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Sample records for artery image quality

  1. Improving Image Quality of Bronchial Arteries with Virtual Monochromatic Spectral CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Guangming; He, Taiping; Yu, Yong; Duan, Haifeng; Yang, Chuangbo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical value of using monochromatic images in spectral CT pulmonary angiography to improve image quality of bronchial arteries. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the chest CT images of 38 patients who underwent contrast-enhanced spectral CT. These images included a set of 140kVp polychromatic images and the default 70keV monochromatic images. Using the standard Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) viewer on an advanced workstation (AW4.6,GE Healthcare), an optimal energy level (in keV) for obtaining the best contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for the artery could be automatically obtained. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), CNR and objective image quality score (1–5) for these 3 image sets (140kVp, 70keV and optimal energy level) were obtained and, statistically compared. The image quality score consistency between the two observers was also evaluated using Kappa test. Results The optimal energy levels for obtaining the best CNR were 62.58±2.74keV.SNR and CNR from the 140kVp polychromatic, 70keV and optimal keV monochromatic images were (16.44±5.85, 13.24±5.52), (20.79±7.45, 16.69±6.27) and (24.9±9.91, 20.53±8.46), respectively. The corresponding subjective image quality scores were 1.97±0.82, 3.24±0.75, and 4.47±0.60. SNR, CNR and subjective scores had significant difference among groups (all p<0.001). The optimal keV monochromatic images were superior to the 70keV monochromatic and 140kVp polychromatic images, and there was high agreement between the two observers on image quality score (kappa>0.80). Conclusions Virtual monochromatic images at approximately 63keV in dual-energy spectral CT pulmonary angiography yielded the best CNR and highest diagnostic confidence for imaging bronchial arteries. PMID:26967737

  2. High-quality 3-D coronary artery imaging on an interventional C-arm x-ray system

    SciTech Connect

    Hansis, Eberhard; Carroll, John D.; Schaefer, Dirk; Doessel, Olaf; Grass, Michael

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of the coronary arteries during a cardiac catheter-based intervention can be performed from a C-arm based rotational x-ray angiography sequence. It can support the diagnosis of coronary artery disease, treatment planning, and intervention guidance. 3-D reconstruction also enables quantitative vessel analysis, including vessel dynamics from a time-series of reconstructions. Methods: The strong angular undersampling and motion effects present in gated cardiac reconstruction necessitate the development of special reconstruction methods. This contribution presents a fully automatic method for creating high-quality coronary artery reconstructions. It employs a sparseness-prior based iterative reconstruction technique in combination with projection-based motion compensation. Results: The method is tested on a dynamic software phantom, assessing reconstruction accuracy with respect to vessel radii and attenuation coefficients. Reconstructions from clinical cases are presented, displaying high contrast, sharpness, and level of detail. Conclusions: The presented method enables high-quality 3-D coronary artery imaging on an interventional C-arm system.

  3. Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging as a Quality Assurance Tool for Evaluating Endoscopic Harvest of the Radial Artery

    PubMed Central

    Burris, Nicholas S.; Brown, Emile N.; Grant, Michael; Kon, Zachary N.; Gibber, Marc; Gu, Junyen; Schwartz, Kimberly; Kallam, Seeta; Joshi, Ashish; Vitali, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Background Concerns about intimal disruption and spasm have limited enthusiasm for endoscopic radial artery harvest (ERAH), although the risk of these problems after this procedure remains uncertain. Radial artery conduits were screened intraoperatively before and after ERAH vs open harvest using catheter-based high-resolution optical coherence tomogaraphy (OCT) imaging. Methods Twenty-four cadavers nad 60 coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients scheduled to receive a RA graft underwent OCT imaging before (in situ) and after (ex vivo) open harvest or ERAH. spasm was quantified by the percentage change in luminal volume between images. Intimal disruption was classified as minor or severe depending on whether the defect was confined to branch ostia or involve the luminal surface. Histology was used to confirm OCT findings. Results Luminal volume significantly declined after harvest in all RAs from CABG patients, but there was no difference between groups: -43% ± 29% vs -35% ± 38% change after ERAH (n = 21) vs open harvest (n = 39; p = 0.342). Significantly more intimal injury was noted after ERAH vs open harvest (34/41 vs 9/43, intimal tears/total evaluated RAs, p < 0.0001). Most intimal injury was minor: only 2 tears involved the luminal surface of the RA (both after ERAH). Serial imaging in cadavers revealed that 86% of ostial tears occur in ERAH during the initial blunt dissection step using the endoscope. Conclusions Although branch injury is a pitfall of ERAH, OCT imaging documented that the quality of RA procured is acceptable and comparable with open harvest. Catheter-based OCT provides an important quality assurance tool for RA harvest. PMID:18355508

  4. Carotid artery anatomy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are four carotid arteries, two on each side of the neck: right and left internal carotid arteries, and right and left external carotid arteries. The carotid arteries deliver oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the head and brain.

  5. Coronary artery stent (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open. ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open.

  6. Ultrasonic Imaging Of Deep Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, James A.; Heyser, Richard C.; Lecroissette, Dennis H.

    1990-01-01

    Swept-frequency sound replaces pulsed sound. Ultrasonic medical instrument produces images of peripheral and coronary arteries with resolutions higher and at depths greater than attainable by previous ultrasonic systems. Time-delay-spectrometry imager includes scanning, image-processing, and displaying equipment. It sweeps in frequency from 0 to 10 MHz in 20 ms, pauses for 5 ms, and repeats sweep. Intended for use in noninvasive detection and measurement of atherosclerotic lesions.

  7. Coronary Artery Imaging with Transthoracic Doppler Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Masaaki; Nakazono, Akemi

    2016-07-01

    Coronary artery imaging with transthoracic Doppler echocardiography is a simple and useful technique to diagnose significant coronary artery stenosis. The visualization of mosaic flow in the proximal left coronary artery provides a direct indication of the presence of significant stenosis at the corresponding site during routine echocardiography. Coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) has a high diagnostic accuracy and feasibility in detecting the presence of functionally significant coronary stenosis in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and in the right coronary artery. The measurement of CFVR in the LAD also provides prognostic information in patients with intermediate coronary stenosis. This review summarizes the utility of transthoracic coronary artery imaging. PMID:27216843

  8. Noninvasive imaging in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Heo, Ran; Nakazato, Ryo; Kalra, Dan; Min, James K

    2014-09-01

    Noninvasive cardiac imaging is widely used to evaluate the presence of coronary artery disease. Recently, with improvements in imaging technology, noninvasive imaging has also been used for evaluation of the presence, severity, and prognosis of coronary artery disease. Coronary CT angiography and MRI of coronary arteries provide an anatomical assessment of coronary stenosis, whereas the hemodynamic significance of a coronary artery stenosis can be assessed by stress myocardial perfusion imaging, such as SPECT/PET and stress MRI. For appropriate use of multiple imaging modalities, the strengths and limitations of each modality are discussed in this review. PMID:25234083

  9. Noninvasive Imaging in Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Ran; Nakazato, Ryo; Kalra, Dan; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive cardiac imaging is widely used to evaluate the presence of coronary artery disease. Recently, with improvements in imaging technology, noninvasive imaging has also been used for evaluation of the presence, severity, and prognosis of coronary artery disease. Coronary CT angiography and MRI of coronary arteries provide an anatomical assessment of coronary stenosis, whereas the hemodynamic significance of a coronary artery stenosis can be assessed by stress myocardial perfusion imaging, such as SPECT/PET and stress MRI. For appropriate use of multiple imaging modalities, the strengths and limitations of each modality are discussed in this review. PMID:25234083

  10. Location of foot arteries using infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villasenor-Mora, Carlos; González-Vega, Arturo; Martín Osmany Falcón, Antonio; Benítez Ferro, Jesús Francisco Guillemo; Córdova Fraga, Teodoro

    2014-11-01

    In this work are presented the results of localization of foot arteries, in a young group of participants by using infrared thermal images, these are the dorsal, posterior tibial and anterior tibial arteries. No inclusion criteria were considered, that causes that no strong statistical data about the influence of the age in the arterial localization. It was achieved to solve the confusion when veins present a heat distribution similar to the artery and in the position of this. it contributes to enhance the rate of location of arteries. In general it is possible to say that the use of infrared thermal images is a good technique to find the foot arteries and can be applied in its characterization in a future. The procedure proposed is a non-invasive technique, and in certain fashion does not requires specialized personnel to achieve locate the arteries. It is portable, safe, and relatively economical.

  11. Photoacoustic imaging of carotid artery atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruizinga, Pieter; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; de Jong, Nico; Springeling, Geert; Robertus, Jan Lukas; van der Lugt, Aad; van Soest, Gijs

    2014-11-01

    We introduce a method for photoacoustic imaging of the carotid artery, tailored toward detection of lipid-rich atherosclerotic lesions. A common human carotid artery was obtained at autopsy, embedded in a neck mimicking phantom and imaged with a multimodality imaging system using interstitial illumination. Light was delivered through a 1.25-mm-diameter optical probe that can be placed in the pharynx, allowing the carotid artery to be illuminated from within the body. Ultrasound imaging and photoacoustic signal detection is achieved by an external 8-MHz linear array coupled to an ultrasound imaging system. Spectroscopic analysis of photoacoustic images obtained in the wavelength range from 1130 to 1250 nm revealed plaque-specific lipid accumulation in the collagen structure of the artery wall. These spectroscopic findings were confirmed by histology.

  12. Troubleshooting Arterial-Phase MR Images of Gadoxetate Disodium-Enhanced Liver

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jimi; Yeh, Benjamin M.; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Kyoung Won; Wu, En-Haw; Wang, Z. Jane; Zhao, Li-qin; Chang, Wei Chou

    2015-01-01

    Gadoxetate disodium is a widely used magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent for liver MR imaging, and it provides both dynamic and hepatobiliary phase images. However, acquiring optimal arterial phase images at liver MR using gadoxetate disodium is more challenging than using conventional extracellular MR contrast agent because of the small volume administered, the gadolinium content of the agent, and the common occurrence of transient severe motion. In this article, we identify the challenges in obtaining high-quality arterial-phase images of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced liver MR imaging and present strategies for optimizing arterial-phase imaging based on the thorough review of recent research in this field. PMID:26576109

  13. Social image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Guoping; Kheiri, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Current subjective image quality assessments have been developed in the laboratory environments, under controlledconditions, and are dependent on the participation of limited numbers of observers. In this research, with the help of Web 2.0 and social media technology, a new method for building a subjective image quality metric has been developed where the observers are the Internet users. A website with a simple user interface that enables Internet users from anywhere at any time to vote for a better quality version of a pair of the same image has been constructed. Users' votes are recorded and used to rank the images according to their perceived visual qualities. We have developed three rank aggregation algorithms to process the recorded pair comparison data, the first uses a naive approach, the second employs a Condorcet method, and the third uses the Dykstra's extension of Bradley-Terry method. The website has been collecting data for about three months and has accumulated over 10,000 votes at the time of writing this paper. Results show that the Internet and its allied technologies such as crowdsourcing offer a promising new paradigm for image and video quality assessment where hundreds of thousands of Internet users can contribute to building more robust image quality metrics. We have made Internet user generated social image quality (SIQ) data of a public image database available online (http://www.hdri.cs.nott.ac.uk/siq/) to provide the image quality research community with a new source of ground truth data. The website continues to collect votes and will include more public image databases and will also be extended to include videos to collect social video quality (SVQ) data. All data will be public available on the website in due course.

  14. Coronary artery imaging system using gated tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Macovski, A.

    1987-05-05

    A method is described of imaging a blood vessel such as a coronary artery. The steps comprise: providing radiation source means and radiation detector means on opposing sides of a target area and of administering a contrast agent intravenously; gating the radiation source means based on a selected time using an electrocardiogram to obtain detector signals indicative of views through the target area; and tomosynthesisly combining the detector signals to provide a planar image through the target area, the planar image being generally perpendicular to the path of radiation through the target area.

  15. MR Imaging of Coronary Arteries and Plaques.

    PubMed

    Dweck, Marc R; Puntman, Valentina; Vesey, Alex T; Fayad, Zahi A; Nagel, Eike

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance offers the promise of radiation-free imaging of the coronary arteries, providing information with respect to luminal stenosis, plaque burden, high-risk plaque characteristics, and disease activity. In combination, this would provide a comprehensive, individualized assessment of coronary atherosclerosis that could be used to improve patient risk stratification and to guide treatment. However, the technical challenges involved with delivering upon this promise are considerable, requiring sophisticated approaches to both data acquisition and post-processing. In this review, we describe the current status of this technology, its capabilities, its limitations, and what will be required in the future to translate this technology into routine clinical practice. PMID:26965732

  16. Coronary artery balloon angioplasty - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of patients and may eliminate the need for coronary artery bypass surgery. The outcome is relief from chest pain ... of the narrowing is not accomplished, heart surgery (coronary artery bypass graft surgery, also called a CABG) may be ...

  17. Different Imaging Strategies in Patients With Possible Basilar Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Sebastian E.; Hunink, Myriam G.; Schöberl, Florian; von Baumgarten, Louisa; Petersen, Steffen E.; Dichgans, Martin; Janssen, Hendrik; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Reiser, Maximilian F.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of different noninvasive imaging strategies in patients with possible basilar artery occlusion. Methods— A Markov decision analytic model was used to evaluate long-term outcomes resulting from strategies using computed tomographic angiography (CTA), magnetic resonance imaging, nonenhanced CT, or duplex ultrasound with intravenous (IV) thrombolysis being administered after positive findings. The analysis was performed from the societal perspective based on US recommendations. Input parameters were derived from the literature. Costs were obtained from United States costing sources and published literature. Outcomes were lifetime costs, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), incremental cost-effectiveness ratios, and net monetary benefits, with a willingness-to-pay threshold of $80 000 per QALY. The strategy with the highest net monetary benefit was considered the most cost-effective. Extensive deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to explore the effect of varying parameter values. Results— In the reference case analysis, CTA dominated all other imaging strategies. CTA yielded 0.02 QALYs more than magnetic resonance imaging and 0.04 QALYs more than duplex ultrasound followed by CTA. At a willingness-to-pay threshold of $80 000 per QALY, CTA yielded the highest net monetary benefits. The probability that CTA is cost-effective was 96% at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $80 000/QALY. Sensitivity analyses showed that duplex ultrasound was cost-effective only for a prior probability of ≤0.02 and that these results were only minimally influenced by duplex ultrasound sensitivity and specificity. Nonenhanced CT and magnetic resonance imaging never became the most cost-effective strategy. Conclusions— Our results suggest that CTA in patients with possible basilar artery occlusion is cost-effective. PMID:26022634

  18. Vessel Wall Imaging of the Intracranial and Cervical Carotid Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Jun; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, Deok Hee

    2015-01-01

    Vessel wall imaging can depict the morphologies of atherosclerotic plaques, arterial walls, and surrounding structures in the intracranial and cervical carotid arteries beyond the simple luminal changes that can be observed with traditional luminal evaluation. Differentiating vulnerable from stable plaques and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques are vital parts of the early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of stroke and the neurological adverse effects of atherosclerosis. Various techniques for vessel wall imaging have been developed and introduced to differentiate and analyze atherosclerotic plaques in the cervical carotid artery. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) is the most important and popular vessel wall imaging technique for directly evaluating the vascular wall and intracranial artery disease. Intracranial artery atherosclerosis, dissection, moyamoya disease, vasculitis, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome can also be diagnosed and differentiated by using HR-MRI. Here, we review the radiologic features of intracranial artery disease and cervical carotid artery atherosclerosis on HR-MRI and various other vessel wall imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography). PMID:26437991

  19. Vessel Wall Imaging of the Intracranial and Cervical Carotid Arteries.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Jun; Jung, Seung Chai; Lee, Deok Hee

    2015-09-01

    Vessel wall imaging can depict the morphologies of atherosclerotic plaques, arterial walls, and surrounding structures in the intracranial and cervical carotid arteries beyond the simple luminal changes that can be observed with traditional luminal evaluation. Differentiating vulnerable from stable plaques and characterizing atherosclerotic plaques are vital parts of the early diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of stroke and the neurological adverse effects of atherosclerosis. Various techniques for vessel wall imaging have been developed and introduced to differentiate and analyze atherosclerotic plaques in the cervical carotid artery. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HR-MRI) is the most important and popular vessel wall imaging technique for directly evaluating the vascular wall and intracranial artery disease. Intracranial artery atherosclerosis, dissection, moyamoya disease, vasculitis, and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome can also be diagnosed and differentiated by using HR-MRI. Here, we review the radiologic features of intracranial artery disease and cervical carotid artery atherosclerosis on HR-MRI and various other vessel wall imaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography-computed tomography). PMID:26437991

  20. Evaluation of image quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavel, M.

    1993-01-01

    This presentation outlines in viewgraph format a general approach to the evaluation of display system quality for aviation applications. This approach is based on the assumption that it is possible to develop a model of the display which captures most of the significant properties of the display. The display characteristics should include spatial and temporal resolution, intensity quantizing effects, spatial sampling, delays, etc. The model must be sufficiently well specified to permit generation of stimuli that simulate the output of the display system. The first step in the evaluation of display quality is an analysis of the tasks to be performed using the display. Thus, for example, if a display is used by a pilot during a final approach, the aesthetic aspects of the display may be less relevant than its dynamic characteristics. The opposite task requirements may apply to imaging systems used for displaying navigation charts. Thus, display quality is defined with regard to one or more tasks. Given a set of relevant tasks, there are many ways to approach display evaluation. The range of evaluation approaches includes visual inspection, rapid evaluation, part-task simulation, and full mission simulation. The work described is focused on two complementary approaches to rapid evaluation. The first approach is based on a model of the human visual system. A model of the human visual system is used to predict the performance of the selected tasks. The model-based evaluation approach permits very rapid and inexpensive evaluation of various design decisions. The second rapid evaluation approach employs specifically designed critical tests that embody many important characteristics of actual tasks. These are used in situations where a validated model is not available. These rapid evaluation tests are being implemented in a workstation environment.

  1. [Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation of coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Bayraktaroğlu, Selen; Alper, Hüdaver

    2008-07-01

    Considerable advances have been achieved in cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology, and MRI has become an important noninvasive imaging tool in the management of coronary artery disease. Cardiac MRI can provide information about myocardial perfusion, viability and contractile reserve. The information obtained not only provides diagnostic information but also has an important prognostic value. This article reviews the recent advances in cardiac MRI for evaluation of coronary artery disease. PMID:18611838

  2. [Arterial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries with situs inversus and mirror image dextrocardia].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Hiroaki; Nemoto, Shintaro; Ozawa, Hideki; Sasaki, Tomoyasu; Motohashi, Yoshikazu; Katsumata, Takahiro; Inoue, Nao; Kishi, Kanta; Okumura, Kenichi; Mori, Yasuhiko

    2012-09-01

    We report a successful arterial switch operation for complete transposition of great arteries with atrial and visceral situs inversus totalis and mirror image dextrocardia in a 12-day-old infant girl. The aorta was located left side-by-side to the pulmonary trunk with a single coronary artery (mirror image of 1RLCx). After French maneuver, the posterior circumference of the neo-aorta was reconstructed. Then the coronary button was transplanted into the neo-aorta with a trap door technique carefully avoiding any twist and over-stretch. The neo-pulmonary trunk was reconstructed with an autologous pericardial patch and sutured to the longitudinal incision made into the left central pulmonary artery. The baby was discharged from hospital and has been doing well without any morbidity relating myocardial ischemia. PMID:22940657

  3. Image Enhancement, Image Quality, and Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Zia-ur; Jobson, Daniel J.; Woodell, Glenn A.; Hines, Glenn D.

    2005-01-01

    The Multiscale Retinex With Color Restoration (MSRCR) is a non-linear image enhancement algorithm that provides simultaneous dynamic range compression, color constancy and rendition. The overall impact is to brighten up areas of poor contrast/lightness but not at the expense of saturating areas of good contrast/brightness. The downside is that with the poor signal-to-noise ratio that most image acquisition devices have in dark regions, noise can also be greatly enhanced thus affecting overall image quality. In this paper, we will discuss the impact of the MSRCR on the overall quality of an enhanced image as a function of the strength of shadows in an image, and as a function of the root-mean-square (RMS) signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio of the image.

  4. Dynamic diffuse optical tomography imaging of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Michael A.; Kim, Hyun K.; Kim, In-Kyong; Flexman, Molly; Dayal, Rajeev; Shrikhande, Gautam; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is the narrowing of arteries due to plaque accumulation in the vascular walls. This leads to insufficient blood supply to the extremities and can ultimately cause cell death. Currently available methods are ineffective in diagnosing PAD in patients with calcified arteries, such as those with diabetes. In this paper we investigate the potential of dynamic diffuse optical tomography (DDOT) as an alternative way to assess PAD in the lower extremities. DDOT is a non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging modality that uses near-infrared light to create spatio-temporal maps of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin in tissue. We present three case studies in which we used DDOT to visualize vascular perfusion of a healthy volunteer, a PAD patient and a diabetic PAD patient with calcified arteries. These preliminary results show significant differences in DDOT time-traces and images between all three cases, underscoring the potential of DDOT as a new diagnostic tool. PMID:23024920

  5. Retinal Image Quality During Accommodation

    PubMed Central

    López-Gil, N.; Martin, J.; Liu, T.; Bradley, A.; Díaz-Muñoz, D.; Thibos, L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We asked if retinal image quality is maximum during accommodation, or sub-optimal due to accommodative error, when subjects perform an acuity task. Methods Subjects viewed a monochromatic (552nm), high-contrast letter target placed at various viewing distances. Wavefront aberrations of the accommodating eye were measured near the endpoint of an acuity staircase paradigm. Refractive state, defined as the optimum target vergence for maximising retinal image quality, was computed by through-focus wavefront analysis to find the power of the virtual correcting lens that maximizes visual Strehl ratio. Results Despite changes in ocular aberrations and pupil size during binocular viewing, retinal image quality and visual acuity typically remain high for all target vergences. When accommodative errors lead to sub-optimal retinal image quality, acuity and measured image quality both decline. However, the effect of accommodation errors of on visual acuity are mitigated by pupillary constriction associated with accommodation and binocular convergence and also to binocular summation of dissimilar retinal image blur. Under monocular viewing conditions some subjects displayed significant accommodative lag that reduced visual performance, an effect that was exacerbated by pharmacological dilation of the pupil. Conclusions Spurious measurement of accommodative error can be avoided when the image quality metric used to determine refractive state is compatible with the focusing criteria used by the visual system to control accommodation. Real focusing errors of the accommodating eye do not necessarily produce a reliably measurable loss of image quality or clinically significant loss of visual performance, probably because of increased depth-of-focus due to pupil constriction. When retinal image quality is close to maximum achievable (given the eye’s higher-order aberrations), acuity is also near maximum. A combination of accommodative lag, reduced image quality, and reduced

  6. Image-Guided Thromboembolectomy of Acute Arterial Occlusion in Children.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Han, Ahram; Choi, Chanjoong; Min, Sang-Il; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Ha, Jongwon; Min, Seung-Kee

    2016-07-01

    Acute arterial thromboembolism (ATE) is rare in childhood, but this medical emergency requires immediate treatment. Described herein are separate instances of lower extremity ATE in 2 children, both of whom were successfully managed through image-guided thromboembolectomy (IGT). One patient, a 34-month-old female child with nephrotic syndrome, developed bilateral iliac and popliteal thromboembolic arterial occlusions after high-dose steroid therapy. Another 9-year-old girl suffered an embolism of left popliteal artery due to infectious endocarditis. Both patients underwent IGT using over-the-wire Fogarty catheters. During follow-up, presenting symptoms resolved without significant complications. PMID:27177711

  7. Quality assessment for hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuheng; Chen, Xinhua; Zhou, Jiankang; Shen, Weimin

    2014-11-01

    Image quality assessment is an essential value judgement approach for many applications. Multi & hyper spectral imaging has more judging essentials than grey scale or RGB imaging and its image quality assessment job has to cover up all-around evaluating factors. This paper presents an integrating spectral imaging quality assessment project, in which spectral-based, radiometric-based and spatial-based statistical behavior for three hyperspectral imagers are jointly executed. Spectral response function is worked out based on discrete illumination images and its spectral performance is deduced according to its FWHM and spectral excursion value. Radiometric response ability of different spectral channel under both on-ground and airborne imaging condition is judged by SNR computing based upon local RMS extraction and statistics method. Spatial response evaluation of the spectral imaging instrument is worked out by MTF computing with slanted edge analysis method. Reported pioneering systemic work in hyperspectral imaging quality assessment is carried out with the help of several domestic dominating work units, which not only has significance in the development of on-ground and in-orbit instrument performance evaluation technique but also takes on reference value for index demonstration and design optimization for instrument development.

  8. Foveated wavelet image quality index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhou; Bovik, Alan C.; Lu, Ligang; Kouloheris, Jack L.

    2001-12-01

    The human visual system (HVS) is highly non-uniform in sampling, coding, processing and understanding. The spatial resolution of the HVS is highest around the point of fixation (foveation point) and decreases rapidly with increasing eccentricity. Currently, most image quality measurement methods are designed for uniform resolution images. These methods do not correlate well with the perceived foveated image quality. Wavelet analysis delivers a convenient way to simultaneously examine localized spatial as well as frequency information. We developed a new image quality metric called foveated wavelet image quality index (FWQI) in the wavelet transform domain. FWQI considers multiple factors of the HVS, including the spatial variance of the contrast sensitivity function, the spatial variance of the local visual cut-off frequency, the variance of human visual sensitivity in different wavelet subbands, and the influence of the viewing distance on the display resolution and the HVS features. FWQI can be employed for foveated region of interest (ROI) image coding and quality enhancement. We show its effectiveness by using it as a guide for optimal bit assignment of an embedded foveated image coding system. The coding system demonstrates very good coding performance and scalability in terms of foveated objective as well as subjective quality measurement.

  9. Progress in noninvasive coronary artery imaging using multislice CT

    PubMed Central

    Meijs, M.F.L.; de Vos, A.M.; Rutten, A.; Prokop, M.; Cramer, M.J.M.; Doevendans, P.A.F.M.

    2005-01-01

    Conventional coronary angiography (CAG) has been the reference standard for the assessment of coronary artery disease since its introduction in 1958. However, several studies have shown that diagnostic CAG has an average morbidity of 2% and a mortality of approximately 0.1%. In the last decade, progress in medical imaging has opened the way to noninvasive assessment of the coronary arteries at lower cost and risk. Of the different modalities, multislice CT (MSCT) has made the biggest step forward. At the 2005 European Congress of Radiology (ECR), experiences with the latest developments in noninvasive coronary artery imaging were reported. This report summarises the advances in the use of MSCT in coronary stenosis detection, emergency decision-making, plaque imaging, and the analysis of cardiac function and late enhancement. Also, attention is paid to new strategies to reduce MSCT-related radiation exposure. PMID:25696518

  10. Multimodality Imaging in Coronary Artery Disease: Focus on Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Han, Donghee; Danad, Ibrahim; Hartaigh, Bríain ó; Lin, Fay Y.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide, and various cardiovascular imaging modalities have been introduced for the purpose of diagnosing and determining the severity of CAD. More recently, advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have contributed to the widespread clinical application of cardiac CT for accurate and noninvasive evaluation of CAD. In this review, we focus on imaging assessment of CAD based upon CT, which includes coronary artery calcium screening, coronary CT angiography, myocardial CT perfusion, and fractional flow reserve CT. Further, we provide a discussion regarding the potential implications, benefits and limitations, as well as the possible future directions according to each modality. PMID:27081438

  11. Molecular analysis of arterial remodeling: a novel application of infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Brad C.; Kundi, Rishi; Yamanouchi, Dai; Kent, K. Craig; Liu, Bo; Pleshko, Nancy

    2009-02-01

    Arterial remodeling, i.e. changes in size and/or structure of arteries, plays an important role in vascular disease. Conflicting findings have been reported as to whether an abundance of collagen causes inward or outward remodeling, phenomena that result in either a smaller or larger lumen, respectively. We hypothesize that the amount, type and quality of collagen influence the remodeling response. Here, we create mechanical injury to the rat carotid artery using a balloon catheter, and this leads to inward remodeling. Treatment of the artery with Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) causes outward remodeling. We investigated the arterial composition in injured CTGF-treated and non-CTGF-treated and sham CTGF-treated and non-CTGF treated arteries 14 days post-injury (n = 7-8 per group) using infrared imaging. A Perkin Elmer Spotlight Spectrum 300 FT-IR microscope was used for data collection. Cross-sections of paraffinembedded arteries were scanned at 2 cm-1 spectral resolution with spatial resolution of 6.25 μm/pixel, and data analyzed using Malvern Instruments ISys 5.0. Post-injury, we found a nearly 50% reduction in the average 1338/AM2 area ratio (correlated to collagen helical integrity). The most dramatic change was a 600% increase in the 1660/1690 peak height ratio, which has previously been related to collagen crosslink maturity. In all cases, CTGF treatment resulted in the observed changes in peak parameters normalized back to control values. Overall, these preliminary studies demonstrate that infrared imaging can provide insight into the underlying molecular changes that contribute to arterial disease.

  12. Video and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, Jim

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents some of the results of a UK government research program into methods of improving the effectiveness of CCTV surveillance systems. The paper identifies the major components of video security systems and primary causes of unsatisfactory images. A method is outline for relating the picture detail limitations imposed by each system component on overall system performance. The paper also points out some possible difficulties arising from the use of emerging new technology.

  13. Role of radionuclide cardiac imaging in coronary artery bypass surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Heo, J.; Mostel, E.

    1987-01-01

    The main applications of cardiac nuclear imaging in coronary artery bypass surgery include: patient selection, prediction of improvement in resting LV function after revascularization, diagnosis of perioperative myocardial infarction, assessment of the results of revascularization, evaluation of new or recurrent symptoms, and in risk stratification. Proper understanding of which test to be used, when, and why may be important to optimize patient management.

  14. Quantitative image analysis of histological sections of coronary arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David R., III; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-06-01

    The study of coronary arteries has evolved from examining gross anatomy and morphology to scrutinizing micro-anatomy and cellular composition. Technological advances such as high- resolution digital microscopes and high precision cutting devices have allowed examination of coronary artery morphology and pathology at micron resolution. We have developed a software toolkit to analyze histological sections. In particular, we are currently engaged in examining normal coronary arteries in order to provide the foundation for study of remodeled tissue. The first of two coronary arteries was stained for elastin and collagen. The second coronary artery was sectioned and stained for cellular nuclei and smooth muscle. High resolution light microscopy was used to image the sections. Segmentation was accomplished initially with slice- to-slice thresholding algorithms. These segmentation techniques choose optimal threshold values by modeling the tissue as one or more distributions. Morphology and image statistics were used to further differentiate the thresholded data into different tissue categories therefore refine the results of the segmentation. Specificity/sensitivity analysis suggests that automatic segmentation can be very effective. For both tissue samples, greater than 90% specificity was achieved. Summed voxel projection and maximum intensity projection appear to be effective 3-D visualization tools. Shading methods also provide useful visualization, however it is important to incorporate combined 2-D and 3-D displays. Surface rendering techniques (e.g. color mapping) can be used for visualizing parametric data. Preliminary results are promising, but continued development of algorithms is needed.

  15. Arterial Perfusion Imaging-Defined Subvolume of Intrahepatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hesheng; Farjam, Reza; Feng, Mary; Hussain, Hero; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether an increase in a subvolume of intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during radiation therapy (RT) predicts tumor progression post RT. Methods and Materials Twenty patients with unresectable intrahepatic cancers undergoing RT were enrolled in a prospective IRB-approved study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) were performed prior to RT (pre-RT), after delivering ~60% of the planned dose (mid-RT) and one month after completion of RT to quantify hepatic arterial perfusion. The arterial perfusions of the tumors at pre-RT were clustered into low-normal and elevated perfusion by a fuzzy clustering-based method, and the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion were extracted from the hepatic arterial perfusion images. The percentage changes in the tumor subvolumes and means of arterial perfusion over the tumors from pre-RT to mid-RT were evaluated for predicting tumor progression post-RT. Results Of the 24 tumors, 6 tumors in 5 patients progressed 5–21 months after RT completion. Neither tumor volumes nor means of tumor arterial perfusion at pre-RT were predictive of treatment outcome. The mean arterial perfusion over the tumors increased significantly at mid-RT in progressive tumors comparing to the responsive ones (p=0.006). From pre-RT to mid-RT, the responsive tumors had a decrease in the tumor subvolumes with elevated arterial perfusion (median: −14%, range: −75% – 65%), while the progressing tumors had an increase of the subvolumes (median: 57%, range: −7% – 165%) (p=0.003). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of the percentage change in the subvolume for predicting tumor progression post-RT had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.90. Conclusion The increase in the subvolume of the intrahepatic tumor with elevated arterial perfusion during RT has the potential to be a predictor for tumor progression post-RT. The tumor subvolume could be a radiation boost candidate

  16. Fovea based image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Anan; Zhao, Debin; Liu, Shaohui; Cao, Guangyao

    2010-07-01

    Humans are the ultimate receivers of the visual information contained in an image, so the reasonable method of image quality assessment (IQA) should follow the properties of the human visual system (HVS). In recent years, IQA methods based on HVS-models are slowly replacing classical schemes, such as mean squared error (MSE) and Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR). IQA-structural similarity (SSIM) regarded as one of the most popular HVS-based methods of full reference IQA has apparent improvements in performance compared with traditional metrics in nature, however, it performs not very well when the images' structure is destroyed seriously or masked by noise. In this paper, a new efficient fovea based structure similarity image quality assessment (FSSIM) is proposed. It enlarges the distortions in the concerned positions adaptively and changes the importances of the three components in SSIM. FSSIM predicts the quality of an image through three steps. First, it computes the luminance, contrast and structure comparison terms; second, it computes the saliency map by extracting the fovea information from the reference image with the features of HVS; third, it pools the above three terms according to the processed saliency map. Finally, a commonly experimental database LIVE IQA is used for evaluating the performance of the FSSIM. Experimental results indicate that the consistency and relevance between FSSIM and mean opinion score (MOS) are both better than SSIM and PSNR clearly.

  17. High speed intravascular photoacoustic imaging of atherosclerotic arteries (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Zhonglie; Ma, Teng; Qu, Yueqiao; Li, Jiawen; Yu, Mingyue; He, Youmin; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Kim, Chang-Seok; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the industrialized nations. Accurate quantification of both the morphology and composition of lipid-rich vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque are essential for early detection and optimal treatment in clinics. In previous works, intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging for detection of lipid-rich plaque within coronary artery walls has been demonstrated in ex vivo, but the imaging speed is still limited. In order to increase the imaging speed, a high repetition rate laser is needed. In this work, we present a high speed integrated IVPA/US imaging system with a 500 Hz optical parametric oscillator laser at 1725 nm. A miniature catheter with 1.0 mm outer diameter was designed with a 200 μm multimode fiber and an ultrasound transducer with 45 MHz center frequency. The fiber was polished at 38 degree and enclosed in a glass capillary for total internal reflection. An optical/electrical rotary junction and pull-back mechanism was applied for rotating and linearly scanning the catheter to obtain three-dimensional imaging. Atherosclerotic rabbit abdominal aorta was imaged as two frame/second at 1725 nm. Furthermore, by wide tuning range of the laser wavelength from 1680 nm to 1770 nm, spectroscopic photoacoustic analysis of lipid-mimicking phantom and an human atherosclerotic artery was performed ex vivo. The results demonstrated that the developed IVPA/US imaging system is capable for high speed intravascular imaging for plaque detection.

