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  1. Hostility Now, Depression Later? Longitudinal Associations among Emotional Risk Factors for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Jesse C.; Fitzgerald, Griffin J.; Kamarck, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Purpose Given that emotional risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) tend to cluster within individuals, surprisingly little is known about how these negative emotions might influence one another over time. We examined the longitudinal associations among measures of depressive symptoms and hostility/anger in a cohort of 296 healthy, older adults. Methods Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Cook-Medley Hostility (Ho) scale, and Anger-In and Anger-Out subscales of the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory at baseline and 6-year follow-up. We conducted a series of path analyses to evaluate the directionality of the depression-hostility/anger relationship. Results Baseline Ho scale was a predictor of 6-year increases in BDI-II (β = .15, p = .004), Anger-In (β = .14, p = .002) and Anger-Out (β = .11, p = .01). In contrast, baseline BDI-II, Anger-In, and Anger-Out did not predict change in any of the emotional variables. Additional path analytic models revealed that the pattern of relationships was not altered after controlling for demographic, biomedical, and behavioral covariates; anxiety symptoms; social support; and subjective sleep quality. Conclusions The present results suggest that the cognitive aspects of hostility/anger may precede and independently predict future increases in depressive symptoms but not vice versa. Our findings lead us to speculate that (a) hostility may exert part of its cardiotoxic influence by acting to precipitate and/or maintain symptoms of depression and that (b) the potency of depression interventions designed to improve cardiovascular outcomes might be enhanced by incorporating treatments addressing hostility. PMID:20407855

  2. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  3. Longitudinal follow up of elevated pulmonary artery pressures in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Pashankar, Farzana D; Carbonella, Judith; Bazzy-Asaad, Alia; Friedman, Alan

    2009-03-01

    Elevated pulmonary artery pressures (PAP) occur in approximately 30% of children with sickle cell disease. In adults, pulmonary hypertension is significantly associated with mortality. There are no data on the long term significance in children. Nineteen children with SS/Sbeta(0) thalassaemia had elevated PAP, defined as tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) > or =2.5 m/s on screening echocardiograms. They were prospectively followed for 23 months (range 19-31 months). Patients with initial TRV > or = 3 or TRV > or = 2.5 m/s on repeat echocardiogram had cardiopulmonary evaluation and were offered treatment with hydroxyurea. Associated conditions like asthma and obstructive sleep apnea were treated. 18/19 patients had follow-up echocardiograms. These showed normalization of TRV in 8 patients. Risk factors associated with persistent elevation were higher TRV on initial echocardiogram (P = 0.01), lower haemoglobin (P = 0.003) and lower oxygen saturation (P = 0.03). Five patients with persistently elevated PAP were treated with hydroxyurea. Mean right ventricular pressure dropped from 40.16 to 29.26 (P = 0.017) after 3-6 months and to 23.6 mmHg (P = 0.002) after 9-12 months on treatment. In conclusion (i) At borderline elevation of TRV there is intrapatient variability and echocardiograms should be repeated for confirmation. (ii) Elevated PAP are reversible in children with early detection and treatment with hydroxyurea. PMID:19055665

  4. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease is a disease in ... blood to your face, scalp, and neck. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows the location of the right ...

  5. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  6. Association of genetic variants with coronary artery disease and ischemic stroke in a longitudinal population-based genetic epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    YAMADA, YOSHIJI; MATSUI, KOTA; TAKEUCHI, ICHIRO; FUJIMAKI, TETSUO

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies identified nine genes and chromosomal region 3q28 as susceptibility loci for myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke or chronic kidney disease by genome-wide or candidate gene association studies. As coronary artery disease (CAD) and ischemic stroke may share genetic architecture, certain genetic variants may confer susceptibility to the two diseases. The present study examined the association of 13 polymorphisms at these 10 loci with the prevalence of CAD or ischemic stroke in community-dwelling individuals, with the aim of identifying genetic variants that confer susceptibility to the two conditions. Study subjects (170 with CAD, 117 with ischemic stroke and 5,718 controls) were recruited to the Inabe Health and Longevity Study, a longitudinal genetic epidemiological study of atherosclerotic, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. The subjects were recruited from individuals who visited for an annual health checkup and they were followed up each year (mean follow-up period, 5 years). Longitudinal analysis with a generalized estimating equation, and with adjustment for age, gender, body mass index, smoking status, the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia and the serum concentration of creatinine, revealed that rs2074380 (G→A) and rs2074381 (A→G) of the α-kinase 1 (ALPK1) gene and rs8089 (T→G) of the thrombospondin 2 (THBS2) gene were significantly (P<2×10−16) associated with the prevalence of CAD, with the AA genotype of rs2074380 and GG genotypes of rs2074381 and rs8089 being protective against this condition. Similar analysis revealed that rs9846911 (A→G) at chromosome 3q28, rs2074381 of ALPK1, rs8089 of THBS2 and rs6046 (G→A) of the coagulation factor VII gene were significantly (P<2×10−16) associated with the prevalence of ischemic stroke, with the GG genotypes of rs9846911, rs2074381 and rs8089 and the AA genotype of rs6046 being protective against this condition. ALPK1 and THBS2 may thus be

  7. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    MedlinePlus

    ... if they have a history of: Abnormal cholesterol Diabetes Heart disease (coronary artery disease) High blood pressure ( hypertension ) Kidney disease involving hemodialysis Smoking Stroke ( cerebrovascular disease )

  8. Correlation between global longitudinal peak systolic strain and coronary artery disease severity as assessed by the angiographically derived SYNTAX score

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, David; Grigoratos, Chrysanthos; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigate the correlation between reduced global longitudinal peak systolic strain (GLPSS) and the SYNTAX score (SS) in patients undergoing coronary angiography. Methods We examined 71 patients undergoing both echocardiogram and coronary angiography within 15 days. All patients had normal global and/or regional wall motion on resting echocardiogram. We calculated GLPSS using two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography. SS was calculated for each group of patients based on the presence and/or the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD): no CAD on angiogram (n=10, control group), low SS (n=36, SS<22) and high SS (n=25, SS≥22). We hypothesised that GLPSS at rest is inversely correlated with the angiographically derived SS. Results Age, sex and most of the risk factors were equally distributed among the groups. There was a significant inverse correlation between GLPSS and SS values (r2=0.3869, P<0.001). This correlation was weaker in the low-SS group (r2=0.1332, P<0.05), whereas it was lost in the high-SS group (r2=0.0002, P=NS). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified that the optimal cut-off for the detection of high-SS patients was 13.95% (sensitivity=71%, specificity=90%, P<0.001). Conclusions The results of our study suggest that GLPSS might be promising for the detection of patients with high SYNTAX score on coronary angiogram. There is an inverse correlation between resting GLPSS and SS as assessed by coronary angiography. In patients with the highest SS, however, the correlation with GLPSS was less significant. PMID:27248153

  9. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the United States in both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to ...

  10. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death ... both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened ...

  11. Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes and medication . View an animation of atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up ... of an artery. PAD is usually caused by atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries (or outer regions away ...

  12. Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery. Such people should seek medical care immediately. Did You Know... When people suddenly develop a painful, ... In This Article Animation 1 Peripheral Arterial Disease Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  13. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  14. Living with Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Carotid Artery Disease If you have carotid artery disease, you can take steps to manage the ... treatment plan, and getting ongoing care. Having carotid artery disease raises your risk of having a stroke . ...

  15. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Smoking and Your ... in the body's arteries, the condition is called atherosclerosis . Over time, plaque can harden and narrow the ...

  16. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... ve started to help the medicine work. Other Organizations American Heart Association Questions to Ask Your Doctor Am I at risk for coronary artery disease (CAD)? What lifestyle changes should I make to decrease my risk of ...

  17. How socioeconomic inequalities impact pathways of care for coronary artery disease among elderly patients: study protocol for a qualitative longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Sara L; Fink, Astrid; Schumann, Nadine; Moor, Irene; Plehn, Alexander; Richter, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Several studies have identified that socioeconomic inequalities in coronary artery disease (CAD) morbidity and mortality lead to a disadvantage in patients with low socioeconomic status (SES). International studies have shown that socioeconomic inequalities also exist in terms of access, utilisation and quality of cardiac care. The aim of this qualitative study is to provide information on the impact of socioeconomic inequalities on the pathway of care for CAD, and to establish which factors lead to socioeconomic inequality of care to form and expand existing scientific theories. Methods and analysis A longitudinal qualitative study with 48 patients with CAD, aged 60–80 years, is being conducted. Patients have been recruited consecutively at the University Hospital in Halle/Saale, Germany, and will be followed for a period of 6 months. Patients are interviewed two times face-to-face using semistructured interviews. Data are transcribed and analysed based on grounded theory. Ethics and dissemination Only participants who have been informed and who have signed a declaration of consent have been included in the study. The study complies rigorously with data protection legislation. Approval of the Ethical Review Committee at the Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany was obtained. The results of the study will be presented at several congresses, and will be published in high-quality peer-reviewed international journals. Trial registration number This study has been registered with the German Clinical Trials Register and assigned DRKS00007839. PMID:26553827

  18. Peripheral Artery Disease and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Peripheral Artery Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 People with ... developing atherosclerosis, the most common cause of peripheral artery disease (PAD) . And individuals with PAD have a ...

  19. Peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Up to 20% of adults aged over 55 years have detectable peripheral arterial disease of the legs, but this may cause symptoms of intermittent claudication in only a small proportion of affected people. The main risk factors are smoking and diabetes mellitus, but other risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also associated with peripheral arterial disease. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for people with chronic peripheral arterial disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2010. Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review. We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 70 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiplatelet agents, bypass surgery, cilostazol, exercise, pentoxifylline, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), prostaglandins, smoking cessation, and statins. PMID:21477401

  20. Peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Up to 20% of adults aged over 55 years have detectable peripheral arterial disease of the legs, but this may cause symptoms of intermittent claudication in only a small proportion of affected people. The main risk factors are smoking and diabetes mellitus, but other risk factors for cardiovascular disease are also associated with peripheral arterial disease. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for people with chronic peripheral arterial disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009. (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 59 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiplatelet agents; bypass surgery; cilostazol; exercise; pentoxifylline; percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA); prostaglandins; smoking cessation; and statins. PMID:19454099

  1. About Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes and medication . View an animation of atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up ... of an artery. PAD is usually caused by atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries (or outer regions away ...

  2. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a ...

  3. Epigenetics and Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Golledge, Jonathan; Biros, Erik; Bingley, John; Iyer, Vikram; Krishna, Smriti M

    2016-04-01

    The term epigenetics is usually used to describe inheritable changes in gene function which do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. These typically include non-coding RNAs, DNA methylation and histone modifications. Smoking and older age are recognised risk factors for peripheral artery diseases, such as occlusive lower limb artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm, and have been implicated in promoting epigenetic changes. This brief review describes studies that have associated epigenetic factors with peripheral artery diseases and investigations which have examined the effect of epigenetic modifications on the outcome of peripheral artery diseases in mouse models. Investigations have largely focused on microRNAs and have identified a number of circulating microRNAs associated with human peripheral artery diseases. Upregulating or antagonising a number of microRNAs has also been reported to limit aortic aneurysm development and hind limb ischemia in mouse models. The importance of DNA methylation and histone modifications in peripheral artery disease has been relatively little studied. Whether circulating microRNAs can be used to assist identification of patients with peripheral artery diseases and be modified in order to improve the outcome of peripheral artery disease will require further investigation. PMID:26888065

  4. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a process called atherosclerosis ...

  5. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and efficacy continues to be studied in several medical centers. This procedure involves the placement of a small flexible tube (catheter) into an artery from the groin. The catheter is then directed to the neck to reach the carotid artery blockage. A balloon pushes open the artery wall and a stent ( ...

  6. Peripheral artery disease in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Atmer, B; Jogestrand, T; Laska, J; Lund, F

    1995-03-01

    The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease in patients with coronary artery disease has been investigated in many different ways and depends on the diagnostic methods and the definition of the atherosclerotic manifestations in the different vascular beds. In this study we used the non-invasive methods digital volume pulse plethysmography and ankle and toe blood pressure measurements to identify arterial abnormalities in the lower limbs in 58 patients (49 males and 9 females; age 37-72 years) examined with coronary angiography. The prevalence of peripheral artery disease was 22%, in agreement with the results of most previous investigations. There was a tendency towards increasing prevalence of peripheral artery disease with more advanced coronary artery disease: 14% of the patients with no or minimal coronary atheromotous lesions, 18% of the patients with moderate coronary atheromotous lesions and 32% of the patients with marked coronary atheromotous disease. For this reason a non-invasive investigation of the peripheral arterial circulation should be included early in the clinical consideration of patients with chest pain or similar symptoms suggesting coronary heart disease. Toe pressure measurement appears to be the most appropriate technique being rather simple in management and also in evaluation of results. PMID:7658111

  7. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... small balloon on its tip. They inflate the balloon at the blockage site in the carotid artery to flatten or compress the plaque against the artery wall. Carotid angioplasty is often combined with the placement of a small, metal, mesh-like device called a stent. When a stent is placed inside of a ...

  8. How Can Carotid Artery Disease Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Carotid Artery Disease Be Prevented? Taking action to control your risk factors can help prevent or delay carotid artery disease and stroke . Your risk for carotid artery ...

  9. Management of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Gey, Daniela C; Lesho, Emil P; Manngold, Johannes

    2004-02-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is common, but the diagnosis frequently is overlooked because of subtle physical findings and lack of classic symptoms. Screening based on the ankle brachial index using Doppler ultrasonography may be more useful than physical examination alone. Noninvasive modalities to locate lesions include magnetic resonance angiography, duplex scanning, and hemodynamic localization. Major risk factors for peripheral arterial disease are cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, older age (older than 40 years), hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and hyperhomocystinemia. Nonsurgical therapy for intermittent claudication involves risk-factor modification, exercise, and pharmacologic therapy. Based on available evidence, a supervised exercise program is the most effective treatment. All patients with peripheral arterial disease should undergo aggressive control of blood pressure, sugar intake, and lipid levels. All available strategies to help patients quit smoking, such as counseling and nicotine replacement, should be used. Effective drug therapies for peripheral arterial disease include aspirin (with or without dipyridamole), clopidogrel, cilostazol, and pentoxifylline. PMID:14971833

  10. Carotid artery disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have had a stroke or TIA, a nervous system (neurological) exam will show other problems. You may also have the following tests: Blood cholesterol and triglycerides test Blood sugar (glucose) test Ultrasound of the carotid arteries ( carotid ...

  11. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of PAD is atherosclerosis. This happens when plaque ... substance made up of fat and cholesterol. It causes the arteries to narrow or become blocked. This ...

  12. Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease Past Issues / ... narrows or blocks these arteries—a condition called coronary artery disease (CAD) or coronary heart disease (CHD) occurs. A ...

  13. Arterial Stiffness and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Anne-Sophie; Briet, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health concern due to the high prevalence of associated cardiovascular (CV) disease. CV mortality is 10-30 times higher in end-stage renal disease patients than in the age-adjusted general population. The last 20 years have been marked by a huge effort in the characterization of the vascular remodeling process associated with CKD and its consequences on the renal, CV and general prognosis. By comparison with patients with normal renal function, with or without hypertension, an increase in large artery stiffness has been described in end-stage renal disease as well as in CKD stages 2-5. Most clinical studies are consistent with the observation that damage to large arteries may contribute to the high incidence of CV disease. By contrast, the impact of large artery stiffening and remodeling on CKD progression is still a matter of debate. Concomitant exposure to other CV risk factors, including diabetes, seems to play a major role in the association between aortic stiffness and estimated GFR. The conflicting results obtained from longitudinal studies designed to evaluate the impact of baseline aortic stiffness on GFR progression are detailed in the present review. Only pulse pressure, central and peripheral, is almost constantly associated with incident CKD and GFR decline. Kidney transplantation improves patients’ CV prognosis, but its impact on arterial stiffness is still controversial. Donor age, living kidney donation and mean blood pressure appear to be the main determinants of improvement in aortic stiffness after kidney transplantation. PMID:27195244

  14. Coronary Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Coronary Artery Disease Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents ... exercise routine produced a strong heart!" Fast Facts Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood ...

  15. Antihypertensive Drug Use and New-Onset Diabetes in Female Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Population-based Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Liou, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Hung-Yi; Tien, Lyun; Gu, Yi-Sian; Jong, Gwo-Ping

    2015-09-01

    Antihypertensives have been linked to new-onset diabetes (NOD) and different classes of antihypertensives may alter the risk for the development of NOD; however, the effect of different antihypertensives on the development of NOD in women with hypertension and coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between usage of different antihypertensive drugs and the development of NOD in female patients with hypertension and CAD.Data in this retrospective cohort study were obtained from claim forms submitted to the Taiwan Bureau of National Health Insurance in central Taiwan during the period 2006-2011. We estimated the odds ratios (OR) to approximate the relative risk of NOD development associated with antihypertensive drug use.Of the 20,108 female patients with CAD at baseline, 2288 patients developed NOD during the 6-year follow-up. Subjects treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (OR, 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-1.00), angiotensin receptor blockers (OR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.82-0.99), and alpha-blockers (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.79-0.98) in the adjusted analyses had greater reductions of the risk than among nonusers. Patients who took diuretics (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01-1.20), beta-blockers (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.04-1.21), and calcium channel blockers (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.02-1.18) were at high risk of developing NOD than nonusers. Vasodilators were not associated with risk of NOD.We conclude that women with hypertension who take ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and alpha-blockers are at lower risk of NOD and that use of diuretics, beta-blockers, and calcium channel blockers was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing NOD during the 6-year follow-up. PMID:26356715

  16. Effect of comprehensive cardiovascular disease risk management on longitudinal changes in carotid artery intima-media thickness in a community-based prevention clinic

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Henry G.; Patel, Birju S.; Martin, Seth S.; Blaha, Michael; Doneen, Amy; Bale, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to examine changes in carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and carotid plaque morphology in patients receiving multifactorial cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor management in a community-based prevention clinic. Quantitative changes in CIMT and qualitative changes in carotid plaque morphology may be measured non-invasively by ultrasound. Material and methods This is a retrospective study on a cohort of 324 patients who received multifactorial cardiovascular risk reduction treatment at a community prevention clinic. All patients received lipid-lowering medications (statin, niacin, and/or ezetimibe) and lifestyle modification. All patients underwent at least one follow-up CIMT measurement after starting their regimen. Annual biomarker, CIMT, and plaque measurements were analyzed for associations with CVD risk reduction treatment. Results Median time to last CIMT was 3.0 years. Compared to baseline, follow-up analysis of all treatment groups at 2 years showed a 52.7% decrease in max CIMT, a 3.0% decrease in mean CIMT, and an 87.0% decrease in the difference between max and mean CIMT (p < 0.001). Plaque composition changes occurred, including a decrease in lipid-rich plaques of 78.4% within the first 2 years (p < 0.001). After the first 2 years, CIMT and lipid-rich plaques continued to decline at reduced rates. Conclusion In a cohort of patients receiving comprehensive CVD risk reduction therapy, delipidation of subclinical carotid plaque and reductions in CIMT predominantly occurred within 2 years, and correlated with changes in traditional biomarkers. These observations, generated from existing clinical data, provide unique insight into the longitudinal on-treatment changes in carotid plaque. PMID:27478452

  17. Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents ... this depends on which arteries are affected. Coronary Arteries Coronary arteries supply oxygen-rich blood to the ...

  18. Arterial disease in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Moody, William E; Edwards, Nicola C; Chue, Colin D; Ferro, Charles J; Townend, Jonathan N

    2013-03-01

    End stage renal disease is associated with a very high risk of premature cardiovascular death and morbidity. Early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also associated with an increased frequency of cardiovascular events and is a common but poorly recognised and undertreated risk factor. Cardiovascular disease in CKD can be attributed to two distinct but overlapping pathological processes, namely atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis. While the risk of athero-thrombotic events such as myocardial infarction is elevated, arteriosclerosis is the predominant pathophysiological process involving fibrosis and thickening of the medial arterial layer. This results in increased arterial stiffness causing left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis and the exposure of vulnerable vascular beds such as the brain and kidney to high pressure fluctuations causing small vessel disease. These pathophysiological features are manifest by a high risk of lethal arrhythmia, congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction and stroke. Recent work has highlighted the importance of aldosterone and disordered bone mineral metabolism. PMID:23118349

  19. Evolution of complete arterial grafting. For coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Buxton, B F; Fuller, J A; Tatoulis, J

    1998-01-01

    Arterial grafting for the correction of coronary artery disease preceded the use of saphenous vein grafts, but the overwhelming popularity of the saphenous vein from 1970 to 1985 left the development of arterial grafting dormant. Excellent graft patency results from pedicled internal thoracic artery grafting and continued saphenous vein graft failure prompted our unit to explore complete arterial grafting with internal thoracic artery and radial artery grafts. One thousand and fifty-three patients who received a combination of internal thoracic artery and radial artery grafts were compared with 1,156 patients who received internal thoracic artery and saphenous vein grafts. All patients underwent primary coronary artery bypass surgery between 1995 and 1998. The early mortality and morbidity and the probability of survival at 2 years were similar in both groups of patients. Early graft patency studies of 35 radial artery grafts showed 33 (94%) were patent at a mean of 12 months. Complete arterial grafting using internal thoracic and radial arteries is safe and may provide a long-term benefit. Images PMID:9566058

  20. Peripheral Arterial Disease (P.A.D.)

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Peripheral Artery Disease (P.A.D.) What is P.A.D.? Arteries Clogged With Plaque Peripheral arterial disease (P. ... button on your keyboard.) Why Is P.A.D. Dangerous? Click for more information Blocked blood flow ...

  1. Markers of arterial stiffness in peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Husmann, Marc; Jacomella, Vincenzo; Thalhammer, Christoph; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice R

    2015-09-01

    Increased arterial stiffness results from reduced elasticity of the arterial wall and is an independent predictor for cardiovascular risk. The gold standard for assessment of arterial stiffness is the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. Other parameters such as central aortic pulse pressure and aortic augmentation index are indirect, surrogate markers of arterial stiffness, but provide additional information on the characteristics of wave reflection. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterised by its association with systolic hypertension, increased arterial stiffness, disturbed wave reflexion and prognosis depending on ankle-brachial pressure index. This review summarises the physiology of pulse wave propagation and reflection and its changes due to aging and atherosclerosis. We discuss different non-invasive assessment techniques and highlight the importance of the understanding of arterial pulse wave analysis for each vascular specialist and primary care physician alike in the context of PAD. PMID:26317253

  2. Understanding Arteries | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Understanding Arteries Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Below: ... the arteries and veins are healthy. A Healthy Artery An artery is a muscular tube. It has ...

  3. Longitudinal Stent-Shortening during Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty with Stenting of Right Superficial Femoral Artery: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rahman, A; Pasha, K; Hossain, G M; Islam, M M

    2015-10-01

    Longitudinal stent deformation (LSD) involving coronary arteries during PCI have been reported in several literatures. But, LSD occurring during PTA (Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty) involving peripheral arteries is rare. We had such a case who presented with coronary and peripheral artery disease. Longitudinal stent deformation occurred during PTA with stenting of right superficial femoral artery (SFA). For CAD, PCI to RCA and LAD was done beforehand and the peripheral procedure was done 4 days later to avoid increased contrast load. Due to LSD occurring during PTA to Rt. SFA, we had to deploy another stent to cover the lesion over that artery. There was no technical fault or difficulty during negotiating the stent and positioning it covering the lesion. So, we did not find any obvious reason for this complication. Since longitudinal stent deformation is uncommon during PCI of coronary arteries and probably rare during PTA of peripheral arteries and we did not find any literature regarding this, we decided to report this case. PMID:26620030

  4. Medial Arterial Calcification: An Overlooked Player in Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chin Yee; Shanahan, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a global health issue that is becoming more prevalent in an aging world population. Diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease are also on the increase, and both are associated with accelerated vascular calcification and an unfavorable prognosis in PAD. These data challenge the traditional athero-centric view of PAD, instead pointing toward a disease process complicated by medial arterial calcification. Like atherosclerosis, aging is a potent risk factor for medial arterial calcification, and accelerated vascular aging may underpin the devastating manifestations of PAD, particularly in patients prone to calcification. Consequently, this review will attempt to dissect the relationship between medial arterial calcification and atherosclerosis in PAD and identify common as well as novel risk factors that may contribute to and accelerate progression of PAD. In this context, we focus on the complex interplay between oxidative stress, DNA damage, and vascular aging, as well as the unexplored role of neuropathy. PMID:27312224

  5. All about Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... angioplasty (AN-gee-oh-plas-tee), also called balloon angioplasty , a narrow tube with a balloon attached is inserted and threaded into an artery. Then the balloon is inflated, opening the narrowed artery. Awire tube, ...

  6. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Claudication

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fatty deposits inside them. This is called atherosclerosis. If you have PAD, your arms, and more ... also more likely in people who already have atherosclerosis in other arteries, such as the arteries in ...

  7. Diagnosis and therapy of coronary artery disease: Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, P.F.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 18 selections. Some of the titles are: Nuclear cardiology; Diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction; Therapy of angina pectoris; Psychosocial aspects of coronary artery disease; Nonatherosclerotic coronary artery disease; and The epidemiology of coronary artery disease.

  8. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Vilela, P; Goulão, A

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. PMID:15657789

  9. Longitudinal displacement in viscoelastic arteries: a novel fluid-structure interaction computational model, and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Bukač, Martina; Čanić, Sunčica

    2013-04-01

    Recent in vivo studies, utilizing ultrasound contour and speckle tracking methods, have identified significant longitudinal displacements of the intima-media complex, and viscoelastic arterial wall properties over a cardiac cycle. Existing computational models that use thin structure approximations of arterial walls have so far been limited to models that capture only radial wall displacements. The purpose of this work is to present a simple fluid-struture interaction (FSI) model and a stable, partitioned numerical scheme, which capture both longitudinal and radial displacements, as well as viscoelastic arterial wall properties. To test the computational model, longitudinal displacement of the common carotid artery and of the stenosed coronary arteries were compared with experimental data found in literature, showing excellent agreement. We found that, unlike radial displacement, longitudinal displacement in stenotic lesions is highly dependent on the stenotic geometry. We also showed that longitudinal displacement in atherosclerotic arteries is smaller than in healthy arteries, which is in line with the recent in vivo measurements that associate plaque burden with reduced total longitudinal wall displacement. This work presents a first step in understanding the role of longitudinal displacement in physiology and pathophysiology of arterial wall mechanics using computer simulations. PMID:23458302

  10. Noninvasive imaging in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Heo, Ran; Nakazato, Ryo; Kalra, Dan; Min, James K

    2014-09-01

    Noninvasive cardiac imaging is widely used to evaluate the presence of coronary artery disease. Recently, with improvements in imaging technology, noninvasive imaging has also been used for evaluation of the presence, severity, and prognosis of coronary artery disease. Coronary CT angiography and MRI of coronary arteries provide an anatomical assessment of coronary stenosis, whereas the hemodynamic significance of a coronary artery stenosis can be assessed by stress myocardial perfusion imaging, such as SPECT/PET and stress MRI. For appropriate use of multiple imaging modalities, the strengths and limitations of each modality are discussed in this review. PMID:25234083

  11. Noninvasive Imaging in Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Ran; Nakazato, Ryo; Kalra, Dan; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive cardiac imaging is widely used to evaluate the presence of coronary artery disease. Recently, with improvements in imaging technology, noninvasive imaging has also been used for evaluation of the presence, severity, and prognosis of coronary artery disease. Coronary CT angiography and MRI of coronary arteries provide an anatomical assessment of coronary stenosis, whereas the hemodynamic significance of a coronary artery stenosis can be assessed by stress myocardial perfusion imaging, such as SPECT/PET and stress MRI. For appropriate use of multiple imaging modalities, the strengths and limitations of each modality are discussed in this review. PMID:25234083

  12. [Clinical applications of arterial spin labeling technique in brain diseases].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zheng, Gang; Zhao, Tiezhu; Guo, Chao; Li, Lin; Lu, Guangming

    2013-02-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique is a kind of perfusion functional magnetic resonance imaging method that is based on endogenous contrast, and it can measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) noninvasively. The ASL technique has advantages of noninvasiveness, simplicity and relatively lower costs so that it is more suitable for longitudinal studies compared with previous perfusion methods, such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), CT and the contrast agent based magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. This paper mainly discusses the current clinical applications of ASL in brain diseases as cerebrovascular diseases, brain tumors, Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy, etc. PMID:23488163

  13. Coronary artery disease in the military patient.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Iain; White, S; Gill, R; Gray, H H; Rees, P

    2015-09-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is the most common cause of sudden death in the UK, and the most common cardiac cause of medical discharge from the Armed Forces. This paper reviews current evidence pertaining to the diagnosis and management of coronary artery disease from a military perspective, encompassing stable angina and acute coronary syndromes. Emphasis is placed on the limitations inherent in the management of acute coronary syndromes in the deployed environment. Occupational issues affecting patients with coronary artery disease are reviewed. Consideration is also given to the potential for coronary artery disease screening in the military, and the management of modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors, to help decrease the prevalence of coronary artery disease in the military population. PMID:26246347

  14. [Arterial complications of hydatic disease].

