, J.; Manyonda, I.; Belli, A. M.

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a correlation between large uterine fibroid diameter, uterine volume, number of vials of embolic agent used and risk of complications from uterine artery embolisation (UAE). This was a prospective study involving 121 patients undergoing UAE embolisation for symptomatic uterine fibroids at a single institution. Patients were grouped according to diameter of largest fibroid and uterine volume. Results were also stratified according to the number of vials of embolic agent used and rate of complications. No statistical difference in complication rate was demonstrated between the two groups according to diameter of the largest fibroid (large fibroids were classified as {>=}10 cm; Fisher's exact test P = 1.00), and no statistical difference in complication rate was demonstrated according to uterine volume (large uterine volume was defined as {>=}750 cm{sup 3}; Fisher's exact test P = 0.70). 84 of the 121 patients had documentation of the number of vials used during the procedure. Patients were divided into two groups, with {>=}4 used defined as a large number of embolic agent. There was no statistical difference between these two groups and no associated increased risk of developing complications. This study showed no increased incidence of complications in women with large-diameter fibroids or uterine volumes as defined. In addition, there was no evidence of increased complications according to quantity of embolic material used. Therefore, UAE should be offered to women with large fibroids and uterine volumes.

  9. Catheter Ablation of Arrhythmia During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Driver, Kevin; Chisholm, Christian A; Darby, Andrew E; Malhotra, Rohit; Dimarco, John P; Ferguson, John D

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac arrhythmia as a complication of pregnancy can be problematic to maternal health and fetal life and development. Catheter ablation of tachyarrhythmias during pregnancy has been successfully performed in selected patients with limited experience. Techniques to limit maternal and fetal radiation exposure, including intracardiac echo and electroanatomic mapping systems, are particularly important in this setting. Specific accommodations are necessary in the care of the gravid patient during catheter ablation. PMID:25828853

  10. Balloon catheter coronary angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, P.

    1987-01-01

    The author has produced a reference and teaching book on balloon angioplasty. Because it borders in surgery and is performed on an awake patient without circulatory assistance, it is a complex and demanding procedure that requires thorough knowledge before it is attempted. The text is divided into seven sections. The first section describes coronary anatomy and pathophysiology, defines the objectives and mechanisms of the procedure and lists four possible physiologic results. The next section describes equipment in the catheterization laboratory, catheters, guidewires and required personnel. The following section is on the procedure itself and includes a discussion of examination, testing, technique and follow-up. The fourth section details possible complications that can occur during the procedure, such as coronary spasms, occlusion, thrombosis, perforations and ruptures, and also discusses cardiac surgery after failed angioplasty. The fifth section details complex or unusual cases that can occur. The sixth and seventh sections discuss radiation, alternative procedures and the future of angioplasty.

  11. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it. PMID:27152256

  12. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it. PMID:27152256

  13. Comparison of Heparin-Coated and Conventional Split-Tip Hemodialysis Catheters

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Timothy W. I. Jacobs, David; Charles, Hearns W.; Kovacs, Sandor; Aquino, Theresa; Erinjeri, Joseph; Benstein, Judith A.

    2009-07-15

    Catheter coatings have the potential to decrease infection and thrombosis in patients with chronic dialysis catheters. We report our midterm experience with a heparin-coated dialysis catheter. This retrospective, case-control study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. A total of 88 tunneled dialysis catheters were inserted over a 13-month period via the internal jugular vein. Thirty-eight uncoated split-tip catheters and 50 heparin-coated catheters were inserted. Primary catheter patency was compared between the two groups using the log rank test, with infection and/or thrombosis considered as catheter failures. Dialysis parameters during the first and last dialysis sessions, including pump speed, actual blood flow, and arterial port pressures, were compared using unpaired t-tests. Primary patency of the uncoated catheters was 86.0 {+-} 6.5% at 30 days and 76.1 {+-} 8.9% at 90 days. Primary patency of heparin-coated catheters was 92.0 {+-} 6.2% at 30 days and 81.6 {+-} 8.0% at 90 days (p = 0.87, log rank test). Infection requiring catheter removal occurred in four patients with uncoated catheters and two patients with heparin-coated catheters (p = 0.23). Catheter thrombosis requiring catheter replacement or thrombolysis occurred in one patient with an uncoated catheter and two patients with heparin-coated catheters (p = 0.9). No differences in catheter function during hemodialysis were seen between the two groups. In conclusion, the heparin-coated catheter did not show a significantly longer patency compared to the uncoated catheter. The flow characteristics of this device were comparable to those of the conventional uncoated catheter. A demonstrable benefit of the heparin-coated catheter in randomized trials is needed before a recommendation for routine implementation can be made.

  14. [Ultrasound guided radial artery cannulation: procedure description and literature review].

    PubMed

    Carmona Monge, F J; Martínez Lareo, M; Núñez Reiz, A

    2011-01-01

    Arterial catheterization is the second most common invasive procedure performed in critical care units. These devices are essential in certain types of patients (the hemodinamically unstable or those who require regular evaluation of the gasometric values). Complications related to arterial cannulation are relatively scarce. However, there are no reliable indicators to predict the occurrence of radial artery occlusions or ischemic lesions in the hand after a radial cannulation procedure has been performed. Ultrasound-guided catheter insertion has been used for years to guide central venous cannulation in critical care, but its use has been more limited for arterial catheterization. This paper aims to describe the technique of ultrasound-guided radial artery catheterization and reviews the most important research papers that have evaluated the safety and efficacy of this procedure in the adult population. PMID:21256787

  15. Serum uric acid predicts vascular complications in adults with type 1 diabetes: the coronary artery calcification in type 1 diabetes study.

    PubMed

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M; Rivard, Christopher J; Pyle, Laura; Rewers, Marian; Johnson, Richard J; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiologic evidence supports a link between serum uric acid (SUA) and vascular complications in diabetes, but it remains unclear whether SUA improves the ability of conventional risk factor to predict complications. We hypothesized that SUA at baseline would independently predict the development of vascular complications over 6 years and that the addition of SUA to American Diabetes Association's ABC risk factors (HbA1c, BP, LDL-C) would improve vascular complication prediction over 6 years in adults with type 1 diabetes. Study participants (N = 652) were 19-56 year old at baseline and re-examined 6 years later. Diabetic nephropathy was defined as incident albuminuria or rapid GFR decline (>3.3 %/year) estimated by the CKD-EPI cystatin C. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was based on self-reported history, and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was defined as laser eye therapy; coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured using electron-beam computed tomography. Progression of CAC (CACp) was defined as a change in the square-root-transformed CAC volume ≥2.5. Predictors of each complication were examined in stepwise logistic regression with subjects with complications at baseline excluded from analyses. C-statistics, integrated discrimination indices and net-reclassification improvement were utilized for prediction performance analyses. SUA independently predicted development of incident albuminuria (OR 1.8, 95 % CI 1.2-2.7), rapid GFR decline (1.9, 1.1-3.3), DR (1.4, 1.1-1.9), PDR (2.1, 1.4-3.0) and CACp (1.5, 1.1-1.9). SUA improved the discrimination and net-classification risk of vascular complications over 6 years. SUA independently predicted the development of vascular complications in type 1 diabetes and also improved the reclassification of vascular complications. PMID:24929955

  16. Serum Uric Acid Predicts Vascular Complications in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes: the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M.; Rivard, Christopher J.; Pyle, Laura; Rewers, Marian; Johnson, Richard J.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothesis Epidemiologic evidence support a link between serum uric acid (SUA) and vascular complications in diabetes, but it remains unclear whether SUA improves the ability of conventional risk factor to predict complications. We hypothesized that SUA at baseline would independently predict the development of vascular complications over 6 years, and that the addition of SUA to American Diabetes Association’s ABC risk factors (HbA1c, BP, LDL-C) would improve vascular complication prediction over 6-years in adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods Study participants (N=652) were 19–56 year old at baseline and re-examined 6-years later. Diabetic nephropathy (DN) was defined as incident albuminuria or rapid GFR decline (>3.3%/year) estimated by the CKD-EPI cystatin C. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was based on self-reported history, proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) was defined as laser eye therapy; coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured using electron-beam computed-tomography. Progression of CAC (CACp) was defined as a change in the square-root transformed CAC-volume ≥ 2.5. Predictors of each complication were examined in stepwise logistic regression with subjects with complications at baseline excluded from analyses. C-statistics, integrated-discrimination indices and net-reclassification improvement were utilized for prediction performance analyses. Results SUA independently predicted development of incident albuminuria (OR: 1.8, 95% CI 1.2–2.7), rapid GFR decline (1.9, 1.1–3.3), DR (1.4, 1.1–1.9), PDR (2.1, 1.4–3.0) and CACp (1.5 (1.1–1.9). SUA improved the discrimination and net-classification risk of vascular complications over 6-years. Conclusion SUA independently predicted the development of vascular complications in type 1 diabetes, and also improved the reclassification of vascular complications. PMID:24929955

  17. 21 CFR 870.1340 - Catheter introducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catheter introducer. 870.1340 Section 870.1340 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... the skin into a vein or artery. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  18. Ultraminiature manometer-tipped cardiac catheter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, G. W.

    1967-01-01

    Miniature diaphragm-type capacitance transducer capable of being mounted on the end of a cardiac catheter has been developed for measurement of intravascular pressures. The transducer can be inserted in small ducts /arteries and veins/ without disturbing the flow characteristics. It is very useful for making measurements in babies.

  19. A numerical study of the effect of catheter angle on the blood flow characteristics in a graft during hemodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryou, Hong Sun; Kim, Soyoon; Ro, Kyoungchul

    2013-02-01

    For patients with renal failure, renal replacement therapies are needed. Hemodialysis is a widely used renal replacement method to remove waste products. It is important to improve the patency rate of the vascular access for efficient dialysis. Since some complications such as an intimal hyperplasia are associated with the flow pattern, the hemodynamics in the vascular access must be considered to achieve a high patency rate. In addition, the blood flow from an artificial kidney affects the flow in the vascular access. Generally, the clinical techniques of hemodialysis such as the catheter angle or dialysis dose have been set up empirically. In this study, a numerical analysis is performed on the effect of the catheter angle on the flow in the graft. Blood is assumed to be a non-Newtonian fluid. According to the high average wall shear stress value, the leucocytes and platelets can be activated not only at the arterial anastomosis, but also at the bottom of the venous graft, when the catheter angle is not zero. For a catheter angle less than five degrees, there is a low shear and high oscillatory shear index region that appears at the venous graft and the venous anastomosis. Thus, a catheter angle less than five degrees should be avoided to prevent graft failure.

  20. Central venous catheters - ports

    MedlinePlus

    Central venous catheter - subcutaneous; Port-a-Cath; InfusaPort; PasPort; Subclavian port; Medi - port; Central venous line - port ... catheter is attached to a device called a port that will be under your skin. The port ...

  1. [Catheter ablation of atrial flutter and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Márquez, Manlio F

    2003-01-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation has emerged as a curative therapy for atrial flutter based on studies demonstrating the role of the cavotricuspid isthmus. With a high rate of success and minimal complications, catheter ablation is the therapy of choice for patients with the common type of atrial flutter. Left atrial flutter, non-cavotricuspid isthmus dependent, and those associated with heart disease have a worst outcome with catheter ablation. Radiofrequency catheter ablation has also emerged as a curative therapy for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation based on studies demonstrating the role of triggering foci in the pulmonary veins for the initiation of atrial fibrillation. Catheter ablation is performed by a transseptal approach using radiofrequency energy at the ostium of each pulmonary vein. Mapping is guided by special catheters. Sequential radiofrequency applications eliminates or dissociates pulmonary vein muscle activity. Although complications exists, this is the only curative method for these patients. PMID:12966653

  2. Local Intravascular Drug Delivery: In Vitro Comparison of Three Catheter Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alfke, Heiko; Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Calmer, Christian; Klose, Klaus Jochen

    1998-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare different catheter systems for local drug delivery with respect to the penetration depth of a biotin marker solution delivered into the vessel wall. Methods: Post-mortem carotid arteries from pigs were locally infused with a biotin solution using three different catheter systems. With all catheters (microporous balloon catheter, hydrogel-coated balloon catheter, and spiral balloon catheter) we used the same pressure of 405 kPa (4 atm) and infusion times of 60, 90, and 300 sec. After infusion the arteries were histologically prepared and stained using a biotin-specific method. With a light microscope an observer, blinded to the catheter type, scored the amount of biotin within the vessel wall, measured as staining intensity, and the penetration depth of the biotin. Results: Delivery with the hydrogel-coated balloon catheter was limited to the intima and the innermost parts of the media. The spiral balloon and microporous balloon catheter showed both a deeper penetration and a larger amount of delivered biotin compared with the hydrogel catheter, with a slightly deeper penetration using the microporous catheter. The penetration depth showed a correlation with infusion time for the spiral balloon and microporous catheters, but not for the hydrogel-coated catheter. Conclusion: Different catheter designs lead to different patterns of local drug delivery. The differences in penetration depth and amount of the substance delivered to the vessel wall should be known and might be useful for targeting specific areas within the vessel wall.

  3. Fluid mechanics and clinical success of central venous catheters for dialysis--answers to simple but persisting problems.

    PubMed

    Ash, Stephen R

    2007-01-01

    Over 60% of patients initiating chronic hemodialysis in the United States have a chronic central venous catheter (CVC) as their first blood access device. Although it would be better if these patients started dialysis with fistulas, the CVC is used because it is a reliable and relatively safe method for obtaining blood access over a period of months. Drawing blood from a vein at 300-400 ml/minute is a relatively delicate and somewhat unpredictable process, and there is always a tendency for the vein wall to draw over the arterial tip and obstruct flow. Several methods have been employed to minimize this problem and maximize blood flow, and differing catheter designs have resulted. With all of the different catheter designs now on the market, it is natural to ask what is the logic of different designs. Moreover, in the absence of many direct comparative studies it is natural to ask whether one design is really better than another. There is some misinformation regarding catheter design and function. The following is a list of 10 frequently asked questions In this review, the hydraulic features of CVC are discussed and explained, and logical answers are provided for the following questions: 1. Why do ''D'' catheters flow better than concentric or side by side catheters? 2. Why are all catheters about the same diameter? Does making them bigger really decrease the resistance to flow? 3. Why might a split tip catheter flow better than a solid body catheter? 4. What happens to injections of lock solution at catheter volume? 5. What's better-numerous side holes or none? 6. Why does blood rise into some internal jugular catheters over time, displacing the lock solution? 7. How can a little kink (or stenosis) decrease flow so much? 8. Where should the tips be placed-superior vena cava or right atrium? 9. Which is really better, splitsheath or over-the-wire placement? 10. Which dialysis access has a lower complication rate--CVC or arteriovenous (AV) graft? There remain

  4. Percutaneous repair of iatrogenic subclavian artery injury by suture-mediated closure device

    PubMed Central

    Chivate, Rahul S; Kulkarni, Suyash S; Shetty, Nitin S; Polnaya, Ashwin M; Gala, Kunal B; Patel, Paresh G

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheterization through internal jugular vein is done routinely in intensive care units. It is generally safe, more so when the procedure is performed under ultrasound guidance. However, there could be inadvertent puncture of other vessels in the neck when the procedure is not performed under real-time sonographic guidance. Closure of this vessel opening can pose a challenge if it is an artery, in a location difficult to compress, and is further complicated by deranged coagulation profile. Here, we discuss the removal of an inadvertently placed catheter from subclavian artery with closure of arteriotomy percutaneously using arterial suture-mediated closure device. PMID:27413277

  5. Percutaneous repair of iatrogenic subclavian artery injury by suture-mediated closure device.

    PubMed

    Chivate, Rahul S; Kulkarni, Suyash S; Shetty, Nitin S; Polnaya, Ashwin M; Gala, Kunal B; Patel, Paresh G

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheterization through internal jugular vein is done routinely in intensive care units. It is generally safe, more so when the procedure is performed under ultrasound guidance. However, there could be inadvertent puncture of other vessels in the neck when the procedure is not performed under real-time sonographic guidance. Closure of this vessel opening can pose a challenge if it is an artery, in a location difficult to compress, and is further complicated by deranged coagulation profile. Here, we discuss the removal of an inadvertently placed catheter from subclavian artery with closure of arteriotomy percutaneously using arterial suture-mediated closure device. PMID:27413277

  6. Management of an iatrogenic radial artery perforation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Buturak, Ali; Demirci, Yasemin; Dağdelen, Sinan

    2013-06-01

    A 73-year-old female patient underwent transradial coronary angiography with stable angina and signs of significant myocardial ischemia revealed by exercise stress test. After insertion of a 6F radial sheath into the right radial artery and intra-arterial administration of heparin plus verapamil, the hydrophilic guidewire could not be advanced under fluoroscopic guidance. Immediately afterwards, radial angiography was performed, which displayed a radial artery perforation with significant contrast extravasation. The perforated segment was crossed meticulously with the same guidewire after additional vasodilator drug administration. Afterwards, a 5F TIG catheter was advanced to the axillary artery and held in place for 20 minutes with application of external compression with a sphygmomanometer cuff at the level of systolic blood pressure. The same maneuver was again performed following cuff deflation and completion of coronary angiography with the 5F catheter. Final angiography displayed complete sealing of the perforation without a need for neutralization of heparin. External compression was continued for two hours, and after documentation of normal triphasic radial artery flow by Doppler ultrasound (DUS), the radial sheath was removed. The patient was discharged the following day with no evidence of hand ischemia and well-palpable radial artery pulse. DUS demonstrated normal radial artery flow one month later. This unusual complication was managed successfully with a simple and easily applicable technique that can be performed in such cases. PMID:23760121

  7. ABC goal achievement predicts microvascular but not macrovascular complications over 6-years in adults with type 1 diabetes: the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjornstad, Petter; Maahs, David M.; Rewers, Marian; Johnson, Richard J.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothesis Vascular complications of type 1 diabetes are thought to cluster. We examined the prevalence and incidence of vascular complications and American Diabetes Association’s ABC goal achievements in a prospective cohort of adults with type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that ABC achievement at baseline would predict both micro- and macrovascular complications over 6-years. Methods Participants (N=652) were 19–56 year old at baseline and re-examined 6-years later. Microvascular complications included diabetic nephropathy (DN), defined as incident albuminuria (AER≥20μg/min) or rapid GFR decline (>3.3%/year) by CKD-EPI cystatin C and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), defined as laser eye-therapy. Macrovascular complications were defined as coronary artery calcium progression (CACp), measured by electron-beam computed-tomography. ABC goals were defined as HbA1c<7.0%, BP<130/80 mmHg, LDL-C<100mg/dL. Results ABC control was suboptimal with only 6% meeting all goals. Meeting no ABC goals at baseline compared to meeting all goals was associated with increased odds of developing microvascular complications (OR: 8.5, 2.3–31.5, p=0.001), but did not reach significance for CACp (OR: 1.7, 0.8–3.9, p=0.19). Conclusion ABC achievement at baseline strongly predicted microvascular but not macrovascular complications over 6-years in adults with type 1 diabetes, suggesting a need for novel therapeutic targets to complement conventional risk factors in treating macrovascular complications. PMID:25270733

  8. A comparison of epidural catheters with or without subcutaneous injection ports for treatment of cancer pain.

    PubMed

    de Jong, P C; Kansen, P J

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of technical complications of epidural catheters with subcutaneous injection ports to percutaneous epidural catheters without ports, fixed only by adhesive dressing. We reviewed 149 patients who received 250 epidural catheters for treatment of cancer pain during a 3 1/2-yr period from January 1, 1989, to June 30, 1992. Of the 250 catheters, 52 were provided with subcutaneous injection ports and 198 were percutaneous catheters. Of the 198 percutaneous catheters, 41 were tunneled for a short distance; the remainder entered the skin at the dorsal midline. In the percutaneous group 21% of the catheters became dislodged. In the injection port group, there were no catheter dislodgements. The overall incidence of infections was similar in both groups (13.6%). When we indexed the infection rate to catheter-days, the number of infections per 1000 catheter-days in the injection port group was half that of the percutaneous group (2.86 infections versus 5.97 for percutaneous catheters). No injection port became infected during the first 70 days of treatment, whereas in the percutaneous group infections occurred as early as the first week. Within the percutaneous group the complication rate in the tunneled epidural catheters was as high as in the nontunneled. We conclude that injection ports reduce the complication rate of epidural catheters, particularly catheter dislodgement and early infections. PMID:8267188

  9. Advanced Imaging Catheter: Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Krulevitch, P; Colston, B; DaSilva, L; Hilken, D; Kluiwstra, J U; Lee, A P; London, R; Miles, R; Schumann, D; Seward, K; Wang, A

    2001-07-20

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an approach whereby procedures conventionally performed with large and potentially traumatic incisions are replaced by several tiny incisions through which specialized instruments are inserted. Early MIS, often called laparoscopic surgery, used video cameras and laparoscopes to visualize and control the medical devices, which were typically cutting or stapling tools. More recently, catheter-based procedures have become a fast growing sector of all surgeries. In these procedures, small incisions are made into one of the main arteries (e.g. femoral artery in the thigh), and a long thin hollow tube is inserted and positioned near the target area. The key advantage of this technique is that recovery time can be reduced from months to a matter of days. In the United States, over 700,000 catheter procedures are performed annually representing a market of over $350 million. Further growth in this area will require significant improvements in the current catheter technology. In order to effectively navigate a catheter through the tortuous vessels of the body, two capabilities must exist: imaging and positioning. In most cases, catheter procedures rely on radiography for visualization and manual manipulation for positioning of the device. Radiography provides two-dimensional, global images of the vasculature and cannot be used continuously due to radiation exposure to both the patient and physician. Intravascular ultrasound devices are available for continuous local imaging at the catheter tip, but these devices cannot be used simultaneously with therapeutic devices. Catheters are highly compliant devices, and manipulating the catheter is similar to pushing on a string. Often, a guide wire is used to help position the catheter, but this procedure has its own set of problems. Three characteristics are used to describe catheter maneuverability: (1) pushability -- the amount of linear displacement of the distal end (inside body) relative to

  10. The effect of low dose versus standard dose of arterial heparin on vascular complications following transradial coronary angiography: Randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Roghani, Farshad; Shirani, Babak; Hashemifard, Omid

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The potential risk of vascular complications associated with heparin, the dose of heparin therapy has not been exactly examined in patients undergoing transradial angiography. Thus, this study was aimed to compare referral arterial thrombosis, hematoma and hemorrhagic complications with 2500 and 5000 IU arterial heparin and the association of these complications with predictors in patients undergoing diagnostic angiography. METHODS This prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled trial was carried out on 441 patients aged ≥ 18-year-old in Isfahan, Iran. They were referred for diagnostic coronary angiography with radial access. First participants were randomized into to inject either 2500 IU (group A) or 5000 IU (group B) of heparin. Study’s primary endpoints were thrombosis, hematoma, and hemorrhage. RESULTS The frequency of thrombosis was 25.5% in group A vs. 2.3% in group B (P < 0.001), while the frequency of hematoma had no significant differences in group A and B. None of patients in both groups had hemorrhage. Using 5000 IU of heparin protected the occurrence of thrombosis by 95% [odds ratio (OR): 0.05, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.02-012] after adjustment for confounders. CONCLUSION The low dose (2500 IU) versus standard dose (5000 IU) of heparin use increased the risk of thrombosis following trans-radial diagnostic coronary angiography, with no effect on hematoma and bleeding. PMID:27114732

  11. Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Peritoneal Catheter Knot Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ul-Haq, Anwar; Al-Otaibi, Faisal; Alshanafey, Saud; Sabbagh, Mohamed Diya; Al Shail, Essam

    2013-01-01

    The ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is a common procedure in pediatric neurosurgery that carries a risk of complications at cranial and abdominal sites. We report on the case of a child with shunt infection and malfunction. The peritoneal catheter was tethered within the abdominal cavity, precluding its removal. Subsequently, laparoscopic exploration identified a knot at the distal end of the peritoneal catheter around the omentum. A new VP shunt was inserted after the infection was healed. This type of complication occurs rarely, so there are a limited number of case reports in the literature. This report is complemented by a literature review. PMID:24109528

  12. A patent ductus arteriosus complicating cardiopulmonary bypass for combined coronary artery bypass grafting and aortic valve replacement only discovered by computed tomography 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Middendorp, Lars B; Maessen, Jos G; Sardari Nia, Peyman

    2014-12-01

    We describe the case of a 59-year old male patient undergoing combined coronary artery bypass grafting and aortic valve replacement. Manipulation of the heart during cardiopulmonary bypass significantly decreased venous return. Several measures were necessary to improve venous return to a level at which continuation of the procedure was safe. Based on the initial troubles with venous return, we decided to selectively cross-clamp the aorta. This resulted in a large amount of backflow of oxygenated blood from the left ventricle, necessitating additional vents in the pulmonary artery and directly in the left ventricle. The procedure was continued uneventfully, and postoperative recovery was without significant complications. Postoperative 2D computed tomography did not show any signs of a shunt, but 3D reconstruction showed a small patent ductus arteriosus. PMID:25164136

  13. Central vascular catheters and infections.

    PubMed

    Dioni, Elisabetta; Franceschini, Renata; Marzollo, Roberto; Oprandi, Daniela; Chirico, Gaetano

    2014-03-01

    Newborn infants in critical conditions require a permanent intra-venous line to allow for the administration of fluids, parenteral nutrition and drugs. The use of central venous catheters, however, is associated with an increased risk of infections, leading to prolongation of length of stay and higher hospitalization costs, particularly in extremely preterm infants. Dwell time is a significant factor for complications, with a predicted risk of catheter related infections of about 4 per 1000 catheter-days. To reduce the incidence of complications, several requirements must be met, including adequate staff and resources to provide education, training, and quality improvement programs, within a culture of communication and teamwork. Rigorous reporting schedule on line care and the implementation of unique bundle elements, the use of health care failure mode and effect analysis, the judicious use of antibiotics through an antimicrobial stewardship strategy, the application of specific antifungal prophylaxis are among the most effective interventions, while the addition of heparin to parenteral solution, or the use of antibiotic plus heparin lock therapy are under evaluation. Nursing assistance plays a fundamental role in managing central venous lines and in reducing or preventing the incidence of infection, by the application of several complex professional strategies. PMID:24709460

  14. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Three Methods of Recanalization in a Model of the Middle Cerebral Artery: Thrombus Aspiration via a 4F Catheter, Thrombus Aspiration via the GP Thromboaspiration Device, and Mechanical Thrombectomy Using the Solitaire Thrombectomy Device.