  18. Landsat image data quality studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schueler, C. F.; Salomonson, V. V.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary results of the Landsat-4 Image Data Quality Analysis (LIDQA) program to characterize the data obtained using the Thematic Mapper (TM) instrument on board the Landsat-4 and Landsat-5 satellites are reported. TM design specifications were compared to the obtained data with respect to four criteria, including spatial resolution; geometric fidelity; information content; and image relativity to Multispectral Scanner (MSS) data. The overall performance of the TM was rated excellent despite minor instabilities and radiometric anomalies in the data. Spatial performance of the TM exceeded design specifications in terms of both image sharpness and geometric accuracy, and the image utility of the TM data was at least twice as high as MSS data. The separability of alfalfa and sugar beet fields in a TM image is demonstrated.

  19. The development and potential of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging for carotid artery plaque characterization.

    PubMed

    Allen, Jason D; Ham, Katherine L; Dumont, Douglas M; Sileshi, Bantayehu; Trahey, Gregg E; Dahl, Jeremy J

    2011-08-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death and long-term disability in the USA. Currently, surgical intervention decisions in asymptomatic patients are based upon the degree of carotid artery stenosis. While there is a clear benefit of endarterectomy for patients with severe (> 70%) stenosis, in those with high/moderate (50-69%) stenosis the evidence is less clear. Evidence suggests ischemic stroke is associated less with calcified and fibrous plaques than with those containing softer tissue, especially when accompanied by a thin fibrous cap. A reliable mechanism for the identification of individuals with atherosclerotic plaques which confer the highest risk for stroke is fundamental to the selection of patients for vascular interventions. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is a new ultrasonic-based imaging method that characterizes the mechanical properties of tissue by measuring displacement resulting from the application of acoustic radiation force. These displacements provide information about the local stiffness of tissue and can differentiate between soft and hard areas. Because arterial walls, soft tissue, atheromas, and calcifications have a wide range in their stiffness properties, they represent excellent candidates for ARFI imaging. We present information from early phantom experiments and excised human limb studies to in vivo carotid artery scans and provide evidence for the ability of ARFI to provide high-quality images which highlight mechanical differences in tissue stiffness not readily apparent in matched B-mode images. This allows ARFI to identify soft from hard plaques and differentiate characteristics associated with plaque vulnerability or stability. PMID:21447606

  20. High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Vessel Wall Imaging for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xian-Jin; Wang, Wu; Liu, Zun-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the feasibility and clinical value of high-resolution magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging (HRMR VWI) for intracranial arterial stenosis. Date Sources: We retrieved information from PubMed database up to December 2015, using various search terms including vessel wall imaging (VWI), high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging, intracranial arterial stenosis, black blood, and intracranial atherosclerosis. Study Selection: We reviewed peer-reviewed articles printed in English on imaging technique of VWI and characteristic findings of various intracranial vasculopathies on VWI. We organized this data to explain the value of VWI in clinical application. Results: VWI with black blood technique could provide high-quality images with submillimeter voxel size, and display both the vessel wall and lumen of intracranial artery simultaneously. Various intracranial vasculopathies (atherosclerotic or nonatherosclerotic) had differentiating features including pattern of wall thickening, enhancement, and vessel remodeling on VWI. This technique could be used for determining causes of stenosis, identification of stroke mechanism, risk-stratifying patients, and directing therapeutic management in clinical practice. In addition, a new morphological classification based on VWI could be established for predicting the efficacy of endovascular therapy. Conclusions: This review highlights the value of HRMR VWI for discrimination of different intracranial vasculopathies and directing therapeutic management. PMID:27231176

  1. Fused monochromatic imaging acquired by single source dual energy CT in hepatocellular carcinoma during arterial phase: an initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shun-Yu; Cui, Yong; Sun, Ying-Shi; Tang, Lei; Li, Xiao-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Shan, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore whether single and fused monochromatic images can improve liver tumor detection and delineation by single source dual energy CT (ssDECT) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during arterial phase. Methods Fifty-seven patients with HCC who underwent ssDECT scanning at Beijing Cancer Hospital were enrolled retrospectively. Twenty-one sets of monochromatic images from 40 to 140 keV were reconstructed at 5 keV intervals in arterial phase. The optimal contrast-noise ratio (CNR) monochromatic images of the liver tumor and the lowest-noise monochromatic images were selected for image fusion. We evaluated the image quality of the optimal-CNR monochromatic images, the lowest-noise monochromatic images and the fused monochromatic images, respectively. The evaluation indicators included the spatial resolution of the anatomical structure, the noise level, the contrast and CNR of the tumor. Results In arterial phase, the anatomical structure of the liver can be displayed most clearly in the 65-keV monochromatic images, with the lowest image noise. The optimal-CNR monochromatic images of HCC tumor were 50-keV monochromatic images in which the internal structural features of the liver tumors were displayed most clearly and meticulously. For tumor detection, the fused monochromatic images and the 50-keV monochromatic images had similar performances, and were more sensitive than 65-keV monochromatic images. Conclusions We achieved good arterial phase images by fusing the optimal-CNR monochromatic images of the HCC tumor and the lowest-noise monochromatic images. The fused images displayed liver tumors and anatomical structures more clearly, which is potentially helpful for identifying more and smaller HCC tumors. PMID:25232217

  2. Quality metrics for sensor images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, AL

    1993-01-01

    Methods are needed for evaluating the quality of augmented visual displays (AVID). Computational quality metrics will help summarize, interpolate, and extrapolate the results of human performance tests with displays. The FLM Vision group at NASA Ames has been developing computational models of visual processing and using them to develop computational metrics for similar problems. For example, display modeling systems use metrics for comparing proposed displays, halftoning optimizing methods use metrics to evaluate the difference between the halftone and the original, and image compression methods minimize the predicted visibility of compression artifacts. The visual discrimination models take as input two arbitrary images A and B and compute an estimate of the probability that a human observer will report that A is different from B. If A is an image that one desires to display and B is the actual displayed image, such an estimate can be regarded as an image quality metric reflecting how well B approximates A. There are additional complexities associated with the problem of evaluating the quality of radar and IR enhanced displays for AVID tasks. One important problem is the question of whether intruding obstacles are detectable in such displays. Although the discrimination model can handle detection situations by making B the original image A plus the intrusion, this detection model makes the inappropriate assumption that the observer knows where the intrusion will be. Effects of signal uncertainty need to be added to our models. A pilot needs to make decisions rapidly. The models need to predict not just the probability of a correct decision, but the probability of a correct decision by the time the decision needs to be made. That is, the models need to predict latency as well as accuracy. Luce and Green have generated models for auditory detection latencies. Similar models are needed for visual detection. Most image quality models are designed for static imagery

  3. Pathophysiology of coronary artery disease: the case for multiparametric imaging.

    PubMed

    Gamble, James H P; Scott, Gemma; Ormerod, Julian O M; Frenneaux, Michael P

    2009-03-01

    Interventions to treat coronary artery disease are available but they must be targeted at the correct individuals (and indeed lesions), in order to gain maximal benefit with the minimal adverse effects. Coronary contrast angiography is not able to provide all the information required for the assessment of the effects of artery disease. Other imaging modalities are of growing importance as they can reduce radiation exposure and invasiveness of screening, as well as providing important extra information. The ideal 'multiparametric' imaging technique would assess anatomy, viability and lesion activity in a single quick scan. Currently, MRI is the technology closest to achieving this ideal, although the existing technology still has some limitations. This review discusses the currently available techniques for the imaging of coronary anatomy and of myocardial viability, and considers their benefits and limitations. We also discuss the developing field of imaging molecularly targeted to active coronary lesions. Finally we provide a 5-year view of the current and likely future optimal imaging strategies. PMID:19296768

  4. ECG-synchronized DSA exposure control: improved cervicothoracic image quality

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, W.M.; Gould, R.; Norman, D.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Cox, L.

    1984-10-01

    An electrocardiogram (ECG)-synchronized x-ray exposure sequence was used to acquire digital subtraction angiographic (DSA) images during 13 arterial injection studies of the aortic arch or carotid bifurcations. These gated images were compared with matched ungated DSA images acquired using the same technical factors, contrast material volume, and patient positioning. Subjective assessments by five experienced observers of edge definition, vessel conspicuousness, and overall diagnostic quality showed overall preference for one of the two acquisition methods in 69% of cases studied. Of these, the ECG-synchronized exposure series were rated superior in 76%. These results, as well as the relatively simple and inexpensive modifications required, suggest that routine use of ECG exposure control can facilitate improved arterial DSA evaluations of suspected cervicothoracic vascular disease.

  5. Combined vector velocity and spectral Doppler imaging for improved imaging of complex blood flow in the carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Dahl, Torbjørn; Torp, Hans; Løvstakken, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    Color flow imaging and pulsed wave (PW) Doppler are important diagnostic tools in the examination of patients with carotid artery disease. However, measurement of the true peak systolic velocity is dependent on sample volume placement and the operator's ability to provide an educated guess of the flow direction. Using plane wave transmissions and a duplex imaging scheme, we present an all-in-one modality that provides both vector velocity and spectral Doppler imaging from one acquisition, in addition to separate B-mode images of sufficient quality. The vector Doppler information was used to provide automatically calibrated (angle-corrected) PW Doppler spectra at every image point. It was demonstrated that the combined information can be used to generate spatial maps of the peak systolic velocity, highlighting regions of high velocity and the extent of the stenotic region, which could be used to automate work flow as well as improve the accuracy of measurement of true peak systolic velocity. The modality was tested in a small group (N = 12) of patients with carotid artery disease. PW Doppler, vector velocity and B-mode images could successfully be obtained from a single recording for all patients with a body mass index ranging from 21 to 31 and a carotid depth ranging from 16 to 28 mm. PMID:24785436

  6. A mathematical model for estimating the axial stress of the common carotid artery wall from ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Effat; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manijhe; Saberi, Hajir; Sharif-Kashani, Shervin

    2016-08-01

    Clarifying the complex interaction between mechanical and biological processes in healthy and diseased conditions requires constitutive models for arterial walls. In this study, a mathematical model for the displacement of the carotid artery wall in the longitudinal direction is defined providing a satisfactory representation of the axial stress applied to the arterial wall. The proposed model was applied to the carotid artery wall motion estimated from ultrasound image sequences of 10 healthy adults, and the axial stress waveform exerted on the artery wall was extracted. Consecutive ultrasonic images (30 frames per second) of the common carotid artery of 10 healthy subjects (age 44 ± 4 year) were recorded and transferred to a personal computer. Longitudinal displacement and acceleration were extracted from ultrasonic image processing using a block-matching algorithm. Furthermore, images were examined using a maximum gradient algorithm and time rate changes of the internal diameter and intima-media thickness were extracted. Finally, axial stress was estimated using an appropriate constitutive equation for thin-walled tubes. Performance of the proposed model was evaluated using goodness of fit between approximated and measured longitudinal displacement statistics. Values of goodness-of-fit statistics indicated high quality of fit for all investigated subjects with the mean adjusted R-square (0.86 ± 0.08) and root mean squared error (0.08 ± 0.04 mm). According to the results of the present study, maximum and minimum axial stresses exerted on the arterial wall are 1.7 ± 0.6 and -1.5 ± 0.5 kPa, respectively. These results reveal the potential of this technique to provide a new method to assess arterial stress from ultrasound images, overcoming the limitations of the finite element and other simulation techniques. PMID:26563198

  7. Imaging the Vessel Wall in Major Peripheral Arteries using Susceptibility Weighted Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi; Liu, Jiantao; Barnes, Samuel R.S.; Wu, Zhen; Li, Kuncheng; Neelavalli, Jaladhar; Hu, Jiani; Haacke, E. Mark

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate a novel contrast mechanism for imaging the vessel wall and vessel wall calcification using susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI). Materials and Methods 18 subjects were imaged with multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) and high resolution SWI at 3T. The SWI imaging parameters were optimized to allow for the best visualization of the femoral artery lumen and the arterial wall in magnitude and phase images, respectively. SWI filtered phase data were used to evaluate the diamagnetic susceptibility of vessel wall and of putative vessel wall calcification. Imaging was performed using TE = 15.6 ms (in-phase for fat); TR = 25 ms, FA = 10°, BW = 80 Hz/pixel, resolution = 0.5mm ×0.5mm in-plane and 1.0mm through-plane, an acquisition matrix of 512 × 384 × 64 (for read, phase and slice-select directions) and a total scan time of 8 minutes. Results Nineteen calcifications were identified in CT and SWI and they correlated well in both size and position. The contrast-to-noise ratio between the blood signal in the lumen of the artery and arterial wall was 11.7:1 and 7.4:1 in magnitude and in phase images, respectively. Conclusion SWI provides a novel means to visualize vessel wall and recognize the presence of calcification. PMID:19629989

  8. Variation in electrosurgical vessel seal quality along the length of a porcine carotid artery

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Hayley Louise; Richards, Rosie; Pullin, Rhys; Yang, TH Jimmy; Blain, Emma J; Evans, Sam L

    2016-01-01

    Electrosurgical vessel sealing has been demonstrated to have benefits for both patients and practitioners, but significant variation in the strength of the seal continues to be a concern. This study aims to examine the variation in electrosurgical seal quality along the length of a porcine common carotid artery and explore the relationships between seal quality, vessel size and morphology. Additionally, the study aimed to investigate the minimum safety threshold for successful seals and the influence of vessel characteristics on meeting this requirement. A total of 35 porcine carotid arteries were sealed using the PlasmaKinetic Open Seal device (Gyrus). Each seal was burst pressure tested and a sample taken for staining with elastin van Gieson’s stain, with morphological quantification using image processing software ImageJ. With increasing distance from the bifurcation, there was an increase in seal strength and a reduction in both elastin content and vessel outer diameter. A significant correlation was found between burst pressure with both outer diameter (p < 0.0001) and elastin content (p = 0.001). When considering the safe limits of operation, vessels of less than 5 mm in outer diameter were shown to consistently produce a seal of a sufficient strength (burst pressure > 360 mmHg) irrespective of vessel morphology. PMID:26743899

  9. Variation in electrosurgical vessel seal quality along the length of a porcine carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Hayley Louise; Richards, Rosie; Pullin, Rhys; Yang, Th Jimmy; Blain, Emma J; Evans, Sam L

    2016-03-01

    Electrosurgical vessel sealing has been demonstrated to have benefits for both patients and practitioners, but significant variation in the strength of the seal continues to be a concern. This study aims to examine the variation in electrosurgical seal quality along the length of a porcine common carotid artery and explore the relationships between seal quality, vessel size and morphology. Additionally, the study aimed to investigate the minimum safety threshold for successful seals and the influence of vessel characteristics on meeting this requirement. A total of 35 porcine carotid arteries were sealed using the PlasmaKinetic Open Seal device (Gyrus). Each seal was burst pressure tested and a sample taken for staining with elastin van Gieson's stain, with morphological quantification using image processing software ImageJ. With increasing distance from the bifurcation, there was an increase in seal strength and a reduction in both elastin content and vessel outer diameter. A significant correlation was found between burst pressure with both outer diameter (p < 0.0001) and elastin content (p = 0.001). When considering the safe limits of operation, vessels of less than 5 mm in outer diameter were shown to consistently produce a seal of a sufficient strength (burst pressure > 360 mmHg) irrespective of vessel morphology. PMID:26743899

  10. Noncontrast MR Angiography for Comprehensive Assessment of Abdominopelvic Arteries using Quadruple Inversion-Recovery Preconditioning and 3D balanced Steady-State Free Precession Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Atanasova, Iliyana P.; Kim, Daniel; Lim, Ruth P.; Storey, Pippa; Kim, Sooah; Guo, Hua; Lee, Vivian S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To develop a non-contrast MR angiography (MRA) method for comprehensive evaluation of abdominopelvic arteries in a single 3D acquisition. Materials and Methods A non-contrast MRA (NC MRA) pulse sequence was developed using 4 inversion-recovery (IR) pulses and 3D balanced steady-state free precession (b-SSFP) readout to provide arterial imaging from renal to external iliac arteries. Respiratory triggered, high spatial resolution (1.3 × 1.3 × 1.7 mm3) non-contrast angiograms were obtained in seven volunteers and ten patients referred for gadolinium-enhanced MRA (CE MRA). Images were assessed for diagnostic quality by two radiologists. Quantitative measurements of arterial signal contrast were also performed. Results NC MRA imaging was successfully completed in all subjects in 7.0 ± 2.3 minutes. In controls, image quality of NC MRA averaged 2.79 ± 0.39 on a scale of 0 to 3, where 3 is maximum. Image quality of NC MRA (2.65 ± 0.41) was comparable to that of CE MRA (2.9 ± 0.32) in all patients. Contrast ratio measurements in patients demonstrated that NC MRA provides arterial contrast comparable to source CE MRA images with adequate venous and excellent background tissue suppression. Conclusion The proposed non-contrast MRA pulse sequence provides high quality visualization of abdominopelvic arteries within clinically feasible scan times. PMID:21591013

  11. Despeckle filtering software toolbox for ultrasound imaging of the common carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Loizou, Christos P; Theofanous, Charoula; Pantziaris, Marios; Kasparis, Takis

    2014-04-01

    Ultrasound imaging of the common carotid artery (CCA) is a non-invasive tool used in medicine to assess the severity of atherosclerosis and monitor its progression through time. It is also used in border detection and texture characterization of the atherosclerotic carotid plaque in the CCA, the identification and measurement of the intima-media thickness (IMT) and the lumen diameter that all are very important in the assessment of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Visual perception, however, is hindered by speckle, a multiplicative noise, that degrades the quality of ultrasound B-mode imaging. Noise reduction is therefore essential for improving the visual observation quality or as a pre-processing step for further automated analysis, such as image segmentation of the IMT and the atherosclerotic carotid plaque in ultrasound images. In order to facilitate this preprocessing step, we have developed in MATLAB(®) a unified toolbox that integrates image despeckle filtering (IDF), texture analysis and image quality evaluation techniques to automate the pre-processing and complement the disease evaluation in ultrasound CCA images. The proposed software, is based on a graphical user interface (GUI) and incorporates image normalization, 10 different despeckle filtering techniques (DsFlsmv, DsFwiener, DsFlsminsc, DsFkuwahara, DsFgf, DsFmedian, DsFhmedian, DsFad, DsFnldif, DsFsrad), image intensity normalization, 65 texture features, 15 quantitative image quality metrics and objective image quality evaluation. The software is publicly available in an executable form, which can be downloaded from http://www.cs.ucy.ac.cy/medinfo/. It was validated on 100 ultrasound images of the CCA, by comparing its results with quantitative visual analysis performed by a medical expert. It was observed that the despeckle filters DsFlsmv, and DsFhmedian improved image quality perception (based on the expert's assessment and the image texture and quality metrics). It is anticipated that the

  12. Characterization of endothelial function in the brachial artery via affine registration of ultrasonographic image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamata, Pablo; Laclaustra, Martin; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2003-05-01

    The assessment and characterization of the endothelial function is a current research topic as it may play an important role in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. Flow mediated dilatation may be used to investigate endothelial function, and B-mode ultrasonography is a cheap and non-invasive way to assess the vasodilation response. Computerized analysis techniques are very desirable to give higher accuracy and objectivity to the measurements. A new method is presented that solves some limitations of existing methods, which in general depend on accurate edge detection of the arterial wall. This method is based on a global image analysis strategy. The arterial vasodilation between two frames is modeled by a superposition of a rigid motion model and a stretching perpendicular to the artery. Both transformation models are recovered using an image registration algorithm based on normalized mutual information and a multi-resolution search framework. Temporal continuity of in the variation of the registration parameters is enforced with a Kalman filter, since the dilation process is known to be a gradual and continuous physiological phenomenon. The proposed method presents a negligible bias when compared with manual assessment. It also eliminates artifacts introduced by patient and probe motion, thus improving the accuracy of the measurements. Finally, it is also robust to typical problems of ultrasound, like speckle noise and poor image quality.

  13. Arterial Tortuosity Syndrome: An Approach through Imaging Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Venkatraman

    2014-01-01

    This pictorial illustration demonstrates various aspects of arterial tortuosity syndrome (ATS) obtained predominantly from a multiple detector computed tomography (MDCT) examination of a patient. In addition, a comprehensive review of typical multi-modality imaging observations in patients with ATS is presented along with a description of a few imaging signs. Non-invasively obtained, conclusive information is required in patients with ATS in view of the fragile vascular structures involved. An amazing wealth of information can be obtained by reviewing the volumetric data sets of MDCT examination. In the context of incomplete clinical information or remote reading of radiographic examination with inadequate clinical details, ability to “image data mine” the hidden, unexplored information may be vastly useful. The role of MDCT as a single modality of evaluation in ATS is highlighted. PMID:25250193

  14. Image quality based x-ray dose control in cardiac imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Andrew G.; Kengyelics, Stephen M.; Gislason-Lee, Amber J.

    2015-03-01

    An automated closed-loop dose control system balances the radiation dose delivered to patients and the quality of images produced in cardiac x-ray imaging systems. Using computer simulations, this study compared two designs of automatic x-ray dose control in terms of the radiation dose and quality of images produced. The first design, commonly in x-ray systems today, maintained a constant dose rate at the image receptor. The second design maintained a constant image quality in the output images. A computer model represented patients as a polymethylmetacrylate phantom (which has similar x-ray attenuation to soft tissue), containing a detail representative of an artery filled with contrast medium. The model predicted the entrance surface dose to the phantom and contrast to noise ratio of the detail as an index of image quality. Results showed that for the constant dose control system, phantom dose increased substantially with phantom size (x5 increase between 20 cm and 30 cm thick phantom), yet the image quality decreased by 43% for the same thicknesses. For the constant quality control, phantom dose increased at a greater rate with phantom thickness (>x10 increase between 20 cm and 30 cm phantom). Image quality based dose control could tailor the x-ray output to just achieve the quality required, which would reduce dose to patients where the current dose control produces images of too high quality. However, maintaining higher levels of image quality for large patients would result in a significant dose increase over current practice.

  15. Automatic determination of the artery vein ratio in retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeijer, Meindert; van Ginneken, Bram; Abràmoff, Michael D.

    2010-03-01

    A lower ratio between the width of the arteries and veins (Arteriolar-to-Venular diameter Ratio, AVR) on the retina, is well established to be predictive of stroke and other cardiovascular events in adults, as well as an increased risk of retinopathy of prematurity in premature infants. This work presents an automatic method that detects the location of the optic disc, determines the appropriate region of interest (ROI), classifies the vessels in the ROI into arteries and veins, measures their widths and calculates the AVR. After vessel segmentation and vessel width determination the optic disc is located and the system eliminates all vessels outside the AVR measurement ROI. The remaining vessels are thinned, vessel crossing and bifurcation points are removed leaving a set of vessel segments containing centerline pixels. Features are extracted from each centerline pixel that are used to assign them a soft label indicating the likelihood the pixel is part of a vein. As all centerline pixels in a connected segment should be the same type, the median soft label is assigned to each centerline pixel in the segment. Next artery vein pairs are matched using an iterative algorithm and the widths of the vessels is used to calculate the AVR. We train and test the algorithm using a set of 25 high resolution digital color fundus photographs a reference standard that indicates for the major vessels in the images whether they are an artery or a vein. We compared the AVR values produced by our system with those determined using a computer assisted method in 15 high resolution digital color fundus photographs and obtained a correlation coefficient of 0.881.

  16. Augmented reality image guidance for minimally invasive coronary artery bypass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figl, Michael; Rueckert, Daniel; Hawkes, David; Casula, Roberto; Hu, Mingxing; Pedro, Ose; Zhang, Dong Ping; Penney, Graeme; Bello, Fernando; Edwards, Philip

    2008-03-01

    We propose a novel system for image guidance in totally endoscopic coronary artery bypass (TECAB). A key requirement is the availability of 2D-3D registration techniques that can deal with non-rigid motion and deformation. Image guidance for TECAB is mainly required before the mechanical stabilization of the heart, thus the most dominant source of non-rigid deformation is the motion of the beating heart. To augment the images in the endoscope of the da Vinci robot, we have to find the transformation from the coordinate system of the preoperative imaging modality to the system of the endoscopic cameras. In a first step we build a 4D motion model of the beating heart. Intraoperatively we can use the ECG or video processing to determine the phase of the cardiac cycle. We can then take the heart surface from the motion model and register it to the stereo-endoscopic images of the da Vinci robot using 2D-3D registration methods. We are investigating robust feature tracking and intensity-based methods for this purpose. Images of the vessels available in the preoperative coordinate system can then be transformed to the camera system and projected into the calibrated endoscope view using two video mixers with chroma keying. It is hoped that the augmented view can improve the efficiency of TECAB surgery and reduce the conversion rate to more conventional procedures.

  17. Comparative imaging study in ultrasound, MRI, CT, and DSA using a multimodality renal artery phantom

    SciTech Connect

    King, Deirdre M.; Fagan, Andrew J.; Moran, Carmel M.; Browne, Jacinta E.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: A range of anatomically realistic multimodality renal artery phantoms consisting of vessels with varying degrees of stenosis was developed and evaluated using four imaging techniques currently used to detect renal artery stenosis (RAS). The spatial resolution required to visualize vascular geometry and the velocity detection performance required to adequately characterize blood flow in patients suffering from RAS are currently ill-defined, with the result that no one imaging modality has emerged as a gold standard technique for screening for this disease. Methods: The phantoms, which contained a range of stenosis values (0%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 85%), were designed for use with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, and x-ray digital subtraction angiography. The construction materials used were optimized with respect to their ultrasonic speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, MR relaxometry (T{sub 1},T{sub 2}) properties, and Hounsfield number/x-ray attenuation coefficient, with a design capable of tolerating high-pressure pulsatile flow. Fiducial targets, incorporated into the phantoms to allow for registration of images among modalities, were chosen to minimize geometric distortions. Results: High quality distortion-free images of the phantoms with good contrast between vessel lumen, fiducial markers, and background tissue to visualize all stenoses were obtained with each modality. Quantitative assessments of the grade of stenosis revealed significant discrepancies between modalities, with each underestimating the stenosis severity for the higher-stenosed phantoms (70% and 85%) by up to 14%, with the greatest discrepancy attributable to DSA. Conclusions: The design and construction of a range of anatomically realistic renal artery phantoms containing varying degrees of stenosis is described. Images obtained using the main four diagnostic techniques used to detect RAS were free from artifacts and exhibited adequate contrast

  18. Image quality assessment in the low quality regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Guilherme O.; Hemami, Sheila S.

    2012-03-01

    Traditionally, image quality estimators have been designed and optimized to operate over the entire quality range of images in a database, from very low quality to visually lossless. However, if quality estimation is limited to a smaller quality range, their performances drop dramatically, and many image applications only operate over such a smaller range. This paper is concerned with one such range, the low-quality regime, which is defined as the interval of perceived quality scores where there exists a linear relationship between the perceived quality scores and the perceived utility scores and exists at the low-quality end of image databases. Using this definition, this paper describes a subjective experiment to determine the low-quality regime for databases of distorted images that include perceived quality scores but not perceived utility scores, such as CSIQ and LIVE. The performances of several image utility and quality estimators are evaluated in the low-quality regime, indicating that utility estimators can be successfully applied to estimate perceived quality in this regime. Omission of the lowestfrequency image content is shown to be crucial to the performances of both kinds of estimators. Additionally, this paper establishes an upper-bound for the performances of quality estimators in the LQR, using a family of quality estimators based on VIF. The resulting optimal quality estimator indicates that estimating quality in the low-quality regime is robust to exact frequency pooling weights, and that near-optimal performance can be achieved by a variety of estimators providing that they substantially emphasize the appropriate frequency content.

  19. Direct Characterization of Arterial Input Functions by Fluorescence Imaging of Exposed Carotid Artery to Facilitate Kinetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Sexton, Kristian J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose With the goal of facilitating tracer kinetic analysis in small-animal planar fluorescence imaging, an experimental method for characterizing tracer arterial input functions is presented. The proposed method involves exposing the common carotid arteries by surgical dissection, which can then be imaged directly during tracer injection and clearance. Procedures Arterial concentration curves of IRDye-700DX-carboxylate, IRDye-800CW-EGF, and IRDye-800CW conjugated to anti-EGFR Affibody are recovered from athymic female mice (n=12) by directly imaging exposed vessels. Images were acquired with two imaging protocols: a slow-kinetics approach (temporal resolution=45 s) to recover the arterial curves from two tracers simultaneously, and a fast-kinetics approach (temporal resolution=500 ms) to characterize the first-pass peak of a single tracer. Arterial input functions obtained by the carotid imaging technique, as well as plasma curves measured by blood sampling were fit with a biexponential pharmacokinetic model. Results Pharmacological fast- and slow-phase rate constants recovered with the proposed method were 0.37±0.26 and 0.007±0.001 min−1, respectively, for the IRDye700DX-C. For the IRDye800CW-EGF, the rate constants were 0.11±0.13 and 0.003±0.002 min−1. These rate constants did not differ significantly from those calculated previously by blood sampling, as determined by an F test; however, the between-subject variability was four times lower for arterial curves recovered using the proposed technique, compared with blood sampling. Conclusions The proposed technique enables the direct characterization of arterial input functions for kinetic analysis. As this method requires no additional instrumentation, it is immediately deployable in commercially available planar fluorescence imaging systems. PMID:24420443

  20. High-definition computed tomography for coronary artery stents: image quality and radiation doses for low voltage (100 kVp) and standard voltage (120 kVp) ECG-triggered scanning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Won; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Han Cheol; Wu, Ming-Ting; Hwangbo, Lee; Choo, Ki Seok; Kim, June Hong; Lee, Ki-Nam; Kim, Jin You; Jeong, Yeon Joo

    2015-06-01

    The noninvasive assessment of coronary stents by coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is an attractive method. However, the radiation dose associated with CCTA remains a concern for patients. The purpose of this study is to compare the radiation doses and image qualities of CCTA performed using tube voltages of 100 or 120 kVp for the evaluation of coronary stents. After receiving institutional review board approval, 53 consecutive patients with previously implanted stents (101 stents) underwent 64-slice CCTA. Patients were divided into three different protocol groups, namely, prospective ECG triggering at 100 kVp, prospective ECG triggering at 120 kVp, or retrospective gating at 100 kVp. Two reviewers qualitatively scored the quality of the resulting images for coronary stents and determined levels of artificial lumen narrowing (ALN), stent lumen attenuation increase ratio (SAIR), image noise, and radiation dose parameters. No significant differences were found between the three protocol groups concerning qualitative image quality or SAIR. Coronary lumen attenuation and in-stent attenuation of 100 kVp prospective CCTA (P-CCTA) were higher than in the 120 kVp P-CCTA protocol (all Ps < 0.001). Mean ALN was significantly lower for 100 kVp P-CCTA than for 100 kVp retrospective CCTA (R-CCTA, P = 0.007). The mean effective radiation dose was significantly lower (P < 0.001) for 100 kVp P-CCTA (3.3 ± 0.4 mSv) than for the other two protocols (100 kVp R-CCTA 6.7 ± 1.0 mSv, 120 kVp P-CCTA 4.6 ± 1.2 mSv). We conclude that the use of 100 kVp P-CCTA can reduce radiation doses for patients while maintaining the imaging quality of 100 kVp R-CCTA and 120 kVp P-CCTA for the evaluation of coronary stents. PMID:26022439

  1. Assessing product image quality for online shopping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Anjan; Chung, Sung H.; Chittar, Naren; Islam, Atiq

    2012-01-01

    Assessing product-image quality is important in the context of online shopping. A high quality image that conveys more information about a product can boost the buyer's confidence and can get more attention. However, the notion of image quality for product-images is not the same as that in other domains. The perception of quality of product-images depends not only on various photographic quality features but also on various high level features such as clarity of the foreground or goodness of the background etc. In this paper, we define a notion of product-image quality based on various such features. We conduct a crowd-sourced experiment to collect user judgments on thousands of eBay's images. We formulate a multi-class classification problem for modeling image quality by classifying images into good, fair and poor quality based on the guided perceptual notions from the judges. We also conduct experiments with regression using average crowd-sourced human judgments as target. We compute a pseudo-regression score with expected average of predicted classes and also compute a score from the regression technique. We design many experiments with various sampling and voting schemes with crowd-sourced data and construct various experimental image quality models. Most of our models have reasonable accuracies (greater or equal to 70%) on test data set. We observe that our computed image quality score has a high (0.66) rank correlation with average votes from the crowd sourced human judgments.

  2. Infrared image quality evaluation method without reference image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Song; Ren, Tingting; Wang, Chengsheng; Lei, Bo; Zhang, Zhijie

    2013-09-01

    Since infrared image quality depends on many factors such as optical performance and electrical noise of thermal imager, image quality evaluation becomes an important issue which can conduce to both image processing afterward and capability improving of thermal imager. There are two ways of infrared image quality evaluation, with or without reference image. For real-time thermal image, the method without reference image is preferred because it is difficult to get a standard image. Although there are various kinds of methods for evaluation, there is no general metric for image quality evaluation. This paper introduces a novel method to evaluate infrared image without reference image from five aspects: noise, clarity, information volume and levels, information in frequency domain and the capability of automatic target recognition. Generally, the basic image quality is obtained from the first four aspects, and the quality of target is acquired from the last aspect. The proposed method is tested on several infrared images captured by different thermal imagers. Calculate the indicators and compare with human vision results. The evaluation shows that this method successfully describes the characteristics of infrared image and the result is consistent with human vision system.

