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Sample records for artery median nerve

  1. High Median Nerve Injuries.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Jonathan; Ugwu-Oju, Obinna

    2016-08-01

    The median nerve serves a crucial role in extrinsic and intrinsic motor and sensory function to the radial half of the hand. High median nerve injuries, defined as injuries proximal to the anterior interosseous nerve origin, therefore typically result in significant functional loss prompting aggressive surgical management. Even with appropriate recognition and contemporary nerve reconstruction, however, motor and sensory recovery may be inadequate. With isolated persistent high median nerve palsies, a variety of available tendon transfers can improve key motor functions and salvage acceptable use of the hand. PMID:27387077

  2. Distal median nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Neuropathy - distal median nerve Images Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system References Jarvik JG, Comstock BA, Kliot M, et al. Surgery versus non-surgical therapy for carpal tunnel syndrome: a randomized ... D. Disorders of peripheral nerves. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, ...

  3. Endoscopic Excision of Supracondylar Humeral Spur for Decompression of the Median Nerve and Brachial Artery

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Gregory; Gupta, Prince; Phadnis, Joideep; Singhi, Prahalad K.

    2016-01-01

    The humeral supracondylar process and Struthers ligament comprise a relatively rare but well-known anatomic variant. They are usually asymptomatic but may produce clinical symptoms related to compression of the median nerve or brachial artery below the ligament. Previously, surgery has been performed with an open ligament release and supracondylar process excision. This article reports on the use of endoscopic findings and the method of ligament release and process excision. Endoscopy is a minimally invasive technique that provides excellent visualization and enables the surgeon to perform dissection with magnification and precision. It allows the surgeon to introduce open surgical techniques into the depths of the wound in a controlled manner. Because of the dead space created, there is a risk of hematoma formation. Many of the concepts used in open surgery are now being used for endoscopic surgery, and vice versa. The barriers and differences among endoscopic, arthroscopic, and open procedures are being broken down. We report another endoscopic technique, which is part of the ongoing evolution of musculoskeletal surgery. PMID:27073779

  4. Median Sacral Artery, Sympathetic Nerves, and the Coccygeal Body: A Study Using Serial Sections of Human Embryos and Fetuses.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhe Wu; Cho, Kwang Ho; Jang, Hyung Suk; Murakami, Gen; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco

    2016-07-01

    To examine how the median sacral artery (MSA) is involved with the coccygeal body or glomus coccygeum, we studied serial frontal or sagittal sections of 14 embryos (approximately 5-6 weeks of gestation) and 12 fetuses (10-18 weeks). At five weeks, the caudal end of the dorsal aorta (i.e., MSA) accompanied putative sympathetic ganglion cells in front of the upper coccygeal and lower sacral vertebrae. At six weeks, a candidate for the initial coccygeal body was identified as a longitudinal arterial plexus involving nerve fibers and sympathetic ganglion cells between arteries. At 10-18 weeks, the MSA exhibited a highly tortuous course at the lower sacral and coccygeal levels, and was attached to and surrounded by veins, nerve fibers, and sympathetic ganglion cells near and between the bilateral origins of the levator ani muscle. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and chromogranin A in the nerves. However, throughout the stages examined, we found no evidence suggestive of an arteriovenous anastomosis, such as well-developed smooth muscle. An acute anterior flexure of the vertebrae at the lower sacrum, as well as regression of the secondary neural tube, seemed to induce arterial plexus formation from an initial straight MSA. Nerves and ganglion cells were likely to be secondarily involved with the plexus because of the close topographical relationship. However, these nerves might play a major role in the extreme change into adult morphology. An arteriovenous anastomosis along the MSA might be an overinterpretation, at least in the prenatal human. Anat Rec, 299:819-827, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27149546

  5. Low Median Nerve Transfers (Opponensplasty).

    PubMed

    Chadderdon, Robert Christopher; Gaston, R Glenn

    2016-08-01

    Opposition is the placement of the thumb opposite the fingers into a position from which it can work. This motion requires thumb palmar abduction, flexion, and pronation, which are provided by the abductor pollicis brevis, flexor pollicis brevis (FPB), and opponens pollicis. In the setting of a median nerve palsy, this function is typically lost, although anatomic variations and the dual innervation of the FPB may prevent complete loss at times. There are multiple well described and accepted tendon transfers to restore opposition, none of which have been proven to be superior to the others. PMID:27387078

  6. Intraneural Venous Malformations of the Median Nerve

    PubMed Central

    González Rodríguez, Alba; Midón Míguez, José

    2016-01-01

    Venous malformations arising from the peripheral nerve are a rare type of vascular malformation. We present the first case of an intraneural venous malformation of the median nerve to be reported in a child and review the previous two cases of median nerve compression due to a venous malformation that have been reported. These cases presented with painless masses in the volar aspect of the wrist or with symptoms suggestive of carpal tunnel syndrome. Clinical suspicion should lead to the use of Doppler ultrasonography as the first-line diagnostic tool. Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology can confirm the diagnosis, as phleboliths are pathognomonic of venous malformations. Surgical treatment appears to be the only modality capable of successfully controlling the growth of an intraneural malformation. Sclerotherapy and radiotherapy have never been used to treat this type of malformation. PMID:27462571

  7. [Right median nerve injury following laparoscopic sigmoidectomy].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Ju; Yonenaga, Kazumichi; Arita, Hideko; Hanaoka, Kazuo

    2008-06-01

    Brachial plexus injury has often occurred secondary to malposition of the patient during general anesthesia. We have experienced median nerve injury following laparoscopic sigmoidectomy. A 61-year-old man with diabetes and hypertension received laparoscopic sigmoidectomy under general and epidural anesthesia. Tracheal intubation was easy without excessive retroflextion of his neck after anesthesia induction with fentanyl, propofol, and vecuronium. Both his upper arms were abducted to 80 degrees and his elbows were extended on a padded arm board. The shoulder braces were placed over both his acromioclavicular joints. His head remained in neutral position. Anesthesia was maintained with air, oxygen, sevoflurane, fentanyl, and vecuronium using mepivacaine via epidural catheter. During surgical procedures, he was in a combined lithotomy and head down position at maximum of 20 degrees. The operative table was tilted to the right at maximum of 20 degrees. The operation was finished successfully in 2 hours and 40 minutes without a special event. Postoperatively, he complained of numbness of the first, second, and third digits, and the radial side of fourth digit in his right hand. The redness on both his shoulders was observed. Muscle weakness and motor disturbance were not observed. Orthopedic surgeon diagnosed him as right median nerve injury. His symptoms improved gradually by physical training and disappeared one week after the operation. We suspect that his right median nerve injury was caused by compression and stretching of the brachial plexus in head down position, right lateral tilt table, use of shoulder brace, laparoscopy, abduction of the upper arm, and extension of the elbow. In laparoscopic operation in head down position, we should avoid using the shoulder brace to minimize the risk of brachial plexus injury. The arms should be approximated to the sides as nearly as possible and the elbows should be gently flexed to unload the median nerve and relieve