    PubMed

    Tennuci, Christopher; Pearce, Gillian; Wong, Julian; Nayak, Sanjeev; Jones, Tom; Lally, Frank; Roffe, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. This paper compares different approaches to recanalization in a model of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Methods. An occlusive thrombus (lamb's blood) was introduced into the MCA of a model of the cerebral circulation perfused with Hartmann's solution (80 pulsations/min, mean pressure 90 mm Hg). Three methods of clot retrieval were tested: thrombus aspiration via a 4F catheter (n = 26), thrombus aspiration via the GP thrombus aspiration device (GPTAD) (n = 30), and mechanical thrombectomy via the Solitaire Device (n = 30). Results. Recanalization rate was similar for all 3 approaches (62%, 77%, and 85%). Time to recanalization was faster with aspiration devices (41 SD 42 s for 4F and 61 SD 21 s for GPTAD) than with the Solitaire (197 SD 64 s P < .05 Kruksal-Wallis). Clot fragmentation was the same in the Solitaire (23%) and the GPTAD (23%), but higher with the 4F (53%, P < .05). Conclusion. In this model, thrombus aspiration was faster than mechanical thrombectomy, and similarly effective at recanalization. These results should be confirmed in vivo. PMID:21603169

  15. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Three Methods of Recanalization in a Model of the Middle Cerebral Artery: Thrombus Aspiration via a 4F Catheter, Thrombus Aspiration via the GP Thromboaspiration Device, and Mechanical Thrombectomy Using the Solitaire Thrombectomy Device

    PubMed Central

    Tennuci, Christopher; Pearce, Gillian; Wong, Julian; Nayak, Sanjeev; Jones, Tom; Lally, Frank; Roffe, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. This paper compares different approaches to recanalization in a model of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Methods. An occlusive thrombus (lamb's blood) was introduced into the MCA of a model of the cerebral circulation perfused with Hartmann's solution (80 pulsations/min, mean pressure 90 mm Hg). Three methods of clot retrieval were tested: thrombus aspiration via a 4F catheter (n = 26), thrombus aspiration via the GP thrombus aspiration device (GPTAD) (n = 30), and mechanical thrombectomy via the Solitaire Device (n = 30). Results. Recanalization rate was similar for all 3 approaches (62%, 77%, and 85%). Time to recanalization was faster with aspiration devices (41 SD 42 s for 4F and 61 SD 21 s for GPTAD) than with the Solitaire (197 SD 64 s P < .05 Kruksal-Wallis). Clot fragmentation was the same in the Solitaire (23%) and the GPTAD (23%), but higher with the 4F (53%, P < .05). Conclusion. In this model, thrombus aspiration was faster than mechanical thrombectomy, and similarly effective at recanalization. These results should be confirmed in vivo. PMID:21603169

  16. Severe Intimal Thickening of Interlobular Arteries Revealed by a Renal Biopsy in an Adult with Prader-Willi Syndrome Complicated by IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takayasu; Ishikawa, Eiji; Fujimoto, Mika; Murata, Tomohiro; Yamada, Norikazu; Ito, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Renal complications are rare in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). We herein experienced a 31-year-old woman with PWS, in whom a renal biopsy showed IgA nephropathy and severe intimal thickening of the interlobular arteries. The patient was admitted to our hospital due to proteinuria and microscopic hematuria after an upper respiratory infection. The occurrence of cardiovascular events has been reported as a cause of death in obese PWS patients. Because chronic kidney disease is generally a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, early detection checkups are essential in obese PWS patients to monitor the possible development of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26781016

  17. Lemierre syndrome complicated by cavernous sinus thrombosis, the development of subdural empyemas, and internal carotid artery narrowing without cerebral infarction. Case report.

    PubMed

    Westhout, Franklin; Hasso, Anton; Jalili, Mehrdad; Afghani, Behnoosh; Armstrong, William; Nwagwu, Chiedozie; Ackerman, Laurie L

    2007-01-01

    Lemierre syndrome is an extremely rare complication of mild-to-moderate pharyngeal infections. The authors present an unusual case of Lemierre syndrome in a 16-year-old boy with cavernous sinus thrombosis and right internal carotid artery narrowing without neurological sequelae, right subdural empyema, and cerebritis in the right temporal and occipital lobes. Neuroimaging also demonstrated right jugular vein thrombosis. Cultures of samples from the blood proved positive for the presence of Fusobacterium necrophorum. The patient underwent unilateral tonsillectomy, drainage of the peritonsillar abscess, and a myringotomy on the right side. Postoperatively the patient was treated conservatively with antibiotic therapy resulting in an excellent outcome. PMID:17233314

  18. Risk Factors and Prevention of Guiding Catheter-induced Vasospasm in Neuroendovascular Treatment

    PubMed Central

    ISHIHARA, Hideaki; ISHIHARA, Shoichiro; NIIMI, Jun; NEKI, Hiroaki; KAKEHI, Yoshiaki; UEMIYA, Nahoko; KOHYAMA, Shinya; YAMANE, Fumitaka; KATO, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Mechanically-induced vasospasm often occurs during guiding catheter insertion, occasionally preventing catheter advancement to the desired location. Delicate manipulation would be impossible without the proper positioning of guiding catheters, and vasospasm-induced cerebral hypoperfusion may cause thrombotic complications. From June 2012 to December 2013, we prospectively analyzed 150 endovascular treatment cases, excluding acute cases, for the frequency of vasospasm, risk factors, and countermeasures. The associated risk factors such as the Japanese-style State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) score; anatomy and devices; and the efficacies of warm compresses, intra-arterial lidocaine/nicardipine, and tranquilizers were analyzed. Groups 1, 2, and 3 comprised 50 patients each with controls, tranquilizer administration, and prophylactic warm compresses/intra-arterial drug injection, respectively. Moderate or severe vasospasm was seen in approximately 40% patients in each group; however, severe vasospasm was absent in Group 3. Mild vasospasm-induced cerebral infarction occurred in one patient each in Groups 1 and 2. Vasospasm during diagnostic angiography [odds ratio (OR) = 10.63; P = 0.01], many ≥ 30° vessel curves [OR = 4.21; P = 0.01], and the high STAI score [OR = 1.84; P = 0.01] were risk factors for severe vasospasm. Although the relationship between anxiety and sympathetic tone remained unclear, tranquilizer administration relieved vasospasm. Warm compresses and the intra-arterial drug infusion were also useful for relieving vasospasm. Prophylactic measures such as a tranquilizer and warm compresses are expected to alleviate vasospasm; in addition, countermeasures such as the intra-arterial injection of lidocaine/nicardipine are effective. PMID:25739431

  19. Stereotactic catheter placement for Ommaya reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Benjamin C; Brown, Lauren T; Komotar, Ricardo J; McKhann, Guy M

    2016-05-01

    Ommaya reservoirs are an important surgical therapy for the chronic intrathecal administration of chemotherapy for patients with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. Surgical accuracy is paramount in these patients with typically normal sized ventricles, and may be improved with stereotactic guidance. This paper aimed to review a large series of stereotactic Ommaya catheter placements, examining accuracy and complications. We conducted a retrospective review of 109 consecutive adult patients who underwent stereotactic Ommaya catheter placement for leptomeningeal carcinomatosis or central nervous system lymphoma at Columbia University Medical Center, USA, from 1998-2013. The rate of accurate placement in the ventricular system was 99%, with the only poor catheter position due to post-placement migration. The rate of peri-operative complications was 6.4%. Hemorrhagic complications occurred in patients with thrombocytopenia or therapeutic anti-coagulation pre-operatively or during the post-operative period. Use of stereotaxy for catheter placement of Ommaya reservoirs is safe and effective, and should be considered when placing a catheter into non-hydrocephalic ventricles. PMID:26778516

  20. Feasibility and Safety of Transradial Arterial Approach for Simultaneous Right and Left Vertebral Artery Angiographic Studies and Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, H.-K.; Youssef, Ali A.; Chang, W.-N.; Lu, C.-H.; Yang, C.-H.; Chen, S.-M.; Wu, C.-J.

    2007-09-15

    Objectives. This study investigated whether the transradial artery (TRA) approach using a 6-French (F) Kimny guiding catheter for right vertebral artery (VA) angiographic study and stenting is safe and effective for patients with significant VA stenosis. Background. The TRA approach is commonly performed worldwide for both diagnostic cardiac catheterization and catheter-based coronary intervention. However, to our knowledge, the safety and feasibility of left and right VA angiographic study and stenting, in the same procedure, using the TRA approach for patients with brain ischemia have not been reported. Methods. The study included 24 consecutive patients (22 male, 2 female; age, 63-78 years). Indications for VA angiographic study and stenting were (1) prior stroke or symptoms related to vertebrobasilar ischemia and (2) an asymptomatic but vertebral angiographic finding of severe stenosis (>70%). A combination of the ipsilateral and retrograde-engagement technique, which involved a looping 6-F Kimny guiding catheter, was utilized for VA angiographic study. For VA stenting, an ipsilateral TRA approach with either a Kimny guiding catheter or a left internal mammary artery guiding catheter was utilized in 22 patients and retrograde-engagement technique in 2 patients. Results. A technically successful procedure was achieved in all patients, including left VA stenting in 15 patients and right VA stenting in 9 patients. The mean time for stenting (from engagement to stent deployment) was 12.7 min. There were no vascular complications or mortality. However, one patient suffered from a transient ischemic attack that resolved within 3 h. Conclusion. We conclude that TRA access for both VA angiographic study and VA stenting is safe and effective, and provides a simple and useful clinical tool for patients unsuited for femoral arterial access.

  1. A Novel Fenestration Technique for Abdominal Aortic Dissection Membranes Using a Combination of a Needle Re-entry Catheter and the 'Cheese-wire' Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kos, Sebastian; Guerke, Lorenz; Jacob, Augustinus L.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to demonstrate the applicability of a combined needle-based re-entry catheter and 'cheese-wire' technique for fenestration of abdominal aortic dissection membranes. Methods: Four male patients (mean age: 65 years) with acute complicated aortic type B dissections were treated at our institution by fenestrating the abdominal aortic dissection membrane using a hybrid technique. This technique combined an initial membrane puncture with a needle-based re-entry catheter using a transfemoral approach. A guidewire was passed through the re-entry catheter and across the membrane. Using a contralateral transfemoral access, this guidewire was then snared, creating a through-and-through wire access. The membrane was then fenestrated using the cheese-wire maneuver. Results: We successfully performed: (a) membrane puncture; (b) guidewire passage; (c) guidewire snaring; and (d) cheese-wire maneuver in all four cases. After this maneuver, decompression of the false lumen and acceptable arterial inflow into the true lumen was observed in all cases. The dependent visceral arteries were reperfused. In one case, portions of the fenestrated membrane occluded the common iliac artery, which was immediately and successfully stented. In another case, long-standing intestinal hypoperfusion before the fenestration resulted in reperfusion-related shock and intraoperative death of the patient. Conclusions: The described hybrid approach for fenestration of dissection membranes is technically feasible and may be established as a therapeutic method in cases with a complicated type B dissection.

  2. Distal access using hyperflexible atraumatic distal tip with optimized proximal stability of the Benchmark intracranial guide catheter for the treatment of cerebral vascular diseases: a technical note

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Arun; Puthuran, Mani; Eldridge, Paul R; Nahser, Hans C

    2016-01-01

    Background A stable guide catheter position within the intracranial vasculature is critical for safe, successful endovascular treatment. Objective To present ourinitial experience with the 0.071 inch inner diameter Benchmark guide catheter used in the treatment of intracranial cerebrovascular pathologies, demonstrating its safety and efficacy. Methods We retrospectively reviewed use of the Benchmark guide catheter from September through December 2014 in the management of various neuroendovascular intracranial pathologies. Clinical performance and complication rates were evaluated, with particular consideration of vessel tortuosity. A total of 62 Benchmarks were used, 47 in the anterior circulation, 10 in the posterior circulation, 4 in the external carotid, and 1 in the venous sinus. The five cases with access to the external carotid and venous sinus were excluded. Results The Benchmark was able to cross at least one 90° turn in 49 (86%) of the 57 patients. Reversal of the catheter was seen in 15% of 47 anterior circulation cases (4 at one 90° turn; 3 at two 90° turns). We report no complications of dissection or thromboembolic events. All guide catheter positions were safely achieved over a 0.035 Terumo stiff glidewire without need for an inner smaller lumen guide catheter for navigation. Conclusions Benchmark is a new guide catheter, with an ideal combination of both hyperflexible, atraumatic distal tip and optimized proximal shaft support to provide stable 6F primary access for a successful neurointerventional procedure. Benchmark can be easily, safely, and consistently positioned in a desired location within intracranial arteries providing a stable position for intervention and adequate angiography. PMID:26071386

  3. Encrusted and incarcerated urinary bladder catheter: what are the options?

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Christopher C.K.; Khandasamy, Yugasaravanan; Singam, Praveen; Hong Goh, Eng; Zainuddin, Zulkifli M.

    2010-01-01

    Urinary bladder catheter encrustations are known complications of long-term urinary catheterisation, which is commonly seen in clinical practice. These encrustations can impede deflation of the balloon and therefore cause problems in the removal of the catheter. The options in managing an encrusted and incarcerated urinary bladder catheter include extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and lithoclast. We describe here another technique of dealing with a stuck and encrustated catheter, via direct crushing of the encrustations with a rigid cystoscope inserted through a suprapubic cystostomy tract. PMID:21483557

  4. Evaluation of the Pullback Atherectomy Catheter in the Treatment of Lower Limb Vascular Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Grubnic, Sisa; Heenan, Susan D.; Buckenham, Timothy M.; Belli, Anna-Maria

    1996-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate prospectively the Pullback Atherectomy Catheter (PAC) in terms of its technical success and 1-year patency in the treatment of lower limb vascular disease. Methods: Thirty-nine PAC procedures were performed in 34 patients to treat atherosclerotic disease (occlusive in 51%) of the femoropopliteal arteries, including four cases of graft neointimal hyperplasia and three dissection flaps. Follow-up was by ankle<+>-<+>brachial indices at 24 hr and 1 month, and arteriography at 6 and 12 months. Results: Technical success was achieved in 38 of 39 procedures (97.4%). There was a reduction in mean stenosis from 89.4% to 12.1%, but 69.2% of procedures required additional balloon dilatation to achieve an adequate arterial lumen. Complications followed 15.4% of procedures, a third of which required surgery. Conclusion: The PAC is an easy and relatively safe catheter to use, but does not provide a satisfactory arterial lumen without additional percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). It proved to be effective, however, in the treatment of graft neointimal hyperplasia and in the resection of obstructive intimal flaps following PTA.

  5. Radiofrequency catheter septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy in children

    PubMed Central

    Emmel, M.; Sreeram, N.

    2005-01-01

    Background The definitive therapeutic options for symptomatic obstructive cardiomyopathy in childhood are restricted. At present, extensive surgical myectomy is the only procedure that is of proven benefit. Patients and Methods Three patients, aged 5, 11 and 17 years, respectively, with progressive hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and increasing symptoms were considered for radiofrequency catheter septal ablation. The peak Doppler gradient recorded on several occasions ranged between 50 to 90mmHg. Via a femoral arterial approach, the His bundle was initially plotted and marked using the LocaLisa navigation system. Subsequently, using a cooled tip catheter a series of lesions were placed in the hypertrophied septum, taking care to stay away from the His bundle. A total of 17, 50 and 45 lesions were applied in the three patients. In one case, the procedure was complicated by two episodes of ventricular fibrillation requiring DC cardioversion but without any neurological sequelae. Results The preablation peak-to-peak gradient between left ventricle and aorta was 50 mmHg, 60 mmHg and 60 mmHg, respectively, and remained unchanged immediately after the procedure. All patients were discharged from hospital 48 hours later. Serial measurement of serum troponin T and CK-MB isoenzyme confirmed significant myocardial necrosis. Follow-up echocardiography both at seven days and at six weeks postablation confirmed a beneficial haemodynamic result, with reduction of left ventricular outflow obstruction and relief of symptoms. Conclusion In young children, in whom alcohol-induced septal ablation is not an option, radiofrequency catheter ablation offers an alternative to surgery, with the benefits of repeatability and a lower risk of procedure-related permanent AV block. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:25696442

  6. Digital Subtraction MR Angiography Roadmapping for Magnetic Steerable Catheter Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Alastair J.; Lillaney, Prasheel; Saeed, Maythem; Losey, Aaron D.; Settecase, Fabio; Evans, Lee; Arenson, Ronald L.; Wilson, Mark W.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a high temporal resolution MR imaging technique that could be employed with magnetically-assisted remote control (MARC) endovascular catheters. Materials and Methods A technique is proposed based on selective intra-arterial injections of dilute MR contrast at the beginning of a fluoroscopic MR angiography acquisition. The initial bolus of contrast is used to establish a vascular roadmap upon which MARC catheters can be tracked. The contrast to noise ratio of the achieved roadmap was assessed in phantoms and in a swine animal model. The ability of the technique to permit navigation of activated MARC catheters through arterial branch points was evaluated. Results The roadmapping mode proved effective in phantoms for tracking objects and achieved a contrast to noise ratio of 35.7 between the intra and extra-vascular space. In vivo, the intra-arterial enhancement strategy produced roadmaps with a contrast to noise ratio of 42.0. The artifact produced by MARC catheter activation provided signal enhancement patterns on the roadmap that experienced interventionalists could track through vascular structures. Conclusion A roadmapping approach with intra-arterial CE-MRA is introduced for navigating the MARC catheter. The technique mitigates the artifact produced by the MARC catheter, greatly limits the required SAR, permits regular roadmap updates due to the low contrast agent requirements, and proved effective in the in vivo setting. PMID:24797218

  7. Central venous catheters for chemotherapy of solid tumors--our results in the last 5 years.

    PubMed

    Zganjer, Mirko; Cizmić, Ante; Butković, Diana; Matolić, Martina; Karaman-Ilić, Maja; Stepan, Jasminka

    2008-09-01

    Central venous catheters provide an easy access for intravenous medications. Having a central line in place will relieve a child from the discomfort and danger of multiple regular intravenous lines for chemotherapy. The use of indwelling central venous catheters has become commonplace in the management of children undergoing oncological treatment. There are two types of central lines commonly used. There are Broviac catheters and Port-A-Cath (PAC) catheters. In the last 5 years we inserted 194 catheters in 175 children. We inserted 121 Broviac catheters and 73 PAC catheters. During the follow up of 39382 catheter days 44 complications were observed. In Broviac group the median follow up was 155 days and in PAC group was 230 days. We observed differences in the incidence between two devices. In Broviac group infections were more frequent and in PAC group other complications were more frequent than infections. PMID:18982750

  8. Bowel Perforation During Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter Placement.

    PubMed

    Abreo, Kenneth; Sequeira, Adrian

    2016-08-01

    Interventional nephrologists and radiologists place peritoneal dialysis catheters using the percutaneous fluoroscopic technique in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. Nephrologists caring for such patients may have to diagnose and manage the complications resulting from these procedures. Abdominal pain can occur following peritoneal dialysis catheter placement when the local and systemic analgesia wears off. However, abdominal pain with hypotension is suggestive of a serious complication. Bleeding into the abdomen and perforation of the colon or bladder should be considered in the differential diagnosis. In the case reported here, the peritoneogram showed contrast in the bowel, and correct interpretation by the interventionist would have prevented this complication. The characteristic pattern of peritoneogram images in this case will guide interventionists to avoid this complication, and the discussion of the differential diagnosis and management will assist nephrologists in taking care of such patients. PMID:26857647

  9. Hemosuccus pancreaticus caused by rupture of a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm complicating chronic alcoholic pancreatitis: an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hiltrop, Nick; Vanhauwaert, Anke; Palmers, Pieter-Jan Liesbeth Herman; Cool, Mike; Deboever, Guido; Lambrecht, Guy

    2015-12-01

    We present a case of a 52-year old female patient with intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding and iron deficiency anaemia. Repeated endoscopic investigation revealed no diagnosis, but contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a splenic artery pseudo-aneurysm secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. A distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy was performed. Hemosuccus pancreaticus is an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, most frequently associated with chronic pancreatitis. Erosion of a peripancreatic artery by a pseudocyst can cause a pseudoaneurysm and rupture occurs in up to 10% of the cases. Bleeding from a pseudocyst wall or rupture of an atherosclerotic or traumatic aneurysm is rare. Angiography, contrast-enhanced computed tomography and endoscopic findings can be diagnostic in the majority of cases. Angiographic embolization or surgery are both therapeutic options depending on underlying nonvascular pancreas related indications requiring surgery. We discuss diagnostic pitfalls and current therapeutic strategies in the management of this disease. PMID:26712055

  10. Transvaginal Oocyte Retrieval Complicated by Life-Threatening Obturator Artery Haemorrhage and Managed by a Vessel-Preserving Technique.

    PubMed Central

    Bolster, Ferdia; Mocanu, Edgar; Geoghegan, Tony; Lawler, Leo

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 36-year-old woman with secondary infertility who underwent routine transvaginal oocyte retrieval as part of IVF treatment. Four days following the procedure she presented with life threatening haemorrhagic shock. She underwent surgical laparotomy followed by CT and selective angiography, which demonstrated haemorrhage from a pseudoaneurysm of the obturator artery. The haemorrhage was successfully managed endovascularly with a vessel preserving covered stent. PMID:25484463

  11. Catheter tip force transducer for cardiovascular research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Culler, V. H. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A force transducer for measuring dynamic force activity within the heart of a subject essentially consists of a U-shaped beam of low elastic compliance material. Two lines extend from the beams's legs and a long coil spring is attached to the beam. A strain gauge is coupled to one of the beam's legs to sense deflections thereof. The beam with the tines and most of the spring are surrounded by a flexible tube, defining a catheter, which is insertable into a subject's heart through an appropriate artery. The tines are extractable from the catheter for implantation into the myocardium by pushing on the end of the spring which extends beyond the external end of the catheter.

  12. Adjacent central venous catheters can result in immediate aspiration of infused drugs during renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Kam, K Y R; Mari, J M; Wigmore, T J

    2012-02-01

    Dual-lumen haemodiafiltration catheters enable continuous renal replacement therapy in the critically ill and are often co-located with central venous catheters used to infuse drugs. The extent to which infusions are immediately aspirated by an adjacent haemodiafiltration catheter remains unknown. A bench model was constructed to evaluate this effect. A central venous catheter and a haemodiafiltration catheter were inserted into a simulated central vein and flow generated using centrifugal pumps within the simulated vein and haemodiafiltration circuit. Ink was used as a visual tracer and creatinine solution as a quantifiable tracer. Tracers were completely aspirated by the haemodiafiltration catheter unless the infusion was at least 1 cm downstream to the arterial port. No tracer was aspirated from catheters infusing at least 2 cm downstream. Orientation of side ports did not affect tracer elimination. Co-location of central venous and haemodiafiltration catheters may lead to complete aspiration of infusions into the haemodiafilter with resultant drug under-dosing. PMID:22059378

  13. The Effect of Intensive Glycemic Treatment on Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetic Participants of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Patricia A.; Orchard, Trevor J.; Genuth, Saul; Wong, Nathan D.; Detrano, Robert; Backlund, Jye-Yu C.; Zinman, Bernard; Jacobson, Alan; Sun, Wanjie; Lachin, John M.; Nathan, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study, an observational follow-up of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) type 1 diabetes cohort, measured coronary artery calcification (CAC), an index of atherosclerosis, with computed tomography (CT) in 1,205 EDIC patients at ~7–9 years after the end of the DCCT. We examined the influence of the 6.5 years of prior conventional versus intensive diabetes treatment during the DCCT, as well as the effects of cardiovascular disease risk factors, on CAC. The prevalences of CAC >0 and >200 Agatston units were 31.0 and 8.5%, respectively. Compared with the conventional treatment group, the intensive group had significantly lower geometric mean CAC scores and a lower prevalence of CAC >0 in the primary retinopathy prevention cohort, but not in the secondary intervention cohort, and a lower prevalence of CAC >200 in the combined cohorts. Waist-to-hip ratio, smoking, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia, before or at the time of CT, were significantly associated with CAC in univariate and multivariate analyses. CAC was associated with mean HbA1c (A1C) levels before enrollment, during the DCCT, and during the EDIC study. Prior intensive diabetes treatment during the DCCT was associated with less atherosclerosis, largely because of reduced levels of A1C during the DCCT. PMID:17130504

  14. Steerable Catheter Microcoils for Interventional MRI: Reducing Resistive Heating

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Anthony; Wilson, Mark W.; Settecase, Fabio; Evans, Leland; Malba, Vincent; Martin, Alastair J.; Saeed, Maythem; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Arenson, Ronald L.; Hetts, Steven W.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess resistive heating of microwires used for remote catheter steering in interventional magnetic resonance imaging. To investigate the use of alumina to facilitate heat transfer to saline flowing in the catheter lumen. MATERIALS AND METHODS A microcoil was fabricated using a laser lathe onto polyimide-tipped or alumina-tipped endovascular catheters. In vitro testing was performed in a 1.5 T MR system using a vessel phantom, body RF coil, and steady state pulse sequence. Resistive heating was measured with water flowing over a polyimide tip catheter, or saline flowing through the lumen of an alumina-tip catheter. Preliminary in vivo testing in porcine common carotid arteries was conducted with normal blood flow or after arterial ligation when current was applied to an alumnia-tip catheter for up to 5 minutes. RESULTS After application of up to 1 W of DC power, clinically significant temperature increases were noted with the polyimide-tip catheter: 23°C/W at zero flow, 13°C/W at 0.28 cc/s, and 7.9°C/W at 1 cc/s. Using the alumina-tip catheter, the effluent temperature rise using the lowest flow rate (0.12 cc/s) was 2.3°C/W. In vivo testing demonstrated no thermal injury to vessel walls at normal and zero arterial flow. CONCLUSION Resistive heating in current carrying wire pairs can be dissipated by saline coolant flowing within the lumen of a catheter tip composed of material that facilitates heat transfer. PMID:21075017

  15. [Suprapubic catheter insertion].