  3. Coronary artery anomalies in adults: imaging at dual source CT coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Laspas, Fotios; Roussakis, Arkadios; Mourmouris, Christos; Kritikos, Nikolaos; Efthimiadou, Roxani; Andreou, John

    2013-04-01

    Congenital abnormalities of the coronary arteries have an incidence of 1%, and most of these are benign. However, a small number are associated with myocardial ischaemia and sudden death. Various imaging modalities are available for coronary artery assessment. Recently, multi-detector CT has emerged as an accurate diagnostic tool for defining coronary artery anomalies. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the dual source CT appearance of congenital anomalies of the coronary arteries in adults. PMID:23551776

  4. Comparative evaluation of despeckle filtering in ultrasound imaging of the carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Loizou, Christos P; Pattichis, Constantinos S; Christodoulou, Christodoulos I; Istepanian, Robert S H; Pantziaris, Marios; Nicolaides, Andrew

    2005-10-01

    It is well-known that speckle is a multiplicative noise that degrades the visual evaluation in ultrasound imaging. The recent advancements in ultrasound instrumentation and portable ultrasound devices necessitate the need of more robust despeckling techniques for enhanced ultrasound medical imaging for both routine clinical practice and teleconsultation. The objective of this work was to carry out a comparative evaluation of despeckle filtering based on texture analysis, image quality evaluation metrics, and visual evaluation by medical experts in the assessment of 440 (220 asymptomatic and 220 symptomatic) ultrasound images of the carotid artery bifurcation. In this paper a total of 10 despeckle filters were evaluated based on local statistics, median filtering, pixel homogeneity, geometric filtering, homomorphic filtering, anisotropic diffusion, nonlinear coherence diffusion, and wavelet filtering. The results of this study suggest that the first order statistics filter lsmv, gave the best performance, followed by the geometric filter gf4d, and the homogeneous mask area filter lsminsc. These filters improved the class separation between the asymptomatic and the symptomatic classes based on the statistics of the extracted texture features, gave only a marginal improvement in the classification success rate, and improved the visual assessment carried out by the two experts. More specifically, filters lsmv or gf4d can be used for despeckling asymptomatic images in which the expert is interested mainly in the plaque composition and texture analysis; and filters lsmv, gf4d, or lsminsc can be used for the despeckling of symptomatic images in which the expert is interested in identifying the degree of stenosis and the plaque borders. The proper selection of a despeckle filter is very important in the enhancement of ultrasonic imaging of the carotid artery. Further work is needed to evaluate at a larger scale and in clinical practice the performance of the proposed

  5. An Underwater Color Image Quality Evaluation Metric.

    PubMed

    Yang, Miao; Sowmya, Arcot

    2015-12-01

    Quality evaluation of underwater images is a key goal of underwater video image retrieval and intelligent processing. To date, no metric has been proposed for underwater color image quality evaluation (UCIQE). The special absorption and scattering characteristics of the water medium do not allow direct application of natural color image quality metrics especially to different underwater environments. In this paper, subjective testing for underwater image quality has been organized. The statistical distribution of the underwater image pixels in the CIELab color space related to subjective evaluation indicates the sharpness and colorful factors correlate well with subjective image quality perception. Based on these, a new UCIQE metric, which is a linear combination of chroma, saturation, and contrast, is proposed to quantify the non-uniform color cast, blurring, and low-contrast that characterize underwater engineering and monitoring images. Experiments are conducted to illustrate the performance of the proposed UCIQE metric and its capability to measure the underwater image enhancement results. They show that the proposed metric has comparable performance to the leading natural color image quality metrics and the underwater grayscale image quality metrics available in the literature, and can predict with higher accuracy the relative amount of degradation with similar image content in underwater environments. Importantly, UCIQE is a simple and fast solution for real-time underwater video processing. The effectiveness of the presented measure is also demonstrated by subjective evaluation. The results show better correlation between the UCIQE and the subjective mean opinion score. PMID:26513783

  6. In-vivo validation of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) of coronary arteries in swine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bec, Julien; Ma, Dinglong; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Gorpas, Dimitris S.; Ferrier, William T.; Southard, Jeffrey; Marcu, Laura

    2015-02-01

    We report a scanning imaging system that enables high speed multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) of coronary arteries. This system combines a custom low profile (3 Fr) imaging catheter using a 200 μm core side viewing UV-grade silica fiber optic, an acquisition system able to measure fluorescence decays over four spectral bands at 20 kHz and a fast data analysis and display module. In vivo use of the system has been optimized, with particular emphasis on clearing blood from the optical pathway. A short acquisition time (5 seconds for a 20 mm long coronary segment) enabled data acquisition during a bolus saline solution injection through the 7 Fr catheter guide. The injection parameters were precisely controlled using a power injector and optimized to provide good image quality while limiting the bolus injection duration and volume (12 cc/s, 80 cc total volume). The ability of the system to acquire data in vivo was validated in healthy swine by imaging different sections of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary. A stent coated with fluorescent markers was placed in the LAD and imaged, demonstrating the ability of the system to discriminate in vivo different fluorescent features and structures from the vessel background fluorescence using spectral and lifetime information. Intensity en face images over the four bands of the instrument were available within seconds whereas lifetime images were computed in 2 minutes, providing efficient feedback during the procedure. This successful demonstration of FLIm in coronaries enables future study of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

  7. Analysis of the Sensitivity and Specificity of Noninvasive Imaging Tests for the Diagnosis of Renal Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Borelli, Flavio Antonio de Oliveira; Pinto, Ibraim M. F.; Amodeo, Celso; Smanio, Paola E. P.; Kambara, Antonio M.; Petisco, Ana Claudia G.; Moreira, Samuel M.; Paiva, Ricardo Calil; Lopes, Hugo Belotti; Sousa, Amanda G. M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Aging and atherosclerosis are related to renovascular hypertension in elderly individuals. Regardless of comorbidities, renal artery stenosis is itself an important cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Objective To define the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of noninvasive imaging tests used in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis. Methods In a group of 61 patients recruited, 122 arteries were analized, thus permitting the definition of sensitivity, specificity, and the relative contribution of each imaging study performed (Doppler, scintigraphy and computed tomographic angiography in comparison to renal arteriography). Results The mean age was 65.43 years (standard deviation: 8.7). Of the variables related to the study population that were compared to arteriography, two correlated with renal artery stenosis, renal dysfunction and triglycerides. The median glomerular filtration rate was 52.8 mL/min/m2. Doppler showed sensitivity of 82.90%, specificity of 70%, a positive predictive value of 85% and negative predictive value of 66.70%. For tomography, sensitivity was 66.70%, specificity 80%, positive predictive value 87.50% and negative predictive value 55.20%. With these findings, we could identify the imaging tests that best detected stenosis. Conclusion Tomography and Doppler showed good quality and efficacy in the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis, with Doppler having the advantage of not requiring the use of contrast medium for the assessment of a disease that is common in diabetics and is associated with renal dysfunction and severe left ventricular dysfunction. PMID:24061685

  8. Automated construction of arterial and venous trees in retinal images.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiao; Abràmoff, Michael D; Garvin, Mona K

    2015-10-01

    While many approaches exist to segment retinal vessels in fundus photographs, only a limited number focus on the construction and disambiguation of arterial and venous trees. Previous approaches are local and/or greedy in nature, making them susceptible to errors or limiting their applicability to large vessels. We propose a more global framework to generate arteriovenous trees in retinal images, given a vessel segmentation. In particular, our approach consists of three stages. The first stage is to generate an overconnected vessel network, named the vessel potential connectivity map (VPCM), consisting of vessel segments and the potential connectivity between them. The second stage is to disambiguate the VPCM into multiple anatomical trees, using a graph-based metaheuristic algorithm. The third stage is to classify these trees into arterial or venous (A/V) trees. We evaluated our approach with a ground truth built based on a public database, showing a pixel-wise classification accuracy of 88.15% using a manual vessel segmentation as input, and 86.11% using an automatic vessel segmentation as input. PMID:26636114

  9. Blood vessel classification into arteries and veins in retinal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondermann, Claudia; Kondermann, Daniel; Yan, Michelle

    2007-03-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is expected to increase dramatically in coming years; already today it accounts for a major proportion of the health care budget in many countries. Diabetic Retinopathy (DR), a micro vascular complication very often seen in diabetes patients, is the most common cause of visual loss in working age population of developed countries today. Since the possibility of slowing or even stopping the progress of this disease depends on the early detection of DR, an automatic analysis of fundus images would be of great help to the ophthalmologist due to the small size of the symptoms and the large number of patients. An important symptom for DR are abnormally wide veins leading to an unusually low ratio of the average diameter of arteries to veins (AVR). There are also other diseases like high blood pressure or diseases of the pancreas with one symptom being an abnormal AVR value. To determine it, a classification of vessels as arteries or veins is indispensable. As to our knowledge despite the importance there have only been two approaches to vessel classification yet. Therefore we propose an improved method. We compare two feature extraction methods and two classification methods based on support vector machines and neural networks. Given a hand-segmentation of vessels our approach achieves 95.32% correctly classified vessel pixels. This value decreases by 10% on average, if the result of a segmentation algorithm is used as basis for the classification.

  10. Noninvasive two-dimensional strain imaging of arteries: validation in phantoms and preliminary experience in carotid arteries in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ribbers, Hermine; Lopata, Richard G P; Holewijn, Suzanne; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Blankensteijn, Jan D; de Korte, Chris L

    2007-04-01

    Cardiac disease and stroke are the major causes of death in the Western World. Atherosclerosis of the carotid artery is the most important predictor of stroke. Elastography is a technique to assess the composition and vulnerability of an atherosclerotic plaque. Contrary to intravascular applications, the ultrasound beam and radial strain are not aligned in noninvasive acquisitions. In this study, 2D displacement and strain images were determined and used to calculate the radial and circumferential strain. Rf-data were acquired using a Philips SONOS 7500 live 3D ultrasound system, equipped with an 11_3L (3 to 11 MHz) linear array transducer and rf-interface. A homogeneous, hollow cylinder phantom [20% gelatin, 1% SiC scatterers (10 microM)] was measured in a water tank at different intraluminal pressures. In addition, measurements in patients (n = 12) were made to evaluate the in vivo applicability of the technique. Longitudinal and cross-sectional recordings were made, both in phantoms and patients. Strain along the ultrasound beam (axial strain) was determined using cross-correlation analysis for signal-windows from both the pre- and post-compression data. For lateral strain, new ultrasound lines were generated between the acquired lines using interpolation. A cross-correlation based search algorithm was applied to determine lateral displacement and strain. Longitudinal axial strain images in the phantom showed a decreasing strain from the lumen- vessel wall interface to the outer region that can be described by a 1 over r(2) relationship. The lateral strain image showed no strain in this direction indicating a plane strain situation. In the cross-sectional view, compression of the material in regions at 12 and 6 o'clock was observed, whereas expansion was observed in regions at 3 and 9 o'clock. This pattern is in accordance with theory, but can only be partly corrected for: in the transition regions, zero axial strain was measured. The lateral strain image showed

  11. Process perspective on image quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisti, Tuomas; Halonen, Raisa; Kokkonen, Anna; Weckman, Hanna; Mettänen, Marja; Lensu, Lasse; Ritala, Risto; Oittinen, Pirkko; Nyman, Göte

    2008-01-01

    The psychological complexity of multivariate image quality evaluation makes it difficult to develop general image quality metrics. Quality evaluation includes several mental processes and ignoring these processes and the use of a few test images can lead to biased results. By using a qualitative/quantitative (Interpretation Based Quality, IBQ) methodology, we examined the process of pair-wise comparison in a setting, where the quality of the images printed by laser printer on different paper grades was evaluated. Test image consisted of a picture of a table covered with several objects. Three other images were also used, photographs of a woman, cityscape and countryside. In addition to the pair-wise comparisons, observers (N=10) were interviewed about the subjective quality attributes they used in making their quality decisions. An examination of the individual pair-wise comparisons revealed serious inconsistencies in observers' evaluations on the test image content, but not on other contexts. The qualitative analysis showed that this inconsistency was due to the observers' focus of attention. The lack of easily recognizable context in the test image may have contributed to this inconsistency. To obtain reliable knowledge of the effect of image context or attention on subjective image quality, a qualitative methodology is needed.

  12. Wavelet based image quality self measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jawad, Naseer; Jassim, Sabah

    2010-04-01

    Noise in general is considered to be degradation in image quality. Moreover image quality is measured based on the appearance of the image edges and their clarity. Most of the applications performance is affected by image quality and level of different types of degradation. In general measuring image quality and identifying the type of noise or degradation is considered to be a key factor in raising the applications performance, this task can be very challenging. Wavelet transform now a days, is widely used in different applications. These applications are mostly benefiting from the wavelet localisation in the frequency domain. The coefficients of the high frequency sub-bands in wavelet domain are represented by Laplace histogram. In this paper we are proposing to use the Laplace distribution histogram to measure the image quality and also to identify the type of degradation affecting the given image. Image quality and the level of degradation are mostly measured using a reference image with reasonable quality. The discussed Laplace distribution histogram provides a self testing measurement for the quality of the image. This measurement is based on constructing the theoretical Laplace distribution histogram of the high frequency wavelet sub-band. This construction is based on the actual standard deviation, then to be compared with the actual Laplace distribution histogram. The comparison is performed using histogram intersection method. All the experiments are performed using the extended Yale database.

  13. Automatic no-reference image quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjun; Hu, Wei; Xu, Zi-Neng

    2016-01-01

    No-reference image quality assessment aims to predict the visual quality of distorted images without examining the original image as a reference. Most no-reference image quality metrics which have been already proposed are designed for one or a set of predefined specific distortion types and are unlikely to generalize for evaluating images degraded with other types of distortion. There is a strong need of no-reference image quality assessment methods which are applicable to various distortions. In this paper, the authors proposed a no-reference image quality assessment method based on a natural image statistic model in the wavelet transform domain. A generalized Gaussian density model is employed to summarize the marginal distribution of wavelet coefficients of the test images, so that correlative parameters are needed for the evaluation of image quality. The proposed algorithm is tested on three large-scale benchmark databases. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is easy to implement and computational efficient. Furthermore, our method can be applied to many well-known types of image distortions, and achieves a good quality of prediction performance. PMID:27468398

  14. JPEG2000 still image coding quality.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzong-Jer; Lin, Sheng-Chieh; Lin, You-Chen; Cheng, Ren-Gui; Lin, Li-Hui; Wu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    This work demonstrates the image qualities between two popular JPEG2000 programs. Two medical image compression algorithms are both coded using JPEG2000, but they are different regarding the interface, convenience, speed of computation, and their characteristic options influenced by the encoder, quantization, tiling, etc. The differences in image quality and compression ratio are also affected by the modality and compression algorithm implementation. Do they provide the same quality? The qualities of compressed medical images from two image compression programs named Apollo and JJ2000 were evaluated extensively using objective metrics. These algorithms were applied to three medical image modalities at various compression ratios ranging from 10:1 to 100:1. Following that, the quality of the reconstructed images was evaluated using five objective metrics. The Spearman rank correlation coefficients were measured under every metric in the two programs. We found that JJ2000 and Apollo exhibited indistinguishable image quality for all images evaluated using the above five metrics (r > 0.98, p < 0.001). It can be concluded that the image quality of the JJ2000 and Apollo algorithms is statistically equivalent for medical image compression. PMID:23589187

  15. Tissue Doppler Imaging in Coronary Artery Diseases and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Correale, Michele; Totaro, Antonio; Ieva, Riccardo; Ferraretti, Armando; Musaico, Francesco; Biase, Matteo Di

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have explored the prognostic role of TDI-derived parameters in major cardiac diseases, such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure (HF). In these conditions, myocardial mitral annular systolic (S’) and early diastolic (E’) velocities have been shown to predict mortality or cardiovascular events. In heart failure non invasive assessment of LV diastolic pressure by transmitral to mitral annular early diastolic velocity ratio (E/E’) is a strong prognosticator, especially when E/E’ is > or =15. Moreover, other parameters derived by TDI, as cardiac time intervals and Myocardial Performance Index, might play a role in the prognostic stratification in CAD and HF. Recently, a three-dimensional (3-D) TDI imaging modality, triplane TDI, has become available, and this allows calculation of 3-Dvolumes and LV ejection fraction. We present a brief update of TDI. PMID:22845815

  16. Cognitive issues in image quality measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ridder, Huib

    2001-01-01

    Designers of imaging systems, image processing algorithms, etc., usually take for granted that methods for assessing perceived image quality produce unbiased estimates of the viewers' quality impression. Quality judgments, however, are affected by the judgment strategies induced by the experimental procedures. In this paper the results of two experiments are presented illustrating the influence judgment strategies can have on quality judgments. The first experiment concerns contextual effects due to the composition of the stimulus sets. Subjects assessed the sharpness of two differently composed sets of blurred versions of one static image. The sharpness judgments for the blurred images present in both stimulus sets were found to be dependent on the composition of the set as well as the scaling technique employed. In the second experiment subjects assessed either the overall quality or the overall impairment of manipulated and standard JPEG-coded images containing two main artifacts. The results indicate a systematic different between the quality and impairment judgments that could be interpreted as instruction-based different weighting of the two artifacts. Again, some influence of scaling techniques was observed. The results of both experiments underscore the important role judgment strategies play in the psychophysical evaluation of image quality. Ignoring this influence on quality judgments may lead to invalid conclusions about the viewers' impression of image quality.

  17. Phase congruency assesses hyperspectral image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiaopeng; Zhong, Cheng

    2012-10-01

    Blind image quality assessment (QA) is a tough task especially for hyperspectral imagery which is degraded by noise, distortion, defocus, and other complex factors. Subjective hyperspectral imagery QA methods are basically measured the degradation of image from human perceptual visual quality. As the most important image quality measurement features, noise and blur, determined the image quality greatly, are employed to predict the objective hyperspectral imagery quality of each band. We demonstrate a novel no-reference hyperspectral imagery QA model based on phase congruency (PC), which is a dimensionless quantity and provides an absolute measure of the significance of feature point. First, Log Gabor wavelet is used to calculate the phase congruency of frequencies of each band image. The relationship between noise and PC can be derived from above transformation under the assumption that noise is additive. Second, PC focus measure evaluation model is proposed to evaluate blur caused by different amounts of defocus. The ratio and mean factors of edge blur level and noise is defined to assess the quality of each band image. This image QA method obtains excellent correlation with subjective image quality score without any reference. Finally, the PC information is utilized to improve the quality of some bands images.

  18. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    PubMed Central

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe−/−Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages “dancing on the spot” and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells. PMID:25710308

  19. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe-/-Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP+ macrophages "dancing on the spot" and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells.

  20. Intravital live cell triggered imaging system reveals monocyte patrolling and macrophage migration in atherosclerotic arteries.

    PubMed

    McArdle, Sara; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Ray, Nilanjan; Ley, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton imaging of arteries is technically challenging because the artery expands with every heartbeat, causing severe motion artifacts. To study leukocyte activity in atherosclerosis, we developed the intravital live cell triggered imaging system (ILTIS). This system implements cardiac triggered acquisition as well as frame selection and image registration algorithms to produce stable movies of myeloid cell movement in atherosclerotic arteries in live mice. To minimize tissue damage, no mechanical stabilization is used and the artery is allowed to expand freely. ILTIS performs multicolor high frame-rate two-dimensional imaging and full-thickness three-dimensional imaging of beating arteries in live mice. The external carotid artery and its branches (superior thyroid and ascending pharyngeal arteries) were developed as a surgically accessible and reliable model of atherosclerosis. We use ILTIS to demonstrate Cx3cr1GFP monocytes patrolling the lumen of atherosclerotic arteries. Additionally, we developed a new reporter mouse (Apoe−/−Cx3cr1GFP/+Cd11cYFP) to image GFP+ and GFP+YFP + macrophages “dancing on the spot” and YFP+ macrophages migrating within intimal plaque. ILTIS will be helpful to answer pertinent open questions in the field, including monocyte recruitment and transmigration, macrophage and dendritic cell activity, and motion of other immune cells. PMID:25710308

  1. Thallium-201 myocardial imaging in young adults with anomalous left coronary artery arising from the pulmonary artery

    SciTech Connect

    Moodie, D.S.; Cook, S.A.; Gill, C.C.; Napoli, C.A.

    1980-11-01

    Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (Bland-Garland-White syndrome) may produce myocardial ischemia, infarction, and frequently death in infancy. Some patients, however, develop satisfactory coronary artery collaterals and are relatively asymptomatic into adulthood. Very little is known about their myocardial perfusion patterns. We studied three young adults with this condition using stress thallium-201 myocardial imaging. Electrocardiograms in two patients demonstrated old arterolateral myocardial infarctions. Preoperative stress exercise tests were positive in all three patients. Marked perfusion abnormalities were found in the proximal anterolateral wall in all patients, and one patient also had a posterolateral defect. Postoperatively, all stress tests returned to normal. Thallium imaging demonstrated improvement in ischemic areas, but old scars persisted.

  2. Retinal image quality assessment using generic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasih, Mahnaz; Langlois, J. M. Pierre; Ben Tahar, Houssem; Cheriet, Farida

    2014-03-01

    Retinal image quality assessment is an important step in automated eye disease diagnosis. Diagnosis accuracy is highly dependent on the quality of retinal images, because poor image quality might prevent the observation of significant eye features and disease manifestations. A robust algorithm is therefore required in order to evaluate the quality of images in a large database. We developed an algorithm for retinal image quality assessment based on generic features that is independent from segmentation methods. It exploits the local sharpness and texture features by applying the cumulative probability of blur detection metric and run-length encoding algorithm, respectively. The quality features are combined to evaluate the image's suitability for diagnosis purposes. Based on the recommendations of medical experts and our experience, we compared a global and a local approach. A support vector machine with radial basis functions was used as a nonlinear classifier in order to classify images to gradable and ungradable groups. We applied our methodology to 65 images of size 2592×1944 pixels that had been graded by a medical expert. The expert evaluated 38 images as gradable and 27 as ungradable. The results indicate very good agreement between the proposed algorithm's predictions and the medical expert's judgment: the sensitivity and specificity for the local approach are respectively 92% and 94%. The algorithm demonstrates sufficient robustness to identify relevant images for automated diagnosis.

  3. Optical coherence tomography and hyperspectral imaging of vascular recovery in a model of peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Kristin M.; Sit, Wesley W.; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Duvall, Craig L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) leads to an increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke, increased mortality, and reduced quality of life. The mouse hind limb ischemia (HLI) model is the most commonly used system for studying the mechanisms of collateral vessel formation and for testing new PAD therapies, but there is a lack of techniques for acquiring physiologically-relevant, quantitative data intravitally in this model. In this work, non-invasive, quantitative optical imaging techniques were applied to the mouse HLI model over a time course. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaged changes in blood flow (Doppler OCT) and microvessel morphology (speckle variance OCT) through the skin of haired mice with high resolution. Hyperspectral imaging was also used to quantify blood oxygenation. In ischemic limbs, blood oxygenation in the footpad was substantially reduced after induction of ischemia followed by complete recovery by three weeks, consistent with standard measures. Three dimensional images of the vasculature distal to vessel occlusion acquired with speckle variance OCT revealed changes in OCT flow signal and vessel morphology. Taken together, OCT and hyperspectral imaging enable intravital acquisition of both functional and morphological data which fill critical gaps in understanding structure-function relationships that contribute to recovery in the mouse HLI model. Therefore, these optical imaging methods hold promise as tools for studying the mechanisms of vascular recovery and evaluating novel therapeutic treatments in preclinical studies.

  4. Assessment of artery dilation by using image registration based on spatial features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oubel, Estanislao; Neemuchwala, Huzefa; Hero, Alfred; Boisrobert, Loic; Laclaustra, Martin; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2005-04-01

    The use of affine image registration based on normalized mutual information (NMI) has recently been proposed by Frangi et al. as an automatic method for assessing brachial artery flow mediated dilation (FMD) for the characterization of endothelial function. Even though this method solves many problems of previous approaches, there are still some situations that can lead to misregistration between frames, such as the presence of adjacent vessels due to probe movement, muscle fibres or poor image quality. Despite its widespread use as a registration metric and its promising results, MI is not the panacea and can occasionally fail. Previous work has attempted to include spatial information into the image similarity metric. Among these methods the direct estimation of alpha-MI through Minimum Euclidean Graphs allows to include spatial information and it seems suitable to tackle the registration problem in vascular images, where well oriented structures corresponding to vessel walls and muscle fibres are present. The purpose of this work is twofold. Firstly, we aim to evaluate the effect of including spatial information in the performance of the method suggested by Frangi et al. by using alpha-MI of spatial features as similarity metric. Secondly, the application of image registration to long image sequences in which both rigid motion and deformation are present will be used as a benchmark to prove the value of alpha-MI as a similarity metric, and will also allow us to make a comparative study with respect to NMI.

  5. Seven challenges for image quality research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Damon M.; Alam, Md M.; Phan, Thien D.

    2014-02-01

    Image quality assessment has been a topic of recent intense research due to its usefulness in a wide variety of applications. Owing in large part to efforts within the HVEI community, image-quality research has particularly benefited from improved models of visual perception. However, over the last decade, research in image quality has largely shifted from the previous broader objective of gaining a better understanding of human vision, to the current limited objective of better fitting the available ground-truth data. In this paper, we discuss seven open challenges in image quality research. These challenges stem from lack of complete perceptual models for: natural images; suprathreshold distortions; interactions between distortions and images; images containing multiple and nontraditional distortions; and images containing enhancements. We also discuss challenges related to computational efficiency. The objective of this paper is not only to highlight the limitations in our current knowledge of image quality, but to also emphasize the need for additional fundamental research in quality perception.

  6. Combined terahertz imaging system for enhanced imaging quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolganova, Irina N.; Zaytsev, Kirill I.; Metelkina, Anna A.; Yakovlev, Egor V.; Karasik, Valeriy E.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.

    2016-06-01

    An improved terahertz (THz) imaging system is proposed for enhancing image quality. Imaging scheme includes THz source and detection system operated in active mode as well as in passive one. In order to homogeneously illuminate the object plane the THz reshaper is proposed. The form and internal structure of the reshaper were studied by the numerical simulation. Using different test-objects we compare imaging quality in active and passive THz imaging modes. Imaging contrast and modulation transfer functions in active and passive imaging modes show drawbacks of them in high and low spatial frequencies, respectively. The experimental results confirm the benefit of combining both imaging modes into hybrid one. The proposed algorithm of making hybrid THz image is an effective approach of retrieving maximum information about the remote object.

  7. Optimization of synthetic aperture image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Jensen, Jonas; Villagomez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Stuart, Matthias B.; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic Aperture (SA) imaging produces high-quality images and velocity estimates of both slow and fast flow at high frame rates. However, grating lobe artifacts can appear both in transmission and reception. These affect the image quality and the frame rate. Therefore optimization of parameters effecting the image quality of SA is of great importance, and this paper proposes an advanced procedure for optimizing the parameters essential for acquiring an optimal image quality, while generating high resolution SA images. Optimization of the image quality is mainly performed based on measures such as F-number, number of emissions and the aperture size. They are considered to be the most contributing acquisition factors in the quality of the high resolution images in SA. Therefore, the performance of image quality is quantified in terms of full-width at half maximum (FWHM) and the cystic resolution (CTR). The results of the study showed that SA imaging with only 32 emissions and maximum sweep angle of 22 degrees yields a very good image quality compared with using 256 emissions and the full aperture size. Therefore the number of emissions and the maximum sweep angle in the SA can be optimized to reach a reasonably good performance, and to increase the frame rate by lowering the required number of emissions. All the measurements are performed using the experimental SARUS scanner connected to a λ/2-pitch transducer. A wire phantom and a tissue mimicking phantom containing anechoic cysts are scanned using the optimized parameters for the transducer. Measurements coincide with simulations.

  8. High-Pitch CT Pulmonary Angiography in Third Generation Dual-Source CT: Image Quality in an Unselected Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Sabel, Bastian O.; Buric, Kristijan; Karara, Nora; Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Dinkel, Julien; Sommer, Wieland H.; Meinel, Felix G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the feasibility of high-pitch CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in 3rd generation dual-source CT (DSCT) in unselected patients. Methods Forty-seven patients with suspected pulmonary embolism underwent high-pitch CTPA on a 3rd generation dual-source CT scanner. CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) were obtained. Objective image quality was analyzed by calculating signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Subjective image quality on the central, lobar, segmental and subsegmental level was rated by two experienced radiologists. Results Median CTDI was 8.1 mGy and median DLP was 274 mGy*cm. Median SNR was 32.9 in the central and 31.9 in the segmental pulmonary arteries. CNR was 29.2 in the central and 28.2 in the segmental pulmonary arteries. Median image quality was “excellent” in central and lobar arteries and “good” in subsegmental arteries according to both readers. Segmental arteries varied between “excellent” and “good”. Image quality was non-diagnostic in one case (2%), beginning in the lobar arteries. Thirteen patients (28%) showed minor motion artifacts. Conclusions In third-generation dual-source CT, high-pitch CTPA is feasible for unselected patients. It yields excellent image quality with minimal motion artifacts. However, compared to standard-pitch cohorts, no distinct decrease in radiation dose was observed. PMID:26872262

  9. Signal and image processing for early detection of coronary artery diseases: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobssite, Youness; Samir, B. Belhaouari; Mohamad Hani, Ahmed Fadzil B.

    2012-09-01

    Today biomedical signals and image based detection are a basic step to diagnose heart diseases, in particular, coronary artery diseases. The goal of this work is to provide non-invasive early detection of Coronary Artery Diseases relying on analyzing images and ECG signals as a combined approach to extract features, further classify and quantify the severity of DCAD by using B-splines method. In an aim of creating a prototype of screening biomedical imaging for coronary arteries to help cardiologists to decide the kind of treatment needed to reduce or control the risk of heart attack.

  10. Quantification of pulmonary arterial wall distensibility using parameters extracted from volumetric micro-CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Roger H.; Karau, Kelly L.; Molthen, Robert C.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    1999-09-01

    Stiffening, or loss of distensibility, of arterial vessel walls is among the manifestations of a number of vascular diseases including pulmonary arterial hypertension. We are attempting to quantify the mechanical properties of vessel walls of the pulmonary arterial tree using parameters derived from high-resolution volumetric x-ray CT images of rat lungs. The pulmonary arterial trees of the excised lungs are filled with a contrast agent. The lungs are imaged with arterial pressures spanning the physiological range. Vessel segment diameters are measured from the inlet to the periphery, and distensibilities calculated from diameters as a function of pressure. The method shows promise as an adjunct to other morphometric techniques such as histology and corrosion casting. It possesses the advantages of being nondestructive, characterizing the vascular structures while the lungs are imaged rapidly and in a near-physiological state, and providing the ability to associate mechanical properties with vessel location in the intact tree hierarchy.

  11. Automatic quality assessment of planetary images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidiropoulos, P.; Muller, J.-P.

    2015-10-01

    A significant fraction of planetary images are corrupted beyond the point that much scientific meaning can be extracted. For example, transmission errors result in missing data which is unrecoverable. The available planetary image datasets include many such "bad data", which both occupy valuable scientific storage resources and create false impressions about planetary image availability for specific planetary objects or target areas. In this work, we demonstrate a pipeline that we have developed to automatically assess the quality of planetary images. Additionally, this method discriminates between different types of image degradation, such as low-quality originating from camera flaws or low-quality triggered by atmospheric conditions, etc. Examples of quality assessment results for Viking Orbiter imagery will be also presented.

  12. How much image noise can be added in cardiac x-ray imaging without loss in perceived image quality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gislason-Lee, Amber J.; Kumcu, Asli; Kengyelics, Stephen M.; Brettle, David S.; Treadgold, Laura A.; Sivananthan, Mohan; Davies, Andrew G.

    2015-09-01

    Cardiologists use x-ray image sequences of the moving heart acquired in real-time to diagnose and treat cardiac patients. The amount of radiation used is proportional to image quality; however, exposure to radiation is damaging to patients and personnel. The amount by which radiation dose can be reduced without compromising patient care was determined. For five patient image sequences, increments of computer-generated quantum noise (white + colored) were added to the images, frame by frame using pixel-to-pixel addition, to simulate corresponding increments of dose reduction. The noise adding software was calibrated for settings used in cardiac procedures, and validated using standard objective and subjective image quality measurements. The degraded images were viewed next to corresponding original (not degraded) images in a two-alternative-forced-choice staircase psychophysics experiment. Seven cardiologists and five radiographers selected their preferred image based on visualization of the coronary arteries. The point of subjective equality, i.e., level of degradation where the observer could not perceive a difference between the original and degraded images, was calculated; for all patients the median was 33%±15% dose reduction. This demonstrates that a 33%±15% increase in image noise is feasible without being perceived, indicating potential for 33%±15% dose reduction without compromising patient care.

  13. Two- and three-dimensional quantitative image analysis of coronary arteries from high-resolution histological sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, David R., III; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-05-01

    The study of coronary arteries has evolved from examining gross anatomy and morphology to scrutinizing micro-anatomy and cellular composition. Technological advances such as high-powered digital microscopes and high precision cutting devices have allowed clinicians to examine coronary artery morphology and pathology at micron resolution. Our work explores the composition of normal coronary arteries in order to provide the foundation for further study of remodeled tissue. The first of two coronary arteries was sliced into 442 sections with 4 micron inter-slice spacing. Each slice was stained for elastin and collagen. The second coronary artery was sectioned into 283 slices, also with 4 micron resolution. These slices were stained for cellular nuclei and smooth muscle. High sectioned into 283 slices, also with 4 micron resolution. These slices were stained for cellular nuclei and smooth muscle. High resolution light microscopy was used to image the sections. The data was analyzed for collagen/elastin content and nuclei density, respectively. Processing of this type of data is challenging in the areas of segmentation, visualization and quantification. Segmentation was confounded by variation in image quality as well as complexity of the coronary tissue. These problems were overcome by the development of 'smart' thresholding algorithms for segmentation. In addition, morphology and image statistics were used to further refine the result of the segmentation. Specificity/sensitivity analysis suggests that automatic segmentation can be very effective. 3D visualization of coronary arteries is challenging due to multiple tissue layers. Method such as summed voxel projection and maximum intensity projection appear to be effective. Shading methods also provide adequate visualization, however it is important to incorporate combined 2D and 3D displays. Surface rendering techniques are useful tools for visualizing parametric data. Quantification in 3D is simple in practice but

  14. Work in progress: common carotid artery contours reconstructed in three dimensions from parallel ultrasonic images.

    PubMed

    Blankenhorn, D H; Chin, H P; Strikwerda, S; Bamberger, J; Hestenes, J D

    1983-08-01

    Three-dimensional sonograms of the common carotid artery were obtained using a device which takes images in parallel planes. Tests in phantoms simulating atherosclerotic vessels the same size as the common carotid artery indicated that the coefficient of variation of a single luminal measurement was 2-5%. PMID:6867354

  15. In vivo imaging of superficial femoral artery (SFA) stents for deformation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, A.; Schneider, A.; Keck, B.; Bennett, N. R.; Fahrig, R.

    2008-03-01

    A high-resolution (198 μm) C-arm CT imaging system (Axiom Artis dTA, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) was optimized for imaging superficial femoral artery (SFA) stents in humans. The SFA is susceptible to the development of atherosclerotic lesions. These are typically treated with angioplasty and stent deployment. However, these stents can have a fracture rate as high as 35%. Fracture is usually accompanied by restenosis and reocclusion. The exact cause of breakage is unknown and is hypothesized to result from deforming forces due to hip and knee flexion. Imaging was performed with the leg placed in both straight and bent positions. Projection images obtained during 20 s scans with ~200° of rotation of the C-arm were back-projected to obtain 3D volumes. Using a semi-automatic software algorithm developed in-house, the stent centerlines were found and ellipses were fitted to the slice normals. Image quality was adequate for calculations in 11/13 subjects. Bending the leg was found to shorten the stents in 10/11 cases with the maximum change being 9% (12 mm in a 133 mm stent), and extend the stent in one case by 1.6%. The maximum eccentricity change was 36% with a bend angle of 72° in a case where the stent extended behind the knee.

  16. Perceptual image quality: Effects of tone characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Delahunt, Peter B.; Zhang, Xuemei; Brainard, David H.