    PubMed

    Mayoussi, C; El Mesnaoui, A; Lekehal, B; Sefiani, Y; Benosman, A; Bensaid, Y

    2002-04-01

    We report two cases of hydatic cyst with rupture into the aorta in two young patients cared for at the Ibn Sina hospital in Rabat, Morocco. In the first patient, a false hydatic aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta was discovered at surgery performed for suspected hydatic cyst of the lower lobe of the left lung. Despite reconstruction with a prosthetic graft, the patient died peroperatively due to exsanguination via uncontrollable bleeding through the aneurysmal sac. The second case was a 20-year-old woman whose false hydatic aneurysm of the thoracoabdominal aorta was disclosed by embolic ischemia of the lower limbs. Aorto-aortic reconstruction was followed by medical treatment with albendazol. During follow-up, the patient developed a hydatic cyst of the kidney and a parietal cyst. Both were treated surgically. An analysis of these two cases and 9 others reported in the literature concerning arterial involvement in hydatic disease revealed the characteristic clinical, radiological and therapeutic features of this rare but serious complication. PMID:12015489

  15. Serum estradiol and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, R J; Gore, J M; Zive, M; Brady, P; Klaiber, E; Broverman, D; Ockene, I S; Dalen, J E

    1987-01-01

    Serum estradiol levels were measured in 300 men undergoing coronary angiography. Among these men, there were no significant differences in the serum estradiol levels between patients with (mean, 26.4 pg/ml) and those without (mean, 30.9 pg/ml) angiographically confirmed coronary artery disease. There were no significant differences in any of the established coronary risk factors when patients were subdivided according to the presence or absence of coronary artery disease or according to the extent of disease. In addition, no significant correlation was noted between mean serum estradiol levels and the extent of coronary artery disease as classified by the number of obstructed coronary vessels. A matched-pairs analysis was carried out in which patients who had normal coronary arteries were matched with those who had coronary artery disease on the basis of age, cigarette smoking, prior history of myocardial infarction, and body mass index. The mean serum estradiol level in the patients with coronary artery disease was 28.7 pg/ml, and the mean estradiol level was 31.4 pg/ml for the matched patients with normal coronary arteries. In addition, when serial (three) estradiol determinations were carried out in 100 patients, no association was observed between degree of estradiol variability and the occurrence and/or extent of coronary artery disease. The results of this observational study fail to support an association between serum estradiol levels and the presence or degree of coronary artery disease in men as documented by coronary angiography. PMID:3799667

  16. Computer measurement of arterial disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J.; Selzer, R. H.; Barndt, R.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Brooks, S.

    1980-01-01

    Image processing technique quantifies human atherosclerosis by computer analysis of arterial angiograms. X-ray film images are scanned and digitized, arterial shadow is tracked, and several quantitative measures of lumen irregularity are computed. In other tests, excellent agreement was found between computer evaluation of femoral angiograms on living subjects and evaluation by teams of trained angiographers.

  17. Inflammatory bowel disease and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Sappati Biyyani, Raja Shekhar R; Fahmy, Nabil M; Baum, Elizabeth; Nelson, Karl M; King, James F

    2009-01-01

    Chronic inflammation with the presence of excess serum acute-phase proteins, cytokines and cell adhesion molecules is increasingly being implicated in atherosclerosis. The association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and coronary artery disease (CAD) is unstudied. This is a preliminary, thesis-generating cross-sectional study aimed at evaluating the presence of traditional atherosclerotic risk factors in patients with IBD and CAD compared with the control population. The medical records of 42 consecutive IBD patients with CAD from 1999 to 2005 (27 men) were reviewed for the Framingham risk factors. The Framingham risk score (FRS) is calculated based on age, sex, hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia. FRS of patients with IBD and CAD was compared with the FRS of 137 age- and sex-matched (102 men) consecutive patients with CAD (controls). When the Framingham risk score adjusted for group and gender with age as a covariate, the adjusted total FRS score was higher in patients with CAD alone (10.0 [3.75]) as compared to those with; IBD and CAD: (8.1 [3.47]; p = 0.001). FRS is lower in cases (patients with IBD and CAD) when compared with the controls (CAD alone). PMID:19529899

  18. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Carotid Artery Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease may not cause signs or symptoms until it severely narrows or blocks a carotid artery. Signs and symptoms may include a bruit, a ...

  19. Echocardiographic evaluation of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Chatzizisis, Yiannis S; Murthy, Venkatesh L; Solomon, Scott D

    2013-11-01

    Although the availability and utilization of other noninvasive imaging modalities for the evaluation of coronary artery disease have expanded over the last decade, echocardiography remains the most accessible, cost-effective, and lowest risk imaging choice for many indications. The clinical utility of mature echocardiographic methods (i.e. two-dimensional echocardiography, stress echocardiography, contrast echocardiography) across the spectrum of coronary artery disease has been well established by numerous clinical studies. With continuing advancements in ultrasound technology, emerging ultrasound technologies such as three-dimensional echocardiography, tissue Doppler imaging, and speckle tracking methods hold significant promise to further widen the scope of clinical applications and improve diagnostic accuracy. In this review, we provide an update on the role of echocardiography in the diagnosis, management, and prognosis of coronary artery disease and introduce emerging technologies that are anticipated to further increase the clinical utility of echocardiography in the evaluation of patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:24077229

  20. In situ longitudinal pre-stretch in the human femoropopliteal artery

    PubMed Central

    Kamenskiy, Alexey; Seas, Andreas; Bowen, Grant; Deegan, Paul; Desyatova, Anastasia; Bohlim, Nick; Poulson, William; MacTaggart, Jason

    2016-01-01

    In situ longitudinal (axial) pre-stretch (LPS) plays a fundamental role in the mechanics of the femoropopliteal artery (FPA). It conserves energy during pulsation and prevents buckling of the artery during limb movement. We investigated how LPS is affected by demographics and risk factors, and how these patient characteristics associate with the structural and physiologic features of the FPA. LPS was measured in n = 148 fresh human FPAs (14–80 years old). Mechanical properties were characterized with biaxial extension and histopathological characteristics were quantified with Verhoeff–Van Gieson Staining. Constitutive modeling was used to calculate physiological stresses and stretches which were then analyzed in the context of demographics, risk factors and structural characteristics. Age had the strongest negative effect (r = −0.812, p < 0.01) on LPS and could alone explain 66% of LPS variability. Male gender, higher body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, dyslipidemia and tobacco use had negative effects on LPS, but only the effect of tobacco was not associated with aging. FPAs with less pre-stretch had thicker medial layers, but thinner intramural elastic fibers with less dense and more fragmented external elastic laminae. Elastin degradation was associated with decreased physiological tethering force and longitudinal stress, while circumferential stress remained constant. FPA wall pathology was negatively associated with LPS (r = −0.553, p < 0.01), but the effect was due primarily to aging. LPS in the FPA may serve as an energy reserve for adaptive remodeling. Reduction of LPS due to degradation and fragmentation of intramural longitudinal elastin during aging can be accelerated in tobacco users. PMID:26766633

  1. Infectious and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee-Zavareh, Mohammad Saeid; Tohidi, Mohammad; Sabouri, Amin; Ramezani-Binabaj, Mahdi; Sadeghi-Ghahrodi, Mohsen; Einollahi, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Atherosclerotic event is one of the most causes of death in the world. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one manifestation of atherosclerosis. It is well-known that several risk factors, such as diabetes mellitus (DM), smoking, hypertension (HTN), have effects on it. It is proposed that infection can lead to atherosclerosis or even make its process faster. Here, we discuss about the effect of some of infectious agents on the atherosclerosis and CAD. METHODS In this study, first we did a comprehensive search in PubMed, Scopus, and Science Direct using some related keywords such as atherosclerosis, CAD, myocardial infarction (MI), infection, and name of viruses and bacteria. After finding the related papers, we reviewed the correlation between some microbial agents and risk of CAD. RESULTS Literature has reported several infectious agents (viruses, bacteria, and parasites) that can be associated with risk of CAD. This association for some of them like Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), Chlamydia pneumonia (C. pneumoniae), and Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a very strong. On the other hand, there are some other agents like influenza that still need to be more investigated through original studies. Furthermore, different mechanisms (general and special) have been reported for the association of each agent with CAD. CONCLUSION Based on the studies in databases and our literature review, it is so clear that some microbes and infectious agents can be involved in the process of atherosclerosis. Therefore, controlling each type of infections especially among people with a traditional risk factor for atherosclerosis should be taken into account for reducing the risk of CAD and atherosclerosis. PMID:27114736

  2. Genetics of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Ruth; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-02-19

    Genetic factors contribute importantly to the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD), and in the past decade, there has been major progress in this area. The tools applied include genome-wide association studies encompassing >200,000 individuals complemented by bioinformatic approaches, including 1000 Genomes imputation, expression quantitative trait locus analyses, and interrogation of Encyclopedia of DNA Elements, Roadmap, and other data sets. close to 60 common SNPs (minor allele frequency>0.05) associated with CAD risk and reaching genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8)) have been identified. Furthermore, a total of 202 independent signals in 109 loci have achieved a false discovery rate (q<0.05) and together explain 28% of the estimated heritability of CAD. These data have been used successfully to create genetic risk scores that can improve risk prediction beyond conventional risk factors and identify those individuals who will benefit most from statin therapy. Such information also has important applications in clinical medicine and drug discovery by using a Mendelian randomization approach to interrogate the causal nature of many factors found to associate with CAD risk in epidemiological studies. In contrast to genome-wide association studies, whole-exome sequencing has provided valuable information directly relevant to genes with known roles in plasma lipoprotein metabolism but has, thus far, failed to identify other rare coding variants linked to CAD. Overall, recent studies have led to a broader understanding of the genetic architecture of CAD and demonstrate that it largely derives from the cumulative effect of multiple common risk alleles individually of small effect size rather than rare variants with large effects on CAD risk. Despite this success, there has been limited progress in understanding the function of the novel loci; the majority of which are in noncoding regions of the genome. PMID:26892958

  3. Coronary artery disease and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Doron; Edelman, Elazer R

    2014-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Near-normal glycemic control does not reduce cardiovascular events. For many patients with 1- or 2-vessel coronary artery disease, there is little benefit from any revascularization procedure over optimal medical therapy. For multivessel coronary disease, randomized trials demonstrated the superiority of coronary artery bypass grafting over multivessel percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with treated DM. However, selection of the optimal myocardial revascularization strategy requires a multidisciplinary team approach ('heart team'). This review summarizes the current evidence regarding the effectiveness of various medical therapies and revascularization strategies in patients with DM. PMID:25091969

  4. Coronary Artery Disease and Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Doron; Edelman, Elazer R

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Near-normal glycemic control does not reduce cardiovascular events. For many patients with 1- or 2-vessel coronary artery disease, there is little benefit from any revascularization procedure over optimal medical therapy. For multivessel coronary disease, randomized trials demonstrated the superiority of coronary artery bypass grafting over multivessel percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with treated DM. However, selection of the optimal myocardial revascularization strategy requires a multidisciplinary team approach ('heart team'). This review summarizes the current evidence regarding the effectiveness of various medical therapies and revascularization strategies in patients with DM. PMID:26567979

  5. Depression Treatment in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Trejo, Edgardo; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Depression has been linked to adverse coronary artery disease outcomes. Whether depression treatment improves or worsens coronary artery disease prognosis is unclear. This 25-year systematic review examines medical outcomes, and, secondarily, mood outcomes of depression treatment among patients with coronary artery disease. Data Sources: We systematically reviewed the past 25 years (January 1, 1986–December 31, 2011) of prospective trials reporting on the medical outcomes of depression treatment among patients with established coronary artery disease using keywords and MESH terms from OVID MEDLINE. Search 1 combined depression AND coronary artery disease AND antidepressants. Search 2 combined depression AND coronary artery disease AND psychotherapy. Search 3 combined depression AND revascularization AND antidepressants OR psychotherapy. Study Selection: English-language longitudinal randomized controlled trials, with at least 50 depressed coronary artery disease patients, reporting the impact of psychotherapy and/or antidepressants on cardiac and mood outcomes were included. Data Extraction: Data extracted included author name, year published, number of participants, enrollment criteria, depression definition/measures (standardized interviews, rating scales), power analyses, description of control arms and interventions (psychotherapy and/or medications), randomization, blinding, follow-up duration, follow-up loss, depression scores, and medical outcomes Results: The review yielded 10 trials. Antidepressant and/or psychotherapy did not significantly influence coronary artery disease outcomes in the overall population, but most studies were underpowered. There was a trend toward worse coronary artery disease outcomes after treatment with bupropion. Conclusions: After an acute coronary syndrome, depression often spontaneously remitted without treatment. Post–acute coronary syndrome persistence of depression predicted adverse coronary artery disease

  6. Cell Therapy of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Zankhana; Losordo, Douglas W.

    2013-01-01

    The age-adjusted prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in the US population was estimated to approach 12% in 1985, and as the population ages, the overall population having peripheral arterial disease is predicted to rise. The clinical consequences of occlusive peripheral arterial disease include intermittent claudication, that is, pain with walking, and critical limb ischemia (CLI), which includes pain at rest and loss of tissue integrity in the distal limbs, which may ultimately lead to amputation of a portion of the lower extremity. The risk factors for CLI are similar to those linked to coronary artery disease and include advanced age, smoking, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. The worldwide incidence of CLI was estimated to be 500 to 1000 cases per million people per year in 1991. The prognosis is poor for CLI subjects with advanced limb disease. One study of >400 such subjects in the United Kingdom found that 25% required amputation and 20% (including some subjects who had required amputation) died within 1 year. In the United States, ≈280 lower-limb amputations for ischemic disease are performed per million people each year. The first objective in treating CLI is to increase blood circulation to the affected limb. Theoretically, increased blood flow could be achieved by increasing the number of vessels that supply the ischemic tissue with blood. The use of pharmacological agents to induce new blood vessel growth for the treatment or prevention of pathological clinical conditions has been called therapeutic angiogenesis. Since the identification of the endothelial progenitor cell in 1997 by Asahara and Isner, the field of cell-based therapies for peripheral arterial disease has been in a state of continuous evolution. Here, we review the current state of that field. PMID:23620237

  7. Living with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and other related problems, such as coronary heart disease, heart attack, stroke, and transient ischemic attack. Heart-healthy lifestyle changes include ... Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA ...

  8. [Peripheral arterial disease--an underappreciated clinical problem].

    PubMed

    Masanauskiene, Edita; Naudziūnas, Albinas

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease is a common vascular disorder. In contrast to coronary and cerebral artery disease, peripheral arterial disease remains an underappreciated condition that despite being serious and extremely prevalent is rarely diagnosed and even less frequently treated. Early diagnosis of peripheral artery disease and individual assessment of risk factors are important in preventing further cardiovascular complications. The ankle-brachial index is a simple, reliable tool for diagnosing peripheral artery disease. Many studies underscore the importance of using the ankle-brachial index to identify persons with peripheral artery disease, since peripheral artery disease is frequently undiagnosed or asymptomatic. Measurement of the ankle-brachial index is simple enough to be performed in any doctor's office, and it is one of the most reliable indices of peripheral artery disease. PMID:18469511

  9. [Noninvasive diagnostic of coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Zuber, Michel; Zellweger, Michael; Bremerich, Jens; Auf der Mauer, Christoph; Buser, Peter T

    2009-04-01

    Noninvasive imaging of coronary artery disease has extensively evolved during the last decade. Today, at least four imaging techniques with excellent image quality such as echocardiography, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and PET, cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac CT are widely available in order to estimate the risk for future ischemic events, to corroborate the suspected diagnosis of coronary artery disease, to demonstrate the extent and localisation of myocardial ischemia, to diagnose myocardial infarction and measure it's size, to identify the myocardium at risk during acute ischemia, to differentiate between viable and nonviable myocardium and thereby provide the basis for indications of revascularisations, to follow revascularized patients over long time, to assess the risk for sudden cardiac death and the development of heart failure after myocardial infarction and to depict atheromatosis and atherosclerosis of the coronary artery tree. Echocardiography is the most widely used imaging method in cardiology. It provides excellent information on morphology and function of nearly all cardiac structures. Stress echocardiography has been proven to be a reliable tool for the demonstration of myocardial ischemia and for the acquisition of prognostic data. Newer ultrasound techniques may further improve investigator dependence and thereby reproducibility. The completeness of echocardiography will always depend on acoustic windows, which are given in a specific patient. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy provides the largest database especially on prognosis in coronary artery disease. It has been the for the depictions of ischemic and infarcted myocardium. Radiation exposure will always be an issue. Newer hybrid techniques combining nuclear methods with cardiac CT may add arguments, which will be needed for clinical decision-making. Cardiac magnetic resonance has evolved as an important tool in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. It is

  10. Peripheral arterial endothelial dysfunction of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Yusuke; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Shang, Jingwei; Sato, Kota; Nakano, Yumiko; Morihara, Ryuta; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Toru; Abe, Koji

    2016-07-15

    This study evaluates endothelial functions of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA) and spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). The reactive hyperemia index (RHI) of peripheral arterial tonometry and serological data were compared between age- and gender-matched normal controls (n=302) and five disease groups (ALS; n=75, PD; n=180, PSP; n=30, MSA; n=35, SCA; n=53). Correlation analyses were performed in ALS with functional rating scale-revised (FRS-R), and in PD with the Hehn-Yahr scale (H-Y) and a heart to mediastinum ratio using (123)I-MIBG scintigraphy (MIBG). The RHI of ALS and PD, but not of PSP, MSA or SCA, were significantly lower than normal controls (p<0.01). ALS showed a negative correlation of RHI with serum triglycerides (TG) and immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels, but not with disease severity (FRS-R) or rates of disease progression (∆FRS-R). On the other hand, PD showed a negative correlation of RHI with a progressive disease severity (H-Y) and a positive correlation of RHI with early/delayed MIBG scintigraphy, but not with serological data. The present study demonstrated significant declines of peripheral arterial endothelial functions in ALS and PD. The RHI of ALS was more correlated with disease duration and serum parameters while the RHI of PD was more correlated with disease severity and MIBG, suggesting different mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27288784

  11. [New antiplatelet drugs in coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Jover, Eva; Valdés, Mariano

    2014-12-01

    The dual antiplatelet therapy with acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel has been the mainstay of both acute and chronic phase coronary artery disease, reducing importantly the risk of adverse events. Despite a correct compliance, a non-negligible rate of adverse events still happens. New compounds, with improved properties, are now clinically available (such as prasugrel or ticagrelor) or under advanced development. The aim of the present review is the description of these new compounds, particularly prasugrel and ticagrelor. PMID:24480290

  12. Paediatric UK demyelinating disease longitudinal study (PUDDLS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is evidence that at least 5% of Multiple sclerosis (MS) cases manifest in childhood. Children with MS present with a demyelinating episode involving single or multiple symptoms prior to developing a second event (usually within two years) to then meet criteria for diagnosis. There is evidence from adult cohorts that the incidence and sex ratios of MS are changing and that children of immigrants have a higher risk for developing MS. A paediatric population should reflect the vanguard of such changes and may reflect trends yet to be observed in adult cohorts. Studying a paediatric population from the first demyelinating event will allow us to test these hypotheses, and may offer further valuable insights into the genetic and environmental interactions in the pathogenesis of MS. Methods/Design The Paediatric UK Demyelinating Disease Longitudinal Study (PUDDLS) is a prospective longitudinal observational study which aims to determine the natural history, predictors and outcomes of childhood CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases. PUDDLS will involve centres in the UK, and will establish a cohort of children affected with a first CNS inflammatory demyelinating event for long-term follow up by recruiting for approximately 5 years. PUDDLS will also establish a biological sample archive (CSF, serum, and DNA), allowing future hypothesis driven research. For example, the future discovery of a biomarker will allow validation within this dataset for the evaluation of novel biomarkers. Patients will also be requested to consent to be contacted in the future. A secondary aim is to collaborate internationally with the International Paediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group when future collaborative studies are proposed, whilst sharing a minimal anonymised dataset. PUDDLS is the second of two jointly funded studies. The first (UCID-SS) is an epidemiological surveillance study that already received ethical approvals, and started on the 1st September 2009. There is

  13. Management of Extracranial Carotid Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Yinn Cher

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in developed nations. Up to 88% of strokes are ischemic in nature. Extracranial carotid artery atherosclerotic disease is the third leading cause of ischemic stroke in the general population and the second most common non-traumatic cause among adults <45 years of age. The aim of this paper is to provide comprehensive, evidence-based recommendations for the management of extracranial atherosclerotic disease, including imaging for screening and diagnosis, medical management and interventional management. PMID:25439328

  14. Genetics and Genomics of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Pjanic, Milos; Miller, Clint L; Wirka, Robert; Kim, Juyong B; DiRenzo, Daniel M; Quertermous, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Coronary artery disease (or coronary heart disease), is the leading cause of mortality in many of the developing as well as the developed countries of the world. Cholesterol-enriched plaques in the heart's blood vessels combined with inflammation lead to the lesion expansion, narrowing of blood vessels, reduced blood flow, and may subsequently cause lesion rupture and a heart attack. Even though several environmental risk factors have been established, such as high LDL-cholesterol, diabetes, and high blood pressure, the underlying genetic composition may substantially modify the disease risk; hence, genome composition and gene-environment interactions may be critical for disease progression. Ongoing scientific efforts have seen substantial advancements related to the fields of genetics and genomics, with the major breakthroughs yet to come. As genomics is the most rapidly advancing field in the life sciences, it is important to present a comprehensive overview of current efforts. Here, we present a summary of various genetic and genomics assays and approaches applied to coronary artery disease research. PMID:27586139

  15. Adiposity, obesity, and arterial aging: longitudinal study of aortic stiffness in the Whitehall II cohort.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Eric J; Shipley, Martin J; Ahmadi-Abhari, Sara; Tabak, Adam G; McEniery, Carmel M; Wilkinson, Ian B; Marmot, Michael G; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Kivimaki, Mika

    2015-08-01

    We sought to determine whether adiposity in later midlife is an independent predictor of accelerated stiffening of the aorta. Whitehall II study participants (3789 men; 1383 women) underwent carotid-femoral applanation tonometry at the mean age of 66 and again 4 years later. General adiposity by body mass index, central adiposity by waist circumference and waist:hip ratio, and fat mass percent by body impedance were assessed 5 years before and at baseline. In linear mixed models adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, and mean arterial pressure, all adiposity measures were associated with aortic stiffening measured as increase in pulse wave velocity (PWV) between baseline and follow-up. The associations were similar in the metabolically healthy and unhealthy, according to Adult Treatment Panel-III criteria excluding waist circumference. C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 levels accounted for part of the longitudinal association between adiposity and PWV change. Adjusting for chronic disease, antihypertensive medication and risk factors, standardized effects of general and central adiposity and fat mass percent on PWV increase (m/s) were similar (0.14, 95% confidence interval: 0.05-0.24, P=0.003; 0.17, 0.08-0.27, P<0.001; 0.14, 0.05-0.22, P=0.002, respectively). Previous adiposity was associated with aortic stiffening independent of change in adiposity, glycaemia, and lipid levels across PWV assessments. We estimated that the body mass index-linked PWV increase will account for 12% of the projected increase in cardiovascular risk because of high body mass index. General and central adiposity in later midlife were strong independent predictors of aortic stiffening. Our findings suggest that adiposity is an important and potentially modifiable determinant of arterial aging. PMID:26056335

  16. Inflammatory markers in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Michalakeas, Christos A; Parissis, John; Paraskevaidis, Ioannis; Ntai, Konstantina; Papadakis, Ioannis; Anastasiou-Nana, Maria; Lekakis, John

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the most common manifestations of atherosclerosis. Inflammation is considered one of the major processes that contribute to atherogenesis. Inflammation plays an important role not only on the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis but also on plaque rupture, an event that leads to acute vascular events. Various biomarkers express different pathways and pathophysiologic mechanisms of cardiovascular disease, and inflammatory biomarkers express different parts of the atherogenic process, regarding the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis or the destabilization of the atherosclerotic plaque. Therefore, inflammatory biomarkers may prove to be useful in the detection, staging, and prognosis of patients with CAD. Furthermore, the fact that inflammatory processes are essential steps in the course of the disease offers future therapeutic targets for the interruption of the atherogenic process or for the management of acute events. PMID:22628054

  17. Coronary artery disease in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Fowkes, Ross; Byrne, Matthew; Sinclair, Hannah; Tang, Eugene; Kunadian, Vijay

    2016-09-01

    Our population is ageing. The prevalence of dementia is increasing as the population ages. Dementia is known to share many common risk factors with coronary artery disease including age, genetics, smoking, the components of the metabolic syndrome and inflammation. Despite the growing ageing population with dementia, there is underutilization of optimal care (pharmacotherapy and interventional procedures) in this cohort. Given common risk factors and potential benefit, patients with cognitive impairment and dementia should be offered contemporary care. However, further research evaluating optimal care in this patient cohort is warranted. PMID:27159265

  18. Unusual Systemic Artery to Pulmonary Artery Malformation Without Evidence of Systemic Disease, Trauma or Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Geyik, Serdar; Yavuz, Kivilcim; Keller, Frederick S.

    2006-10-15

    Connections between the systemic and pulmonary arterial systems are rare conditions that can be due to either congenital or acquired diseases such as anomalous systemic arterial supply to normal lung, pulmonary sequestration, and systemic supply to pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. Herein, a unique case of systemic artery to pulmonary arterial malformation and its endovascular treatment in a patient with no history of the usual etiologies is reported.

  19. Clinical outcomes of fractional flow reserve by computed tomographic angiography-guided diagnostic strategies vs. usual care in patients with suspected coronary artery disease: the prospective longitudinal trial of FFRCT: outcome and resource impacts study

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Pamela S.; Pontone, Gianluca; Hlatky, Mark A.; Patel, Manesh R.; Norgaard, Bjarne L.; Byrne, Robert A.; Curzen, Nick; Purcell, Ian; Gutberlet, Matthias; Rioufol, Gilles; Hink, Ulrich; Schuchlenz, Herwig Walter; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Gilard, Martine; Andreini, Daniele; Jensen, Jesper M.; Hadamitzky, Martin; Chiswell, Karen; Cyr, Derek; Wilk, Alan; Wang, Furong; Rogers, Campbell; De Bruyne, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Aims In symptomatic patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), computed tomographic angiography (CTA) improves patient selection for invasive coronary angiography (ICA) compared with functional testing. The impact of measuring fractional flow reserve by CTA (FFRCT) is unknown. Methods and results At 11 sites, 584 patients with new onset chest pain were prospectively assigned to receive either usual testing (n = 287) or CTA/FFRCT (n = 297). Test interpretation and care decisions were made by the clinical care team. The primary endpoint was the percentage of those with planned ICA in whom no significant obstructive CAD (no stenosis ≥50% by core laboratory quantitative analysis or invasive FFR < 0.80) was found at ICA within 90 days. Secondary endpoints including death, myocardial infarction, and unplanned revascularization were independently and blindly adjudicated. Subjects averaged 61 ± 11 years of age, 40% were female, and the mean pre-test probability of obstructive CAD was 49 ± 17%. Among those with intended ICA (FFRCT-guided = 193; usual care = 187), no obstructive CAD was found at ICA in 24 (12%) in the CTA/FFRCT arm and 137 (73%) in the usual care arm (risk difference 61%, 95% confidence interval 53–69, P< 0.0001), with similar mean cumulative radiation exposure (9.9 vs. 9.4 mSv, P = 0.20). Invasive coronary angiography was cancelled in 61% after receiving CTA/FFRCT results. Among those with intended non-invasive testing, the rates of finding no obstructive CAD at ICA were 13% (CTA/FFRCT) and 6% (usual care; P = 0.95). Clinical event rates within 90 days were low in usual care and CTA/FFRCT arms. Conclusions Computed tomographic angiography/fractional flow reserve by CTA was a feasible and safe alternative to ICA and was associated with a significantly lower rate of invasive angiography showing no obstructive CAD. PMID:26330417

  20. Coronary artery bypass graft in a patient with Fabry's disease.

    PubMed

    Osada, Hiroaki; Kanemitsu, Naoki; Kyogoku, Masahisa

    2016-01-01

    Fabry's disease is a lysosomal storage disease characterized by intracellular accumulation of ceramide trihexoside resulting from alpha-galactosidase A deficiency. While the heart is often involved, coronary artery disease and its management in Fabry's disease patients are extremely rare clinical entities. We report a case of a 72-year-old man with left main disease in Fabry's disease with special consideration of the arterial wall pathology. PMID:27131517

  1. Intravascular stenting following bypass grafting in terminal coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vecht, R J; Sigwart, U

    1995-01-01

    Reoperation after coronary artery bypass grafting in terminal coronary artery disease is associated with a substantial risk. Advances in coronary artery angioplasty offer alternative treatment with low morbidity and acceptable mortality. Images Figure 1 (a) Figure 1 (b) Figure 2 (a) Figure 2 (b) Figure 1 PMID:7884772

  2. Motexafin lutetium in graft coronary artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodburn, Kathryn W.; Rodriquez, Shari L.; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Hayase, Motoya; Robbins, Robert C.; Kessel, David

    2000-03-01

    Graft coronary artery disease (GCAD) is the chief complication following cardiac transplantation. Presently, there are limited treatment options. Insights into more expedient diagnosis and amelioration, if only partially, of GCAD are fervently sought. The selectivity of Antrin Injection (Lu-Tex) with subsequent photoactivation has been evaluated in several preclinical atherosclerosis models. The inhibitory effect of Lu-Tex induced photosensitization was demonstrated with human bypass coronary smooth muscle cells. The biodistribution of Lu-Tex was evaluated in a rat model of heterotopic cardiac allografts 60 days following transplantation. Lu-Tex was retained in the cardiac allograft, exhibiting a five-fold increase in retention between the allograft and native heart. These findings lead us to suggest that further studies are warranted to ascertain the merits of Lu-Tex for the diagnosis and possible attenuation of chronic graft vascular disease.