    PubMed

    Neumann, Eva; Schwentner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The suprapubic catheter enables a percutaneous drainage of urine. The insertion is made superior of the pubic bone through the abdominal wall into the bladder. It allows a permanent drainage of urine bypassing the urethra. The insertion of a suprapubic catheter requires knowledge and expertise. This paper summarizes the basic background and allows to follow the practical application step by step. PMID:26800072

  16. Uterine Artery Embolization in 101 Cases of Uterine Fibroids: Do Size, Location, and Number of Fibroids Affect Therapeutic Success and Complications?

    SciTech Connect

    Firouznia, Kavous Ghanaati, Hossein; Jalali, Amir H.; Shakiba, Madjid

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the size, location, or number of fibroids affects therapeutic efficacy or complications of uterine artery embolization (UAE). Patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids (n = 101) were treated by selective bilateral UAE using 500- to 710-{mu}m polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles. Baseline measures of clinical symptoms, sonography, and MRI taken before the procedure were compared to those taken 1, 3, 6, and 12 months later. Complications and outcomes were analyzed for associations with fibroid size, location, and number. Reductions in mean fibroid volume were similar in patients with single (66.6 {+-} 21.5%) and multiple (67.4 {+-} 25.0%) fibroids (p-value = 0.83). Menstrual improvement occurred in patients with single (93.3%) and multiple (72.2%) fibroids (p = 0.18). Changes in submucosal and other fibroids were not significantly different between the two groups (p's > 0.56). Linear regression analysis between primary fibroid volume as independent variable and percentage reduction of fibroid volume after 1 year yielded an R{sup 2} of 0.083 and the model coefficient was not statistically significant (p = 0.072). Multivariate regression models revealed no statistically or clinically significant coefficients or odds ratios for three independent variables (primary fibroid size, total number, and fibroid location) and all outcome variables (percent reduction of uterus and fibroid volumes in 1 year, improvement of clinical symptoms [menstrual, bulk related, and urinary] in 1 year, and complications after UAE). In conclusion, neither the success rate nor the probability of complications was affected by the primary fibroid size, location, or total number of fibroids.

  17. Repositioning of Misplaced Central Venous Catheter with Saline Injection Under C-Arm Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Parshotam Lal; Jain, Krishan; Monga, Hitika

    2015-01-01

    Malposition of central venous catheter is a well known technical complication. Misplaced catheter often requires reinsertion for proper placement of the catheter in the superior vena cava (SVC) to support safe delivery of care and minimize complications. But reinsertion exposes the patient once again to risks of complications related to the procedure including potential of misplacement. Literature describes only a few techniques for repositioning a misplaced central venous catheter (CVC). We tried old simple method of saline injection with force under image intensifier using hydrostatic force of intravenous fluid to straighten the CVC. We could successfully reposition two misplaced CVC’s using this method. PMID:26816974

  18. Modified multipurpose catheter enhances clinical utility for cardiac catheterizations.

    PubMed

    Mannino, S C; Scavina, M; Palmer, S

    1994-10-01

    The Multipurpose technique for coronary arteriography employs a single catheter. The benefits are a reduction in the cost of the procedure and a shorter procedural time by experienced operators. To enhance the performance of these catheters, a modification was made in the materials and tip design, and these modifications were clinically evaluated in a small study. Compared to the control group of patients (n = 41), patients catheterized with the Multipurpose-SM (n = 43) were shown to have a shorter procedural time as measured by a reduced fluoroscopy time (7.08 min vs. 9.52 min, P = .007). This difference is statistically significant at a 95% confidence level and resulted in less radiation exposure to the operator and cath lab staff. The procedural time was significantly reduced by fewer catheter exchanges (19% study vs. 46% control; P = .006), which were needed to successfully complete the procedure. The new Multipurpose-SM catheter also demonstrated enhanced flexibility for cannulating coronary arteries with superior or anterior takeoffs. This study concludes that the utilization of a modified Multipurpose-SM catheter is safe and effective in cannulating both the left and right coronary arteries, bypass grafts, and performing left ventriculography. The primary benefits of using this modified catheter are reduced fluoroscopy time and the need for fewer catheter exchanges. PMID:7834732

  19. Prospective Study of Elective Bilateral Versus Unilateral Femoral Arterial Puncture for Uterine Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Bratby, M. J.; Ramachandran, N.; Sheppard, N.; Kyriou, J.; Munneke, G. M.; Belli, A.-M.

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of elective bilateral femoral arterial punctures for uterine artery embolization (UAE) of symptomatic fibroids on fluoroscopy and procedural time, patient dose, and ease of procedure. We conducted a prospective study of UAE with either the intention to catheterize both uterine arteries using a single femoral puncture (n = 12) or elective bilateral arterial punctures from the outset (n = 12). The same two operators undertook each case. Main outcome measures were total procedure time, fluoroscopy time, dose-area product (DAP), and total skin dose. A simulation was then performed on an anthropomorphic phantom using the mean in vivo fluoroscopy parameters to estimate the ovarian dose. Bilateral UAE was achieved in all patients. None of the patients with initial unilateral arterial puncture required further contralateral arterial puncture. The mean fluoroscopy time in the group with elective bilateral punctures was 12.8 min, compared with a mean of 16.6 min in patients with unilateral puncture (p = 0.046). There was no significant difference in overall procedure time (p = 0.68). No puncture-site complications were found. Additional catheters were required only following unilateral puncture. The simulated dose was 25% higher with unilateral puncture. Although there was no significant difference in measured in vivo patient dose between the two groups (DAP, p = 0.32), this is likely to reflect the wide variation in other patient characteristics. Allowing for the small study size, our results show that the use of elective bilateral arterial punctures reduces fluoroscopy time, requires less catheter manipulation, and, according to the simulation model, has the potential to reduce patient dose. The overall procedure time, however, is not significantly reduced.

  20. Fractional flow reserve-guided percutaneous coronary intervention for an intermediate stenosis complicated by a coronary-to-pulmonary artery fistula.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tsuyoshi; Murai, Shunsuke; Fujita, Hiroshi; Tani, Tomomitsu; Ohte, Nobuyuki

    2016-05-01

    A 65-year-old man was referred to our hospital following repetitive chest pain. Invasive coronary angiography showed an intermediate stenosis of the proximal left anterior descending artery (LAD), and a coronary fistula originating distal to the stenosis draining into the main pulmonary artery. To evaluate the functional abnormality arising from the stenosis and coronary steal due to the fistula, fractional flow reserve (FFR) was measured using a pressure wire with pullback recording. The FFR value was 0.74 at the distal LAD, 0.78 distal to the fistula, 0.81 proximal to the fistula (distal to the stenosis), and abruptly increased to 1.0 proximal to the stenosis. Based on these FFR results, percutaneous coronary intervention was performed to the stenosis. After stent placement, the FFR value improved to 0.87 at the distal LAD, and no abrupt pressure gradient was observed beyond the fistula and the stent. FFR-guided intervention with pullback pressure recording could be a useful and practical method to apply in cases with coronary stenosis complicated by coronary fistula in the same vessel. PMID:25643760

  1. Epidural catheter with integrated light guides for spectroscopic tissue characterization

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Astorga, R. P.; West, S.; Putnis, S.; Hebden, J. C.; Desjardins, A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Epidural catheters are used to deliver anesthetics and opioids for managing pain in many clinical scenarios. Currently, epidural catheter insertion is performed without information about the tissues that are directly ahead of the catheter. As a result, the catheter can be incorrectly positioned within a blood vessel, which can cause toxicity. Recent studies have shown that optical reflectance spectroscopy could be beneficial for guiding needles that are used to insert catheters. In this study, we investigate the whether this technique could benefit the placement of catheters within the epidural space. We present a novel optical epidural catheter with integrated polymer light guides that allows for optical spectra to be acquired from tissues at the distal tip. To obtain an initial indication of the information that could be obtained, reflectance values and photon penetration depth were estimated using Monte Carlo simulations, and optical reflectance spectra were acquired during a laminectomy of a swine ex vivo. Large differences between the spectra acquired from epidural adipose tissue and from venous blood were observed. The optical catheter has the potential to provide real-time detection of intravascular catheter placement that could reduce the risk of complications. PMID:24298420

  2. [Incidence and risk factors for infections from hemodialysis catheters].

    PubMed

    Jean, G

    2001-01-01

    We report here a revue of hemodialysis catheter-related infections data published since 1985. The reported prevalence of bacteremia is 1 to 20% of catheters, and incidence is 0.72 to 9/1000 catheter-days. Local infection is reported in 6 to 63% of catheters and in 1 to 5/1000 catheter-days. Tunneled catheters and implantables chambers reported less infection rate. The most severe complication is endocarditis (4% rate). Death occurs in 8 to 20% of cases. Reported microbial data show that Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is responsible for most infections ahead of non-aureus Staphylococcus. SA skin colonisation is a risk factor for catheter colonisation and the first step of infection. On the other hand, the host immunity impairment in hemodialysis patients seems a significant risk factor. Iron overload, specially after blood transfusions, older age, diabetes mellitus, low serum albumin level, previous history of bacteremia and immunosuppressive treatment have been frequently involved. Other catheter-related factors are time of use, absence of tunnel and use for parenteral nutrition. Nurses plans, dressing type and frequency, nurses work experience are also important. In spite of recent progress in risk factor understanding, hemodialysis-related infection remains frequent. Multicentre studies are necessary to better evaluated care protocols and new catheter material. PMID:11811006

  3. Laser welding of balloon catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Aidan J.

    2003-03-01

    The balloon catheter is one of the principal instruments of non-invasive vascular surgery. It is used most commonly for angioplasty (and in recent years for delivering stents) at a multitude of different sites in the body from small arteries in the heart to the bilary duct. It is composed of a polymer balloon that is attached to a polymer shaft at two points called the distal and proximal bonds. The diverse utility of balloon catheters means a large range of component sizes and materials are used during production; this leads to a complexity of bonding methods and technology. The proximal and distal bonds have been conventionally made using cyanoacrylate or UV curing glue, however with performance requirements of bond strength, flexibility, profile, and manufacturing costs these bonds are increasingly being made by welding using laser, RF, and Hot Jaw methods. This paper describes laser welding of distal and proximal balloon bonds and details beam delivery, bonding mechanisms, bond shaping, laser types, and wavelength choice.

  4. Auditing urinary catheter care.

    PubMed

    Dailly, Sue

    Urinary catheters are the main cause of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections among inpatients. Healthcare staff can reduce the risk of patients developing an infection by ensuring they give evidence-based care and by removing the catheter as soon as it is no longer necessary. An audit conducted in a Hampshire hospital demonstrated there was poor documented evidence that best practice was being carried out. Therefore a urinary catheter assessment and monitoring tool was designed to promote best practice and produce clear evidence that care had been provided. PMID:22375340

  5. Robust catheter identification and tracking in X-ray angiographic sequences.

    PubMed

    Fazlali, H R; Karimi, N; Soroushmehr, S M R; Samavi, S; Nallamothu, B; Derksen, H; Najarian, K

    2015-08-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the major causes of death worldwide. Today X-ray angiography is a standard method for CAD diagnosis. Usually, the quality of these images is not good enough. Noise, camera and heart motions, non-uniform illumination and even the presence of catheter are sources of quality degradation. The existence of catheter can produce difficulties in vessel extraction methods because catheter is structurally similar to arteries. In this paper we propose a fully automatic method for catheter detection and tracking during the whole angiography sequence. In this method with a vesselness map, we smooth each frame using guided filter. The catheter is detected in the first frame using Hough transform. We then fit a second order polynomial on the catheter and accurately track it throughout the sequence. Our method is tested on 25 X-ray angiography sequences where a precision of 0.9597 is achieved. PMID:26738124

  6. Impact of catheter fragmentation followed by local intrapulmonary thrombolysis in acute high risk pulmonary embolism as primary therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Bishav; Aslam, Naved; Kumar Mehra, Anil; Takkar Chhabra, Shibba; Wander, Praneet; Tandon, Rohit; Singh Wander, Gurpreet

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary embolism (PE) with more than 50% compromise of pulmonary circulation results significant right ventricular (RV) afterload leading to progressive RV failure, systemic hypotension and shock. Prompt restoration of thrombolysis, surgical embolectomy, or percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) prevents progressive hemodynamic decline. We report our single center experience in high risk PE patients treated with standard pigtail catheter mechanical fragmentation followed by intrapulmonary thrombolysis as a primary therapy. Methods 50 consecutive patients with diagnosis of high risk PE defined as having shock index >1 with angiographic evidence of >50% pulmonary arterial occlusion are included in the present study. All patients underwent emergent cardiac catheterization. After ensuring flow across pulmonary artery with mechanical breakdown of embolus by rotating 5F pigtail catheter; bolus dose of urokinase (4400 IU/kg) followed by infusion for 24 h was given in the thrombus. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded and follow up pulmonary angiogram was done. Clinical and echo follow up was done for one year. Results Pigtail rotational mechanical thrombectomy restored antegrade flow in all patients. The mean pulmonary artery pressure, Miller score, Shock index decreased significantly from 41 ± 8 mmHg, 20 ± 5, 1.32 ± 0.3 to 24.52 ± 6.89, 5.35 ± 2.16, 0.79 ± 0.21 respectively (p < 0.0001). In-hospital major complications were seen in 4 patients. There was a statistically significant reduction of PA pressures from 62 ± 11 mmHg to 23±6 mmHg on follow up. Conclusions Rapid reperfusion of pulmonary arteries with mechanical fragmentation by pigtail catheter followed by intrapulmonary thrombolysis results in excellent immediate and intermediate term outcomes in patients presenting with high risk pulmonary embolism. PMID:24973834

  7. Balloon Dilatation for Removal of an Irretrievable Permanent Hemodialysis Catheter: The Safest Approach.

    PubMed

    Garcarek, Jerzy; Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Letachowicz, Krzysztof; Kusztal, Mariusz; Szymczak, Maciej; Madziarska, Katarzyna; Jakuszko, Katarzyna; Zmonarski, Sławomir; Guziński, Maciej; Weyde, Wacław; Klinger, Marian

    2016-05-01

    Long-term hemodialysis catheter dwell time in the central vein predisposes to fibrin sheath development, which subsequently causes catheter malfunction or occlusion. In very rare cases, the catheter can be overgrown with fibrin and rigidly connected with the vein or heart structures. This makes its removal almost impossible and dangerous because of the possibility of serious complications, namely vein and heart wall perforation, bleeding, or catheter abruption in deep tissues. We describe two cases in which standard retrieval of long-term catheters was not possible. Balloon dilatation of catheter lumens was successfully used to increase the catheter diameter with simultaneous tearing of the fibrin sheath surrounding it. This allowed the catheter to be set free safely. Based on this experience, we present recent literature and our point of view. PMID:26684390

  8. Advancement of epidural catheter from lumbar to thoracic space in children: Comparison between 18G and 23G catheters

    PubMed Central

    Baidya, Dalim Kumar; Pawar, Dilip Kumar; Dehran, Maya; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds and Objectives: Lumbar-to-thoracic advancement of epidural catheter is a safe alternative to direct thoracic placement in children. In this prospective randomized study, success rate of advancement of two different types and gauges of catheter from lumbar-to-thoracic space were studied. Materials and Methods: Forty ASA I and II children (up to 6 years) undergoing thoracic or upper-abdominal surgery were allocated to either Group I (18G catheter) or Group II (23G catheter). After induction of general anesthesia a pre-determined length of catheter was inserted. Successful catheter placement was defined as the catheter tip within two segment of surgical incision in radio-contrast study. Intra-operative analgesia was provided by epidural bupivacaine and intravenous morphine. Post-operative analgesia was provided with epidural infusion of 0.1% bupivacaine+1mcg/ml fentanyl. Observations and Results: Catheter advancement was successful in 3 cases in Group I and 2 cases in Group II. Five different types of catheter positions were found on X-ray. Negative correlation was found between age and catheter advancement [significance (2-tailed) =0.03]. However, satisfactory post-operative analgesia was obtained in 35 cases. Positive correlation was found between infusion rate, the number of segment of gap between desired level and the level reached [significance (2-tailed) =0.00]. 23G catheter use was associated with more technical complications. Conclusion: Advancement of epidural catheter from lumbar to thoracic level was successful in only 10-15% cases but satisfactory analgesia could be provided by increasing the infusion rates. PMID:22345940

  9. Strategies for Successful Percutaneous Revascularization of Chronic Total Occlusion of the Femoropopliteal Arteries When the Antegrade Passage of a Guide Wire Fails

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hui Jin; Chang, Il Soo; Jeon, Hae Jeong; Park, Jeong Hee

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of various strategies for revascularization of chronic total occlusion of femoropopliteal arteries when the guide wire does not pass in an anterograde direction. Materials and Methods Twenty-four patients with totally occluded femoropopliteal arteries (mean occlusion length 13.75 cm; range, 6-22 cm) were treated by using a retrograde approach and two novel catheters. After successful recanalization or reentry, balloon angioplasty followed by stent placement was performed to complete the revascularization. Results In 16 cases in which to cross the occlusion via intraluminal or subintimal route was failed, we used Frontrunner catheters in five cases and Outback catheters in 11 cases. In eight cases in which to reenter after subintimal passage of the guide wire was failed, we used Outback catheters. Successful recanalization was achieved intraluminally or subintimally in all cases. One perforation occurred during subintimal passage of the guide wire that was controlled by recanalization of another subintimal tract. There were no cases of distal thromboembolism or other complications. Conclusion A retrograde approach and using the Frontrunner and Outback catheters are safe and effective for successful revascularization of chronic total occlusion of femoropopliteal arteries. In particular, they are useful when the initial antegrade attempts at recanalization have failed. PMID:22778569

  10. Progression of Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness During 12 Years in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Polak, Joseph F.; Backlund, Jye-Yu C.; Cleary, Patricia A.; Harrington, Anita P.; O’Leary, Daniel H.; Lachin, John M.; Nathan, David M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study investigated the long-term effects of intensive diabetic treatment on the progression of atherosclerosis, measured as common carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 1,116 participants (52% men) in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) trial, a long-term follow-up of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT), had carotid IMT measurements at EDIC years 1, 6, and 12. Mean age was 46 years, with diabetes duration of 24.5 years at EDIC year 12. Differences in IMT progression between DCCT intensive and conventional treatment groups were examined, controlling for clinical characteristics, IMT reader, and imaging device. RESULTS Common carotid IMT progression from EDIC years 1 to 6 was 0.019 mm less in intensive than in conventional (P < 0.0001), and from years 1 to 12 was 0.014 mm less (P = 0.048); but change from years 6 to 12 was similar (intensive − conventional = 0.005 mm, P = 0.379). Mean A1C levels during DCCT and DCCT/EDIC were strongly associated with progression of IMT, explaining most of the differences in IMT progression between DCCT treatment groups. Albuminuria, older age, male sex, smoking, and higher systolic blood pressure were significant predictors of IMT progression. CONCLUSIONS Intensive treatment slowed IMT progression for 6 years after the end of DCCT but did not affect IMT progression thereafter (6–12 years). A beneficial effect of prior intensive treatment was still evident 13 years after DCCT ended. These differences were attenuated but not negated after adjusting for blood pressure. These results support the early initiation and continued maintenance of intensive diabetes management in type 1 diabetes to retard atherosclerosis. PMID:21270271

  11. Timing of catheter drainage in infected necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    van Grinsven, Janneke; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Boermeester, Marja A; Dejong, Cornelis H; van Eijck, Casper H; Fockens, Paul; Besselink, Marc G

    2016-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastrointestinal indication for hospital admission, and infected pancreatic and/or extrapancreatic necrosis is a potentially lethal complication. Current standard treatment of infected necrosis is a step-up approach, consisting of catheter drainage followed, if necessary, by minimally invasive necrosectomy. International guidelines recommend postponing catheter drainage until the stage of 'walled-off necrosis' has been reached, a process that typically takes 4 weeks after onset of acute pancreatitis. This recommendation stems from the era of primary surgical necrosectomy. However, postponement of catheter drainage might not be necessary, and earlier detection and subsequent earlier drainage of infected necrosis could improve outcome. Strong data and consensus among international expert pancreatologists are lacking. Future clinical, preferably randomized, studies should focus on timing of catheter drainage in patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis. In this Perspectives, we discuss challenges in the invasive treatment of patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis, focusing on timing of catheter drainage. PMID:26956064

  12. Catheter Obstruction of Intrathecal Drug Administration System -A Case Report-

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Seok Myeon; Choi, Eun Joo; Lee, Pyung Bok

    2012-01-01

    Intrathecal drug administration system (ITDAS) can reduce the side effects while increasing the effectiveness of opioids compared to systemic opioid administration. Therefore, the use of ITDAS has increased in the management of cancer pain and chronic intractable pain. Catheter obstruction is a serious complication of ITDAS. Here, we present a case of catheter obstruction by a mass formed at the side hole and in the lumen. A 37-year-old man suffering from failed back surgery syndrome received an ITDAS implantation, and the ITDAS was refilled with morphine every 3 months. When the patient visited the hospital 18 months after ITDAS implantation for a refill, the amount of delivered morphine sulfate was much less than expected. Movement of the pump rotor was examined with fluoroscopy; however, it was normal. CSF aspiration through the catheter access port was impossible. When the intrathecal catheter was removed, we observed that the side hole and lumen of the catheter was plugged. PMID:22259717

  13. Management of Dysfunctional Catheters and Tubes Inserted by Interventional Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Steven Y.; Engstrom, Bjorn I.; Lungren, Matthew P.; Kim, Charles Y.

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive percutaneous interventions are often used for enteral nutrition, biliary and urinary diversion, intra-abdominal fluid collection drainage, and central venous access. In most cases, radiologic and endoscopic placement of catheters and tubes has replaced the comparable surgical alternative. As experience with catheters and tubes grows, it becomes increasingly evident that the interventional radiologist needs to be an expert not only on device placement but also on device management. Tube dysfunction represents the most common complication requiring repeat intervention, which can be distressing for patients and other health care professionals. This manuscript addresses the etiologies and solutions to leaking and obstructed feeding tubes, percutaneous biliary drains, percutaneous catheter nephrostomies, and drainage catheters, including abscess drains. In addition, we will address the obstructed central venous catheter. PMID:26038615

  14. Sinuplasty (Balloon Catheter Dilation)

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of the balloon dilating catheter and its adaptation to sinus surgery. In the 1980s, the field ... used in endoscopic sinus surgery. It is the adaptation or application of minimally-invasive balloon technology to ...

  15. Indwelling catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Common reasons to have an indwelling catheter are urinary incontinence (leakage), urinary retention (not being able to urinate), ... gov/pubmed/22094023 . Read More Radical prostatectomy Stress urinary incontinence Transurethral resection of the prostate Urge incontinence Urinary ...

  16. Suprapubic catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may need a catheter because you have urinary incontinence (leakage), urinary retention (not being able to urinate), ... vaginal wall repair Inflatable artificial sphincter Radical prostatectomy Urinary incontinence - injectable implant Urinary incontinence - retropubic suspension Urinary incontinence - ...

  17. Suprapubic catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... store. Other supplies you will need are sterile gloves, a catheter pack, syringes, sterile solution to clean ... your back. Put on two pairs of sterile gloves, one over the other. Then: Make sure your ...

  18. Central venous catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  19. Comparison of outcomes between surgically placed and percutaneously placed peritoneal dialysis catheters: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Gupta, S.; Agarwal, S. K.; Bhowmik, D.; Mahajan, S.

    2016-01-01

    There is lack of adequate data on comparison of outcomes between percutaneously placed peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters inserted by nephrologists and PD catheters placed by surgeons. The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the outcomes of PD catheters inserted by surgeons (by open surgical or laparoscopic technique) and compare them with those inserted by nephrologists among ESRD patients who underwent elective PD catheter insertions between January 2009 and December 2012. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of catheters removed because of primary nonfunction. The secondary outcome measures were catheter survival, patient survival, and incidence of complications of catheter insertion. A total of 143 PD catheter insertions (88 by surgeons and 55 by nephrologists) performed in 132 patients were considered for the analysis. The primary nonfunction rate of PD catheter insertions in both groups was comparable (18.2% and 7.3%, P = 0.08). Break-in period was shorter in Group N (p = <0.001). No differences were noted in patient or catheter survival. Percutaneously placed PD catheters performed by nephrologists have comparable outcomes with surgically placed PD catheters among selected cases and have the advantage of lower costs, avoidance of operation theater scheduling issues, smaller incision length, and shorter break-in period. Therefore, more nephrologists should acquire the expertise on percutaneous PD catheter placement as it leads to lesser waiting times and better utilization of PD. PMID:27512299

  20. Comparison of outcomes between surgically placed and percutaneously placed peritoneal dialysis catheters: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, R; Gupta, S; Agarwal, S K; Bhowmik, D; Mahajan, S

    2016-01-01

    There is lack of adequate data on comparison of outcomes between percutaneously placed peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters inserted by nephrologists and PD catheters placed by surgeons. The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the outcomes of PD catheters inserted by surgeons (by open surgical or laparoscopic technique) and compare them with those inserted by nephrologists among ESRD patients who underwent elective PD catheter insertions between January 2009 and December 2012. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of catheters removed because of primary nonfunction. The secondary outcome measures were catheter survival, patient survival, and incidence of complications of catheter insertion. A total of 143 PD catheter insertions (88 by surgeons and 55 by nephrologists) performed in 132 patients were considered for the analysis. The primary nonfunction rate of PD catheter insertions in both groups was comparable (18.2% and 7.3%, P = 0.08). Break-in period was shorter in Group N (p = <0.001). No differences were noted in patient or catheter survival. Percutaneously placed PD catheters performed by nephrologists have comparable outcomes with surgically placed PD catheters among selected cases and have the advantage of lower costs, avoidance of operation theater scheduling issues, smaller incision length, and shorter break-in period. Therefore, more nephrologists should acquire the expertise on percutaneous PD catheter placement as it leads to lesser waiting times and better utilization of PD. PMID:27512299

  1. Embolization of a PORT-A-CATH device in the main pulmonary artery and its percutaneous extraction in a patient with pinch-off syndrome.