    2007-01-01

    Tone mapping refers to the conversion of luminance values recorded by a digital camera or other acquisition device, to the luminance levels available from an output device, such as a monitor or a printer. Tone mapping can improve the appearance of rendered images. Although there are a variety of algorithms available, there is little information about the image tone characteristics that produce pleasing images. We devised an experiment where preferences for images with different tone characteristics were measured. The results indicate that there is a systematic relation between image tone characteristics and perceptual image quality for images containing faces. For these images, a mean face luminance level of 46–49 CIELAB L* units and a luminance standard deviation (taken over the whole image) of 18 CIELAB L* units produced the best renderings. This information is relevant for the design of tone-mapping algorithms, particularly as many images taken by digital camera users include faces. PMID:17235365

  17. Image Quality Ranking Method for Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Koho, Sami; Fazeli, Elnaz; Eriksson, John E.; Hänninen, Pekka E.

    2016-01-01

    Automated analysis of microscope images is necessitated by the increased need for high-resolution follow up of events in time. Manually finding the right images to be analyzed, or eliminated from data analysis are common day-to-day problems in microscopy research today, and the constantly growing size of image datasets does not help the matter. We propose a simple method and a software tool for sorting images within a dataset, according to their relative quality. We demonstrate the applicability of our method in finding good quality images in a STED microscope sample preparation optimization image dataset. The results are validated by comparisons to subjective opinion scores, as well as five state-of-the-art blind image quality assessment methods. We also show how our method can be applied to eliminate useless out-of-focus images in a High-Content-Screening experiment. We further evaluate the ability of our image quality ranking method to detect out-of-focus images, by extensive simulations, and by comparing its performance against previously published, well-established microscopy autofocus metrics. PMID:27364703

  18. Image Quality Ranking Method for Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koho, Sami; Fazeli, Elnaz; Eriksson, John E; Hänninen, Pekka E

    2016-01-01

    Automated analysis of microscope images is necessitated by the increased need for high-resolution follow up of events in time. Manually finding the right images to be analyzed, or eliminated from data analysis are common day-to-day problems in microscopy research today, and the constantly growing size of image datasets does not help the matter. We propose a simple method and a software tool for sorting images within a dataset, according to their relative quality. We demonstrate the applicability of our method in finding good quality images in a STED microscope sample preparation optimization image dataset. The results are validated by comparisons to subjective opinion scores, as well as five state-of-the-art blind image quality assessment methods. We also show how our method can be applied to eliminate useless out-of-focus images in a High-Content-Screening experiment. We further evaluate the ability of our image quality ranking method to detect out-of-focus images, by extensive simulations, and by comparing its performance against previously published, well-established microscopy autofocus metrics. PMID:27364703

  19. Image Quality Ranking Method for Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koho, Sami; Fazeli, Elnaz; Eriksson, John E.; Hänninen, Pekka E.

    2016-07-01

    Automated analysis of microscope images is necessitated by the increased need for high-resolution follow up of events in time. Manually finding the right images to be analyzed, or eliminated from data analysis are common day-to-day problems in microscopy research today, and the constantly growing size of image datasets does not help the matter. We propose a simple method and a software tool for sorting images within a dataset, according to their relative quality. We demonstrate the applicability of our method in finding good quality images in a STED microscope sample preparation optimization image dataset. The results are validated by comparisons to subjective opinion scores, as well as five state-of-the-art blind image quality assessment methods. We also show how our method can be applied to eliminate useless out-of-focus images in a High-Content-Screening experiment. We further evaluate the ability of our image quality ranking method to detect out-of-focus images, by extensive simulations, and by comparing its performance against previously published, well-established microscopy autofocus metrics.

  20. End-to-end image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raventos, Joaquin

    2012-05-01

    An innovative computerized benchmarking approach (US Patent pending Sep 2011) based on extensive application of photometry, geometrical optics, and digital media using a randomized target, for a standard observer to assess the image quality of video imaging systems, at different day time, and low-light luminance levels. It takes into account, the target's contrast and color characteristics, as well as the observer's visual acuity and dynamic response. This includes human vision as part of the "extended video imaging system" (EVIS), and allows image quality assessment by several standard observers simultaneously.

  1. MIQM: a multicamera image quality measure.

    PubMed

    Solh, Mashhour; AlRegib, Ghassan

    2012-09-01

    Although several subjective and objective quality assessment methods have been proposed in the literature for images and videos from single cameras, no comparable effort has been devoted to the quality assessment of multicamera images. With the increasing popularity of multiview applications, quality assessment of multicamera images and videos is becoming fundamental to the development of these applications. Image quality is affected by several factors, such as camera configuration, number of cameras, and the calibration process. In order to develop an objective metric specifically designed for multicamera systems, we identified and quantified two types of visual distortions in multicamera images: photometric distortions and geometric distortions. The relative distortion between individual camera scenes is a major factor in determining the overall perceived quality. In this paper, we show that such distortions can be translated into luminance, contrast, spatial motion, and edge-based structure components. We propose three different indices that can quantify these components. We provide examples to demonstrate the correlation among these components and the corresponding indices. Then, we combine these indices into one multicamera image quality measure (MIQM). Results and comparisons with other measures, such as peak signal-to noise ratio, mean structural similarity, and visual information fidelity show that MIQM outperforms other measures in capturing the perceptual fidelity of multicamera images. Finally, we verify the results against subjective evaluation. PMID:22645264

  2. No-reference stereoscopic image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Roushain; Parvez Sazzad, Z. M.; Horita, Y.; Baltes, J.

    2010-02-01

    Display of stereo images is widely used to enhance the viewing experience of three-dimensional imaging and communication systems. In this paper, we propose a method for estimating the quality of stereoscopic images using segmented image features and disparity. This method is inspired by the human visual system. We believe the perceived distortion and disparity of any stereoscopic display is strongly dependent on local features, such as edge (non-plane) and non-edge (plane) areas. Therefore, a no-reference perceptual quality assessment is developed for JPEG coded stereoscopic images based on segmented local features of artifacts and disparity. Local feature information such as edge and non-edge area based relative disparity estimation, as well as the blockiness and the blur within the block of images are evaluated in this method. Two subjective stereo image databases are used to evaluate the performance of our method. The subjective experiments results indicate our model has sufficient prediction performance.

  3. Computer-generated 3D ultrasound images of the carotid artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, Robert H.; Lee, Paul L.; Lai, June Y.; Frieden, Howard J.; Blankenhorn, David H.

    1989-01-01

    A method is under development to measure carotid artery lesions from a computer-generated three-dimensional ultrasound image. For each image, the position of the transducer in six coordinates (x, y, z, azimuth, elevation, and roll) is recorded and used to position each B-mode picture element in its proper spatial position in a three-dimensional memory array. After all B-mode images have been assembled in the memory, the three-dimensional image is filtered and resampled to produce a new series of parallel-plane two-dimensional images from which arterial boundaries are determined using edge tracking methods.

  4. Continuous assessment of perceptual image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamberg, Roelof; de Ridder, Huib

    1995-12-01

    The study addresses whether subjects are able to assess the perceived quality of an image sequence continuously. To this end, a new method for assessing time-varying perceptual image quality is presented by which subjects continuously indicate the perceived strength of image quality by moving a slider along a graphical scale. The slider's position on this scale is sampled every second. In this way, temporal variations in quality can be monitored quantitatively, and a means is provided by which differences between, for example, alternative transmission systems can be analyzed in an informative way. The usability of this method is illustrated by an experiment in which, for a period of 815 s, subjects assessed the quality of still pictures comprising time-varying degrees of sharpness. Copyright (c) 1995 Optical Society of America

  5. Rendered virtual view image objective quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gang; Li, Xiangchun; Zhang, Yi; Peng, Kai

    2013-08-01

    The research on rendered virtual view image (RVVI) objective quality assessment is important for integrated imaging system and image quality assessment (IQA). Traditional IQA algorithms cannot be applied directly on the system receiver-side due to interview displacement and the absence of original reference. This study proposed a block-based neighbor reference (NbR) IQA framework for RVVI IQA. Neighbor views used for rendering are employed for quality assessment in the proposed framework. A symphonious factor handling noise and interview displacement is defined and applied to evaluate the contribution of the obtained quality index in each block pair. A three-stage experiment scheme is also presented to testify the proposed framework and evaluate its homogeneity performance when comparing to full reference IQA. Experimental results show the proposed framework is useful in RVVI objective quality assessment at system receiver-side and benchmarking different rendering algorithms.

  6. Quality measures in applications of image restoration.

    PubMed

    Kriete, A; Naim, M; Schafer, L

    2001-01-01

    We describe a new method for the estimation of image quality in image restoration applications. We demonstrate this technique on a simulated data set of fluorescent beads, in comparison with restoration by three different deconvolution methods. Both the number of iterations and a regularisation factor are varied to enforce changes in the resulting image quality. First, the data sets are directly compared by an accuracy measure. These values serve to validate the image quality descriptor, which is developed on the basis of optical information theory. This most general measure takes into account the spectral energies and the noise, weighted in a logarithmic fashion. It is demonstrated that this method is particularly helpful as a user-oriented method to control the output of iterative image restorations and to eliminate the guesswork in choosing a suitable number of iterations. PMID:11587324

  7. Toward clinically relevant standardization of image quality.

    PubMed

    Samei, Ehsan; Rowberg, Alan; Avraham, Ellie; Cornelius, Craig

    2004-12-01

    In recent years, notable progress has been made on standardization of medical image presentations in the definition and implementation of the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) Grayscale Standard Display Function (GSDF). In parallel, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 18 has provided much needed guidelines and tools for visual and quantitative assessment of medical display quality. In spite of these advances, however, there are still notable gaps in the effectiveness of DICOM GSDF to assure consistent and high-quality display of medical images. In additions the degree of correlation between display technical data and diagnostic usability and performance of displays remains unclear. This article proposes three specific steps that DICOM, AAPM, and ACR may collectively take to bridge the gap between technical performance and clinical use: (1) DICOM does not provide means and acceptance criteria to evaluate the conformance of a display device to GSDF or to address other image quality characteristics. DICOM can expand beyond luminance response, extending the measurable, quantifiable elements of TG18 such as reflection and resolution. (2) In a large picture archiving and communication system (PACS) installation, it is critical to continually track the appropriate use and performance of multiple display devices. DICOM may help with this task by adding a Device Service Class to the standard to provide for communication and control of image quality parameters between applications and devices, (3) The question of clinical significance of image quality metrics has rarely been addressed by prior efforts. In cooperation with AAPM, the American College of Radiology (ACR), and the Society for Computer Applications in Radiology (SCAR), DICOM may help to initiate research that will determine the clinical consequence of variations in image quality metrics (eg, GSDF conformance) and to define what constitutes image quality from a

  8. Pitfalls of Doppler Measurements for Arterial Blood Flow Quantification in Small Animal Research: A Study Based on Virtual Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Swillens, Abigail; Shcherbakova, Darya; Trachet, Bram; Segers, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    High-resolution Doppler is a popular tool for evaluating cardiovascular physiology in mutant mice, though its 1-D nature and spectral broadening processes complicate interpretation of the measurement. Hence, it is crucial for pre-clinical researchers to know how error sources in Doppler assessments reveal themselves in the murine arterial system. Therefore, we performed virtual Doppler experiments in a computer model of an aneurysmatic murine aorta with full control of the imaging and insonified fluid dynamics. We observed significant variability in Doppler performance and derived vascular indices depending on the interrogated flow, operator settings and signal processing. In particular, we found that (i) Doppler spectra in the upper aortic branches and celiac artery exhibited more broadening because of complex out-of-beam flow paths; (ii) mean frequency tracking outperforms tracking of the outer envelope, but is sensitive to errors in angle correction; and (iii) imaging depths deviating much from the elevation focus suffer from decreased spectral quality. PMID:27004960

  9. Unusual Malignant Coronary Artery Anomaly: Results of Coronary Angiography, MR Imaging, and Multislice CT

    SciTech Connect

    Apitzsch, Jonas; Kuehl, Harald P.; Muehlenbruch, Georg; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2010-04-15

    We report the case of a man with an uncommon anomaly of the origin and course of the left coronary artery. Clinical, coronary angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and multislice computed tomography findings of this intermittently symptomatic 49 year-old patient with the rare anomaly of his left coronary artery stemming from the right sinus of Valsalva and taking an interarterial and intraseptal course are presented. The diagnostic value of the different imaging modalities is discussed.

  10. Image quality evaluation using moving targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artmann, Uwe

    2013-03-01

    The basic concept of testing a digital imaging device is to reproduce a known target and to analyze the resulting image. This semi-reference approach can be used for various different aspects of image quality. Each part of the imaging chain can have an influence on the results: lens, sensor, image processing and the target itself. The results are valid only for the complete system. If we want to test a single component, we have to make sure that we change only one and keep all others constant. When testing mobile imaging devices, we run into the problem that hardly anything can be manually controlled by the tester. Manual exposure control is not available for most devices, the focus cannot be influenced and hardly any settings for the image processing are available. Due to the limitations in the hardware, the image pipeline in the digital signal processor (DSP) of mobile imaging devices is a critical part of the image quality evaluation. The processing power of the DSPs allows sharpening, tonal correction and noise reduction to be non-linear and adaptive. This makes it very hard to describe the behavior for an objective image quality evaluation. The image quality is highly influenced by the signal processing for noise and resolution and the processing is the main reason for the loss of low contrast, _ne details, the so called texture blur. We present our experience to describe the image processing in more detail. All standardized test methods use a defined chart and require, that the chart and the camera are not moved in any way during test. In this paper, we present our results investigating the influence of chart movement during the test. Different structures, optimized for different aspects of image quality evaluation, are moved with a defined speed during the capturing process. The chart movement will change the input for the signal processing depending on the speed of the target during the test. The basic theoretical changes in the image will be the

  11. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of coronary arteries for open-heart surgery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Roderick S.; Gladysz, D.; Brown, Derek W.; Higginson, Lyall A. J.

    1991-07-01

    A technique utilizing laser induced fluorescence has been developed to obtain direct real-time imaging of the coronary artery network for open heart surgery applications. Both excimer pumped dye and cw argon-ion laser radiation transmitted through a fused silica fiber were used as laser sources to irradiate swine, bovine, and human cadaver hearts whose coronary arteries had been injected with strongly fluorescent dyes. The laser induces fluorescence originating from within the coronary arteries and detected by the surgeon's eye, allows the entire coronary network to be directly viewed. A comparison between laser induced fluorescence and the use of direct visual inspection of arteries following injection of the dye Cardio-Green(R) as well as conventional thermal imaging is presented. The limitations imposed on each technique by layers of fat on top of the coronary arteries are also described. The possibility of using these techniques to detect mechanical or laser beam perforations during laser endarterectomy procedures is discussed.

  12. Quality of Life after Intra-arterial Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Melissa M.; Wilder, Michael; McFadden, Molly; Majersik, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    Few data exist about health-related quality of life outcomes after intra-arterial therapy for acute ischemic stroke. We assessed stroke-specific quality of life in stroke survivors after intra-arterial therapy. Consecutive patients undergoing intra-arterial therapy for acute ischemic stroke from 2005-2010 were retrospectively identified via an institutional database. Stroke-specific quality of life (using the Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Score) and disability status (modified Rankin Scale) were prospectively assessed via mailed questionnaire. We analyzed quality of life scores by domain and summary score, with a summary score of ≥ 4 defined as a good outcome. Analysis of variance was used to model the effect of final recanalization status, stroke severity, and modified Rankin Scale on total quality of life score. ANOVA and Pearson's correlations were used to test the association between stroke severity/modified Rankin Scale and quality of life/time since stroke respectively. Of ninety-nine acute ischemic stroke patients, 61 responded yielding: 11 interim deaths, 7 incomplete surveys, and 43 complete surveys for analysis. Among responding survivors, overall quality of life score was 3.9 (SD 0.7); 77% of these reported good quality of life. Scores were higher in recanalized patients in 11 of 12 domains, but was significant only for mood. Although modified Rankin Scale was associated with stroke severity, quality of life was independent of both. Seventy-seven percent of acute ischemic stroke survivors who received intra-arterial therapy reported good quality of life. Furthermore, these data suggest that stroke-specific quality of life is an independent outcome from stroke severity and disability status. PMID:24813258

  13. Propagation, structural similarity, and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Jorge; Mas, David; Espinosa, Julián; Vázquez, Carmen; Illueca, Carlos

    2012-06-01

    Retinal image quality is usually analysed through different parameters typical from instrumental optics, i.e, PSF, MTF and wavefront aberrations. Although these parameters are important, they are hard to translate to visual quality parameters since human vision exhibits some tolerance to certain aberrations. This is particularly important in postsurgery eyes, where non-common aberration are induced and their effects on the final image quality is not clear. Natural images usually show a strong dependency between one point and its neighbourhood. This fact helps to the image interpretation and should be considered when determining the final image quality. The aim of this work is to propose an objective index which allows comparing natural images on the retina and, from them, to obtain relevant information abut the visual quality of a particular subject. To this end, we propose a individual eye modelling. The morphological data of the subject's eye are considered and the light propagation through the ocular media is calculated by means of a Fourier-transform-based method. The retinal PSF so obtained is convolved with the natural scene under consideration and the obtained image is compared with the ideal one by using the structural similarity index. The technique is applied on 2 eyes with a multifocal corneal profile (PresbyLasik) and can be used to determine the real extension of the achieved pseudoaccomodation.

  14. No training blind image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Ying; Mou, Xuanqin; Ji, Zhen

    2014-03-01

    State of the art blind image quality assessment (IQA) methods generally extract perceptual features from the training images, and send them into support vector machine (SVM) to learn the regression model, which could be used to further predict the quality scores of the testing images. However, these methods need complicated training and learning, and the evaluation results are sensitive to image contents and learning strategies. In this paper, two novel blind IQA metrics without training and learning are firstly proposed. The new methods extract perceptual features, i.e., the shape consistency of conditional histograms, from the joint histograms of neighboring divisive normalization transform coefficients of distorted images, and then compare the length attribute of the extracted features with that of the reference images and degraded images in the LIVE database. For the first method, a cluster center is found in the feature attribute space of the natural reference images, and the distance between the feature attribute of the distorted image and the cluster center is adopted as the quality label. The second method utilizes the feature attributes and subjective scores of all the images in the LIVE database to construct a dictionary, and the final quality score is calculated by interpolating the subjective scores of nearby words in the dictionary. Unlike the traditional SVM based blind IQA methods, the proposed metrics have explicit expressions, which reflect the relationships of the perceptual features and the image quality well. Experiment results in the publicly available databases such as LIVE, CSIQ and TID2008 had shown the effectiveness of the proposed methods, and the performances are fairly acceptable.

  15. Image Acquisition and Quality in Digital Radiography.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    Medical imaging has undergone dramatic changes and technological breakthroughs since the introduction of digital radiography. This article presents information on the development of digital radiography and types of digital radiography systems. Aspects of image quality and radiation exposure control are highlighted as well. In addition, the article includes related workplace changes and medicolegal considerations in the digital radiography environment. PMID:27601691

  16. 3DVIEWNIX-AVS: a software package for the separate visualization of arteries and veins in CE-MRA images.

    PubMed

    Lei, Tianhu; Udupa, Jayaram K; Odhner, Dewey; Nyúl, László G; Saha, Punam K

    2003-01-01

    Our earlier study developed a computerized method, based on fuzzy connected object delineation principles and algorithms, for artery and vein separation in contrast enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography (CE-MRA) images. This paper reports its current development-a software package-for routine clinical use. The software package, termed 3DVIEWNIX-AVS, consists of the following major operational parts: (1) converting data from DICOM3 to 3DVIEWNIX format, (2) previewing slices and creating VOI and MIP Shell, (3) segmenting vessel, (4) separating artery and vein, (5) shell rendering vascular structures and creating animations. This package has been applied to EPIX Medical Inc's CE-MRA data (AngioMark MS-325). One hundred and thirty-five original CE-MRA data sets (of 52 patients) from 6 hospitals have been processed. In all case studies, unified parameter settings produce correct artery-vein separation. The current package is running on a Pentium PC under Linux and the total computation time per study is about 3 min. The strengths of this software package are (1) minimal user interaction, (2) minimal anatomic knowledge requirements on human vascular system, (3) clinically required speed, (4) free entry to any operational stages, (5) reproducible, reliable, high quality of results, and (6) cost effective computer implementation. To date, it seems to be the only software package (using an image processing approach) available for artery and vein separation of the human vascular system for routine use in a clinical setting. PMID:12821028

  17. Holographic projection with higher image quality.

    PubMed

    Qu, Weidong; Gu, Huarong; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2016-08-22

    The spatial resolution limited by the size of the spatial light modulator (SLM) in the holographic projection can hardly be increased, and speckle noise always appears to induce the degradation of image quality. In this paper, the holographic projection with higher image quality is presented. The spatial resolution of the reconstructed image is 2 times of that of the existing holographic projection, and speckles are suppressed well at the same time. Finally, the effectiveness of the holographic projection is verified in experiments. PMID:27557197

  18. Color image processing for date quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dah Jye; Archibald, James K.

    2010-01-01

    Many agricultural non-contact visual inspection applications use color image processing techniques because color is often a good indicator of product quality. Color evaluation is an essential step in the processing and inventory control of fruits and vegetables that directly affects profitability. Most color spaces such as RGB and HSV represent colors with three-dimensional data, which makes using color image processing a challenging task. Since most agricultural applications only require analysis on a predefined set or range of colors, mapping these relevant colors to a small number of indexes allows simple and efficient color image processing for quality evaluation. This paper presents a simple but efficient color mapping and image processing technique that is designed specifically for real-time quality evaluation of Medjool dates. In contrast with more complex color image processing techniques, the proposed color mapping method makes it easy for a human operator to specify and adjust color-preference settings for different color groups representing distinct quality levels. Using this color mapping technique, the color image is first converted to a color map that has one color index represents a color value for each pixel. Fruit maturity level is evaluated based on these color indices. A skin lamination threshold is then determined based on the fruit surface characteristics. This adaptive threshold is used to detect delaminated fruit skin and hence determine the fruit quality. The performance of this robust color grading technique has been used for real-time Medjool date grading.

  19. Perceptual image quality and telescope performance ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, Joshua K.; Harvey, James E.; Marshall, Kenneth H.; Salg, Joseph; Houston, Joseph B.

    2010-08-01

    Launch Vehicle Imaging Telescopes (LVIT) are expensive, high quality devices intended for improving the safety of vehicle personnel, ground support, civilians, and physical assets during launch activities. If allowed to degrade from the combination of wear, environmental factors, and ineffective or inadequate maintenance, these devices lose their ability to provide adequate quality imagery to analysts to prevent catastrophic events such as the NASA Space Shuttle, Challenger, accident in 1986 and the Columbia disaster of 2003. A software tool incorporating aberrations and diffraction that was developed for maintenance evaluation and modeling of telescope imagery is presented. This tool provides MTF-based image quality metric outputs which are correlated to ascent imagery analysts' perception of image quality, allowing a prediction of usefulness of imagery which would be produced by a telescope under different simulated conditions.

  20. Simultaneous automatic arteries-veins separation and cerebral blood flow imaging with single-wavelength laser speckle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Nengyun; Qiu, Jianjun; Li, Pengcheng; Sun, Xiaoli; Yin, Cui; Luo, Weihua; Chen, Shangbin; Luo, Qingming

    2011-08-01

    Automatic separation of arteries and veins in optical cerebral cortex images is important in clinical practice and preclinical study. In this paper, a simple but effective automatic artery-vein separation method which utilizes single-wavelength coherent illumination is presented. This method is based on the relative temporal minimum reflectance analysis of laser speckle images. The validation is demonstrated with both theoretic simulations and experimental results applied to the rat cortex. Moreover, this method can be combined with laser speckle contrast analysis so that the artery-vein separation and blood flow imaging can be simultaneously obtained using the same raw laser speckle images data to enable more accurate analysis of changes of cerebral blood flow within different tissue compartments during functional activation, disease dynamic, and neurosurgery, which may broaden the applications of laser speckle imaging in biology and medicine.

  1. Color image attribute and quality measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chen; Panetta, Karen; Agaian, Sos

    2014-05-01

    Color image quality measures have been used for many computer vision tasks. In practical applications, the no-reference (NR) measures are desirable because reference images are not always accessible. However, only limited success has been achieved. Most existing NR quality assessments require that the types of image distortion is known a-priori. In this paper, three NR color image attributes: colorfulness, sharpness and contrast are quantified by new metrics. Using these metrics, a new Color Quality Measure (CQM), which is based on the linear combination of these three color image attributes, is presented. We evaluated the performance of several state-of-the-art no-reference measures for comparison purposes. Experimental results demonstrate the CQM correlates well with evaluations obtained from human observers and it operates in real time. The results also show that the presented CQM outperforms previous works with respect to ranking image quality among images containing the same or different contents. Finally, the performance of CQM is independent of distortion types, which is demonstrated in the experimental results.

  2. Multiresolution Approach for Noncontact Measurements of Arterial Pulse Using Thermal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekmenev, Sergey Y.; Farag, Aly A.; Miller, William M.; Essock, Edward A.; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    This chapter presents a novel computer vision methodology for noncontact and nonintrusive measurements of arterial pulse. This is the only investigation that links the knowledge of human physiology and anatomy, advances in thermal infrared (IR) imaging and computer vision to produce noncontact and nonintrusive measurements of the arterial pulse in both time and frequency domains. The proposed approach has a physical and physiological basis and as such is of a fundamental nature. A thermal IR camera was used to capture the heat pattern from superficial arteries, and a blood vessel model was proposed to describe the pulsatile nature of the blood flow. A multiresolution wavelet-based signal analysis approach was applied to extract the arterial pulse waveform, which lends itself to various physiological measurements. We validated our results using a traditional contact vital signs monitor as a ground truth. Eight people of different age, race and gender have been tested in our study consistent with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) regulations and internal review board approval. The resultant arterial pulse waveforms exactly matched the ground truth oximetry readings. The essence of our approach is the automatic detection of region of measurement (ROM) of the arterial pulse, from which the arterial pulse waveform is extracted. To the best of our knowledge, the correspondence between noncontact thermal IR imaging-based measurements of the arterial pulse in the time domain and traditional contact approaches has never been reported in the literature.

  3. MR and CT imaging of the structural and functional changes of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Schiebler, Mark L.; Bhalla, Sanjeev; Runo, James; Jarjour, Nizar; Roldan, Alejandro; Chesler, Naomi; François, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    The current Dana Point classification system (2009) divides elevation of pulmonary artery pressure into Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH). Fortunately, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is not a common disease. However, with the aging of the first world’s population, heart failure is now an important cause of pulmonary hypertension with up to 9% of the population involved. PAH is usually asymptomatic until late in the disease process. While there are indirect features of PAH found on noninvasive imaging studies, the diagnosis and management still requires right heart catheterization. Imaging features of PAH include: 1. Enlargement of the pulmonary trunk and main pulmonary arteries, 2. Decreased pulmonary arterial compliance, 3. Tapering of the peripheral pulmonary arteries, 4. Enlargement of the inferior vena cava, and 5. Increased mean transit time. The chronic requirement to generate high pulmonary arterial pressures measurably affects the right heart and main pulmonary artery. This change in physiology causes the following structural and functional alterations that have been shown to have prognostic significance: Relative area change of the pulmonary trunk, RVSVindex, RVSV, RVEDVindex, LVEDVindex, and baseline RVEF <35%. All of these variables can be quantified non-invasively and followed longitudinally in each patient using MRI to modify the treatment regimen. Untreated PAH frequently results in a rapid clinical decline and death within 3 years of diagnosis. Unfortunately, even with treatment, less than 1/2 of these patients are alive at four years. PMID:23612440

  4. Automated measurement of pulmonary artery in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiting; Liang, Mingzhu; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    A new measurement of the pulmonary artery diameter is obtained where the artery may be robustly segmented between the heart and the artery bifurcation. An automated algorithm is presented that can make this pulmonary artery measurement in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images. The algorithm uses a cylinder matching method following geometric constraints obtained from other adjacent organs that have been previously segmented. This new measurement and the related ratio of pulmonary artery to aortic artery measurement are compared to traditional manual approaches for pulmonary artery characterization. The algorithm was qualitatively evaluated on 124 low-dose and 223 standard-dose non-contrast chest CT scans from two public datasets; 324 out of the 347 cases had good segmentations and in the other 23 cases there was significant boundary inaccuracy. For quantitative evaluation, the comparison was to manually marked pulmonary artery boundary in an axial slice in 45 cases; the resulting average Dice Similarity Coefficient was 0.88 (max 0.95, min 0.74). For the 45 cases with manual markings, the correlation between the automated pulmonary artery to ascending aorta diameter ratio and manual ratio at pulmonary artery bifurcation level was 0.81. Using Bland-Altman analysis, the mean difference of the two ratios was 0.03 and the limits of agreement was (-0.12, 0.18). This automated measurement may have utility as an alternative to the conventional manual measurement of pulmonary artery diameter at the bifurcation level especially in the context of noisy low-dose CT images.

  5. A method to compensate for the underestimation of collagen with polarized picrosirius red imaging in human artery atherosclerotic plaques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, C. A.; Grainger, S. J.; Su, J. L.; Madden, S. P.; Muller, J. E.

    2016-04-01

    Although picrosirius red (PSR) is known to be in quantifying collagen under polarized light (PL), commonly used linearly PL can result in an underestimation of collagen, as some of the fibers may appear dark if aligned with the transmission axis of the polarizers. To address this, a sample may be imaged with circularly polarized light at the expense of higher background intensity. However, the quality and alignment of the microscope illumination optics, polarizers and waveplates can still produce imaging variability with circular polarization. A simpler technique was tested that minimized variability and background intensity with linear polarization by acquiring images at multiple angles of histology slide rotation to create a composite co-registered image, permitting the optimal semi-quantitative visualization of collagen. Linear polarization imaging was performed on PSR stained artery sections. By rotating the slide at 60° intervals while maintaining illumination, polarization and exposure parameters, 6 images were acquired for each section. A composite image was created from the 6 co-registered images, and comprised of the maximum pixel intensity at each point. Images from any of the 6 rotation positions consistently showed variation in PSR signal. A composite image compensates for this variability, without loss of spatial resolution. Additionally, grayscale analysis showed an increased intensity range of 15 - 50% with a linearly polarized composite image over a circularly polarized image after background correction, indicating better SNR. This proposed technique will be applied in the development of a near infrared spectroscopy algorithm to detect vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques in vivo.

  6. Computerized measurement of mammographic display image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Dev P.; Sivarudrappa, Mahesh; Roehrig, Hans

    1999-05-01

    Since the video monitor is widely believed to be the weak link in the imaging chain, it is critical, to include it in the total image quality evaluation. Yet, most physical measurements of mammographic image quality are presently limited to making measurements on the digital matrix, not the displayed image. A method is described to quantitatively measure image quality of mammographic monitors using ACR phantom-based test patterns. The image of the test pattern is digitized using a charge coupled device (CCD) camera, and the resulting image file is analyzed by an existing phantom analysis method (Computer Analysis of Mammography Phantom Images, CAMPI). The new method is called CCD-CAMPI and it yields the Signal-to-Noise-Ratio (SNR) for an arbitrary target shape (e.g., speck, mass or fiber). In this work we show the feasibility of this idea for speck targets. Also performed were physical image quality characterization of the monitor (so-called Fourier measures) and analysis by another template matching method due to Tapiovaara and Wagner (TW) which is closely related to CAMPI. The methods were applied to a MegaScan monitor. Test patterns containing a complete speck group superposed on a noiseless background were displayed on the monitor and a series of CCD images were acquired. These images were subjected to CCD-CAMPI and TW analyses. It was found that the SNR values for the CCD-CAMPI method tracked those of the TW method, although the latter measurements were considerably less precise. The TW SNR measure was also about 25% larger than the CCD-CAMPI determination. These differences could be understood from the manner in which the two methods evaluate the noise. Overall accuracy of the CAMPI SNR determination was 4.1% for single images when expressed as a coefficient of variance. While the SNR measures are predictable from the Fourier measures the number of images and effort required is prohibitive and it is not suited to Quality Control (QC). Unlike the Fourier

  7. Registration of coronary arteries in computed tomography angiography images using Hidden Markov Model.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuxuan; Feng, Jianjiang; Xu, Miao; Zhou, Jie; Min, James K; Xiong, Guanglei

    2015-08-01

    Computed tomography angiography (CTA) allows for not only diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) with high spatial resolution but also monitoring the remodeling of vessel walls in the progression of CAD. Alignment of coronary arteries in CTA images acquired at different times (with a 3-7 years interval) is required to visualize and analyze the geometric and structural changes quantitatively. Previous work in image registration primarily focused on large anatomical structures and leads to suboptimal results when applying to registration of coronary arteries. In this paper, we develop a novel method to directly align the straightened coronary arteries in the cylindrical coordinate system guided by the extracted centerlines. By using a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), image intensity information from CTA and geometric information of extracted coronary arteries are combined to align coronary arteries. After registration, the pathological features in two straightened coronary arteries can be directly visualized side by side by synchronizing the corresponding cross-sectional slices and circumferential rotation angles. By evaluating with manually labeled landmarks, the average distance error is 1.6 mm. PMID:26736676

  8. A database for spectral image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Moan, Steven; George, Sony; Pedersen, Marius; Blahová, Jana; Hardeberg, Jon Yngve

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new image database dedicated to multi-/hyperspectral image quality assessment. A total of nine scenes representing pseudo-at surfaces of different materials (textile, wood, skin. . . ) were captured by means of a 160 band hyperspectral system with a spectral range between 410 and 1000nm. Five spectral distortions were designed, applied to the spectral images and subsequently compared in a psychometric experiment, in order to provide a basis for applications such as the evaluation of spectral image difference measures. The database can be downloaded freely from http://www.colourlab.no/cid.