  3. Cutaneous markers of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Shridhar; Jhamb, Rajat

    2010-09-26

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is rapidly increasing in prevalence across the world and particularly in south Asians at a relatively younger age. As atherosclerosis starts in early childhood, the process of risk evaluation must start quite early. The present review addresses the issue of cutaneous markers associated with atherosclerosis, and the strengths and weaknesses of the markers in identifying early coronary atherosclerosis. A diligent search for such clinical markers, namely xanthelasma, xanthoma, arcus juvenilis, acanthosis nigricans, skin tags, ear lobe crease, nicotine stains, premature graying in smokers, hyperpigmented hands in betel quid sellers, central obesity, and signs of peripheral vascular disease may prove to be a rewarding exercise in identifying asymptomatic CAD in high risk individuals. PMID:21160602

  4. Longitudinal Evaluation of Segmental Arterial Mediolysis in Splanchnic Arteries: Case Series and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Min, Sang-il; Han, Ahram; Choi, Chanjoong; Min, Seung-Kee; Ha, Jongwon

    2016-01-01

    Background Segmental arterial mediolysis (SAM) is a rare non-atherosclerotic, non-inflammatory vascular disorder varying widely in clinical course. The purpose of this study is to analyze detailing clinical and imaging manifestations over time in patients with SAM through a literature review and to suggest an optimal management strategy. Methods A retrospective review of eight consecutive patients diagnosed with SAM between January, 2000 and January, 2012 was conducted. All presented with acute-onset abdominal or flank pain. Clinical features, imaging studies, and laboratory findings served as grounds for diagnosis, having excluded more common conditions (ie, fibromuscular dysplasia, collagen vascular disorders, or arteritis). CT angiography was done initially and repeated periodically (Week 1, Month 3, then yearly). Treatment was conservative, utilizing endovascular intervention as warranted by CT diagnostics. In a related systematic review, all English literature from 1976 to 2015 was screened via the PubMed database, assessing patient demographics, affected arteries, clinical presentations, and treatment methods. Findings Ultimately, 25 arterial lesions identified in eight patients (median age, 62.8 years; range, 40–84 years) were monitored for a median period of 26 months (range, 15–57 months). At baseline, celiac axis (3/8, 37.5%), superior mesenteric (4/8, 50%), and common hepatic (2/8, 25%) arteries were involved, in addition to isolated lesions of right renal, splenic, right colic, middle colic, gastroduodenal, left gastric, right gastroepiploic, proper hepatic, right hepatic, and left hepatic arteries. Compared with prior publications, celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery were more commonly affected in cohort. Arterial dissections (n = 8), aneurysms (n = 5), stenoses or occlusions (n = 4), and a single pseudoaneurysm were documented. Despite careful conservative management, new splanchnic arterial lesions (n = 4) arose during follow

  5. Digital ischemia: angiographic differentiation of embolism from primary arterial disease

    SciTech Connect

    Maiman, M.H.; Bookstein, J.J.; Bernstein, E.F.

    1981-12-01

    Embolic disease is often overlooked as a cause of digital ischemia. Unilateral symptoms, in particular, should suggest the possibility of emboli arising from the subclavian or more distal upper extremity vessels. Emboli may originate in the subclavian artery as the result of atherosclerosis at its origin or arterial injury secondary to thoracic outlet compression. Arteriography can be useful in the identification of upper extremity emboli and their source, and should include studies of the aortic, arch, proximal subclavian artery, and digital arteries. Retrograde subclavian injections may be required to adequately demonstrate the origin of the subclavian artery. Magnification technique is often essential in differentiating small digital artery emboli from primary arterial diseases, such as Buerger disease or scleroderma.

  6. Evaluation of Peripheral Arterial Disease in Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Faghihimani, Elham; Darakhshandeh, Ali; Feizi, Awat; Amini, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of prediabetes in the world continues to increase. These patients have elevated the risk of atherosclerosis. The current study was designed to assess the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and its related risk factors in prediabetes patients. Methods: This was the case-control study in which 135 adults in three groups: Diabetes, prediabetes, and normal were studied. We evaluated the prevalence of PAD through the measurement of ankle-brachial index (ABI). All the patients were interviewed about demographic and medical data, including age, sex, disease duration, body mass index, hypertension (HTN), fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C), lipid profile, and medication use. Results: The prevalence of PAD in diabetes patients was higher than the normal group (8.5%vs. 0.0%) (P < 0.05), but the differences between prediabetes compared with diabetes and normal group were not significant. The mean level of ABI in normal, prediabetes, and diabetes group was (1.11 ± 0.11), (1.09 ± 0.12), and (1.05 ± 0.03) respectively (P < 0.1). There were marginally significant differences of ABI observed between the normal group and the diabetes group. The observed differences between groups in the ABI were significant after adjusting the effects of age and sex (P < 0.05). There was an association observed between ABI and HbA1C in diabetes patients (r = 0.249, P < 0.01) and a significant association seen between PAD and HTN in the prediabetes group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Peripheral arterial disease is common in asymptomatic diabetes and prediabetes patients. Management of hypertensive prediabetes patients and early detection of PAD in this group as well as in asymptomatic patients is important. PMID:25317291

  7. Pneumoconiosis Increases the Risk of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chih-Hao; Lin, Te-Yu; Huang, Wen-Yen; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This nationwide population-based retrospective cohort study was used to evaluate the association between pneumoconiosis and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We identified 3374 patients with pneumoconiosis from the catastrophic illness registry who were newly diagnosed from 2000 to 2005; 13,496 patients without pneumoconiosis from Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 (LHID2000) were randomly frequency matched according to sex, age, and index year and used as a nonpneumoconiosis group. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of PAD in the pneumoconiosis group compared with the nonpneumoconiosis group. The mean follow-up years were 7.44 years in the pneumoconiosis group and 8.17 years in the nonpneumoconiosis group. The incidence density rate of PAD was 1.25 times greater in the pneumoconiosis group than in the nonpneumoconiosis group (8.37 vs 6.70 per 1000 person-years). After adjusting for sex, age, and comorbidities, the adjusted HRs of PAD for the pneumoconiosis group were 1.30 (95% CI = 1.08–1.57), compared with the nonpneumoconiosis group. The combined impacts of patients with pneumoconiosis and diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and asthma showed a significant by joint association with PAD risk compared with patients with no pneumoconiosis and no counterpart comorbidity. Patients with pneumoconiosis have an independently higher risk of developing PAD. Physicians should include pneumoconiosis in evaluating PAD risk. PMID:26020403

  8. Longitudinal distribution of vascular resistance in the pulmonary arteries, capillaries, and veins

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Jerome S.; Stemmler, Edward J.; DuBois, Arthur B.

    1968-01-01

    A new method has been described for measuring the pressure and resistance to blood flow in the pulmonary arteries, capillaries, and veins. Studies were performed in dog isolated lung lobes perfused at constant flow with blood from a donor dog. Pulmonary artery and vein volume and total lobar blood volume were measured by the ether plethysmograph and dyedilution techniques. The longitudinal distribution of vascular resistance was determined by analyzing the decrease in perfusion pressure caused by a bolus of low viscosity liquid introduced into the vascular inflow of the lobe. The pulmonary arteries were responsible for 46% of total lobar vascular resistance, whereas the pulmonary capillaries and veins accounted for 34 and 20% of total lobar vascular resistance respectively. Vascular resistance was 322 dynes ·sec·cm-5/ml of vessel in the lobar pulmonary arteries, 112 dynes·sec·cm-5/ml in the pulmonary capillaries, and 115 dynes·sec·cm-5/ml in the lobar pulmonary veins. Peak vascular resistivity (resistance per milliliter of volume) was in an area 2 ml proximal to the capillary bed, but resistivity was high throughout the pulmonary arterial tree. The pulmonary arteries accounted for approximately 50% of vascular resistance upstream from the sluice point when alveolar pressure exceeded venous pressure. The method described provides the first measurements of pulmonary capillary pressure. Mid-capillary pressure averaged 13.3 cm H2O, pulmonary artery pressure averaged 20.4 cm H2O, and pulmonary vein pressure averaged 9.2 cm H2O. These techniques also provide a way of analyzing arterial, capillary, and venous responses to various pharmacologic and physiologic stimuli. PMID:4868032

  9. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Avram

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an entity that is known to complicate connective tissue diseases (CTD). PAH in CTD is a very important diagnosis which greatly affects treatment and prognosis. The most commonly affected CTD is scleroderma, although lupus, inflammatory myopathies such as poly and dermatomyositis, and mixed CTD are also associated with PAH. The manifestations of PAH have both similarities and differences when occurring in the setting of CTD as compared with idiopathic PAH. These differences are most notable in scleroderma. In this section we will discuss the features of PAH as they appear in CTDs, and in particular, scleroderma. The focus of this article is an approach to the diagnosis and treatment of PAH in CTD, and how this setting might differ from idiopathic and other forms of PAH. PMID:20160534

  10. Coronary artery disease in Bangladesh: A review

    PubMed Central

    Islam, A.K.M. Monwarul; Majumder, A.A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is an increasingly important medical and public health problem, and is the leading cause of mortality in Bangladesh. Like other South Asians, Bangladeshis are unduly prone to develop CAD, which is often premature in onset, follows a rapidly progressive course and angiographically more severe. The underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. Genetic predisposition, high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and conventional risk factors play important role. Lifestyle related factors, including poor dietary habits, excess saturated and trans fat, high salt intake, and low-level physical activity may be important as well. Some novel risk factors, including hypovitaminosis D, arsenic contamination in water and food-stuff, particulate matter air pollution may play unique role. At the advent of the new millennium, we know little about our real situation. Largescale epidemiological, genetic and clinical researches are needed to explore the different aspects of CAD in Bangladesh. PMID:23993003

  11. Peripheral artery disease of the legs - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... 000577.htm Peripheral artery disease of the legs - self-care To use the sharing features on this ... do not heal Alternate Names Peripheral vascular disease - self-care; Intermittent claudication - self-care References Creager MA, ...

  12. Retinal arterial occlusive disease in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Gold, D; Feiner, L; Henkind, P

    1977-09-01

    Four patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) developed an unusual form of occlusive retinal arterial disease. The most prominent clinical features of this disorder were deposition of yellow-white material in retinal arterial walls and evidence of multifocal retinal arterial occlusion. Fluorescein angiographic findings included nonperfusion of the obstructed arteries and the retinal capillary beds fed by them, and fluorescein leakage at the sites of involvement of the retinal arteries. This ocular complication of SLE is presumably a manifestation of the widespread systemic vascular problems seen in this disorder. It may be more common in patients with lupus involving the CNS. PMID:901267

  13. Endovascular Intervention for Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thukkani, Arun K.; Kinlay, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Advances in endovascular therapies during the past decade have broadened the options for treating peripheral vascular disease percutaneously. Endovascular treatment offers a lower risk alternative to open surgery in many patients with multiple comorbidities. Noninvasive physiological tests and arterial imaging precede an endovascular intervention and help localize the disease and plan the procedure. The timing and need for revascularization are broadly related to the 3 main clinical presentations of claudication, critical limb ischemia, and acute limb ischemia. Many patients with claudication can be treated by exercise and medical therapy. Endovascular procedures are considered when these fail to improve quality of life and function. In contrast, critical limb ischemia and acute limb ischemia threaten the limb and require more urgent revascularization. In general, endovascular treatments have greater long-term durability for aortoiliac disease than femoral popliteal disease. Infrapopliteal revascularization is generally reserved for critical and acute limb ischemia. Balloon angioplasty and stenting are the mainstays of endovascular therapy. New well-tested innovations include drug-eluting stents and drug-coated balloons. Adjunctive devices for crossing chronic total occlusions or debulking plaque with atherectomy are less rigorously studied and have niche roles. Patients receiving endovascular procedures need a structured surveillance plan for follow-up care. This includes intensive treatment of cardiovascular risk factors to prevent myocardial infarction and stroke, which are the main causes of death. Limb surveillance aims to identify restenosis and new disease beyond the intervened segments, both of which may jeopardize patency and lead to recurrent symptoms, functional impairment, or a threatened limb. PMID:25908731

  14. Exercise Training and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Tara L.; Lloyd, Pamela G.; Yang, Hsiao-Tung; Terjung, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common vascular disease that reduces blood flow capacity to the legs of patients. PAD leads to exercise intolerance that can progress in severity to greatly limit mobility, and in advanced cases leads to frank ischemia with pain at rest. It is estimated that 12–15 million people in the United States are diagnosed with PAD, with a much larger population that is undiagnosed. The presence of PAD predicts a 50–1500% increase in morbidity and mortality, depending on severity. Treatment of patients with PAD is limited to modification of cardiovascular disease risk factors, pharmacological intervention, surgery, and exercise therapy. Extended exercise programs that involve walking ~5 times/wk, at a significant intensity that requires frequent rest periods, are most significant. Pre-clinical studies and virtually all clinical trials demonstrate the benefits of exercise therapy, including: improved walking tolerance, modified inflammatory/hemostatic markers, enhanced vasoresponsiveness, adaptations within the limb (angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, mitochondrial synthesis) that enhance oxygen delivery and metabolic responses, potentially delayed progression of the disease, enhanced quality of life indices, and extended longevity. A synthesis is provided as to how these adaptations can develop in the context of our current state of knowledge and events known to be orchestrated by exercise. The benefits are so compelling that exercise prescription should be an essential option presented to patients with PAD in the absence of contraindications. Obviously, selecting for a life style pattern, that includes enhanced physical activity prior to the advance of PAD limitations, is the most desirable and beneficial. PMID:23720270

  15. Carotid artery disease following external cervical irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Elerding, S.C.; Fernandez, R.N.; Grotta, J.C.; Lindberg, R.D.; Causay, L.C.; McMurtrey, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    A retrospective study of 910 patients surviving at least five years after cervical irradiation for Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, or primary head an neck neoplasms showed the incidence of stroke following cervical irradiation was 63 of 910 patients (6.3%) during a mean period of observation of nine years. This represents a trend toward an increased risk for this population observed over the same period of time (p . 0.39). A prospective study of 118 similar patients currently living five years after cervical radiotherapy was performed to determine the incidence of carotid artery disease occurring as a consequence of neck irradiation. Abnormal carotid phonangiograms (CPA) were found in 25% of the patients and abnormal oculoplethysmographs (OPG) were found in 17%. These studies represent significant carotid lesions that are not expected in such a population. It is concluded that the carotid stenoses demonstrated are most likely a consequence of prior irradiation. Patients that are five-year survivors of cervical irradiation should have noninvasive vascular laboratory studies performed as part of their routine follow-up examinations in order to detect these carotid lesions while they are occult.

  16. Arterial disease ulcers, part 1: clinical diagnosis and investigation.

    PubMed

    Weir, Gregory Ralph; Smart, Hiske; van Marle, Jacobus; Cronje, Frans Johannes

    2014-09-01

    Arterial disease (peripheral vascular disease) is the result of narrowing of the blood vessel lumen. The classic clinical signs need to be recognized early before progression to arterial predominant disease and limb ischemia. Arterial ulcers or tissue breakdown can result from trauma, infection, or other etiologies with diabetes, smoking, increasing age, and hypertension the most important risk factors. Diagnostic testing starts with a palpable pulse with special investigation including handheld Doppler for ankle brachial pressure index ratios, segmental duplex leg Doppler waveforms, and more specialized procedures, including transcutaneous oxygen saturation. PMID:25133344

  17. Stable coronary artery disease: revascularisation and invasive strategies.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, Raffaele; Giustino, Gennaro; Mehran, Roxana; Windecker, Stephan

    2015-08-15

    Stable coronary artery disease is the most common clinical manifestation of ischaemic heart disease and a leading cause of mortality worldwide. Myocardial revascularisation is a mainstay in the treatment of symptomatic patients or those with ischaemia-producing coronary lesions, and reduces ischaemia to a greater extent than medical treatment. Documentation of ischaemia and plaque burden is fundamental in the risk stratification of patients with stable coronary artery disease, and several invasive and non-invasive techniques are available (eg, fractional flow reserve or intravascular ultrasound) or being validated (eg, instantaneous wave-free ratio and optical coherence tomography). The use of new-generation drug-eluting stents and arterial conduits greatly improve clinical outcome in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). PCI is feasible, safe, and effective in many patients with stable coronary artery disease who remain symptomatic despite medical treatment. In patients with multivessel and left main coronary artery disease, the decision between PCI or CABG is guided by the local Heart Team (team of different cardiovascular specialists, including non-invasive and invasive cardiologists, and cardiac surgeons), who carefully judge the possible benefits and risks inherent to PCI and CABG. In specific subsets, such as patients with diabetes and advanced, multivessel coronary artery disease, CABG remains the standard of care in view of improved protection against recurrent ischaemic adverse events. PMID:26334162

  18. Spatiotemporal Changes Posttreatment in Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Sara A.; Huben, Neil B.; Yentes, Jennifer M.; McCamley, John D.; Lyden, Elizabeth R.; Pipinos, Iraklis I.; Johanning, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests revascularization of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) limbs results in limited improvement in functional gait parameters, suggesting underlying locomotor system pathology. Spatial and temporal (ST) gait parameters are well studied in patients with PAD at baseline and are abnormal when compared to controls. The purpose of this study was to systematically review and critically analyze the available data on ST gait parameters before and after interventions. A full review of literature was conducted and articles were included which examined ST gait parameters before and after intervention (revascularization and exercise). Thirty-three intervention articles were identified based on 154 articles that evaluated ST gait parameters in PAD. Four articles fully assessed ST gait parameters before and after intervention and were included in our analysis. The systematic review of the literature revealed a limited number of studies assessing ST gait parameters. Of those found, results demonstrated the absence of improvement in gait parameters due to either exercise or surgical intervention. Our study demonstrates significant lack of research examining the effectiveness of treatments on ST gait parameters in patients with PAD. Based on the four published articles, ST gait parameters failed to significantly improve in patients with PAD following intervention. PMID:26770826

  19. Leptospirosis and Peripheral Artery Occlusive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lee, Feng-You; Wang, Ying-Chuan; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Data on the association between peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) and leptospirosis are limited. We conducted a retrospective cohort study for determining whether leptospirosis is one of the possible risk factors for PAOD. Patients diagnosed with leptospirosis by using 2000 to 2010 data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with leptospirosis without a history of PAOD were selected. For each leptospirosis patient, 4 controls without a history of leptospirosis and PAOD were randomly selected and frequency-matched for sex, age, the year of the index date, and comorbidity diseases. The follow-up period was from the time of the initial diagnosis of leptospirosis to the diagnosis date of PAOD, or December 31, 2011. The Cox proportional hazard regression models were used for analyzing the risk of PAOD. During the follow-up period, the cumulative incidence of PAOD was higher among the patients from the leptospirosis cohort than among the nonleptospirosis cohort (log-rank test, P < 0.001). In total, 29 patients with PAOD from the leptospirosis cohort and 81 from the nonleptospirosis cohort were observed with the incidence rates of 2.1 and 1.3 per 1000 person-years, respectively, yielding a crude hazards ratio (HR) of 1.62 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.44–1.81) and adjusted HR (aHR) of 1.75 (95% CI = 1.58–1.95). The risk of PAOD was 1.75-fold higher in the patients with leptospirosis than in the general population. PMID:26986166

  20. Suppression of ischemia in arterial occlusive disease by JNK-promoted native collateral artery development

    PubMed Central

    Ramo, Kasmir; Sugamura, Koichi; Craige, Siobhan; Keaney, John F; Davis, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    Arterial occlusive diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Blood flow to the affected tissue must be restored quickly if viability and function are to be preserved. We report that disruption of the mixed-lineage protein kinase (MLK) - cJun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway in endothelial cells causes severe blockade of blood flow and failure to recover in the murine femoral artery ligation model of hindlimb ischemia. We show that the MLK-JNK pathway is required for the formation of native collateral arteries that can restore circulation following arterial occlusion. Disruption of the MLK-JNK pathway causes decreased Dll4/Notch signaling, excessive sprouting angiogenesis, and defects in developmental vascular morphogenesis. Our analysis demonstrates that the MLK-JNK signaling pathway is a key regulatory mechanism that protects against ischemia in arterial occlusive disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18414.001 PMID:27504807

  1. [Issues in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting for Kawasaki Disease].

    PubMed

    Katahira, Shintaro; Kawamoto, Shunsuke; Hosoyama, Katsuhiro; Masaki, Naoki; Kanda, Keisuke; Suzuki, Tomoyuki; Kawatsu, Satoshi; Yoshioka, Ichiro; Fujiwara, Hidenori; Kumagai, Kiichiro; Adachi, Osamu; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu

    2016-05-01

    Progressive narrowing at the entrance and exit of coronary artery aneurysm can develop at late phase of Kawasaki disease (KD). Evaluation and prediction of progressive coronary lesions remain a challenge in the treatment of post-KD coronary artery disease. We aimed to elucidate long-standing issues imposed on the patients who underwent coronary artry bypass grafting(CABG) for coronary artery lesions associated with KD. Between January, 2000 and December, 2013, CABG for coronary artery lesions associated with KD were performed in 6 patients (male/female:5/1, mean age 14.5±10.0). There was no operative mortality. Follow-up for the 6 patients has been performed with the average period of 5 years(1~9 years). Cardiac events occurred in 2 patients during follow-up. In 1patient, left internal thoracic artery( LITA) occluded due to flow competition between the native artery and LITA graft after LITA to LAD bypass grafting. The other patient required a re-do CABG using the free right internal thoracic artery to the circumflex branch because of occlusion at the coronary artery aneurysms after 4 years postoperatively. Meticulous preoperative diagnostic evaluations of coronary artery aneurysm may further improve the long-term outcome after surgical intervention for coronary lesions in conjunction with an aneurysm. PMID:27220919

  2. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Peripheral Arterial Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Peripheral Artery Disease? Many people ... flow, so the symptoms will go away. Other Signs and Symptoms Other signs and symptoms of P. ...

  3. [Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Bayraktaroğlu, Selen; Alper, Hüdaver

    2008-07-01

    Considerable advances have been achieved in cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology, and MRI has become an important noninvasive imaging tool in the management of coronary artery disease. Cardiac MRI can provide information about myocardial perfusion, viability and contractile reserve. The information obtained not only provides diagnostic information but also has an important prognostic value. This article reviews the recent advances in cardiac MRI for evaluation of coronary artery disease. PMID:18611838

  4. Genetically Determined Height and Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, C.P.; Hamby, S.E.; Saleheen, D.; Hopewell, J.C.; Zeng, L.; Assimes, T.L.; Kanoni, S.; Willenborg, C.; Burgess, S.; Amouyel, P.; Anand, S.; Blankenberg, S.; Boehm, B.O.; Clarke, R.J.; Collins, R.; Dedoussis, G.; Farrall, M.; Franks, P.W.; Groop, L.; Hall, A.S.; Hamsten, A.; Hengstenberg, C.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Ingelsson, E.; Kathiresan, S.; Kee, F.; König, I.R.; Kooner, J.; Lehtimäki, T.; März, W.; McPherson, R.; Metspalu, A.; Nieminen, M.S.; O’Donnell, C.J.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Peters, A.; Perola, M.; Reilly, M.P.; Ripatti, S.; Roberts, R.; Salomaa, V.; Shah, S.H.; Schreiber, S.; Siegbahn, A.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Veronesi, G.; Wareham, N.; Willer, C.J.; Zalloua, P.A.; Erdmann, J.; Deloukas, P.; Watkins, H.; Schunkert, H.; Danesh, J.; Thompson, J.R.; Samani, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The nature and underlying mechanisms of an inverse association between adult height and the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) are unclear. METHODS We used a genetic approach to investigate the association between height and CAD, using 180 height-associated genetic variants. We tested the association between a change in genetically determined height of 1 SD (6.5 cm) with the risk of CAD in 65,066 cases and 128,383 controls. Using individual-level genotype data from 18,249 persons, we also examined the risk of CAD associated with the presence of various numbers of height-associated alleles. To identify putative mechanisms, we analyzed whether genetically determined height was associated with known cardiovascular risk factors and performed a pathway analysis of the height-associated genes. RESULTS We observed a relative increase of 13.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4 to 22.1; P<0.001) in the risk of CAD per 1-SD decrease in genetically determined height. There was a graded relationship between the presence of an increased number of height-raising variants and a reduced risk of CAD (odds ratio for height quartile 4 versus quartile 1, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.84; P<0.001). Of the 12 risk factors that we studied, we observed significant associations only with levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides (accounting for approximately 30% of the association). We identified several overlapping pathways involving genes associated with both development and atherosclerosis. CONCLUSIONS There is a primary association between a genetically determined shorter height and an increased risk of CAD, a link that is partly explained by the association between shorter height and an adverse lipid profile. Shared biologic processes that determine achieved height and the development of atherosclerosis may explain some of the association. PMID:25853659

  5. How Is Carotid Artery Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Carotid Endarterectomy Carotid Ultrasound Stents Stroke Send a link to NHLBI to someone ... outward against the wall of the artery. A stent (a small mesh tube) is then put in ...

  6. How Is Peripheral Arterial Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood flow to the affected limb. Angioplasty and Stent Placement Your doctor may recommend angioplasty to restore ... widens the artery and restores blood flow. A stent (a small mesh tube) may be placed in ...

  7. [Why screen for lung cancer in patients with arterial disease?].