    PubMed

    Çilingiroğlu, Mehmet; Akkuş, Nuri lker

    2012-03-01

    Totally implanted port devices play an important role in acute and chronic medical care of patients with various conditions and are widely used for infusion of fluids, medications, blood or other blood products, and for monitoring hemodynamic parameters. Embolization of a part of port devices is a rare but potentially serious complication of port catheter placement. We report distal embolization of a catheter fragment of a PORT-A-CATH device into the main pulmonary artery and right ventricle and its successful percutaneous retrieval in a patient with metastatic lung cancer, who was also found to have thoracic inlet syndrome or pinch-off syndrome. PMID:22710588

  2. Combination of Superselective Arterial Embolization and Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of a Giant Renal Angiomyolipoma Complicated with Caval Thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Stamatiou, Konstantinos N.; Moschouris, Hippocrates; Marmaridou, Kiriaki; Kiltenis, Michail; Kladis-Kalentzis, Konstantinos; Malagari, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    This is a case of a 78-year-old male patient with multiple angiomyolipomas of a solitary right kidney. The largest of these tumors (maximum diameter: 13.4 cm) caused significant extrinsic compression of the inferior vena cava complicated by thrombosis of this vessel. Treatment of thrombosis with anticoagulants had been ineffective and the patient had experienced a bleeding episode from the largest right renal angiomyolipoma, which had been treated by transarterial embolization in another institution, 4 months prior to our intervention. Our approach included superselective transarterial embolization of the dominant, right kidney angiomyolipoma with hydrogel microspheres, which was combined, 20 days later, with ultrasonographically guided radiofrequency ablation. Both interventions were uneventful. Computed tomography 2 months after ablation showed a 53% reduction in tumor volume, reduced space-occupying effect on inferior vena cava, and resolution of caval thrombus. Nine months after intervention the patient has had no recurrence of thrombosis or hemorrhage and no tumor regrowth has been observed. The combination of superselective transarterial embolization and radiofrequency ablation seems to be a feasible, safe, and efficient treatment of large renal angiomyolipomas. PMID:27293932

  3. Combination of Superselective Arterial Embolization and Radiofrequency Ablation for the Treatment of a Giant Renal Angiomyolipoma Complicated with Caval Thrombus.

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, Konstantinos N; Moschouris, Hippocrates; Marmaridou, Kiriaki; Kiltenis, Michail; Kladis-Kalentzis, Konstantinos; Malagari, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    This is a case of a 78-year-old male patient with multiple angiomyolipomas of a solitary right kidney. The largest of these tumors (maximum diameter: 13.4 cm) caused significant extrinsic compression of the inferior vena cava complicated by thrombosis of this vessel. Treatment of thrombosis with anticoagulants had been ineffective and the patient had experienced a bleeding episode from the largest right renal angiomyolipoma, which had been treated by transarterial embolization in another institution, 4 months prior to our intervention. Our approach included superselective transarterial embolization of the dominant, right kidney angiomyolipoma with hydrogel microspheres, which was combined, 20 days later, with ultrasonographically guided radiofrequency ablation. Both interventions were uneventful. Computed tomography 2 months after ablation showed a 53% reduction in tumor volume, reduced space-occupying effect on inferior vena cava, and resolution of caval thrombus. Nine months after intervention the patient has had no recurrence of thrombosis or hemorrhage and no tumor regrowth has been observed. The combination of superselective transarterial embolization and radiofrequency ablation seems to be a feasible, safe, and efficient treatment of large renal angiomyolipomas. PMID:27293932

  4. Videolaparoscopic Catheter Placement Reduces Contraindications to Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Santarelli, Stefano; Zeiler, Matthias; Monteburini, Tania; Agostinelli, Rosa Maria; Marinelli, Rita; Degano, Giorgio; Ceraudo, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    ♦ Background: Videolaparoscopy is considered the reference method for peritoneal catheter placement in patients with previous abdominal surgery. The placement procedure is usually performed with at least two access sites: one for the catheter and the second for the laparoscope. Here, we describe a new one-port laparoscopic procedure that uses only one abdominal access site in patients not eligible for laparotomic catheter placement. ♦ Method: We carried out one-port laparoscopic placement in 21 patients presenting contraindications to blind surgical procedures because of prior abdominal surgery. This technique consists in the creation of a single mini-laparotomy access through which laparoscopic procedures and placement are performed. The catheter, rectified by an introducer, is inserted inside the port. Subsequently, the port is removed, leaving the catheter in pelvic position. The port is reintroduced laterally to the catheter, confirming or correcting its position. Laparotomic placement was performed in a contemporary group of 32 patients without contraindications to blind placement. Complications and long-term catheter outcome in the two groups were evaluated. ♦ Results: Additional interventions during placement were necessary in 12 patients of the laparoscopy group compared with 5 patients of the laparotomy group (p = 0.002). Laparoscopy documented adhesions in 13 patients, with need for adhesiolysis in 6 patients. Each group had 1 intraoperative complication: leakage in the laparoscopy group, and intestinal perforation in the laparotomy group. During the 2-year follow-up period, laparoscopic revisions had to be performed in 6 patients of the laparoscopy group and in 5 patients of the laparotomy group (p = 0.26). The 1-year catheter survival was similar in both groups. Laparoscopy increased by 40% the number of patients eligible to receive peritoneal dialysis. ♦ Conclusions: Videolaparoscopy placement in patients not eligible for blind surgical

  5. [Cardiac tamponade after withdrawal of a peripheral access central catheter].

    PubMed

    García-Galiana, E; Sanchis-Gil, V; Martínez-Navarrete, M Á

    2015-03-01

    Central venous catheterization is a very common technique, although its complications can be multiple and sometimes fatal. A case is presented of cardiac tamponade by parenteral nutrition a few hours after moving a central venous catheter peripherally inserted a few days before. The diagnosis was made by echocardiography, and an emergency pericardiocentesis was performed, achieving complete recovery of the patient. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters are more likely to change their position secondary to the movements of the patient's arm, thus it is important to use soft catheters, make sure the tip lies above the carina to avoid perforation of the pericardial reflexion, and fix it well to the skin. Diagnosis must be made as soon as possible, given the high mortality rate of this complication, and the essential diagnostic tool is echocardiography. Elective treatment consists of early catheter withdrawal and emergency pericardiocentesis. PMID:24929256

  6. [Novel strategy for thoracoabdomianl aortic aneurysm repair; intraoperative selective perfusion of the Adamkiewicz artery].

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, S; Furukawa, K; Rikitake, K; Okazaki, Y; Sato, M; Natsuaki, M; Matsumoto, K; Kato, A; Kudo, S; Itoh, T

    2004-04-01

    We report our method for delineating the Adamkiewicz artery using multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) with selective perfusion using a distal perfusion cannula that is clinically available for off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB). The tip of a distal perfusion catheter (Medtronic Quickflow, Minneapolis) designed for OPCAB was applicable for selective perfusion of the segmental arteries. The femoro-femoral venoarterial bypass was branched off into selective perfusion of the segmental arteries, using an independent roller pump and heat exchanger. Our method of visualization of the Adamkiewicz artery was MDCT scanning with injection of contrast medium directly into the proximal descending aorta: namely, "CT during aortography". Lower descending aorta to abdominal aorta (the range involving the aneurysm) was scanned in a cephalad-to-caudal direction using a detector collimation of 4 x 1.25 mm with a table speed of 9.4 mm/sec, pitch of 6, and image thickness of 1.25 mm. All images were reviewed on a workstation to investigate the continuity between the Adamkiewicz artery and its proximal segmental artery with paging, mulitplanar reformation and curved planar reformation. Distal perfusion cannulae of 2.0 mm in diameter were inserted into the respective intercostal arteries. 4-0 polyethylene sutures were placed to tourniquet the catheters. Segmental arteries were perfused with total flow of approximately 80 ml/min at a circuit pressure of 120 mmHg. Reattachment of the ninth intercostal arteries related to the Adamkiewicz artery was carried out. A total of 6 consecutive 6 patients with thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) have undergone graft replacement by the methods described, since April 2002. All patients survived surgery without any neurological complications. This method is expected to minimize the ischemic time of the spinal cord and attenuate the reperfusion injury. PMID:15071861

  7. Delayed Onset of Subdural Hematoma following Epidural Catheter Breakage

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Gotoh, Momokazu; Nishiwaki, Kimitoshi; Nagao, Yoshimasa; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objectives To describe a case of delayed-onset spinal hematoma following the breakage of a spinal epidural catheter. Methods The authors describe the clinical case review. Results A 64-year-old woman had undergone epidural anesthesia 18 years before she was referred to our hospital because of lower-back pain and lower neurologic deficit with leg pain. The clinical examination showed the presence of a fragment of an epidural catheter in the thoracolumbar canal, as assessed by computed tomography, and a spinal hematoma that compressed the spinal cord at the same spinal level, as assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical removal of the epidural catheter and decompression surgery were performed. The patient exhibited substantial clinical improvement 1 month after surgery; she achieved a steady gait without the need for a cane and had no leg pain. Conclusion This is the first report of delayed onset of spinal hematoma following the breakage of an epidural catheter. Generally, when the breakage of an epidural catheter occurs without symptoms, follow-up alone is recommended. However, because spinal hematoma might exhibit a late onset, the possibility of this complication should be considered when deciding whether to remove the catheter fragment. We believe that in our patient, there could be a relationship between the catheter fragment and subdural hematoma, and catheter breakage could have been a risk factor for the spinal hematoma. PMID:26835209

  8. Percutaneous Management of Postoperative Duodenal Stump Leakage with Foley Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jung Suk Lee, Hae Giu Chun, Ho Jong; Choi, Byung Gil; Lee, Sang Hoon; Hahn, Seong Tai; Ohm, Joon Young

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate retrospectively the safety and efficacy of the percutaneous management of duodenal stump leakage with a Foley catheter after subtotal gastrectomy. Methods: Ten consecutive patients (M:F = 9:1, median age: 64 years) were included in this retrospective study. The duodenal stump leakages were diagnosed in all the patients within a median of 10 days (range, 6-20). At first, the patients underwent percutaneous drainage on the day of or the day after confirmation of the presence of duodenal stump leakage, and then the Foley catheters were replaced at a median of 9 days (range, 6-38) after the percutaneous drainage. Results: Foley catheters were placed successfully in the duodenal lumen of all the patients under a fluoroscopic guide. No complication was observed during and after the procedures in all the patients. All of the patients started a regular diet 1 day after the Foley catheter placement. The patients were discharged at a median of 7 days (range, 5-14) after the Foley catheter placement. The catheters were removed in an outpatient clinic 10-58 days (median, 28) after the Foley catheter placement. Conclusions: Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous Foley catheter placement may be a safe and effective treatment option for postoperative duodenal stump leakage and may allow for shorter hospital stays, earlier oral intake, and more effective control of leakage sites.

  9. [Prevention and treatment of intraoperative complications of thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Lampl, L

    2015-05-01

    In order to achieve a minimal complication rate there is a need for a comprehensive strategy. This means in the first line preventive steps which include patient positioning, suitable approaches and access, an appropriately qualified surgical team as well as a carefully planned dissection and preparation. Furthermore, a supply of additional instrumentation, such as thrombectomy catheters, special vascular clamps and even extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and a heart-lung machine (HLM) in cases of centrally located lesions should be on stand-by. Control instruments, such as a bronchoscope and esophagoscope should not be forgotten. In selected cases a preoperative embolization (vascular malformation) or cream swallow (thoracic duct injury) can be helpful. Special interventions to overcome complications arising are described for the chest wall, lung parenchyma, pulmonary vessels, great vessels, bronchial arteries, trachea and bronchi, esophagus, thoracic duct, heart, vertebral column and sternum corresponding to the topography. PMID:25691227

  10. Hemobilia secondary to hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm: an unusual complication of bile leakage in a patient with a history of a resected IIIb Klatskin tumor.

    PubMed

    Siablis, Dimitrios; Papathanassiou, Zafiria G; Karnabatidis, Dimitrios; Christeas, Nikolaos; Vagianos, Constantine

    2005-09-01

    We report a case of a 74-year-old woman with a 16-year history of a double bilo-enteric anastomosis due to resected hilar cholangiocarcinoma (Type IIIb Klatskin tumor). The patient presented with cholangitis secondary to benign anastomotic stenosis which resulted in a large intrahepatic biloma. In order to restore the patency of the anastomosis and overcome cholangitis, several attempts took place, including endobiliary stenting, balloon-assisted biloplasty and transhepatic billiary drainage. Anastomotic patency was achieved, complicated, however, by persistent upper gastro-intestinal bleeding, presented as hemobilia. A biloma-induced pseudoaneurysm of the left hepatic artery was diagnosed. This had ruptured into the biliary tract, and presented the actual cause of the hemobilia. Selective embolism of the pseudoaneurysm resulted in control of the hemorrhage, and was successfully combined with transhepatic dilatation of the anastomosis and percutaneous drainage of the biloma. The patient was ultimately cured and seems to be in excellent condition, 5 mo after treatment. PMID:16127759

  11. [Experience in the use of Broviac catheters in children with hematologic neoplastic diseases].

    PubMed

    Swiatkiewicz, V; Molski, S; Wysocki, M; Jundziłł, W; Hryncewicz, W; Pilecki, O

    1996-08-01

    Between 1990 and 1994, 61 Broviac catheters were implanted in 53 children with haematological neoplastic diseases. The mean duration of catheter function was 206 days (range 14-615 days). The total observation time was 12544 days, during which 84 catheter-related complications were recorded, i.e. 6.7 per 1000 catheter use days. Infections occurred with a frequency of 3.8 episodes/1000 cath, days, the majority of which were bacteriemias (2.6/1000 cath, days). Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains were the isolated etiologic agents with equal frequency. Most of infectious episodes (85%) responded well to initial empiric antibiotics treatment without removal of the catheters. Mechanica complications (occlusion, displacement or catheter leakage) occurred significant less frequently and were managed by repairing or replacing the device or clearing the block. No deaths were related to catheter complications. In conclusion indwelling Broviac catheters offer a safe and effective method of long-term venous access. Infections are the most frequent catheter-related complications. PMID:8927470

  12. Thrombolytic Therapy Using Urokinase for Management of Central Venous Catheter Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jung Tack; Min, Sun Young; Kim, Jae Il; Choi, Pyong Wha; Heo, Tae Gil; Lee, Myung Soo; Kim, Chul-Nam; Kim, Hong-Yong; Yi, Seong Yoon; Lee, Hye Ran; Roh, Young-Nam

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The management of central venous catheters (CVCs) and catheter thrombosis vary among centers, and the efficacy of the methods of management of catheter thrombosis in CVCs is rarely reported. We investigated the efficacy of bedside thrombolysis with urokinase for the management of catheter thrombosis. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed data from patients who had undergone CVC insertion by a single surgeon in a single center between April 2012 and June 2014. We used a protocol for the management of CVCs and when catheter thrombosis was confirmed, 5,000 U urokinase was infused into the catheter. Results: A total of 137 CVCs were inserted in 126 patients. The most common catheter-related complication was thrombosis (12, 8.8%) followed by infection (8, 5.8%). Nine of the 12 patients (75%) with catheter thrombosis were recanalized successfully with urokinase. The rate of CVC recanalization was higher in the peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) group (87.5%) than the chemoport group (50%). Reintervention for catheter-related thrombosis was needed in only 2.2% of patients when thrombolytic therapy using urokinase was applied. Age <60 years (P=0.035), PICC group (P=0.037) and location of the catheter tip above the superior vena cava (P=0.044) were confirmed as independent risk factors for catheter thrombosis. Conclusion: Thrombolysis therapy using urokinase could successfully manage CVC thrombosis. Reintervention was rarely needed when a protocol using urokinase was applied for the management of CVC thromboses. PMID:26217634

  13. Catheter-tip force transducer for cardiovascular research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Culler, V. H.

    1975-01-01

    Sensor can be installed in left ventricle by means of procedures available for inserting catheter into an artery at body's extremities and manipulating it through vessel and past aortic valve. Metallic tines of device can be used as internal electrode for electrocardiogram.

  14. Digital subtraction angiography of a persistent trigeminal artery variant.

    PubMed

    Temizöz, Osman; Genchellac, Hakan; Unlü, Ercüment; Cağli, Bekir; Ozdemir, Hüseyin; Demir, M Kemal

    2010-09-01

    Persistent trigeminal artery variants are described as cerebellar arteries that directly originate from the precavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. This has been observed in 0.18% of cerebral catheter angiograms. On the other hand, a persistent trigeminal artery variant feeding both the anterior inferior cerebellar artery and the posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory is very rare. We present this uncommon anomalous artery along with digital subtraction angiography findings and discuss its clinical significance in light of the literature. PMID:19821254

  15. Breast Capsular Cerebrospinal Fluid Collection from Migration of a Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, William J.; Kamali, Parisa; Chun, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Summary: In this case report we have described an unusual complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt migration into a breast implant capsule. The patient was appropriately diagnosed with computed tomographic imaging and successfully managed with shunt revision and cerebrospinal fluid aspiration. Given the high complication profile of ventriculoperitoneal shunt catheters, this case suggests an opportunity for improved perioperative communication between plastic surgeons and neurosurgeons in patients with breast implants. Coordination regarding the subcutaneous catheter tunneling may hopefully minimize the risk of this complication. PMID:27257570

  16. Successful surgical treatment with mitral valve replacement and coronary embolectomy in a patient with active infective endocarditis complicated by multiple septic embolisms involving cerebral arteries and the right coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Manabu; Watanabe, Sunao; Abe, Kohei; Uenishi, Michiko; Kawazoe, Kohei

    2010-09-01

    The proper management of a patient with active infective endocarditis (IE) remains to be determined, especially when his or her condition is complicated with intracranial mycotic aneurysm. Here we present a 46-year-old company employee hospitalized with a subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by a ruptured mycotic aneurysm. Cardiac echography showed a verruca on the posterior mitral cusp and leaflet destruction, resulting in severe valvular regurgitation (determined pathogen was α-streptococcus). High-dose antibiotic infusion and restriction of physical activity to prevent heart failure were combined with emergency craniotomy drainage and coiling of the necks of two cerebral mycotic aneurysms. After 2 months of conservative therapy for IE, he suddenly collapsed with hypotension and bradycardia because of embolic occlusion of the proximal right coronary artery (RCA). An emergent operation was carried out to remove the emboli in the RCA and to replace the mitral valve with a mechanical prosthesis. The postoperative course was uneventful. Although disturbances of spatial recognition and manual dexterity remained, he was able to walk and talk. After postoperative sufficient-duration antibiotic therapy, which lasted 20 days, he was transferred to a rehabilitation center. PMID:20859727

  17. Peripherally inserted central catheter - insertion

    MedlinePlus

    ... central catheters and nontunneled central venous catheters. In: Mauro MA, Murphy KPJ, Thomson KR, et al., eds. ... Procedures . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2007:chap 4. Mansour JC, Neiderhuber JE. Establishing and ...

  18. Management Of Fever And Suspected Infection In Pediatric Patients With Central Venous Catheters.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Courtney; Wang, Vincent J

    2015-12-01

    The use of indwelling central venous catheters is essential for pediatric patients who require hemodialysis, parenteral nutrition, chemotherapy, or other medications. Fever is a common chief complaint in the emergency department, and fever in a patient with a central venous catheter may be related to a common cause of fever, or it may be due to a catheter-associated bloodstream infection. Catheter-associated bloodstream infections may also lead to additional complications such as sepsis, septic shock, or septic complications including suppurative thrombophlebitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, septic emboli, and abscesses. Early resuscitation as well as timely and appropriate antibiotic therapy have been shown to improve outcomes. This issue focuses on the approach to fever in pediatric patients with central venous catheters and the management and disposition of patients with possible catheter-associated bloodstream infections. PMID:26569627

  19. Confirmation of endovenous placement of central catheter using the ultrasonographic “bubble test”

    PubMed Central

    Baviskar, Ajit S.; Khatib, Khalid I.; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Galwankar, Sagar C.; Dongare, Harshad C.

    2015-01-01

    Insertion of central venous catheter (CVC) is the most common procedure to be performed in Intensive Care Units. Addition of ultrasonographic guidance to this procedure, which was initially performed blindly, has improved safety of this procedure. Confirmation of endovenous placement of CVC though, is tricky, as methods for confirmation are either operator dependent, time-consuming or not available at bedside. Prospective observational study was carried out to study feasibility of use of sonobubble test to confirm the presence of CVC within central vein. After insertion of CVC in the internal jugular, subclavian or axillary vein, a 10 ml bolus of shaken saline microbubble is injected through port of CVC, and opacification of right atrium is observed in xiphoid view on ultrasonography. The Sonobubble test was helpful for dynamic confirmation of endovenous placement of CVC and prevented complications such as arterial puncture and cannulation. We recommend its use following CVC insertion. PMID:25624649

  20. [Candida catheter related-blood stream infection].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Masako; Shimono, Nobuyuki

    2014-02-01

    Candida catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is a biofilm-related disease, which is usually refractory because antifungals show limited effect. With medical development and increase in number of compromised hosts, CRBSI became more frequent. Candida, which is one of the opportunistic pathogens, ranks the fourth causative organism of bacteremia. The onset of bacteremia is greatly associated with the presence of catheter. Repeated blood cultures and the central venous catheter (CVC) tip culture are done for the definitive diagnosis of Candida CRBSI. Additionally serological examinations such as (1 --> 3)-beta-D-glucan and mannan antigen are also useful for early diagnosis. It is important for the appropriate treatment to remove CVC, which is an artificial contaminated material, and administer antifungals promptly. As to the choice of antifungals, we should also take into account the ability of antibiofilm effect of antifungals as well as immunological state of host including neutropenia, prior administration of azoles, isolated or estimated Candida species, sensitivity against antifungals, administration route, pharmacokinetics (bioavailability, metabolic and excretion pathway, distribution) and drug interaction. As to complication of Candida bacteremia, first we should check endophthalmitis, which occurs frequently and leads to the loss of eyesight, as well as infective endocarditis, arthritis, metastatic infections such as embolic pneumonia and suppurative thrombotic phlebitis of catheter insertion site. Lastly we emphasize that the appropriate treatment based on the character of Candida bacteremia and biofilm leads to favorable prognosis. PMID:24809204

  1. Reliability of pressure recordings via catheters used for transluminal coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed

    Busch, U W; Sebening, H; Beeretz, R; Heinze, R

    1984-06-01

    Because of common difficulties in obtaining adequate pressure tracing during transluminal coronary angioplasty, the pressure transmission characteristics of catheter systems used for angioplasty were determined. Transmission of cine wave pressures (0.2 to 14 Hz) and of arterial pressure pulses reproduced in vitro was evaluated. Following adequate elimination of air bubbles from the system, the Grüntzig dilatation catheters yielded satisfactory frequency response curves and thus good reproduction of arterial pressure waveforms. The Simpson-Robert catheter showed clearly inferior frequency response characteristics, explaining the more significant damping of the pressure tracings. However, mean pressures were reliably recorded with each type. PMID:15227077

  2. [Ablation of supraventricular tachycardias : Complications and emergencies].

    PubMed

    Sawan, N; Eitel, C; Thiele, H; Tilz, R

    2016-06-01

    Catheter ablation is an established treatment of supraventricular tachycardias (SVT) with high success rates of > 95 %. Complication rates range from 3 to 5 %, with serious complications occurring in about 0.8 %. There are general complications caused either by the vascular access or the catheters (e. g. hematomas, hemo-pneumothorax, embolism, thrombosis and aspiration) und specific ablation related complications (e. g. AV block during ablation of the slow pathway). The complication risk is elevated in elderly and multimorbid patients. Furthermore, the experience of the treating physician and the respective team plays an essential role. The purpose of this article is to give an overview on incidences, causes and management as well as prevention strategies of complications associated with catheter ablation of SVT. PMID:27206630

  3. Complications and Their Management During NBCA Embolization of Craniospinal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Y.; Berenstein, A.; Setton, A.

    2003-01-01

    Summary Technical complications during embolization of craniospinal lesions using NBCA may be classified as nonspecific catheterization-related or specific embolization-related. Catheterization-related complications include vessel injuries such as spasm, dissection or perforation, catheter injuries and thrombus formation. Embolization-related complications include occlusion of normal territories, migration of the embolic material to the venous side, and catheter gluing to the vessel wall. Causes, prevention and management of each complication are discussed with presentation of demonstrative cases. PMID:20591246

  4. Catheter fracture and embolization from totally implanted venous access ports--case reports.

    PubMed

    Vadlamani, P; Dawn, B; Perry, M C

    1998-12-01

    Totally implanted venous access ports are excellent devices for delivering chemotherapeutic agents and prolonged intravenous infusions in patients with cancer. Catheter fracture and embolization are rare and potentially serious complications of these widely used devices. Retrieval of the embolized fragment is generally indicated but may not be possible. The authors report three cases of catheter embolization in their center over a period of 9 years. Catheter "pinch-off," fracture, embolization, and retrieval are discussed. PMID:9855376

  5. Extrahepatic Blood Supply to Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Angiographic Demonstration and Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Matsui, Osamu; Taki, Keiichi; Minami, Tetsuya; Ryu, Yasuji; Ito, Chiharu; Nakamura, Koichi; Inoue, Dai; Notsumata, Kazuo; Toya, Daisyu; Tanaka, Nobuyoshi; Mitsui, Takeshi

    2006-02-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the incidence of each extrahepatic collateral pathway to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to assess technical success rates and complications of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) through each collateral. Methods. We retrospective evaluated extrahepatic collateral pathways to HCC on angiography in 386 procedures on 181 consecutive patients. One hundred and seventy patients had previously undergone TACE. TACE through extrahepatic collaterals using iodized oil and gelatin sponge particles was performed when a catheter was advanced into the tumor-feeding branch to avoid nontarget embolization. Results. A single collateral was revealed in 275 TACE procedures, two were revealed in 74, and three or more were revealed in 34. Incidences of collateral source to HCC were 83% from the right inferior phrenic artery (IPA), 24% from the cystic artery, 13% from the omental artery, 12% from the right renal capsular artery (RCA) and left IPA, 8% from the right internal mammary artery (IMA) and right intercostal artery (ICA), and 7% from the right inferior adrenal artery (IAA). Technical success rates of TACE were 53% in the right ICA, 70% in the cystic artery, 74% in the omental artery, 93% in the left IPA, 96% in the right IPA, and 100% in the right RCA, right IMA, and right IAA. Complications included skin necrosis after TACE through the right IMA (n = 1), cholecystitis after TACE through the cystic artery (n = 1), and ulcer formation after TACE through the right gastric artery (n = 1), in addition to pleural effusion and basal atelectasis after TACE through the IPA and IMA. Conclusion. Our study suggests that TACE through extrahepatic collaterals is possible with high success rates, and is also relatively safe.