  8. Median nerve schwannoma: A case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Padasali, Praveen S.; Shankaregowda, V. S.; Kshirsagar, Shriram D.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a median nerve schwannoma, a rare type of a benign tumor of Schwann cells that presents as a palpable and painful mass on the flexor aspect of the forearm. Schwannomas of the median nerve make up 0.1–0.3% of all hand tumors. Symptoms are caused by an entrapment syndrome resulting from the growing tumor. Pain is the most common complaint of schwannomas. Imaging studies include computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. It is difficult to differentiate schwanommas from neurofibromas solely on the basis of a radiological investigation. Tumors of the median nerve are diagnostically challenging and median nerve schwannomas are rare. Diagnostic pearls are described to facilitate a more accurate and timely diagnosis. These characteristics include mobility, Tinel's sign, S-100 histological staining, and Antoni patterns. With a correct diagnosis, the tumor can be extirpated with preservation of nerve function and a low risk of recurrence. PMID:26396609

  9. Clinical Outcomes following median to radial nerve transfers

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Wilson Z.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In this study the authors evaluate the clinical outcomes in patients with radial nerve palsy who underwent nerve transfers utilizing redundant fascicles of median nerve (innervating the flexor digitorum superficialis and flexor carpi radialis muscles) to the posterior interosseous nerve and the nerve to the extensor carpi radialis brevis. Methods A retrospective review of the clinical records of 19 patients with radial nerve injuries who underwent nerve transfer procedures using the median nerve as a donor nerve were included. All patients were evaluated using the Medical Research Council (MRC) grading system. Results The mean age of patients was 41 years (range 17 – 78 years). All patients received at least 12 months of follow-up (20.3 ± 5.8 months). Surgery was performed at a mean of 5.7 ± 1.9 months post-injury. Post-operative functional evaluation was graded according to the following scale: grades MRC 0/5 - MRC 2/5 were considered poor outcomes, while MRC of 3/5 was a fair result, MRC grade 4/5 was a good result, and grade 4+/5 was considered an excellent outcome. Seventeen patients (89%) had a complete radial nerve palsy while two patients (11%) had intact wrist extension but no finger or thumb extension. Post-operatively all patients except one had good to excellent recovery of wrist extension. Twelve patients recovered good to excellent finger and thumb extension, two patients had fair recovery, five patients had a poor recovery. Conclusions The radial nerve is a commonly injured nerve, causing significant morbidity in affected patients. The median nerve provides a reliable source of donor nerve fascicles for radial nerve reinnervation. This transfer was first performed in 1999 and evolved over the subsequent decade. The important nuances of both surgical technique and motor re-education critical for to the success of this transfer have been identified and are discussed. PMID:21168979

  10. Median nerve behavior at different wrist positions among older males

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroki; Muraki, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The effect of wrist flexion-extension on the median nerve appearance, namely the cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and the longitudinal (D1) and vertical (D2) diameters, was investigated among older adults (N = 34). Ultrasound examination was conducted to examine the median nerve at different wrist angles (neutral; and 15°, 30°, and 45° extension and flexion), in both the dominant and nondominant hand. Median nerve behavior were significantly associated with wrist angle changes. The MNCSA at wrist flexion and extension were significantly smaller (P < .001) compared with the neutral position in both the dominant and nondominant hand. The D1 and D2 were significantly reduced at flexion (P < .001) and extension (P < .001), respectively, in both the dominant and nondominant hand. Our results suggest that a larger flexion-extension angle causes higher compression stress on the median nerve, leading to increased deformation of the MNCSA, D1, and D2 among older adults. PMID:25945317

  11. Myofibroma in the Palm Presenting with Median Nerve Compression Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Sarkozy, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Summary: A myofibroma is a benign proliferation of myofibroblasts in the connective tissue. Solitary myofibromas are a rare finding especially in an adult. We report a case of a 23-year-old man presenting with an enlarging mass over his right palm. The patient is an active weight lifter. He reported numbness and tingling in the median nerve distribution. Nerve conduction studies and magnetic resonance imaging scans suggested a tumor involving or compressing the median nerve. The final diagnosis of myofibroma was made only after the histopathological diagnosis. PMID:25426387

  12. Median and ulnar nerve injuries; what causes different repair outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Nouraei, Mohammad Hadi; Hosseini, Alireza; Salek, Shadi; Nouraei, Farhad; Bina, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peripheral nerve injuries have significant effects on patients’ life quality. To make patients’ therapeutic expectations more realistic, prediction of repair outcome has significant importance. Materials and Methods: Totally, 74 patients with 94 nerve injuries (44 median and 50 ulnar nerves) were evaluated and followed up for 5 years between 2008 and 2013 in two main university hospitals of Isfahan. Patients’ age was 6–64 years. 24 nerves were excluded from the study and among the remaining; 53 nerves were repaired primarily and 17 nerves secondarily. 42 nerves were injured at a low-level, 17 nerves at intermediate and 11 at a high one. Medical Research Council Scale used for sensory and motor assessment. S3+ and S4 scores for sensory recovery and M4 and M5 scores for motor recovery were considered as favorable results. The follow-up time was between 8 and 24 months. Results: There was no significant difference between favorable sensory outcomes of median and ulnar nerves. The difference between favorable motor outcomes of the median nerve was higher than ulnar nerve (P = 0.03, odds ratio = 2.9). More favorable results were seen in high-level injuries repair than low ones (P = 0.035), and also cases followed more than 18 months compared to less than 12 months (P = 0.041), respectively. The favorable outcomes for patients younger than 16 were more than 40 and older, however, their difference was not significant (P = 0.059). The difference between primary and secondary repair favorable outcomes was not significant (P = 0.37). Conclusion: In patients older than 40 or injured at a high-level, there is a high possibility of repetitive operations and reconstructive measures. The necessity for long-term follow-up and careful attentions during a postoperative period should be pointed to all patients. PMID:26605244

  13. Usefulness of additional measurements of the median nerve with ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Claes, F; Meulstee, J; Claessen-Oude Luttikhuis, T T M; Huygen, P L M; Verhagen, W I M

    2010-12-01

    High resolution sonography is a relatively new diagnostic technique in diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Normal values in different studies, however, vary and this makes their practical use difficult. The aim of this study was to establish normal values for the median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA) and to investigate the value of measuring additional parameters. Ninety-eight wrists of 29 women and 25 men without signs or symptoms of CTS were included. Width and circumference of the wrist were measured. The CSA of the median nerve at the level of the pisiform bone was measured using ultrasonography. We found a significant correlation between the CSA of the median nerve at the wrist and wrist circumference. Measuring wrist circumference will establish the upper level of normal more accurately compared to predictions solely based upon gender. This has important implications in diagnosing CTS with ultrasonography. PMID:20429021

  14. Schwannoma of the Median Nerve: Diagnosis Sometimes Delayed

    PubMed Central

    Boufettal, Monsef; Azouz, Mohamed; Rhanim, Abdelkarim; Abouzahir, Mohamed; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Bardouni, Ahmed El; Berrada, Mohamed S; Yaacoubi, Moradh El