  9. Joint segmentation of lumen and outer wall from femoral artery MR images: Towards 3D imaging measurements of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Ukwatta, Eranga; Yuan, Jing; Qiu, Wu; Rajchl, Martin; Chiu, Bernard; Fenster, Aaron

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) measurements of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) plaque burden extracted from fast black-blood magnetic resonance (MR) images have shown to be more predictive of clinical outcomes than PAD stenosis measurements. To this end, accurate segmentation of the femoral artery lumen and outer wall is required for generating volumetric measurements of PAD plaque burden. Here, we propose a semi-automated algorithm to jointly segment the femoral artery lumen and outer wall surfaces from 3D black-blood MR images, which are reoriented and reconstructed along the medial axis of the femoral artery to obtain improved spatial coherence between slices of the long, thin femoral artery and to reduce computation time. The developed segmentation algorithm enforces two priors in a global optimization manner: the spatial consistency between the adjacent 2D slices and the anatomical region order between the femoral artery lumen and outer wall surfaces. The formulated combinatorial optimization problem for segmentation is solved globally and exactly by means of convex relaxation using a coupled continuous max-flow (CCMF) model, which is a dual formulation to the convex relaxed optimization problem. In addition, the CCMF model directly derives an efficient duality-based algorithm based on the modern multiplier augmented optimization scheme, which has been implemented on a GPU for fast computation. The computed segmentations from the developed algorithm were compared to manual delineations from experts using 20 black-blood MR images. The developed algorithm yielded both high accuracy (Dice similarity coefficients ≥ 87% for both the lumen and outer wall surfaces) and high reproducibility (intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.95 for generating vessel wall area), while outperforming the state-of-the-art method in terms of computational time by a factor of ≈ 20. PMID:26387053

  10. Blind image quality assessment through anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Gabarda, Salvador; Cristóbal, Gabriel

    2007-12-01

    We describe an innovative methodology for determining the quality of digital images. The method is based on measuring the variance of the expected entropy of a given image upon a set of predefined directions. Entropy can be calculated on a local basis by using a spatial/spatial-frequency distribution as an approximation for a probability density function. The generalized Rényi entropy and the normalized pseudo-Wigner distribution (PWD) have been selected for this purpose. As a consequence, a pixel-by-pixel entropy value can be calculated, and therefore entropy histograms can be generated as well. The variance of the expected entropy is measured as a function of the directionality, and it has been taken as an anisotropy indicator. For this purpose, directional selectivity can be attained by using an oriented 1-D PWD implementation. Our main purpose is to show how such an anisotropy measure can be used as a metric to assess both the fidelity and quality of images. Experimental results show that an index such as this presents some desirable features that resemble those from an ideal image quality function, constituting a suitable quality index for natural images. Namely, in-focus, noise-free natural images have shown a maximum of this metric in comparison with other degraded, blurred, or noisy versions. This result provides a way of identifying in-focus, noise-free images from other degraded versions, allowing an automatic and nonreference classification of images according to their relative quality. It is also shown that the new measure is well correlated with classical reference metrics such as the peak signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:18059913

  11. Requirements for imaging vulnerable plaque in the coronary artery using a coded aperture imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozian, Cynthia

    the SNR, spatial resolution, dynamic range of 4:1 to 6:1, and decreased the MDA required at the site of a plaque by twofold in comparison with other nuclear medicine imaging methods. Recommendations to increase the field of view (FOV) along with a better imaging geometry would enable placement of larger objects (human heart included) within the fully encoded FOV while improving spatial resolution, magnification factors, and efficiency. Further improvements to the algorithm and imaging system may enable novel vulnerable plaque imaging and early detection of coronary artery disease. 1See definitions beginning on page xvii.

  12. Monotonic correlation analysis of image quality measures for image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Lance M.; Burks, Stephen D.; Moore, Richard K.; Nguyen, Quang

    2008-04-01

    The next generation of night vision goggles will fuse image intensified and long wave infra-red to create a hybrid image that will enable soldiers to better interpret their surroundings during nighttime missions. Paramount to the development of such goggles is the exploitation of image quality (IQ) measures to automatically determine the best image fusion algorithm for a particular task. This work introduces a novel monotonic correlation coefficient to investigate how well possible IQ features correlate to actual human performance, which is measured by a perception study. The paper will demonstrate how monotonic correlation can identify worthy features that could be overlooked by traditional correlation values.

  13. Noninvasive ergonovine maleate provocative testing for coronary artery spasm: the need for routine thallium-201 imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shanes, J.G.; Krone, R.J.; Fisher, K.; Shah, B.; Eisenkramer, G.; Humphrey, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    We administered ergonovine and used both electrocardiographic monitoring and thallium-/sup 201/ (/sup 201/Tl) imaging to detect reversible ischemia in 100 patients. Patients already established as having coronary artery spasm and those with nonbypassed, proximal, high-grade coronary artery stenosis were excluded. No complication occurred in any patient. The use of thallium imaging in addition to electrocardiographic monitoring resulted in a higher degree of sensitivity than did ECG monitoring alone. Fourteen patients demonstrated evidence of coronary artery spasm as documented by /sup 201/Tl imaging but of the 14, significant ECG changes occurred in only 50%, and classic ST segment elevation in 21%. Thus, in carefully selected patients the noninvasive provocation of coronary spasm can be accomplished safely, but ECG monitoring must be combined with thallium-/sup 201/ imaging to achieve an acceptable degree of sensitivity.

  14. Lessions learned in WISE image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Martha; Duval, Valerie G.; Larsen, Mark F.; Heinrichsen, Ingolf H.; Esplin, Roy W.; Shannon, Mark; Wright, Edward L.

    2010-08-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission launched in December of 2009 is a true success story. The mission is performing beyond expectations on-orbit and maintained cost and schedule throughout. How does such a thing happen? A team constantly focused on mission success is a key factor. Mission success is more than a program meeting its ultimate science goals; it is also meeting schedule and cost goals to avoid cancellation. The WISE program can attribute some of its success in achieving the image quality needed to meet science goals to lessons learned along the way. A requirement was missed in early decomposition, the absence of which would have adversely affected end-to-end system image quality. Fortunately, the ability of the cross-organizational team to focus on fixing the problem without pointing fingers or waiting for paperwork was crucial in achieving a timely solution. Asking layman questions early in the program could have revealed requirement flowdown misunderstandings between spacecraft control stability and image processing needs. Such is the lesson learned with the WISE spacecraft Attitude Determination & Control Subsystem (ADCS) jitter control and the image data reductions needs. Spacecraft motion can affect image quality in numerous ways. Something as seemingly benign as different terminology being used by teammates in separate groups working on data reduction, spacecraft ADCS, the instrument, mission operations, and the science proved to be a risk to system image quality. While the spacecraft was meeting the allocated jitter requirement , the drift rate variation need was not being met. This missing need was noticed about a year before launch and with a dedicated team effort, an adjustment was made to the spacecraft ADCS control. WISE is meeting all image quality requirements on-orbit thanks to a diligent team noticing something was missing before it was too late and applying their best effort to find a solution.

  15. Thallium-201 imaging in anomalous left coronary artery originating from pulmonary trunk

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.M.; Park, C.H.; Intenzo, C.M.; Baht, A.M. )

    1989-07-01

    A 3-month-old infant with anomalous origin of the left main coronary artery (LMCA) from the pulmonary trunk was evaluated using resting thallium imaging. The imaging findings were consistent with myocardial scar and ischemia of the anterolateral and posterolateral walls in the distribution of the LMCA.

  16. Development of functional in vivo imaging of cerebral lenticulostriate artery using novel synchrotron radiation angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaojie; Miao, Peng; Mu, Zhihao; Jiang, Zhen; Lu, Yifan; Guan, Yongjing; Chen, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2015-02-01

    The lenticulostriate artery plays a vital role in the onset and development of cerebral ischemia. However, current imaging techniques cannot assess the in vivo functioning of small arteries such as the lenticulostriate artery in the brain of rats. Here, we report a novel method to achieve a high resolution multi-functional imaging of the cerebrovascular system using synchrotron radiation angiography, which is based on spatio-temporal analysis of contrast density in the arterial cross section. This method provides a unique tool for studying the sub-cortical vascular elasticity after cerebral ischemia in rats. Using this technique, we demonstrated that the vascular elasticity of the lenticulostriate artery decreased from day 1 to day 7 after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats and recovered from day 7 to day 28 compared to the controls (p < 0.001), which paralleled with brain edema formation and inversely correlated with blood flow velocity (p < 0.05). Our results demonstrated that the change of vascular elasticity was related to the levels of brain edema and the velocity of focal blood flow, suggesting that reducing brain edema is important for the improvement of the function of the lenticulostriate artery in the ischemic brain.

  17. Primary Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma on Dual-Time Point FDG PET/CT Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Zhao, Qian; He, Lirong; Zhuang, Xiaoqing; Li, Fang

    2016-08-01

    A 59-year-old man presented cough, chest pain, and shortness of breath for 2 weeks and fever for 4 days. A contrast chest CT revealed a large right pulmonary artery filling defect, suggestive of pulmonary embolism that failed to respond to anticoagulation therapy. FDG PET/CT was performed to evaluate possible malignancy, which revealed intense activity in the right main pulmonary artery without any extrathoracic abnormality. The ratio of the SUVmax of this lesion to the liver was significantly increased in the delayed PET images. The pathological examination demonstrated primary pulmonary artery sarcoma. PMID:27163460

  18. Imaging arterial cells, atherosclerosis, and restenosis by multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han-Wei; Simianu, Vlad; Locker, Matthew J.; Sturek, Michael; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2008-02-01

    By integrating sum-frequency generation (SFG), and two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) on a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope platform, multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) imaging of arteries and atherosclerotic lesions was demonstrated. CARS signals arising from CH II-rich membranes allowed visualization of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in a carotid artery. Additionally, CARS microscopy allowed vibrational imaging of elastin and collagen fibrils which are rich in CH II bonds in their cross-linking residues. The extracellular matrix organization was further confirmed by TPEF signals arising from elastin's autofluorescence and SFG signals arising from collagen fibrils' non-centrosymmetric structure. The system is capable of identifying different atherosclerotic lesion stages with sub-cellular resolution. The stages of atherosclerosis, such as macrophage infiltration, lipid-laden foam cell accumulation, extracellular lipid distribution, fibrous tissue deposition, plaque establishment, and formation of other complicated lesions could be viewed by our multimodal CARS microscope. Collagen percentages in the region adjacent to coronary artery stents were resolved. High correlation between NLO and histology imaging evidenced the validity of the NLO imaging. The capability of imaging significant components of an arterial wall and distinctive stages of atherosclerosis in a label-free manner suggests the potential application of multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy to monitor the onset and progression of arterial diseases.

  19. Subjective matters: from image quality to image psychology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorovskaya, Elena A.; De Ridder, Huib

    2013-03-01

    From the advent of digital imaging through several decades of studies, the human vision research community systematically focused on perceived image quality and digital artifacts due to resolution, compression, gamma, dynamic range, capture and reproduction noise, blur, etc., to help overcome existing technological challenges and shortcomings. Technological advances made digital images and digital multimedia nearly flawless in quality, and ubiquitous and pervasive in usage, provide us with the exciting but at the same time demanding possibility to turn to the domain of human experience including higher psychological functions, such as cognition, emotion, awareness, social interaction, consciousness and Self. In this paper we will outline the evolution of human centered multidisciplinary studies related to imaging and propose steps and potential foci of future research.

  20. Measuring image quality in overlapping areas of panoramic composed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitjà, Carles; Bover, Toni; Escofet, Jaume

    2012-06-01

    Several professional photographic applications uses the merging of consecutive overlapping images in order to obtain bigger files by means of stitching techniques or extended field of view (FOV) for panoramic images. All of those applications share the fact that the final composed image is obtained by overlapping the neighboring areas of consecutive individual images taken as a mosaic or a series of tiles over the scene, from the same point of view. Any individual image taken with a given lens can carry residual aberrations and several of them will affect more probably the borders of the image frame. Furthermore, the amount of distortion aberration present in the images of a given lens will be reversed in position for the two overlapping areas of a pair of consecutive takings. Finally, the different images used in composing the final one have corresponding overlapping areas taken with different perspective. From all the previously stated can be derived that the software employed must remap all the pixel information in order to resize and match image features in those overlapping areas, providing a final composed image with the desired perspective projection. The work presented analyse two panoramic format images taken with a pair of lenses and composed by means of a state of the art stitching software. Then, a series of images are taken to cover an FOV three times the original lens FOV, the images are merged by means of a software of common use in professional panoramic photography and the final image quality is evaluated through a series of targets positioned in strategic locations over the whole taking field of view. That allows measuring the resulting Resolution and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). The results are shown compared with the previous measures on the original individual images.

  1. FFDM image quality assessment using computerized image texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Rachelle; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Kontos, Despina

    2010-04-01

    Quantitative measures of image quality (IQ) are routinely obtained during the evaluation of imaging systems. These measures, however, do not necessarily correlate with the IQ of the actual clinical images, which can also be affected by factors such as patient positioning. No quantitative method currently exists to evaluate clinical IQ. Therefore, we investigated the potential of using computerized image texture analysis to quantitatively assess IQ. Our hypothesis is that image texture features can be used to assess IQ as a measure of the image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). To test feasibility, the "Rachel" anthropomorphic breast phantom (Model 169, Gammex RMI) was imaged with a Senographe 2000D FFDM system (GE Healthcare) using 220 unique exposure settings (target/filter, kVs, and mAs combinations). The mAs were varied from 10%-300% of that required for an average glandular dose (AGD) of 1.8 mGy. A 2.5cm2 retroareolar region of interest (ROI) was segmented from each image. The SNR was computed from the ROIs segmented from images linear with dose (i.e., raw images) after flat-field and off-set correction. Image texture features of skewness, coarseness, contrast, energy, homogeneity, and fractal dimension were computed from the Premium ViewTM postprocessed image ROIs. Multiple linear regression demonstrated a strong association between the computed image texture features and SNR (R2=0.92, p<=0.001). When including kV, target and filter as additional predictor variables, a stronger association with SNR was observed (R2=0.95, p<=0.001). The strong associations indicate that computerized image texture analysis can be used to measure image SNR and potentially aid in automating IQ assessment as a component of the clinical workflow. Further work is underway to validate our findings in larger clinical datasets.

  2. Geometric assessment of image quality using digital image registration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tisdale, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Image registration techniques were developed to perform a geometric quality assessment of multispectral and multitemporal image pairs. Based upon LANDSAT tapes, accuracies to a small fraction of a pixel were demonstrated. Because it is insensitive to the choice of registration areas, the technique is well suited to performance in an automatic system. It may be implemented at megapixel-per-second rates using a commercial minicomputer in combination with a special purpose digital preprocessor.

  3. Image quality measures and their performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskicioglu, Ahmet M.; Fisher, Paul S.; Chen, Si-Yuan

    1994-01-01

    A number of quality measures are evaluated for gray scale image compression. They are all bivariate exploiting the differences between corresponding pixels in the original and degraded images. It is shown that although some numerical measures correlate well with the observers' response for a given compression technique, they are not reliable for an evaluation across different techniques. The two graphical measures (histograms and Hosaka plots), however, can be used to appropriately specify not only the amount, but also the type of degradation in reconstructed images.

  4. Quality evaluation of fruit by hyperspectral imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter presents new applications of hyperspectral imaging for measuring the optical properties of fruits and assessing their quality attributes. A brief overview is given of current techniques for measuring optical properties of turbid and opaque biological materials. Then a detailed descripti...

  5. ASAP (Automatic Software for ASL Processing): A toolbox for processing Arterial Spin Labeling images.

    PubMed

    Mato Abad, Virginia; García-Polo, Pablo; O'Daly, Owen; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Zelaya, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The method of Arterial Spin Labeling (ASL) has experienced a significant rise in its application to functional imaging, since it is the only technique capable of measuring blood perfusion in a truly non-invasive manner. Currently, there are no commercial packages for processing ASL data and there is no recognized standard for normalizing ASL data to a common frame of reference. This work describes a new Automated Software for ASL Processing (ASAP) that can automatically process several ASL datasets. ASAP includes functions for all stages of image pre-processing: quantification, skull-stripping, co-registration, partial volume correction and normalization. To assess the applicability and validity of the toolbox, this work shows its application in the study of hypoperfusion in a sample of healthy subjects at risk of progressing to Alzheimer's disease. ASAP requires limited user intervention, minimizing the possibility of random and systematic errors, and produces cerebral blood flow maps that are ready for statistical group analysis. The software is easy to operate and results in excellent quality of spatial normalization. The results found in this evaluation study are consistent with previous studies that find decreased perfusion in Alzheimer's patients in similar regions and demonstrate the applicability of ASAP. PMID:26612079

  6. Image Quality Indicator for Infrared Inspections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The quality of images generated during an infrared thermal inspection depends on many system variables, settings, and parameters to include the focal length setting of the IR camera lens. If any relevant parameter is incorrect or sub-optimal, the resulting IR images will usually exhibit inherent unsharpness and lack of resolution. Traditional reference standards and image quality indicators (IQIs) are made of representative hardware samples and contain representative flaws of concern. These standards are used to verify that representative flaws can be detected with the current IR system settings. However, these traditional standards do not enable the operator to quantify the quality limitations of the resulting images, i.e. determine the inherent maximum image sensitivity and image resolution. As a result, the operator does not have the ability to optimize the IR inspection system prior to data acquisition. The innovative IQI described here eliminates this limitation and enables the operator to objectively quantify and optimize the relevant variables of the IR inspection system, resulting in enhanced image quality with consistency and repeatability in the inspection application. The IR IQI consists of various copper foil features of known sizes that are printed on a dielectric non-conductive board. The significant difference in thermal conductivity between the two materials ensures that each appears with a distinct grayscale or brightness in the resulting IR image. Therefore, the IR image of the IQI exhibits high contrast between the copper features and the underlying dielectric board, which is required to detect the edges of the various copper features. The copper features consist of individual elements of various shapes and sizes, or of element-pairs of known shapes and sizes and with known spacing between the elements creating the pair. For example, filled copper circles with various diameters can be used as individual elements to quantify the image sensitivity

  7. Scene reduction for subjective image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowska (Tomaszewska), Anna

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of image quality is important for many image processing systems, such as those used for acquisition, compression, restoration, enhancement, or reproduction. Its measurement is often accompanied by user studies, in which a group of observers rank or rate results of several algorithms. Such user studies, known as subjective image quality assessment experiments, can be very time consuming and do not guarantee conclusive results. This paper is intended to help design an efficient and rigorous quality assessment experiment. We propose a method of limiting the number of scenes that need to be tested, which can significantly reduce the experimental effort and still capture relevant scene-dependent effects. To achieve it, we employ a clustering technique and evaluate it on the basis of compactness and separation criteria. The correlation between the results obtained from a set of images in an initial database and the results received from reduced experiment are analyzed. Finally, we propose a procedure for reducing the initial scenes number. Four different assessment techniques were tested: single stimulus, double stimulus, forced choice, and similarity judgments. We conclude that in most cases, 9 to 12 judgments per evaluated algorithm for a large scene collection is sufficient to reduce the initial set of images.

  8. Analysis of image quality based on perceptual preference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liqin; Hua, Yuning; Zhao, Guangzhou; Qi, Yaping

    2007-11-01

    This paper deals with image quality analysis considering the impact of psychological factors involved in assessment. The attributes of image quality requirement were partitioned according to the visual perception characteristics and the preference of image quality were obtained by the factor analysis method. The features of image quality which support the subjective preference were identified, The adequacy of image is evidenced to be the top requirement issues to the display image quality improvement. The approach will be beneficial to the research of the image quality subjective quantitative assessment method.

  9. Prediction of Viking lander camera image quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, F. O.; Burcher, E. E.; Jobson, D. J.; Wall, S. D.

    1976-01-01

    Formulations are presented that permit prediction of image quality as a function of camera performance, surface radiance properties, and lighting and viewing geometry. Predictions made for a wide range of surface radiance properties reveal that image quality depends strongly on proper camera dynamic range command and on favorable lighting and viewing geometry. Proper camera dynamic range commands depend mostly on the surface albedo that will be encountered. Favorable lighting and viewing geometries depend mostly on lander orientation with respect to the diurnal sun path over the landing site, and tend to be independent of surface albedo and illumination scattering function. Side lighting with low sun elevation angles (10 to 30 deg) is generally favorable for imaging spatial details and slopes, whereas high sun elevation angles are favorable for measuring spectral reflectances.

  10. Triple Arterial Phase MR Imaging with Gadoxetic Acid Using a Combination of Contrast Enhanced Time Robust Angiography, Keyhole, and Viewsharing Techniques and Two-Dimensional Parallel Imaging in Comparison with Conventional Single Arterial Phase

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Yu, Mi Hye; Kim, Eun Ju; Han, Joon Koo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether triple arterial phase acquisition via a combination of Contrast Enhanced Time Robust Angiography, keyhole, temporal viewsharing and parallel imaging can improve arterial phase acquisition with higher spatial resolution than single arterial phase gadoxetic-acid enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods Informed consent was waived for this retrospective study by our Institutional Review Board. In 752 consecutive patients who underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI, either single (n = 587) or triple (n = 165) arterial phases was obtained in a single breath-hold under MR fluoroscopy guidance. Arterial phase timing was assessed, and the degree of motion was rated on a four-point scale. The percentage of patients achieving the late arterial phase without significant motion was compared between the two methods using the χ2 test. Results The late arterial phase was captured at least once in 96.4% (159/165) of the triple arterial phase group and in 84.2% (494/587) of the single arterial phase group (p < 0.001). Significant motion artifacts (score ≤ 2) were observed in 13.3% (22/165), 1.2% (2/165), 4.8% (8/165) on 1st, 2nd, and 3rd scans of triple arterial phase acquisitions and 6.0% (35/587) of single phase acquisitions. Thus, the late arterial phase without significant motion artifacts was captured in 96.4% (159/165) of the triple arterial phase group and in 79.9% (469/587) of the single arterial phase group (p < 0.001). Conclusion Triple arterial phase imaging may reliably provide adequate arterial phase imaging for gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI. PMID:27390543

  11. Live 3D image overlay for arterial duct closure with Amplatzer Duct Occluder II additional size.

    PubMed

    Goreczny, Sebstian; Morgan, Gareth J; Dryzek, Pawel

    2016-03-01

    Despite several reports describing echocardiography for the guidance of ductal closure, two-dimensional angiography remains the mainstay imaging tool; three-dimensional rotational angiography has the potential to overcome some of the drawbacks of standard angiography, and reconstructed image overlay provides reliable guidance for device placement. We describe arterial duct closure solely from venous approach guided by live three-dimensional image overlay. PMID:26358032

  12. Physical measures of image quality in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Dev P.

    1996-04-01

    A recently introduced method for quantitative analysis of images of the American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography accreditation phantom has been extended to include signal- to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements, and has been applied to survey the image quality of 54 mammography machines from 17 hospitals. Participants sent us phantom images to be evaluated for each mammography machine at their hospital. Each phantom was loaned to us for obtaining images of the wax insert plate on a reference machine at our institution. The images were digitized and analyzed to yield indices that quantified the image quality of the machines precisely. We have developed methods for normalizing for the variation of the individual speck sizes between different ACR phantoms, for the variation of the speck sizes within a microcalcification group, and for variations in overall speeds of the mammography systems. In terms of the microcalcification SNR, the variability of the x-ray machines was 40.5% when no allowance was made for phantom or mAs variations. This dropped to 17.1% when phantom variability was accounted for, and to 12.7% when mAs variability was also allowed for. Our work shows the feasibility of practical, low-cost, objective and accurate evaluations, as a useful adjunct to the present ACR method.

  13. Naturalness and interestingness of test images for visual quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halonen, Raisa; Westman, Stina; Oittinen, Pirkko

    2011-01-01

    Balanced and representative test images are needed to study perceived visual quality in various application domains. This study investigates naturalness and interestingness as image quality attributes in the context of test images. Taking a top-down approach we aim to find the dimensions which constitute naturalness and interestingness in test images and the relationship between these high-level quality attributes. We compare existing collections of test images (e.g. Sony sRGB images, ISO 12640 images, Kodak images, Nokia images and test images developed within our group) in an experiment combining quality sorting and structured interviews. Based on the data gathered we analyze the viewer-supplied criteria for naturalness and interestingness across image types, quality levels and judges. This study advances our understanding of subjective image quality criteria and enables the validation of current test images, furthering their development.

  14. No-reference image quality metric based on image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyunsoo; Lee, Chulhee

    2011-12-01

    In this article, we present a new no-reference (NR) objective image quality metric based on image classification. We also propose a new blocking metric and a new blur metric. Both metrics are NR metrics since they need no information from the original image. The blocking metric was computed by considering that the visibility of horizontal and vertical blocking artifacts can change depending on background luminance levels. When computing the blur metric, we took into account the fact that blurring in edge regions is generally more sensitive to the human visual system. Since different compression standards usually produce different compression artifacts, we classified images into two classes using the proposed blocking metric: one class that contained blocking artifacts and another class that did not contain blocking artifacts. Then, we used different quality metrics based on the classification results. Experimental results show that each metric correlated well with subjective ratings, and the proposed NR image quality metric consistently provided good performance with various types of content and distortions.

  15. Quantitative Statistical Methods for Image Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Joyita; Ahn, Sangtae; Li, Quanzheng

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative measures of image quality and reliability are critical for both qualitative interpretation and quantitative analysis of medical images. While, in theory, it is possible to analyze reconstructed images by means of Monte Carlo simulations using a large number of noise realizations, the associated computational burden makes this approach impractical. Additionally, this approach is less meaningful in clinical scenarios, where multiple noise realizations are generally unavailable. The practical alternative is to compute closed-form analytical expressions for image quality measures. The objective of this paper is to review statistical analysis techniques that enable us to compute two key metrics: resolution (determined from the local impulse response) and covariance. The underlying methods include fixed-point approaches, which compute these metrics at a fixed point (the unique and stable solution) independent of the iterative algorithm employed, and iteration-based approaches, which yield results that are dependent on the algorithm, initialization, and number of iterations. We also explore extensions of some of these methods to a range of special contexts, including dynamic and motion-compensated image reconstruction. While most of the discussed techniques were developed for emission tomography, the general methods are extensible to other imaging modalities as well. In addition to enabling image characterization, these analysis techniques allow us to control and enhance imaging system performance. We review practical applications where performance improvement is achieved by applying these ideas to the contexts of both hardware (optimizing scanner design) and image reconstruction (designing regularization functions that produce uniform resolution or maximize task-specific figures of merit). PMID:24312148

  16. Quantitative statistical methods for image quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Joyita; Ahn, Sangtae; Li, Quanzheng

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative measures of image quality and reliability are critical for both qualitative interpretation and quantitative analysis of medical images. While, in theory, it is possible to analyze reconstructed images by means of Monte Carlo simulations using a large number of noise realizations, the associated computational burden makes this approach impractical. Additionally, this approach is less meaningful in clinical scenarios, where multiple noise realizations are generally unavailable. The practical alternative is to compute closed-form analytical expressions for image quality measures. The objective of this paper is to review statistical analysis techniques that enable us to compute two key metrics: resolution (determined from the local impulse response) and covariance. The underlying methods include fixed-point approaches, which compute these metrics at a fixed point (the unique and stable solution) independent of the iterative algorithm employed, and iteration-based approaches, which yield results that are dependent on the algorithm, initialization, and number of iterations. We also explore extensions of some of these methods to a range of special contexts, including dynamic and motion-compensated image reconstruction. While most of the discussed techniques were developed for emission tomography, the general methods are extensible to other imaging modalities as well. In addition to enabling image characterization, these analysis techniques allow us to control and enhance imaging system performance. We review practical applications where performance improvement is achieved by applying these ideas to the contexts of both hardware (optimizing scanner design) and image reconstruction (designing regularization functions that produce uniform resolution or maximize task-specific figures of merit). PMID:24312148

  17. Complimentary use of epicardial echo imaging and Doppler in quantification of coronary artery stenoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Kent L.; Cannon, Scott R.

    1990-08-01

    As more advanced therapeutic procedures are performed on coronary arteries during open chest surgery more advanced diagnostic procedures will be required to define the location and severity of coronary artery disease. This manuscript describes our preliminary experiences in identifying human coronary artery stenoses using epicardial two-dimensional color flow Doppler. Once the lesions were identified we used standard echo Doppler and imaging techniques to define their severity. The accuracy of stenotic cross sectional area calculated using the continuity equation and pressure gradient calculated using the Bernoulli equation were defined using a pulsatile flow model of the coronary circulation. Suggestions about further hardware development required to allow easy clinical application of this technique are described. 1 - CLINICAL NEED FOR INTRA-OPERATIVE EVAUJATION OFCORONARY ARTERIES The severity of coronary artery disease in adults who require coronary bypass surgery has changed significantly in the last ten years. More effective medications used to control angina pectoris and the wide use of percutaneous y artery angioplasty have delayed the timing of surgery until atherosclerotic involvement is more extensive. In addition patients who have had initial coronary bypass operations are now reaching ages at which atherosclerotic involvement of their bypass grafts and native vessels has progressed and reoperation is required. To meet the challenge of coronary arteries with multiple lesions or diffuse disease intraoperative angioplasty devices are being developed. Whether bypass surgery for advanced lesions or reoperation of

  18. Evaluation of diseased coronary arterial branches by polar representations of thallium-201 rotational myocardial imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Iino, T.; Toyosaki, N.; Katsuki, T.; Noda, T.; Natsume, T.; Yaginuma, T.; Hosoda, S.; Furuse, M.

    1987-09-01

    The perfusion territories in polar representations of stress Tl-201 rotational myocardial imaging in patients with angina pectoris who had one diseased coronary segment were analyzed. The lesions proximal or distal to the first major septal perforator in left anterior descending arteries were detected by the presence or absence of defects at the base of the anterior septum. Right coronary artery lesions were detected by the presence of defects at the basal posterior septum, in contrast to the preservation of myocardial uptake at this portion in lesions of the left circumflex artery. The specific defect patterns were detected in cases with lesions at the first diagonal, obtuse marginal, and posterolateral branches. Recognition of these defects in the polar maps allows detailed detection of diseased coronary arterial branches.

  19. Medical Imaging Image Quality Assessment with Monte Carlo Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michail, C. M.; Karpetas, G. E.; Fountos, G. P.; Kalyvas, N. I.; Martini, Niki; Koukou, Vaia; Valais, I. G.; Kandarakis, I. S.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess image quality of PET scanners through a thin layer chromatography (TLC) plane source. The source was simulated using a previously validated Monte Carlo model. The model was developed by using the GATE MC package and reconstructed images obtained with the STIR software for tomographic image reconstruction, with cluster computing. The PET scanner simulated in this study was the GE DiscoveryST. A plane source consisted of a TLC plate, was simulated by a layer of silica gel on aluminum (Al) foil substrates, immersed in 18F-FDG bath solution (1MBq). Image quality was assessed in terms of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). MTF curves were estimated from transverse reconstructed images of the plane source. Images were reconstructed by the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE)-OSMAPOSL algorithm. OSMAPOSL reconstruction was assessed by using various subsets (3 to 21) and iterations (1 to 20), as well as by using various beta (hyper) parameter values. MTF values were found to increase up to the 12th iteration whereas remain almost constant thereafter. MTF improves by using lower beta values. The simulated PET evaluation method based on the TLC plane source can be also useful in research for the further development of PET and SPECT scanners though GATE simulations.

  20. Image registration for DSA quality enhancement.

    PubMed

    Buzug, T M; Weese, J

    1998-01-01

    A generalized framework for histogram-based similarity measures is presented and applied to the image-enhancement task in digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The class of differentiable, strictly convex weighting functions is identified as suitable weightings of histograms for measuring the degree of clustering that goes along with registration. With respect to computation time, the energy similarity measure is the function of choice for the registration of mask and contrast image prior to subtraction. The robustness of the energy measure is studied for geometrical image distortions like rotation and scaling. Additionally, it is investigated how the histogram binning and inhomogeneous motion inside the templates influence the quality of the similarity measure. Finally, the registration success for the automated procedure is compared with the manually shift-corrected image pair of the head. PMID:9719851

  1. Reducing radiation dose without compromising image quality in preoperative perforator flap imaging with CTA using ASIR technology.

    PubMed

    Niumsawatt, Vachara; Debrotwir, Andrew N; Rozen, Warren Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) has become a mainstay in preoperative perforator flap planning in the modern era of reconstructive surgery. However, the increased use of CTA does raise the concern of radiation exposure to patients. Several techniques have been developed to decrease radiation dosage without compromising image quality, with varying results. The most recent advance is in the improvement of image reconstruction using an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm. We sought to evaluate the image quality of ASIR in preoperative deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap surgery, through a direct comparison with conventional filtered back projection (FBP) images. A prospective review of 60 consecutive ASIR and 60 consecutive FBP CTA images using similar protocol (except for radiation dosage) was undertaken, analyzed by 2 independent reviewers. In both groups, we were able to accurately identify axial arteries and their perforators. Subjective analysis of image quality demonstrated no statistically significant difference between techniques. ASIR can thus be used for preoperative imaging with similar image quality to FBP, but with a 60% reduction in radiation delivery to patients. PMID:25058789

  2. Reducing Radiation Dose Without Compromising Image Quality in Preoperative Perforator Flap Imaging With CTA Using ASIR Technology

    PubMed Central

    Niumsawatt, Vachara; Debrotwir, Andrew N.; Rozen, Warren Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) has become a mainstay in preoperative perforator flap planning in the modern era of reconstructive surgery. However, the increased use of CTA does raise the concern of radiation exposure to patients. Several techniques have been developed to decrease radiation dosage without compromising image quality, with varying results. The most recent advance is in the improvement of image reconstruction using an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm. We sought to evaluate the image quality of ASIR in preoperative deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap surgery, through a direct comparison with conventional filtered back projection (FBP) images. A prospective review of 60 consecutive ASIR and 60 consecutive FBP CTA images using similar protocol (except for radiation dosage) was undertaken, analyzed by 2 independent reviewers. In both groups, we were able to accurately identify axial arteries and their perforators. Subjective analysis of image quality demonstrated no statistically significant difference between techniques. ASIR can thus be used for preoperative imaging with similar image quality to FBP, but with a 60% reduction in radiation delivery to patients. PMID:25058789

  3. Classification of coronary artery tissues using optical coherence tomography imaging in Kawasaki disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolmanafi, Atefeh; Prasad, Arpan Suravi; Duong, Luc; Dahdah, Nagib

    2016-03-01

    Intravascular imaging modalities, such as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) allow nowadays improving diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and even prevention of coronary artery disease in the adult. OCT has been recently used in children following Kawasaki disease (KD), the most prevalent acquired coronary artery disease during childhood with devastating complications. The assessment of coronary artery layers with OCT and early detection of coronary sequelae secondary to KD is a promising tool for preventing myocardial infarction in this population. More importantly, OCT is promising for tissue quantification of the inner vessel wall, including neo intima luminal myofibroblast proliferation, calcification, and fibrous scar deposits. The goal of this study is to classify the coronary artery layers of OCT imaging obtained from a series of KD patients. Our approach is focused on developing a robust Random Forest classifier built on the idea of randomly selecting a subset of features at each node and based on second- and higher-order statistical texture analysis which estimates the gray-level spatial distribution of images by specifying the local features of each pixel and extracting the statistics from their distribution. The average classification accuracy for intima and media are 76.36% and 73.72% respectively. Random forest classifier with texture analysis promises for classification of coronary artery tissue.