  6. Vertebral artery origin angioplasty and primary stenting: safety and restenosis rates in a prospective series

    PubMed Central

    Cloud, G; Crawley, F; Clifton, A; McCabe, D; Brown, M; Markus, H

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To report a single centre ongoing experience of endovascular treatment for atherosclerotic vertebral artery origin stenosis in a series of symptomatic patients, with follow up imaging to determine the incidence of restenosis. Methods: 14 patients with vertebral artery origin stenosis on catheter angiography were treated. Angioplasty without stenting was undertaken in the first four patients, all of whom had follow up catheter angiography at one year. Subsequently, patients were treated by primary stenting and followed up with colour Doppler ultrasound examination. Results: The procedure was technically successful in all treated arteries, with no immediate complications. The degree of stenosis was reduced from (mean (SD)) 73 (18)% before treatment to 21 (26)% immediately after treatment in the angioplasty alone group (p = 0.059). In the primary stenting patients, the severity of stenosis was reduced from 82 (8)% to 13 (13)% immediately after treatment (p < 0.001). Restenosis to 70% or greater occurred at one year in all four patients initially treated by angioplasty without stenting. One patient subsequently developed further symptoms and was retreated by stenting. One of the 10 patients treated by primary stenting developed restenosis. None of the remaining patients had further posterior circulation ischaemic symptoms during a mean follow up period of 33.6 months (range 1 to 72 months). Conclusions: Restenosis occurs often after vertebral artery origin balloon angioplasty without stenting but is uncommon after stenting. Primary stenting is therefore recommended to maintain patency at this site, and had a low complication rate in this series. PMID:12700299

  7. Indwelling catheter care

    MedlinePlus

    ... clean between your fingers and under your nails. Wet one of the washcloths with warm water and soap it up. Gently wash all around the area where the catheter goes in with the soapy washcloth. Females should wipe from front to back. Males should wipe from ...

  8. Conservative Management of Left Atrial Intramural Hematoma after Catheter Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Oraii, Saeed; Roshanali, Farideh; Ghorbanisharif, Alireza; Mikaeili, Javad; Tahraei, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Left atrial intramural hematoma is a very rare complication of radiofrequency ablation procedures. A patient with tachyarrhythmia underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation. Echocardiography performed the following morning showed a large mass in the left atrium, suggestive of intramural hematoma formation. The patient was in a stable condition; therefore, it was decided that follow-up should be conservative and her anticoagulation therapy was continued. The size of the hematoma decreased significantly over the following 50 days. This case highlights a rare complication of a complex catheter ablation procedure in the left atrium that was managed via a noninvasive approach, with which all interventionists should be familiar. PMID:27482270

  9. Bacterial biofilms in patients with indwelling urinary catheters.

    PubMed

    Stickler, David J

    2008-11-01

    Bacteria have a basic survival strategy: to colonize surfaces and grow as biofilm communities embedded in a gel-like polysaccharide matrix. The catheterized urinary tract provides ideal conditions for the development of enormous biofilm populations. Many bacterial species colonize indwelling catheters as biofilms, inducing complications in patients' care. The most troublesome complications are the crystalline biofilms that can occlude the catheter lumen and trigger episodes of pyelonephritis and septicemia. The crystalline biofilms result from infection by urease-producing bacteria, particularly Proteus mirabilis. Urease raises the urinary pH and drives the formation of calcium phosphate and magnesium phosphate crystals in the biofilm. All types of catheter are vulnerable to encrustation by these biofilms, and clinical prevention strategies are clearly needed, as bacteria growing in the biofilm mode are resistant to antibiotics. Evidence indicates that treatment of symptomatic, catheter-associated urinary tract infection is more effective if biofilm-laden catheters are changed before antibiotic treatment is initiated. Infection with P. mirabilis exposes the many faults of currently available catheters, and plenty of scope exists for improvement in both their design and production; manufacturers should take up the challenge to improve patient outcomes. PMID:18852707

  10. Complications of Transjugular Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Navuluri, Rakesh; Ahmed, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Transvenous biopsy was first performed in 1964 by Charles Dotter. Now routinely performed in the liver and kidney by interventional radiologists, the transjugular approach to biopsy has assumed a central role in coagulopathic patients. Major arterial complications from transjugular liver and renal biopsy are rare. In this article, the authors describe such complications in both organs that necessitated selective endovascular coil embolization. PMID:25762847

  11. Catheter-related mortality among ESRD patients.

    PubMed

    Wasse, Haimanot

    2008-01-01

    Hemodialysis access-related complications remain one of the most important sources of morbidity and cost among persons with end-stage renal disease, with total annual costs exceeding $1 billion annually. In this context, the creation and maintenance of an effective hemodialysis vascular access is essential for safe and adequate hemodialysis therapy. Multiple reports have documented the type of vascular access used for dialysis and associated risk of infection and mortality. Undoubtedly, the central venous catheter (CVC) is associated with the greatest risk of infection-related and all-cause mortality compared with the autogenous arteriovenous fistula (AVF) or synthetic graft (AVG). The AVF has the lowest risk of infection, longer patency rates, greater quality of life, and lower all-cause mortality compared with the AVG or CVC. It is for these reasons that the National Kidney Foundation's Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Access recommend the early placement and use of the AVF among at least 50% of incident hemodialysis patients. This report presents catheter-related mortality and calls for heightened awareness of catheter-related complications. PMID:19000119

  12. Myocardial infarction determined by technetium-99m pyrophosphate single-photon tomography complicating elective coronary artery bypass grafting for angina pectoris

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, R.J.; Gladstone, P.J.; Tremblay, P.C.; Feindel, C.M.; Salter, D.R.; Lipton, I.H.; Ogilvie, R.R.; David, T.E.

    1989-06-15

    The incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) complicating coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) has previously been based on concordance of electrocardiographic, enzymatic and scintigraphic criteria. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate (Tc-PPi) single-photon emission computed tomography now enables detection of AMI with high sensitivity and specificity. Using this technique, perioperative AMI was detected in 12 of 58 patients (21%) undergoing successful elective CABG for stable angina pectoris. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to compare the predictive value of preoperative (New York Heart Association class, left ventricular ejection fraction and use of beta blockers) and intraoperative (number of grafts constructed, use of internal mammary anastomoses, use of sequential saphenous vein grafts, smallest grafted distal vessel lumen caliber and aortic cross-clamp time) variables. Preoperative New York Association class (p = 0.04) and smallest grafted distal vessel lumen caliber (p = 0.03) were significant multivariate predictors of perioperative AMI. Only 1 perioperative patient with AMI (and 1 pyrophosphate-negative patient) developed new Q waves. Serum creatine kinase-MB was higher in patients with AMI by repeated measures analysis of variance (p = 0.0003). Five AMIs occurred in myocardial segments revascularized using sequential saphenous vein grafts, and 7 in segments perfused by significantly stenosed epicardial vessels with distal lumen diameter and perfusion territory considered too small to warrant CABG. At 6-month follow-up, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction increased from 0.61 to 0.65 in Tc-PPI-negative patients (p = 0.01), but not in perioperative patients with AMI.

  13. Ventriculomammary shunt: an unusual ventriculoperitoneal shunt complication.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Nauman S; Johnson, Jeremiah N; Morcos, Jacques J

    2015-02-01

    Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt malfunctions are common and can result in significant consequences for patients. Despite the prevalence of breast augmentation surgery and breast surgery for other pathologies, few breast related VP shunt complications have been reported. A 54-year-old woman with hydrocephalus post-subarachnoid hemorrhage returned 1 month after VP shunt placement complaining of painful unilateral breast enlargement. After investigation, it was determined that the distal VP shunt catheter had migrated from the peritoneal cavity into the breast and wrapped around her breast implant. The breast enlargement was the result of cerebrospinal fluid retention. We detail this unusual case and review all breast related VP shunt complications reported in the literature. To avoid breast related complications related to VP shunt procedures, it is important to illicit pre-procedural history regarding breast implants, evade indwelling implants during catheter tunneling and carefully securing the abdominal catheter to prevent retrograde catheter migration to the breast. PMID:25127261

  14. In Vitro Activity and Durability of a Combination of an Antibiofilm and an Antibiotic against Vascular Catheter Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Richard A.; Stager, Charles E.; Cadle, Richard M.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2013-01-01

    Catheter-associated infections can cause severe complications and even death. Effective antimicrobial modification of catheters that can prevent device colonization has the potential of preventing clinical infection. We studied in vitro the antimicrobial activities of central venous catheters impregnated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antibiofilm agent, and a broad-spectrum antibiotic against a range of important clinical pathogens. NAC-levofloxacin-impregnated (NACLEV) catheters were also evaluated for their antiadherence activity. NACLEV catheters produced the most active and durable antimicrobial effect against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates and significantly reduced colonization (P < 0.0001) by all tested pathogens compared to control catheters. These in vitro results suggest that this antimicrobial combination can potentially be used to combat catheter colonization and catheter-associated infection. PMID:23114776

  15. Clinical Outcomes of Cryopreserved Arterial Allograft Used as a Vascular Conduit for Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Chang, Jai Won; Park, Yangsoon; Han, Youngjin; Kwon, Hyunwook; Kwon, Tae-Won; Han, Duck Jong; Cho, Yong-Pil; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    This single center cohort study aimed to test the hypothesis that use of a cryopreserved arterial allograft could avoid the maturation or healing process of a new vascular access and to evaluate the patency of this technique compared with that of vascular access using a prosthetic graft. Between April 2012 and March 2013, 20 patients underwent an upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft for failed or failing vascular accesses and 53 using a prosthetic graft were included in this study. The mean duration of catheter dependence, calculated as the time interval from upper arm access placement to removal of the tunneled central catheter after successful cannulation of the access, was significantly longer for accesses using a prosthetic graft than a cryopreserved arterial allograft (34.4 ± 11.39 days vs. 4.9 ± 8.5 days, P < 0.001). In the allograft group, use of vascular access started within 7 days in 16 patients (80%), as soon as from the day of surgery in 10 patients. Primary (unassisted; P = 0.314) and cumulative (assisted; P = 0.673) access survivals were similar in the two groups. There were no postoperative complications related to the use of a cryopreserved iliac arterial allograft except for one patient who experienced wound hematoma. In conclusion, upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft may permit immediate hemodialysis without the maturation or healing process, resulting in access survival comparable to that of an access using a prosthetic graft. PMID:27478338

  16. Clinical Outcomes of Cryopreserved Arterial Allograft Used as a Vascular Conduit for Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Chang, Jai Won; Park, Yangsoon; Han, Youngjin; Kwon, Hyunwook; Kwon, Tae-Won; Han, Duck Jong; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    This single center cohort study aimed to test the hypothesis that use of a cryopreserved arterial allograft could avoid the maturation or healing process of a new vascular access and to evaluate the patency of this technique compared with that of vascular access using a prosthetic graft. Between April 2012 and March 2013, 20 patients underwent an upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft for failed or failing vascular accesses and 53 using a prosthetic graft were included in this study. The mean duration of catheter dependence, calculated as the time interval from upper arm access placement to removal of the tunneled central catheter after successful cannulation of the access, was significantly longer for accesses using a prosthetic graft than a cryopreserved arterial allograft (34.4 ± 11.39 days vs. 4.9 ± 8.5 days, P < 0.001). In the allograft group, use of vascular access started within 7 days in 16 patients (80%), as soon as from the day of surgery in 10 patients. Primary (unassisted; P = 0.314) and cumulative (assisted; P = 0.673) access survivals were similar in the two groups. There were no postoperative complications related to the use of a cryopreserved iliac arterial allograft except for one patient who experienced wound hematoma. In conclusion, upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft may permit immediate hemodialysis without the maturation or healing process, resulting in access survival comparable to that of an access using a prosthetic graft. PMID:27478338

  17. Complications of coronary intervention: device embolisation, no-reflow, air embolism

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Debabrata

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of drug-eluting stents, better equipment, stronger antiplatelet drugs, and higher levels of operator experience has led to markedly improved patency rates for complex percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs). The evolving techniques of contemporary PCI have been unable to completely eliminate complications. However, rigorous preventive measures pre-empt the appearance of complications. During traversal of severely diseased coronary arteries and manipulating equipment, particularly devices with detachable components, the opportunity for loss or embolisation of material in the coronary circulation presents itself. Device embolisation is associated with periprocedural myocardial infarction and emergent referral to surgery, particularly if the device is not retrieved. The coronary no-reflow phenomenon is a feared complication of PCI. It is associated with a worse prognosis and has been shown to be an independent predictor of death, myocardial infarction and impaired left ventricular function. Air embolism can be prevented by flushing of catheters during equipment exchanges. PMID:27326077

  18. Sagittal vein thrombosis caused by central vein catheter.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Karim, Hosein; Heydar Pour, Behzad; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis, including thrombosis of cerebral veins and major dural sinuses, is an uncommon disorder in the general population. However, it has a higher frequency among patients younger than 40 years of age, patients with thrombophilia, pregnant patients or those receiving hormonal contraceptive therapy or has foreign body such as catheter in their veins or arterial system. In this case report, we described clinical and radiological findings in a patient with protein C-S deficiency and malposition of central vein catheter. PMID:25796028

  19. Monitoring Central Venous Catheter Resistance to Predict Imminent Occlusion: A Prospective Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Joshua; Tang, Li; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Brennan, Rachel C.; Shook, David R.; Stokes, Dennis C.; Monagle, Paul; Curtis, Nigel; Worth, Leon J.; Allison, Kim; Sun, Yilun; Flynn, Patricia M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-term central venous catheters are essential for the management of chronic medical conditions, including childhood cancer. Catheter occlusion is associated with an increased risk of subsequent complications, including bloodstream infection, venous thrombosis, and catheter fracture. Therefore, predicting and pre-emptively treating occlusions should prevent complications, but no method for predicting such occlusions has been developed. Methods We conducted a prospective trial to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of catheter-resistance monitoring, a novel approach to predicting central venous catheter occlusion in pediatric patients. Participants who had tunneled catheters and were receiving treatment for cancer or undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation underwent weekly catheter-resistance monitoring for up to 12 weeks. Resistance was assessed by measuring the inline pressure at multiple flow-rates via a syringe pump system fitted with a pressure-sensing transducer. When turbulent flow through the device was evident, resistance was not estimated, and the result was noted as “non-laminar.” Results Ten patients attended 113 catheter-resistance monitoring visits. Elevated catheter resistance (>8.8% increase) was strongly associated with the subsequent development of acute catheter occlusion within 10 days (odds ratio = 6.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8–21.5; p <0.01; sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 67%). A combined prediction model comprising either change in resistance greater than 8.8% or a non-laminar result predicted subsequent occlusion (odds ratio = 6.8; 95% confidence interval, 2.0–22.8; p = 0.002; sensitivity, 80%; specificity, 63%). Participants rated catheter-resistance monitoring as highly acceptable. Conclusions In this pediatric hematology and oncology population, catheter-resistance monitoring is feasible, acceptable, and predicts imminent catheter occlusion. Larger studies are required to validate

  20. [Medium- and long-term use of central venous catheters in pediatrics. Personal experience].

    PubMed

    Orfei, P; Pinto, G; Properzi, E; Piccardo, A; Cerroni, A; Prosperi, M; Cozzi, F

    1996-04-01

    From January 1992 to October 1994, 74 central venous catheters were inserted, in the University Hospital of Rome: Polyclinic Umberto I - "La Sapienza", in 62 paediatric patients (15.17 +/- 1.64 years old), admitted to the paediatric surgery division. The authors used a large amount of CVC: totally implanted devices (34 Groshong, 7 Broviac, 2 Hickman, 3 Port) and percutaneous catheters (28 Arrow). The choice of the infusional devices has been influenced by the length of the treatment, the primitive disease, the age and the size of the patient. The authors used totally implanted devices in paediatric patients undergoing chemotherapeutic and nutritional therapies. External central venous access devices were used in patients undergoing central catheterization lasting less than two months. The subclavian vein has been used as venous access in patients weighing > 5 kg, the internal jugular vein in < 5, kg patients. This work reports the early (PNX, hematomas, arterial access) and the long term complications (infections, accidental unthreading, occlusions and dislocations). We can say that the medium and long last term CVC is well tolerated and accepted in paediatric patients too, for antineoplastic, nutritional and infusion therapies. PMID:8984428

  1. Direct reperfusion of the right common carotid artery prior to cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with brain malperfusion complicated with acute aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Okita, Yutaka; Matsumori, Masamichi; Kano, Hiroya

    2016-04-01

    The cases of 3 patients with brain malperfusion secondary to acute aortic dissection who underwent preoperative perfusion of the right common carotid artery are presented. The patients were 64, 65 and 72 years old and 2 were female. All were in a comatose or semi-comatose state with left hemiplegia. The right common carotid artery was exposed and directly cannulated, using a 12-Fr paediatric arterial cannula. The right common femoral artery was chosen for arterial drainage, using a 14-Fr double-lumen cannula. The circuit contained a small roller pump and heat exchanger coil. Target flow was set at 90 ml/min and blood temperature at 30 °C. Durations of right carotid perfusion were 120, 100 and 45 min, respectively. All underwent partial arch replacement and survived. Postoperative neurological sequelae were minimal in all cases. PMID:26003959

  2. Contrast-enhanced sonothrombolysis in a porcine model of acute peripheral arterial thrombosis and prevention of anaphylactic shock.

    PubMed

    Nederhoed, Johanna H; Slikkerveer, Jeroen; Meyer, Klaas W; Wisselink, Willem; Musters, René J P; Yeung, Kak K

    2014-03-01

    Acute peripheral arterial thrombosis can be threatening to life and limb. Dissolution of the thrombus local catheter-directed intra-arterial infusion of fibrinolytic agents such as urokinase is the standard therapy for thrombosis; however, this method is time-intensive, and amputation of the affected limb is still needed in 10-30% of cases. Furthermore, thrombolytic therapy carries the risk of bleeding complications. The use of small gas-filled bubbles, or ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), in combination with ultrasound has been investigated as an improved thrombolytic therapy in acute coronary and cerebral arterial thrombosis. The authors describe a porcine model of acute peripheral arterial occlusion to test contrast-enhanced sonothrombolysis approaches that combine ultrasound, UCAs and fibrinolytic agents and recommend a strategy for preventing severe allergic reactions to UCAs in the pigs. PMID:24552914

  3. Right atrial thrombus associated with subclavian catheter developed due to total parenteral nutrition application

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Nursel; Basarici, Ibrahim; Erbasan, Ozan

    2016-01-01

    Central venous catheterization as a frequent routine clinical procedure may have significant complications. Mechanical complications may occur during catheter placement, whereas thromboembolic and infectious complications can be seen during follow-up. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) associated central venous catheterizations may result in early mechanical complications and thrombotic and infectious complications in the long term. This paper describes a patient diagnosed as mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy requiring long-term central venous catheterization for TPN implementation, who had an infected thrombus on the catheter tip resected by cardiac surgery. PMID:27212985

  4. Yttrium-90 Resin Microsphere Radioembolization Using an Antireflux Catheter: An Alternative to Traditional Coil Embolization for Nontarget Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Morshedi, Maud M. Bauman, Michael Rose, Steven C. Kikolski, Steven G.

    2015-04-15

    PurposeSerious complications can result from nontarget embolization during yttrium-90 (Y-90) transarterial radioembolization. Hepatoenteric artery coil embolization has been traditionally performed to prevent nontarget radioembolization. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved Surefire Infusion System (SIS) catheter, designed to prevent reflux, is an alternative to coils. The hypothesis that quantifiable SIS procedural parameters are comparable to coil embolization was tested.MethodsFourteen patients aged 36–79 years with colorectal, neuroendocrine, hepatocellular, and other predominantly bilobar hepatic tumors who underwent resin microsphere Y-90 radioembolization using only the SIS catheter (n = 7) versus only detachable coils (n = 7) for nontarget protection were reviewed retrospectively. Procedure time, fluoroscopy time, contrast dose, radiation dose, and cost were evaluated.ResultsMultivariate analysis identified significant cohort differences in the procedural parameters evaluated (F(10, 3) = 10.39, p = 0.04). Between-group comparisons of the pretreatment planning procedure in the SIS catheter group compared to the coil embolization group demonstrated a significant reduction in procedure time (102.6 vs. 192.1 min, respectively, p = 0.0004), fluoroscopy time (14.3 vs. 49.7 min, respectively, p = 0.0016), and contrast material dose (mean dose of 174.3 vs. 265.0 mL, respectively, p = 0.0098). Procedural parameters were not significantly different between the two groups during subsequent dose delivery procedures. Overall cost of combined first-time radioembolization procedures was significantly less in the SIS group ($4252) compared to retrievable coil embolization ($11,123; p = 0.001).ConclusionThe SIS catheter results in a reduction in procedure time, fluoroscopy time, and contrast material dose and may be an attractive cost-effective alternative to detachable coil embolization for prevention of nontarget radioembolization.

  5. Recanalization of Acute and Subacute Venous and Synthetic Bypass-Graft Occlusions With a Mechanical Rotational Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Wissgott, Christian Kamusella, Peter; Andresen, Reimer

    2013-08-01

    PurposePercutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) is now established as an alternative treatment of acute arterial occlusions in addition to fibrinolysis and surgical thrombectomy. The objective of this retrospective study was the investigation of a rotational atherothrombectomy catheter in terms of safety and efficacy in the treatment of acute and subacute femoropopliteal bypass occlusions.Materials and MethodsForty-two patients (average age 65.8 {+-} 9.1 years) with acute (<14 days [n = 31]) and subacute (14-42 days [n = 11]) femoropopliteal bypass occlusions were treated consecutively with a rotational debulking and removal catheter (Straub Rotarex). The average occlusion length was 28.4 {+-} 2.9 (24-34) cm. Thirty-four (81 %) patients underwent venous bypass, and 8 (19 %) patients underwent polytetrafluoroethylene bypass.ResultsThe technical success rate was 97.6 % (41 of 42). In 1 patient, blood flow could not be restored despite the use of the atherothrombectomy system. The average catheter intervention time was 6.9 {+-} 2.1 (4-9) min. Ankle-brachial index increased from 0.39 {+-} 0.13 to 0.83 {+-} 0.11 at discharge and to 0.82 {+-} 0.17 after 1 month (p < 0.05). There were a total of 2 (4.8 %) peri-interventional complications: One patient developed a distal embolism, which was successfully treated with local lysis, and another patient had a small perforation at the distal anastomosis, which was successfully treated with a stent.ConclusionPMT with the Rotarex atherothrombectomy catheter represents a safe and effective option in the treatment of acute and subacute femoropopliteal bypass occlusions because it can quickly restore blood flow.

  6. Persistent trigeminal artery arising from the arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Kurita, Hiroki; Ishihara, Shoichiro

    2012-09-01

    A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most common carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis, usually arising from the cavernous or precavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and connecting to the distal basilar artery. There are two types of PTA, lateral and medial. We present the first case of a lateral-type PTA arising from the large arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the left ICA with findings from both magnetic resonance angiography and selective catheter angiography. PMID:22215430

  7. A Taurolidine-Citrate-Heparin Lock Solution Effectively Eradicates Pathogens From the Catheter Biofilm in Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Zwiech, Rafał; Adelt, Maria; Chrul, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Catheter-related bacteremia (CRB) is a typical complication of hemodialysis catheter use. Catheter lumen colonization by pathogens is regarded as a direct cause of CRB. Once settled, the catheter biofilm increases the risk of developing infection, thus necessitating insertion replacement and antibiotic treatment. The study assessed the self-sufficient efficacy of taurolidine-citrate-heparin lock solution in eradicating catheter biofilm bacteria and keeping it sterile in patients on hemodialysis. Twenty-nine chronic patients on hemodialysis with tunneled and nontunneled catheters locked with a heparin filling (the mean time of heparin lock use -30.1 ± 2.0 days) and subsequently converted to a taurolidine-citrate-heparin filling were included. Peripheral vein and catheter lumen blood cultures were obtained before the filling change and after taurolidine-citrate-heparin lock use (mean time 33.8 ± 7.6 days). Twenty-four participants with tunneled and nontunneled catheters locked with taurolidine-citrate-heparin filling served as the control group. During the heparin-locking period, CRB was diagnosed in 3 cases (only nontunneled catheters). The catheter blood cultures findings were positive in 23 patients (10 temporary and 13 permanent catheters), whereas both the catheter and peripheral vein blood cultures were sterile in 3 of 29 subjects (only permanent catheters). Irrespective of catheter type (tunneled or nontunneled), repeated culture revealed no pathogens in any of the 23 patients with initial positive catheter blood culture, after the use of taurolidine-citrate-heparin filling. No positive blood culture was noted in the control group. The taurolidine-citrate-heparin lock solution effectively eradicated pathogens from nontunneled and tunneled catheter biofilms and helped to maintain catheter lumen sterility. PMID:23665885

  8. Intravascular near-infrared fluorescence catheter with ultrasound guidance and blood attenuation correction

    PubMed Central

    Hossack, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Intravascular near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging offers a new approach for characterizing atherosclerotic plaque, but random catheter positioning within the vessel lumen results in variable light attenuation and can yield inaccurate measurements. We hypothesized that NIRF measurements could be corrected for variable light attenuation through blood by tracking the location of the NIRF catheter with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). In this study, a combined NIRF-IVUS catheter was designed to acquire coregistered NIRF and IVUS data, an automated image processing algorithm was developed to measure catheter-to-vessel wall distances, and depth-dependent attenuation of the fluorescent signal was corrected by an analytical light propagation model. Performance of the catheter sensing distance correction method was evaluated in coronary artery phantoms and ex vivo arteries. The correction method produced NIRF estimates of fluorophore concentrations, in coronary artery phantoms, with an average root mean square error of 17.5%. In addition, the correction method resulted in a statistically significant improvement in correlation between spatially resolved NIRF measurements and known fluorophore spatial distributions in ex vivo arteries (from r=0.24 to 0.69, p<0.01, n=6). This work demonstrates that catheter-to-vessel wall distances, measured from IVUS images, can be employed to compensate for inaccuracies caused by variable intravascular NIRF sensing distances. PMID:23698320

  9. Basilar artery dissection: A rare complication of posterior fossa epidermoid cyst resection, and evaluation of the possible effects of cerebrospinal fluid drainage on disease progression.