    2014-01-01

    Schwannoma is a tumor that develops from nerve sheath. The authors report an unusual case of schwannoma of the median nerve (MN) that remained asymptomatic for four years. The diagnosis was based on MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and histopathological examination. Surgical removal is usually curative. The asymptomatic character of the tumor and its slow evolution remain an essential factor in diagnosis delays. This tumor has a good prognosis with a low recurrence rate and potential for malignant transformation. PMID:25125990

  15. The Mouse Median Nerve Experimental Model in Regenerative Research

    PubMed Central

    Buskbjerg Jager, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Sciatic nerve crush injury in rat animal model is one of the most common experimental models used in regenerative research. However, the availability of transgenic mouse for nerve regeneration studies is constantly increasing and, therefore, the shift from rat model to mouse model is, in some cases, necessary. Moreover, since most of the human nerve lesions occur in the upper limb, it is also advantageous to shift from sciatic nerve to median nerve. In this study we described an experimental model which involves lesions of the median nerve in the mouse. Data showed that the finger flexor muscle contraction strength, assessed to evaluate the motor function recovery, and reached values not different from the control already 20 days after injury. The degree of nerve regeneration evaluated with stereological methods in light microscopy showed that, 25 days after injury, the number of regenerated myelinated fibers was comparable to the control, but they were smaller with a thinner myelin thickness. Stereological analysis made in electron microscopy confirmed these results, although the total number of fibers quantified was significantly higher compared to light microscopy analysis, due to the very small size of some fibers that can be detected only in electron microscopy. PMID:25180190

  16. Ultrasonographic reference sizes of the median and ulnar nerves and the cervical nerve roots in healthy Japanese adults.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Takamichi; Ochi, Kazuhide; Hosomi, Naohisa; Mukai, Tomoya; Ueno, Hiroki; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, Toshiho; Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify, for practical use, ultrasonographic reference values for nerve sizes at multiple sites, including entrapment and non-entrapment sites along the median and ulnar nerves and among the cervical nerve roots. We verified reliable sites and site-based differences between the reference values. In addition, we found associations between the reference nerve sizes and several physical characteristics (gender, dominant hand, age, height, weight, body mass index [BMI] and wrist circumference). Nerves were measured bilaterally at 26 sites or levels in 60 healthy Japanese adults (29 males; age, 35.4 ± 9.7 y; BMI, 22.3 ± 3.6 kg/m(2); wrist circumference, 16.0 ± 1.3 cm on the right side and 15.9 ± 1.2 cm on the left side). The mean reference nerve sizes were 5.6-9.1 mm(2) along the median nerve, 4.1-6.7 mm(2) along the ulnar nerve and 2.14-3.39 mm among the cervical nerve roots. Multifactorial regression analyses revealed that the physical characteristics most strongly associated with nerve size were age, BMI and wrist circumference at the entrapment sites (F = 7.6, p < 0.01, at the pisiform bone level of the carpal tunnel; F = 15.1, p < 0.001, at the level of Guyon's canal), as well as wrist circumference and gender at the non-entrapment sites (F = 70.6, p < 0.001, along the median nerve; F = 24.7, p < 0.001, along the ulnar nerve). Our results suggest that the factors with the greatest influence on nerve size differed between entrapment and non-entrapment sites. Site-based differences in nerve size were determined using one-way analyses of variance (p < 0.001). Intra- and inter-observer reliability was highest for the median nerve, at both the distal wrist crease and mid-humerus; at the arterial split along the ulnar nerve; and at the fifth cervical nerve root level. No systematic error was indicated by Bland-Altman analysis; the coefficients of variation were 5.5%-9.2% for intra-observer reliability and 7.1%-8.7% for inter

  17. Intraneural hemangioma of the median nerve: A case report

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Hemangiomas of the median nerve are very rare and, so far, only ten cases of intraneural hemangioma of this nerve have been reported in the literature. We present a case of 14-year-old girl who had a soft tissue mass in the region of the left wrist with signs and symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. Total removal of the mass was achieved using microsurgical epineural and interfasicular dissection. The symptoms were relieved completely, after this procedure, without any neurologic deficit. On follow-up two years later, no recurrence was observed. Whenever a child or young adult patient presents with CTS the possibility of a hemangioma involving the median nerve should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. PMID:18294368

  18. Fascicular Topography of the Human Median Nerve for Neuroprosthetic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Martínez, Ignacio; Badia, Jordi; Pascual-Font, Arán; Rodríguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    One of the most sought-after applications of neuroengineering is the communication between the arm and an artificial prosthetic device for the replacement of an amputated hand or the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. For that, an electrode is placed around or inside the median nerve to serve as interface for recording and stimulation of nerve signals coming from the fascicles that innervate the muscles responsible for hand movements. Due to the lack of a standard procedure, the electrode implantation by the surgeon is strongly based on intuition, which may result in poor performance of the neuroprosthesis because of the suboptimal location of the neural interface. To provide morphological data that can aid the neuroprosthetic surgeon with this procedure, we investigated the fascicular topography of the human median nerve along the forearm and upper arm. We first performed a description of the fascicular content and branching patterns along the length of the arm. Next we built a 3D reconstruction of the median nerve so we could analyze the fascicle morphological features in relation to the arm level. Finally, we characterized the motor content of the median nerve fascicles in the upper arm. Collectively, these results indicate that fascicular organization occurs in a short segment distal to the epicondyles and remains unaltered until the muscular branches leave the main trunk. Based on our results, overall recommendations based on electrode type and implant location can be drawn to help and aid the neuroprosthetic procedure. Invasive interfaces would be more convenient for the upper arm and the most proximal third of the forearm. Epineural electrodes seem to be most suitable for the forearm segment after fascicles have been divided from the main trunk. PMID:27445660

  19. Fascicular Topography of the Human Median Nerve for Neuroprosthetic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Martínez, Ignacio; Badia, Jordi; Pascual-Font, Arán; Rodríguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    One of the most sought-after applications of neuroengineering is the communication between the arm and an artificial prosthetic device for the replacement of an amputated hand or the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. For that, an electrode is placed around or inside the median nerve to serve as interface for recording and stimulation of nerve signals coming from the fascicles that innervate the muscles responsible for hand movements. Due to the lack of a standard procedure, the electrode implantation by the surgeon is strongly based on intuition, which may result in poor performance of the neuroprosthesis because of the suboptimal location of the neural interface. To provide morphological data that can aid the neuroprosthetic surgeon with this procedure, we investigated the fascicular topography of the human median nerve along the forearm and upper arm. We first performed a description of the fascicular content and branching patterns along the length of the arm. Next we built a 3D reconstruction of the median nerve so we could analyze the fascicle morphological features in relation to the arm level. Finally, we characterized the motor content of the median nerve fascicles in the upper arm. Collectively, these results indicate that fascicular organization occurs in a short segment distal to the epicondyles and remains unaltered until the muscular branches leave the main trunk. Based on our results, overall recommendations based on electrode type and implant location can be drawn to help and aid the neuroprosthetic procedure. Invasive interfaces would be more convenient for the upper arm and the most proximal third of the forearm. Epineural electrodes seem to be most suitable for the forearm segment after fascicles have been divided from the main trunk. PMID:27445660