  4. Watertight modeling and segmentation of bifurcated Coronary arteries for blood flow simulation using CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haoyin; Sun, Peng; Ha, Seongmin; Lundine, Devon; Xiong, Guanglei

    2016-10-01

    Image-based simulation of blood flow using computational fluid dynamics has been shown to play an important role in the diagnosis of ischemic coronary artery disease. Accurate extraction of complex coronary artery structures in a watertight geometry is a prerequisite, but manual segmentation is both tedious and subjective. Several semi- and fully automated coronary artery extraction approaches have been developed but have faced several challenges. Conventional voxel-based methods allow for watertight segmentation but are slow and difficult to incorporate expert knowledge. Machine learning based methods are relatively fast and capture rich information embedded in manual annotations. Although sufficient for visualization and analysis of coronary anatomy, these methods cannot be used directly for blood flow simulation if the coronary vasculature is represented as a loose combination of tubular structures and the bifurcation geometry is improperly modeled. In this paper, we propose a novel method to extract branching coronary arteries from CT imaging with a focus on explicit bifurcation modeling and application of machine learning. A bifurcation lumen is firstly modeled by generating the convex hull to join tubular vessel branches. Guided by the pre-determined centerline, machine learning based segmentation is performed to adapt the bifurcation lumen model to target vessel boundaries and smoothed by subdivision surfaces. Our experiments show the constructed coronary artery geometry from CT imaging is accurate by comparing results against the manually annotated ground-truths, and can be directly applied to coronary blood flow simulation. PMID:27490317

  5. Radiological Management of Hemoptysis: A Comprehensive Review of Diagnostic Imaging and Bronchial Arterial Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Joo-Young Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2010-04-15

    Hemoptysis can be a life-threatening respiratory emergency and indicates potentially serious underlying intrathoracic disease. Large-volume hemoptysis carries significant mortality and warrants urgent investigation and intervention. Initial assessment by chest radiography, bronchoscopy, and computed tomography (CT) is useful in localizing the bleeding site and identifying the underlying cause. Multidetector CT angiography is a relatively new imaging technique that allows delineation of abnormal bronchial and nonbronchial arteries using reformatted images in multiple projections, which can be used to guide therapeutic arterial embolization procedures. Bronchial artery embolization (BAE) is now considered to be the most effective procedure for the management of massive and recurrent hemoptysis, either as a first-line therapy or as an adjunct to elective surgery. It is a safe technique in the hands of an experienced operator with knowledge of bronchial artery anatomy and the potential pitfalls of the procedure. Recurrent bleeding is not uncommon, especially if there is progression of the underlying disease process. Prompt repeat embolization is advised in patients with recurrent hemoptysis in order to identify nonbronchial systemic and pulmonary arterial sources of bleeding. This article reviews the pathophysiology and causes of hemoptysis, diagnostic imaging and therapeutic options, and technique and outcomes of BAE.

  6. Imaging of Small Animal Peripheral Artery Disease Models: Recent Advancements and Translational Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jenny B.; Phillips, Evan H.; Riggins, Ti’Air E.; Sangha, Gurneet S.; Chakraborty, Sreyashi; Lee, Janice Y.; Lycke, Roy J.; Hernandez, Clarissa L.; Soepriatna, Arvin H.; Thorne, Bradford R. H.; Yrineo, Alexa A.; Goergen, Craig J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a broad disorder encompassing multiple forms of arterial disease outside of the heart. As such, PAD development is a multifactorial process with a variety of manifestations. For example, aneurysms are pathological expansions of an artery that can lead to rupture, while ischemic atherosclerosis reduces blood flow, increasing the risk of claudication, poor wound healing, limb amputation, and stroke. Current PAD treatment is often ineffective or associated with serious risks, largely because these disorders are commonly undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Active areas of research are focused on detecting and characterizing deleterious arterial changes at early stages using non-invasive imaging strategies, such as ultrasound, as well as emerging technologies like photoacoustic imaging. Earlier disease detection and characterization could improve interventional strategies, leading to better prognosis in PAD patients. While rodents are being used to investigate PAD pathophysiology, imaging of these animal models has been underutilized. This review focuses on structural and molecular information and disease progression revealed by recent imaging efforts of aortic, cerebral, and peripheral vascular disease models in mice, rats, and rabbits. Effective translation to humans involves better understanding of underlying PAD pathophysiology to develop novel therapeutics and apply non-invasive imaging techniques in the clinic. PMID:25993289

  7. Registration, segmentation, and visualization of confocal microscopy images of arterial thrombus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Ishita; Camp, Jon J.; McBane, Robert; Wysokinski, Waldemar; Robb, Richard A.

    2004-05-01

    Arterial thrombosis causes death or paralysis of an organ, as it migrates to and localizes in different parts of the body. Massive pulmonary emboli cause 50,000 deaths per year. The cause and origin of arterial thrombosis is not well understood nor objectively characterized. The object of this study was to investigate the microscopic structure of arterial thrombus to better understand this pathology. Confocal microscopy cross-sectional images of an embolized thrombus in the coronary artery were obtained. Adjacent pairs of sections were stained with two different stains, fibrin and CD61, to reveal mutually complementary information. The very thin adjacent slices were treated as one slice. Adjacent slices were registered by a combination of manual and automatic techniques using Analyze software developed in the Biomedical Imaging Resource at Mayo. After smoothing the images with a median filter, the CD61 and fibrin stained section images were used together to segment the tissues by multispectral classification. The image volume was classified into background, platelets and surrounding tissue, and thrombus. The segmented volume was then rendered for visualization and analysis of structure of the thrombus in three dimensions. Preliminary results are promising. Such correlation of structural and histological information may be helpful in determining the origin of the thrombus.

  8. Dried fruits quality assessment by hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serranti, Silvia; Gargiulo, Aldo; Bonifazi, Giuseppe

    2012-05-01

    Dried fruits products present different market values according to their quality. Such a quality is usually quantified in terms of freshness of the products, as well as presence of contaminants (pieces of shell, husk, and small stones), defects, mould and decays. The combination of these parameters, in terms of relative presence, represent a fundamental set of attributes conditioning dried fruits humans-senses-detectable-attributes (visual appearance, organolectic properties, etc.) and their overall quality in terms of marketable products. Sorting-selection strategies exist but sometimes they fail when a higher degree of detection is required especially if addressed to discriminate between dried fruits of relatively small dimensions and when aiming to perform an "early detection" of pathogen agents responsible of future moulds and decays development. Surface characteristics of dried fruits can be investigated by hyperspectral imaging (HSI). In this paper, specific and "ad hoc" applications addressed to propose quality detection logics, adopting a hyperspectral imaging (HSI) based approach, are described, compared and critically evaluated. Reflectance spectra of selected dried fruits (hazelnuts) of different quality and characterized by the presence of different contaminants and defects have been acquired by a laboratory device equipped with two HSI systems working in two different spectral ranges: visible-near infrared field (400-1000 nm) and near infrared field (1000-1700 nm). The spectra have been processed and results evaluated adopting both a simple and fast wavelength band ratio approach and a more sophisticated classification logic based on principal component (PCA) analysis.

  9. Retinal image quality in the rodent eye.

    PubMed

    Artal, P; Herreros de Tejada, P; Muñoz Tedó, C; Green, D G

    1998-01-01

    Many rodents do not see well. For a target to be resolved by a rat or a mouse, it must subtend a visual angle of a degree or more. It is commonly assumed that this poor spatial resolving capacity is due to neural rather than optical limitations, but the quality of the retinal image has not been well characterized in these animals. We have modified a double-pass apparatus, initially designed for the human eye, so it could be used with rodents to measure the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the eye's optics. That is, the double-pass retinal image of a monochromatic (lambda = 632.8 nm) point source was digitized with a CCD camera. From these double-pass measurements, the single-pass MTF was computed under a variety of conditions of focus and with different pupil sizes. Even with the eye in best focus, the image quality in both rats and mice is exceedingly poor. With a 1-mm pupil, for example, the MTF in the rat had an upper limit of about 2.5 cycles/deg, rather than the 28 cycles/deg one would obtain if the eye were a diffraction-limited system. These images are about 10 times worse than the comparable retinal images in the human eye. Using our measurements of the optics and the published behavioral and electrophysiological contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) of rats, we have calculated the CSF that the rat would have if it had perfect rather than poor optics. We find, interestingly, that diffraction-limited optics would produce only slight improvement overall. That is, in spite of retinal images which are of very low quality, the upper limit of visual resolution in rodents is neurally determined. Rats and mice seem to have eyes in which the optics and retina/brain are well matched. PMID:9682864

  10. Visualization of mouse spinal cord intramedullary arteries using phase- and attenuation-contrast tomographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yong; Yin, Xianzhen; Zhang, Jiwen; Wu, Tianding; Li, Dongzhe; Lu, Hongbin; Hu, Jianzhong

    2016-07-01

    Many spinal cord circulatory disorders present the substantial involvement of small vessel lesions. The central sulcus arteries supply nutrition to a large part of the spinal cord, and, if not detected early, lesions in the spinal cord will cause irreversible damage to the function of this organ. Thus, early detection of these small vessel lesions could potentially facilitate the effective diagnosis and treatment of these diseases. However, the detection of such small vessels is beyond the capability of current imaging techniques. In this study, an imaging method is proposed and the potential of phase-contrast imaging (PCI)- and attenuation-contrast imaging (ACI)-based synchrotron radiation for high-resolution tomography of intramedullary arteries in mouse spinal cord is validated. The three-dimensional vessel morphology, particularly that of the central sulcus arteries (CSA), detected with these two imaging models was quantitatively analyzed and compared. It was determined that both PCI- and ACI-based synchrotron radiation can be used to visualize the physiological arrangement of the entire intramedullary artery network in the mouse spinal cord in both two dimensions and three dimensions at a high-resolution scale. Additionally, the two-dimensional and three-dimensional vessel morphometric parameter measurements obtained with PCI are similar to the ACI data. Furthermore, PCI allows efficient and direct discrimination of the same branch level of the CSA without contrast agent injection and is expected to provide reliable biological information regarding the intramedullary artery. Compared with ACI, PCI might be a novel imaging method that offers a powerful imaging platform for evaluating pathological changes in small vessels and may also allow better clarification of their role in neurovascular disorders. PMID:27359146

  11. Image quality assessment and human visual system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xinbo; Lu, Wen; Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong

    2010-07-01

    This paper summaries the state-of-the-art of image quality assessment (IQA) and human visual system (HVS). IQA provides an objective index or real value to measure the quality of the specified image. Since human beings are the ultimate receivers of visual information in practical applications, the most reliable IQA is to build a computational model to mimic the HVS. According to the properties and cognitive mechanism of the HVS, the available HVS-based IQA methods can be divided into two categories, i.e., bionics methods and engineering methods. This paper briefly introduces the basic theories and development histories of the above two kinds of HVS-based IQA methods. Finally, some promising research issues are pointed out in the end of the paper.

  12. Retinal image quality, reading and myopia.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michael J; Buehren, Tobias; Iskander, D Robert

    2006-01-01

    Analysis was undertaken of the retinal image characteristics of the best-spectacle corrected eyes of progressing myopes (n = 20, mean age = 22 years; mean spherical equivalent = -3.84 D) and a control group of emmetropes (n = 20, mean age = 23 years; mean spherical equivalent = 0.00 D) before and after a 2h reading task. Retinal image quality was calculated based upon wavefront measurements taken with a Hartmann-Shack sensor with fixation on both a far (5.5 m) and near (individual reading distance) target. The visual Strehl ratio based on the optical transfer function (VSOTF) was significantly worse for the myopes prior to reading for both the far (p = 0.01) and near (p = 0.03) conditions. The myopic group showed significant reductions in various aspects of retinal image quality compared with the emmetropes, involving components of the modulation transfer function, phase transfer function and point spread function, often along the vertical meridian of the eye. The depth of focus of the myopes (0.54 D) was larger (p = 0.02) than the emmetropes (0.42 D) and the distribution of refractive power (away from optimal sphero-cylinder) was greater in the myopic eyes (variance of distributions p < 0.05). We found evidence that the lead and lag of accommodation are influenced by the higher order aberrations of the eye (e.g. significant correlations between lead/lag and the peak of the visual Strehl ratio based on the MTF). This could indicate that the higher accommodation lags seen in myopes are providing optimized retinal image characteristics. The interaction between low and high order aberrations of the eye play a significant role in reducing the retinal image quality of myopic eyes compared with emmetropes. PMID:15913701

  13. Mirror Image Distal Anterior Cerebral Artery Aneurysms Treated with Coil Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Enesi, E.; Rroji, A.; Demneri, M.; Vreto, G.; Petrela, M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mirror image aneurysms of the distal anterior cerebral arteries (DACA) are rare. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report of two patients with mirror image DACA aneurysms treated successfully with coil embolization. The association of aneurysms with anatomic variants has been extensively reported. We may speculate that the remnants of the failed regression of the supreme anterior communicating artery could lead to an increase in stress across their territorial bifurcation, leading to the development of mirror image DACA aneurysms. We found the endovascular treatment of mirror image DACA aneurysms to be feasible and effective. If possible, we suggest the treatment of both aneurysms in one procedure. PMID:23472723

  14. Towards real-time image quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geary, Bobby; Grecos, Christos

    2011-03-01

    We introduce a real-time implementation and evaluation of a new fast accurate full reference based image quality metric. The popular general image quality metric known as the Structural Similarity Index Metric (SSIM) has been shown to be an effective, efficient and useful, finding many practical and theoretical applications. Recently the authors have proposed an enhanced version of the SSIM algorithm known as the Rotated Gaussian Discrimination Metric (RGDM). This approach uses a Gaussian-like discrimination function to evaluate local contrast and luminance. RGDM was inspired by an exploration of local statistical parameter variations in relation to variation of Mean Opinion Score (MOS) for a range of particular distortion types. In this paper we out-line the salient features of the derivation of RGDM and show how analyses of local statistics of distortion type necessitate variation in discrimination function width. Results on the LIVE image database show tight banding of RGDM metric value when plotted against mean opinion score indicating the usefulness of this metric. We then explore a number of strategies for algorithmic speed-up including the application of Integral Images for patch based computation optimisation, cost reduction for the evaluation of the discrimination function and general loop unrolling. We also employ fast Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) intrinsics and explore data parallel decomposition on a multi-core Intel Processor.

  15. Dual-source computed tomographic coronary angiography: image quality and stenosis diagnosis in patients with high heart rates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Minwen; Li, Jiayi; Xu, Jian; Chen, Kang; Zhao, Hongliang; Huan, Yi

    2009-01-01

    We sought to evaluate prospectively the effects of heart rate and heart-rate variability on dual-source computed tomographic coronary image quality in patients whose heart rates were high, and to determine retrospectively the accuracy of dual-source computed tomographic diagnosis of coronary artery stenosis in the same patients.We compared image quality and diagnostic accuracy in 40 patients whose heart rates exceeded 70 beats/min with the same data in 40 patients whose heart rates were 70 beats/min or slower. In both groups, we analyzed 1,133 coronary arterial segments. Five hundred forty-five segments (97.7%) in low-heart-rate patients and 539 segments (93.7%) in high-heart-rate patients were of diagnostic image quality. We considered P < 0.05 to be statistically significant. No statistically significant differences between the groups were found in diagnostic-image quality scores of total segments or of any coronary artery, nor were any significant differences found between the groups in the accurate diagnosis of angiographically significant stenosis.Calcification was the chief factor that affected diagnostic accuracy. In high-heart-rate patients, heart-rate variability was significantly related to the diagnostic image quality of all segments (P = 0.001) and of the left circumflex coronary artery (P = 0.016). Heart-rate variability of more than 5 beats/min most strongly contributed to an inability to evaluate segments in both groups. When heart rates rose, the optimal reconstruction window shifted from diastole to systole.The image quality of dual-source computed tomographic coronary angiography at high heart rates enables sufficient diagnosis of stenosis, although variability of heart rates significantly deteriorates image quality. PMID:19436804

  16. Improving Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Image Quality with Image Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Tarolli, Jay G.; Jackson, Lauren M.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The spatial resolution of chemical images acquired with cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is limited not only by the size of the probe utilized to create the images, but also by detection sensitivity. As the probe size is reduced to below 1 µm, for example, a low signal in each pixel limits lateral resolution due to counting statistics considerations. Although it can be useful to implement numerical methods to mitigate this problem, here we investigate the use of image fusion to combine information from scanning electron microscope (SEM) data with chemically resolved SIMS images. The advantage of this approach is that the higher intensity and, hence, spatial resolution of the electron images can help to improve the quality of the SIMS images without sacrificing chemical specificity. Using a pan-sharpening algorithm, the method is illustrated using synthetic data, experimental data acquired from a metallic grid sample, and experimental data acquired from a lawn of algae cells. The results show that up to an order of magnitude increase in spatial resolution is possible to achieve. A cross-correlation metric is utilized for evaluating the reliability of the procedure. PMID:24912432

  17. Imaging findings and endovascular management of iatrogenic hepatic arterial injuries.

    PubMed

    Güneyli, Serkan; Gök, Mustafa; Çınar, Celal; Bozkaya, Halil; Korkmaz, Mehmet; Parıldar, Mustafa; Oran, İsmail

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic hepatic arterial injuries (IHAIs) include pseudoaneurysm, extravasation, arteriovenous fistula, arteriobiliary fistula, and dissection. IHAIs are usually demonstrated following percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, percutaneous liver biopsy, liver surgery, chemoembolization, radioembolization, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The latency period between the intervention and diagnosis varies. The most common symptom is hemorrhage, and the most common lesion is pseudoaneurysm. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is mostly performed prior to angiography, and IHAIs are demonstrated on CTA in most of the patients. Patients with IHAI are mostly treated by coils, but some patients may be treated by liquid embolic materials or stent-grafts. CTA can also be used in the follow-up period. Endovascular treatment is a safe and minimally invasive treatment option with high success rates. PMID:26359873

  18. Model-based quantification of image quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazra, Rajeeb; Miller, Keith W.; Park, Stephen K.

    1989-01-01

    In 1982, Park and Schowengerdt published an end-to-end analysis of a digital imaging system quantifying three principal degradation components: (1) image blur - blurring caused by the acquisition system, (2) aliasing - caused by insufficient sampling, and (3) reconstruction blur - blurring caused by the imperfect interpolative reconstruction. This analysis, which measures degradation as the square of the radiometric error, includes the sample-scene phase as an explicit random parameter and characterizes the image degradation caused by imperfect acquisition and reconstruction together with the effects of undersampling and random sample-scene phases. In a recent paper Mitchell and Netravelli displayed the visual effects of the above mentioned degradations and presented subjective analysis about their relative importance in determining image quality. The primary aim of the research is to use the analysis of Park and Schowengerdt to correlate their mathematical criteria for measuring image degradations with subjective visual criteria. Insight gained from this research can be exploited in the end-to-end design of optical systems, so that system parameters (transfer functions of the acquisition and display systems) can be designed relative to each other, to obtain the best possible results using quantitative measurements.

  19. The role of completion imaging following carotid artery endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste; Schneider, Fabrice; Illuminati, Giulio; Samson, Russell H

    2013-05-01

    A variety of completion imaging methods can be used during carotid endarterectomy to recognize technical errors or intrinsic abnormalities such as mural thrombus or platelet aggregation, but none of these methods has achieved wide acceptance, and their ability to improve the outcome of the operation remains a matter of controversy. It is unclear if completion imaging is routinely necessary and which abnormalities require re-exploration. Proponents of routine completion imaging argue that identification of these abnormalities will allow their immediate correction and avoid a perioperative stroke. However, much of the evidence in favor of this argument is incidental, and many experienced vascular surgeons who perform carotid endarterectomy do not use any completion imaging technique and report equally good outcomes using a careful surgical protocol. Furthermore, certain postoperative strokes, including intracerebral hemorrhage and hyperperfusion syndrome, are unrelated to the surgical technique and cannot be prevented by completion imaging. This controversial subject is now open to discussion, and our debaters have been given the task to clarify the evidence to justify their preferred option for completion imaging during carotid endarterectomy. PMID:23601598

  20. 3D GRASE PROPELLER: Improved Image Acquisition Technique for Arterial Spin Labeling Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Huan; Hoge, W. Scott; Hamilton, Craig A.; Günther, Matthias; Kraft, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is a non-invasive technique that can quantitatively measure cerebral blood flow (CBF). While traditionally ASL employs 2D EPI or spiral acquisition trajectories, single-shot 3D GRASE is gaining popularity in ASL due to inherent SNR advantage and spatial coverage. However, a major limitation of 3D GRASE is through-plane blurring caused by T2 decay. A novel technique combining 3D GRASE and a PROPELLER trajectory (3DGP) is presented to minimize through-plane blurring without sacrificing perfusion sensitivity or increasing total scan time. Full brain perfusion images were acquired at a 3×3×5mm3 nominal voxel size with Q2TIPS-FAIR as the ASL preparation sequence. Data from 5 healthy subjects was acquired on a GE 1.5T scanner in less than 4 minutes per subject. While showing good agreement in CBF quantification with 3D GRASE, 3DGP demonstrated reduced through-plane blurring, improved anatomical details, high repeatability and robustness against motion, making it suitable for routine clinical use. PMID:21254211

  1. The mobile image quality survey game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, D. René

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss human assessment of the quality of photographic still images, that are degraded in various manners relative to an original, for example due to compression or noise. In particular, we examine and present results from a technique where observers view images on a mobile device, perform pairwise comparisons, identify defects in the images, and interact with the display to indicate the location of the defects. The technique measures the response time and accuracy of the responses. By posing the survey in a form similar to a game, providing performance feedback to the observer, the technique attempts to increase the engagement of the observers, and to avoid exhausting observers, a factor that is often a problem for subjective surveys. The results are compared with the known physical magnitudes of the defects and with results from similar web-based surveys. The strengths and weaknesses of the technique are discussed. Possible extensions of the technique to video quality assessment are also discussed.

  2. Carotid artery and aortic arch imaging with ECG gating in DSA

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, D.A.; Sheldon, J.J.; Soila, K.; Tobias, J.

    1985-06-01

    New computer software for gated digital subtraction angiography imaging was used to study 57 patients over 3 months. Better mask registration on isolated sets of systolic and diastolic images improved image quality. Detail of vessel outline and lesion was better than that seen on nongated images.

  3. Hyperspectral and multispectral imaging for evaluating food safety and quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spectral imaging technologies have been developed rapidly during the past decade. This paper presents hyperspectral and multispectral imaging technologies in the area of food safety and quality evaluation, with an introduction, demonstration, and summarization of the spectral imaging techniques avai...

  4. High spatial and temporal resolution imaging of the arterial vasculature of the lower extremity with contrast enhanced MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Mostardi, Petrice M; Haider, Clifton R; Glockner, James F; Young, Phillip M; Riederer, Stephen J

    2011-05-01

    Vascular imaging can be essential in the diagnosis, monitoring, and planning and assessment of treatment of patients with peripheral vascular disease. The purpose of this work is to describe a recently developed three-dimensional (3D) time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) technique, Cartesian Acquisition with Projection Reconstruction-like sampling (CAPR), and its application to imaging of the vasculature of the lower legs and feet. CAPR implements accelerated imaging techniques and uses specialized multielement imaging coil arrays to achieve high temporal and high spatial resolution imaging. Volunteer and patient studies of the vasculature of the lower legs and feet have been performed. Temporal resolution of 4.9-6.5 sec and spatial resolution less than or equal to 1 mm in all directions allow for the depiction of progressive arterial filling and complex flow patterns as well as sharp visualization of vascular structure as small as the fine muscular branches. High-quality diagnostic imaging is made possible with CAPR's advanced acquisition and reconstruction techniques and the use of specialized coil arrays. PMID:21509813

  5. High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Imaging of the Arterial Vasculature of the Lower Extremity With Contrast Enhanced MR Angiography

    PubMed Central

    MOSTARDI, PETRICE M.; HAIDER, CLIFTON R.; GLOCKNER, JAMES F.; YOUNG, PHILLIP M.; RIEDERER, STEPHEN J.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular imaging can be essential in the diagnosis, monitoring, and planning and assessment of treatment of patients with peripheral vascular disease. The purpose of this work is to describe a recently developed three-dimensional (3D) time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) technique, Cartesian Acquisition with Projection Reconstruction-like sampling (CAPR), and its application to imaging of the vasculature of the lower legs and feet. CAPR implements accelerated imaging techniques and uses specialized multielement imaging coil arrays to achieve high temporal and high spatial resolution imaging. Volunteer and patient studies of the vasculature of the lower legs and feet have been performed. Temporal resolution of 4.9–6.5 sec and spatial resolution less than or equal to 1 mm in all directions allow for the depiction of progressive arterial filling and complex flow patterns as well as sharp visualization of vascular structure as small as the fine muscular branches. High-quality diagnostic imaging is made possible with CAPR’s advanced acquisition and reconstruction techniques and the use of specialized coil arrays. PMID:21509813

  6. Computerised multiparametric analysis from images of blood flow through frog mesenteric arterial bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Umrani, J; Prakash, B; Singh, M

    1997-07-01

    A computerised multiparametric procedure is developed to analyse the images of blood flow through various locations of the mesenteric arterial bifurcation of frog. The data are recorded by a video microscopic system and, after digitisation and pre-processing, are analysed by an IBM PC/AT based image processing system to obtain erythrocyte and velocity distribution profiles by axial tomographic and image velocimetry techniques, respectively. The vessel radius, haematocrit, blood flow through main and branch arteries and flow separation zones are determined from the data by various analytical procedures. In contrast to the earlier techniques the data are obtained from the same location of the vessel and thus the variability in flow parameters is minimised. PMID:9327615

  7. Robust extraction of the aorta and pulmonary artery from 3D MDCT image data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taeprasartsit, Pinyo; Higgins, William E.

    2010-03-01

    Accurate definition of the aorta and pulmonary artery from three-dimensional (3D) multi-detector CT (MDCT) images is important for pulmonary applications. This work presents robust methods for defining the aorta and pulmonary artery in the central chest. The methods work on both contrast enhanced and no-contrast 3D MDCT image data. The automatic methods use a common approach employing model fitting and selection and adaptive refinement. During the occasional event that more precise vascular extraction is desired or the method fails, we also have an alternate semi-automatic fail-safe method. The semi-automatic method extracts the vasculature by extending the medial axes into a user-guided direction. A ground-truth study over a series of 40 human 3D MDCT images demonstrates the efficacy, accuracy, robustness, and efficiency of the methods.

  8. Retinal artery-vein caliber grading using color fundus imaging.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Alauddin; Kawasaki, Ryo; Lamoureux, Ecosse; Ramamohanarao, Kotagiri; Wong, Tien Yin

    2013-07-01

    Recent research suggests that retinal vessel caliber (or cross-sectional width) measured from retinal photographs is an important feature for predicting cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). One of the most utilized measures is to quantify retinal arteriolar and venular caliber as the Central Retinal Artery Equivalent (CRAE) and Central Retinal Vein Equivalent (CRVE). However, current computer tools utilize manual or semi-automatic grading methods to estimate CRAE and CRVE. These methods involve a significant amount of grader's time and can add a significant level of inaccuracy due to repetitive nature of grading and intragrader distances. An automatic and time efficient grading of the vessel caliber with highly repeatable measurement is essential, but is technically challenging due to a substantial variation of the retinal blood vessels' properties. In this paper, we propose a new technique to measure the retinal vessel caliber, which is an "edge-based" vessel tracking method. We measured CRAE and CRVE from each of the vessel types. We achieve very high accuracy (average 96.23%) for each of the cross-sectional width measurement compared to manually graded width. For overall vessel caliber measurement accuracy of CRAE and CRVE, we compared the results with an existing semi-automatic method which showed high correlation of 0.85 and 0.92, respectively. The intra-grader reproducibility of our method was high, with the correlation coefficient of 0.881 for CRAE and 0.875 for CRVE. PMID:23535181

  9. In vivo high-resolution structural imaging of large arteries in small rodents using two-photon laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megens, Remco T. A.; Reitsma, Sietze; Prinzen, Lenneke; Oude Egbrink, Mirjam G. A.; Engels, Wim; Leenders, Peter J. A.; Brunenberg, Ellen J. L.; Reesink, Koen D.; Janssen, Ben J. A.; Ter Haar Romeny, Bart M.; Slaaf, Dick W.; van Zandvoort, Marc A. M. J.

    2010-01-01

    In vivo (molecular) imaging of the vessel wall of large arteries at subcellular resolution is crucial for unraveling vascular pathophysiology. We previously showed the applicability of two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) in mounted arteries ex vivo. However, in vivo TPLSM has thus far suffered from in-frame and between-frame motion artifacts due to arterial movement with cardiac and respiratory activity. Now, motion artifacts are suppressed by accelerated image acquisition triggered on cardiac and respiratory activity. In vivo TPLSM is performed on rat renal and mouse carotid arteries, both surgically exposed and labeled fluorescently (cell nuclei, elastin, and collagen). The use of short acquisition times consistently limit in-frame motion artifacts. Additionally, triggered imaging reduces between-frame artifacts. Indeed, structures in the vessel wall (cell nuclei, elastic laminae) can be imaged at subcellular resolution. In mechanically damaged carotid arteries, even the subendothelial collagen sheet (~1 μm) is visualized using collagen-targeted quantum dots. We demonstrate stable in vivo imaging of large arteries at subcellular resolution using TPLSM triggered on cardiac and respiratory cycles. This creates great opportunities for studying (diseased) arteries in vivo or immediate validation of in vivo molecular imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and positron emission tomography (PET).

  10. Use of Sonicated Albumin (Infoson) to Enhance Arterial Spectral and Color Doppler Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Abildgaard, Andreas; Egge, Tor S.; Klow, Nils-Einar; Jakobsen, Jarl A.

    1996-04-15

    Purpose: To examine the effect of an ultrasound contrast medium (UCM), Infoson, on Doppler examination of stenotic arteries. Methods: Stenoses were created in the common carotid artery of six piglets, and examined with spectral Doppler and color Doppler imaging during UCM infusion in the left ventricle. Results: UCM caused a mean increase in recorded maximal systolic and end-diastolic velocities of 5% and 6%, respectively, while blood flow remained constant. Increased spectral intensity with UCM was accompanied by spectral broadening. Reduction of spectral intensity by adjustment of Doppler gain counteracted the velocity effects and the spectral broadening. With color Doppler, UCM caused dose-dependent color artifacts outside the artery. Flow in narrow stenoses could be visualized with UCM. Conclusion: The effects of UCM on velocity measurements were slight, and were related to changes in spectral intensity. With color Doppler, UCM may facilitate flow detection, but color artifacts may interfere.

  11. Effect of Bismuth Breast Shielding on Radiation Dose and Image Quality in Coronary CT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Elliston, Carl D.; Groves, Daniel W.; Cheng, Bin; Wolff, Steven D.; Pearson, Gregory D. N.; Peters, M. Robert; Johnson, Lynne L.; Bokhari, Sabahat; Johnson, Gary W.; Bhatia, Ketan; Pozniakoff, Theodore; Brenner, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) is associated with high radiation dose to the female breasts. Bismuth breast shielding offers the potential to significantly reduce dose to the breasts and nearby organs, but the magnitude of this reduction and its impact on image quality and radiation dose have not been evaluated. Methods Radiation doses from CCTA to critical organs were determined using metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors positioned in a customized anthropomorphic whole-body dosimetry verification phantom. Image noise and signal were measured in regions of interest (ROIs) including the coronary arteries. Results With bismuth shielding, breast radiation dose was reduced 46–57% depending on breast size and scanning technique, with more moderate dose reduction to the heart, lungs, and esophagus. However, shielding significantly decreased image signal (by 14.6 HU) and contrast (by 28.4 HU), modestly but significantly increased image noise in ROIs in locations of coronary arteries, and decreased contrast-to-noise ratio by 20.9%.. Conclusions While bismuth breast shielding can significantly decrease radiation dose to critical organs, it is associated with an increase in image noise, decrease in contrast-to-noise, and changes tissue attenuation characteristics in the location of the coronary arteries. PMID:22068687

  12. On pictures and stuff: image quality and material appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferwerda, James A.

    2014-02-01

    Realistic images are a puzzle because they serve as visual representations of objects while also being objects themselves. When we look at an image we are able to perceive both the properties of the image and the properties of the objects represented by the image. Research on image quality has typically focused improving image properties (resolution, dynamic range, frame rate, etc.) while ignoring the issue of whether images are serving their role as visual representations. In this paper we describe a series of experiments that investigate how well images of different quality convey information about the properties of the objects they represent. In the experiments we focus on the effects that two image properties (contrast and sharpness) have on the ability of images to represent the gloss of depicted objects. We found that different experimental methods produced differing results. Specifically, when the stimulus images were presented using simultaneous pair comparison, observers were influenced by the surface properties of the images and conflated changes in image contrast and sharpness with changes in object gloss. On the other hand, when the stimulus images were presented sequentially, observers were able to disregard the image plane properties and more accurately match the gloss of the objects represented by the different quality images. These findings suggest that in understanding image quality it is useful to distinguish between quality of the imaging medium and the quality of the visual information represented by that medium.

  13. The value of imaging in subclinical coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Zimarino, Marco; Prati, Francesco; Marano, Riccardo; Angeramo, Francesca; Pescetelli, Irene; Gatto, Laura; Marco, Valeria; Bruno, Isabella; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2016-07-01

    Although the treatment of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) has advanced considerably, the ability to detect, predict, and prevent complications of atherosclerotic plaques, considered the main cause of ACS, remains elusive. Several imaging tools have therefore been developed to characterize morphological determinants of plaque vulnerability, defined as the propensity or probability of plaques to complicate with coronary thrombosis, able to predict patients at risk. By utilizing both intravascular and noninvasive imaging tools, indeed prospective longitudinal studies have recently provided considerable knowledge, increasing our understanding of determinants of plaque formation, progression, and instabilization. In the present review we aim at 1) critically analyzing the incremental utility of imaging tools over currently available "traditional" methods of risk stratification; 2) documenting the capacity of such modalities to monitor atherosclerosis progression and regression according to lifestyle modifications and targeted therapy; and 3) evaluating the potential clinical relevance of advanced imaging, testing whether detection of such lesions may guide therapeutic decisions and changes in treatment strategy. The current understanding of modes of progression of atherosclerotic vascular disease and the appropriate use of available diagnostic tools may already now gauge the selection of patients to be enrolled in primary and secondary prevention studies. Appropriate trials should now, however, evaluate the cost-effectiveness of an aggressive search of vulnerable plaques, favoring implementation of such diagnostic tools in daily practice. PMID:26851577

  14. Image analysis for dental bone quality assessment using CBCT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suprijanto; Epsilawati, L.; Hajarini, M. S.; Juliastuti, E.; Susanti, H.

    2016-03-01

    Cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) is one of X-ray imaging modalities that are applied in dentistry. Its modality can visualize the oral region in 3D and in a high resolution. CBCT jaw image has potential information for the assessment of bone quality that often used for pre-operative implant planning. We propose comparison method based on normalized histogram (NH) on the region of inter-dental septum and premolar teeth. Furthermore, the NH characteristic from normal and abnormal bone condition are compared and analyzed. Four test parameters are proposed, i.e. the difference between teeth and bone average intensity (s), the ratio between bone and teeth average intensity (n) of NH, the difference between teeth and bone peak value (Δp) of NH, and the ratio between teeth and bone of NH range (r). The results showed that n, s, and Δp have potential to be the classification parameters of dental calcium density.

  15. Stereoscopic image quality assessment using disparity-compensated view filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang; Yu, Mei; Jiang, Gangyi; Shao, Feng; Peng, Zongju

    2016-03-01

    Stereoscopic image quality assessment (IQA) plays a vital role in stereoscopic image/video processing systems. We propose a new quality assessment for stereoscopic image that uses disparity-compensated view filtering (DCVF). First, because a stereoscopic image is composed of different frequency components, DCVF is designed to decompose it into high-pass and low-pass components. Then, the qualities of different frequency components are acquired according to their phase congruency and coefficient distribution characteristics. Finally, support vector regression is utilized to establish a mapping model between the component qualities and subjective qualities, and stereoscopic image quality is calculated using this mapping model. Experiments on the LIVE 3-D IQA database and NBU 3-D IQA databases demonstrate that the proposed method can evaluate stereoscopic image quality accurately. Compared with several state-of-the-art quality assessment methods, the proposed method is more consistent with human perception.