    PubMed

    Pikis, Stylianos; Cohen, José E; Margolin, Emil

    2016-10-01

    We report a rare case of a 45-year-old female with an unruptured basilar artery dissecting aneurysm presenting with locked-in syndrome due to brainstem ischemia eleven months following resection of a giant cerebellopontine angle epidermoid cyst and three months after insertion of ventriculo peritoneal shunt due to hydrocephalus. The etiology of basilar artery dissection and the effect of hydrocephalus and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid drainage on disease progression in this patient are unclear. Our report suggests a possible effect of hydrocephalus and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid drainage on intracranial arterial dissection progression. PMID:27344090

  10. Surface-Treated versus Untreated Large-Bore Catheters as Vascular Access in Hemodialysis and Apheresis Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Bambauer, Rolf; Schiel, Ralf; Bambauer, Carolin; Latza, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Background. Catheter-related infections, thrombosis, and stenosis are among the most frequent complications associated with catheters, which are inserted in vessels. Surface treatment processes of the outer surface, such as ion-beam-assisted deposition, can be used to mitigate such complications. Methods. This retrospective study (1992–2007) evaluated silver-coated (54 patients) and noncoated (105 patients) implanted large-bore catheters used for extracorporeal detoxification. The catheters were inserted into the internal jugular or subclavian veins. After removal, the catheters were cultured for bacterial colonization using standard microbiologic assays. They also were examined using scanning electron microscope. Results. The silver coated catheters showed a tendency towards longer in situ time. The microbiologic examinations of the catheter tips were in both catheter types high positive, but not significant. Conclusion. The silver-coated catheters showed no significantly reduction in infection rate by evaluation of all collected data in this retrospective study. There was no association between both catheters in significantly reducing savings in treatment costs and in reducing patient discomfort. Other new developed catheter materials such as the microdomain-structured inner and outer surface are considered more biocompatible because they mimic the structure of natural biological surface. PMID:22577548

  11. Small bowel injury after suprapubic catheter insertion presenting 3 years after initial insertion

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Kevin M; Good, Daniel W; Brush, John P; Al-hasso, Ammar; Stewart, Grant D

    2013-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman was referred to urology with blockages of her suprapubic catheter (SPC). The catheter was replaced easily in the emergency department, however, no urine was draining, only a cloudy green fluid was visible. On cystoscopy bilious material was identified in the bladder. There was no catheter visible. There seemed to be a fistulous tract entering the bladder at the left dome. The urethra was dilated, a urethral catheter was placed and the SPC was removed. A CT demonstrated that the SPC tract transfixed a loop of pelvic small bowel and entered the bladder with no intraperitoneal contrast leak. The patient recovered well and did not require laparotomy. This case emphasises that bowel perforation, although rare, must be considered as a complication of SPC placement even years after initial insertion when catheter problems arise. Unusually, we learn that this complication may not present with abdominal pain or peritonism. PMID:24326435

  12. Endovascular Stenting under Cardiac and Cerebral Protection for Subclavian Steal after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Due to Right Subclavian Artery Origin Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Okazaki, Takahito; Ichinose, Nobuhiko; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2015-03-01

    Coronary-subclavian steal (CSS) can occur after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) using the internal thoracic artery (ITA). Subclavian artery (SA) stenosis proximal to the ITA graft causes CSS. We describe a technique for cardiac and cerebral protection during endovascular stenting for CSS due to right SA origin stenosis after CABG. A 64-year-old man with a history of CABG using the right ITA presented with exertional right arm claudication. Angiogram showed a CSS and retrograde blood flow in the right vertebral artery (VA) due to severe stenosis of the right SA origin. Endovascular treatment of the right SA stenosis was planned. For cardiac and cerebral protection, distal balloon protection by inflating a 5.2-F occlusion balloon catheter in the SA proximal to the origin of the right VA and ITA through the right brachial artery approach and distal filter protection of the right internal carotid artery (ICA) through the left femoral artery (FA) approach were performed. Endovascular stenting for SA stenosis from the right FA approach was performed under cardiac and cerebral protection by filter-protection of the ICA and balloon-protection of the VA and ITA. Successful treatment of SA severe stenosis was achieved with no complications. PMID:25874182

  13. Endovascular Stenting under Cardiac and Cerebral Protection for Subclavian Steal after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Due to Right Subclavian Artery Origin Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kiura, Yoshihiro; Okazaki, Takahito; Ichinose, Nobuhiko; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Coronary-subclavian steal (CSS) can occur after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) using the internal thoracic artery (ITA). Subclavian artery (SA) stenosis proximal to the ITA graft causes CSS. We describe a technique for cardiac and cerebral protection during endovascular stenting for CSS due to right SA origin stenosis after CABG. A 64-year-old man with a history of CABG using the right ITA presented with exertional right arm claudication. Angiogram showed a CSS and retrograde blood flow in the right vertebral artery (VA) due to severe stenosis of the right SA origin. Endovascular treatment of the right SA stenosis was planned. For cardiac and cerebral protection, distal balloon protection by inflating a 5.2-F occlusion balloon catheter in the SA proximal to the origin of the right VA and ITA through the right brachial artery approach and distal filter protection of the right internal carotid artery (ICA) through the left femoral artery (FA) approach were performed. Endovascular stenting for SA stenosis from the right FA approach was performed under cardiac and cerebral protection by filter-protection of the ICA and balloon-protection of the VA and ITA. Successful treatment of SA severe stenosis was achieved with no complications. PMID:25874182

  14. A retrospective study of central venous catheters GCRI experience

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sachin A.; Shukla, Shilin N.; Talati, Shailesh S.; Parikh, Sonia K.; Bhatt, Shivani J.; Maka, Vinayak

    2013-01-01

    Background: The use of central venous catheters (CVCs) has greatly improved the quality-of-care in cancer patients, yet these catheters may cause serious infectious and thrombotic complications. The aim of this retrospective study was to study the various types of CVCs and their complications. Materials and Methods: We studied retrospectively 213 cases of CVCs in our institute with their indications, type and complications from August 2010 to July 2011. Results: A total of 213 CVCs were inserted in patients with hematological (62%) and solid organ malignancies (38%). Ninety-eight patients (46%) had peripheral inserted central catheter (PICC), 90 (42%) patients had Hickman catheters and 25 (12%) had a port. The median duration of retention of Hickman catheters was 104 days (3-365 days), for the peripherally inserted central catheters was 59 days (3-100 days) and for the port it was 280 days (45-365 days). Non-infective complications were more than infective (12% vs. 7%). The most common complication was non-infective occlusion and thrombophlebitis. In one patient with PICC thrombosis occurred in the cephalic, radial and ulnar vein and in one patient with port thrombosis occurred in the superior vena cava. Organisms were isolated in 60% (12 out of 20) of cultures. Common organisms isolated were Pseudomonas aeruginosa in 5 (42%), Staphylococcus aureus in 2 (16%), Escherichia coli in 2 (16%) and Aspergillus in 3 (25%) patients. 7 out of 12 infected patients had negative blood cultures within 7 days of antibiotic treatment, 5 patients remained positive for more than 7 days with antibiotics. In 155 patients (73%), the desired treatment protocol was completed and at present there are still 28 patients (13%) with catheters. 5 patients (2.3%) died of febrile neutropenia and septicemia with multi-organ failure. In 5 patients (2.3%), the catheters (1 Port, 1 Hickman and 3 PICC) were prematurely removed because of thrombosis. Conclusion: CVCs are better options to facilitate

  15. How to deal with dialysis catheters in the ICU setting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney insufficiency (AKI) occurs frequently in intensive care units (ICU). In the management of vascular access for renal replacement therapy (RRT), several factors need to be taken into consideration to achieve an optimal RRT dose and to limit complications. In the medium and long term, some individuals may become chronic dialysis patients and so preserving the vascular network is of major importance. Few studies have focused on the use of dialysis catheters (DC) in ICUs, and clinical practice is driven by the knowledge and management of long-term dialysis catheter in chronic dialysis patients and of central venous catheter in ICU patients. This review describes the appropriate use and management of DCs required to obtain an accurate RRT dose and to reduce mechanical and infectious complications in the ICU setting. To deliver the best RRT dose, the length and diameter of the catheter need to be sufficient. In patients on intermittent hemodialysis, the right internal jugular insertion is associated with a higher delivered dialysis dose if the prescribed extracorporeal blood flow is higher than 200 ml/min. To prevent DC colonization, the physician has to be vigilant for the jugular position when BMI < 24 and the femoral position when BMI > 28. Subclavian sites should be excluded. Ultrasound guidance should be used especially in jugular sites. Antibiotic-impregnated dialysis catheters and antibiotic locks are not recommended in routine practice. The efficacy of ethanol and citrate locks has yet to be demonstrated. Hygiene procedures must be respected during DC insertion and manipulation. PMID:23174157

  16. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of accessory pathways in infants.

    PubMed Central

    Benito, F.; Sánchez, C.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the indications, results and complications of radiofrequency catheter ablation in small infants with supraventricular tachycardia due to an accessory atrioventricular pathway. METHODS: Five infants less than 9 months old underwent radiofrequency catheter ablation of accessory pathways. Ablation was done for medically refractory tachyarrhythmia associated with aborted sudden death in two patients, left ventricular dysfunction in one, failure of antiarrhythmic drugs in one, and planned cardiac surgery in one. All five patients underwent a single successful procedure. Three left free wall pathways were ablated by transseptal approach, a right posteroseptal pathway was ablated from the inferior vena cava, and a left posteroseptal pathway was approached from the inferior vena cava into the coronary sinus. A deflectable 5F bipolar electrode catheter with a 3 mm tip was used. RESULTS: A sudden increment in impedance indicative of coagulum formation was observed in two procedures. One patient developed a transient ischaemic complication after ablation of a left lateral accessory pathway by transseptal approach. This patient had mild pericardial effusion after the procedure. Moderate pericardial effusion was also noted in another patient. After a mean follow up of 18.4 months all patients are symptom free without treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Radiofrequency catheter ablation can be performed successfully in infants. Temperature monitoring in 5F ablation catheters would be desirable to prevent the development of coagulum. Echocardiography must be performed after the ablation procedure to investigate pericardial effusion. Images PMID:9326990

  17. The Hunter Pulmonary Angiography Catheter for a Brachiocephalic Vein Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, Galia Kowalik, Karen J.; Ganguli, Suverano; Hunter, David W.

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this work was to describe our experience in performing pulmonary angiography using the Hunter pulmonary catheter, manufactured by Cook, Inc., which is a modified 6F pigtail catheter with a 'C-shaped' curve, designed for a brachiocephalic vein approach. One hundred twenty-three patients underwent pulmonary angiograms using the Hunter catheter between August 1997 and January 2002. Operator comments were gathered in 86 (70%) of the cases. The operator was, if possible, the most junior resident on the service. Thirty-nine operators participated in the survey. Efficacy, safety, and ease of use of the catheter were determined by operators' comments and ECG observations during the procedure. Corroborating clinical data were gathered from medical records. In 68 (79%) of the procedures that were commented upon, the operator described insertion into the pulmonary artery (PA) as easy; only 2 (2%) indicated difficulty in accessing the PA. In 41 (63%) of the bilateral angiograms that were commented upon, the operator described accessing the left PA from the right PA as easy; only 6 (9%) rated it as difficult and all were with an older technique in which the catheter was withdrawn to the pulmonary bifurcation without a wire or with only the soft tip of the wire in the pigtail and then rotated to the left main pulmonary artery. Thirty-one of the 41 patients who demonstrated premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) had a previous history of heart disease. Nineteen of the 39 patients who did not have PVCs had a history of heart disease (p = 0.018). The maneuverability and shape of the Hunter catheter make pulmonary angiography an easy procedure, even for operators with minimal experience and limited technical proficiency. PVCs demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with a positive patient history for cardiac disease, rather than being a universal risk.

  18. Nosocomial sepsis in neonates with single lumen vascular catheters.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, V; Eisenfeld, L; Lerer, T; Holman, M; Rowe, J

    1997-01-01

    Catheter-related sepsis is commonly encountered in the neonatal intensive care unit. We retrospectively studied infants with vascular catheters at 2 NICUs. Data were obtained from the computerised admission records available at both the hospitals. Our aims were to describe the clinical and microbial profile of nosocomial sepsis in infants with vascular catheters [umbilical artery (UA), umbilical venous (UV), central venous Broviac (CV), percutaneously placed central venous (PC), peripheral artery (PA)], and to determine the association between catheter type, duration and sepsis in a subset of the population. Nosocomial sepsis (positive blood culture after the 3rd postnatal day) occurred in 217 of 2091 (10.4%) infants. Infected infants, in contrast to non-infected, had a significantly (P < 0.001) greater number of multiple catheters (2.3 vs 1.4) had lower birth weights (1.2 vs 2.1 kg), were younger (28 vs 33 weeks) and had lower 1 and 5 minute Apgar scores (4.3 and 6.7 vs 5.5 and 7.4). The most common organism was coagulase negative Staphylococcus. In a subset population as analyses revealed, longer duration of UA use was associated with higher infection rates [13.6% with UA use for > or = 8 days vs 1.3% for < or = 7 days (P < 0.0001)]. PC use had a lower rate of sepsis than CV use (5.1% vs 15.2%; P < 0.05). Use of intravascular catheters should be balanced between the need for vascular access and the risk of sepsis. PMID:10771883

  19. Distance of the internal central venous catheter tip from the right atrium is positively correlated with central venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ballard, David H; Samra, Navdeep S; Gifford, Karen Mathiesen; Roller, Robert; Wolfe, Bruce M; Owings, John T

    2016-06-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are associated with occlusive, infectious, and thrombotic complications. The aim of this study was to determine if internal CVC tip position was correlated with subsequent complications. This was an institutional review board approved single-center retrospective review of 169 consecutive patients who underwent placement of 203 semipermanent CVCs. Using post-placement chest X-rays, a de novo scale of internal catheter tip position was developed. Major complications were recorded. A logistic regression analysis was used to determine if catheter tip position predicted subsequent complications. There were 78 men and 91 women with a mean age of 48 ± 11 years. There were 21 catheter tips placed in the subclavian/innominate veins, 32 in the upper superior vena cava, 113 in the atriocaval junction, and 37 in the right atrium. There were 83 complications occurring in 61 (36.1 %) patients, including sepsis in 40 (23.7 %), venous thrombosis in 18 (10.7 %), catheter occlusion in 16 (9.5 %), internal catheter repositioning in 6 (3.6 %), pneumothorax in 2 (1.2 %), and death in 1 (0.6 %). An internal catheter tip position peripheral to the atriocaval junction resulted in a catheter that was more likely to undergo internal repositioning (p < 0.001) and venous thrombosis (p < 0.001). Patients with femoral catheters were more likely to develop sepsis (45 %) than patients whose catheters were inserted through the upper extremity veins (18 %) (p < 0.01). In conclusion, to reduce catheter-associated morbidity and potentially mortality, the internal catheter tip should be positioned at the atriocaval junction or within the right atrium and femoral insertion sites should be avoided whenever possible. PMID:27112774

  20. Uneventful 25-year course of an intracardiac intravenous catheter fragment in the right heart.

    PubMed

    Van Den Akker-Berman, Lily M; Pinzur, Sergey; Aydinalp, Alp; Brezins, Marc; Gellerman, Marc; Elami, Amir; Roguin, Nathan

    2002-10-01

    We describe a patient with an intracardiac intravenous catheter fragment in the right heart that was found during fluoroscopy. The catheter fragment had broken off from an intravenous catheter inserted 25 years previously when the patient was admitted after a road accident. There were no complications during these years. The fragment was removed during coronary bypass surgery. Other cases of intracardiac foreign bodies have been described, some causing complications even after many years. Uninfected, these can be removed easily with local interventional techniques. Removal of an infected foreign body per cardiotomy has a much higher mortality risk. PMID:12440190

  1. [Cardiac tamponade associated with umbilical venous catheter (UVC) placed in inappropriate position].

    PubMed

    Gálvez-Cancino, Franco; de la Luz Sánchez-Tirado, María

    2015-01-01

    Umbilical venous catheter (UVC) is widely used in neonatal intensive care units. Pericardial effusion is an uncommon but life-threatening complication; and tamponade have been reported in 3% of neonates having such catheters. We present a case of cardiac tamponade as a complication of venous catheter in a neonate. The patient was diagnosed at the appropriate time by echocardiography and the pericardiocentesis was performed, and after removal of the complete pericardial effusion,an improvement of the critical condition was achieved. It is important to document the optimal positioning of UVC before the start of infusions. PMID:26089276

  2. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wear a mask, cap, sterile gown, and sterile gloves when putting in the catheter to keep it ... putting in the catheter. • Clean their hands, wear gloves, and clean the catheter opening with an antiseptic ...

  3. Mobility therapy and central or peripheral catheter-related adverse events in an ICU in Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Natália Pontes; da Silva, Gregório Marques Cardim; Park, Marcelo; Pires-Neto, Ruy Camargo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether mobility therapy is associated with central or peripheral catheter-related adverse events in critically ill patients in an ICU in Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the daily medical records of patients admitted to the Clinical Emergency ICU of the University of São Paulo School of Medicine Hospital das Clínicas Central Institute between December of 2009 and April of 2011. In addition to the demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients, we collected data related to central venous catheters (CVCs), hemodialysis (HD) catheters and indwelling arterial catheters (IACs): insertion site; number of catheter days; and types of adverse events. We also characterized the mobility therapy provided. RESULTS: Among the 275 patients evaluated, CVCs were used in 49%, HD catheters were used in 26%, and IACs were used in 29%. A total of 1,268 mobility therapy sessions were provided to patients while they had a catheter in place. Catheter-related adverse events occurred in 20 patients (a total of 22 adverse events): 32%, infection; 32%, obstruction; and 32%, accidental dislodgement. We found that mobility therapy was not significantly associated with any catheter-related adverse event, regardless of the type of catheter employed: CVC-OR = 0.8; 95% CI: 0.7-1.0; p = 0.14; HD catheter-OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 0.89-1.21; p = 0.56; or IAC-OR = 1.74; 95% CI: 0.94-3.23; p = 0.07. CONCLUSIONS: In critically ill patients, mobility therapy is not associated with the incidence of adverse events involving CVCs, HD catheters, or IACs. PMID:26176520

  4. Percutaneous retrieval of centrally embolized fragments of central venous access devices or knotted Swan-Ganz catheters. Clinical report of 14 retrievals with detailed angiographic analysis and review of procedural aspects

    PubMed Central

    Chmielak, Zbigniew; Dębski, Artur; Kępka, Cezary; Rudziński, Piotr N.; Bujak, Sebastian; Skwarek, Mirosław; Kurowski, Andrzej; Dzielińska, Zofia; Demkow, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Totally implantable venous access systems (TIVAS), Swan-Ganz (SG) and central venous catheters (CVC) allow easy and repetitive entry to the central cardiovascular system. Fragments of them may be released inadvertently into the cardiovascular system during their insertion or as a result of mechanical complications encountered during long-term utilization. Aim To present results of percutaneous retrieval of embolized fragments of central venous devices or knotted SG and review the procedural aspects with a series of detailed angiographies. Material and methods Between January 2003 and December 2012 there were 14 (~0.025%) successful retrievals in 13 patients (44 ±16 years, 15% females) of embolized fragments of TIVAS (n = 10) or CVC (n = 1) or of dislodged guide-wires (n = 2) or knotted SG (n = 1). Results Foreign bodies with the forward end located in the right ventricle (RV), as well as those found in the pulmonary artery (PA), often required repositioning with a pigtail catheter as compared to those catheter fragments which were located in the right atrium (RA) and/or great vein and possessed an accessible free end allowing their direct ensnarement with the loop snare (57.0% (4/7) vs. 66.7% (2/3) vs. 0.0% (0/3); p = 0.074 respectively). Procedure duration was 2–3 times longer among catheters retrieved from the PA than among those with the forward edge located in the RV or RA (30 (18–68) vs. 13.5 (11–37) vs. 8 min (8–13); p = 0.054 respectively). The SG catheter knotted in the vena cava superior (VCS) was encircled with the loop snare introduced transfemorally, subsequently cut at its skin entrance and then pulled down inside the 14 Fr vascular sheath. Conclusions By using the pigtail catheter and the loop snare, it is feasible to retrieve centrally embolized fragments or knotted central venous access devices. PMID:27279874

  5. Heart catheter cable and connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. R.; Cota, F. L.; Sandler, H.

    1972-01-01

    Ultraminiature catheter cables that are stiff enough for intravenous insertion yet flexible at the tip, sterilizable, and economical are fabricated entirely from commercially available parts. Assembly includes air passageway for reference pressures and coaxial cable for transmission of signals from the tip of catheter.

  6. "Combo" technique for the use of 7F guide catheter system during transradial approach.

    PubMed

    Patel, Tejas; Shah, Sanjay; Pancholy, Samir

    2015-11-15

    Even a regular lumen of radial artery may create difficulty in smooth negotiation and propagation of a 7F guide catheter while performing intervention through transradial approach. We describe successive five cases of a simple and innovative "Combo" technique, which helps relatively atraumatic tracking of a 7F guide catheter through the course of arm and chest vasculature for successful completion of procedure without significant damage and local pain. PMID:26255995

  7. Pseudoaneurysm of the deep circumflex iliac artery: a rare complication at an anterior iliac bone graft donor site treated by coil embolization.

    PubMed

    Chou, Andy Shau-Bin; Hung, Chein-Fu; Tseng, Jeng-Hwei; Pan, Kuang-Tse; Yen, Pao-Sheng

    2002-07-01

    Pseudoaneurysm formation of the deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) after harvesting an anterior iliac bone graft for spinal fusion is reported herein. A 76-year-old man with cervical myelopathy underwent anterior cervical decompression and fusion with a left anterior iliac bone graft. A painful left inguinal mass was noted 1 month later. He was admitted to our emergency ward. Angiography of the left external iliac artery was performed which showed a pseudoaneurysm of the DCIA. Selective transarterial coil embolization of the artery was performed, and bleeding was arrested. In a review of the previous literature, only 1 pseudoaneurysm of the DCIA was reported to be associated with anterior iliac bone graft. In conclusion, vascular injury after anterior iliac bone harvesting is rare but can occur. Selective transarterial coil embolization is a prompt and effective solution. PMID:12350036

  8. Catheter-based radiofrequency renal-nerve ablation in patients with resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Azizi, M; Steichen, O; Frank, M; Bobrie, G; Plouin, P-F; Sapoval, M

    2012-03-01

    This review aims to describe the role and the results of catheter-based renal nerve ablation for the treatment of resistant hypertension. Despite the availability of multiple classes of orally active antihypertensive treatments, resistant hypertension remains an important public health issue in 2012 due to its prevalence and association with target-organ damage and poor prognosis. The failure of purely pharmacological approaches to treat resistant hypertension has stimulated interest in invasive device-based treatments based on old concepts. In the absence of orally active antihypertensive agents, patients with severe and complicated hypertension were widely treated by surgical denervation of the kidney until the 1960s, but this approach was associated with a high incidence of severe adverse events and a high mortality rate. A new catheter system using radiofrequency energy has been developed, allowing an endovascular approach to renal denervation and providing patients with resistant hypertension with a new therapeutic option that is less invasive than surgery and can be performed rapidly under local anaesthesia. To date, this technique has been evaluated only in open-label trials including small numbers of highly selected resistant hypertensive patients with suitable renal artery anatomy. The available evidence suggests a favourable blood pressure-lowering effect in the short term (6 months) and a low incidence of immediate local and endovascular complications. This follow-up period is, however, too short for the detection of rare or late-onset adverse events. For the time being, the benefit/risk ratio of this technique remains to be evaluated, precluding its uncontrolled and widespread use in routine practice. PMID:22237510

  9. Comparison between retrograde and transeptal approach in radiofrequency catheter ablation of left accessory pathways.

    PubMed

    Hashem, S; Choudhury, A K; Paul, G K; Rahman, M Z

    2015-01-01

    To study a series of patients submitted to radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) of left accessory pathways (AP) using the transeptal approach (TSA) as compared to the conventional retrograde arterial approach (RAA). Sixty consecutive patients (44 male; mean age of 35.60±11.63 years) with 60 left APs (39 overt and 21 concealed) underwent catheter ablation using the TS method (30 patients) and the RAA method (30 patients) in an alternate fashion. The analysis was performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. The transeptal puncture was successfully performed in 29 patients (96%). This access allowed primary success in the ablation in all the patients without any complication. When we compared this approach with the RAA there was no difference as regards the primary success (p=0.103), fluoroscopy time (p=0.565) and total time (p=0.1917). Three patients in the RAA group presented a vascular complication. The TSA allowed shorter ablation times (p=0.006) and smaller number of radiofrequency applications (p=0.042) as compared to the conventional RAA. The patients who had unsuccessful ablation in the first session in each approach underwent with the opposite technique (cross-over), with a final ablation success rate of 100%.The TS and RA approaches showed similar efficacy and safety for the ablation of left accessory pathways. The TSA allowed shorter ablation times and smaller number of radiofrequency applications. When the techniques were used in a complementary fashion, they increased the final efficacy of the ablation. PMID:25725674

  10. [Reducing the risk of vascular complications during percutaneous aortic valve replacement].

    PubMed

    Stratiev, V; Guyon, P; Teiger, E; Collet, J-P

    2012-08-01

    The percutaneous aortic valve replacement (TAVI) is the most recent and promising procedure in the area of interventional cardiology with a rapidly growing number of interventions worldwide. The transfemoral approach being less invasive, it has become the predominant access for the device delivery. The prevention of vascular complications by an optimal risk stratification using appropriate imaging techniques (vascular CT scan and angiography), optimised techniques for femoral puncture (active control of the arterial punction, crossover...) and skilled teams for peripheral angioplasty and percutaneous arterial closure devices (Prostar) has become mandatory given the fragile target population for TAVI. Vascular complications remain indeed one of the most frequent complication although the trend toward reduced sheeths size led to significant reduction This is mandatory regarding the needed size of the vascular arterial access - itself with constant improvement by minimising the initial 24 French with mandatory real chirurgical closure to the actual 18-19 French and soon 16 French. The improvement of the implanted devices is due to the recent evidence of the promising future of this technique and the important technological effort realised by the industry not only on the implanted aortic prosthesis but also on their delivering catheters. PMID:22497766

  11. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome Complicated by Diabetic Ketoacidosis and Graves' Disease in Slowly Progressive Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (SPIDDM): A Case Report and a Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hiroyuki; Fukushima, Naotaro; Hasegawa, Koji; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Osamu; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman with a history of diabetes was admitted for nausea and vomiting with body weight loss. A blood examination revealed high plasma glucose and thyroid hormone levels and metabolic acidosis. She was therefore diagnosed with both diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperthyroidism. Nausea and vomiting continued intermittently despite the administration of saline and insulin. The patient was further diagnosed with superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) after abdominal computed tomography revealed that a horizontal portion of the duodenum was sandwiched between the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery. Clinicians should be vigilant for SMAS in patients with both DKA and hyperthyroidism who present body weight loss. PMID:27477411

  12. [Anesthetic Management for Lobectomy in a Patient with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension].