  20. Tendon Transfers Part II: Transfers for Ulnar Nerve Palsy and Median Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Sammer, Douglas M.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives After reading this article (part II of II), the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the anatomy and function of the median and ulnar nerves in the forearm and hand. 2. Describe the clinical deficits associated with injury to each nerve. 3. Describe the indications, benefits, and drawbacks for various tendon transfer procedures used to treat median and ulnar nerve palsy.4. Describe the treatment of combined nerve injuries. 5. Describe postoperative care and possible complications associated with these tendon transfer procedures. Summary This article discusses the use of tendon transfer procedures for treatment of median and ulnar nerve palsy as well as combined nerve palsies. Postoperative management and potential complications are also discussed. PMID:19730287

  1. Inter-hemispheric plasticity in patients with median nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Fornander, Lotta; Nyman, Torbjörn; Hansson, Thomas; Brismar, Tom; Engström, Maria

    2016-08-15

    Peripheral nerve injuries result in reorganization within the contralateral hemisphere. Furthermore, recent animal and human studies have suggested that the plastic changes in response to peripheral nerve injury also include several areas of the ipsilateral hemisphere. The objective of this study was to map the inter-hemispheric plasticity in response to median nerve injury, to investigate normal differences in contra- and ipsilateral activation, and to study the impact of event-related or blocked functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design on ipsilateral activation. Four patients with median nerve injury at the wrist (injured and epineurally sutured >2 years earlier) and ten healthy volunteers were included. 3T fMRI was used to map the hemodynamic response to brain activity during tactile stimulation of the fingers, and a laterality index (LI) was calculated. Stimulation of Digits II-III of the injured hand resulted in a reduction in contralateral activation in the somatosensory area SI. Patients had a lower LI (0.21±0.15) compared to healthy controls (0.60±0.26) indicating greater ipsilateral activation of the primary somatosensory cortex. The spatial dispersion of the coordinates for areas SI and SII was larger in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral hemisphere in the healthy controls, and was increased in the contralateral hemisphere of the patients compared to the healthy controls. There was no difference in LI between the event-related and blocked paradigms. In conclusion, patients with median nerve injury have increased ipsilateral SI area activation, and spatially more dispersed contralateral SI activation during tactile stimulation of their injured hand. In normal subjects ipsilateral activation has larger spatial distribution than the contralateral. Previous findings in patients performed with the blocked fMRI paradigm were confirmed. The increase in ipsilateral SI activation may be due to an interhemispheric disinhibition associated with

  2. Morphometric studies of the muscular branch of the median nerve.

    PubMed

    Olave, E; Prates, J C; Gabrielli, C; Pardi, P

    1996-10-01

    The branch from the median nerve to the thenar muscles has a proximal and lateral (recurrent) course and is vulnerable to lesions that affect these muscles. Because of its anatomical-clinical importance, this branch was studied in 60 palmar regions from 30 cadavers of adult individuals of both sexes, aged between 23 and 77 y. It arose from the lateral branch of the median nerve in 83.3% of the cases. Its origin was distal to the flexor retinaculum in 48.3%, at the distal margin of the retinaculum in 31.6%, in the carpal tunnel in 18.3% and proximal to the retinaculum in 1.7%; it pierced the retinaculum in 15%. The point of recurrence of the branch was localised topographically to 34.6 +/- 3.6 mm from the distal wrist crease; the angle between its recurrent course and the longitudinal axis of the hand averaged 66.8 degrees. In 50% of the cases the muscular branch innervated abductor pollicis brevis (APB), opponens pollicis (OP) and the superficial head of flexor pollicis brevis (FPB), in 40% it supplied only APB and OP, and in 10% a short muscular branch gave rise to independent branches in the palm and which supplied APB, OP and the superficial head of FPB. The so called "accessory thenar branch' was found in 38.3%. PMID:8886966

  3. Cold intolerance following median and ulnar nerve injuries: prognosis and predictors.

    PubMed

    Ruijs, A C J; Jaquet, J-B; van Riel, W G; Daanen, H A M; Hovius, S E R

    2007-08-01

    This study describes the predictors for cold intolerance and the relationship to sensory recovery after median and ulnar nerve injuries. The study population consisted of 107 patients 2 to 10 years after median, ulnar or combined median and ulnar nerve injuries. Patients were asked to fill out the Cold Intolerance Severity Score (CISS) questionnaire and sensory recovery was measured using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments. Fifty-six percent of the patients with a single nerve injury and 70% with a combined nerve injury suffered abnormal cold intolerance. Patients with no return of sensation had dramatically higher CISS-scores than patients with normal sensory recovery. Females had higher CISS scores post-injury than males. Cold intolerance did not diminish over the years. Patients with higher CISS scores needed more time to return to their work. Age, additional arterial injury, site or type of the injury and dominance of the hand were not found to have a significant influence on cold intolerance. PMID:17482322

  4. Right Median Nerve Electrical Stimulation for Acute Traumatic Coma Patients.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jin; Wang, Lei; Gao, Guoyi; Cooper, Edwin; Jiang, Jiyao

    2015-10-15

    The right median nerve as a peripheral portal to the central nervous system can be electrically stimulated to help coma arousal after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The present study set out to examine the efficacy and safety of right median nerve electrical stimulation (RMNS) in a cohort of 437 comatose patients after severe TBI from August 2005 to December 2011. The patients were enrolled 2 weeks after their injury and assigned to the RMNS group (n=221) receiving electrical stimulation for 2 weeks or the control group (n = 216) treated by standard management according to the date of birth in the month. The baseline data were similar. After the 2-week treatment, the RMNS-treated patients demonstrated a more rapid increase of the mean Glasgow Coma Score, although statistical significance was not reached (8.43 ± 4.98 vs. 7.47 ± 5.37, p = 0.0532). The follow-up data at 6-month post-injury showed a significantly higher proportion of patients who regained consciousness (59.8% vs. 46.2%, p = 0.0073). There was a lower proportion of vegetative persons in the RMNS group than in the control group (17.6% vs. 22.0%, p = 0.0012). For persons regaining consciousness, the functional independence measurement (FIM) score was higher among the RMNS group patients (91.45 ± 8.65 vs. 76.23 ± 11.02, p < 0.001). There were no unique complications associated with the RMNS treatment. The current study, although with some limitations, showed that RMNS may serve as an easy, effective, and noninvasive technique to promote the recovery of traumatic coma in the early phase. PMID:25664378

  5. Does Pulsed Magnetic Field Therapy Influence Nerve Regeneration in the Median Nerve Model of the Rat?

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta E.; Lamia, Androniki; Fregnan, Federica; Smeets, Ralf; Becker, Stephan T.; Sinis, Nektarios