    PubMed

    Lederlin, M; Trédaniel, J; Priollet, P

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death in France. Such a prognosis is explained by late diagnosis at a metastatic stage for half of the patients. Tobacco is the main risk factor for lung cancer, as it is for peripheral arterial disease. A review of literature shows that between 2.3% and 19% of patients with arterial disease also have lung cancer. When lung cancer is detected after treatment of arterial disease, it is at an advanced stage. But it can be diagnosed at an early stage when it is searched simultaneously with arterial disease treatment. There is no recommendation for lung cancer screening specifically for patients with arterial disease. However individual screening based on an annual low-dose chest scan is proposed for smokers meeting the criteria defined by the study of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). Such screening has two disadvantages : the high number of false positives and the irradiation induced by the accumulation of examinations. The ISET method would alternatively help to identify circulating tumor cells on a simple blood test for subjects not yet at solid tumor stage, provided this method be subject to multicentric validation. Thus one could consider that the management of a patient with arterial disease meeting NLST criteria should be accompanied with screening for lung cancer by searching for tumor cells associated with low-dose scanner. PMID:26276562

  8. Long Segmental Reconstruction of Diffusely Diseased Left Anterior Descending Coronary Artery Using Left Internal Thoracic Artery with Extensive Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Woon; Min, Ho-Ki; Kang, Do Kyun; Lee, Sung Kwang; Jun, Hee Jae; Hwang, Youn-Ho

    2015-01-01

    In coronary artery bypass grafting, a diffusely diseased left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) is an obstacle to achieving complete revascularization, consequently leading to the possibility of a poor prognosis. Long segmental reconstruction with or without endarterectomy is a revascularization method for treating diffusely diseased coronary arteries. Herein, we report a successful case of long segmental reconstruction of a diffusely diseased LAD using a left internal thoracic artery onlay patch after endarterectomy. PMID:26290842

  9. Management of pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, I; Suteu, Carmen; Blesneac, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases are the most common congenital malformations and account for about eight cases per 1000 births and are often associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Increased shear stress and the excess flow through the pulmonary vascular bed due to a systemic-to-pulmonary shunt lead to the development of pulmonary vascular disease and an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. Without surgical repair approximately 30% of patients develop pulmonary vascular disease. Eisenmenger syndrome represents the extreme end of pulmonary arterial hypertension with congenital heart disease. We summarized the current therapeutic options for pulmonary arterial hypertension; conventional treatments including calcium channel blockers, anticoagulation, digitalis, diuretics, and new treatment: prostacyclin, bosentan, sildenafil, ambrisentan. Preliminary data of new therapies are encouraging with disease significantly improved natural history, but there is need for more evidence-based data. PMID:18333354

  10. [Arterial hypertension in gravidity - a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Kováčová, M; Kiňová, S

    2012-12-01

    Gravidity is a dynamic process and complications may occur at any stage and anytime during a thus far physiological gravidity. Such gravidity puts the mother, the foetus and, later, the newborn at a greater risk. The incidence of arterial hypertension is between 7 and 15% and is one of the 4 main causes of maternal and perinatal mortality. Cardiovascular stress test, such as gravidity, might help to identify women at a greater risk of cardiovascular diseases or with a subclinical vascular disease. Women with a history of preeclampsia are more likely to develop chronic arterial hypertension in the future either alone or associated with a cardiovascular disease. Arterial hypertension during gravidity should be considered as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases during later stages of maternal life. Prevention of cardiovascular diseases should be a life-long aspiration. PMID:23427950

  11. Diseased Region Detection of Longitudinal Knee Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao; Shan, Liang; Charles, H. Cecil; Wirth, Wolfgang; Niethammer, Marc; Zhu, Hongtu

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important imaging technique for quantifying the spatial location and magnitude/direction of longitudinal cartilage morphology changes in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Although several analytical methods, such as subregion-based analysis, have been developed to refine and improve quantitative cartilage analyses, they can be suboptimal due to two major issues: the lack of spatial correspondence across subjects and time and the spatial heterogeneity of cartilage progression across subjects. The aim of this paper is to present a statistical method for longitudinal cartilage quantification in OA patients, while addressing these two issues. The 3D knee image data is preprocessed to establish spatial correspondence across subjects and/or time. Then, a Gaussian hidden Markov model (GHMM) is proposed to deal with the spatial heterogeneity of cartilage progression across both time and OA subjects. To estimate unknown parameters in GHMM, we employ a pseudo-likelihood function and optimize it by using an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm. The proposed model can effectively detect diseased regions in each OA subject and present a localized analysis of longitudinal cartilage thickness within each latent subpopulation. Our GHMM integrates the strengths of two standard statistical methods including the local subregion-based analysis and the ordered value approach. We use simulation studies and the Pfizer longitudinal knee MRI dataset to evaluate the finite sample performance of GHMM in the quantification of longitudinal cartilage morphology changes. Our results indicate that GHMM significantly outperforms several standard analytical methods. PMID:25823031

  12. The association of central retinal artery occlusion and extracranial carotid artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, D J; Schuler, J J; Buchbinder, D; Dillon, B C; Flanigan, D P

    1988-01-01

    To determine the incidence of associated carotid artery disease and the effect of carotid endarterectomy on subsequent neurologic sequelae, a retrospective study of 66 patients with central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) was undertaken. Ipsilateral extracranial carotid artery disease was present in 23 of 33 patients (70%) who had carotid arteriography. Sixteen patients had carotid endarterectomy following their CRAO (Group I) and 50 did not (Group II). Seven of the 40 patients available for follow-up in Group II had a subsequent stroke (mean follow-up: 54 months). Of the seven Group II patients shown to have associated carotid disease (Group IIs), three (43%) had a subsequent stroke during follow-up (mean: 28.3 months) compared to zero in Group I (p = 0.033; mean follow-up: 18.7 months). Because of the strong association between CRAO and ipsilateral carotid artery disease and because of the significantly higher incidence of subsequent ipsilateral stroke in CRAO patients with carotid disease who did not undergo endarterectomy, thorough evaluation of the carotid arteries followed by carotid endarterectomy, if indicated, is warranted in CRAO patients who have no other obvious etiology for the occlusion. PMID:3389947

  13. The Contribution of Arterial Calcification to Peripheral Arterial Disease in Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum

    PubMed Central

    Leftheriotis, Georges; Kauffenstein, Gilles; Hamel, Jean François; Abraham, Pierre; Le Saux, Olivier; Willoteaux, Serge; Henrion, Daniel; Martin, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims The contribution of arterial calcification (AC) in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and arterial wall compressibility is a matter of debate. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), an inherited metabolic disease due to ABCC6 gene mutations, combines elastic fiber fragmentation and calcification in various soft tissues including the arterial wall. Since AC is associated with PAD, a frequent complication of PXE, we sought to determine the role of AC in PAD and arterial wall compressibility in this group of patients. Methods and Results Arterial compressibility and patency were determined by ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) in a cohort of 71 PXE patients (mean age 48±SD 14 yrs, 45 women) and compared to 30 controls without PAD. Lower limb arterial calcification (LLAC) was determined by non-contrast enhanced helicoidal CT-scan. A calcification score (Ca-score) was computed for the femoral, popliteal and sub-popliteal artery segments of both legs. Forty patients with PXE had an ABI<0.90 and none had an ABI>1.40. LLAC increased with age, significantly more in PXE subjects than controls. A negative association was found between LLAC and ABI (r = −0.363, p = 0.002). The LLAC was independently associated with PXE and age, and ABI was not linked to cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusions The presence of AC was associated with PAD and PXE without affecting arterial compressibility. PAD in PXE patients is probably due to proximal obstructive lesions developing independently from cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:24800819

  14. Coronary Artery Disease Risk Factors, Coronary Artery Calcification and Coronary Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ulusoy, Fatih Rifat; Ipek, Emrah; Korkmaz, Ali Fuat; Gurler, Mehmet Yavuz; Gulbaran, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Atherosclerosis is an intimal disease which affects large and medium size arteries including aorta and carotid, coronary, cerebral and radial arteries. Calcium accumulated in the coronary arterial plaques have substantial contribution to the plaque volume. The aim of our study is to investigate the relationship between coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors and coronary arterial calcification, and to delineate the importance of CACS in coronary artery bypass surgery. Materials and Methods The current study is retrospective and 410 patients admitted to our clinic with atypical chest pain and without known CAD were included. These individuals were evaluated by 16 slice electron beam computed tomography with suspicion of CAD and their calcium scores were calculated. Detailed demographic and medical history were obtained from all of the patients. Results In our study, we employed five different analyses using different coronary arterial calcification score (CACS) thresold levels reported in previous studies. All of the analyses, performed according to the previously defined thresold levels, showed that risk factors had strong positive relationship with CACS as mentioned in previous studies. Conclusion Coronary arterial calcification is part of the athero-sclerotic process and although it can be detected in atherosclerotic vessel, it is absent in a normal vessel. It can be concluded that the clinical scores, even they are helpful, have some limitations in a significant part of the population for cardiovascular risk determination. It is important for an anastomosis region to be noncalcified in coronary bypass surgery. In a coronary artery, it will be helpness for showing of calcific field and anostomosis spot. PMID:26155507

  15. Longitudinal study of heart disease in a Jamaican rural population

    PubMed Central

    Miall, W. E.; Del Campo, E.; Fodor, J.; Rhode, J. R. Nava; Ruiz, L.; Standard, K. L.; Swan, A. V.

    1972-01-01

    A long-term epidemiological study of heart disease in a representative rural community in Jamaica was started in 1962-63 and the first follow-up survey was carried out in 1967-68. This report describes the prevalence of several cardiovascular characteristics at each survey, and their associations with other measurements. The nature of the electrocardiographic abnormalities and their relationship with symptoms of effort pain and prolonged chest pain suggests that much of the disease seen in this population is ultimately ischaemic in origin despite evidence that classical myocardial infarction and severe coronary atheroma are relatively infrequent. Nevertheless both the symptoms and the electrocardiographic abnormalities had features that were not completely typical of occlusive disease of extramural coronary arteries. These findings are discussed in terms of the four conditions—hypertension, conventional coronary heart disease, small artery disease, and cardiomyopathy—that are believed to account for most cases of heart disease in this community, and it is concluded that the overall pattern of disease cannot be explained by any single disorder of overriding importance. The evidence suggests that all may be important contributors. PMID:4538187

  16. Tetranectin as a Potential Biomarker for Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yanjia; Han, Hui; Yan, Xiaoxiang; Ding, Fenghua; Su, Xiuxiu; Wang, Haibo; Chen, Qiujing; Lu, Lin; Zhang, Ruiyan; Jin, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study tested the hypothesis that decreased serum levels of tetranectin (TN), a regulator of the fibrinolysis and proteolytic system, is associated with the presence and severity of CAD. We conducted a systematic serological and immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis to respectively compare the TN levels in serum and artery samples in CAD patients and healthy controls. Our results showed that serum levels of TN were significantly lower in patients with CAD than in healthy controls. Further analysis via trend tests revealed that serum TN levels correlated with the number of diseased arteries. Besides, the multivariate logistic regression model revealed TN as an independent factor associated with the presence of CAD. Additionally, IHC analysis showed that TN expression was significantly higher in atherosclerotic arteries as compared to healthy control tissues. In conclusion, our study suggests that increased serum TN level is associated with the presence and severity of diseased coronary arteries in patients with stable CAD. PMID:26621497

  17. Coronary Artery Disease Severity and Cardiovascular Biomarkers in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Hikita, Hiroyuki; Shigeta, Takatoshi; Kimura, Shigeki; Takahashi, Atsushi; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular mortality in peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients is higher in critical limb ischemia (CLI) than in intermittent claudication (IC). We sought to evaluate differential characteristics of coronary artery disease (CAD) severity and prognostic biomarkers for cardiovascular events between CLI and IC patients. Coronary angiography was performed on 242 PAD patients (age 73 ± 8 years) with either CLI or IC. High-sensitivity troponin T (hs-TnT), eicosapentaenoic acid-arachidonic acid ratio (EPA/AA), and lipoprotein(a), as biomarkers for prognostic factors, were measured from blood samples. The study patients were divided into a CLI-group (n = 42) and IC-group (n = 200). The Gensini score as an indicator of coronary angiographic severity was higher in the CLI-group than in the IC-group (39.1 ± 31.2 vs. 8.5 ± 8.3, p < 0.0001). Hs-TnT and lipoprotein(a) values were higher in the CLI-group than in the IC-group (0.152 ± 0.186 ng/mL vs. 0.046 ± 0.091, p < 0.0001, 45.9 ± 23.3 mg/dL vs. 26.2 ± 27.7, p = 0.0002, respectively) and EPA/AA was lower in the CLI-group than in the IC-group (0.22 ± 0.11 vs. 0.38 ± 0.29, p = 0.0049, respectively). Greater CAD severity, higher hs-TnT, and lipoprotein(a), and lower EPA/AA were observed in the CLI-group, which may explain higher cardiovascular events in patients with CLI. PMID:26648670

  18. Pulmonary artery aneurysms in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Sema; Cimen, Kadriye Akar

    2010-08-01

    Behçet's disease is the most common cause of pulmonary artery aneurysms. Pulmonary artery aneurysms are rare, but they are life-threatening because of their high tendency to rupture. However, there is also a chance that the aneurysms may completely resolve with immunosuppressive therapy. A 30-year-old man was admitted with chest pain, painful oral and genital ulcers, skin rash, weakness, and intermittent hemoptysis. He had a history of Behçet's disease for 6 years. The chest radiography showed a round opacity superior part of hilus on right. The helical thoracic computed tomography (CT) angiography demonstrated pulmonary aneurysms associated with Behçet's disease. The patient was successfully treated with colchicine, corticosteroids, and cyclophosphamide. A discussion about pulmonary artery aneurysms associated with Behçet's disease is provided in this case. PMID:19693504

  19. Inconsistent Correlation Between Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness and Peripheral Arterial Tonometry: Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    PubMed

    Lemos, Sara P; Passos, Valéria Maria A; Brant, Luisa C C; Bensenor, Isabela J M; Ribeiro, Antônio Luiz P; Barreto, Sandhi Maria

    2015-08-01

    To estimate the association between 2 markers for atherosclerosis, measurements of carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and of peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT), and to evaluate the role of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in this association.We applied the 2 diagnostic tests to 588 participants from the ELSA-Brazil longitudinal study cohort. The PAT measurements, obtained with the EndoPAT2000, were the reactive hyperemia index (RHI), the Framingham RHI (F-RHI), and the mean basal pulse amplitude (BPA). We used the mean of the mean scores of carotid IMT of the distal layers of the left and right common carotids obtained by ultrasonography after 3 cardiac cycles. We used linear regression and the Spearman correlation coefficient to test the relationship between the 2 markers, and multiple linear regressions to exam the relationship between the RHI/F-RHI scores and the mean BPA and IMT scores after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors.In the multivariate analysis, RHI (but not F-RHI) was positively correlated with the mean of the means of the IMT values after adjusting for sex and risk factors connected with both measures (β = 0.05, P = 0.02). Mean BPA did not remain significantly associated with IMT after adjusting for common risk factors.We found that the higher the IMT (or the worse the IMT), the higher the RHI (or the better the endothelial function). F-RHI was not associated with IMT. These 2 results are against the direction that one would expect and may imply that digital endothelial function (RHI and F-RHI) and IMT correspond to distinct and independent stages of the complex atherosclerosis process and represent different pathways in the disease's progression. Therefore, IMT and PAT measures may be considered complementary and not interchangeable. PMID:26287431

  20. Coronary Artery Disease - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... 繁體中文) French (français) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Portuguese (português) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) Tagalog ( ... 한국어 (Korean) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Portuguese (português) Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) Doença Arterial Coronariana (DAC) - ...

  1. [Advances in Genomics Studies for Coronary Artery Disease].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhu, Hui-juan; Zeng, Yong

    2015-08-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the major life-threatening diseases. In addition to traditional risk factors including age, sex, smoking, hypertension,and diabetes, genomic studies have shown that CAD has obvious genetic predisposition. In recent years, the rapid advances in genomics shed new light on early diagnosis, risk stratification and new treatment targets. PMID:26564468

  2. Hydroxychloroquine, a promising choice for coronary artery disease?

    PubMed

    Sun, Lizhe; Liu, Mengping; Li, Ruifeng; Zhao, Qiang; Liu, Junhui; Yang, Yanjie; Zhang, Lisha; Bai, Xiaofang; Wei, Yuanyuan; Ma, Qiangqiang; Zhou, Juan; Yuan, Zuyi; Wu, Yue

    2016-08-01

    Coronary artery disease is a common disease that seriously threaten the health of more than 150 million people per year. Atherosclerosis is considered to be the main cause of coronary artery disease which begins with damage or injury to the inner layer of a coronary artery, sometimes as early as childhood. The damage may be caused by various factors, including: smoking, high blood pressure, hypercholesterolemia, sedentary lifestyle, diabetes and insulin resistance. Once a coronary artery disease has developed, all patients need to be treated with long term standard treatment, including heart-healthy lifestyle changes, medicines, and medical procedures or surgery. Hydroxychloroquine, an original antimalarial drug, prevents inflammation caused by lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. It is relatively safe and well-tolerated during the treatment. Since atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis have resemble mechanism and increasing clinical researches confirm that hydroxychloroquine has an important role in both anti-rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular protection (such as anti-platelet, anti-thrombotic, lipid-regulating, anti-hypertension, hypoglycemia, and so on), we hypothesize that hydroxychloroquine might be a promising choice to coronary artery disease patients for its multiple benefits. PMID:27372847

  3. Endovascular Treatment of the Internal Iliac Artery in Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Huetink, K. Steijling, J.J.F.; Mali, W.P.T.M.

    2008-03-15

    In patients with peripheral arterial disease not much is known about the relationship between the localization of the pain and the localization of arterial occlusions in the iliac arteries. Occlusions high in the iliac arteries are assumed to be able to induce pain in the buttocks and upper leg as well as pain in the calves. Several case reports show that the symptoms of arteriosclerotic lesions in the internal iliac artery are often atypical and not easy to diagnose. In this report, 3 patients with internal iliac artery occlusions who were treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) are described. One patient had isolated pain in the buttock region. In the other 2 patients the initial pain was focused on the buttock region with extension to the calves during exercise. After PTA, 2 patients were free of symptoms, while in the other patient the symptoms improved but did not disappear. Future research should clarify the relation between certain arterial occlusions and the location of the pain.

  4. Subintimal Angioplasty for Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Met, Rosemarie Lienden, Krijn P. Van; Koelemay, Mark J. W.; Bipat, Shandra; Legemate, Dink A.; Reekers, Jim A.

    2008-07-15

    The objective of this study was to summarize outcomes of subintimal angioplasty (SA) for peripheral arterial occlusive disease. The Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase databases were searched to perform a systematic review of the literature from 1966 through May 2007 on outcomes of SA for peripheral arterial occlusive disease of the infrainguinal vessels. The keywords 'percutaneous intentional extraluminal revascularization,' 'subintimal angioplasty,' 'peripheral arterial disease,' 'femoral artery,' 'popliteal artery,' and 'tibial artery' were used. Assessment of study quality was done using a form based on a checklist of the Dutch Cochrane Centre. The recorded outcomes were technical and clinical success, primary (assisted) patency, limb salvage, complications, and survival, in relation to the clinical grade of disease (intermittent claudication or critical limb ischemia [CLI] or mixed) and location of lesion (femoropopliteal, crural, or mixed). Twenty-three cohort studies including a total of 1549 patients (range, 27 to 148) were included in this review. Methodological and reporting quality were moderate, e.g., there was selection bias and reporting was not done according to the reporting standards. These and significant clinical heterogeneity obstructed a meta-analysis. Reports about length of the lesion and TASC classification were too various to summarize or were not mentioned at all. The technical success rates varied between 80% and 90%, with lower rates for crural lesions compared with femoral lesions. Complication rates ranged between 8% and 17% and most complications were minor. After 1 year, clinical success was between 50% and 70%, primary patency was around 50% and limb salvage varied from 80% to 90%. In conclusion, taking into account the methodological shortcomings of the included studies, SA can play an important role in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease, especially in the case of critical limb ischemia. Despite the moderate patency

  5. Drug-Coated Balloons for Infrainguinal Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjum S; Lee, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Revascularization of infrainguinal peripheral artery disease has traditionally been accomplished via percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. However, long-term results have been hampered by high rates of restenosis. Along with the advent of stents, paclitaxel-coated balloons are an emerging therapeutic option for the invasive management of infrainguinal peripheral artery disease. Paclitaxel has been successful in inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia, the main mechanism for in-stent restenosis. Technological advances have facilitated the development of paclitaxel-coated balloons, which show promise in early trials for femoropopliteal stenosis relative to uncoated balloons. For infrapopliteal stenoses, the data remain scant and conflicted. Therefore, large-scale randomized clinical trials with long-term follow-up evaluating safety and effectiveness between various strategies need to be performed to determine the optimal invasive management strategy for infrainguinal peripheral artery disease. PMID:27342205

  6. Cardiac parasympathetic activity in severe uncomplicated coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, J.; Flapan, A. D.; Reid, J.; Neilson, J. M.; Bloomfield, P.; Ewing, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Previous studies have suggested that coronary artery disease is independently associated with reduced cardiac parasympathetic activity, and that this is important in its pathophysiology. These studies included many patients with complications that might be responsible for the reported autonomic abnormalities. OBJECTIVE--To measure cardiac parasympathetic activity in patients with uncomplicated coronary artery disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS--44 patients of mean (SD) age 56 (8) with severe uncomplicated coronary artery disease (symptoms uncontrolled on maximal medical treatment; > 70% coronary stenosis at angiography; normal ejection fraction; no evidence of previous infarction, diabetes, or hypertension). Heart rate variability was measured from 24 hour ambulatory electrocardiograms by counting the number of times successive RR intervals exceeded the preceding RR interval by > 50 ms, a previously validated sensitive and specific index of cardiac parasympathetic activity. RESULTS--Mean (range) of counts were: waking 112 (range 6-501)/h, sleeping 198 (0-812)/h, and total 3912 (151-14 454)/24 h. These mean results were unremarkable, and < 10% of patients fell below the lower 95% confidence interval for waking, sleeping, or total 24 hour counts in normal people. There was no relation between the severity of coronary artery disease or the use of concurrent antianginal drug treatment and cardiac parasympathetic activity. CONCLUSION--In contrast with previous reports no evidence of a specific independent association between coronary artery disease and reduced cardiac parasympathetic activity was found. The results of previous studies may reflect the inclusion of patients with complications and not the direct effect of coronary artery disease itself. PMID:7913823

  7. Transient Ischemic Attack in the Setting of Carotid Atheromatous Disease with a Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery Successfully Treated with Stenting: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meng; Moisi, Marc; Zwillman, Michael E; Volpi, John J; Diaz, Orlando; Klucznik, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Fetal brain perfusion is supplied by the primitive dorsal aorta anteriorly, longitudinal neural arteries posteriorly, and anastomotic transverse segmentals. Most notable of these connections are the primitive trigeminal, otic, hypoglossal, and proatlantal arteries. With cranial-cervical circulatory maturation and development of the posterior communicating segments and vertebro-basilar system, these primitive segmental anastomoses normally regress. Anomalous neurovascular development can result in persistence of these anastomoses. Due to its territory of perfusion, the persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) is associated with vertebral artery and posterior communicating artery hypoplasia or aplasia. As a consequence, primary blood supply to the hindbrain comes chiefly from this single artery. Although usually clinically silent, PPHA is susceptible to common cerebrovascular disorders including athero-ischemic disease and saccular aneurysmal dilation to name a few. We present a case of transient ischemic attack in a patient with a PPHA and proximal atherosclerotic disease treated by endovascular stenting. PMID:26929891

  8. Transient Ischemic Attack in the Setting of Carotid Atheromatous Disease with a Persistent Primitive Hypoglossal Artery Successfully Treated with Stenting: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Moisi, Marc; Zwillman, Michael E; Volpi, John J; Diaz, Orlando; Klucznik, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Fetal brain perfusion is supplied by the primitive dorsal aorta anteriorly, longitudinal neural arteries posteriorly, and anastomotic transverse segmentals. Most notable of these connections are the primitive trigeminal, otic, hypoglossal, and proatlantal arteries. With cranial-cervical circulatory maturation and development of the posterior communicating segments and vertebro-basilar system, these primitive segmental anastomoses normally regress. Anomalous neurovascular development can result in persistence of these anastomoses. Due to its territory of perfusion, the persistent primitive hypoglossal artery (PPHA) is associated with vertebral artery and posterior communicating artery hypoplasia or aplasia. As a consequence, primary blood supply to the hindbrain comes chiefly from this single artery. Although usually clinically silent, PPHA is susceptible to common cerebrovascular disorders including athero-ischemic disease and saccular aneurysmal dilation to name a few. We present a case of transient ischemic attack in a patient with a PPHA and proximal atherosclerotic disease treated by endovascular stenting.  PMID:26929891

  9. Dynamic diffuse optical tomography imaging of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Michael A.; Kim, Hyun K.; Kim, In-Kyong; Flexman, Molly; Dayal, Rajeev; Shrikhande, Gautam; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is the narrowing of arteries due to plaque accumulation in the vascular walls. This leads to insufficient blood supply to the extremities and can ultimately cause cell death. Currently available methods are ineffective in diagnosing PAD in patients with calcified arteries, such as those with diabetes. In this paper we investigate the potential of dynamic diffuse optical tomography (DDOT) as an alternative way to assess PAD in the lower extremities. DDOT is a non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging modality that uses near-infrared light to create spatio-temporal maps of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin in tissue. We present three case studies in which we used DDOT to visualize vascular perfusion of a healthy volunteer, a PAD patient and a diabetic PAD patient with calcified arteries. These preliminary results show significant differences in DDOT time-traces and images between all three cases, underscoring the potential of DDOT as a new diagnostic tool. PMID:23024920

  10. Advances in percutaneous therapy for upper extremity arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Capers, Quinn; Phillips, John

    2011-08-01

    Upper extremity arteries are affected by occlusive diseases from diverse causes, with atherosclerosis being the most common. Although the overriding principle in managing patients with upper extremity arterial occlusive disease should be cardiovascular risk reduction by noninvasive and pharmacologic means, when target organ ischemia produces symptoms or threatens the patient's well-being, revascularization is necessary. Given their minimally invasive nature and successful outcomes, percutaneous catheter-based therapies are preferred to surgical approaches. The fact that expertise in these techniques resides in not one but several disciplines (vascular surgery, radiology, cardiology, vascular medicine) makes this an area ripe for multidisciplinary collaboration to the benefit of patients. PMID:21803225

  11. Regional Myocardial Perfusion Rates in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Paul J.; Dell, Ralph B.; Dwyer, Edward M.

    1972-01-01

    Regional myocardial perfusion rates were estimated from the myocardial washout of 133Xenon in 24 patients with heart disease whose coronary arteriograms were abnormal and 17 similar subjects whose coronary arteriograms were judged to be normal. Disappearance rates of 133Xe from multiple areas of the heart were monitored externally with a multiple-crystal scintillation camera after the isotope had been injected into a coronary artery and local myocardial perfusion rates were calculated by the Kety formula. The mean myocardial perfusion rates in the left ventricle exceeded those in the right ventricle or atrial regions in subjects without demonstrable coronary artery disease. In this group there was a significant lack of homogeneity of local perfusion rates in left ventricular myocardium; the mean coefficient of variation of left ventricular local perfusion rates was 15.8%. In the patients with radiographically demonstrable coronary artery disease, a variety of myocardial perfusion patterns were observed. Local capillary blood flow rates were depressed throughout the myocardium of patients with diffuse coronary disease but were subnormal only in discrete myocardial regions of others with localized occlusive disease. Local myocardial perfusion rates were similar to those found in the group with normal coronary arteriograms in patients with slight degrees of coronary disease and in those areas of myocardium distal to marked coronary constrictions or occlusions which were well supplied by collateral vessels. In subjects with right coronary disease, the mean right ventricular perfusion rates were significantly subnormal; in seven subjects of this group perfusion of the inferior left ventricle by a dominant right coronary artery was absent or depressed. The average mean left ventricular perfusion rate of 12 subjects with significant disease of two or more branches of the left coronary artery was significantly lower than that of the group with normal left coronary

  12. Endovascular Treatment of Behcet Disease With Recurrent Infrainguinal Arterial Pseudoaneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ze-yang; Jin, Guan-nan; Ai, Xi; Li, Li-yan; Zheng, Ping; Guan, Yan; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Zhi-wei; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aneurysm or pseudoaneurysm formation is one of the vascular complications of Behcet disease. At present, the optimal treatment for the disease has not been established. The authors report a case of vasculo-Behcet disease (v-BD) with recurrent pseudoaneurysms in the left infrainguinal arteries (common femoral artery, superficial femoral artery, and popliteal artery), as well as thrombosis in the popliteal vein and posterior tibial vein. The patient underwent 3 rounds of surgery, but developed a new pseudoaneurysm several months after each surgery. Eventually, the patient was successfully treated with a combination of endovascular repair, using a fully covered stent graft, and prednisone. The pseudoaneurysm regressed without recurrence for more than 1 year. For v-BD, treatment with immunosuppressive therapy alone may not be sufficient to prevent the recurrence of pseudoaneurysms. For the endovascular treatment of pseudoaneurysms affecting the infrainguinal arteries in v-BD, a fully covered stent graft without oversizing is essential to prevent the recurrence of pseudoaneurysms. PMID:27175653

  13. Stenting for Peripheral Artery Disease of the Lower Extremities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary Background Objective In January 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat received an application from University Health Network to provide an evidentiary platform on stenting as a treatment management for peripheral artery disease. The purpose of this health technology assessment is to examine the effectiveness of primary stenting as a treatment management for peripheral artery disease of the lower extremities. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a progressive disease occurring as a result of plaque accumulation (atherosclerosis) in the arterial system that carries blood to the extremities (arms and legs) as well as vital organs. The vessels that are most affected by PAD are the arteries of the lower extremities, the aorta, the visceral arterial branches, the carotid arteries and the arteries of the upper limbs. In the lower extremities, PAD affects three major arterial segments i) aortic-iliac, ii) femoro-popliteal (FP) and iii) infra-popliteal (primarily tibial) arteries. The disease is commonly classified clinically as asymptomatic claudication, rest pain and critical ischemia. Although the prevalence of PAD in Canada is not known, it is estimated that 800,000 Canadians have PAD. The 2007 Trans Atlantic Intersociety Consensus (TASC) II Working Group for the Management of Peripheral Disease estimated that the prevalence of PAD in Europe and North America to be 27 million, of whom 88,000 are hospitalizations involving lower extremities. A higher prevalence of PAD among elderly individuals has been reported to range from 12% to 29%. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) estimated that the prevalence of PAD is 14.5% among individuals 70 years of age and over. Modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors associated with PAD include advanced age, male gender, family history, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia. PAD is a strong predictor of myocardial infarction (MI

  14. Peripheral arterial disease: implications beyond the peripheral circulation.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Whayne, Thomas F

    2013-11-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects a considerable percentage of the population. The manifestations of this disease are not always clinically overt. As a result, PAD remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. PAD is not just a disease of the peripheral arteries, but also an indication of generalized vascular atherosclerosis. PAD patients also have a high prevalence of other arterial diseases, such as coronary/carotid artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysms. PAD is also a predictor of increased risk of lung and other cancers. The most often used examination for the establishment of the diagnosis of PAD, the ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI), is also a predictor of generalized atherosclerosis, future cardiovascular events and cardiovascular mortality. Several markers that have been linked with PAD (e.g. C-reactive protein, serum bilirubin levels) may also have predictive value for other conditions besides PAD (e.g. kidney dysfunction). The management of PAD should therefore not be restricted to the peripheral circulation but should include measurements to manage and decrease the systemic atherosclerotic burden of the patient. PMID:23221278

  15. Evaluating coronary artery disease noninvasively--which test for whom?

    PubMed Central

    Chou, T M; Amidon, T M

    1994-01-01

    The generally accepted indications for stress testing in patients with coronary artery disease include confirming the diagnosis of angina, determining the limitation of activity caused by angina, assessing prognosis in patients with known coronary artery disease, assessing perioperative risk, and evaluating responses to therapy. In patients with a clinical scenario strongly suggestive of angina, testing is not necessary to diagnose coronary artery disease. The exercise treadmill-electrocardiogram test is the oldest and most extensively used stress test and can be reliably performed in patients who are clinically stable and who have an interpretable resting electrocardiogram. The addition of myocardial imaging agents such as thallium 201, technetium Tc 99m sestamibi, and technetium Tc 99m teboroxime increases the sensitivity and specificity for detecting coronary disease. Pharmacologic agents such as dipyridamole, adenosine, and dobutamine may be used in patients who cannot exercise adequately. Myocardial ischemia can also be evaluated by echocardiography, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging, especially when additional information such as left ventricular and valvular function is desired. We review the indications for the noninvasive evaluation of coronary artery disease and the rationale for selecting a diagnostic test. PMID:7941543

  16. [Intra-arterial administration of prostaglandin E1 in occlusive arterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Davidović, L; Vranes, M; Cernak, I; Kostić, D; Lovrić, A; Sagić, D; Lotina, S