  16. Determination of lung segments in computed tomography images using the Euclidean distance to the pulmonary artery

    SciTech Connect

    Stoecker, Christina; Moltz, Jan H.; Lassen, Bianca; Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin; Krass, Stefan; Welter, Stefan; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) imaging is the modality of choice for lung cancer diagnostics. With the increasing number of lung interventions on sublobar level in recent years, determining and visualizing pulmonary segments in CT images and, in oncological cases, reliable segment-related information about the location of tumors has become increasingly desirable. Computer-assisted identification of lung segments in CT images is subject of this work.Methods: The authors present a new interactive approach for the segmentation of lung segments that uses the Euclidean distance of each point in the lung to the segmental branches of the pulmonary artery. The aim is to analyze the potential of the method. Detailed manual pulmonary artery segmentations are used to achieve the best possible segment approximation results. A detailed description of the method and its evaluation on 11 CT scans from clinical routine are given.Results: An accuracy of 2–3 mm is measured for the segment boundaries computed by the pulmonary artery-based method. On average, maximum deviations of 8 mm are observed. 135 intersegmental pulmonary veins detected in the 11 test CT scans serve as reference data. Furthermore, a comparison of the presented pulmonary artery-based approach to a similar approach that uses the Euclidean distance to the segmental branches of the bronchial tree is presented. It shows a significantly higher accuracy for the pulmonary artery-based approach in lung regions at least 30 mm distal to the lung hilum.Conclusions: A pulmonary artery-based determination of lung segments in CT images is promising. In the tests, the pulmonary artery-based determination has been shown to be superior to the bronchial tree-based determination. The suitability of the segment approximation method for application in the planning of segment resections in clinical practice has already been verified in experimental cases. However, automation of the method accompanied by an evaluation on a larger

  17. Finger vein image quality evaluation using support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Xiao, Rongyang

    2013-02-01

    In an automatic finger-vein recognition system, finger-vein image quality is significant for segmentation, enhancement, and matching processes. In this paper, we propose a finger-vein image quality evaluation method using support vector machines (SVMs). We extract three features including the gradient, image contrast, and information capacity from the input image. An SVM model is built on the training images with annotated quality labels (i.e., high/low) and then applied to unseen images for quality evaluation. To resolve the class-imbalance problem in the training data, we perform oversampling for the minority class with random-synthetic minority oversampling technique. Cross-validation is also employed to verify the reliability and stability of the learned model. Our experimental results show the effectiveness of our method in evaluating the quality of finger-vein images, and by discarding low-quality images detected by our method, the overall finger-vein recognition performance is considerably improved.

  18. Evidence for myocardial CT perfusion imaging in the diagnosis of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This editorial discusses a recent paper published in the August issue of Radiology about the diagnostic value of myocardial computer tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in the detection of hemodynamically significant coronary stenosis when compared to single-photon emission CT (SPECT) imaging based on a secondary analysis of CORE320 study. Three aspects including high diagnostic sensitivity of CT perfusion imaging, moderate specificity of SPECT imaging and lack of use of attenuation correction in SPECT imaging have been discussed with reference to the current literature, and some suggestions have been highlighted for future studies to improve the diagnostic performance of CT perfusion and SPECT imaging in the diagnostic evaluation of coronary artery disease. PMID:25774349

  19. Images of arterial tissues using catheter swept source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Youxin; Flueraru, Costel; Chang, Shoude; Popescu, Dan P.; Sowa, M. G.

    2010-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography images of arterial samples harvested from asymptomatic pigs and from lipid-rich Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits were acquired using a fiber catheter-based swept-source optical coherence tomography system (OCT). A quadrature Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on multi-port fiber couplers and a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) were employed in the swept-source optical coherence tomography system. The improvement of signal to noise ratio as a result of incorporating the SOA into the configuration translated in an increase of the penetration depth. A fiber probe ending in a fiber ball lens was developed for the arterial imaging. The images acquired by this system offer the possibility to investigate anatomical details located under the surface of the artery such as the intima, media, and adventitia layers (from lumen side) of the blood vessel wall , as well as morphological features specific to artherosclerotic plaques such as lipid pools, fibrous caps, macrophage accumulations and calcified. This report indicates that our improved catheter-based swept source OCT is a potential tool for in vivo intravascular imaging.

  20. Intravascular ultrasound imaging of peripheral arteries as an adjunct to balloon angioplasty and atherectomy.

    PubMed

    Korogi, Y; Hirai, T; Takahashi, M

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews many of the applications of intravascular ultrasound (US) imaging for peripheral arterial diseases. In vitro studies demonstrate an excellent correlation between ultrasound measurements of lumen and plaque cross-sectional area compared with histologic sections. In vivo clinical studies reveal the enhanced diagnostic capabilities of this technology compared with angiography. Intravascular US imaging can provide valuable information on the degree, eccentricity, and histologic type of stenosis before intervention, and on the morphological changes in the arterial wall and the extent of excision after intervention. Intravascular US may also serve as a superior index for gauging the diameter of balloon, stent, laser probe, and/or atherectomy catheter appropriate for a proposed intervention. Significant new insights into the mechanisms of balloon angioplasty and atherectomy have been established by intravascular US findings. Intravascular US imaging has been shown to be a more accurate method than angiography for determining the cross-sectional area of the arterial lumen, and for assessing severity of stenosis. Quantitative assessment of the luminal cross-sectional area after the balloon dilatation should be more accurate than angiography as intimal tears or dissections produced by the dilatation may not be accurately evaluated with angiography. At the present time, intravascular US is still a controversial imaging technique. Outcome studies are currently being organized to assess the clinical value and cost effectiveness of intravascular ultrasound in the context of these interventional procedures. PMID:8653738

  1. Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging of Peripheral Arteries as an Adjunct to Balloon Angioplasty and Atherectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Korogi, Yukunori; Hirai, Toshinori; Takahashi, Mutsumasa

    1996-11-15

    This article reviews many of the applications of intravascular ultrasound (US) imaging for peripheral arterial diseases. In vitro studies demonstrate an excellent correlation between ultrasound measurements of lumen and plaque crossectional area compared with histologic sections. In vivo clinical studies reveal the enhanced diagnostic capabilities of this technology compared with angiography. Intravascular US imaging can provide valuable information on the degree, eccentricity, and histologic type of stenosis before intervention, and on the morphological changes in the arterial wall and the extent of excision after intervention. Intravascular US may also serve as a superior index for gauging the diameter of balloon, stent, laser probe, and/or atherectomy catheter appropriate for a proposed intervention. Significant new insights into the mechanisms of balloon angioplasty and atherectomy have been established by intravascular US findings. Intravascular US imaging has been shown to be a more accurate method than angiography for determining the cross-sectional area of the arterial lumen, and for assessing severity of stenosis. Quantitative assessment of the luminal cross-sectional area after the balloon dilatation should be more accurate than angiography as intimal tears or dissections produced by the dilatation may not be accurately evaluated with angiography. At the present time, intravascular US is still a controversial imaging technique. Outcome studies are currently being organized to assess the clinical value and cost effectiveness of intravascular ultrasound in the context of these interventional procedures.

  2. Differences in the Properties of the Radial Artery between Cun, Guan, Chi, and Nearby Segments Using Ultrasonographic Imaging: A Pilot Study on Arterial Depth, Diameter, and Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeuk U.; Lee, Yu Jung; Kim, Jong Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the Study. The three conventional pulse-diagnostic palpation locations (PLs) on both wrists are Cun, Guan, and Chi, and each location reveals different clinical information. To identify anatomical or hemodynamic specificity, we used ultrasonographic imaging to determine the arterial diameter, radial artery depth, and arterial blood flow velocity at the three PLs and at nearby non-PL segments. Methods. We applied an ultrasound scanner to 44 subjects and studied the changes in the arterial diameter and depth as well as in the average/maximum blood flow velocities along the radial artery at three PLs and three non-PLs located more proximally than Chi. Results. All of the measurements at all of the PLs were significantly different (P < 0.01). Artery depth was significantly different among the non-PLs; however, this difference became insignificant after normalization to the arm circumference. Conclusions. Substantial changes in the hemodynamic and anatomical properties of the radial artery around the three PLs were insignificant at the nearby non-PLs segments. This finding may provide a partial explanation for the diagnostic use of “Cun, Guan, and Chi.” PMID:25763090

  3. Image quality metrics for optical coherence angiography.

    PubMed

    Lozzi, Andrea; Agrawal, Anant; Boretsky, Adam; Welle, Cristin G; Hammer, Daniel X

    2015-07-01

    We characterized image quality in optical coherence angiography (OCA) en face planes of mouse cortical capillary network in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and Weber contrast (Wc) through a novel mask-based segmentation method. The method was used to compare two adjacent B-scan processing algorithms, (1) average absolute difference (AAD) and (2) standard deviation (SD), while varying the number of lateral cross-sections acquired (also known as the gate length, N). AAD and SD are identical at N = 2 and exhibited similar image quality for N<10. However, AAD is relatively less susceptible to bulk tissue motion artifact than SD. SNR and Wc were 15% and 35% higher for AAD from N = 25 to 100. In addition data sets were acquired with two objective lenses with different magnifications to quantify the effect of lateral resolution on fine capillary detection. The lower power objective yielded a significant mean broadening of 17% in Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM) diameter. These results may guide study and device designs for OCA capillary and blood flow quantification. PMID:26203372

  4. Quality Control of Diffusion Weighted Images

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhexing; Wang, Yi; Gerig, Guido; Gouttard, Sylvain; Tao, Ran; Fletcher, Thomas; Styner, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) has become an important MRI procedure to investigate the integrity of white matter in brain in vivo. DTI is estimated from a series of acquired Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) volumes. DWI data suffers from inherent low SNR, overall long scanning time of multiple directional encoding with correspondingly large risk to encounter several kinds of artifacts. These artifacts can be too severe for a correct and stable estimation of the diffusion tensor. Thus, a quality control (QC) procedure is absolutely necessary for DTI studies. Currently, routine DTI QC procedures are conducted manually by visually checking the DWI data set in a gradient by gradient and slice by slice way. The results often suffer from low consistence across different data sets, lack of agreement of different experts, and difficulty to judge motion artifacts by qualitative inspection. Additionally considerable manpower is needed for this step due to the large number of images to QC, which is common for group comparison and longitudinal studies, especially with increasing number of diffusion gradient directions. We present a framework for automatic DWI QC. We developed a tool called DTIPrep which pipelines the QC steps with a detailed protocoling and reporting facility. And it is fully open source. This framework/tool has been successfully applied to several DTI studies with several hundred DWIs in our lab as well as collaborating labs in Utah and Iowa. In our studies, the tool provides a crucial piece for robust DTI analysis in brain white matter study. PMID:24353379

  5. Improving imaging to optimize screening strategies for carotid artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Ankur; Gupta, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Carotid stenosis is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. Recently, the United States Preventive Services Task Force issued a recommendation against screening for carotid stenosis in the general population. There is the potential for efficient risk-stratifying or staged screening approaches that identify individuals at highest risk for carotid stenosis and stroke, but these tools have yet to be proven effective in external validation studies. In this paper, we review how medical imaging can be used to detect carotid stenosis and highlight several areas that could be improved to identify potentially efficient screening strategies for carotid stenosis. PMID:26275846

  6. Relationship Between Carotid Artery Calcification Detected in Dental Panoramic Images and Hypertension and Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Moshfeghi, Mahkameh; Taheri, Jamileh Beigom; Bahemmat, Nika; Evazzadeh, Mohammad Ebrahim; Hadian, Hoora

    2014-01-01

    Background: Carotid artery calcification may be related to cerebrovascular accident, which may result in death or physical and mental disabilities in survivors. Objectives: Our purpose is to study the association of carotid artery calcification (CAC) on dental panoramic radiographs and two risk factors of cerebrovascular accident (CVA) including hypertension and myocardial infarction (MI). Patients and Methods: Panoramic images of 200 patients that were all women above 50 years of age (a population suffering from vascular diseases) were investigated. All panoramic images were provided under similar conditions in terms of the type of panoramic radiograph equipment, type of applied films and the automatic film processor. Then, the patients answered questions about MI history and taking antihypertensive drugs. We also measured the blood pressure of patients in two separate surveys. Data analysis was performed by SPSS statistical program. We used Exact Fisher test and Chi-Square test at a significant level of less than 0.05 to study the effect of these variables on the occurrence of carotid artery calcification. Results: Among 200 studied samples, 22 of the patients (11%) had carotid artery calcification on the dental panoramic radiograph. In total, 52 patients (26%) had hypertension and four people (2%) had a history of MI. Eleven individuals among patients suffering from hypertension (21.2%) and three individuals among patients with a history of MI (75%) demonstrated CAC on dental panoramic images . Conclusions: The relationship between CAC found on dental panoramic radiographs and two CVA risk factors--hypertension and MI-- was significant. Therefore, it seems that detection of CAC on panoramic images of dental patients must be considered by dentists. PMID:25763086

  7. Duplication of the superficial femoral artery: comprehensive review of imaging literature and insight into embryology

    PubMed Central

    Hapugoda, Sachintha; Kwan, Gigi Nga Chi; Watkins, Trevor William; Rophael, John A

    2016-01-01

    An extremely rare case of duplicated superficial femoral artery (SFA) was incidentally observed on computed tomography angiogram (CTA) of the lower limbs for presurgical planning for an osteomyocutaneous fibula flap in a patient with T4a oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To our knowledge, this is the sixth reported case in the imaging literature. We performed a comprehensive review of the English literature and discuss the underlying embryological origin underpinning this rare anatomical variant. PMID:27504194

  8. Image Quality Characteristics of Handheld Display Devices for Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Asumi; Liu, Peter; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Badano, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Handheld devices such as mobile phones and tablet computers have become widespread with thousands of available software applications. Recently, handhelds are being proposed as part of medical imaging solutions, especially in emergency medicine, where immediate consultation is required. However, handheld devices differ significantly from medical workstation displays in terms of display characteristics. Moreover, the characteristics vary significantly among device types. We investigate the image quality characteristics of various handheld devices with respect to luminance response, spatial resolution, spatial noise, and reflectance. We show that the luminance characteristics of the handheld displays are different from those of workstation displays complying with grayscale standard target response suggesting that luminance calibration might be needed. Our results also demonstrate that the spatial characteristics of handhelds can surpass those of medical workstation displays particularly for recent generation devices. While a 5 mega-pixel monochrome workstation display has horizontal and vertical modulation transfer factors of 0.52 and 0.47 at the Nyquist frequency, the handheld displays released after 2011 can have values higher than 0.63 at the respective Nyquist frequencies. The noise power spectra for workstation displays are higher than 1.2×10−5 mm2 at 1 mm−1, while handheld displays have values lower than 3.7×10−6 mm2. Reflectance measurements on some of the handheld displays are consistent with measurements for workstation displays with, in some cases, low specular and diffuse reflectance coefficients. The variability of the characterization results among devices due to the different technological features indicates that image quality varies greatly among handheld display devices. PMID:24236113

  9. Arterial Wall Imaging in Symptomatic Carotid Stenosis: Delayed Enhancement on MDCT Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Su Min; Seo, Woo-Keun; Seol, Hae Young

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate progressive enhancement in the carotid arterial wall overlying plaque in the symptomatic side for patients with cerebrovascular symptoms until delayed phase using MDCTA. Materials and Methods Twenty-one patients (all men; ages, 49-82 years; mean, 67.8 ± 8.4 years) with recent stroke and severe extracranial carotid stenosis were retrospectively analyzed. Pre-, early- and delayed phase images of MDCTA were obtained, and Hounsfield units (HU) of carotid walls were measured. We also measured HU of the asymptomatic contralateral carotid arterial wall for comparison. Friedman's test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to evaluate the differences between groups. Results The averaged HU of the carotid wall in the symptomatic side was higher on the delayed phase (65.8 ± 14.2 HU) compared to early arterial phase (54.2 ± 12.6 HU). The averaged HU difference of wall enhancement between pre-contrast and delayed phase (28.0 ± 14.8 HU) was significantly higher than the between pre-contrast and early arterial phase (16.4 ± 12.1 HU) with P < 0.05. In analysis of the contralateral asymptomatic side, the HU difference between pre-contrast and delayed phase (15.5 ± 12.0 HU) showed no significant higher value than between pre-contrast and early arterial phase (14.9 ± 10.9 HU). Conclusion The pronounced enhancement of the carotid wall in the delayed phase on MDCTA was demonstrated in symptomatic patients with severe internal carotid artery stenosis. In the future, we need more comparative studies to verify this finding as one of risk stratification. PMID:26958408

  10. Comparison of exercise electrocardiography and quantitative thallium imaging for one-vessel coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kaul, S.; Kiess, M.; Liu, P.; Guiney, T.E.; Pohost, G.M.; Okada, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.

    1985-08-01

    The relative value of exercise electrocardiography and computer analyzed thallium-201 imaging was compared in 124 patients with 1-vessel coronary artery disease (CAD). Of these, 78 had left anterior descending (LAD), 32 right and 14 left circumflex (LC) CAD. In patients with no previous myocardial infarction (MI), thallium imaging was more sensitive than the electrocardiogram (78% vs 64%, p less than 0.01), but in patients with previous MI, sensitivity was similar. Further, thallium imaging was more sensitive only in LAD and LC disease. Redistribution was compared with ST-segment depression as a marker of ischemia. Only in patients with prior MI (76% vs 44%, p less than 0.01) and only in LC and right CAD did redistribution occur more often than ST depression. Thallium imaging was more accurate in localizing stenoses than the electrocardiogram (p less than 0.001), but did not always correctly predict coronary anatomy. Septal thallium defects were associated with LAD disease in 84%, inferior defects with right CAD in 40% and posterolateral lesion defects with LC CAD in 22%. The results indicate the overall superiority of thallium imaging in 1-vessel CAD compared with exercise electrocardiography; however, there is a wide spectrum of extent and location of perfusion defects associated with each coronary artery. Thallium imaging complements coronary angiography by demonstrating the functional impact of CAD on myocardial perfusion.

  11. Quality assessment for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Paranjape, Amit S.; Elmaanaoui, Badr; Dewelle, Jordan; Rylander, H. Grady, III; Markey, Mia K.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2009-02-01

    Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, a measure of glaucoma progression, can be measured in images acquired by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). The accuracy of RNFL thickness estimation, however, is affected by the quality of the OCT images. In this paper, a new parameter, signal deviation (SD), which is based on the standard deviation of the intensities in OCT images, is introduced for objective assessment of OCT image quality. Two other objective assessment parameters, signal to noise ratio (SNR) and signal strength (SS), are also calculated for each OCT image. The results of the objective assessment are compared with subjective assessment. In the subjective assessment, one OCT expert graded the image quality according to a three-level scale (good, fair, and poor). The OCT B-scan images of the retina from six subjects are evaluated by both objective and subjective assessment. From the comparison, we demonstrate that the objective assessment successfully differentiates between the acceptable quality images (good and fair images) and poor quality OCT images as graded by OCT experts. We evaluate the performance of the objective assessment under different quality assessment parameters and demonstrate that SD is the best at distinguishing between fair and good quality images. The accuracy of RNFL thickness estimation is improved significantly after poor quality OCT images are rejected by automated objective assessment using the SD, SNR, and SS.

  12. Construction of Reference Data for Tissue Characterization of Arterial Wall Based on Elasticity Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Jun; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi; Ichiki, Masataka; Tezuka, Fumiaki

    2005-06-01

    Previously, we developed the phased tracking method [H. Kanai et al.: IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 43 (1996) 791] for measuring the minute change in thickness during one heartbeat and the elasticity of the arterial wall. By comparing pathological images with elasticity images measured with ultrasound, elasticity distributions for respective tissues in the arterial wall were determined. We have already measured the elasticity distributions for lipids and fibrous tissues (mixtures of smooth-muscle and collagen fiber) [H. Kanai et al.: Circulation 107 (2003) 3018]. In this study, elasticity distributions were measured for blood clots and calcified tissues. We discuss whether these elasticity distributions, which were measuerd in vitro, can be used as reference data for classifying cross-sectional elasticity images measured in vivo into respective tissues. In addition to the measurement of elasticity distributions, correlations between collagen content and elasticity were investigated with respect to fibrous tissue to estimate the collagen and smooth-muscle content based on elasticity. Collagen and smooth-muscle content may be important factors in determining the stability of the fibrous cap of atherosclerotic plaque. Therefore, correlations between elasticity and elements of the tissue in the arterial wall may provide useful information for the noninvasive diagnosis of plaque vulnerability.

  13. Determinants of an impaired quality of life five years after coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Herlitz, J; Wiklund, I; Caidahl, K; Karlson, B; Sjoland, H; Hartford, M; Haglid, M; Karlsson, T

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To identify determinants of an inferior quality of life (QoL) five years after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).
SETTING—University hospital.
PARTICIPANTS—Patients from western Sweden who underwent CABG between 1988 and 1991.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Questionnaires for evaluating QoL before CABG and five years after operation. Three different instruments were used: the Nottingham health profile (NHP), the psychological general wellbeing index (PGWI), and the physical activity score (PAS).
RESULTS—2121 patients underwent CABG, of whom 310 died during five years' follow up. Information on QoL after five years was available in 1431 survivors (79%). There were three independent predictors for an inferior QoL with all three instruments: female sex, a history of diabetes mellitus, and a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Multivariate analysis showed that a poor preoperative QoL was a strong independent predictor for an impaired QoL five years after CABG. An impaired QoL was also predicted by previous disease.
CONCLUSIONS—Female sex, an impaired QoL before surgery, and other diseases such as diabetes mellitus are independent predictors for an impaired QoL after CABG in survivors five years after operation.

 Keywords: coronary artery bypass surgery; predictors; quality of life PMID:10092557

  14. The influence of statistical variations on image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultgren, Bror; Hertel, Dirk; Bullitt, Julian

    2006-01-01

    For more than thirty years imaging scientists have constructed metrics to predict psychovisually perceived image quality. Such metrics are based on a set of objectively measurable basis functions such as Noise Power Spectrum (NPS), Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), and characteristic curves of tone and color reproduction. Although these basis functions constitute a set of primitives that fully describe an imaging system from the standpoint of information theory, we found that in practical imaging systems the basis functions themselves are determined by system-specific primitives, i.e. technology parameters. In the example of a printer, MTF and NPS are largely determined by dot structure. In addition MTF is determined by color registration, and NPS by streaking and banding. Since any given imaging system is only a single representation of a class of more or less identical systems, the family of imaging systems and the single system are not described by a unique set of image primitives. For an image produced by a given imaging system, the set of image primitives describing that particular image will be a singular instantiation of the underlying statistical distribution of that primitive. If we know precisely the set of imaging primitives that describe the given image we should be able to predict its image quality. Since only the distributions are known, we can only predict the distribution in image quality for a given image as produced by the larger class of 'identical systems'. We will demonstrate the combinatorial effect of the underlying statistical variations in the image primitives on the objectively measured image quality of a population of printers as well as on the perceived image quality of a set of test images. We also will discuss the choice of test image sets and impact of scene content on the distribution of perceived image quality.

  15. Can selective arterial clamping with fluorescence imaging preserve kidney function during robotic partial nephrectomy?

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Tyler R.; Bjurlin, Marc A.; Wysock, James S.; Borofsky, Michael S.; Marien, Tracy P.; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Stifelman, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare renal functional outcomes in robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN) with selective arterial clamping guided by near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging to a matched cohort of patients who underwent RPN without selective arterial clamping and NIRF imaging. Methods From April 2011 to December 2012, NIRF imaging-enhanced RPN with selective clamping was utilized in 42 cases. Functional outcomes of successful cases were compared with a cohort of patients, matched by tumor size, preoperative eGFR, functional kidney status, age, sex, body mass index, and American Society of Anesthesiologists score, who underwent RPN without selective clamping and NIRF imaging. Results In matched-pair analysis, selective clamping with NIRF was associated with superior kidney function at discharge, as demonstrated by postoperative eGFR (78.2 vs 68.5 ml/min per 1.73m2; P=0.04), absolute reduction of eGFR (−2.5 vs −14.0 ml/min per 1.73m2; P<0.01) and percent change in eGFR (−1.9% vs −16.8%, P<0.01). Similar trends were noted at three month follow up but these differences became non-significant (P[eGFR]=0.07], P[absolute reduction of eGFR]=0.10, and P[percent change in eGFR]=0.07). In the selective clamping group, a total of four perioperative complications occurred in three patients, all of which were Clavien I-III. Conclusion Utilization of NIRF imaging was associated with improved short-term renal functional outcomes when compared to RPN without selective arterial clamping and NIRF imaging. With this effect attenuated at later follow-up, randomized prospective studies and long-term assessment of kidney-specific functional outcomes are needed to further assess the benefits of this technology. PMID:24909960

  16. Mechanical Stabilization of Mouse Carotid Artery for In Vivo Intravital Microscopy Imaging of Atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chèvre, Raphaël

    2015-01-01

    We present here a procedure that allows real-time high-resolution multichannel imaging of early atherosclerotic lesions of live mice, by dramatically reducing the respiratory and pulsatile movements of the athero-susceptible carotid artery, without significantly altering blood flow dynamics. This surgical preparation can be combined with the use of various fluorescent probes and reporter mice to simultaneously visualize the dynamics of inflammatory leukocytes, platelets, or even subcellular structures. Stabilization of the tissue renders it suitable for two-photon laser scanning microscopic imaging and allows tracking the behavior of inflammatory cells in three dimensions. PMID:26445802

  17. Case-volume, quality of care, and care efficiency in coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Andrew D.; Hilton, Joan F.; Maselli, Judith; Pekow, Penelope S.; Rothberg, Michael B.; Lindenauer, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    Background How case volume and quality of care relate to hospital costs or length of stay are important questions as we seek to improve the value of healthcare. Methods Observational study of patients 18 or older who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in a network of US hospitals. Case volumes were estimated using our dataset. Quality was assessed by whether recommended medications and services were not received in ideal patients, as well as the overall number of measures missed. We used multivariable hierarchical models to estimate the effects of case volume and quality on hospital cost and length of stay. Results The majority of hospitals (51%) and physicians (78%) were lowest volume providers and only 18% of patients received all quality of care measures. Median length of stay was 7 days (interquartile range [IQR] 6 to 11 days), and median costs were $25140 (IQR $19677, $33121). In analyses adjusted for patient and site characteristics, lowest volume hospitals had 19.8% higher costs (95% CI 3.9% to 38% higher); adjusting for care quality did not eliminate differences in costs. Low surgeon volume was also associated with higher costs, though less strongly (3.1% higher costs, 95% CI 0.6% to 5.6% higher). Individual quality measures had inconsistent associations with costs or length of stay, but patients who had no quality measures missed had much lower length of stay and costs than those who missed even one. Conclusions Avoiding lowest volume hospitals and maximizing quality are separate approaches to improving healthcare efficiency through reducing costs of coronary bypass surgery. PMID:20660837

  18. Quality of Life on Arterial Hypertension: Validity of Known Groups of MINICHAL

    PubMed Central

    Soutello, Ana Lúcia Soares; Rodrigues, Roberta Cunha Matheus; Jannuzzi, Fernanda Freire; São-João, Thaís Moreira; Martini, Gabriela Giordano; Nadruz Jr., Wilson; Gallani, Maria-Cecília Bueno Jayme

    2015-01-01

    Introductions In the care of hypertension, it is important that health professionals possess available tools that allow evaluating the impairment of the health-related quality of life, according to the severity of hypertension and the risk for cardiovascular events. Among the instruments developed for the assessment of health-related quality of life, there is the Mini-Cuestionario of Calidad de Vida en la Hipertensión Arterial (MINICHAL) recently adapted to the Brazilian culture. Objective To estimate the validity of known groups of the Brazilian version of the MINICHAL regarding the classification of risk for cardiovascular events, symptoms, severity of dyspnea and target-organ damage. Methods Data of 200 hypertensive outpatients concerning sociodemographic and clinical information and health-related quality of life were gathered by consulting the medical charts and the application of the Brazilian version of MINICHAL. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare health-related quality of life in relation to symptoms and target-organ damage. The Kruskal-Wallis test and ANOVA with ranks transformation were used to compare health-related quality of life in relation to the classification of risk for cardiovascular events and intensity of dyspnea, respectively. Results The MINICHAL was able to discriminate health-related quality of life in relation to symptoms and kidney damage, but did not discriminate health-related quality of life in relation to the classification of risk for cardiovascular events. Conclusion The Brazilian version of the MINICHAL is a questionnaire capable of discriminating differences on the health‑related quality of life regarding dyspnea, chest pain, palpitation, lipothymy, cephalea and renal damage. PMID:25993593

  19. Using short-wave infrared imaging for fruit quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong; Lee, Dah-Jye; Desai, Alok

    2013-12-01

    Quality evaluation of agricultural and food products is important for processing, inventory control, and marketing. Fruit size and surface quality are two important quality factors for high-quality fruit such as Medjool dates. Fruit size is usually measured by length that can be done easily by simple image processing techniques. Surface quality evaluation on the other hand requires more complicated design, both in image acquisition and image processing. Skin delamination is considered a major factor that affects fruit quality and its value. This paper presents an efficient histogram analysis and image processing technique that is designed specifically for real-time surface quality evaluation of Medjool dates. This approach, based on short-wave infrared imaging, provides excellent image contrast between the fruit surface and delaminated skin, which allows significant simplification of image processing algorithm and reduction of computational power requirements. The proposed quality grading method requires very simple training procedure to obtain a gray scale image histogram for each quality level. Using histogram comparison, each date is assigned to one of the four quality levels and an optimal threshold is calculated for segmenting skin delamination areas from the fruit surface. The percentage of the fruit surface that has skin delamination can then be calculated for quality evaluation. This method has been implemented and used for commercial production and proven to be efficient and accurate.

  20. Quality Prediction of Asymmetrically Distorted Stereoscopic 3D Images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiheng; Rehman, Abdul; Zeng, Kai; Wang, Shiqi; Wang, Zhou

    2015-11-01

    Objective quality assessment of distorted stereoscopic images is a challenging problem, especially when the distortions in the left and right views are asymmetric. Existing studies suggest that simply averaging the quality of the left and right views well predicts the quality of symmetrically distorted stereoscopic images, but generates substantial prediction bias when applied to asymmetrically distorted stereoscopic images. In this paper, we first build a database that contains both single-view and symmetrically and asymmetrically distorted stereoscopic images. We then carry out a subjective test, where we find that the quality prediction bias of the asymmetrically distorted images could lean toward opposite directions (overestimate or underestimate), depending on the distortion types and levels. Our subjective test also suggests that eye dominance effect does not have strong impact on the visual quality decisions of stereoscopic images. Furthermore, we develop an information content and divisive normalization-based pooling scheme that improves upon structural similarity in estimating the quality of single-view images. Finally, we propose a binocular rivalry-inspired multi-scale model to predict the quality of stereoscopic images from that of the single-view images. Our results show that the proposed model, without explicitly identifying image distortion types, successfully eliminates the prediction bias, leading to significantly improved quality prediction of the stereoscopic images. PMID:26087491

  1. Sexuality and Body Image After Uterine Artery Embolization and Hysterectomy in the Treatment of Uterine Fibroids: A Randomized Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Hehenkamp, Wouter J. K. Volkers, Nicole A.; Bartholomeus, Wouter; Blok, Sjoerd de; Birnie, Erwin; Reekers, Jim A.; Ankum, Willem M.

    2007-09-15

    In this paper the effect of uterine artery embolization (UAE) on sexual functioning and body image is investigated in a randomized comparison to hysterectomy for symptomatic uterine fibroids. The EMbolization versus hysterectoMY (EMMY) trial is a randomized controlled study, conducted at 28 Dutch hospitals. Patients were allocated hysterectomy (n = 89) or UAE (n 88). Two validated questionnaires (the Sexual Activity Questionnaire [SAQ] and the Body Image Scale [BIS]) were completed by all patients at baseline, 6 weeks, and 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after treatment. Repeated measurements on SAQ scores revealed no differences between the groups. There was a trend toward improved sexual function in both groups at 2 years, although this failed to reach statistical significance except for the dimensions discomfort and habit in the UAE arm. Overall quality of sexual life deteriorated in a minority of cases at all time points, with no significant differences between the groups (at 24 months: UAE, 29.3%, versus hysterectomy, 23.5%; p = 0.32). At 24 months the BIS score had improved in both groups compared to baseline, but the change was only significant in the UAE group (p = 0.009). In conclusion, at 24 months no differences in sexuality and body image were observed between the UAE and the hysterectomy group. On average, both after UAE and hysterectomy sexual functioning and body image scores improved, but significantly so only after UAE.

  2. [Optical coherence tomography of coronary arteries--a novel intravascular imaging modality].

    PubMed

    Mrevlje, B; Legutko, J; Jąkała, J; Noč, M; Dudek, D; Birkemeyer, R; Aboukoura, M; Nienaber, C

    2014-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is the latest intravascular imaging modality for the investigation of coronary arteries. It can be used in patients with stable coronary artery disease as well as in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Its almost microscope-like resolution of 10-20 μm (10-times greater than intravascular ultrasound) gives us the most detailed insight into the coronary artery wall in vivo so far.Optical coherence tomography can be used for accurate qualitative and quantitative assessment of stenoses in stable coronary artery disease and accurate guidance of percutaneous coronary interventions as well as accurate postprocedural control. In patients with acute coronary syndrome it can be used for the detection of culprit of the culprit lesion (vulnerable plaque) which allows the operator to cover not only angiographically tightest stenosis (angiographic culprit lesion, caused in most cases by thrombus only) but most importantly the vulnerable plaque, which led to the acute event, as well. Furthermore, optical coherence tomography allows accurate assessment of thrombotic burden, stent apposition/malapposition, edge dissections and tissue prolaps or thrombus protrusions throught stent struts, etc. PMID:25225864

  3. Cross-Sectional Elastic Imaging of Arterial Wall Using Intravascular Ultrasonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, Hitoshi; Kanai, Hiroshi; Koiwa, Yoshiro; Ichiki, Masataka; Tezuka, Fumiaki

    2001-07-01

    There have been several studies on the imaging of the distribution of the elasticity of the arterial wall using intravascular ultrasonography (IVUS). In those studies, the elasticity is estimated only during ventricular diastole. However, the viscous characteristics of the smooth muscle in the media of the arterial wall are also included in the strain measured during diastole. Alternatively, during systole, the smooth muscle has an almost purely elastic characteristic. However, the IVUS probe moves greatly due to the arrival of the pulsatile wave at the beginning of the ejection period. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a method to compensate for the movement of the IVUS probe in order to precisely measure the regional change in thickness of the arterial wall during one cardiac cycle. Basic experiments using a silicone rubber tube, in which pulsatile flow is generated by an artificial heart, determined the two-dimensional (2-D) distribution of the regional change in thickness and the elasticity. The obtained incremental elastic modulus coincides with that determined by the static pressure-strain test. Furthermore, in an in vitro experiment performed on an extracted human iliac artery, the 2-D distribution of elasticity is obtained and compared with pathological results.