    PubMed

    Imajo, Yukihiro; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Kusaka, Yusuke; Kido, Haruki; Minami, Toshiaki

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a known risk factor of perioperative complications, but the risks for non-cardiac operations have not yet been examined sufficiently. We report a case of a right lower lobectomy in a patient with PAH. A 73-year-old woman with Sjögren's syndrome was scheduled for right lowr lobectomy for primary lung cancer under general anesthesia. She was diagnosed with symptomatic PAH (estimated mean pulmonary arterial pressure, 40 mmHg) and medicated with ambrisentan. After induction of general anesthesia with propofol and fentanyl, a pulmonary artery catheter was placed to measure pulmonary artery pressure. The Pp/Ps was roughly 0.4 and the pulmonary artery clamp elevated it to 0.5. Milrinone administration gradually improved the Pp/Ps to 0.3. To avoid pulmonary artery pressure elevation during emergence of anesthesia, continuous dexmedetomidine was administered. The double-lumen tracheal tube was extubated uneventfully with minimal elevation in pulmonary arterial pressure. PMID:27017766

  13. Pacemaker wire central venous stenosis and one more reason to not run central venous catheters for dialysis in reverse flow.

    PubMed

    Ash, Stephen R; Ugianskis, Erika J

    2013-01-01

    A 75-year-old man on chronic peritoneal dialysis had unrecognized stenosis of the superior vena cava (SVC) due to pacemaker wires placed 5 years earlier. The patient was placed on hemodialysis after hernia surgery. When a tunneled central venous catheter for dialysis was placed from the right internal jugular (IJ) vein, the venous lumen extended through the stenotic area but not the arterial lumen. Probably due to a subsequent clot at the arterial lumen port the patient developed SVC syndrome and when the catheter was run in the reversed flow direction he developed hypovolemic shock. The stenosis and SVC syndrome resolved with angioplasty of the SVC stenosis, removal of the IJ catheter and use of a femoral vein catheter. The patient eventually returned to peritoneal dialysis and the femoral catheter was removed. PMID:22860886

  14. Patterns of Hemodialysis Catheter Dysfunction Defined According to National Kidney Foundation Guidelines As Blood Flow <300 mL/min

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Robert I.; Newsome, Britt B.; Block, Geoffrey A.; Herbert, Robert J.; Danese, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    Blood flow rate (BFR) <300 mL/min commonly is used to define hemodialysis catheter dysfunction and the need for interventions to prevent complications. The objective of this study was to describe patterns of unplanned BFR <300 mL/min during catheter hemodialysis using data from DaVita dialysis facilities and the United States Renal Data System. Patients were included if they received at least eight weeks of hemodialysis exclusively through a catheter between 08/04 and 12/06, and catheter hemodialysis was the first treatment modality following diagnosis of end-stage renal disease (first access), or it immediately followed at least one 30-day period of dialysis exclusively through a fistula or graft (replacement access). Actual BFR <300 mL/min despite a planned BFR ≥300 mL/min defined catheter dysfunction during each dialysis session. There were 3,364 patients, 268,363 catheter dialysis sessions, and 19,118 (7.1%) sessions with catheter dysfunction. Almost two-thirds of patients had ≥1 catheter dysfunction session, and 30% had ≥1 catheter dysfunction session per month. Patients with catheter as a replacement access had a higher rate of catheter dysfunction than those with a catheter as first access (hazard ratio: 1.13; P = 0.04). Catheter dysfunction affects almost one-third of catheter dialysis patients each month and two-thirds overall. PMID:22187643

  15. Taurolidine Lock Is Superior to Heparin Lock in the Prevention of Catheter Related Bloodstream Infections and Occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Olthof, Evelyn D.; Versleijen, Michelle W.; Huisman–de Waal, Getty; Feuth, Ton; Kievit, Wietske; Wanten, Geert J. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Patients on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) are at risk for catheter-related complications; mainly infections and occlusions. We have previously shown in HPN patients presenting with catheter sepsis that catheter locking with taurolidine dramatically reduced re-infections when compared with heparin. Our HPN population therefore switched from heparin to taurolidine in 2008. The aim of the present study was to compare long-term effects of this catheter lock strategy on the occurrence of catheter-related bloodstream infections and occlusions in HPN patients. Methods Data of catheter-related complications were retrospectively collected from 212 patients who received HPN between January 2000 and November 2011, comprising 545 and 200 catheters during catheter lock therapy with heparin and taurolidine, respectively. We evaluated catheter-related bloodstream infection and occlusion incidence rates using Poisson-normal regression analysis. Incidence rate ratios were calculated by dividing incidence rates of heparin by those of taurolidine, adjusting for underlying disease, use of anticoagulants or immune suppressives, frequency of HPN/fluid administration, composition of infusion fluids, and duration of HPN/fluid use before catheter creation. Results Bloodstream infection incidence rates were 1.1/year for heparin and 0.2/year for taurolidine locked catheters. Occlusion incidence rates were 0.2/year for heparin and 0.1/year for taurolidine locked catheters. Adjusted incidence ratios of heparin compared to taurolidine were 5.9 (95% confidence interval, 3.9–8.7) for bloodstream infections and 1.9 (95% confidence interval, 1.1–3.1) for occlusions. Conclusions Given that no other procedural changes than the catheter lock strategy were implemented during the observation period, these data strongly suggest that taurolidine decreases catheter-related bloodstream infections and occlusions in HPN patients compared with heparin. PMID:25379781

  16. A Prospective Comparison of Two Types of Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters: The Ash Split Versus the PermCath

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dwyer, H.; Fotheringham, T.; O'Kelly, P.; Doyle, S.; Haslam, P.; McGrath, F.; Conlon, P.; Lee, M.J.

    2005-01-15

    Purpose: In a prospective randomized study a standard dual-tip hemodialysis catheter (PermCath, Sherwood Medical, St. Louis, MO, USA) was compared with a newer split-lumen catheter (Ash Split, Medcomp, Harleysville, PA, USA).Methods: Sixty-nine patients (42 men, 27 women; mean age 62 years) were randomized to receive either the Ash Split (AS) or the PermCath (PC) catheter. The catheters were inserted into the internal jugular vein. The primary outcome evaluated was blood flow measurements during the first six hemodialysis sessions. Secondary outcomes included: technical difficulties encountered at insertion, early complications and late complications requiring catheter removal or exchange.Results: A total of 69 hemodialysis catheters, 33 AS and 36 PC, were successfully inserted in the internal jugular vein (right 60, left 9) of 69 patients. Mean blood flow during dialysis (Qb) was 270.75 ml/min and 261.86 ml/hr for the AS and PC groups respectively (p = 0.27). Mean duration of catheter use was 111.7 days (range 5.4-548.9 days) and 141.2 days (range 7.0-560.9 days) in the AS and PC groups respectively (p = 0.307). Catheter failures leading to removal or exchange occurred in 20 patients: 14 in the AS group and six in the PC group. Survival curves with censored endpoints (i.e., recovery, arteriovenous fistula formation, peritoneal dialysis and transplantation) showed significantly better outcome with PermCath catheters (p = 0.024). There was no significant difference in ease of insertion or early complication rates.Conclusion: The Ash Split catheter allows increased rates of blood flow during hemodialysis but this increase was not significant at the beginning (p = 0.21) or end (p 0.27) of the first six hemodialysis sessions. The Ash Split catheter is more prone to minor complications, particularly dislodgement, than the PermCath catheter.

  17. Complications of denver shunt.

    PubMed

    Perera, Eranga; Bhatt, Shweta; Dogra, Vikram S

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic hydrothorax secondary to transdiaphragmatic spread of peritoneal fluid can cause respiratory discomfort to the patient. Draining of hydrothorax helps relieve these symptoms. Pleurovenous shunt (Denver shunt) is a relatively non-invasive method of shunting the pleural fluid to the central venous system. Reported complications of pleurovenous shunts are shunt failure, pulmonary edema, post shunt coagulopathy, deep vein thrombosis, and infection. We report a rare case of a leak at the venous end of the catheter that was placed within the right internal jugular vein, resulting in a large collection in the neck. PMID:21915387

  18. Telemetric Catheter-Based Pressure Sensor for Hemodynamic Monitoring: Experimental Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Urban, Ute; Fassbender, Holger; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Schoth, Felix; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical and animal experimental feasibility of a percutaneously implantable pulmonary arterial implant for permanent hemodynamic monitoring. Two systems for measuring pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) as well as pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP) were developed by modifying a commercially available pulmonary artery catheter (PAC). First, a cable-bound catheter-based system was designed by implementation of a capacitive absolute-pressure sensor in the catheter tip. This system was developed further into a completely implantable telemetric system. The devices were tested in an acute setting in a total of 10 sheep. The implant was placed with its tip in the descending pulmonary artery via the right jugular approach. Results were compared with conventional PAC positioned in the contralateral pulmonary artery using Pearson's correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots. Implantation of the monitoring systems was uneventful in 10 animals. Data from two fully functional cable-bound and telemetric pressure monitoring systems were available, with a total of 18,506 measurements. There was an excellent correlation between reference data and the data obtained with the implants (r = 0.9944). Bland-Altman plots indicated a very good agreement between the techniques. We report the development and successful initial test of an implantable catheter-based device for long-term measurement of PAP and PAOP. Both devices may be applicable for hemodynamic monitoring. Further long-term studies for assessing reliability and durability of the device are warranted.

  19. Virulence factors in Proteus bacteria from biofilm communities of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Hola, Veronika; Peroutkova, Tereza; Ruzicka, Filip

    2012-07-01

    More than 40% of nosocomial infections are those of the urinary tract, most of these occurring in catheterized patients. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters results not only in infection, but also various complications, such as blockage of catheters with crystalline deposits of bacterial origin, generation of gravels and pyelonephritis. The diversity of the biofilm microbial community increases with duration of catheter emplacement. One of the most important pathogens in this regard is Proteus mirabilis. The aims of this study were to identify and assess particular virulence factors present in catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) isolates, their correlation and linkages: three types of motility (swarming, swimming and twitching), the ability to swarm over urinary catheters, biofilm production in two types of media, urease production and adherence of bacterial cells to various types of urinary tract catheters. We examined 102 CAUTI isolates and 50 isolates taken from stool samples of healthy people. Among the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters, significant differences were found in biofilm-forming ability and the swarming motility. In comparison with the control group, the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters showed a wider spectrum of virulence factors. The virulence factors (twitching motility, swimming motility, swarming over various types of catheters and biofilm formation) were also more intensively expressed. PMID:22533980

  20. Microwave catheter design.

    PubMed

    Nevels, R D; Arndt, G D; Raffoul, G W; Carl, J R; Pacifico, A

    1998-07-01

    A microwave antenna system for transcatheter ablation of cardiac tissue is investigated. A numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain method incorporating a Gaussian pulse excitation has been constructed and frequency domain electric and magnetic fields are obtained through Fourier transformation. Results are presented for a coaxial line fed monopole catheter which is modified by the successive inclusion of a Teflon sheath outer coating, a terminating disk at the tip of the antenna, a sleeve choke, and a high dielectric constant cylinder surrounding the monopole antenna. The effects of these design features are characterized in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR) and return loss (RL). Numerical calculations are confirmed by comparing with the RL measurement of a Teflon-coated monopole containing a disk and choke. PMID:9644897

  1. Severe hypernatremia associated catheter malposition in an intensive care patient.

    PubMed

    Silahli, Musa; Gökdemir, Mahmut; Duman, Enes; Gökmen, Zeynel

    2016-09-01

    We present a catheter related severe hypernatremia in a 2-month-old baby who was admitted to the pediatric intensive care. Imbalance of plasma sodium is commonly seen in pediatric intensive care patients. The water and sodium balance is a complex process. Especially, brain and kidneys are the most important organs that affect the water and sodium balance. Other mechanisms of the cellular structure include osmoreceptors, Na-K ATPase systems, and vasopressin. Hypernatremia is usually an iatrogenic condition in hospitalized patients due to mismanagement of water electrolyte imbalance. Central venous catheterization is frequently used in pediatric intensive care patients. Complications of central venous catheter placement still continue despite the usage of ultrasound guidance. Malposition of central venous catheter in the brain veins should be kept in mind as a rare cause of iatrogenic hypernatremia. PMID:27555161

  2. Novel catheter enabling simultaneous radiofrequency ablation and optical coherence reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Herranz, D.; Lloret, Juan; Jiménez-Valero, Santiago; Rubio-Guivernau, J. L.; Margallo-Balbás, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    A novel radiofrequency ablation catheter has been developed with integrated custom designed optics, enabling real-time monitoring of radiofrequency ablation procedures through polarization-sensitive optical coherence reflectometry. The optics allow for proper tissue illumination through a view-port machined in the catheter tip, thus providing lesion depth control over the RF ablation treatment. The system was verified in an in-vitro model of swine myocardium. Optical performance and thermal stability was confirmed after more than 25 procedures, without any damage to the optical assembly induced by thermal stress or material degradation. The use of this catheter in RF ablation treatments may make possible to assess lesion depth during therapy, thus translating into a reduction of potential complications on the procedure. PMID:26417499

  3. Pigtail Catheter: A Less Invasive Option for Pleural Drainage in Egyptian Patients with Recurrent Hepatic Hydrothorax

    PubMed Central

    Sharaf-Eldin, Mohamed; Bediwy, Adel Salah; Kobtan, Abdelrahman; El-Kalla, Ferial; Mansour, Loai; Elkhalawany, Walaa; Elhendawy, Mohamed; Soliman, Samah

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Treatment of hepatic hydrothorax is a clinical challenge. Chest tube insertion for hepatic hydrothorax is associated with high complication rates. We assessed the use of pigtail catheter as a safe and practical method for treatment of recurrent hepatic hydrothorax as it had not been assessed before in a large series of patients. Methods. This study was conducted on 60 patients admitted to Tanta University Hospital, Egypt, suffering from recurrent hepatic hydrothorax. The site of pigtail catheter insertion was determined by ultrasound guidance under complete aseptic measures and proper local anesthesia. Insertion was done by pushing the trocar and catheter until reaching the pleural cavity and then the trocar was withdrawn gradually while inserting the catheter which was then connected to a collecting bag via a triple way valve. Results. The use of pigtail catheter was successful in pleural drainage in 48 (80%) patients with hepatic hydrothorax. Complications were few and included pain at the site of insertion in 12 (20%) patients, blockage of the catheter in only 2 (3.3%) patients, and rapid reaccumulation of fluid in 12 (20%) patients. Pleurodesis was performed on 38 patients with no recurrence of fluid within three months of observation. Conclusions. Pigtail catheter insertion is a practical method for treatment of recurrent hepatic hydrothorax with a low rate of complications. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02119169. PMID:27340399

  4. The Cleveland Clinic Experience with Supraclavicular and Popliteal Ambulatory Nerve Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Gharabawy, Ramez; Eid, Gamal; Mendoza, Maria; Mounir-Soliman, Loran; Ali Sakr Esa, Wael

    2014-01-01

    Continuous peripheral nerve blocks (CPNB) are commonly used for intraoperative and postoperative analgesia. Our study aimed at describing our experience with ambulatory peripheral nerve catheters. After Institutional Review Board approval, records for all patients discharged with supraclavicular or popliteal catheters between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011 were reviewed. A licensed practitioner provided verbal and written instructions to the patients prior to discharge. Daily follow-up phone calls were conducted. Patients either removed their catheters at home with real-time simultaneous telephone guidance by a member of the Acute Pain Service or had them removed by the surgeon during a regular office visit. The primary outcome of this analysis was the incidence of complications, categorized as pharmacologic, infectious, or other. The secondary outcome measure was the average daily pain score. Our study included a total of 1059 patients with ambulatory catheters (769 supraclavicular, 290 popliteal). The median infusion duration was 5 days for both groups. Forty-two possible complications were identified: 13 infectious, 23 pharmacologic, and 6 labeled as other. Two patients had retained catheters, 2 had catheter leakage, and 2 had shortness of breath. Our study showed that prolonged use of ambulatory catheters for a median period of 5 days did not lead to an increased incidence of complications. PMID:25535627

  5. Duplicated Origin of the Left Vertebral Artery: A Case Report and Embryological Review

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Seunguk; Bae, Yun Jung; Choi, Byung Se; Kim, Jae Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    The duplicated origin of vertebral artery (VA) is a very rare condition. It could be easily misdiagnosed as an arterial dissection on selective catheter angiography, especially in a patient with acute cerebellar infarction of unknown etiology. We report a patient with an acute cerebellar infarction and duplicated origin of the left VA, which was found during the selective catheter angiography. PMID:26958414

  6. Risk factor analysis for long-term tunneled dialysis catheter-related bacteremias.

    PubMed

    Jean, G; Charra, B; Chazot, C; Vanel, T; Terrat, J C; Hurot, J M; Laurent, G

    2002-07-01

    Infection, mainly related to vascular access, is one of the main causes of morbidity and a preventable cause of death in hemodialysis patients. From January 1994 to April 1998 we conducted a prospective study to assess the incidence and risk factors of catheter-related bacteremia. One hundred and twenty-nine tunneled dual-lumen hemodialysis catheters were inserted percutaneously into the internal jugular vein in 89 patients. Bacteremia (n = 56) occurred at least once with 37 (29%) of the catheters (an incidence of 1.1/1,000 catheter-days); local infection (n = 45, 1/1,000 catheter-days) was associated with bacteremia in 18 cases. Death in 1 case was directly related to Staphylococcus aureus (SA) septic shock, and septicemia contributed to deaths in 2 additional cases. Catheters were removed in 48% of the bacteremic episodes. Treatment comprised intravenous double antimicrobial therapy for 15-20 days. Bacteriological data of bacteremia showed 55% involvement of SA. Nasal carriage of SA was observed in 35% of the patients with catheters. Bacteremic catheters were more frequently observed in patients with diabetes mellitus (p = 0.03), peripheral atherosclerosis (p = 0.001), a previous history of bacteremia (p = 0.05), nasal carriage of SA (p = 0.0001), longer catheter survival time (p = 0.001), higher total intravenous iron dose (p = 0.001), more frequent urokinase catheter infusion (p < 0.01), and local infection (p < 0.001) compared with non-bacteremic catheters. Monovariate survival analysis showed that significant initial risk factors for bacteremia were nasal carriage of SA (p = 0.00001), previous bacteremia (p = 0.0001), peripheral atherosclerosis (p = 0.005), and diabetes (p = 0.04). This study confirms the relatively high incidence of bacteremia with tunneled double-lumen silicone catheters and its potential complications. Possible preventive actions are discussed according to the risk factors. PMID:12119469

  7. A New Rotational Thrombectomy Catheter: System Design and First Clinical Experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, Hans-Erich; Jaeger, Kurt A.; Jacob, Augustinus L.; Mohr, Helmuth; Labs, Karl-Heinz; Steinbrich, Wolfgang

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: To describe a new catheter for the percutaneous mechanical removal of fresh and organized thrombi, and to assess its efficacy and safety in vitro and in vivo. Methods: The catheter consists of a coated stainless steel spiral that rotates at 40,000 rpm over a guidewire inside the whole length of an 8 Fr, single-lumen, polyurethane catheter, driving a dual-blade cutting crown. Abraded occlusion material is sucked into the catheter head through distal side holes and transported by the spiral into a reservoir at the proximal end. The efficacy of the device was tested in arterial models and fresh bovine carotid arteries (n = 72). In a clinical pilot study 10 patients (8 women, 2 men; mean age 70.6 {+-} 10.1 years) with occlusions of the superficial femoral artery (2-12 cm, mean 5.8 cm), not older than 4 weeks, underwent thrombectomy with the new catheter. Results: In arterial models and bovine cadaver arteries the catheter completely removed fresh thrombi. Occlusion material of higher consistency was cut into particles of 100-500 {mu}m and transported outside. Thrombectomy was successful and vessel patency restored in all 10 patients. The ankle/brachial pressure index significantly (p < 0.0005) increased from 0.41 {+-} 0.18 before intervention to 0.88 {+-} 0.15 after 48 hr and to 0.84 {+-} 0.20 after 3 months. Two reocclusions occurred within 14 days after the intervention. Conclusion: Thrombectomy with the new device appears to be feasible and safe in patients with acute and subacute occlusions of the femoropopliteal artery.

  8. Cryo-balloon catheter position planning using AFiT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinoeder, Andreas; Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common heart arrhythmia. In certain situations, it can result in life-threatening complications such as stroke and heart failure. For paroxsysmal AFib, pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) by catheter ablation is the recommended choice of treatment if drug therapy fails. During minimally invasive procedures, electrically active tissue around the pulmonary veins is destroyed by either applying heat or cryothermal energy to the tissue. The procedure is usually performed in electrophysiology labs under fluoroscopic guidance. Besides radio-frequency catheter ablation devices, so-called single-shot devices, e.g., the cryothermal balloon catheters, are receiving more and more interest in the electrophysiology (EP) community. Single-shot devices may be advantageous for certain cases, since they can simplify the creation of contiguous (gapless) lesion sets around the pulmonary vein which is needed to achieve PVI. In many cases, a 3-D (CT, MRI, or C-arm CT) image of a patient's left atrium is available. This data can then be used for planning purposes and for supporting catheter navigation during the procedure. Cryo-thermal balloon catheters are commercially available in two different sizes. We propose the Atrial Fibrillation Planning Tool (AFiT), which visualizes the segmented left atrium as well as multiple cryo-balloon catheters within a virtual reality, to find out how well cryo-balloons fit to the anatomy of a patient's left atrium. First evaluations have shown that AFiT helps physicians in two ways. First, they can better assess whether cryoballoon ablation or RF ablation is the treatment of choice at all. Second, they can select the proper-size cryo-balloon catheter with more confidence.

  9. Lumbar Catheter Placement Using Paramedian Approach Under Fluoroscopic Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Khan, Asif A.; Malik, Ahmed A.; Afzal, Mohammad Rauf; Herial, Nabeel A.; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Suri, M. Fareed K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lumbar catheter placement under fluoroscopic guidance may reduce the rate of technical failures and associated complications seen with insertion guided by manually palpable landmarks. Methods We reviewed our experience with 43 attempted lumbar catheter placements using paramedian approach under fluoroscopic guidance and ascertained rates of technical success, and clinical events. Results Among the 43 patients, 18, 1, and 1 patients were on aspirin (with dipyrimadole in 2), clopidogrel, and combination of both, respectively. Lumbar catheter placement was successful in 42 of 43 attempted placements. Floroscopic guidance was critical in three patients; one patient had severe cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) depletion (empty thecal sac phenomenon) following pituitary surgery leading to no cerebrospinal fluid return despite correct placement confirmation under fluoroscopy. Two patients had spinal needle placement at the junction between epidural and cerebrospinal fluid spaces (junctional position) leading to cerebrospinal fluid return but inability to introduce the lumbar catheter. After confirmation of position by the injection of contrast or radiographic landmarks the needle was advanced by indenting the subcutaneous tissue or reinserting at a spinal level above the first insertion. The lumbar catheter remained in position over a mean period (±standard deviation) of 4.1(±2.3) days. Improvement in hydrocephalus was seen in two patients with intracranial mass lesions. One patient developed cerebrospinal fluid leakage through the insertion track following removal of catheter and required skin suturing at the site of insertion. Conclusions We observed a high technical success rate with low rate of complications even in patients with intracranial mass lesions, those on ongoing antiplatelet medications or in whom insertion would not be possible guided by manually palpable landmarks. PMID:26958156

  10. Influence of fine-bore catheter length on infusion thrombophlebitis in peripheral intravenous nutrition: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Everitt, N. J.; McMahon, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that the risk of thrombophlebitis associated with continuous infusion of intravenous nutrition (IVN) via peripheral veins was reduced when fine-bore catheters, inserted to 15 cm, were used in place of standard intravenous cannulas. An explanation has not been identified, but may be owing to the greater length of the catheters. A randomised controlled study was performed in which a standard nutritional solution was infused via 22G polyurethane catheters inserted to a length of either 5 cm or 15 cm. Catheters were reviewed twice each day and removed when complications occurred, or when IVN was no longer required. There was no significant difference in median time to thrombophlebitis or extravasation, or in daily risk of thrombophlebitis, between insertion lengths. Survival proportions were similar for each length at all times. Catheters inserted into cephalic veins were more prone to thrombophlebitis or extravasation (nine episodes, 14 catheters) than catheters inserted into basilic veins (five episodes, 24 catheters, P = 0.009). The survival proportion was at all times greater when catheter tips lay in basilic veins. Thus, the risk of thrombophlebitis or extravasation was not influenced by the length of catheter within the vein. However, the vein in which the catheter tip lay appeared to influence the development of morbidity. PMID:9196346

  11. Right Internal Jugular Vein Cannulation: Carotid Artery-directed versus Sternocleidomastoid-directed Methods.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhao-Yan; Yuan, Ping; Pan, Yang; Zhang, Zhong-Min

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore a simple and safe method for central venous catheterization (CVC) from the right internal jugular vein (RIJV) by comparing carotid artery (CA) positioning with sternocleidomastoid (SCM) positioning. The medical records of patients who underwent CVC between January 2011 and January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Central venous catheters were inserted into the RIJV either above the level of the cricoid cartilage using the CA-directed method (419 patients, Group 1) or below the level of the cricoid cartilage using the SCM-directed method (436 patients, Group 2). Success rate and related complications of catheterization were evaluated in the two groups. The total success rate of RIJV cannulation in Group 1 (97.2%) was higher than that in Group 2 (94.5%). Moreover, the success rate at first attempt was significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 (92.4% vs 86.9%). The incidence of hematoma was 1.6 per cent in Group 1 and 3.8 per cent in Group 2. The rate of other complications such as pneumothorax, catheter-related infections, and catheter occlusion did not significantly differ between the groups. In conclusions, CA-directed RIJV cannulation is more effective and simple to perform than the SCM-directed method, and should become the preferred CVC technique in the absence of ultrasound guidance. PMID:26874140

  12. Surgical removal of an intravascular ultrasonography catheter captured in a stent after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hiroya; Asada, Tatsuro; Gan, Kunio; Yamada, Akitoshi; Sato, Masanobu

    2011-03-01

    A-79-year-old woman underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to the right coronary artery (RCA) for effort angina, followed by intravascular ultrasonography (IVUS) to ascertain stent expansion. The IVUS catheter became entangled in the stent and could not be withdrawn from the outside. The patient was transferred to our hospital for its surgical removal. For the emergent surgery, we opened the stent region in the RCA and directly removed the IVUS catheter with the twisted stent. Additional coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) involving three vessels was performed. She was discharged 42 days after surgery. PMID:21448795

  13. Postoperative false aneurysm of left ventricle and obstruction of left circumflex coronary artery complicating enlargement of restrictive ventricular septal defect in double-outlet right ventricle.