    1992-01-01

    The authors present their result of a two-year follow-up of 106 patients to whom an intra-arterial perfusion of prostaglandin E1 was administered, as limb salvage procedure. The patients were in the IIIrd and IVth stage of occlusive diseases by Fountain, and surgical reconstructions were not possible. All patients were divided into five groups: A--diabetic angiopathy (5), B--distal form of atherosclerosis (40), C--diabetic angiopathy and atherosclerosis (45), D--Burger disease (10) and E--adjuvant therapy in reconstruction with poor run-off (6). The Doppler sonographic and angiographic measurements were performed. After transcutaneous (16 cases), or intraoperative (90 cases) introduction of the catheter into superficial of profunda femoral artery, a continuous intraarterial administration of prostaglandin E1 was carried out in a dose of 10 nanograms/kg body weight/minute (total dosage 3000 nanograms). The patients were controlled immediately after the treatment, as well as 1, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after the treatment. In efficiency of the treatment was estimated on the following basis: elimination of rest pain, healing of trophic ulceration and demarcation of gangrenous processes. Our late results of intra-arterial administration of prostaglandin E1 proved to be a very successful limb salvage procedure. The treatment was more successful in a connections between the upper knee arterial net and pedal arterial arches were preserved. PMID:1641706

  17. CD40 in coronary artery disease: a matter of macrophages?

    PubMed

    Jansen, Matthijs F; Hollander, Maurits R; van Royen, Niels; Horrevoets, Anton J; Lutgens, Esther

    2016-07-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD), also known as ischemic heart disease (IHD), is the leading cause of mortality in the western world, with developing countries showing a similar trend. With the increased understanding of the role of the immune system and inflammation in coronary artery disease, it was shown that macrophages play a major role in this disease. Costimulatory molecules are important regulators of inflammation, and especially, the CD40L-CD40 axis is of importance in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Although it was shown that CD40 can mediate macrophage function, its exact role in macrophage biology has not gained much attention in cardiovascular disease. Therefore, the goal of this review is to give an overview on the role of macrophage-specific CD40 in cardiovascular disease, with a focus on coronary artery disease. We will discuss the function of CD40 on the macrophage and its (proposed) role in the reduction of atherosclerosis, the reduction of neointima formation, and the stimulation of arteriogenesis. PMID:27146510

  18. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Paraoxonases and Chemokines in Arteries of Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Sepúlveda, Julio; Rodríguez-Gallego, Esther; Guirro, Maria; García-Heredia, Anabel; Cabré, Noemí; Luciano-Mateo, Fedra; Fort-Gallifa, Isabel; Martín-Paredero, Vicente; Joven, Jorge; Camps, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative damage to lipids and lipoproteins is implicated in the development of atherosclerotic vascular diseases, including peripheral artery disease (PAD). The paraoxonases (PON) are a group of antioxidant enzymes, termed PON1, PON2, and PON3 that protect lipoproteins and cells from peroxidation and, as such, may be involved in protection against the atherosclerosis process. PON1 inhibits the production of chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) in endothelial cells incubated with oxidized lipoproteins. PON1 and CCL2 are ubiquitously distributed in tissues, and this suggests a joint localization and combined systemic effect. The aim of the present study has been to analyze the quantitative immunohistochemical localization of PON1, PON3, CCL2 and CCL2 receptors in a series of patients with severe PAD. Portions of femoral and/or popliteal arteries from 66 patients with PAD were obtained during surgical procedures for infra-inguinal limb revascularization. We used eight normal arteries from donors as controls. PON1 and PON3, CCL2 and the chemokine-binding protein 2, and Duffy antigen/chemokine receptor, were increased in PAD patients. There were no significant changes in C–C chemokine receptor type 2. Our findings suggest that paraoxonases and chemokines play an important role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis in peripheral artery disease. PMID:25993297

  19. Early diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease can save limbs.

    PubMed

    Savill, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Prompt identification and management of patients with peripheral arterial disease can improve quality of life, save limbs and reduce cardiovascular events. The most common initial symptom is leg pain on exertion or intermittent claudication. More severe or critical limb ischaemia can present with pain at rest, ulceration, tissue loss and/or gangrene, In most patients the symptoms remain stable, but approximately 20% will develop limb threatening critical ischaemia. The incidence of peripheral arterial disease increases with age and up to 20% of people aged over 60 are affected to some degree. The incidence is also high in smokers, diabetes patients, and those with coronary disease. A focused history should identify the presence and severity of intermittent claudication and any critical limb ischaemia. Examination should concentrate on the palpation of lower limb arterial pulses and look for signs of critical ischaemia such as ulceration. The key primary care investigation in suspected peripheral arterial disease is measurement of the ankle brachial pressure index. Lifestyle interventions are a key component of management. NICE recommends that a supervised exercise programme is offered to all patients with intermittent claudication. Pharmacological therapy should always include an antiplatelet agent and statin. Vasoactive drugs such as naftidrofuryl oxalate should be considered for symptom control in intermittent claudication when exercise has not led to a satisfactory improvement and the patient prefers not to be referred for revascularisation. Patients with severe and inadequately controlled symptoms should be referred to secondary care with a view to further imaging to assess the appropriateness of revascularisation. PMID:23214272

  20. Childhood Antecedents to Adult Coronary Artery Diseases. Special Reference Briefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winick, Myron

    This reference brief deals with the childhood antecedents to atherosclerosis and hypertension. While diet is related to the development of coronary artery diseases, there is some disagreement about what dietary changes are necessary or desirable in children to prevent their development, and at what age such changes should be made. Fifty-five…

  1. Genetic contribution of the leukotriene pathway to coronary artery disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the genetic contribution of the leukotriene (LT) pathway to risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in 4,512 Caucasian and African American subjects ascertained through elective cardiac evaluation. Of the three previously associated variants, the shorter "3" and "4" alleles of a promoter ...

  2. Learning Style Preferences of Elderly Coronary Artery Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theis, Saundra L.; Merritt, Sharon L.

    1992-01-01

    The Patient Learning Styles Questionnaire derived from Canfield and administered to 134 elderly coronary artery disease patients revealed the following order of learning preferences: structure, iconics, listening, direct experience, reading, achievement, affiliation, and eminence. Level of education significantly influenced preferred learning…

  3. Factors Influencing Smoking Cessation in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, Kryss; Higgins, Helen

    1997-01-01

    Ten sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics considered predictors of difficulty with smoking cessation in patients with coronary artery disease are reviewed. The compounding effects of nicotine addiction are discussed. Consideration of these factors may result in individualized programs for smoking cessation. A brief overview…

  4. [The best of coronary artery disease in 1999].

    PubMed

    Gayet, J L

    2000-01-01

    Despite the (modest) regression observed in the MONICA study, coronary artery disease remains the leading cause of mortality in industrialised countries and it is worryingly progressive in emerging countries. Therapeutic progress has been considerable but only a small number of coronary patients benefit from it. The techniques are costly and justify efforts to improve selection of high risk patients. The results of the VA-HIT study, which demonstrated the importance of HDL cholesterol level in prevention, now raise the question of the optimal treatment of these patients and that of the association of fibrates and statins. The value of ACE inhibitors in the HOPE study in coronary artery disease was outstanding. In parallel, the efficacy of Mediterranean diet has been confirmed in secondary prevention as that of supplements of omega-3 fatty acids in the GISSI-Prevenzione study. When reference anti-anginal agents are ineffective in the most resistant forms of coronary artery disease, other classes of drugs have been shown to be effective in association. Finally, the theory of inflammation and infection of atherosclerosis has found new indirect arguments, whereas angiogenesis and vasculogenesis have been confirmed as the main leaders in the future treatment of coronary artery disease. PMID:10721448

  5. Mesenteric castleman disease mimicking superior mesenteric artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Soo; Park, Yang Jin; Kim, Young-Wook

    2015-02-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is known as a lymphoproliferative disorder, which is most commonly located in the mediastinum. CD occurring in the mesentery is very rare. We report a case of CD in the mesentery, which is mimicking a superior mesenteric artery aneurysm on computed tomography image. PMID:25463333

  6. Longitudinal Neuropsychiatric Predictors of Death in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Spalletta, Gianfranco; Long, Jeffrey D; Robinson, Robert G; Trequattrini, Alberto; Pizzoli, Sonia; Caltagirone, Carlo; Orfei, Maria D

    2015-01-01

    Characteristics associated with life expectancy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are still far from known. Here we aimed at examining the ability of baseline/longitudinal clinical variables to predict time to death. One-hundred fifty AD outpatients underwent diagnostic, neuropsychiatric, and functional assessment at baseline (when ApoE ɛ4 was also investigated) and at each subsequent annual visit. A random effects joint modeling approach was used to simultaneously model the baseline and longitudinal trajectory of each factor and predict the time to death, adjusting for demographic covariates. An ancillary analysis of ApoE ɛ4 status as a predictor was also conducted. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were constructed to elucidate the relationship between each factor and the estimated probability of death over time. Shorter survival was associated with male gender, higher education, older age, lower cognition, and worse functioning in daily life, but not ApoE ɛ4 status. Longitudinal trajectories increased predictive power over using just baseline levels highlighting apathy, and secondarily aberrant motor behaviors and sleep disorders, as a highly reliable predictor for mortality. Apathy was the strongest neuropsychiatric predictor of time to death, which supports its role in the pathogenesis of the disorder. An increased knowledge of factors modulating survival in AD is a strategic prerequisite to plan therapeutic interventions. PMID:26402103

  7. Peripheral arterial disease in general and diabetic population.

    PubMed

    Rabia, K; Khoo, E M

    2007-06-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is stenosis or occlusion of peripheral arterial vessels by atherosclerotic plaque. It may present as intermittent claudication, rest pain and impotence. PAD of the lower limbs is the third most important site of atherosclerotic disease after coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. Increasing age, family history, smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia and more decisively diabetes are significant risk factors. PAD is a clinical condition that has often been neglected, underdiagnosed, undertreated and has a serious outcome. It may lead to nonhealing wounds, gangrene and amputation of the lower limbs. Hence, early identification of patients at risk of PAD and timely referral to the vascular surgeon in severe cases is crucial. PMID:18705464

  8. Haemodynamic and radionuclide effects of amlodipine in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Silke, B; Verma, S P; Zezulka, A V; Sharma, S; Reynolds, G; Jackson, N C; Guy, S; Taylor, S H

    1990-01-01

    1. The haemodynamic and radionuclide effects of a new long-acting slow-calcium channel blocking agent, amlodipine, were evaluated in 32 patients with coronary artery disease. 2. Haemodynamic measurements in 24 patients were made at rest and 10 to 15 min after 20 mg i.v. amlodipine. Amlodipine significantly reduced systemic arterial blood pressure and vascular resistance index with an increased heart rate and augmented cardiac index. Cardiac stroke volume index rose and stroke work fell without change in pulmonary artery occluded pressure (PAOP). 3. The exercise effects were determined by comparison of measurements during 4 min of supine bicycle exercise at a fixed workload before and after drug treatment. During dynamic exercise, amlodipine reduced systemic arterial pressure and vascular resistance index. Exercise cardiac index, stroke volume index and heart rate were higher. The left ventricular filling pressure was significantly reduced. 4. Radionuclide parameters were studied in 16 patients at rest and on exercise; ejection fraction was unaltered following amlodipine. 5. Pre-therapy haemodynamic values correlated with response following amlodipine for resting mean blood pressure, systemic vascular resistance and exercise PAOP. 6. Thus, the immediate impact of amlodipine in stable coronary artery disease was to reduce left ventricular afterload and thereby improve cardiac pumping performance. PMID:2139339

  9. Diagnosis & Treatment | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Diagnosis & Treatment Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Diagnosis Your healthcare provider diagnoses coronary artery disease (atherosclerosis) based on your medical and family ...

  10. Multimodality Imaging in Coronary Artery Disease: Focus on Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Han, Donghee; Danad, Ibrahim; Hartaigh, Bríain ó; Lin, Fay Y.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide, and various cardiovascular imaging modalities have been introduced for the purpose of diagnosing and determining the severity of CAD. More recently, advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have contributed to the widespread clinical application of cardiac CT for accurate and noninvasive evaluation of CAD. In this review, we focus on imaging assessment of CAD based upon CT, which includes coronary artery calcium screening, coronary CT angiography, myocardial CT perfusion, and fractional flow reserve CT. Further, we provide a discussion regarding the potential implications, benefits and limitations, as well as the possible future directions according to each modality. PMID:27081438

  11. Revascularization therapy for coronary artery disease. Coronary artery bypass grafting versus percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J M; Ferguson, J J

    1995-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass surgery relieves the symptoms of myocardial ischemia and prolongs survival of patients with more severe coronary artery disease. Randomized trials of surgical therapy have consistently shown that the benefits of surgical revascularization are proportional to the amount of myocardium affected by, or at risk for, ischemic injury. This risk is inferred from angiographically delineated coronary anatomy, estimates of left ventricular function, and physiologic testing. The population that may see a survival benefit from surgical revascularization has probably been expanded beyond that reported in the VA, CASS, and ECSS trials, due to improved perioperative care, longer graft survival, and the use of internal mammary artery grafts. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty revascularizes myocardium by dilating a stenotic segment of coronary artery. While successful in relieving the symptoms of myocardial ischemia, PTCA is hindered by the occurrence of abrupt vessel closure and the frequent development of restenosis. Furthermore, firm proof of a survival benefit, outside of emergency therapy for acute myocardial infarction, is not yet available. However, because the risk of procedure-related death or serious complication is lower than that seen with bypass surgery, PTCA provides a useful alternative revascularization method for patients with less extensive disease, in whom the risk of surgery may equal or exceed any beneficial effect. New technology and growing experience are widening the scope of percutaneous revascularization by extending the hope of symptomatic relief and survival benefit even to patients with extensive, severe coronary artery disease. Comparisons between surgical therapy and PTCA in select populations with single- and multivessel coronary artery disease have shown that PTCA is not as effective as surgery for long-term symptomatic control, and that it often requires repeat PTCA or cross-over to bypass surgery; however, long

  12. Premature coronary artery disease in systemic lupus erythematosus with extensive reocclusion following coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    D Agate, David J; Kokolis, Spyros; Belilos, Elise; Carsons, Steven; Andrieni, Julia; Argyros, Thomas; Glasser, Lynne A; Dangas, George

    2003-03-01

    A 21-year-old woman with a history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presented to the emergency room with a chief complaint of substernal chest pain and palpitations. She had undergone a four-vessel coronary artery bypass graft operation with separate saphenous vein grafts to the left anterior descending (LAD), obtuse marginal (OM) 1 and 2, and distal right coronary arteries (RCA) 8 months prior to admission. The patient underwent angiography of the coronary vessels, which showed severe diffuse disease with a long, 90% narrowing of the vein graft to the LAD and closed vein grafts to OM1 and OM2. The RCA graft showed mild diffuse disease. An intervention was done in which the LAD was stented twice with subsequent TIMI 3 flow. Advances in medical therapy and a better understanding of the disease have contributed to a dramatic improvement in the long-term survival of patients with SLE. However, despite the overall long-term improvement, coronary artery disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality with an incidence of approximately nine-fold greater than would be expected for this population. PMID:12612393

  13. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ivy, D D; Feinstein, J A; Humpl, T; Rosenzweig, E B

    2009-12-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, hemoglobinopathies, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension and HIV. Three classes of drugs have been extensively studied for the treatment of IPAH in adults: prostanoids (epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost, beraprost), endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxsentan, ambrisentan), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (Sildenafil, tadalafil). These medications have been used in treatment of children with pulmonary arterial hypertension, although randomized clinical trial data is lacking. As pulmonary vasodilator therapy in certain diseases may be associated with adverse outcomes, further study of these medications is needed before widespread use is encouraged. PMID:21852894

  14. Endovascular Intervention in the Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Couto, Marian; Figueróa, Alejandro; Sotolongo, Antonio; Pérez, Reynerio; Ojeda, José Martinez

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular therapy has emerged as an essential part of the management we can offer patients suffering from peripheral arterial disease. The AHA/ACCF guidelines deemed ballon angioplasty as a reasonable alternative for patients with limb threatening lower extremity ischemia who are not candidates for an autologus venous graft. Endovascular treatment is most useful for the treatment of critical limb ischemia and should ensure adequate proximal flow before engaging in interventions of distal disease.To increase procedure success rate, a thorough diagnostic evaluation is fundamental. This evaluation must take into account amount of calcium, no flow occlusion, length of occlusion, and presence of collaterals. There are different tools and procedure techniques available. Among these are the medicated ballon angioplasty and atherectomy by laser or high-speed drill, among others. Further studies may consolidate endovascular intervention as a safe and effective management for patients with lower extremity arterial disease and possibly cause a change in the actual practice guidelines. PMID:26742196

  15. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ivy, D. D.; Feinstein, J. A.; Humpl, T.; Rosenzweig, E. B.

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, hemoglobinopathies, hepatopulmonary syndrome, portopulmonary hypertension and HIV. Three classes of drugs have been extensively studied for the treatment of IPAH in adults: prostanoids (epoprostenol, treprostinil, iloprost, beraprost), endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxsentan, ambrisentan), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (Sildenafil, tadalafil). These medications have been used in treatment of children with pulmonary arterial hypertension, although randomized clinical trial data is lacking. As pulmonary vasodilator therapy in certain diseases may be associated with adverse outcomes, further study of these medications is needed before widespread use is encouraged. PMID:21852894

  16. Facial nerve palsy, Kawasaki disease, and coronary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Robert C

    2015-09-01

    Kawasaki disease is rarely complicated by cranial nerve VII palsy. This report describes a 15-month-old female presenting with 3 days of fever, irritability, and rash who was subsequently diagnosed with Kawasaki disease and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. She was found to have mild coronary artery ectasia and developed an acute, transient, left-sided facial palsy on the sixth day of illness. Repeat echocardiography demonstrated worsening aneurysm and intravenous methylprednisolone was added to her treatment regimen. At 1 and 3 months post-discharge, echocardiography demonstrated resolution of her coronary aneurysm. This case makes 41 total described in the literature. Patients tend to be under 12-months-old and there is a higher association with coronary artery aneurysm in such patients compared to those without facial palsy who never even received treatment. Kawasaki disease associated with facial palsy may indicate increased inflammatory burden and patients may require additional anti-inflammatory agents and more vigilant echocardiography. PMID:26101056

  17. Coronary Artery Disease in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Seropositive Population.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Michael G; Arora, Rohit R

    2016-01-01

    The development of efficient combined antiretroviral therapies has lengthened the mean life span of the population affected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transforming this terminal infection to a chronic yet manageable disease. Nonetheless, patients with HIV--treatment naive or not--exhibit larger risks for coronary artery disease than the noninfected population. Moreover, coronary atherosclerosis/arteriosclerosis may be the most prevalent condition in the HIV-infected population that is being accentuated by the effects of viral agents and the antiretroviral drugs, especially protease inhibitors. Nonetheless, generalized metabolic dysfunctions and premature senescence are often attributed to the viremia caused by the HIV infection directly and primarily. Therefore, a multifactorial approach is to be considered when attempting to explain the strong correlation between HIV and coronary artery disease, including co-opportunistic viremias and vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency. PMID:23797758

  18. Sudden cardiac death from the perspective of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Sara, Jaskanwal D; Eleid, Mackram F; Gulati, Rajiv; Holmes, David R

    2014-12-01

    Sudden cardiac death accounts for approximately 50% of all deaths attributed to cardiovascular disease in the United States. It is most commonly associated with coronary artery disease and can be its initial manifestation or may occur in the period after an acute myocardial infarction. Decreasing the rate of sudden cardiac death requires the identification and treatment of at-risk patients through evidence-based pharmacotherapy and interventional strategies aimed at primary and secondary prevention. For this review, we searched PubMed for potentially relevant articles published from January 1, 1970, through March 1, 2014, using the following key search terms: sudden cardiac death, ischemic heart disease, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and cardiac arrest. Searches were enhanced by scanning bibliographies of identified articles, and those deemed relevant were selected for full-text review. This review outlines various mechanisms for sudden cardiac death in the setting of coronary artery disease, describes risk factors for sudden cardiac death, explores the management of cardiac arrest, and outlines optimal practice for the monitoring and treatment of patients after an acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction to decrease the risk of sudden death. PMID:25440727

  19. Operative Treatment of Combined Aortic Stenosis and Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kadric, Nedzad; Kabil, Emir; Mujanovic, Emir; Hadziselimovic, Mehdin; Jahic, Mirza; Rajkovic, Stojan; Osmanovic, Enes; Avdic, Sevleta; Keranovic, Suad; Behrem, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aortic valve replacement is a standard operating procedure in patients with severe aortic stenosis. Structure of patients undergoing surgery ranges from young population with isolated mitral valvular disease to the elderly population, which is in addition to the underlying disease additionally burdened with comorbidity. One of the most commonly present factors that further complicate the surgery is coronary heart disease that occurs in, almost, one third of patients with aortic stenosis. The aim is to compare the results of surgery for aortic valve replacement with or without coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Patients and Methods: From August 2008 to January 2013 in our center operated on 120 patients for aortic stenosis. Of this number, 75 were men and 45 women. The average age was 63.37 years (16-78). Isolated aortic valve replacement was performed in 89 patients and in 31 patients underwent aortic valve replacement and coronary bypass surgery. Implanted 89 biological and 31 mechanical valves. Results: Patients with associated aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease were more expressed symptomatic symptoms preoperatively to patients with isolated aortic stenosis who were on average younger age. Intra-hospital morbidity and mortality was more pronounced in the group of patients with concomitant aortic valve replacement and coronary bypass surgery. Morbidity was recorded in 17 patients (14.3%) in both groups, while the mortality rate in both groups was 12 patients (10.1%). Conclusion: Evaluation of preoperative risk factors and comorbidity in patients with aortic stenosis and coronary artery disease contributes to a significant reduction in intraoperative and postoperative complications. Also, early diagnosis of associated coronary artery disease and aortic stenosis contributes to timely decision for surgery thus avoiding subsequent ischaemic changes and myocardial damage. PMID:25870480

  20. Characteristic patterns of the longitudinal and circumferential distribution of calcium deposits by parent coronary arteries observed from computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Ehara, Shoichi; Matsumoto, Kenji; Hasegawa, Takao; Otsuka, Kenichiro; Sakaguchi, Mikumo; Shimada, Kenei; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2016-04-01

    Many investigators have reported that the total amount of coronary calcium correlates with the overall magnitude of atherosclerotic plaque burden in the entire coronary tree and is a powerful predictor of future cardiovascular events. However, the development and spatial distribution of coronary calcifications remain unclear. We investigated the spatial distribution of calcifications throughout the coronary tree during coronary artery evaluation using coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA). A further aim was to assess the progression of existing calcifications and the development of new deposits in a follow-up study. The study population consisted of 287 patients for the cross-sectional study using CTA to evaluate the spatial distribution of calcifications by parent coronary arteries. Next, we analyzed a CTA dataset of 57 patients who had undergone two CTA examinations. In this group, the two CTA images were used for assessing the progression of existing calcifications and the development of new deposits. The coronary calcifications tended to be clustered within the proximal and middle portions. Moreover, in the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), small calcifications were located more toward the inner pericardial side. Finally, new calcium deposits developed within the proximal and middle portions of the LAD and left circumflex coronary artery, but those in the right coronary artery were likely to appear evenly from the proximal to the distal portion. This study shows the characteristic patterns of the longitudinal and circumferential distribution of calcifications by parent coronary arteries. PMID:25712608

  1. Connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yon K; Chung, Lorinda

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by vascular remodeling of pulmonary arterioles that leads to increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right heart failure, and death. It is associated with connective tissue diseases, including systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and mixed connective tissue disease. PAH is characterized by dyspnea on exertion and fatigue. Syncopal events suggest severe disease. Patients may present with signs of right heart failure. One- and 3-year survival rates are approximately 81% and 52%, respectively. Given the high prevalence and mortality, algorithms for screening are currently under investigation and will hopefully lead to earlier diagnosis and improved survival. PMID:25836644

  2. Development of advanced pulmonary vascular disease in D-transposition of the great arteries after the neonatal arterial switch operation.

    PubMed Central

    Rivenes, S M; Grifka, R G; Feltes, T F

    1998-01-01

    We report the case of a neonate with D-transposition of the great arteries who, after undergoing an uneventful arterial switch operation at the age of 4 days, was found at the age of 42 months to have developed advanced pulmonary vascular disease. Because the arterial switch operation was performed when our patient was only 4 days old, this case challenges the hypothesis that postnatal hemodynamics alone dictate the development of advanced pulmonary vascular disease in infants and children with transposition of the great arteries. Images PMID:9782561

  3. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed Central

    Petrkova, Jana; Szotkowska, Jaroslava; Hermanova, Zuzana; Lukl, Jan; Petrek, Martin

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chemokine-driven migration of inflammatory cells has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic conditions including peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is elevated in patients with coronary artery disease and in hypertensive patients. This study therefore investigated MCP-1 in patients with PAD. METHODS: Serum MCP-1 was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 36 healthy, control subjects and in 19 patients with PAD. Statistical analysis utilised the Mann-Whitney test and Spearman correlation (p < 0.05). RESULTS: MCP-1 (pg/ml) was increased in patients compared with in controls (mean+/-standard error of the mean: PAD group, 748+/-60; control group, 459+/-27; p=0.0001). MCP-1 levels tended to decrease with progressing disease. From atherosclerosis risk factors, diabetes inclined to increase MCP-1 levels; hypertension had no effect. Serum MCP-1 correlated with cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein but not high-density lipoprotein. Conclusion: Elevation of MCP-1 in the circulation of PAD patients shown in the present pilot study implicates this CC chemokine ligand 2 in inflammatory processes contributing to PAD clinical symptomatology. Further investigations are necessary to evaluate whether MCP-1 can be used as a potential marker of peripheral arterial disease follow-up and/or prognosis. PMID:15203564

  4. Conservative treatment of arterial pseudoaneurism in patients with behcet disease.

    PubMed

    Unal, O; Citgez, B; Cipe, G; Toydemir, T; Karatepe, O

    2013-02-01

    Behcet's Disease (BD) is a rare disease, of unknown origin that generally causes an inflammation in the subcutaneous tissue, eyes and brain vessels, and related with the immune system, predominantly seen in male patients and the mean age at onset is mainly in the third decade. The aim of the study was to present our experiences with the cases of arterial pseudoaneurysms that we treated conservatively without surgical or radiological intervention. Eleven patients with Behcet's disease who developed arterial pseudoaneuryms and responsed to the medical treatment are included in the study. The operation requirement, the complication rates, and factors that influence morbidity and mortality are evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 29,5 (18-35) years. Nine of the patients were male and 2 were female. The mean period of hospitalization was 18 (11-34) days. Six patients redeveloped aneurysm during their follow-up. Three of these patients were treated with surgery. Five patients had no complication during an average of 20 months of follow-up period. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is a rare complication of Behcet's disease. Despite the good response to conservative treatment at the beginning period, the patients should be closely followed up and redevelopment of the aneurysm should be kept in mind. PMID:23482359

  5. Maggot Debridement Therapy for Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Maggots are potent debriding agents capable of removing necrotic tissue and slough; however, it is still unclear which wounds are most likely to benefit from maggot debridement therapy (MDT). Thus, we performed this retrospective review to gain insight into the patient and therapy characteristics influencing outcome. Patients and Methods: We reviewed patients with foot ulcers caused by critical limb ischemia, encountered during the period between June 2005 and May 2010. The treatment outcomes were defined as effective or ineffective. Results: There were 16 patients with 16 leg ulcers. The patients were 13 men and 3 women, with an average age of 67.2 years (range, 47–85 years). Ten (63%) of the 16 ulcers were treated effectively. According to univariate analyses, an ankle brachial pressure index (ABI) lower than 0.6 (p = 0.03) had a negative impact on the outcome of MDT; however, outcome was not influenced by gender, obesity, ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hemodialysis, smoking, or laboratory findings. Conclusions: Some patient characteristics, such as gender, obesity, ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hemodialysis, and smoking, do not seem to contraindicate eligibility for MDT. However, a limb with an ABI lower than 0.6 is less likely to benefit. (*English Translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol 2011; 51: 209-213.) PMID:23825493

  6. Endothelial function and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kinlay, S; Libby, P; Ganz, P

    2001-08-01

    The endothelium produces a number of vasodilator and vasoconstrictor substances that not only regulate vasomotor tone, but also the recruitment and activity of inflammatory cells and the propensity towards thrombosis. Endothelial vasomotor function is a convenient way to assess these other functions, and is related to the long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. Lipids (particularly low density lipoprotein cholesterol) and oxidant stress play a major role in impairing these functions, by reducing the bioavailability of nitric oxide and activating pro-inflammatory signalling pathways such as nuclear factor kappa B. Biomechanical forces on the endothelium, including low shear stress from disturbed blood flow, also activate the endothelium increasing vasomotor dysfunction and promoting inflammation by upregulating pro-atherogenic genes. In contrast, normal laminar shear stress promotes the expression of genes that may protect against atherosclerosis. The sub-cellular structure of endothelial cells includes caveolae that play an integral part in regulating the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Low density lipoprotein cholesterol and oxidant stress impair caveolae structure and function and adversely affect endothelial function. Lipid-independent pathways of endothelial cell activation are increasingly recognized, and may provide new therapeutic targets. Endothelial vasoconstrictors, such as endothelin, antagonize endothelium-derived vasodilators and contribute to endothelial dysfunction. Some but not all studies have linked certain genetic polymorphisms of the nitric oxide synthase enzyme to vascular disease and impaired endothelial function. Such genetic heterogeneity may nonetheless offer new insights into the variability of endothelial function. PMID:11507322

  7. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tarbell, John M.; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow–induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial) cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid me chanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs. PMID:25360054

  8. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarbell, John M.; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow-induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid mechanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs.