  4. LANDSAT-4 image data quality analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anuta, P. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Work done on evaluating the geometric and radiometric quality of early LANDSAT-4 sensor data is described. Band to band and channel to channel registration evaluations were carried out using a line correlator. Visual blink comparisons were run on an image display to observe band to band registration over 512 x 512 pixel blocks. The results indicate a .5 pixel line misregistration between the 1.55 to 1.75, 2.08 to 2.35 micrometer bands and the first four bands. Also a four 30M line and column misregistration of the thermal IR band was observed. Radiometric evaluation included mean and variance analysis of individual detectors and principal components analysis. Results indicate that detector bias for all bands is very close or within tolerance. Bright spots were observed in the thermal IR band on an 18 line by 128 pixel grid. No explanation for this was pursued. The general overall quality of the TM was judged to be very high.

  5. Quantitative optical imaging of vascular response in vivo in a model of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Poole, Kristin M; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M; Sit, Wesley W; Walsh, Alex J; Duvall, Craig L; Skala, Melissa C

    2013-10-15

    The mouse hind limb ischemia (HLI) model is well established for studying collateral vessel formation and testing therapies for peripheral arterial disease, but there is a lack of quantitative techniques for intravitally analyzing blood vessel structure and function. To address this need, non-invasive, quantitative optical imaging techniques were developed to assess the time-course of recovery in the mouse HLI model. Hyperspectral imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to non-invasively image hemoglobin oxygen saturation and microvessel morphology plus blood flow, respectively, in the anesthetized mouse after induction of HLI. Hyperspectral imaging detected significant increases in hemoglobin saturation in the ischemic paw as early as 3 days after femoral artery ligation (P < 0.01), and significant increases in distal blood flow were first detected with OCT 14 days postsurgery (P < 0.01). Intravital OCT images of the adductor muscle vasculature revealed corkscrew collateral vessels characteristic of the arteriogenic response to HLI. The hyperspectral imaging and OCT data significantly correlated with each other and with laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) and tissue oxygenation sensor data (P < 0.01). However, OCT measurements acquired depth-resolved information and revealed more sustained flow deficits following surgery that may be masked by more superficial measurements (LDPI, hyperspectral imaging). Therefore, intravital OCT may provide a robust biomarker for the late stages of ischemic limb recovery. This work validates non-invasive acquisition of both functional and morphological data with hyperspectral imaging and OCT. Together, these techniques provide cardiovascular researchers an unprecedented and comprehensive view of the temporal dynamics of HLI recovery in living mice. PMID:23955718

  6. Quantitative optical imaging of vascular response in vivo in a model of peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Kristin M.; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Sit, Wesley W.; Walsh, Alex J.; Duvall, Craig L.

    2013-01-01

    The mouse hind limb ischemia (HLI) model is well established for studying collateral vessel formation and testing therapies for peripheral arterial disease, but there is a lack of quantitative techniques for intravitally analyzing blood vessel structure and function. To address this need, non-invasive, quantitative optical imaging techniques were developed to assess the time-course of recovery in the mouse HLI model. Hyperspectral imaging and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were used to non-invasively image hemoglobin oxygen saturation and microvessel morphology plus blood flow, respectively, in the anesthetized mouse after induction of HLI. Hyperspectral imaging detected significant increases in hemoglobin saturation in the ischemic paw as early as 3 days after femoral artery ligation (P < 0.01), and significant increases in distal blood flow were first detected with OCT 14 days postsurgery (P < 0.01). Intravital OCT images of the adductor muscle vasculature revealed corkscrew collateral vessels characteristic of the arteriogenic response to HLI. The hyperspectral imaging and OCT data significantly correlated with each other and with laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) and tissue oxygenation sensor data (P < 0.01). However, OCT measurements acquired depth-resolved information and revealed more sustained flow deficits following surgery that may be masked by more superficial measurements (LDPI, hyperspectral imaging). Therefore, intravital OCT may provide a robust biomarker for the late stages of ischemic limb recovery. This work validates non-invasive acquisition of both functional and morphological data with hyperspectral imaging and OCT. Together, these techniques provide cardiovascular researchers an unprecedented and comprehensive view of the temporal dynamics of HLI recovery in living mice. PMID:23955718

  7. Learning to rank for blind image quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Tao, Dacheng; Gao, Xinbo; Li, Xuelong

    2015-10-01

    Blind image quality assessment (BIQA) aims to predict perceptual image quality scores without access to reference images. State-of-the-art BIQA methods typically require subjects to score a large number of images to train a robust model. However, subjective quality scores are imprecise, biased, and inconsistent, and it is challenging to obtain a large-scale database, or to extend existing databases, because of the inconvenience of collecting images, training the subjects, conducting subjective experiments, and realigning human quality evaluations. To combat these limitations, this paper explores and exploits preference image pairs (PIPs) such as the quality of image Ia is better than that of image Ib for training a robust BIQA model. The preference label, representing the relative quality of two images, is generally precise and consistent, and is not sensitive to image content, distortion type, or subject identity; such PIPs can be generated at a very low cost. The proposed BIQA method is one of learning to rank. We first formulate the problem of learning the mapping from the image features to the preference label as one of classification. In particular, we investigate the utilization of a multiple kernel learning algorithm based on group lasso to provide a solution. A simple but effective strategy to estimate perceptual image quality scores is then presented. Experiments show that the proposed BIQA method is highly effective and achieves a performance comparable with that of state-of-the-art BIQA algorithms. Moreover, the proposed method can be easily extended to new distortion categories. PMID:25616080

  8. Imaging findings and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization of hepatic malignancy with right atrial embolus in 46 patients

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hong-Yan; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Guo-Li; Chen, Dong

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the imaging findings of hepatic malignancy with right atrial (RA) embolus. METHODS: Forty-six patients with an embolus in the RA were diagnosed, including 44 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 1 patient with cholangiocellular carcinoma and 1 patient with hepatic carcinoma metastasis. The diagnosis was confirmed by clinical examination, serum α-fetoprotein and imaging. Seventeen patients underwent transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). RESULTS: On enhancement computer tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, a nodular filling defect in the RA could be easily found, with a slight enhancement in the arterial phase. The coronal images of CT or MR showed the extent of lesion. Lipiodol entered the embolus after TACE, hence reducing the speed of embolus growth. There was a survival benefit for patients receiving anticancer treatment. CONCLUSION: Patients with HCC, showing a filling defect of the inferior vena cava (IVC), hepatic vein (HV) and RA on images, can be diagnosed with RA embolus. Encroachment of the RA is very rare in patients with hepatic malignancies. Furthermore, a prolongation of survival time is found in those patients who underwent TACE. PMID:18567087

  9. Food quality assessment by NIR hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, Martin B.; Millar, Samuel J.; Chau, Astor

    2010-04-01

    Near infrared reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy is well established in the food industry for rapid compositional analysis of bulk samples. NIR hyperspectral imaging provides new opportunities to measure the spatial distribution of components such as moisture and fat, and to identify and measure specific regions of composite samples. An NIR hyperspectral imaging system has been constructed for food research applications, incorporating a SWIR camera with a cooled 14 bit HgCdTe detector and N25E spectrograph (Specim Ltd, Finland). Samples are scanned in a pushbroom mode using a motorised stage. The system has a spectral resolution of 256 pixels covering a range of 970-2500 nm and a spatial resolution of 320 pixels covering a swathe adjustable from 8 to 300 mm. Images are acquired at a rate of up to 100 lines s-1, enabling samples to be scanned within a few seconds. Data are captured using SpectralCube software (Specim) and analysed using ENVI and IDL (ITT Visual Information Solutions). Several food applications are presented. The strength of individual absorbance bands enables the distribution of particular components to be assessed. Examples are shown for detection of added gluten in wheat flour and to study the effect of processing conditions on fat distribution in chips/French fries. More detailed quantitative calibrations have been developed to study evolution of the moisture distribution in baguettes during storage at different humidities, to assess freshness of fish using measurements of whole cod and fillets, and for prediction of beef quality by identification and separate measurement of lean and fat regions.

  10. Retinal Image Quality during Accommodation in Adult Myopic Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, Vidhyapriya; Aslakson, Emily; Kornaus, Andrew; Thibos, Larry N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Reduced retinal image contrast produced by accommodative lag is implicated with myopia development. Here, we measure accommodative error and retinal image quality from wavefront aberrations in myopes and emmetropes when they perform visually demanding and naturalistic tasks. Methods Wavefront aberrations were measured in 10 emmetropic and 11 myopic adults at three distances (100, 40, and 20 cm) while performing four tasks (monocular acuity, binocular acuity, reading, and movie watching). For the acuity tasks, measurements of wavefront error were obtained near the end point of the acuity experiment. Refractive state was defined as the target vergence that optimizes image quality using a visual contrast metric (VSMTF) computed from wavefront errors. Results Accommodation was most accurate (and image quality best) during binocular acuity whereas accommodation was least accurate (and image quality worst) while watching a movie. When viewing distance was reduced, accommodative lag increased and image quality (as quantified by VSMTF) declined for all tasks in both refractive groups. For any given viewing distance, computed image quality was consistently worse in myopes than in emmetropes, more so for the acuity than for reading/movie watching. Although myopes showed greater lags and worse image quality for the acuity experiments compared to emmetropes, acuity was not measurably worse in myopes compared to emmetropes. Conclusions Retinal image quality present when performing a visually demanding task (e.g., during clinical examination) is likely to be greater than for less demanding tasks (e.g., reading/movie watching). Although reductions in image quality lead to reductions in acuity, the image quality metric VSMTF is not necessarily an absolute indicator of visual performance because myopes achieved slightly better acuity than emmetropes despite showing greater lags and worse image quality. Reduced visual contrast in myopes compared to emmetropes is consistent

  11. Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl; Flohr, Thomas

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum

  12. Perceptual Quality Assessment for Multi-Exposure Image Fusion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kede; Zeng, Kai; Wang, Zhou

    2015-11-01

    Multi-exposure image fusion (MEF) is considered an effective quality enhancement technique widely adopted in consumer electronics, but little work has been dedicated to the perceptual quality assessment of multi-exposure fused images. In this paper, we first build an MEF database and carry out a subjective user study to evaluate the quality of images generated by different MEF algorithms. There are several useful findings. First, considerable agreement has been observed among human subjects on the quality of MEF images. Second, no single state-of-the-art MEF algorithm produces the best quality for all test images. Third, the existing objective quality models for general image fusion are very limited in predicting perceived quality of MEF images. Motivated by the lack of appropriate objective models, we propose a novel objective image quality assessment (IQA) algorithm for MEF images based on the principle of the structural similarity approach and a novel measure of patch structural consistency. Our experimental results on the subjective database show that the proposed model well correlates with subjective judgments and significantly outperforms the existing IQA models for general image fusion. Finally, we demonstrate the potential application of the proposed model by automatically tuning the parameters of MEF algorithms. PMID:26068317

  13. Multimodal Imaging of Nanocomposite Microspheres for Transcatheter Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery to Liver Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Li, Weiguo; Chen, Jeane; Zhang, Zhuoli; Green, Richard M.; Huang, Sui; Larson, Andrew C.

    2016-01-01

    A modern multi-functional drug carrier is critically needed to improve the efficacy of image-guided catheter-directed approaches for the treatment of hepatic malignancies. For this purpose, a nanocomposite microsphere platform was developed for selective intra-arterial transcatheter drug delivery to liver tumors. In our study, continuous microfluidic methods were used to fabricate drug-loaded multimodal MRI/CT visible microspheres that included both gold nanorods and magnetic clusters. The resulting hydrophilic, deformable, and non-aggregated microspheres were mono-disperse and roughly 25 um in size. Sustained drug release and strong MRI T2 and CT contrast effects were achieved with the embedded magnetic nano-clusters and radiopaque gold nanorods. The microspheres were successfully infused through catheters selectively placed within the hepatic artery in rodent models and subsequent distribution in the targeted liver tissues and hepatic tumors confirmed with MRI and CT imaging. These multimodal nanocomposite drug carriers should be ideal for selective intra-arterial catheter-directed administration to liver tumors while permitting MRI/CT visualization for patient-specific confirmation of tumor-targeted delivery. PMID:27405824

  14. Non-linear imaging and characterization of atherosclerotic arterial tissue using combined SHG and FLIM microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicchi, Riccardo; Matthäus, Christian; Meyer, Tobias; Lattermann, Annika; Dietzek, Benjamin; Brehm, Bernhard R.; Popp, Jürgen; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is among the most widespread cardiovascular diseases and one of the leading cause of death in the Western World. Characterization of arterial tissue in atherosclerotic condition is extremely interesting from the diagnostic point of view, especially for what is concerning collagen content and organization because collagen plays a crucial role in plaque vulnerability. Routinely used diagnostic methods, such as histopathological examination, are limited to morphological analysis of the examined tissues, whereas an exhaustive characterization requires immune-histochemical examination and a morpho-functional approach. Non-linear microscopy techniques offer the potential for providing morpho-functional information on the examined tissues in a label-free way. In this study, we employed combined SHG and FLIM microscopy for characterizing collagen organization in both normal arterial wall and within atherosclerotic plaques. Image pattern analysis of SHG images allowed characterizing collagen organization in different tissue regions. In addition, the analysis of collagen fluorescence decay contributed to the characterization of the samples on the basis of collagen fluorescence lifetime. Different values of collagen fiber mean size, collagen distribution, collagen anisotropy and collagen fluorescence lifetime were found in normal arterial wall and within plaque depositions, prospectively allowing for automated classification of atherosclerotic lesions and plaque vulnerability. The presented method represents a promising diagnostic tool for evaluating atherosclerotic tissue and has the potential to find a stable place in clinical setting as well as to be applied in vivo in the near future.

  15. Multimodal Imaging of Nanocomposite Microspheres for Transcatheter Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery to Liver Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Li, Weiguo; Chen, Jeane; Zhang, Zhuoli; Green, Richard M.; Huang, Sui; Larson, Andrew C.

    2016-07-01

    A modern multi-functional drug carrier is critically needed to improve the efficacy of image-guided catheter-directed approaches for the treatment of hepatic malignancies. For this purpose, a nanocomposite microsphere platform was developed for selective intra-arterial transcatheter drug delivery to liver tumors. In our study, continuous microfluidic methods were used to fabricate drug-loaded multimodal MRI/CT visible microspheres that included both gold nanorods and magnetic clusters. The resulting hydrophilic, deformable, and non-aggregated microspheres were mono-disperse and roughly 25 um in size. Sustained drug release and strong MRI T2 and CT contrast effects were achieved with the embedded magnetic nano-clusters and radiopaque gold nanorods. The microspheres were successfully infused through catheters selectively placed within the hepatic artery in rodent models and subsequent distribution in the targeted liver tissues and hepatic tumors confirmed with MRI and CT imaging. These multimodal nanocomposite drug carriers should be ideal for selective intra-arterial catheter-directed administration to liver tumors while permitting MRI/CT visualization for patient-specific confirmation of tumor-targeted delivery.

  16. Multimodality imaging in congenital heart disease-related pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    D'Alto, Michele; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Budts, Werner; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Di Salvo, Giovanni; Dellegrottaglie, Santo; Festa, Pierluigi; Scognamiglio, Giancarlo; Rea, Gaetano; Ait Ali, Lamia; Li, Wei; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2016-06-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The present review aims to discuss the clinical applications of invasive and non-invasive diagnostic modalities and to describe the strengths and weaknesses of each technique. Chest radiograph is an inexpensive investigation providing information on pulmonary arterial and hilar dilatation, pruning of peripheral pulmonary arteries and cardiomegaly. Transthoracic two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography is the most widely used imaging tool. It provides information on cardiac anatomy and an estimate of haemodynamics and biventricular remodelling and function. In addition, echocardiography is valuable in assessing prognosis and monitoring the efficacy of therapy. Structural and functional changes associated with CHD-PAH, mainly affecting the right ventricle and pulmonary circulation, may represent an ideal target for evaluation with cardiac magnetic resonance. This non-invasive imaging modality has a low biological impact. CT plays an important role for patients with limited echocardiographic windows and those who are unable to undergo MRI (claustrophobia, poor compliance, presence of a pacemaker/implantable cardioverter defibrillator). It is the modality of choice for detailed assessment of pulmonary vessel obstruction or thrombosis. Finally, heart catheterisation remains the gold standard for diagnosing and confirming PAH in patients with CHD and for shunt evaluation. The diagnostic assessment of CHD-PAH requires great expertise and a deep knowledge of both CHD and PAH pathophysiology and should take place in a tertiary centre, where multiple data can be appropriately integrated and applied clinically. PMID:27013702

  17. Multimodal Imaging of Nanocomposite Microspheres for Transcatheter Intra-Arterial Drug Delivery to Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Li, Weiguo; Chen, Jeane; Zhang, Zhuoli; Green, Richard M; Huang, Sui; Larson, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    A modern multi-functional drug carrier is critically needed to improve the efficacy of image-guided catheter-directed approaches for the treatment of hepatic malignancies. For this purpose, a nanocomposite microsphere platform was developed for selective intra-arterial transcatheter drug delivery to liver tumors. In our study, continuous microfluidic methods were used to fabricate drug-loaded multimodal MRI/CT visible microspheres that included both gold nanorods and magnetic clusters. The resulting hydrophilic, deformable, and non-aggregated microspheres were mono-disperse and roughly 25 um in size. Sustained drug release and strong MRI T2 and CT contrast effects were achieved with the embedded magnetic nano-clusters and radiopaque gold nanorods. The microspheres were successfully infused through catheters selectively placed within the hepatic artery in rodent models and subsequent distribution in the targeted liver tissues and hepatic tumors confirmed with MRI and CT imaging. These multimodal nanocomposite drug carriers should be ideal for selective intra-arterial catheter-directed administration to liver tumors while permitting MRI/CT visualization for patient-specific confirmation of tumor-targeted delivery. PMID:27405824

  18. Quantitative image quality evaluation for cardiac CT reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu; Fan, Jiahua; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Balhorn, William; Okerlund, Darin R.

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining image quality in the presence of motion is always desirable and challenging in clinical Cardiac CT imaging. Different image-reconstruction algorithms are available on current commercial CT systems that attempt to achieve this goal. It is widely accepted that image-quality assessment should be task-based and involve specific tasks, observers, and associated figures of merits. In this work, we developed an observer model that performed the task of estimating the percentage of plaque in a vessel from CT images. We compared task performance of Cardiac CT image data reconstructed using a conventional FBP reconstruction algorithm and the SnapShot Freeze (SSF) algorithm, each at default and optimal reconstruction cardiac phases. The purpose of this work is to design an approach for quantitative image-quality evaluation of temporal resolution for Cardiac CT systems. To simulate heart motion, a moving coronary type phantom synchronized with an ECG signal was used. Three different percentage plaques embedded in a 3 mm vessel phantom were imaged multiple times under motion free, 60 bpm, and 80 bpm heart rates. Static (motion free) images of this phantom were taken as reference images for image template generation. Independent ROIs from the 60 bpm and 80 bpm images were generated by vessel tracking. The observer performed estimation tasks using these ROIs. Ensemble mean square error (EMSE) was used as the figure of merit. Results suggest that the quality of SSF images is superior to the quality of FBP images in higher heart-rate scans.

  19. Performance evaluation of an automatic segmentation method of cerebral arteries in MRA images by use of a large image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Asano, Tatsunori; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Asano, Takahiko; Kato, Hiroki; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Iwama, Toru

    2009-02-01

    The detection of cerebrovascular diseases such as unruptured aneurysm, stenosis, and occlusion is a major application of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). However, their accurate detection is often difficult for radiologists. Therefore, several computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) schemes have been developed in order to assist radiologists with image interpretation. The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized method for segmenting cerebral arteries, which is an essential component of CAD schemes. For the segmentation of vessel regions, we first used a gray level transformation to calibrate voxel values. To adjust for variations in the positioning of patients, registration was subsequently employed to maximize the overlapping of the vessel regions in the target image and reference image. The vessel regions were then segmented from the background using gray-level thresholding and region growing techniques. Finally, rule-based schemes with features such as size, shape, and anatomical location were employed to distinguish between vessel regions and false positives. Our method was applied to 854 clinical cases obtained from two different hospitals. The segmentation of cerebral arteries in 97.1%(829/854) of the MRA studies was attained as an acceptable result. Therefore, our computerized method would be useful in CAD schemes for the detection of cerebrovascular diseases in MRA images.

  20. Rapid 3D dynamic arterial spin labeling with a sparse model-based image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Fielden, Samuel W; Feng, Xue; Wintermark, Max; Mugler, John P; Meyer, Craig H

    2015-11-01

    Dynamic arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI measures the perfusion bolus at multiple observation times and yields accurate estimates of cerebral blood flow in the presence of variations in arterial transit time. ASL has intrinsically low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and is sensitive to motion, so that extensive signal averaging is typically required, leading to long scan times for dynamic ASL. The goal of this study was to develop an accelerated dynamic ASL method with improved SNR and robustness to motion using a model-based image reconstruction that exploits the inherent sparsity of dynamic ASL data. The first component of this method is a single-shot 3D turbo spin echo spiral pulse sequence accelerated using a combination of parallel imaging and compressed sensing. This pulse sequence was then incorporated into a dynamic pseudo continuous ASL acquisition acquired at multiple observation times, and the resulting images were jointly reconstructed enforcing a model of potential perfusion time courses. Performance of the technique was verified using a numerical phantom and it was validated on normal volunteers on a 3-Tesla scanner. In simulation, a spatial sparsity constraint improved SNR and reduced estimation errors. Combined with a model-based sparsity constraint, the proposed method further improved SNR, reduced estimation error and suppressed motion artifacts. Experimentally, the proposed method resulted in significant improvements, with scan times as short as 20s per time point. These results suggest that the model-based image reconstruction enables rapid dynamic ASL with improved accuracy and robustness. PMID:26169322

  1. Molecular Imaging of Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Survival and Homing in Murine Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    van der Bogt, Koen E.A.; Hellingman, Alwine A.; Lijkwan, Maarten A.; Bos, Ernst-Jan; de Vries, Margreet R.; Fischbein, Michael P.; Quax, Paul H.; Robbins, Robert C.; Hamming, Jaap F.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow mononuclear cell (MNC) therapy is a promising treatment for peripheral artery disease (PAD). This study aims to provide insight into cellular kinetics using molecular imaging following different transplantation methods. Methods and Results MNCs were isolated from F6 transgenic mice (FVB background) that express firefly luciferase (Fluc) and green fluorescence protein (GFP). Male FVB and C57Bl6 mice (n=50) underwent femoral artery ligation and were randomized into 4 groups receiving: (1) single intramuscular (i.m.) injection of 2×106 MNC; (2) four weekly i.m. injections of 5×105 MNC; (3) 2×106 MNCs intravenously (i.v.); and (4) PBS. Cellular kinetics, measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI), revealed near-complete donor cell death 4 weeks after i.m. transplantation. Following i.v. transplantation, BLI monitored cells homed in on the injured area in the limb, as well as to the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Ex vivo BLI showed presence of MNCs in the scar tissue and adductor muscle. However, no significant effects on neovascularisation were observed as monitored by Laser-Doppler-Perfusion-Imaging and histology. Conclusion This is one of the first studies to assess kinetics of transplanted MNCs in PAD using in vivo molecular imaging. MNC survival is short lived and MNCs do not significantly stimulate perfusion in this model. PMID:22239892

  2. Assessment of single vessel coronary artery disease: results of exercise electrocardiography, thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging and radionuclide angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Port, S.C.; Oshima, M.; Ray, G.; McNamee, P.; Schmidt, D.H.

    1985-07-01

    The sensitivity of the commonly used stress tests for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease was analyzed in 46 patients with significant occlusion (greater than or equal to 70% luminal diameter obstruction) of only one major coronary artery and no prior myocardial infarction. In all patients, thallium-201 perfusion imaging (both planar and seven-pinhole tomographic) and 12 lead electrocardiography were performed during the same graded treadmill exercise test and radionuclide angiography was performed during upright bicycle exercise. Exercise rate-pressure (double) product was 22,307 +/- 6,750 on the treadmill compared with 22,995 +/- 5,622 on the bicycle (p = NS). Exercise electrocardiograms were unequivocally abnormal in 24 patients (52%). Qualitative planar thallium images were abnormal in 42 patients (91%). Quantitative analysis of the tomographic thallium images were abnormal in 41 patients (89%). An exercise ejection fraction of less than 0.56 or a new wall motion abnormality was seen in 30 patients (65%). Results were similar for the right (n = 11) and left anterior descending (n = 28) coronary arteries while all tests but the planar thallium imaging showed a lower sensitivity for isolated circumflex artery disease (n = 7). The specificity of the tests was 72, 83, 89 and 72% for electrocardiography, planar thallium imaging, tomographic thallium imaging and radionuclide angiography, respectively. The results suggest that exercise thallium-201 perfusion imaging is the most sensitive noninvasive stress test for the diagnosis of single vessel coronary artery disease.

  3. Contrast sensitivity function calibration based on image quality prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yu; Cai, Yunze

    2014-11-01

    Contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) describe visual stimuli based on their spatial frequency. However, CSF calibration is limited by the size of the sample collection and this remains an open issue. In this study, we propose an approach for calibrating CSFs that is based on the hypothesis that a precise CSF model can accurately predict image quality. Thus, CSF calibration is regarded as the inverse problem of image quality prediction according to our hypothesis. A CSF could be calibrated by optimizing the performance of a CSF-based image quality metric using a database containing images with known quality. Compared with the traditional method, this would reduce the work involved in sample collection dramatically. In the present study, we employed three image databases to optimize some existing CSF models. The experimental results showed that the performance of a three-parameter CSF model was better than that of other models. The results of this study may be helpful in CSF and image quality research.

  4. Improved imaging of the carotid artery in the short-axis plane by a mechanical scanning ultrasonic probe.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Kazuki; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2007-03-01

    To image the intima-media complex of the carotid artery in a wider region, a method for measuring cross-sectional images in the arterial short-axis plane is presented. Using the proposed mechanical scanning system for an ultrasonic probe, cross-sectional images of a silicon rubber tube and a human carotid artery are measured in basic experiments and in in vivo experiments, respectively. These experiments show that this method successfully images the short-axis cross sections. Using the method proposed in this article, B-mode images in the short-axis plane can be accurately measured in a wider region than is possible with conventional methods. PMID:27278176

  5. A method for 3D reconstruction of coronary arteries using biplane angiography and intravascular ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Bourantas, Christos V; Kourtis, Iraklis C; Plissiti, Marina E; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Katsouras, Christos S; Papafaklis, Michail I; Michalis, Lampros K

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a new method for the three-dimensional reconstruction of coronary arteries and its quantitative validation. Our approach is based on the fusion of the data provided by intravascular ultrasound images (IVUS) and biplane angiographies. A specific segmentation algorithm is used for the detection of the regions of interest in intravascular ultrasound images. A new methodology is also introduced for the accurate extraction of the catheter path. In detail, a cubic B-spline is used for approximating the catheter path in each biplane projection. Each B-spline curve is swept along the normal direction of its X-ray angiographic plane forming a surface. The intersection of the two surfaces is a 3D curve, which represents the reconstructed path. The detected regions of interest in the IVUS images are placed perpendicularly onto the path and their relative axial twist is computed using the sequential triangulation algorithm. Then, an efficient algorithm is applied to estimate the absolute orientation of the first IVUS frame. In order to obtain 3D visualization the commercial package Geomagic Studio 4.0 is used. The performance of the proposed method is assessed using a validation methodology which addresses the separate validation of each step followed for obtaining the coronary reconstruction. The performance of the segmentation algorithm was examined in 80 IVUS images. The reliability of the path extraction method was studied in vitro using a metal wire model and in vivo in a dataset of 11 patients. The performance of the sequential triangulation algorithm was tested in two gutter models and in the coronary arteries (marked with metal clips) of six cadaveric sheep hearts. Finally, the accuracy in the estimation of the first IVUS frame absolute orientation was examined in the same set of cadaveric sheep hearts. The obtained results demonstrate that the proposed reconstruction method is reliable and capable of depicting the morphology of

  6. Three-dimensional segmentation of pulmonary artery volume from thoracic computed tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindenmaier, Tamas J.; Sheikh, Khadija; Bluemke, Emma; Gyacskov, Igor; Mura, Marco; Licskai, Christopher; Mielniczuk, Lisa; Fenster, Aaron; Cunningham, Ian A.; Parraga, Grace

    2015-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), is a major contributor to hospitalization and healthcare costs in North America. While the hallmark of COPD is airflow limitation, it is also associated with abnormalities of the cardiovascular system. Enlargement of the pulmonary artery (PA) is a morphological marker of pulmonary hypertension, and was previously shown to predict acute exacerbations using a one-dimensional diameter measurement of the main PA. We hypothesized that a three-dimensional (3D) quantification of PA size would be more sensitive than 1D methods and encompass morphological changes along the entire central pulmonary artery. Hence, we developed a 3D measurement of the main (MPA), left (LPA) and right (RPA) pulmonary arteries as well as total PA volume (TPAV) from thoracic CT images. This approach incorporates segmentation of pulmonary vessels in cross-section for the MPA, LPA and RPA to provide an estimate of their volumes. Three observers performed five repeated measurements for 15 ex-smokers with ≥10 pack-years, and randomly identified from a larger dataset of 199 patients. There was a strong agreement (r2=0.76) for PA volume and PA diameter measurements, which was used as a gold standard. Observer measurements were strongly correlated and coefficients of variation for observer 1 (MPA:2%, LPA:3%, RPA:2%, TPA:2%) were not significantly different from observer 2 and 3 results. In conclusion, we generated manual 3D pulmonary artery volume measurements from thoracic CT images that can be performed with high reproducibility. Future work will involve automation for implementation in clinical workflows.

  7. Research iris serial images quality assessment method based on HVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-hui; Zhang, Chang-hai; Ming, Xing; Zhao, Yong-hua

    2006-01-01

    Iris recognition can be widely used in security and customs, and it provides superiority security than other human feature recognition such as fingerprint, face and so on. The iris image quality is crucial to recognition effect. Accordingly reliable image quality assessments are necessary for evaluating iris image quality. However, there haven't uniformly criterion to Image quality assessment. Image quality assessment have Objective and Subjective Evaluation methods, In practice, However Subjective Evaluation method is fussy and doesn't effective on iris recognition. Objective Evaluation method should be used in iris recognition. According to human visual system model (HVS) Multi-scale and selectivity characteristic, it presents a new iris Image quality assessment method. In the paper, ROI is found and wavelet transform zero-crossing is used to find Multi-scale edge, and Multi-scale fusion measure is used to assess iris image quality. In experiment, Objective and Subjective Evaluation methods are used to assess iris images. From the results, the method is effectively to iris image quality assessment.

  8. Automated registration of multispectral MR vessel wall images of the carotid artery

    SciTech Connect

    Klooster, R. van 't; Staring, M.; Reiber, J. H. C.; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Geest, R. J. van der; Klein, S.; Kwee, R. M.; Kooi, M. E.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of heart disease and stroke. The detailed assessment of atherosclerosis of the carotid artery requires high resolution imaging of the vessel wall using multiple MR sequences with different contrast weightings. These images allow manual or automated classification of plaque components inside the vessel wall. Automated classification requires all sequences to be in alignment, which is hampered by patient motion. In clinical practice, correction of this motion is performed manually. Previous studies applied automated image registration to correct for motion using only nondeformable transformation models and did not perform a detailed quantitative validation. The purpose of this study is to develop an automated accurate 3D registration method, and to extensively validate this method on a large set of patient data. In addition, the authors quantified patient motion during scanning to investigate the need for correction. Methods: MR imaging studies (1.5T, dedicated carotid surface coil, Philips) from 55 TIA/stroke patients with ipsilateral <70% carotid artery stenosis were randomly selected from a larger cohort. Five MR pulse sequences were acquired around the carotid bifurcation, each containing nine transverse slices: T1-weighted turbo field echo, time of flight, T2-weighted turbo spin-echo, and pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted turbo spin-echo images (T1W TSE). The images were manually segmented by delineating the lumen contour in each vessel wall sequence and were manually aligned by applying throughplane and inplane translations to the images. To find the optimal automatic image registration method, different masks, choice of the fixed image, different types of the mutual information image similarity metric, and transformation models including 3D deformable transformation models, were evaluated. Evaluation of the automatic registration results was performed by comparing the lumen segmentations of the fixed image and

  9. Automated FMV image quality assessment based on power spectrum statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalukin, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Factors that degrade image quality in video and other sensor collections, such as noise, blurring, and poor resolution, also affect the spatial power spectrum of imagery. Prior research in human vision and image science from the last few decades has shown that the image power spectrum can be useful for assessing the quality of static images. The research in this article explores the possibility of using the image power spectrum to automatically evaluate full-motion video (FMV) imagery frame by frame. This procedure makes it possible to identify anomalous images and scene changes, and to keep track of gradual changes in quality as collection progresses. This article will describe a method to apply power spectral image quality metrics for images subjected to simulated blurring, blocking, and noise. As a preliminary test on videos from multiple sources, image quality measurements for image frames from 185 videos are compared to analyst ratings based on ground sampling distance. The goal of the research is to develop an automated system for tracking image quality during real-time collection, and to assign ratings to video clips for long-term storage, calibrated to standards such as the National Imagery Interpretability Rating System (NIIRS).

  10. The study of surgical image quality evaluation system by subjective quality factor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Xuan, Jason R.; Yang, Xirong; Yu, Honggang; Koullick, Edouard

    2016-03-01

    GreenLightTM procedure is an effective and economical way of treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH); there are almost a million of patients treated with GreenLightTM worldwide. During the surgical procedure, the surgeon or physician will rely on the monitoring video system to survey and confirm the surgical progress. There are a few obstructions that could greatly affect the image quality of the monitoring video, like laser glare by the tissue and body fluid, air bubbles and debris generated by tissue evaporation, and bleeding, just to name a few. In order to improve the physician's visual experience of a laser surgical procedure, the system performance parameter related to image quality needs to be well defined. However, since image quality is the integrated set of perceptions of the overall degree of excellence of an image, or in other words, image quality is the perceptually weighted combination of significant attributes (contrast, graininess …) of an image when considered in its marketplace or application, there is no standard definition on overall image or video quality especially for the no-reference case (without a standard chart as reference). In this study, Subjective Quality Factor (SQF) and acutance are used for no-reference image quality evaluation. Basic image quality parameters, like sharpness, color accuracy, size of obstruction and transmission of obstruction, are used as subparameter to define the rating scale for image quality evaluation or comparison. Sample image groups were evaluated by human observers according to the rating scale. Surveys of physician groups were also conducted with lab generated sample videos. The study shows that human subjective perception is a trustworthy way of image quality evaluation. More systematic investigation on the relationship between video quality and image quality of each frame will be conducted as a future study.