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of pulsed magnetic field therapy on peripheral nerve regeneration after median nerve injury and primary coaptation in the rat. Both median nerves were surgically exposed and denervated in 24 female Wistar rats. A microsurgical coaptation was performed on the right side, whereas on the left side a spontaneous healing was prevented. The study group underwent a daily pulsed magnetic field therapy; the other group served as a control group. The grasping force was recorded 2 weeks after the surgical intervention for a period of 12 weeks. The right median nerve was excised and histologically examined. The histomorphometric data and the functional assessments were analyzed by t-test statistics and one-way ANOVA. One-way ANOVA indicated a statistically significant influence of group affiliation and grasping force (P = 0.0078). Grasping strength was higher on a significant level in the experimental group compared to the control group permanently from the 9th week to the end of the study. T-test statistics revealed a significantly higher weight of the flexor digitorum sublimis muscle (P = 0.0385) in the experimental group. The histological evaluation did not reveal any statistically significant differences concerning the histomorphometric parameters. Our results suggest that the pulsed magnetic field therapy has a positive influence on the functional aspects of neural regeneration. More studies are needed to precisely evaluate and optimize the intensity and duration of the application. PMID:25143937

  6. Origin of the widespread N18 in median nerve SEP.

    PubMed

    Sonoo, M; Genba, K; Zai, W; Iwata, M; Mannen, T; Kanazawa, I

    1992-01-01

    The widespread N18 potential in median nerve SEP was studied in normal subjects and in patients with high cervical, brain-stem and thalamic lesions who had profound disturbances of deep sensation. N18 was well identified in the HSi-CV2 derivation in every normal subject as a broad elevation from the baseline lasting about 20 msec. The cortical N20 was absent in all patients. N18 was absent in a patient with a dorsal column lesion at C1-2 level. The amplitude and configuration of N18 were normal in all other patients with brain-stem and thalamic lesions, including a patient with a lesion at the ponto-medullary junction. The sagittal distribution of N18 was studied in a patient with a thalamic lesion and an oblique distribution with the maximum region between Cz and nasion was demonstrated. The present results indicate that at least the greater part of N18 is generated at the caudal most brain-stem or through branches from this level. Taking previous animal and intraoperative studies into consideration, we think it most probable that the main part of N18 corresponds to the ventro-rostral negative pole of the dipolar potential generated at the cuneate nucleus by the primary afferent depolarization of presynaptic terminals of dorsal column fibers. PMID:1382950

  7. Thrombosis of the persistent median artery as a cause of carpal tunnel syndrome - case study.

    PubMed

    Rzepecka-Wejs, Ludomira; Multan, Aleksandra; Konarzewska, Aleksandra

    2012-12-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most frequent neuropathy of the upper extremity, that mainly occurs in manual workers and individuals, whose wrist is overloaded by performing repetitive precise tasks. In the past it was common among of typists, seamstresses and mechanics, but nowadays it is often caused by long hours of computer keyboard use. The patient usually complains of pain, hypersensitivity and paresthesia of his hand and fingers in the median nerve distribution. The symptoms often increase at night. In further course of the disease atrophy of thenar muscles is observed. In the past the diagnosis was usually confirmed in nerve conduction studies. Nowadays a magnetic resonance scan or an ultrasound scan can be used to differentiate the cause of the symptoms. The carpal tunnel syndrome is usually caused by compression of the median nerve passing under the flexor retinaculum due to the presence of structures reducing carpal tunnel area, such as an effusion in the flexor tendons sheaths (due to overload or in the course of rheumatoid diseases), bony anomalies, muscle and tendon variants, ganglion cysts or tumors. In some cases diseases of upper extremity vessels including abnormalities of the persistent median artery may also result in carpal tunnel syndrome. We present a case of symptomatic carpal tunnel syndrome caused by thrombosis of the persistent median artery which was diagnosed in ultrasound examination. The ultrasound scan enabled for differential diagnosis and resulted in an immediate referral to clinician, who recommended instant commencement on anticoagulant treatment. The follow-up observation revealed nearly complete remission of clinical symptoms and partial recanalization of the persistent median artery. PMID:26676173

  8. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion–extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating

  9. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion-extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating

  10. Personal and workplace factors and median nerve function in a pooled study of 2396 US workers

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, David; Gerr, Fred; Harris-Adamson, Carisa; Hegmann, Kurt T; Thiese, Matthew S.; Kapellusch, Jay; Garg, Arun; Burt, Susan; Bao, Stephen; Silverstein, Barbara; Merlino, Linda; Dale, Ann Marie; Evanoff, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluate associations between personal and workplace factors and median nerve conduction latency at the wrist. Methods Baseline data on workplace psychosocial and physical exposures were pooled from five prospective studies of production and service workers (N=2396). During the follow-up period, electrophysiologic measures of median nerve function were collected at regular intervals. Results Significant adjusted associations were observed between age, BMI, gender, peak hand force, duration of forceful hand exertions, TLV for HAL, forceful repetition rate, wrist extension, and decision latitude on median nerve latencies. Conclusions Occupational and non-occupational factors have adverse effects on median nerve function. Measuring median nerve function eliminates possible reporting bias that may affect symptom-based carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) case definitions. These results suggest that previously observed associations between CTS and occupational factors are not the result of such reporting bias. PMID:25563546

  11. Effects of computer keyboarding on ultrasonographic measures of the median nerve

    PubMed Central

    Toosi, KK; Impink, BG; Baker, NA; Boninger, ML

    2011-01-01

    Background Keyboarding is a highly repetitive daily task and has been linked to musculoskeletal disorders of the upper extremity. However, the effect of keyboarding on median nerve injuries is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to use ultrasonographic measurements to determine whether continuous keyboarding can cause acute changes in the median nerve. Methods Ultrasound images of the median nerve from twenty-one volunteers were captured at the levels of the pisiform and distal radius prior to and following a prolonged keyboarding task (i.e., one hour of continuous keyboarding). Images were analyzed by a blinded investigator to quantify the median nerve characteristics. Changes in the median nerve ultrasonographic measures as a result of continuous keyboarding task were evaluated. Results Cross-sectional areas at the pisiform level were significantly larger in both dominant (p=0.004) and non-dominant (p=0.001) hands following the keyboarding task. Swelling ratio was significantly greater in the dominant hand (p=0.020) after 60 minutes of keyboarding when compared to the baseline measures. Flattening ratios were not significantly different in either hand as a result of keyboarding. Conclusion We were able to detect an acute increase in the area of the median nerve following one hour of keyboarding with a computer keyboard. This suggests that keyboarding has an impact on the median nerve. Further studies are required to understand this relationship, which would provide insight into the pathophysiology of median neuropathies such as carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:21739468

  12. Differential Diagnosis and Intervention of Proximal Median Nerve Entrapment: A Resident's Case Problem.

    PubMed

    Bair, Marcus R; Gross, Michael T; Cooke, Jennifer R; Hill, Carla H

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Resident's case problem. Background Entrapment neuropathies represent a diagnostic challenge and require a comprehensive understanding of the nerve's path and the anatomical structures that may cause compression of the nerve. This resident's case problem details the evaluation and differential diagnosis process for median nerve entrapment resulting from forceful and repetitive pronation/supination motions. Diagnosis Median nerve compression syndromes include pronator syndrome, anterior interosseous nerve syndrome, and carpal tunnel syndrome. A cluster of clinical special tests were performed to determine the anatomical site of median nerve entrapment. Based on the patient's history and clinical test results, a diagnosis of pronator syndrome was determined. Provocation testing specific to pronator syndrome assisted with further localizing the site of entrapment to the pronator teres muscle, which guided effective management strategies. Discussion This resident's case problem illustrates the importance of detailed anatomical knowledge and a differential diagnostic process when evaluating a patient with signs and symptoms of an entrapment neuropathy of the median nerve. Electrodiagnostic studies are useful in ruling out carpal tunnel and anterior interosseous nerve syndromes, but are often inconclusive in cases of pronator syndrome. Therefore, a diagnosis of pronator syndrome in this case problem was based on a detailed understanding of median nerve anatomy, potential sites of compression, and unique clinical features associated with this condition. Level of Evidence Differential diagnosis, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):800-808. Epub 5 Aug 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6723. PMID:27494058