  9. [Intermittent thrombolytic treatment. Results during severe, chronic arterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Fiessinger, J N; Aiach, M; Lagneau, P; Cormier, J M; Housset, E

    1975-04-20

    38 patients with severe chronic arteritis of the lower limbs were treated with streptokinase intermittently. All had been refused for surgical operation. One patient died, 4 others had early interruption of treatment. Eleven of the 38 patients had efficient thrombolysis confirmed by arteriography. The facts confirm the possibility of thrombolysis during chronic arterial disease. The fact that the aggravation was recent was favourable factor in prognosis. The eleven patients improved, had severe aggravation of symptomes for less than 2 months. Thus thrombolytic treatment has a place of choice in the treatment of severe arterial disease where surgery is impossible, or dangerous, owing to the uncertain state of the vascular bed below the lesion. Efficacious, it permits reconstructive surgery in cases where it had been at first refused. The use of intermittent treatment, apart from advantages of confort and cost, seems to increase the efficacy of treatment. PMID:176733

  10. [Sulodexide in conservative treatment of peripheral arterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, M R; Kosykh, I V; Yu, Tolstikhin V; Kuznetsova, V F; Magnitsky, I A

    2015-01-01

    Presented in the article is a review of the literature, analysing principles of conservative therapy of patients with obliterating diseases of lower limb arteries and most commonly used drugs to treat them, followed by discussing the mechanisms of action and efficacy of such pharmacological agents as pentoxyphyllin, cilostazol, naphthidrofuryl, aktovegin, sulodexide. Described in details are subtle mechanisms of action of sulodexide as an endothelioprotector, its clinical efficacy in intermittent claudication. PMID:26824094

  11. Deaths from Occlusive Arterial Disease in Renal Allograft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ibels, L. S.; Stewart, J. H.; Mahony, J. F.; Sheil, A. G. R.

    1974-01-01

    In a series of 325 recipients of cadaveric renal transplants sudden occlusive arterial disease was found to be responsible for 12% of deaths. Acute myocardial infarction (9%) occurred 25 times more than expected in the normal population and cerebral thrombosis (3%) 300 times more. The greatest loss was in the initial three-month period after transplantation. Patients with renal failure due to essential hypertension were especially at risk, accounting for six of the 12 deaths. PMID:4606408

  12. Coronary Artery Disease - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) Bosnian (Bosanski) Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional ( ... español) Tagalog (Tagalog) Ukrainian (Українська) Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) Arabic (العربية) Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) (Arabic) (CAD) تصلب ...

  13. Coronary heart disease index based on longitudinal electrocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    A coronary heart disease index was developed from longitudinal ECG (LCG) tracings to serve as a cardiac health measure in studies of working and, essentially, asymptomatic populations, such as pilots and executives. For a given subject, the index consisted of a composite score based on the presence of LCG aberrations and weighted values previously assigned to them. The index was validated by correlating it with the known presence or absence of CHD as determined by a complete physical examination, including treadmill, resting ECG, and risk factor information. The validating sample consisted of 111 subjects drawn by a stratified-random procedure from 5000 available case histories. The CHD index was found to be significantly more valid as a sole indicator of CHD than the LCG without the use of the index. The index consistently produced higher validity coefficients in identifying CHD than did treadmill testing, resting ECG, or risk factor analysis.

  14. Facial expression recognition in Alzheimer's disease: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Torres, Bianca; Santos, Raquel Luiza; Sousa, Maria Fernanda Barroso de; Simões Neto, José Pedro; Nogueira, Marcela Moreira Lima; Belfort, Tatiana T; Dias, Rachel; Dourado, Marcia Cristina Nascimento

    2015-05-01

    Facial recognition is one of the most important aspects of social cognition. In this study, we investigate the patterns of change and the factors involved in the ability to recognize emotion in mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Through a longitudinal design, we assessed 30 people with AD. We used an experimental task that includes matching expressions with picture stimuli, labelling emotions and emotionally recognizing a stimulus situation. We observed a significant difference in the situational recognition task (p ≤ 0.05) between baseline and the second evaluation. The linear regression showed that cognition is a predictor of emotion recognition impairment (p ≤ 0.05). The ability to perceive emotions from facial expressions was impaired, particularly when the emotions presented were relatively subtle. Cognition is recruited to comprehend emotional situations in cases of mild dementia. PMID:26017202

  15. Multi-detector row computed tomography angiography of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Dijkshoorn, Marcel L.; Pattynama, Peter M. T.; Myriam Hunink, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    With the introduction of multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT), scan speed and image quality has improved considerably. Since the longitudinal coverage is no longer a limitation, multi-detector row computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) is increasingly used to depict the peripheral arterial runoff. Hence, it is important to know the advantages and limitations of this new non-invasive alternative for the reference test, digital subtraction angiography. Optimization of the acquisition parameters and the contrast delivery is important to achieve a reliable enhancement of the entire arterial runoff in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) using fast CT scanners. The purpose of this review is to discuss the different scanning and injection protocols using 4-, 16-, and 64-detector row CT scanners, to propose effective methods to evaluate and to present large data sets, to discuss its clinical value and major limitations, and to review the literature on the validity, reliability, and cost-effectiveness of multi-detector row CT in the evaluation of PAD. PMID:17882427

  16. Connective tissue disease-related pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Vivek; Lau, Edmund M T

    2016-02-01

    Over the past two decades, there have been several advances in the assessment and management of connective tissue disease-related pulmonary arterial hypertension (CTD-PAH) that improved outcomes of the treatment of this lethal disease, and this will be the focus of this study. Systemic sclerosis is the leading cause of CTD-PAH, followed by systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue disease, idiopathic inflammatory myositis, rheumatoid arthritis, and Sjogren's syndrome. Clinical registries have been invaluable in informing about the burden of disease, risk and prognostic factors, and temporal trends with respect to treatment and outcome in CTD-PAH. The major advances have centered on improved disease classification and diagnostic criteria, screening and early diagnosis, the emergence of evidence-based therapies including combination goal-orientated treatment strategies, and the establishment of centers with expertise in PAH. PMID:27421214

  17. The role of coronary artery disease in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lala, Anuradha; Desai, Akshay S

    2014-04-01

    Enhanced survival following acute myocardial infarction and the declining prevalence of hypertension and valvular heart disease as contributors to incident heart failure (HF) have fueled the emergence of coronary artery disease (CAD) as the primary risk factor for HF development. Despite the acknowledged role of CAD in the development of HF, the role of coronary revascularization in reducing HF-associated morbidity and mortality remains controversial. The authors review key features of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of CAD in patients with HF as well as the emerging data from recent clinical trials that inform the modern approach to management. PMID:24656111

  18. Epidemiology, Traditional and Novel Risk Factors in Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Mack, Molly; Gopal, Ambarish

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) mortality has been declining in the United States and in regions where health care systems are relatively advanced. Still, CAD remains the number one cause of death in both men and women in the United States, and coronary events have increased in women. Many traditional risk factors for CAD are related to lifestyle, and preventative treatment can be tailored to modifying specific factors. Novel risk factors also may contribute to CAD. Finally, as the risk for CAD is largely understood to be inherited, further genetic testing should play a role in preventative treatment of the disease. PMID:26567971

  19. Endovascular Treatment of a Ruptured Innominate Artery Aneurysm in Behcet Disease.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Kazumasa; Ohkura, Kazuhiro; Shintani, Tsunehiro; Saito, Takaaki; Shiiya, Norihiko

    2016-05-01

    In Behcet disease (BD), vascular complication such as false aneurysm formation is common after surgical treatment in the arterial lesion, and the optimal treatment method remains controversial. Concerning the innominate artery aneurysm, lack of experience due to its rarity in vasculo BD makes decision making even more difficult. We report a ruptured innominate artery aneurysm in a 70-year-old man with BD, which was successfully treated by innominate artery stent grafting through the right common carotid artery, axillo-axillary artery bypass grafting, and right subclavian artery coil embolization. The patient is doing well without any vascular complications at eighth postoperative month. PMID:26907373

  20. Relationship of Inflammatory Biomarkers with Severity of Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Igari, Kimihiro; Kudo, Toshifumi; Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The pentraxin family, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum amyloid P (SAP), and pentraxin 3 (PTX3), has been identified as playing a key role in inflammatory reactions such as in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we examined the relationship between peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and serum levels of pentraxins. Methods. This study was undertaken via a retrospective review of PAD patients with surgical intervention for lesions of the common femoral artery. We evaluated the preoperative patient conditions, hemodynamic status, such as ankle brachial index (ABI), and clinical ischemic conditions according to Rutherford classification. Preoperatively, we collected blood samples for determining the serum levels of hs-CRP, SAP, and PTX3. Results. Twelve PAD patients with common femoral arterial lesions were treated and examined. The hemodynamic severity of PAD was not negatively correlated with hs-CRP, SAP, or PTX3. The clinical severity evaluated by Rutherford classification was significantly positively correlated with the serum level of PTX3 (p = 0.019). Conclusion. We demonstrated that PTX3 might be a better marker of PAD than hs-CRP and SAP. Furthermore, PTX3 might be a prognostic marker to evaluate the severity of PAD. PMID:27559483

  1. Non-Invasive Therapy of Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Marcial, José M; Pérez, Reynerio; Vargas, Pedro; Franqui-Rivera, Hilton

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Lifestyle changes, like the cessation of the use of tobacco as well as a modification of dietary and exercise habits, can be the most cost-effective interventions in patients with PAD. Smocking cessation is the most important intervention, since it increases survival in these patients. Antiplatelet therapy is an essential component in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the lower extremities. In addition to delaying arterial obstructive progression, these agents are most usefull in reducing adverse cardiovascular events such as non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), stroke and vascular death. Mainstay of treatment continues to be aspirin monotherapy (75-325mg daily). Current treatment for lower extremity PAD is directed towards the relief of symptoms and improvement in QoL. The two agents which have consistently been found to be most efficient in achieving these goals are cilostazol and naftidrofuryl oxalate. Naftidrofuryl oxalate may emerge as the most efficient and cost-effective treatment for symptom relief. PMID:26742197

  2. Relationship of Inflammatory Biomarkers with Severity of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The pentraxin family, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum amyloid P (SAP), and pentraxin 3 (PTX3), has been identified as playing a key role in inflammatory reactions such as in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we examined the relationship between peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and serum levels of pentraxins. Methods. This study was undertaken via a retrospective review of PAD patients with surgical intervention for lesions of the common femoral artery. We evaluated the preoperative patient conditions, hemodynamic status, such as ankle brachial index (ABI), and clinical ischemic conditions according to Rutherford classification. Preoperatively, we collected blood samples for determining the serum levels of hs-CRP, SAP, and PTX3. Results. Twelve PAD patients with common femoral arterial lesions were treated and examined. The hemodynamic severity of PAD was not negatively correlated with hs-CRP, SAP, or PTX3. The clinical severity evaluated by Rutherford classification was significantly positively correlated with the serum level of PTX3 (p = 0.019). Conclusion. We demonstrated that PTX3 might be a better marker of PAD than hs-CRP and SAP. Furthermore, PTX3 might be a prognostic marker to evaluate the severity of PAD. PMID:27559483

  3. Longitudinal change in regional brain volumes in prodromal Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, Elizabeth H.; Nopoulos, Peggy C.; Ross, Christopher A.; Langbehn, Douglas R.; Pierson, Ronald K.; Mills, James A.; Johnson, Hans J.; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Juhl, Andrew R.; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective As therapeutics are being developed to target the underlying neuropathology of Huntington disease (HD), interest is increasing in methodologies for conducting clinical trials in the prodromal phase. This study was designed to examine the potential utility of structural MRI measures as outcome measures for such trials. Methods Data are presented from 211 prodromal individuals and 60 controls, scanned both at baseline and two-year follow-up. Prodromal participants were divided into groups based on proximity to estimated onset of diagnosable clinical disease: Far (>15 years from estimated onset); Mid (9–15 years); and Near (<9 years). Volumetric measurements of caudate, putamen, total striatum, globus pallidus, thalamus, total gray and white matter, and CSF were performed. Results All prodromal groups showed a faster rate of atrophy than Controls in striatum, total brain, and cerebral white matter (especially in the frontal lobe). Neither prodromal participants nor Controls showed significant longitudinal change in cortex (either total cortical gray or within individual lobes). When normal age-related atrophy (i.e., change observed in the Control group) was taken into account, there was more statistically significant disease-related atrophy in white matter than in striatum. Conclusion Measures of volume change in striatum and white matter volume, particularly in the frontal lobe, may serve as excellent outcome measures for future clinical trials in prodromal HD. Clinical trials using white matter or striatal volume change as an outcome measure will be most efficient if the sample is restricted to individuals who are within 15 years of estimated onset of diagnosable disease. PMID:20884680

  4. [Diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease and heart disease].

    PubMed

    Clodi, Martin; Säly, Christoph; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Resl, Michael; Steinwender, Clemens; Eber, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and heart failure are interacting dynamically. Patients being diagnosed with cardiovascular disease should be screened for diabetes mellitus. Enhanced cardiovascular risk stratification based on biomarkers, symptoms and classical risk factors should be performed in patients with pre-existing diabetes mellitus. PMID:27052249

  5. Assessing candidate serum biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Zabel, Matthew; Schrag, Matthew; Mueller, Claudius; Zhou, Weidong; Crofton, Andrew; Petersen, Floyd; Dickson, April; Kirsch, Wolff M

    2012-01-01

    Because of the growing impact of late onset cognitive loss, considerable effort has been directed toward the development of improved diagnostic techniques for Alzheimer's disease (AD) that may pave the way for earlier (and more effective) therapeutic efforts. Serum-based biomarkers are the least expensive and invasive modality for screening and routine monitoring. We systematically reviewed the literature to assemble a list of serum biomarkers relevant to AD. In parallel, we conducted a proteomic LC-MS/MS analysis of serum collected from neurologically normal subjects and subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early AD (n = 6 in all). Complement C3 and alpha-2-macroglobulin were identified from both the literature review and our proteomic screen for further validation. For these two candidates, ELISA was performed on serum collected from a small independent cohort of subjects for longitudinal analysis. Serum was serially collected from neurologically normal subjects (n = 5) and subjects with MCI who were subsequently followed for a period of two years (n = 5) and regrouped into stable MCI and progressive MCI or AD (n = 6). The ability of each marker to predict which subjects with MCI would progress to dementia and which would remain cognitively stable was assessed. Patients with probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy were also identified (n = 3). This preliminary analysis tested the most-promising serum protein biomarkers for AD and we concluded that none are yet ready for use in the clinical diagnosis and management of dementia. However, a more thorough assessment in longitudinal studies with higher statistical power is warranted. PMID:22426016

  6. Longitudinal study of circulating protein biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Viennois, Emilie; Baker, Mark T.; Xiao, Bo; Wang, Lixin; Laroui, Hamed; Merlin, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic and progressive inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. In IBD, protein serological biomarkers could be relevant tools for assessing disease activity, performing early-stage diagnosis and managing the treatment. Using the interleukin-10 knockout (IL-10−/−) mouse, a model that develops a time-dependent IBD-like disorder that predominates in the colon; we performed longitudinal studies of circulating protein biomarkers in IBD. Circulating protein profiles in serum samples collected from 30-, 93-, and 135-day-old IL-10−/− mice were investigated using two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and MALDI TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 15 different proteins were identified and confirmed by ELISA and Western blot to be differentially accumulated in serum samples from mid- to late-stage IL-10−/− mice compared to early non-inflamed IL-10−/− mice. The use of another model of colitis and an extra-intestinal inflammation model validated this biomarker panel and demonstrated that comprised some global inflammatory markers, some intestinal inflammation-specific markers and some chronic intestinal inflammation markers. Statistical analyses using misclassification error rate charts validated the use of these identified proteins as powerful biomarkers of colitis. Unlike standard biomarker screening studies, our analyses identified a panel of proteins that allowed the definition of protein signatures that reflect colitis status. PMID:25230104

  7. Advances in nanotechnology for the management of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Rhee, June-Wha; Wu, Joseph C

    2013-02-01

    Nanotechnology holds tremendous potential to advance the current treatment of coronary artery disease. Nanotechnology may assist medical therapies by providing a safe and efficacious delivery platform for a variety of drugs aimed at modulating lipid disorders, decreasing inflammation and angiogenesis within atherosclerotic plaques, and preventing plaque thrombosis. Nanotechnology may improve coronary stent applications by promoting endothelial recovery on a stent surface utilizing bio-mimetic nanofibrous scaffolds, and also by preventing in-stent restenosis using nanoparticle-based delivery of drugs that are decoupled from stents. Additionally, nanotechnology may enhance tissue-engineered graft materials for application in coronary artery bypass grafting by facilitating cellular infiltration and remodeling of a graft matrix. PMID:23245913

  8. Transcatheter Arterial Infusion of Autologous CD133+ Cells for Diabetic Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Lian, Weishuai; Lou, Wensheng; Han, Shilong; Lu, Chenhui; Zuo, Keqiang; Su, Haobo; Xu, Jichong; Cao, Chuanwu; Tang, Tao; Jia, Zhongzhi; Jin, Tao; Uzan, Georges; Gu, Jianping; Li, Maoquan

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular lesion in diabetic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) still cannot be resolved by current surgical and interventional technique. Endothelial cells have the therapeutic potential to cure microvascular lesion. To evaluate the efficacy and immune-regulatory impact of intra-arterial infusion of autologous CD133+ cells, we recruited 53 patients with diabetic PAD (27 of CD133+ group and 26 of control group). CD133+ cells enriched from patients' PB-MNCs were reinfused intra-arterially. The ulcer healing followed up till 18 months was 100% (3/3) in CD133+ group and 60% (3/5) in control group. The amputation rate was 0 (0/27) in CD133+ group and 11.54% (3/26) in control group. Compared with the control group, TcPO2 and ABI showed obvious improvement at 18 months and significant increasing VEGF and decreasing IL-6 level in the CD133+ group within 4 weeks. A reducing trend of proangiogenesis and anti-inflammatory regulation function at 4 weeks after the cells infusion was also found. These results indicated that autologous CD133+ cell treatment can effectively improve the perfusion of morbid limb and exert proangiogenesis and anti-inflammatory immune-regulatory impacts by paracrine on tissue microenvironment. The CD133+ progenitor cell therapy may be repeated at a fixed interval according to cell life span and immune-regulatory function. PMID:26981134

  9. Endothelial Dysfunction and Coronary Artery Disease: Assessment, Prognosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Lerman, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Progress in modification of conventional coronary risk factors and lifestyle behavior reduced atherosclerotic coronary artery disease incidence, nonetheless it continues to be the leading cause of mortality in the world. It might be attributed to the defective risk stratifying and prevention strategy for coronary artery disease. Atherosclerotic coronary artery disease risk is estimated based on identifying and quantifying only traditional risk factors in current clinical settings, it does not consider non-traditional risk factors. In addition, most of prevailing therapies for atherosclerosis are targeted for traditional risk factors rather than atherosclerosis itself. It is desirable to have a methodology which can directly assess the activity of atherogenesis at each moment. Endothelial function is an integrated index of all atherogenic and atheroprotective factors present in an individual including non-traditional and heretofore unknown factors, and is reported to have additional predictive value for future cardiovascular events to traditional risk factors. Moreover, endothelial function has a pivotal role in all phases of atherosclerosis, from initiation to atherothrombotic complication, and is reversible at every phase, indicating that endothelial function-guided therapies might be effective and feasible in cardiovascular practice. Thus, the introduction of endothelial function testing into clinical practice might enable us to innovate individualized cardiovascular medicine. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the contribution of endothelial dysfunction to atherogenesis and review methods that assess endothelial function. Finally we focus on the effects of major anti-atherosclerotic disease therapies on endothelial function, and argue the possibility of non-invasive assessment of endothelial function aiming at individualized cardiovascular medicine. PMID:25365643

  10. Cerebral Arterial Variations Associated with Moyamoya Disease Diagnosed by MR Angiography.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kurita, Hiroki; Ishihara, Shoichiro

    2014-12-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare progressive cerebrovascular steno-occlusive disease associated with different variations of the cerebral arteries. We evaluated the types and prevalence of such variations among patients with moyamoya disease. In our institution during the past seven years, we diagnosed 72 patients (24 male, 48 female; aged 6 to 75 years, mean, 42 years) with moyamoya disease by magnetic resonance (MR) angiography using either a 3-Tesla or one of two 1.5-T imagers and a standard time-of-flight technique without contrast media. An experienced neuroradiologist retrospectively reviewed the images. There were 15 cerebral arterial variations in 13 of 72 patients with moyamoya disease (18.1%), including four basilar artery fenestrations, three ophthalmic arteries arising from the middle meningeal artery, two intracranial vertebral artery fenestrations, two persistent first cervical intersegmental arteries, two persistent trigeminal arteries, one extracranial origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and one persistent stapedial artery. Although our number of patients was small, moyamoya disease was frequently associated with variations of the cerebral arteries, especially fenestrations in the vertebrobasilar system and persistent trigeminal artery. PMID:25489893

  11. Analysis of high risk factors and characteristics of coronary artery in premenopausal women with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhijuan; Cheng, Jianxin; Wang, Liping; Yan, Peng; Liu, Xiangyong; Zhao, Debao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the high risk factors and coronary lesion features in premenopausal women with coronary artery disease (CAD) and provide guideline for diagnosis and therapy. Methods: 114 premenopausal women and 134 postmenopausal women were conducted coronary angiography in our hospital from September, 2012 to September, 2014. According to the results of coronary angiography, premenopausal and postmenopausal women with coronary artery disease were divided into two groups respectively, including 48 premenopausal women with CAD group, 66 premenopausal women with normal coronary artery group, 76 postmenopausal women with CAD group and 58 postmenopausal women with normal coronary artery group. Clinical characteristics and coronary lesion features were analyzed. Results: Incidence rates of hypertension disease and diabetes were higher in premenopausal women with CAD group than control group. Most of premenopausal women suffered from single vessel lesion and the length of impaired vessel was less than 20 mm, meanwhile, postmenopausal women easily confronted from double vessels or mutivessle lesion and the length of impaired vessel was more than 20 mm. Left anterior descending coronary artery lesion was common for premenopausal women. Conclusion: Hypertension disease and diabetes were the main high risk factors for premenopausal women and high triglyceride was the optimal predictable factor, furthermore, single vessel lesion and short artery lesion were common in premenopausal women, which often happened in the anterior descending coronary artery. PMID:26629175

  12. [Coronary artery disease in women: True specificities to know in order to improve management and outcome].

    PubMed

    Madika, Anne-Laure; Mounier-Vehier, Claire

    2016-06-01

    Coronary artery disease is the leading death for women in Europe and developed countries. It kills seven times more than breast cancer. The number of deaths from coronary artery disease increase and affects also younger women (< 55 years old). Coronary artery disease in women is a major public health problem, often underestimated. Women should become a priority target of prevention. Traditional vision of coronary artery disease as myocardial ischemia due to obstruction of major coronary arteries do not represent all the aspects of ischemic disease in women. Myocardial ischemia without obstruction of major coronary arteries, described as microvascular dysfunction is often unknown and ignored. It is yet a situation at high cardiovascular risk. Presentation and symptoms of coronary artery disease are misleading in women. Coronary artery disease in women remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. It is necessary to improve management of women at cardiovascular risk, whose inequalities contribute to the excess of female mortality from coronary artery disease. Coronary artery disease in women needs new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. It must take into account specific risk stratification, evaluation of particular chest pain and reduced performance of non-invasive testing. PMID:27199207

  13. Overview of Classification Systems in Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Rulon L.; Jazaeri, Omid; Yi, J.; Smith, M.; Gupta, Rajan

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD), secondary to atherosclerotic disease, is currently the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. While PAD is common, it is estimated that the majority of patients with PAD are undiagnosed and undertreated. The challenge to the treatment of PAD is to accurately diagnose the symptoms and determine treatment for each patient. The varied presentations of peripheral vascular disease have led to numerous classification schemes throughout the literature. Consistent grading of patients leads to both objective criteria for treating patients and a baseline for clinical follow-up. Reproducible classification systems are also important in clinical trials and when comparing medical, surgical, and endovascular treatment paradigms. This article reviews the various classification systems for PAD and advantages to each system. PMID:25435665

  14. Coronary artery disease and diabetes - Management during Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Idris Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Ramadan is the Islamic holy month of fasting and practiced by all adult Muslims all over the world at the same time simultaneously. Although people who are ill or diabetics with coronary heart disease are exempted from fasting, they still desire to fast and this is a challenge to themselves and the treating physician. We performed a systematic review of the available Medline English literature on the subject from January 1982 to December 2014 so as to help guide physicians in managing these patients. The results revealed that although the metabolic parameters change during Ramadan fasting, but this does not lead to any significant increase in the incidence of acute coronary events. Most adults with stable coronary artery disease can fast without significant complications, but those with unstable disease or recent or pending revascularization procedures should generally refrain from fasting. Regular monitoring by the physician is mandatory along with adjustment of the dosages. PMID:26013792

  15. New Invasive Assessment Measures of Coronary Artery Disease Severity.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Neel; Subramanian, Kathir S; Khera, Sahil; Aronow, Wilbert S; Frishman, William H

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. The assessment and treatment of patients with ischemic heart disease have advanced greatly over the past decade. Particular attention has been given recently to the recognition of lesions that cause ischemia or that are prone to plaque rupture. New invasive measures of coronary artery disease have been developed, including fractional flow reserve, intravascular ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, and most recently, near-infrared spectroscopy. These technologies have helped to guide the assessment of hemodynamically significant lesions and have shown particular promise in guiding percutaneous coronary interventions. However, mortality and the rate of revascularization have shown mixed results to date. This review seeks to investigate the use and potential benefit of these technologies, with particular attention to clinical end points. PMID:26751263

  16. Medical management of patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Poredoš, P; Jezovnik, M; Kalodiki, E; Andreozzi, G; Antignani, P-L; Clement, D; Comerota, A; Fareed, J; Fletcher, J; Fras, Z; Griffin, M; Markel, A; Martini, R; Mignano, A; Nicolaides, A; Novo, G; Novo, S; Roztočil, K; Visona, A

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is one of the most frequent manifestations of atherosclerosis and is associated with atherosclerosis in the coronary and carotid arteries, leading to a highly increased incidence of cardiovascular events. Major risk factors of PAD are similar to those that lead to atherosclerosis in other vascular beds. However, there are differences in the power of individual risk factors in the different vascular territories. Cigarette smoking and diabetes mellitus represent the greatest risks of PAD. For prevention of the progression of PAD and accompanying cardiovascular events similar preventative measures are used as in coronary artery disease (CAD). However, recent data indicate that there are some differences in the efficacy of drugs used in the prevention of atherothrombotic events in PAD. Antiplatelet treatment is indicated in virtually all patients with PAD. In spite of the absence of hard evidence- based data on the long term efficacy of aspirin, it is still considered as a first line treatment and clopidogrel as an effective alternative. The new antiplatelet drugs ticagrelol and prasugrel also represent promising options for treatment of PAD. Statin therapy is indicated to achieve the target low density lipoprotein cholesterol level of ≤2.5 mmol/L (100 mg/dL) and there is emerging evidence that lower levels are more effective. Statins may also improve walking capacity. Antihypertensive treatment is indicated to achieve the goal blood pressure (<140/90 mmHg). All classes of antihypertensive drugs including beta-blockers are acceptable for treatment of hypertension in patients with PAD. Diabetic patients with PAD should reduce their glycosylated haemoglobin to ≤7%. As PAD patients represent the group with the highest risk of atherothrombotic events, these patients need the most intensive treatment and elimination of risk factors of atherosclerosis. These measures should be as comprehensive as those in patients with established

  17. Predictive Value of Endothelial Function by Non-invasive Peripheral Arterial Tonometry for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Li, Jing; Aoki, Tatsuo; Guddeti, Raviteja R.; Kwon, Taek-Geun; Cilluffo, Rebecca; Widmer, R. Jay.; Gulati, Rajiv; Lennon, Ryan J.; Lerman, Lilach O.; Lerman, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction is a key step in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular complications. We examined whether peripheral endothelial function, as assessed by fingertip reactive hyperemia-peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT) can provide additional clinical value to traditional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in predicting coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods We included 118 stable patients who were referred for coronary angiography for chest pain evaluation or abnormal stress test. A natural logarithmic value of RH-PAT index (Ln_RHI) was obtained before cardiac catheterization by an independent operator. Significant CAD was defined as luminal stenosis ≥70% (≥50% at left main) and/or fractional flow reserve ≤0.80 in one or more major coronary arteries or their major branches. Results Levels of Ln_RHI were significantly lower in patients with CAD (n=60) compared to patients without CAD (n=58) (0.69±0.29 vs. 0.88±0.27, p<0.001). Ln_RHI was significantly associated with CAD independent from traditional risk factors (odds ratio [OR] for 0.1 decrease in Ln_RHI 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04 to 1.52, p=0.01). The net reclassification index was improved when Ln_RHI was added to traditional risk factors (0.62, 95% CI: 0.27 to 0.97, p=0.001). Conclusions Peripheral endothelial function, as assessed by RH-PAT, improved risk stratification when added to traditional risk factors. RH-PAT is potentially useful for identifying patients at high risk for CAD. PMID:25503420

  18. Peripheral artery disease and CKD: a focus on peripheral artery disease as a critical component of CKD care.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Pranav S; Hart, Peter D; O'Hare, Ann; DeLoach, Stephanie; Herzog, Charles A; Hirsch, Alan T

    2012-10-01

    The incidence of peripheral artery disease (PAD) is higher in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) than in the general population. PAD is a strong independent risk factor for increased cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity, including limb amputation, in persons with CKD. Diagnosis of PAD in patients with CKD may be challenging in the absence of classic intermittent claudication or the presence of atypical leg symptoms. In addition, pedal artery incompressibility may decrease the accuracy of ankle-brachial index measurement, the most common PAD diagnostic tool. Alternative methods such as toe-brachial index should be used if clinical suspicion persists despite a normal ankle-brachial index value. Aggressive risk-factor modification, including treatment of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension and smoking cessation, should be mandatory in all patients. Treatment of all individuals with PAD should include antiplatelet medications and prescribed supervised exercise programs and/or cilostazol for individuals with claudication symptoms. Preventive foot care measures and a multidisciplinary approach involving podiatrists and vascular and wound care specialists should be used to reduce amputations. Revascularization for critical limb ischemia is associated with poor outcomes in patients with CKD with PAD. Future investigation is recommended to evaluate the benefit of earlier treatment strategies in this high cardiovascular disease risk population with CKD. PMID:22560831

  19. Aortic augmentation index in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Mariella; Scandale, Giovanni; Carzaniga, Gianni; Cinquini, Michela; Minola, Marzio; Antoniazzi, Valeria; Dimitrov, Gabriel; Carotta, Maria

    2014-11-01

    Aortic augmentation index (AIx) is used to investigate arterial stiffness. The authors tested the hypothesis that patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) demonstrate a higher AIx and also evaluated several related factors. In 97 patients with PAD, identified by ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI ≤ 0.9), and 97 controls (ABPI ≥ 0.91< 1.4), AIx (%) was determined using tonometry of the radial artery. There was no significant difference between patients and controls in characteristics of age, sex, height, diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, and heart rate. AIx was higher in patients with PAD (32 ± 9 vs 28 ± 9; P = .001). In multivariate regression analysis, AIx was independently associated with heart rate (β = -0.40, P = .0005). This study showed that AIx increased in patients with PAD and that heart rate is a determinant of AIx. Further studies are necessary to assess the pathophysiological and clinical importance of AIx in patients with PAD. PMID:25228305

  20. Ear lobe crease: a marker of coronary artery disease?

    PubMed Central

    Agouridis, Aris P.; Elisaf, Moses S.; Nair, Devaki R.