    PubMed

    Edwards, W D; Wilcox, W D; Danielson, G K; Feldt, R H

    1980-07-01

    A case is reported of double-outlet right ventricle (DORV) with restrictive subaortic ventricular septal defect (VSD) in which enlargement of the defect at the time of surgical repair was associated with the late postoperative development of a false aneurysm of the left ventricle. The enlarging fale aneurysm caused extrinsic compression of the dominant left circumflex coronary artery, with subsequent ischemia and infarction of the posterolateral left ventricle. The anatomy and surgical implications of restrictive VSD are discussed. PMID:7382528

  14. Tenckhoff tunneled peritoneal catheter placement in the palliative treatment of malignant ascites: technical results and overall clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Indesteege, Inge; Laenen, Annouschka; Verslype, Chris; Vergote, Ignace; Prenen, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background To assess the technical and clinical outcome of percutaneous insertion of tunneled peritoneal catheters in the palliative treatment of refractory malignant ascites and to determine the safety and feasibility of intraperitoneal administration of cytotoxic drugs through the tunneled catheter. Materials and methods Consecutive patients palliatively treated with a tunneled peritoneal catheter to drain the malignant ascites were identified. Patients’ medical history, procedural and clinical follow-up data, including complications and estimated survival, were reviewed. Additionally, a sub analysis of the patients with widespread ovarian cancer and refractory ascites treated with or without intraperitoneal administration of cytotoxic drugs was made. Results In all 94 patients it was technically feasible to insert the peritoneal drainage catheter and to drain a median of 3260 cc (range 100 cc – 8500 cc) of malignant ascitic fluid. Post procedural complications included catheter infection (n = 2; 2%), fluid leakage around the entry site (n = 4; 4%), catheter occlusion (n = 2; 2%), sleeve formation around the catheter tip (n = 1; 1%) and accidental loss of the catheter (n = 1; 1%). There was no increase in catheter infection rate in patients treated with or without intraperitoneal administration of cytotoxic drugs. Median overall survival after catheter insertion is 1.7 months. Conclusions Percutaneous insertion of a tunneled Tenckhoff catheter for the palliative drainage of malignant ascites and intraperitoneal infusion of cytotoxic drugs is feasible and associated with a very low complication rate, including catheter infection. These tunneled peritoneal lines are beneficial for symptomatic palliative treatment of refractory ascites and allow safe intraperitoneal chemotherapy. PMID:27247552

  15. Drawing on Accounts of Long-Term Urinary Catheter Use: Design for the "Seemingly Mundane".

    PubMed

    Chapple, Alison; Prinjha, Suman; Feneley, Roger; Ziebland, Sue

    2016-01-01

    The design of the Foley catheter has not changed since 1937. Scientists interested in medical technology tend to focus on state-of-the-art designs for newsworthy specialties rather than the more mundane technologies of daily life. We interviewed 36 people living with a long-term urinary catheter in the United Kingdom, who described limitations of the current catheter design, including infections and complications and consequences for social life and relationships, and their perceptions of whose responsibility it was to improve the design. All took steps to hide the urine bag, but the need to use a catheter and urine bag had, for some, a very detrimental effect on social life and relationships. People living with long-term catheters are relatively isolated at home and dealing with many different underlying health problems, undermining opportunities to speak with a collective patient voice. Qualitative health researchers could act as a conduit to help stimulate new designs. PMID:25646001

  16. Central venous catheter - dressing change

    MedlinePlus

    ... will need: Sterile gloves Cleaning solution A special sponge A special patch, called a Biopatch A clear ... around the catheter. Clean the skin with the sponge and cleaning solution. Air dry after cleaning. Place ...

  17. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    MedlinePlus

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  18. Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ... your fingers before washing. Dry with a clean paper towel. Set up your supplies on a clean ...

  19. CHLORHEXIDINE-IMPREGNATED DRESSING FOR PREVENTION OF CATHETER-RELATED BLOODSTREAM INFECTION: A META-ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Safdar, Nasia; O’Horo, John C.; Ghufran, Aiman; Bearden, Allison; Didier, Maria Eugenia; Chateau, Dan; Maki, Dennis G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Catheter related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and effective methods for their prevention are needed. Objective To assess the efficacy of a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing for prevention of central venous catheter-related colonization and CRBSI using meta-analysis. Data Sources Multiple computerized database searches supplemented by manual searches including relevant conference proceedings. Study Selection Randomized controlled trials (RCT) evaluating the efficacy of a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing compared with conventional dressings for prevention of catheter colonization and CRBSI. Data Extraction Data were extracted on patient and catheter characteristics and outcomes. Data Synthesis Pooled estimates of the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained using the DerSimonian and Laird random effects model and the Mantel-Haenszel fixed effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using the Cochran Q statistic and I2. Subgroup analyses were used to explore heterogeneity. Results Nine RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Use of a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing resulted in a reduced incidence of CRBSI (random effects RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.42–0.79, P=0.002). The incidence of catheter colonization was also markedly reduced in the chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing group (random effects RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.39–0.67, P< 0.001). There was significant benefit for prevention of catheter colonization and CRBSI, including arterial catheters used for hemodynamic monitoring. Other than in low birth weight infants, adverse effects were rare and minor. Conclusions Our analysis shows that a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing is beneficial in preventing catheter colonization and, more importantly, CRBSI and warrants routine use in patients at high risk of CRBSI and CVC or arterial catheter colonization in ICUs. PMID:24674924

  20. Endovascular parent artery occlusion of proximal posterior cerebral artery aneurysms: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Hidenori; Tanoue, Shunsuke; Teranishi, Kosuke; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Senshu; Magami, Shunsuke; Yamamoto, Munetaka; Arai, Hajime

    2016-06-01

    We report two cases of proximal posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysms treated with endovascular parent artery occlusion (PAO) with coils. In both cases, selective injection from the 4 F distal access catheter clearly showed the perforating arteries arising from the PCA. Case No 1, a 49-year-old woman, was successfully treated with preservation of a paramedian artery. Case No 2, a 54-year-old woman, was treated in the same manner. The patient underwent extensive thalamic infarction after the procedure because of paramedian artery occlusion. Endovascular PAO with coils is feasible for proximal PCA aneurysms; however, preservation of perforating arteries arising from the PCA is mandatory. PMID:25969452

  1. Cerebrospinal Fluid-Cutaneous Fistula After Continuous Spinal Catheter in an Obstetric Patient.

    PubMed

    Lenart, Mark J; Carness, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    A 23-year-old woman at 41 weeks and 6 days estimated gestational age underwent continuous spinal analgesia for labor after a recognized, unintended dural puncture. Excellent analgesia was maintained throughout labor and vaginal delivery, the intrathecal catheter was left in situ for 24 hours postpartum, and the catheter was subsequently removed without apparent complication. On physical examination during her anesthesia postoperative visit, clear fluid was noted to be slowly draining from the catheter insertion site. Although she denied all symptoms associated with a dural puncture, including headache, a cerebrospinal fluid-cutaneous fistula was diagnosed. An epidural blood patch was placed, which terminated the cerebrospinal fluid leak. No long-term complications were evident. Subsequent literature review revealed a rare incidence of this type of complication and varied recommendations for intervention and optimal management. We review the literature with regard to this complication and offer discussion regarding the various suggested means of diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27580408

  2. Heparin-Coated Angiographic Catheters: An In Vivo Comparison of Three Coating Methods with Different Heparin Release Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyoung Ho; Han, Joon Koo Byun, Youngro; Moon, Hyun Tae; Yoon, Chang Jin; Kim, Seung Ja; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2004-09-15

    We evaluated in vivo anti-thrombogenic effects of three different heparin-coated angiographic catheters with different heparin release profiles. Three different types of heparin-coated 5 French angiographic catheters (rapidly-heparin-releasing, slowly-heparin-releasing, and heparin-adherent catheters) were prepared by coating amphiphilic or hydrophobic heparin derivatives in order to regulate heparin elution. After incubation time of 30 minutes in the arteries of dogs, the amount of thrombus deposition, measured as dry weight, was compared in 10 sets of the three heparin-coated catheters and a non-coated catheter used as control. The surface morphology of catheters after their withdrawal was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The amount of thrombus deposition on the non-coated catheter (374.6 {+-} 11.6 mg, mean {+-} SD) was significantly larger than those on the rapidly-heparin-releasing (52.0 {+-} 12.6), slowly-heparin-releasing (70.4 {+-} 23.1), and heparin-adherent catheters (103.7 {+-} 39.9) (p < 0.001, each). The thrombus weights in the three heparin-coated catheters were not statistically different. The scanning electron microscopy showed crusts on the catheter surface, which were thickest in the non-coated catheters. We concluded that the thrombus formation inside a catheter is significantly decreased if the catheter is treated with any of the three heparin-coating methods used in this study. The in vivo anti-thrombogenic effects of these coating methods are not significantly different despite their different heparin release profiles.

  3. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  4. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  5. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  6. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  7. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1210 Continuous flush catheter. (a) Identification. A continuous flush catheter is an attachment to a catheter-transducer...

  8. Numerical simulation of the pulsating catheter pump: A left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Verkerke, G J; Mihaylov, D; Geertsema, A A; Lubbers, J; Rakhorst, G

    1999-10-01

    The pulsating catheter (PUCA) pump, a left ventricular assist device, consists of a hydraulically or pneumatically driven membrane pump, extracorporeally placed and mounted to a valved catheter. The catheter is introduced into an easily accessible artery and positioned with its distal tip in the left ventricle. Blood is aspirated from the left ventricle during systole and ejected into the ascending aorta during diastole. A numerical model of the PUCA pump has been developed to determine the internal diameter of the PUCA pump catheter that allows a certain blood flow. The model considers a limitation of mechanical blood damage and determines the accompanying pressure and flow profile for driving the pump. For a flow of 5 L/min, a catheter with an internal diameter of at least 6. 95 mm is required. For 3 L/min, the minimal diameter is 5.50 mm. The latter catheter can be introduced in the axillary artery, the former via the aorta during an open thorax surgical procedure. To validate the numerical model, 2 different PUCA pump configurations were tested in vitro. Results showed a good resemblance between model and in vitro behavior of the PUCA pump. PMID:10564291

  9. Design, construction, and validation of a rotary multifunctional intravascular diagnostic catheter combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Bec, Julien; Xie, Hongtao; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Zhou, Feifei; Sun, Yang; Ghata, Narugopal; Aldredge, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We report the development and validation of an intravascular rotary catheter for bimodal interrogation of arterial pathologies. This is based on a point-spectroscopy scanning time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy technique enabling reconstruction of fluorescence lifetime images (FLIm) and providing information on arterial intima composition and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) providing information on arterial wall morphology. The catheter design allows for independent rotation of the ultrasonic and optical channels within an 8 Fr outer diameter catheter sheath and integrates a low volume flushing channel for blood removal in the optical pathways. In the current configuration, the two channels consist of (a) a standard 3 Fr IVUS catheter with single element transducer (40 MHz) and (b) a side-viewing fiber optic (400 μm core). Experiments conducted in tissue phantoms showed the ability of the catheter to operate in an intraluminal setting and to generate coregistered FLIm and IVUS in one pull-back scan. Current results demonstrate the feasibility of the catheter for simultaneous bimodal interrogation of arterial lumen and for generation of robust fluorescence lifetime data under IVUS guidance. These results facilitate further development of a FLIm-IVUS technique for intravascular diagnosis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases including vulnerable plaques. PMID:23224011

  10. Design, construction, and validation of a rotary multifunctional intravascular diagnostic catheter combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bec, Julien; Xie, Hongtao; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Zhou, Feifei; Sun, Yang; Ghata, Narugopal; Aldredge, Ralph; Marcu, Laura

    2012-10-01

    We report the development and validation of an intravascular rotary catheter for bimodal interrogation of arterial pathologies. This is based on a point-spectroscopy scanning time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy technique enabling reconstruction of fluorescence lifetime images (FLIm) and providing information on arterial intima composition and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) providing information on arterial wall morphology. The catheter design allows for independent rotation of the ultrasonic and optical channels within an 8 Fr outer diameter catheter sheath and integrates a low volume flushing channel for blood removal in the optical pathways. In the current configuration, the two channels consist of (a) a standard 3 Fr IVUS catheter with single element transducer (40 MHz) and (b) a side-viewing fiber optic (400 μm core). Experiments conducted in tissue phantoms showed the ability of the catheter to operate in an intraluminal setting and to generate coregistered FLIm and IVUS in one pull-back scan. Current results demonstrate the feasibility of the catheter for simultaneous bimodal interrogation of arterial lumen and for generation of robust fluorescence lifetime data under IVUS guidance. These results facilitate further development of a FLIm-IVUS technique for intravascular diagnosis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases including vulnerable plaques.

  11. Fistula formation between the external iliac artery and ileal conduit following a radical cystoprostatectomy: a rare complication with prewarning signs of haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sukha, Anisha; Smyth, Niamh

    2015-01-01

    A 76-year-old man was admitted with bleeding per-urostomy following a collapse at home. Three weeks prior to the admission, he had undergone a radical cystoprostatectomy and formation of ileal-conduit for an extensive bladder carcinoma. A CT angiogram revealed a possible small source of bleeding within the ileal-conduit itself, which settled with conservative management. However, prior to discharge he developed profuse fresh bleeding from the urostomy, which could not be controlled. The patient underwent an emergency endoscopy of the conduit and laparotomy, which revealed a fistula between the right external iliac artery and the proximal end of the ileal-conduit. The right iliac artery was ligated and an emergency left-to-right femoral-femoral crossover bypass was performed. The right ureter was stented and rediverted through the ileal-conduit and the left ureter was stented at a later date. He unfortunately had a stormy postoperative recovery with further episodes of per-urostomy bleeding and no identified source. PMID:25819824

  12. [Peripheral venous catheterization: influence of catheter composition on the occurrence of thrombophlebitis].

    PubMed

    Jacquot, C; Fauvage, B; Bru, J P; Croize, J; Calop, J

    1989-01-01

    Infusion thrombophlebitis is a common troublesome complication of intravenous therapy. This study compared peripheral intravenous Teflon and Vialon catheters. The incidence of phlebitis, bacterial adherence and mechanical resistance (distortion) were assessed on 170 catheters, 85 of each type. The Vialon catheter resulted in less phlebitis than the Teflon one (18 vs. 35; p less than 0.01). During the period 49 to 72 h after the insertion of the catheter, the risk of phlebitis in the Teflon group was twice that in the Vialon group. The study of bacterial adherence using a semi-quantitative culture method demonstrated that 9.0% of the catheters were infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (5.7% Vialon group vs. 12.5% Teflon group). The Teflon catheters were much more distorted than vialon catheters: 1.7% vs. 55.7% in the macroscopic study; 1.75% vs. 8.2% in the microscopic study. As Vialon softens at body temperature, it would seem likely that it generates a lesser degree of endothelial injury, explaining the lower rate of phlebitis with Vialon catheters. PMID:2633660

  13. Observations on the development of the crystalline bacterial biofilms that encrust and block Foley catheters.

    PubMed

    Stickler, D J; Morgan, S D

    2008-08-01

    The care of many patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterisation is complicated when the flow of urine through the catheter is blocked by encrustation. The problem results from infection by urease-producing bacteria, especially Proteus mirabilis, and the subsequent formation of crystalline biofilms on the catheter. The aim of this study was to discover how P. mirabilis initiates the development of these crystalline biofilms. The early stages in the formation of the biofilms were observed on a range of Foley catheters in a laboratory model of the catheterised bladder. Scanning electron micrographs revealed that when all-silicone, silicone-coated latex, hydrogel-coated latex, hydrogel/silver-coated latex and nitrofurazone silicone catheters were inserted into bladder models containing P. mirabilis and alkaline urine, their surfaces were rapidly coated with a microcrystalline foundation layer. X-ray microanalysis showed that this material was composed of calcium phosphate. Bacterial colonisation of the foundation layer followed and by 18h the catheters were encrusted by densely populated crystalline P. mirabilis biofilms. These observations have important implications for the development of encrustation-resistant catheters. In the case of silver catheters for example, bacterial cells can attach to the crystalline foundation layer and continue to grow, protected from contact with the underlying silver. If antimicrobials are to be incorporated into catheters to prevent encrustation, it is important that they diffuse into the urine and prevent the rise in pH that triggers crystal formation. PMID:18550219

  14. Compensation for Unconstrained Catheter Shaft Motion in Cardiac Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Degirmenci, Alperen; Loschak, Paul M.; Tschabrunn, Cory M.; Anter, Elad; Howe, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization with ultrasound (US) imaging catheters provides real time US imaging from within the heart, but manually navigating a four degree of freedom (DOF) imaging catheter is difficult and requires extensive training. Existing work has demonstrated robotic catheter steering in constrained bench top environments. Closed-loop control in an unconstrained setting, such as patient vasculature, remains a significant challenge due to friction, backlash, and physiological disturbances. In this paper we present a new method for closed-loop control of the catheter tip that can accurately and robustly steer 4-DOF cardiac catheters and other flexible manipulators despite these effects. The performance of the system is demonstrated in a vasculature phantom and an in vivo porcine animal model. During bench top studies the robotic system converged to the desired US imager pose with sub-millimeter and sub-degree-level accuracy. During animal trials the system achieved 2.0 mm and 0.65° accuracy. Accurate and robust robotic navigation of flexible manipulators will enable enhanced visualization and treatment during procedures. PMID:27525170

  15. Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Placement Is an Underrecognized Source of Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Eloise D.; Sullivan, Sean B.; Whittier, Susan; Lowy, Franklin D.; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the risks of peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVs) as sources for Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB), a life-threatening complication. We identified 34 PIV-related infections (7.6%) in a cohort of 445 patients with SAB. Peripheral intravenous catheter-related SAB was associated with significantly longer bacteremia duration and thrombophlebitis at old PIV sites rather than current PIVs. PMID:27191005

  16. Arterial devices for regional hepatic chemotherapy: transaxillary versus laparotomic access.

    PubMed

    Arru, M; Aldrighetti, L; Gremmo, F; Ronzoni, M; Angeli, E; Caterini, R; Ferla, G

    2000-01-01

    Introduction. Intra-Arterial Hepatic Chemotherapy (IAHC) based on floxuridine (FUdR) infusion is an effective treatment for hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. A percutaneously implanted intra-arterial device may overcome the surgical stress of the laparotomic placement allowing an increase in the number of patients treated by IAHC. The aim of the present study is the comparative analysis of surgical and percutaneous transaxillary approaches to implant the catheter into the hepatic artery (HA) for IAHC. Materials and Methods. Between September 1993 and February 1999, 56 patients received an implantable infu-sion system [SynchroMed(R) (Medtronic, USA) or Port-a-cath(R) (Deltec, USA) connected to an external infusion pump (CADD(R) , Deltec, USA)] for IAHC. Twenty-eight patients (LPT group) underwent laparotomy to implant the catheter into the HA, the other 28 patients (PCT group) received a percutaneous catheter into the HA through a transaxillary percutaneous access. Indications for the laparotomic placement were: 1) synchronous metastases not suitable [technically unresectable or large (>40% of liver parenchyma) or multiple (> 3) metas-tases] for hepatic resection during colorectal surgery; 2) metachronous metastases treated by radical hepatic resection and subsequent adjuvant IAHC. Indications for percutaneous placement were: 1) metachronous metastases not suitable [see above] for hepatic resection; 2) metachronous metastases suitable for hepatic resection after neoadjuvant IAHC for tumor downstaging. All patients received IAHC based on continuous infusion of FU-dR (dose escalation 0.15-0.30 mg/kg/day for 14 days every 28 days) plus dexamethasone 28 mg. For the purpose of the study, the LPT group and the PCT group were comparatively analyzed in terms of age, gender, primary diagnosis, vascular anatomy of HA, ligation/embolization of aberrant HA, previous intestinal or hepatic surgery, contextual systemic chemotherapy, concomitant diseases. Safety and

  17. [Endovascular radiofrequency denervation of renal arteries as an innovation method of treatment of refractory arterial hypertension. First experience in Russia].

    PubMed

    Danilov, N M; Matchin, Iu G; Chazova, I E

    2012-01-01

    Excessive activation of the sympathetic nervous system forms the basis of pathogenesis of essential arterial hypertension (AH). The present work was aimed at evaluating efficacy and safety of endovascular radiofrequency denervation of renal arteries in patients with AH refractory AH based on the initial first experience in with using this methodology in the Russian Federation. The interventions were carried out on December 14-15th, 2011 in the first five patients presenting with AH refractory to antihypertensive therapy consisting of three and more drugs in therapeutic doses, one of which was a diuretic. The selection criteria were systolic arterial pressure (SAP) ≥160 mm Hg or ≥150 mm Hg in the presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The obligatory conditions for selection were the preserved renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR) ≥45 ml/min] and the absence of the secondary form of AH. The procedure of denervation was performed in the conditions of roentgen-operating room using special Medtronic Ardian Simplicity Catheter System™. In all cases we managed to perform bilateral denervation of renal arteries with the radiofrequency effect in not less than 4 zones of each of vessels. Efficacy of each of the effect was registered with due regard for reaching certain temperature and values of impedance. The interventions were not accompanied by the development of any complications either in the area of manipulations or the site of puncture. Neither were there any complications from the side of the cardiovascular or excretory systems of the body. Diurnal monitoring of AP (DMAP) registered a significant decrease in SAP averagely from 174±12 to 145±10 mm Hg three days after the intervention. A persistent antihypertensive effect was confirmed by the DMAP findings one month after denervation - the SAP level averagely amounted to 131±6 mm Hg. Endovascular radiofrequency denervation of renal arteries is a safe and efficient method of treatment of AH resistant

  18. A case report of multiple fractures with arterial vasospasm associated with ergotamine use.

    PubMed

    Küçükalp, Abdullah; Durak, Kemal; Bilgen, Muhammet Sadık

    2013-09-01

    Vasospasm that develops in association with ergotamine use is a rarely seen but well-understood complication. A case is presented here of multiple fractures in which arteriospasm affecting all the arteries of the lower limb on the same side occurred 10 days post-trauma. In this case, the arteriospasm resulting from ergotamine addiction and high doses of ergotamine, which may be confused with post-traumatic angiospasm, was treated with a marcaine infusion by epidural catheter and heparin, iliomedin and nitronal infusion intravenously. This clinical condition should be borne in mind for all trauma cases determined to have arterial vasospasm, and the use of ergotamine must be queried when taking the anamnesis from the patient. PMID:24214792

  19. Bronchial Artery Aneurysm Embolization with NBCA

    SciTech Connect

    Aburano, Hiroyuki Kawamori, Yasuhiro; Horiti, Yasushi; Kitagawa, Kiyohide; Sanada, Junichiro; Matsui, Osamu

    2006-12-15

    We present a case of asymptomatic bronchial artery aneurysm that formed a fistula with part of the pulmonary artery (there was no definite fistula with the pulmonary vein). We were able to catheterize the feeding vessel but could not reach the aneurysm. We therefore injected a mixture of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA; Histoacryl, B. Braun, Melsungen, Germany) and iodized oil (Lipiodol; Guerbet, Aulnay-sous-Bois, France) from the feeding vessel. The fistula, aneurysm, and feeding vessel were almost totally occluded. After embolization, the patient coughed a little; there were no other definite side effects or complications. One and 3 months later, on chest CT, the aneurysm was almost completely occupied with hyperattenuating NBCA-Lipiodol embolization. NBCA is a liquid embolization material whose time to coagulation after injection can be controlled by diluting it with Lipiodol. It is therefore possible to embolize an aneurysm, feeding vessels, and efferent vessels (in our case, it was a fistula) by using an NBCA-Lipiodol mixture of an appropriate concentration, regardless of whether the catheter can reach the aneurysm or not.

  20. Central Venous Catheter Intravascular Malpositioning: Causes, Prevention, Diagnosis, and Correction

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Carlos J.; Paniagua, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Despite the level of skill of the operator and the use of ultrasound guidance, central venous catheter (CVC) placement can result in CVC malpositioning, an unintended placement of the catheter tip in an inadequate vessel. CVC malpositioning is not a complication of central line insertion; however, undiagnosed CVC malpositioning can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The objectives of this review were to describe factors associated with intravascular malpositioning of CVCs inserted via the neck and chest and to offer ways of preventing, identifying, and correcting such malpositioning. A literature search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and MD Consult was performed in June 2014. By searching for “Central line malposition” and then for “Central venous catheters intravascular malposition,” we found 178 articles written in English. Of those, we found that 39 were relevant to our objectives and included them in our review. According to those articles, intravascular CVC malpositioning is associated with the presence of congenital and acquired anatomical variants, catheter insertion in left thoracic venous system, inappropriate bevel orientation upon needle insertion, and patient’s body habitus variants. Although plain chest radiography is the standard imaging modality for confirming catheter tip location, signs and symptoms of CVC malpositioning even in presence of normal or inconclusive conventional radiography findings should prompt the use of additional diagnostic methods to confirm or rule out CVC malpositioning. With very few exceptions, the recommendation in cases of intravascular CVC malpositioning is to remove and relocate the catheter. Knowing the mechanisms of CVC malpositioning and how to prevent, identify, and correct CVC malpositioning could decrease harm to patients with this condition. PMID:26587087