  13. Sonographic Appearance of the Median Nerve Following Revision Carpal Tunnel Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Shane A; Alkhamisi, Ashkan; Pujalte, George G A

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this pictorial essay is to illustrate the sonographic appearance of the postoperative carpal tunnel and median nerve. Carpal tunnel surgical treatment failures have been shown to occur in up to 19% of a large series requiring re-exploration. Surgical management options for recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) include revision release, neurolysis, vein wrapping, and fat grafting procedures. While several descriptions of median nerve entrapment in CTS exist in the ultrasound literature, little is written regarding its postoperative appearance. We report the sonographic changes in the appearance of the median nerve and postoperative carpal tunnel. PMID:27195177

  14. Median nerve deformation and displacement in the carpal tunnel during index finger and thumb motion.

    PubMed

    van Doesburg, Margriet H M; Yoshii, Yuichi; Villarraga, Hector R; Henderson, Jacqueline; Cha, Stephen S; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the deformation and displacement of the normal median nerve in the carpal tunnel during index finger and thumb motion, using ultrasound. Thirty wrists from 15 asymptomatic volunteers were evaluated. Cross-sectional images during motion from full extension to flexion of the index finger and thumb were recorded. On the initial and final frames, the median nerve, flexor pollicis longus (FPL), and index finger flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendons were outlined. Coordinate data were recorded and median nerve cross-sectional area, perimeter, aspect ratio of the minimal-enclosing rectangle, and circularity in extension and flexion positions were calculated. During index finger flexion, the tendon moves volarly while the nerve moves radially. With thumb flexion, the tendon moves volarly, but the median nerve moves toward the ulnar side. In both motions, the area and perimeter of the median nerve in flexion were smaller than in extension. Thus, during index finger or thumb flexion, the median nerve in a healthy human subject shifts away from the index finger FDS and FPL tendons while being compressed between the tendons and the flexor retinaculum in the carpal tunnel. We are planning to compare these data with measurements in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and believe that these parameters may be useful tools for the assessment of CTS and carpal tunnel mechanics with ultrasound in the future. PMID:20225286

  15. Multielectrode nerve cuff stimulation of the median nerve produces selective movements in a raccoon animal model.

    PubMed

    Walter, J S; Griffith, P; Sweeney, J; Scarpine, V; Bidnar, M; McLane, J; Robinson, C

    1997-04-01

    In this study, an electrode system consisting of twelve small platinum dot electrodes imbedded in a spiral silicone rubber insulating cuff was used to investigate the feasibility of selective (regional) stimulation of the median nerves of the raccoon. Acute experiments in four raccoons consisted of functional responses observations, isometric force recordings from tendon attachments and postmortem fascicular mapping. Functional responses (elbow, wrist and/or digit flexion, pronation and/or thumb abduction) to selective stimulation were noted as dependent upon cuff electrode configuration (longitudinal tripole with and without field steering, as well as a transverse bipolar arrangement) and current level (threshold, 1/2 maximal, maximal). Muscle force recruitment curves (force as a function of stimulus amplitude) were plotted for flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus, flexor carpi radialis, palmaris longus and pronator teres of three raccoons. Fascicular maps at the level of the nerve cuff were created indicating the approximate position of innervation to each of the aforementioned muscles, as well as other innervation such as paw fascicles, sensory fascicles, and elbow innervation (such as coracobrachialis). The greatest selectivity was observed at or near threshold current levels. In all four raccoons studied, a threshold electrode choice and stimulation strategy could be identified enabling selective production of either digit flexion, wrist flexion and/or digit and wrist flexion. It was possible to elicit a selective pronation response at threshold in three of the four animals. Selective elbow flexion at threshold could be produced in all four experiments. With stronger currents, additional movements were usually induced. The raccoon therefore appears to be a suitable, if challenging, animal model for further development of not only nerve cuff electrode approaches but perhaps other stimulation electrode technologies prior to human

  16. Development of Kinematic Graphs of Median Nerve during Active Finger Motion: Implications of Smartphone Use

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Certain hand activities cause deformation and displacement of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel due to the gliding motion of tendons surrounding it. As smartphone usage escalates, this raises the public’s concern whether hand activities while using smartphones can lead to median nerve problems. Objective The aims of this study were to 1) develop kinematic graphs and 2) investigate the associated deformation and rotational information of median nerve in the carpal tunnel during hand activities. Methods Dominant wrists of 30 young adults were examined with ultrasonography by placing a transducer transversely on their wrist crease. Ultrasound video clips were recorded when the subject performing 1) thumb opposition with the wrist in neutral position, 2) thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation and 3) pinch grip with the wrist in neutral position. Six still images that were separated by 0.2-second intervals were then captured from the ultrasound video for the determination of 1) cross-sectional area (CSA), 2) flattening ratio (FR), 3) rotational displacement (RD) and 4) translational displacement (TD) of median nerve in the carpal tunnel, and these collected information of deformation, rotational and displacement of median nerve were compared between 1) two successive time points during a single hand activity and 2) different hand motions at the same time point. Finally, kinematic graphs were constructed to demonstrate the mobility of median nerve during different hand activities. Results Performing different hand activities during this study led to a gradual reduction in CSA of the median nerve, with thumb opposition together with the wrist in ulnar deviation causing the greatest extent of deformation of the median nerve. Thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation also led to the largest extent of TD when compared to the other two hand activities of this study. Kinematic graphs showed that the motion pathways of median nerve during

  17. Use of adjunctive palmaris longus abductorplasty (Camitz) tendon transfer in pediatric median nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Baluch, Narges; Borschel, Gregory H

    2013-05-01

    A number of tendon transfers have been described for opponensplasty. Transfer of the palmaris longus (PL) tendon with a palmar fascial extension was initially described by Camitz. This technique has mostly been combined with carpal tunnel release in patients with long standing median neuropathy with atrophy of the thenar muscles. However, the Camitz transfer has not been previously described in the setting of pediatric median nerve injury. We report 4 cases of Camitz transfer in pediatric patients with median nerve injuries. Four children (all female; age range 3-15 yrs) underwent PL tendon transfer following median nerve injury. The causes of injury included trauma, iatrogenic injury, and neuritis of the brachial plexus. The Camitz procedure was performed at the time of median nerve decompression and/or reconstruction. All patients had excellent early return of function. Transfer of the palmaris longus tendon reliably restores palmar abduction, with minimal to no additional morbidity, in carefully selected pediatric patients with median nerve injury undergoing release of the carpal tunnel. PMID:22981385