    2015-01-01

    The ear lobe crease (ELC) has been defined as a deep wrinkle that extends backwards from the tragus to the auricle. It has been proposed that ELC is a predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD). In this review, we consider the possible association between ELC and CAD. Our aim is to systematically address all the relevant evidence in this field. There are many studies that support an association between ELC and CAD. However, other studies did not find such an association. A recent meta-analysis supports the hypothesis that ELC could be a marker of CAD. However, several limitations raise doubts as to whether we should accept this link. PMID:26788075

  1. Correlation between plasma renalase level and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    He, Benhong; Hao, Jianjun; Sheng, Weiwei; Xiang, Yuancai; Zhang, Jiemei; Zhu, Hao; Tian, Jingcheng; Zhu, Xu; Feng, Yunxia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the correlation between the plasma renalase level of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and the degree of coronary artery stenosis. Methods: A total of 180 patients who received coronary angiography in our hospitals from August 2013 to October 2013 were selected as the CAD group, of which 164 were finally diagnosed as CAD. Another 140 healthy subjects were selected as the control group. The plasma renalase levels of the two groups were detected by ELISA to analyze CA-induced changes and to clarify the correlations with the number of branches with coronary artery stenosis and Syntax scores. Results: The plasma renalase level of the CAD group was significantly lower than that of the control group (P<0.05). The plasma renalase levels of the multi-branch and two-branch stenosis subgroups were significantly lower than that of the subgroup with normal coronary angiography outcomes (P<0.05), while the levels of the single-branch stenosis and normal subgroups were similar (P>0.05). Besides, the plasma renalase level of the low-risk subgroup was significantly higher than those of the medium-risk and high-risk subgroups (P<0.05), and the level of the medium-risk subgroup was significantly higher than that of the high-risk subgroup (P<0.05). Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed that renalase level was the risk factor of CAD (OR=1.12, 95%CI: 1.03-3.34). Conclusion: Plasma renalase level was correlated with CAD, the changes of which may reflect the degree of coronary artery stenosis. Therefore, plasma renalase level can be used to indicate the progression of CAD. PMID:25225499

  2. Intima-media thickness and arterial stiffness of carotid artery in Korean patients with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Moo-Yong; Chang, Hyun Kyu; Kim, Seong-Kyu

    2007-06-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a systemic vasculitis involving diverse sizes of arteries and veins. We performed this study to evaluate the vascular changes by assessment of the arterial stiffness and intima-media thickness (IMT) of carotid artery in Korean patients with BD. Forty-one patients with BD and age-, and sex-matched 53 healthy subjects were recruited in this study. Carotid arterial stiffness and IMT were assessed by using high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography. Arterial stiffness parameters such as carotid arterial distensibility coefficient, stiffness index, and incremental elastic modulus (E(inc)) were significantly increased in BD patients compared with those in healthy subjects, but not in IMT. Positive relationship was noted between age and IMT, whereas age of onset was significantly associated with arterial stiffness in BD. This finding suggests impaired endothelial function before visible structural changes of arterial wall in BD. Age and age of onset may be an independent risk factor for carotid IMT and arterial stiffness, respectively. Further studies in more large populations are required to confirm our results. PMID:17596642

  3. [Off-pump Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting with Concomitant Coronary Endarterectomy for the Diffusely Diseased Coronary Artery].

    PubMed

    Nishigawa, Kosaku; Takanashi, Shuichiro

    2016-07-01

    Recent progress in percutaneous coronary intervention has driven more patients with complex or diffuse coronary artery disease to be referred for surgical revascularization. Coronary endarterectomy (CE) is a treatment option for diffusely diseased coronary arteries. On the other hand, off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (off-pump CABG) has currently been the standard procedure for surgical revascularization in patients with coronary artery disease. We performed off-pump CABG with concomitant CE for the diffusely diseased left anterior descending artery( LAD) for 194 patients from September 2004 to August 2015. Mean age was 66.5±8.9 years and 168 were male. Mean preoperative ejection fraction was 54.9±12.4%. Mean length of arteriotomy in the LAD was 6.1±1.9 cm and endarterectomized LAD was reconstructed using the internal thoracic artery (ITA) with an onlay-patch fashion in all patients. On-pump conversion was required in 13( 6.7%) patients. 17( 8.8%) patients suffered from perioperative myocardial infarction. The 30-day mortality was 1.0 %.Patency rate of the reconstructed LAD at early postoperative angiography was 93.3%( 181/194). In summary, CE with onlay-patch grafting using the ITA for the diffusely diseased LAD with an off-pump technique can be performed safely with satisfactory outcomes. PMID:27440016

  4. Use of Anticoagulants and Antiplatelet Agents in Stable Outpatients with Coronary Artery Disease and Atrial Fibrillation. International CLARIFY Registry

    PubMed Central

    Fauchier, Laurent; Greenlaw, Nicola; Ferrari, Roberto; Ford, Ian; Fox, Kim M.; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tendera, Michal; Steg, Ph. Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Background Few data are available regarding the use of antithrombotic strategies in coronary artery disease patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in everyday practice. We sought to describe the prevalence of AF and its antithrombotic management in a contemporary population of patients with stable coronary artery disease. Methods and Findings CLARIFY is an international, prospective, longitudinal registry of outpatients with stable coronary artery disease, defined as prior (≥12 months) myocardial infarction, revascularization procedure, coronary stenosis >50%, or chest pain associated with evidence of myocardial ischemia. Overall, 33,428 patients were screened, of whom 32,954 had data available for analysis at baseline; of these 2,229 (6.7%) had a history of AF. Median (interquartile range) CHA2DS2-VASc score was 4 (3, 5). Oral anticoagulation alone was used in 25.7%, antiplatelet therapy alone in 52.8% (single 41.8%, dual 11.0%), and both in 21.5%. OAC use was independently associated with permanent AF (p<0.001), CHA2DS2-VASc score (p=0.006), pacemaker (p<0.001), stroke (p=0.04), absence of angina (p=0.004), decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (p<0.001), increased waist circumference (p=0.005), and longer history of coronary artery disease (p=0.008). History of percutaneous coronary intervention (p=0.004) and no/partial reimbursement for cardiovascular medication (p=0.01, p<0.001, respectively) were associated with reduced oral anticoagulant use. Conclusions In this contemporary cohort of patients with stable coronary artery disease and AF, most of whom are theoretical candidates for anticoagulation, oral anticoagulants were used in only 47.2%. Half of the patients received antiplatelet therapy alone and one-fifth received both antiplatelets and oral anticoagulants. Efforts are needed to improve adherence to guidelines in these patients. Trial Registration ISRCTN registry of clinical trials: ISRCTN43070564. PMID:25915904

  5. Arterial stiffness & Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies. PMID:27586642

  6. Relation of anthropometric variables to coronary artery disease risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Virendra C.; Parale, G. P.; Kulkarni, P. M.; Patil, Harsha V.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Anthropometric variables and their relation to conventional coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors in railway employees have been inadequately studied in India. This cross-sectional survey was carried out in the Solapur division of the Central railway in the year 2004, to assess the anthropometric variables in railway employees and their relation to conventional CAD risk factors. Materials and Methods: A total of 995 railway employees, with 872 males and 123 females participated in this cross-sectional study. All subjects underwent anthropometric measurements, fasting lipid profile, and blood sugar level. Various anthropometric indices were calculated for body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), waist-to-height ratio (WHtR), and abdominal volume index (AVI). Statistical analysis was done by EPI Info 6 statistical software. Results: Compared to all other obesity indices, WHtR was most prevalent in both genders. High WHtR was present in 699 (80.16%) males and 103 (83.73%) females. Age ≥45 years, high systolic BP, high diastolic BP, low HDL, high triglyceride, and diabetes mellitus were positively correlated with high BMI, high WC, high WHR, high WHtR, and high AVI. High BMI, high WC, high WHR, high WHtR, and high AVI were negatively associated with physical inactivity. Conclusions: Over all, anthropometric variables in both genders were significantly deranged in subjects with coronary risk factors. Compared to all other anthropometric variables, WHtR was statistically significantly associated with a majority of coronary artery risk factors. Hence we recommend inclusion of WHtR as a parameter of obesity to predict coronary artery disease risk factor along with WC, WHR, and BMI in epidemiologic studies. PMID:21584164

  7. Arterial stiffness &Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies. PMID:27586642

  8. Peripheral artery disease in korean patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: prevalence and association with coronary artery disease severity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Song, Pil Sang; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Song, Young Bin; Hahn, Joo-Yong; Choi, Jin-Ho; Gwon, Hyeon-Cheol; Lee, Sang Hoon; Hong, Kyung Pyo; Park, Jeong Euy; Kim, Duk-kyung; Choi, Seung-Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an important marker for the risk stratification of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We investigated the prevalence of PAD in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with CAD and the relationship between ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) and CAD severity. A total of 711 patients undergoing PCI for CAD from August 2009 to August 2011 were enrolled. PAD diagnosis was made using the ABPI. The prevalence of PAD was 12.8%. In PAD patients, mean values of right and left ABPI were 0.71 ± 0.15 and 0.73 ± 0.15. Patients with PAD had a higher prevalence of left main coronary disease (14.3% vs 5.8%, P = 0.003), more frequently had multivessel lesions (74.9% vs 52.1%, P < 0.001) and had higher SYNTAX score (18.2 ± 12.3 vs 13.1 ± 8.26, P = 0.002). Using multivariate analysis, we determined that left main CAD (OR, 2.954; 95% CI, 1.418-6.152, P = 0.004) and multivessel CAD (OR, 2.321; 95% CI, 1.363-3.953, P = 0.002) were both independently associated with PAD. We recommend that ABPI-based PAD screening should be implemented in all patients undergoing PCI with CAD, especially in severe cases. PMID:23341717

  9. Comparison of Cardiovascular Risk Factors for Peripheral Artery Disease and Coronary Artery Disease in the Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Shin Yi; Ju, Eun Young; Cho, Sung-Il; Lee, Seung Wook

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives The objective of this study was to analyze and compare risk factors for peripheral artery disease (PAD) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Subjects and Methods The sample included 7936 Korean patients aged ≥20 years who were hospitalized from 1994 to 2004. Of the 7936 subjects, PAD (n=415), CAD (n=3686), and normal controls (Control) (n=3835) were examined at the Health Promotion Center, Samsung Medical Center. Results The mean age (years) of PAD subjects was 64.4 (±9.3), while CAD subjects was 61.2 (±9.9), and Control subjects was 59.9 (±9.1) (p<0.01). The proportion of males was 90.6% for PAD, 71.4% for CAD, and 75.5% for Control subjects (p<0.01). The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease were significantly higher in subjects with PAD or CAD compared to those in Control. However, the ORs for high density lipoprotein, being overweight, and being obese were significantly lower in PAD subjects compared to those in Control. Conclusion We found that cardiovascular risk factors were in fact risk factors for both PAD and CAD. PMID:23755078

  10. Cross-Tissue Regulatory Gene Networks in Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Husain A; Foroughi Asl, Hassan; Jain, Rajeev K; Ermel, Raili; Ruusalepp, Arno; Franzén, Oscar; Kidd, Brian A; Readhead, Ben; Giannarelli, Chiara; Kovacic, Jason C; Ivert, Torbjörn; Dudley, Joel T; Civelek, Mete; Lusis, Aldons J; Schadt, Eric E; Skogsberg, Josefin; Michoel, Tom; Björkegren, Johan L M

    2016-03-23

    Inferring molecular networks can reveal how genetic perturbations interact with environmental factors to cause common complex diseases. We analyzed genetic and gene expression data from seven tissues relevant to coronary artery disease (CAD) and identified regulatory gene networks (RGNs) and their key drivers. By integrating data from genome-wide association studies, we identified 30 CAD-causal RGNs interconnected in vascular and metabolic tissues, and we validated them with corresponding data from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel. As proof of concept, by targeting the key drivers AIP, DRAP1, POLR2I, and PQBP1 in a cross-species-validated, arterial-wall RGN involving RNA-processing genes, we re-identified this RGN in THP-1 foam cells and independent data from CAD macrophages and carotid lesions. This characterization of the molecular landscape in CAD will help better define the regulation of CAD candidate genes identified by genome-wide association studies and is a first step toward achieving the goals of precision medicine. PMID:27135365

  11. Optimal treatment of multivessel complex coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    SUN, HAIHUI; CUI, LIANQUN

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate major cardiac events and the similarities and differences of medical costs among patients with multivessel complex coronary artery disease (MCCAD) during the three-year follow-up. The MCCAD patients had undergone single complete revascularization (CR), fractionated revascularization (FR) or partial revascularization (PR) and the present study aimed to screen the optimal treatment program. A total of 2,309 MCCAD patients who had been treated at a single center in the last decade, among which 1,020 cases underwent single CR, 856 cases successively underwent FR and 433 cases only underwent PR, were followed-up for three years. Major cardiac events, including all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, severe heart failure, rehospitalization and revascularization (coronary artery bypass grafting and coronary stent reimplantation), were set as the end points. In addition, the three-year medical costs associated with heart disease were analyzed. The three-year cardiac event rate in the CR group (17%) was significantly lower compared with the other two groups and the average three-year medical costs in the CR group (62,100 RMB) were significantly lower than those in the other two groups. Therefore, under permissive conditions, single CR is the optimal and most economical treatment strategy for patients with MCCAD. PMID:24926344

  12. Coronary artery disease and its association with Vitamin D deficiency.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Ramesh; Akhthar, Tauseef; Jain, Sachin Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has become the latest scourge of humankind and referred to in this article as CAD, is the end result of the accumulation of atheromatous plaques within the walls of coronary arteries that supply the myocardium, a process also known as atherosclerosis and manifests mostly in the form of chronic stable angina or acute coronary syndrome. Vitamin D has attracted considerable interest recently due to its role in a number of extraskeletal disease processes including multiple sclerosis, malignancies, diabetes mellitus, and CAD. It is also known as sunshine vitamin due to its production in the body following exposure to ultraviolet rays, and it is a unique vitamin as it acts like a hormone with its receptor present in a wide range of tissues including endothelium, which is the important mediator of atherosclerosis and subsequent CAD. A large number of studies conducted in the past have provided the basic scientific framework and this article attempts to explore the role of Vitamin D deficiency in the pathogenesis of CAD and stresses the need for further research to fill up gap in our knowledge. PMID:27499590

  13. Lack of MEF2A mutations in coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Li; Kavaslar, Nihan; Ustaszewska, Anna; Doelle, Heather; Schackwitz, Wendy; Hebert, Sybil; Cohen, Jonathan; McPherson, Ruth; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2004-12-01

    Mutations in MEF2A have been implicated in an autosomal dominant form of coronary artery disease (adCAD1). In this study we sought to determine whether severe mutations in MEF2A might also explain sporadic cases of coronary artery disease (CAD). To do this, we resequenced the coding sequence and splice sites of MEF2A in {approx}300 patients with premature CAD and failed to find causative mutations in the CAD cohort. However, we did identify the 21 base pair (bp) MEF2A coding sequence deletion originally implicated in adCAD1 in one of 300 elderly control subjects without CAD. Further screening of an additional {approx}1,500 non-CAD patients revealed two more subjects with the MEF2A 21 bp deletion. Genotyping of 19 family members of the three probands with the 21 bp deletion in MEF2A revealed that the mutation did not co-segregate with early CAD. These studies demonstrate that MEF2A mutations are not a common cause of CAD and cast serious doubt on the role of the MEF2A 21 bp deletion in adCAD1.

  14. Coronary artery disease and its association with Vitamin D deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Ramesh; Akhthar, Tauseef; Jain, Sachin Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has become the latest scourge of humankind and referred to in this article as CAD, is the end result of the accumulation of atheromatous plaques within the walls of coronary arteries that supply the myocardium, a process also known as atherosclerosis and manifests mostly in the form of chronic stable angina or acute coronary syndrome. Vitamin D has attracted considerable interest recently due to its role in a number of extraskeletal disease processes including multiple sclerosis, malignancies, diabetes mellitus, and CAD. It is also known as sunshine vitamin due to its production in the body following exposure to ultraviolet rays, and it is a unique vitamin as it acts like a hormone with its receptor present in a wide range of tissues including endothelium, which is the important mediator of atherosclerosis and subsequent CAD. A large number of studies conducted in the past have provided the basic scientific framework and this article attempts to explore the role of Vitamin D deficiency in the pathogenesis of CAD and stresses the need for further research to fill up gap in our knowledge.

  15. Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension in connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Grünig, Ekkehard

    2012-05-28

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a group of distinct disorders that includes idiopathic PAH (IPAH), familial PAH and PAH associated with other conditions (APAH) such as connective tissue disease (CTD-APAH) or congenital heart disease. PAH is characterized by increased pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. If left untreated, PAH can lead to right heart failure and premature death. CTD-APAH represents an important clinical subgroup of APAH that has a higher risk of death than IPAH. The European treatment guidelines advocate the use of PAH-targeted therapies including bosentan, ambrisentan, sildenafil, inhaled iloprost, intravenous epoprostenol (I-A recommendations), tadalafil or treprostinil (I-B recommendations) for patients in WHO functional class II-III. Not all randomized clinical studies of the approved PAH-targeted therapies have included patients with CTD-APAH. The purpose of this review is to describe the clinical characteristics of CTD-APAH and discuss the approved pharmacological treatments, with a focus on data specific to this subgroup where possible. PMID:22621693

  16. Pathophysiology of coronary artery disease: the case for multiparametric imaging.

    PubMed

    Gamble, James H P; Scott, Gemma; Ormerod, Julian O M; Frenneaux, Michael P

    2009-03-01

    Interventions to treat coronary artery disease are available but they must be targeted at the correct individuals (and indeed lesions), in order to gain maximal benefit with the minimal adverse effects. Coronary contrast angiography is not able to provide all the information required for the assessment of the effects of artery disease. Other imaging modalities are of growing importance as they can reduce radiation exposure and invasiveness of screening, as well as providing important extra information. The ideal 'multiparametric' imaging technique would assess anatomy, viability and lesion activity in a single quick scan. Currently, MRI is the technology closest to achieving this ideal, although the existing technology still has some limitations. This review discusses the currently available techniques for the imaging of coronary anatomy and of myocardial viability, and considers their benefits and limitations. We also discuss the developing field of imaging molecularly targeted to active coronary lesions. Finally we provide a 5-year view of the current and likely future optimal imaging strategies. PMID:19296768

  17. Nanotechnology in diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mahdi; Zare, Hossein; Bakhshian Nik, Amirala; Yazdani, Narges; Hamrang, Mohammad; Mohamed, Elmira; Sahandi Zangabad, Parham; Moosavi Basri, Seyed Masoud; Bakhtiari, Leila; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology could provide a new complementary approach to treat coronary artery disease (CAD) which is now one of the biggest killers in the Western world. The course of events, which leads to atherosclerosis and CAD, involves many biological factors and cellular disease processes which may be mitigated by therapeutic methods enhanced by nanotechnology. Nanoparticles can provide a variety of delivery systems for cargoes such as drugs and genes that can address many problems within the arteries. In order to improve the performance of current stents, nanotechnology provides different nanomaterial coatings, in addition to controlled-release nanocarriers, to prevent in-stent restenosis. Nanotechnology can increase the efficiency of drugs, improve local and systematic delivery to atherosclerotic plaques and reduce the inflammatory or angiogenic response after intravascular intervention. Nanocarriers have potential for delivery of imaging and diagnostic agents to precisely targeted destinations. This review paper will cover the current applications and future outlook of nanotechnology, as well as the main diagnostic methods, in the treatment of CAD. PMID:26906471

  18. [Advances in research on the genetics of peripheral arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Yin, Li; Han, Qi; Li, Xueyang; Liu, Zhenjie

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) shows increasing morbidity and mortality. Clinical manifestations of PAD, such as intermittent claudication, rest pain and nonhealing ulcer, contribute to impaired quality of life, and ischemic stroke caused by PAD can be life-threatening. Unfortunately, PAD patients often receive suboptimal treatment, and pathogenesis of the disease is still unclear. Over the past decade, the evolving technology and interdisciplinary collaboration have enabled improvement of diagnosis and treatment for PAD. This review makes a brief summary of the current status and progress in genetics research on PAD, which included candidate gene studies, linkage analyses, genome-wide association studies, and applications and development prospects of epigenetics, mitochondrial DNA and other new technologies. PMID:26663072

  19. [Vascular rehabilitation in patients with peripheral arterial disease].

    PubMed

    de Holanda, Ana; Aubourg, Marion; Dubus-Bausière, Valérie; Eveno, Dominique; Abraham, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    Lower limb peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a frequent debilitating disease associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate. The benefit of rehabilitation in PAD patients has been largely demonstrated, both for patients that undergo amputation, and for patients with claudication. In these latter patients, rehabilitation programs rely on a variety of additional techniques or tools, among which: stretching, specific muscle proprioception, walking and a variety of other physical activities, exercise or situations adapted to community life, lower limb and respiratory physiotherapy, patient's education, support for smoking cessation and healthy nutrition, social support, etc. Whether rehabilitation is performed in specialised integrated structures or performed on a home-based basis, various clinicians are involved. Despite evidence-based proof of efficacy, rehabilitation of PAD patients with claudication is still under-used. PMID:23669319

  20. Tissue Doppler Imaging in Coronary Artery Diseases and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Correale, Michele; Totaro, Antonio; Ieva, Riccardo; Ferraretti, Armando; Musaico, Francesco; Biase, Matteo Di

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have explored the prognostic role of TDI-derived parameters in major cardiac diseases, such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure (HF). In these conditions, myocardial mitral annular systolic (S’) and early diastolic (E’) velocities have been shown to predict mortality or cardiovascular events. In heart failure non invasive assessment of LV diastolic pressure by transmitral to mitral annular early diastolic velocity ratio (E/E’) is a strong prognosticator, especially when E/E’ is > or =15. Moreover, other parameters derived by TDI, as cardiac time intervals and Myocardial Performance Index, might play a role in the prognostic stratification in CAD and HF. Recently, a three-dimensional (3-D) TDI imaging modality, triplane TDI, has become available, and this allows calculation of 3-Dvolumes and LV ejection fraction. We present a brief update of TDI. PMID:22845815

  1. A walking intervention to reduce inflammation in patients with diabetes and peripheral arterial/artery disease: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Twumasi-Ankrah, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In this pilot study, we sought to determine whether walking reduces inflammation in patients with diabetes mellitus and peripheral arterial/artery disease. Methods: We obtained blood samples from patients with diabetes mellitus and peripheral arterial/artery disease. Intervention participants were advised to walk for 50 min 3 days per week for 6 months. Participants completed assessments of comorbidities and walking ability. Difference-in-difference analyses were used to assess the relationship between group assignment and each biomarker over time. Results: We randomized 55 participants (control = 25 and intervention = 30). At 6 months and based on p values of <0.20, vascular cellular adhesion molecule, beta-2 microglobulin, total cholesterol, and triglycerides demonstrated a greater decrease among participants randomized to the intervention compared to the control. Conclusions: Walking may reduce inflammation in persons with diabetes mellitus and peripheral arterial/artery disease. Further research is needed to determine the impact of walking on inflammation in persons with vascular disease. PMID:26770683

  2. Myeloperoxidase and coronary arterial disease: from research to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Roman, Raquel Melchior; Wendland, Andrea Elisabet; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne

    2008-07-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an enzyme derived of leukocytes that catalyze formation of numerous reactive oxidant species. Besides members of the innate host defense, evidences have been proving the contribution of these oxidants to tissue injury during inflammation. MPO participates in proatherogenic biological activities related to the evolution of cardiovascular disease, including initiation, propagation and acute complications of atherosclerotic process. Thereby, MPO and its inflammatory cascade represents an attractive target for prognostical investigation and therapeutics in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. In this review, we present the state of the art in the understanding of biological actions to clinical evidences of the relationship between MPO and coronary arterial disease. Several studies point to the independent effect of MPO levels in the evolution of disease and incidence of events in patients with acute coronary syndrome. However, the additional predictive value of MPO levels in the cardiovascular risk assessment, to incorporate it to the clinical practice as marker of plaque vulnerability, is still not consistent. Additional studies are necessary to confirm its role in the different forms of presentation of ischemic disease, besides the standardization of the assay, fundamental point for transition of this marker from research atmosphere to use in clinical routine: : from laboratory to clinical practice. PMID:18660935

  3. Enzymatic antioxidant system in vascular inflammation and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Lubrano, Valter; Balzan, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    In biological systems there is a balance between the production and neutralization of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This balance is maintained by the presence of natural antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase. The enhancement of lipid peroxidation or the decrease of antioxidant protection present in metabolic diseases or bad lifestyle can induce endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Clinical studies have shown that oxidative stress can increase ROS reducing the formation of antioxidant defences, especially in subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD). Some observation indicated that in the early stages of the disease there is a homeostatic up-regulation of the antioxidant enzyme system in response to increased free radicals to prevent vascular damage. As soon as free radicals get to chronically elevated levels, this compensation ceases. Therefore, SOD and the other enzymes may represent a good therapeutic target against ROS, but they are not useful markers for the diagnosis of CAD. In conclusion antioxidant enzymes are reduced in presence of metabolic disease and CAD. However the existence of genes that promote their enzymatic activity could contribute to create new drugs for the treatment of damage caused by metabolic diseases or lifestyle that increases the plasma ROS levels. PMID:26618108

  4. Association of arterial stiffness with coronary flow reserve in revascularized coronary artery disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Tritakis, Vlassis; Tzortzis, Stavros; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Dima, Kleanthi; Pavlidis, Georgios; Trivilou, Paraskevi; Paraskevaidis, Ioannis; Katsimaglis, Giorgos; Parissis, John; Lekakis, John

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association of arterial wave reflection with coronary flow reserve (CFR) in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients after successful revascularization. METHODS: We assessed 70 patients with angiographically documented CAD who had undergone recent successful revascularization. We measured (1) reactive hyperemia index (RHI) using fingertip peripheral arterial tonometry (RH-PAT Endo-PAT); (2) carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity (PWVc-Complior); (3) augmentation index (AIx), the diastolic area (DAI%) and diastolic reflection area (DRA) of the central aortic pulse wave (Arteriograph); (4) CFR using Doppler echocardiography; and (5) blood levels of lipoprotein-phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2). RESULTS: After adjustment for age, sex, blood pressure parameter, lipidemic, diabetic and smoking status, we found that coronary flow reserve was independently related to AIx (b = -0.38, r = 0.009), DAI (b = 0.36, P = 0.014), DRA (b = 0.39, P = 0.005) and RT (b = -0.29, P = 0.026). Additionally, patients with CFR < 2.5 had higher PWVc (11.6 ± 2.3 vs 10.2 ± 1.4 m/s, P = 0.019), SBPc (139.1 ± 17.8 vs 125.2 ± 19.1 mmHg, P = 0.026), AIx (38.2% ± 14.8% vs 29.4% ± 15.1%, P = 0.011) and lower RHI (1.26 ± 0.28 vs 1.50 ± 0.46, P = 0.012), DAI (44.3% ± 7.9% vs 53.9% ± 6.7%, P = 0.008), DRA (42.2 ± 9.6 vs 51.6 ± 11.4, P = 0.012) and LpPLA2 (268.1 ± 91.9 vs 199.5 ± 78.4 ng/mL, P = 0.002) compared with those with CFR ≥ 2.5. Elevated LpPLA2 was related with reduced CFR (r = -0.33, P = 0.001), RHI (r = -0.37, P < 0.001) and DRA (r = -0.35, P = 0.001) as well as increased PWVc (r = 0.34, P = 0.012) and AIx (r = 0.34, P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Abnormal arterial wave reflections are related with impaired coronary flow reserve despite successful revascularization in CAD patients. There is a common inflammatory link between impaired aortic wall properties, endothelial dysfunction and coronary flow impairment in CAD. PMID:26981218

  5. Antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2012-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death globally, and atherothrombosis is the underlying cause of most cardiovascular events. Several studies have shown that antiplatelet therapy, including aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), reduces the risk of cardiovascular events and death. However, it is well-known that many patients experience cardiovascular events despite treatment with aspirin, often termed "aspirin low-responsiveness". This fact has caused considerable debate: does biochemical aspirin low-responsiveness have prognostic value? Can low-responders be reliably identified? And if so, should antithrombotic treatment be changed? Is the whole discussion of antiplatelet drug response merely a result of low compliance? Compliance should be carefully optimised, before evaluating the pharmacological effect of a drug. It is well-known that cardiovascular disease is multifactorial, and, therefore, total risk reduction is not feasible. Aetiological factors to the variable platelet inhibition by aspirin seem to include genetic factors, pharmacological interactions, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and increased platelet turnover. It is a captivating thought that antiplatelet therapy may be improved by individually tailored therapy based on platelet function testing. Ongoing studies are challenging the current one-size-fits-all dosing strategy, but the preceding evaluation of platelet function assays has not been adequate. The overall objective of this thesis was to evaluate the reproducibility of and aggreement between a number of widely used platelet function tests and to explore the importance of platelet turnover for the antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with coronary artery disease. In the intervention studies (studies 1, 3, and 4), optimal compliance was confirmed by measurements of serum thromboxane, which is the most sensitive assay to confirm compliance with aspirin. In study 1, platelet function tests widely used to measure the antiplatelet effect

  6. Plasma homoarginine, arginine, asymmetric dimethylarginine and total homocysteine interrelationships in rheumatoid arthritis, coronary artery disease and peripheral artery occlusion disease.

    PubMed

    Kayacelebi, Arslan Arinc; Willers, Janina; Pham, Vu Vi; Hahn, Andreas; Schneider, Jessica Y; Rothmann, Sabine; Frölich, Jürgen C; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2015-09-01

    Elevated circulating concentrations of total L-homocysteine (thCys) and free asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) are long-established cardiovascular risk factors. Low circulating L-homoarginine (hArg) concentrations were recently found to be associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The biochemical pathways of these amino acids overlap and share the same cofactor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). In the present study, we investigated potential associations between hArg, L-arginine (Arg), ADMA and thCys in plasma of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), coronary artery disease (CAD) or peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD). In RA, we did not find any correlation between ADMA or hArg and thCys at baseline (n = 100) and after (n = 83) combined add-on supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin E, vitamin A, copper, and selenium, or placebo (soy oil). ADMA correlated with Arg at baseline (r = 0.446, P < 0.001) and after treatment (r = 0.246, P = 0.03). hArg did not correlate with ADMA, but correlated with Arg before (r = 0.240, P = 0.02) and after treatment (r = 0.233, P = 0.03). These results suggest that hArg, ADMA and Arg are biochemically familiar with each other, but unrelated to hCys in RA. In PAOD and CAD, ADMA and thCys did not correlate. PMID:25618752

  7. Localization of coronary artery disease with exercise electrocardiography: correlation with thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, R.F.; Freedman, B.; Bailey, I.K.; Uren, R.F.; Kelly, D.T.

    1981-11-01

    In 61 patients with single vessel coronary artery disease (70 percent or greater obstruction of luminal diameter in only one vessel) and no previous myocardial infarction, the sites of ischemic changes on 12 lead exercise electrocardiography and on thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scanning were related to the obstructed coronary artery. The site of exercise-induced S-T segment depression did not identify which coronary artery was obstructed. In the 37 patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease S-T depression was most often seen in the inferior leads and leads V4 to V6, and in the 18 patients with right coronary artery disease and in the 6 patients with left circumflex artery disease S-T depression was most often seen in leads V5 and V6. Although S-T segment elevation was uncommon in most leads, it occurred in lead V1 or a VL, or both, in 51 percent of the patients with left anterior descending coronary artery disease. A reversible anterior defect on exercise thallium scanning correlated with left anterior descending coronary artery disease (probability (p) less than 0.0001) and a reversible inferior thallium defect correlated with right coronary or left circumflex artery disease (p less than 0.0001). In patients with single vessel disease, the site of S-T segment depression does not identify the obstructed coronary artery; S-T segment elevation in lead V1 or aVL, or both, identifies left anterior descending coronary artery disease; and the site of reversible perfusion defect on thallium scanning identifies the site of myocardial ischemia and the obstructed coronary artery.

  8. Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease The Coronary Arterial Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Perloff, Joseph K

    2012-01-01

    Background: The coronary circulation in cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) includes the extramural coronary arteries, basal coronary blood flow, flow reserve, the coronary microcirculation, and coronary atherogenesis. Methods: Coronary arteriograms were analyzed in 59 adults with CCHD. Dilated extramural coronaries were examined histologically in six patients. Basal coronary blood flow was determined with N-13 positron emission tomography in 14 patients and in 10 controls. Hyperemic flow was induced by intravenous dipyridamole pharmacologic stress. Immunostaining against SM alpha-actin permitted microcirculatory morphometric analysis. Non-fasting total cholesterols were retrieved in 279 patients divided into four groups: Group A---143 cyanotic unoperated, Group B---47 rendered acyanotic by reparative surgery, Group C---41 acyanotic unoperated, Group D---48 acyanotic before and after operation. Results: Extramural coronary arteries were mildly or moderately dilated to ectatic in 49/59 angiograms. Histologic examination disclosed loss of medial smooth muscle, increased medial collagen, and duplication of internal elastic lamina. Basal coronary flow was appreciably increased. Hyperemic flow was comparable to controls. Remodeling of the microcirculation was based upon coronary arteriolar length, volume and surface densities. Coronary atherosclerosis was absent in both the arteriograms and the necropsy specimens. Conclusions: Extramural coronary arteries in CCHD dilate in response to endothelial vasodilator substances supplemented by mural attenuation caused by medial abnormalities. Basal coronary flow was appreciably increased, but hyperemic flow was normal. Remodeling of the microcirculation was responsible for preservation of flow reserve. The coronaries were atheroma-free because of the salutory effects of hypocholesterolemia, hypoxemia, upregulated nitric oxide, low platelet counts, and hyperbilirubinrmia. PMID:22845810

  9. Socioeconomic Inequality and Peripheral Artery Disease Prevalence in US Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Reena L.; Creager, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lower socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with cardiovascular disease. We sought to determine whether there is a higher prevalence of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in individuals with lower socioeconomic status. Methods and Results We analyzed data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2004. PAD was defined based on an ankle-brachial index (ABI) ≤ 0.90. Measures of SES included poverty-income ratio (PIR), a ratio of self-reported income relative to the poverty line, and attained education level. Of 6791 eligible participants, overall weighted prevalence of PAD was 5.8% (SE 0.3). PAD prevalence was significantly higher in individuals with low income and lower education. Individuals in the lowest of the 6 PIR categories had more than a 2-fold increased odds of PAD compared to those in the highest PIR category (OR 2.69, 95% CI 1.80–4.03, p<0.0001). This association remained significant even after multivariable adjustment (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.04–2.6, p=0.034). Lower attained education level also associated with higher PAD prevalence (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.96–4.0, p<0.0001) but was no longer significant after multivariable adjustment. Conclusions Low income and lower attained education level are associated with peripheral artery disease in US adults. These data suggest that individuals of lower socioeconomic status remain at high risk and highlight the need for education and advocacy efforts focused on these at-risk populations. PMID:24987053

  10. DNA and chromosomal damage in coronary artery disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Mohd Akbar; Mahajan, Naresh; Gandhi, Gursatej

    2013-01-01

    DNA and chromosomal damage in peripheral blood leukocytes of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) were investigated by using the single cell gel electrophoresis assay /comet and cytokinesis- block micronucleus (CBMN) assays, respectively. The case-control study comprised patients with CAD (n = 46; average age 53.0 ± 1.27 y) undergoing treatment at local hospitals, and healthy age-and sex-matched controls (n = 19; average age 54.21 ± 0.91 y) from the general population. The results of the comet assay revealed that the mean values of DNA damage were significantly (p < 0.001) higher in CAD patients than in controls (Tail DNA% 11.55 ± 0.38 vs. 5.31 ± 0.44; Tail moment 6.17 ± 0.31 vs. 2.93 ± 0.21 AU; Olive tail moment 3.52 ± 0.23 vs. 1.25 ± 0.11 AU). The mean values of chromosomal damage were also significantly higher (p < 0.001) in CAD patients than in controls (Binucleated cells with MN- 28.15 ± 1.18 vs. 18.16 ± 2.59; micronuclei 29.52 ± 1.21 vs. 18.68 ± 2.64, respectively) while nuclear division index (1.48 ± 0.01 vs. 1.63 ± 0.01) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in controls. The results of the present study indicate that coronary artery disease patients had increased levels of both, unrepaired (DNA) and repaired (chromosomal) genetic damage which may be a pathological consequence of the disease and/or the drug-treatment. This accumulation of DNA/chromosomal damage is of concern as it can lead to the development of cancer with increased chances of morbidity and mortality in the CAD patients. PMID:26535030

  11. Budd-chiari syndrome and renal arterial neurysms due to behcet disease: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Batur, Abdussamet; Dorum, Meltem; Yüksekkaya, Hasan Ali; Koc, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a multisystemic vasculitis of unknown etiology with a chronic relapsing course. Vasculitis in Behcet's disease with predominant vascular involvement is the only vasculitis that affects both arteries and veins of any size. Involvement of the renal artery and inferior vena cava is rare among the arteries and veins, respectively. When disease affect the veins, it is in the form of thrombosis. Arterial complications include aneurysms, stenosis and occlusions. Both rupture of arterial aneurysm and occlusion of suprahepatic veins, causing Budd-Chiari syndrome, are associated with a high mortality rate. Vascular involvement is more common in male patients than in female patients. Men and patients with a younger age of onset present with a more severe prognosis. In this case report, we describe a very rare cause of intrarenal arterial aneurysm's rupture with previous Budd-Chiari syndrome due to Behcet's disease and successful angiographic embolization of actively bleeding aneurysm. PMID:26491527

  12. Stress factors in the development of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Dorian, B; Taylor, C B

    1984-10-01

    The epidemiologic evidence that stress contributes to cardiovascular disease is reviewed. No one characterization of stress has been associated with all manifestations of cardiovascular disease, yet specific characterizations have been associated with particular manifestations of disease. Type A behavior pattern is a risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) and is correlated with the severity and progression of atherosclerosis demonstrated angiographically. Work overload with job dissatisfaction also predisposes to CAD. Socioeconomic disadvantage in a society of urbanization and industrialization increases the risk of hypertension and CAD, while chronic states of anxiety, depression, and helplessness are associated with angina and sudden death. Traumatic life events, especially involving loss of or threat to self-esteem, may precipitate sudden death in patients with preexisting CAD. There is evidence that the mechanism linking the experience of stress and the development of acute coronary events is exposure to sympathetic hyperarousal and a deficit in soothing. Research is needed to determine if work environments can be designed to minimize hyperarousal and provide protective outlets for individuals experiencing such arousal. PMID:6387069

  13. Prevalence of peripheral arterial disease and related risk factors in Turkish elders

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is known that prevalence of peripheral arterial disease being a widespread atherosclerotic vascular disease increases by age. On the other hand, no comprehensive study showing the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in Turkish elders is seen. In this study, it is aimed to assess prevalence of peripheral arterial disease and related risk factors in Turkish elders in primary health center. Methods 507 elderly staying at Narlidere Geriatric Care Center and Residential Home and accepting to participate in the study were included in the study. Epidemiological data for diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease, risk factors, findings of physical examination and ankle brachial index measurements were assessed in the study. Data were analyzed in terms of prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, age and gender relation and other cardiovascular risk factors. Results Of the participants, 317 (62.5%) were female. The mean age was 77.61 ± 6.93 years (62-102). The most wide-spread chronic diseases in elderly included hypertension, coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia and Type 2 DM, respectively. On the other hand, only 7 (1.4%) elderly were diagnosed with peripheral arterial disease. The number of elderly ABI of whom was measured as < 0.90 and sent to cardiovascular surgery polyclinic with the diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease was assessed as 30 (5.9%). Intermittent claudication was seen in about half of these patients. Conclusions Peripheral arterial disease is expected to be seen prevailing in elderly. However, it was determined at very low rate before the study due to the fact that the disease cannot be diagnosed clinically especially in early-period. Peripheral arterial disease determined in the study is lower than expected as per the age group. This can be associated with practices of geriatrics nursing and family practice including continuous care to reduce cardiovascular risk factors of patients staying at the unit. PMID:21929797

  14. Myocardial Strain and Strain Rate in Kawasaki Disease: Range, Recovery, and Relationship to Systemic Inflammation/Coronary Artery Dilation

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Benjamin; Davidson, Jesse; Tong, Suhong; Martin, Blake; Heizer, Heather; Anderson, Marsha S; Glode, Mary P; Dominguez, Samuel R; Jone, Pei-Ni

    2016-01-01

    Background Kawasaki Disease (KD), a systemic vasculitis of medium sized vessels, is the most common cause of acquired heart disease among children in the developed world. Some KD patients demonstrate echocardiographic evidence of depressed myocardial mechanics. However, the incidence, etiology, and reversibility of abnormal mechanics in KD patients remain undefined. Methods and results We retrospectively studied 41 KD patients and measured myocardial strain and strain rate by velocity vector imaging from pre-treatment and convalescent echocardiograms. Pre-treatment procalcitonin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and coronary artery z-scores were obtained in all patients and compared between the groups with preserved versus depressed acute phase mechanics. The change in mechanics between the acute and convalescent phases was also assessed. Patients with initially low longitudinal strain improved by the convalescent period (mean difference - 4.0%; p<0.005) with the greatest improvement occurring in patients with the lowest initial strain (−7.3%; p<0.05). Patients with higher initial strain did not change significantly by the convalescent period. Patients with lower longitudinal and circumferential strain demonstrated higher median procalcitonin levels (1.2 vs. 0.3 ng/mL; p<0.05 and 1.8 vs. 0.4 ng/mL; p<0.05 respectively) and a trend towards higher CRP, but no difference in coronary artery z-scores. Strain rate was not associated with inflammatory markers or coronary artery z-scores. Conclusions The range of strain found in our cohort was large. Improvement in mean strain was driven primarily by patients with lower initial strain. Lower strain was associated with increased markers of systemic inflammation, but not proximal coronary artery changes. PMID:27182455

  15. Prospective coronary angioscopy assessment of allograft coronary artery disease in human cardiac transplant recipients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ashit; Ventura, Hector O.; Collins, Tyrone J.; Ramee, Stephen R.; White, Christopher J.

    1993-09-01

    Annual angiographic assessment to determine the presence or progression of allograft coronary artery disease (CAD) has been unable to modify the natural history of this disease. Coronary angioscopy is a sensitive method to detect the early presence of coronary artery disease and in a retrospective analysis severity of CAD by angioscopy correlated with the time since transplantation. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate progression of coronary artery disease over a one year period in 40 cardiac transplant recipients. The progression of coronary artery disease as assessed by angioscopy is directly related to time after transplantation and therefore angioscopy may be the method of choice for detection and evaluation of therapeutic regimens to control allograft coronary artery disease.

  16. [Peripheral arterial pseudo-aneurysm in Behçet's disease: Report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Abissegue, Y; Ouldsalek, E; Lyazidi, Y; El Ochi, M R; El Fatemi, B; Chtata, H T; Bensaid, Y; Taberkant, M

    2016-05-01

    Behçet's disease is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiopathogenesis. Arterial events such as pseudo-aneurysms are rare and may be the mode of occurrence of the disease. These pseudo-aneurysms tend, regardless of size, to progress rapidly to life-threatening rupture. We report two cases of arterial pseudo-aneurysms that ruptured. Treatment consisted of surgical repair in one case and arterial ligation in the other; the postoperative course was uneventful in both cases. PMID:26947054

  17. Creating a genetic risk score for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Dandona, Sonny; Roberts, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) and its sequelae represent a significant health burden. Over the past two decades, numerous studies have attempted to link DNA sequence variation with the risk of CAD and related phenotypes. There has been significant evolution in technology from the early linkage studies within kindreds, and now we are able to use high-density genotyping to facilitate large-scale genome-wide association studies. The first novel genetic risk factor for CAD, 9p21.3, has been confirmed, and other loci are awaiting replication studies. The relative importance of each locus from a global standpoint and the incremental information conferred by testing for genetic variants remain to be determined. PMID:19361348

  18. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: on the way to a manageable disease.

    PubMed

    Mucke, Hermann A M

    2008-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an orphan disease for which no specific pharmacological therapy was available until 1996. Pharmacotherapy for PAH is currently dominated by three endothelin receptor antagonists, bosentan, ambrisentan and sitaxentan (which is not yet approved in the US), and the PDE5 inhibitor sildenafil. Drug candidates undergoing phase III clinical trials for PAH include inhalable and oral treprostinil, aviptadil (an inhalable vasoactive intestinal peptide), and the PDE5 inhibitor tadalafil. Riociguat, a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, is scheduled to enter phase III clinical trials in 2008. By approximately 2010, the role of infusable or injectable PGs as treatment for PAH will likely diminish significantly, while inhalable nitric oxide will remain as mainstay therapy in neonatal PAH. Benefits in survival and quality-of-life will decide if any of the more experimental approaches that utilize newly discovered molecular pathways in PAH will ultimately result in marketed drugs. PMID:18729002

  19. Use of adenosine echocardiography for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, W.A. )

    1991-07-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography combined with exercise is sensitive and specific in the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) by demonstrating transient abnormalities in wall motion. Frequently, however, patients cannot achieve maximal exercise because of various factors. Pharmacologic stress testing with intravenous adenosine was evaluated as a means of detecting CAD in a noninvasive manner. Patients with suspected CAD underwent echocardiographic imaging and simultaneous thallium 201 single-photon emission computed tomography during the intravenous administration of 140 micrograms/kg/min of adenosine. An increase in heart rate, decrease in blood pressure, and increase in double product were observed during adenosine administration. Initial observations revealed that wall motion abnormalities were induced by adenosine in areas of perfusion defects. The adenosine infusion was well tolerated, and symptoms disappeared within 1 to 2 minutes after termination of the infusion. Therefore preliminary observations suggest that adenosine echocardiography appears to be useful in the assessment of CAD.

  20. Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Sang Youl

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) exhibits broad clinical characteristics and various consequences and is known as one of the major macrovascular complications of T2DM. Atherosclerosis is recognized as the most direct and important cause of PAD, but acute or chronic limb ischemia may be the result of various risk factors. In light of the increasing number of patients who undergo peripheral vascular procedures, the number of subjects who are exposed to the risks for PAD and related complications is increasing. In this review, we will discuss the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of PAD, as well as the clinical significance of PAD in T2DM subjects. PMID:26301189

  1. Contemporary evaluation and management of lower extremity peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Foley, T Raymond; Armstrong, Ehrin J; Waldo, Stephen W

    2016-09-15

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) includes atherosclerosis of the aorta and lower extremities. Affecting a large segment of the population, PAD is associated with impaired functional capacity and reduced quality of life as well as an increased risk of stroke, myocardial infarction and cardiovascular death. The evaluation of PAD begins with the physical examination, incorporating non-invasive testing such as ankle-brachial indices to confirm the diagnosis. Therapeutic interventions are aimed at alleviating symptoms while preserving limb integrity and reducing overall cardiovascular risk. With this in mind, risk factor modification with exercise and medical therapy are the mainstays of treatment for many patients with PAD. Persistent symptoms or non-healing wounds should prompt more aggressive therapies with endovascular or surgical revascularisation. The following manuscript provides a comprehensive review on the contemporary evaluation and management of PAD. PMID:27250215

  2. Chlamydia pneumoniae and coronary artery disease: the antibiotic trials.

    PubMed

    Higgins, John P

    2003-03-01

    Parallel with the mounting evidence that atherosclerosis has a major inflammatory component, provoking agents that may initiate and drive this process have been sought. Infectious agents such as Chlamydia pneumoniae have been alleged to be activators of inflammation that may contribute to atherosclerosis and thus coronary artery disease (CAD) and its associated complications. A logical pneumoniae extension of this theory whether treating C pneumoniae infection with antibiotics and/or modulating inflammatory processes can affect CAD and its sequelae. This article discusses the potential role of C pneumoniae in atherosclerosis, its detection, and the rationale for antibiotics. Additionally, it summarizes the current randomized clinical trials of antichlamydial antibiotics in patients with CAD and draws conclusions based on the results. PMID:12630585

  3. Novel oral anticoagulants in the management of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Sean R; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen; Schneider, David J

    2016-08-01

    Despite advances in interventional and pharmacologic therapy, survivors of myocardial infarction remain at an increased risk of subsequent cardiovascular events. Initial pharmacological management includes both platelet inhibition and parenteral anticoagulation, whereas long-term pharmacological therapy relies on antiplatelet therapy for prevention of thrombotic complications. Biomarkers showing ongoing thrombin generation after acute coronary syndromes suggest that anticoagulants may provide additional benefit in reducing cardiovascular events. We review the pharmacokinetics of novel anticoagulants, clinical trial results, the role of monitoring, and future directions for the use of novel oral anticoagulants in the treatment of coronary artery disease. Clinical trials have shown that long-term use of oral anticoagulants decreases the risk of cardiovascular events, but they do so at a cost of an increased risk of bleeding. Future studies will need to identify optimal treatment combinations for selected patients and conditions that address both the appropriate combination of therapy and the appropriate dosage of each agent when used in combination. PMID:27228186

  4. Endovascular surgery for peripheral arterial occlusive disease. A critical review.

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, S S; Eton, D; Moore, W S

    1992-01-01

    Endovascular surgery is a new multidisciplinary field that applies the recently innovated techniques of angioscopy, intraluminal ultrasound, balloon angioplasty, laser, mechanical atherectomy, and stents. This field can be defined as a diagnostic and therapeutic discipline that uses catheter-based systems to treat vascular disease. As such, it integrates the subspecialties of vascular surgery, interventional radiology, interventional cardiology, and biomedical engineering for the common purpose of improving arterial hemodynamics. Endovascular surgery offers many potential benefits: long incisions are replaced with a puncture wound, the need for postoperative intensive care is significantly reduced, major cardiac and pulmonary complications from general anesthesia are side stepped, and the dollar savings could be dramatic as the need for intensive care unit and in-hospital stay diminishes. Despite these technological advancements, endovascular surgery is still in its infancy and currently has limited applications. This review provides an updated summary of endovascular surgery today and addresses some of the obstacles still preventing its widespread use. PMID:1385944

  5. Conditions Presenting with Symptoms of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Aditya M.; Norton, Patrick T.; Zhu, Daisy

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is estimated to affect more than 20% of people older than 65 years. The vast majority of patients with symptoms suggestive of PAD have atherosclerosis often associated with conventional vascular risk factors such as smoking, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and inflammation. A minority of people presenting with symptoms suggesting PAD have an alternative etiology. These groups of disorders are often underdiagnosed, and if diagnosed correctly the diagnosis may be delayed. Understanding these pathologies well is important, as they can be very debilitating and optimal treatment may vary significantly. Inappropriate treatment of these disorders can lead to worsening morbidity and mortality. This article discusses the underlying causes of nonatherosclerotic PAD, including the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. PMID:25435652

  6. Prognostic models in coronary artery disease: Cox and network approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Antonio; Sicari, Rosa; Cortigiani, Lauro; Carpeggiani, Clara; Picano, Eugenio; Capobianco, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Predictive assessment of the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases is usually provided by computational approaches centred on Cox models. The complex interdependence structure underlying clinical data patterns can limit the performance of Cox analysis and complicate the interpretation of results, thus calling for complementary and integrative methods. Prognostic models are proposed for studying the risk associated with patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing vasodilator stress echocardiography, an established technique for CAD detection and prognostication. In order to complement standard Cox models, network inference is considered a possible solution to quantify the complex relationships between heterogeneous data categories. In particular, a mutual information network is designed to explore the paths linking patient-associated variables to endpoint events, to reveal prognostic factors and to identify the best possible predictors of death. Data from a prospective, multicentre, observational study are available from a previous study, based on 4313 patients (2532 men; 64±11 years) with known (n=1547) or suspected (n=2766) CAD, who underwent high-dose dipyridamole (0.84 mg kg−1 over 6 min) stress echocardiography with coronary flow reserve (CFR) evaluation of left anterior descending (LAD) artery by Doppler. The overall mortality was the only endpoint analysed by Cox models. The estimated connectivity between clinical variables assigns a complementary value to the proposed network approach in relation to the established Cox model, for instance revealing connectivity paths. Depending on the use of multiple metrics, the constraints of regression analysis in measuring the association strength among clinical variables can be relaxed, and identification of communities and prognostic paths can be provided. On the basis of evidence from various model comparisons, we show in this CAD study that there may be characteristic

  7. Prognostic models in coronary artery disease: Cox and network approaches.

    PubMed

    Mora, Antonio; Sicari, Rosa; Cortigiani, Lauro; Carpeggiani, Clara; Picano, Eugenio; Capobianco, Enrico

    2015-02-01

    Predictive assessment of the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases is usually provided by computational approaches centred on Cox models. The complex interdependence structure underlying clinical data patterns can limit the performance of Cox analysis and complicate the interpretation of results, thus calling for complementary and integrative methods. Prognostic models are proposed for studying the risk associated with patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing vasodilator stress echocardiography, an established technique for CAD detection and prognostication. In order to complement standard Cox models, network inference is considered a possible solution to quantify the complex relationships between heterogeneous data categories. In particular, a mutual information network is designed to explore the paths linking patient-associated variables to endpoint events, to reveal prognostic factors and to identify the best possible predictors of death. Data from a prospective, multicentre, observational study are available from a previous study, based on 4313 patients (2532 men; 64±11 years) with known (n=1547) or suspected (n=2766) CAD, who underwent high-dose dipyridamole (0.84 mg kg(-1) over 6 min) stress echocardiography with coronary flow reserve (CFR) evaluation of left anterior descending (LAD) artery by Doppler. The overall mortality was the only endpoint analysed by Cox models. The estimated connectivity between clinical variables assigns a complementary value to the proposed network approach in relation to the established Cox model, for instance revealing connectivity paths. Depending on the use of multiple metrics, the constraints of regression analysis in measuring the association strength among clinical variables can be relaxed, and identification of communities and prognostic paths can be provided. On the basis of evidence from various model comparisons, we show in this CAD study that there may be characteristic

  8. Heart Attacks, Strokes, and Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Giant-Cell Arteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Annals of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Heart Attacks, Strokes, and Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Giant-Cell Arteritis The full report is titled “Risk for Cardiovascular Disease Early and Late ...

  9. The Risk of Peripheral Arterial Disease after Parathyroidectomy in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Li, Tsai-Chung; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The changes of the risk of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with end-stage renal disease after parathyroidectomy are scant. Methods We used a nationwide health insurance claims database to select all dialysis-dependent patients with end-stage renal disease aged 18 years and older for the study population in 2000 to 2006. Of the patients with end-stage renal disease, we selected 947 patients who had undergone parathyroidectomy as the parathyroidectomy group and frequency matched 3746 patients with end-stage renal disease by sex, age, years since the disease diagnosis, and the year of index date as the non-parathyroidectomy group. We used a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis with the use of a robust sandwich covariance matrix estimate, accounting for the intra-cluster dependence of hospitals or clinics, to measure the risk of peripheral arterial disease for the parathyroidectomy group compared with the non-parathyroidectomy group after adjusting for sex, age, premium-based income, urbanization, and comorbidity. Results The mean post-op follow-up periods were 5.08 and 4.52 years for the parathyroidectomy and non-parathyroidectomy groups, respectively; the incidence density rate of PAD in the PTX group was 12.26 per 1000 person-years, significantly lower than the data in the non-PTX group (24.09 per 1000 person-years, adjusted HR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.46–0.94). Conclusion Parathyroidectomy is associated with reduced risk of peripheral arterial disease in patients with end-stage renal disease complicated with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:27284924

  10. Evaluation of ventricular function in patients with coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rocco, T.P.; Dilsizian, V.; Fischman, A.J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1989-07-01

    The recent expansion of interventional cardiovascular technologies has stimulated a concomitant expansion of noninvasive cardiac studies, both to assist in diagnosis and to evaluate treatment outcomes. Radionuclide ventricular function studies provide a reliable, reproducible means to quantify global left ventricular systolic performance, a critical determinant of prognosis in patients with cardiovascular disease. In addition, the ability to evaluate regional left ventricular wall motion and to assess ventricular performance during exercise have secured a fundamental role for such studies in the screening and treatment of patients with coronary artery disease. Radionuclide techniques have been extended to the evaluation of left ventricular relaxation/filling events, left ventricular systolic/diastolic function in the ambulatory setting, and with appropriate technical modifications, to the assessment of right ventricular performance at rest and with exercise. As a complement to radionuclide perfusion studies, cardiac blood-pool imaging allows for thorough noninvasive description of cardiac physiology and function in both normal subjects and in patients with a broad range of cardiovascular diseases. 122 references.