  18. Functional and morphological assessment of a standardized crush injury of the rat median nerve.

    PubMed

    Ronchi, G; Nicolino, S; Raimondo, S; Tos, P; Battiston, B; Papalia, I; Varejão, A S P; Giacobini-Robecchi, M G; Perroteau, I; Geuna, S

    2009-04-30

    The availability of effective experimental models for investigating nerve regeneration and designing new strategies for promoting this unique repair process is important. The aim of this study was to standardize a rat median nerve crush injury model using a non-serrated clamp exerting a compression force of 17.02 MPa for a duration of 30s. Results showed that functional recovery, evaluated by grasping test, was already detectable at day-12 and progressively increased until day-28 after which animal performance plateaued until the end of testing (day-42), reaching a range of 75-80% of pre-operative values. Morphological analysis on the median nerve segments, distal to the crush lesion, which were withdrawn at the end of the experiment showed that regenerated nerve fibers are significantly more numerous and densely packed; they are also smaller and have a thinner myelin sheath compared to controls. Together, these results provide a baseline characterization of the crush median nerve injury experimental model for its employment in the investigation of nerve regeneration research, especially when a reproducible regeneration process is required, such as for the study of biological mechanisms of peripheral nerve fiber regeneration or development of new therapeutic agents for promoting posttraumatic nerve repair. PMID:19428511

  19. Biomechanics of the Median Nerve During Stretching as Assessed by Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Payá, Jacinto Javier; Ríos-Díaz, José; Del Baño-Aledo, María Elena; García-Martínez, David; de Groot-Ferrando, Ana; Meroño-Gallut, Javier

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this observational cross-sectional study was to investigate the normal motion of the median nerve when stretched during a neurodynamic exercise. In recent years, ultrasonography has been increasingly accepted as an imaging technique for examining peripheral nerves in vivo, offering a reliable and noninvasive method for a precise evaluation of nerve movement. Transverse motion of the median nerve in the arm during a neurodynamic test was measured. A volunteer sample of 22 healthy subjects (11 women) participated in the study. Nerve displacement and deformation were assessed by dynamic ultrasonography. Excellent interobserver agreement was obtained, with kappa coefficient of .7-.8. Ultrasonography showed no lateral motion during wrist extension in 68% of nerves, while 73% moved dorsally, with statistically significant differences between sexes (ORlat = 6.3; 95% CI = 1.4-27.7 and ORdor = 8.3; 95% CI = 1.6-44.6). The cross-sectional area was significantly greater in men (3.6 mm2). Quantitative analysis revealed no other statistically significant differences. Our results provide evidence of substantial individual differences in median nerve transverse displacement in response to a neurodynamic exercise. PMID:26213988

  20. Median and ulnar nerve conduction determinations in the Erb's point--axilla segment in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Ginzburg, M; Lee, M; Ginzburg, J; Alba, A

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-one median and 22 ulnar nerves were tested in 12 patients for motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) and motor nerve conduction time (MNCT) in the segments from Erb's point (N) to axilla (A) bilaterally. It was found that on this segment for both nerves, MNCV values equal to or smaller than 51 m/s or conduction times equal to or longer than 4 ms are to be considered abnormal. For comparative studies and for checking the normality of the tested nerves in their entire length, the more distally located segments in the same nerve were also tested. For diagnostic purposes, the differences between right and left MNCV or MNCT values determined in the same person on N-A segments of homologous nerves were analysed. Motor nerve conduction velocity or MNCT determinations on the N-A nerve segment are expected to replace MNCV determinations on the longer N-AE (AE=100 mm above elbow) nerve segment, which is now in use, for diagnosis of the thoracic outlet syndrome. Images PMID:660207

  1. Embolization in a Patient with Ruptured Anterior Inferior Pancreaticoduodenal Arterial Aneurysm with Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yozo; Banno, Tatsuo; Arakawa, Toshinao; Hara, Masaki

    2002-08-15

    In median arcuate ligament syndrome, the root of the celiac artery is compressed and narrowed by the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm during expiration, causing abdominal angina.Aneurysm may be formed in arteries of the pancreas and duodenum due toa chronic increase in blood flow from the superior mesenteric artery into the celiac arterial region. We report a patient saved by embolization with coils of ruptured aneurysm that developed with markedly dilated anterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery due to median arcuate ligament syndrome.

  2. Importance of Tissue Morphology Relative to Patient Reports of Symptoms and Functional Limitations Resulting From Median Nerve Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Kevin D.; Li, Xiaobai; Sommerich, Carolyn M.; Case-Smith, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Significant data exist for the personal, environmental, and occupational risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome. Few data, however, explain the interrelationship of tissue morphology to these factors among patients with clinical presentation of median nerve pathology. Therefore, our primary objective was to examine the relationship of various risk factors that may be predictive of subjective reports of symptoms or functional deficits accounting for median nerve morphology. Using diagnostic ultrasonography, we observed real-time median nerve morphology among 88 participants with varying reports of symptoms or functional limitations resulting from median nerve pathology. Body mass index, educational level, and nerve morphology were the primary predictive factors. Monitoring median nerve morphology with ultrasonography may provide valuable information for clinicians treating patients with symptoms of median nerve pathology. Sonographic measurements may be a useful clinical tool for improving treatment planning and provision, documenting patient status, or measuring clinical outcomes of prevention and rehabilitation interventions. PMID:23245784

  3. A wakeboarding injury presented as acute carpal syndrome and median nerve contusion after wrist strangulation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We present a case of combined median nerve contusion with immediate loss of sensation after the strangulation with a wakeboarding rope and prolonged referral to our department 72 hours after the injury accompanied by an acute carpal tunnel syndrome with immediate relief of numbness of a significant proportion of the median nerve following surgical decompression. Case presentation The palmar branch of the median nerve was surrounded by a significant haematoma in addition to the strangulation damage caused by its more superficial location in contrast to the median nerve. Conclusion In case of acute median neuropathy, urgent surgical intervention with exploration, decompression of both, the median nerve and the superficial branch of the median nerve, accompanied by compartment measurements of the forearm should be performed to regain or re-establish neurological integrity. PMID:19178709

  4. Morphological and positional changes of the carpal arch and median nerve during wrist compression

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Tamara L.; Gabra, Joseph N.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background The carpal tunnel is a fibro-osseous structure containing the median nerve and flexor tendons. Its cross-sectional area has been shown to increase during compressive force application to the carpal bones in modeling and in vitro studies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphological and positional changes of the carpal arch and median nerve while in vivo compressive force was applied in the radioulnar direction across the wrist. Methods Ultrasound images of the carpal tunnel and its contents were captured for 11 healthy, female volunteers at the distal tunnel level prior to force application and during force application of 10 and 20 N. Findings With applied force, the carpal arch width significantly decreased, while the carpal arch height and area significantly increased (P < 0.001). The median nerve shape became more rounded as the compressive force magnitude increased, reflected by decreases in the nerve’s flattening ratio and increases in its circularity (P < 0.001). The applied force also resulted in nerve displacement in the radial-volar direction. Interpretation This study demonstrates that noninvasively applying radioulnar compressive force across the wrist may potentially provide relief of median nerve compression to patients suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:25661267

  5. The usefulness of terminal latency index of median nerve and f-wave difference between median and ulnar nerves in assessing the severity of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Kang Min; Shin, Kyong Jin; Park, Jinse; Ha, Sam Yeol; Kim, Sung Eun

    2014-04-01

    The calculated electrophysiological parameters, such as terminal latency index (TLI), residual latency, modified F ratio, and F-wave inversion, have been investigated as a diagnostic tool for detection of early stage of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in the literature. However, the correlation of these calculated electrophysiological parameters with the clinical severity of CTS has not been reported. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation of the calculated electrophysiological parameters and clinical severity in patients with CTS. A retrospective study was performed with 212 hands of 106 CTS patients. The CTS hands were classified as asymptomatic, mild, moderate, and severe according to the clinical severity. The distal motor latency and distal motor conduction velocity of median nerve, minimal F-wave latency of median and ulnar nerves, and sensory nerve conduction velocity in the finger-wrist and palm-wrist segment of median nerve (SNCV f-w and SNCV p-w) were obtained in a conventional nerve conduction study. The TLI, residual latency, and modified F ratio of the median nerve and the difference of minimal F-wave latencies between the median and ulnar nerves (F-diff M-U) were calculated. The distal motor latency, residual latency, and F-diff M-U were significantly increased according to the clinical severity of CTS. The motor conduction velocity, SNCV p-w, SNCV f-w, TLI, and modified F ratio were significantly decreased according to the clinical severity of CTS. In analyses of variance and Kruskal-Wallis test, we used the Scheffe test as a post-hoc comparison analysis. The TLI, F-diff M-U, and SNCV f-w showed a significant difference among all groups of each CTS severity. The sensitivity, specificity, and cut-off value of TLI, F-diff M-U, and SNCV f-w between asymptomatic and mild, mild and moderate, and moderate and severe CTS groups were calculated by using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The cut-off values of TLI, F-diff M-U, and

  6. Effect of Wrist Angle on Median Nerve Appearance at the Proximal Carpal Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Ping Yeap; Muraki, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of wrist angle, sex, and handedness on the changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameters, namely longitudinal diameter (D1) and vertical diameter (D2). Ultrasound examination was conducted to examine the median nerve at the proximal carpal tunnel in both dominant and nondominant hands of men (n = 27) and women (n = 26). A total of seven wrist angles were examined: neutral; 15°, 30°, and 45° extension; and 15°, 30°, and 45° flexion. Our results indicated sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry of MNCSA, D1 and D2 measurements. MNCSA was significantly reduced when the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions. At flexion positions, D1 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In contrast, at extension positions, D2 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In conclusion, this study showed that MNCSA decreased as the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions in both dominant and nondominant hands of both sexes, whereas deformation of the median nerve differed between wrist flexion and extension. PMID:25658422

  7. Isolated Fascial Compression of the Recurrent Motor Branch of the Median Nerve: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Isolated compression of the recurrent motor branch (RMB) of the median nerve is not commonly reported. This report deals with a case of fascial band compression of the RMB of the median nerve with sparing of the sensory portion of the nerve in a single patient. The episode was precipitated by the subject was clearing fallen trees after an ice storm. Symptoms occurred only in the left, nondominant hand of the patient, a 43-year-old invasive cardiologist. He presented within weeks of symptom onset, but marked clinical and electrodiagnostic abnormalities of the branch were already present. Timely decompression after evaluation led to a successful clinical outcome, with restoration of full strength on manual muscle testing by 6 months postoperatively and marked electrodiagnostic improvements as well by 11 months after operation. Final clinical examination 16 months after operation showed thenar muscle bulk and strength well maintained. PMID:18780034

  8. Persistent median artery in the carpal tunnel and anastomosis with superficial palmar arch.

    PubMed

    Bijannejad, Dariush; Azandeh, Saeed; Javadnia, Fatemeh; Gholami, Mohammad Reza; Gharravi, Anneh Mohammad; Zhaleh, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Persistent median artery (PMA) in present cadaver originated from the brachial artery and anastomosed with the superficial palmar arch (SPA). As the PMA may be the cause of carpal tunnel syndrome and SPA is the main source of arterial supply, knowledge of which are important for the hand surgical interventions. PMID:27583265

  9. Persistent median artery in the carpal tunnel and anastomosis with superficial palmar arch

    PubMed Central

    Bijannejad, Dariush; Azandeh, Saeed; Javadnia, Fatemeh; Gholami, Mohammad Reza; Gharravi, Anneh Mohammad; zhaleh, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Persistent median artery (PMA) in present cadaver originated from the brachial artery and anastomosed with the superficial palmar arch (SPA). As the PMA may be the cause of carpal tunnel syndrome and SPA is the main source of arterial supply, knowledge of which are important for the hand surgical interventions. PMID:27583265

  10. Topotecan Delivery to the Optic Nerve after Ophthalmic Artery Chemosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Taich, Paula; Requejo, Flavio; Asprea, Marcelo; Sgroi, Mariana; Gobin, Pierre; Abramson, David H.; Chantada, Guillermo; Schaiquevich, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Extraocular retinoblastoma is a major challenge worldwide, especially in developing countries. Current treatment involves the administration of systemic chemotherapy combined with radiation, but there is a clear need for improvement of chemotherapy bioavailability in the optic nerve. Our aim was to study the ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) local route for drug delivery assessing ocular and optic nerve exposure to chemotherapy and to compare it to exposure after intravenous infusion (IV) of the same dose in an animal model. Topotecan was used as a prototype drug that is active in retinoblastoma and based on the extensive knowledge of its pharmacokinetics in preclinical and clinical settings. Five Landrace pigs received 4mg of topotecan via OAC as performed in retinoblastoma patients. At the end of the infusion, the eyes were enucleated, the optic nerve and retina were dissected, and the vitreous and plasma were separated. After recovery and a wash-out period, the animals received a 30-min IV infusion of topotecan (4 mg). The remaining eye was enucleated and tissues and fluids were separated. All samples were stored until quantitation using HPLC. A significantly higher concentration of topotecan in the optic nerve, vitreous, and retina was obtained in eyes after OAC compared to IV infusion (p<0.05). The median (range) ratio between topotecan concentration attained after OAC to IV infusion in the optic nerve, retina and vitreous was 84(54–668), 143(49–200) and 246(56–687), respectively. However, topotecan systemic exposure after OAC and IV infusion remained comparable (p>0.05). The median optic nerve-to-plasma ratio after OAC and IV was 44 and 0.35, respectively. Topotecan OAC delivery attained an 80-fold higher concentration in the optic nerve compared to the systemic infusion of the same dose with similar plasma concentrations in a swine model. Patients with retinoblastoma extension into the optic nerve may benefit from OAC for tumor burden by increased

  11. Topotecan Delivery to the Optic Nerve after Ophthalmic Artery Chemosurgery.

    PubMed

    Taich, Paula; Requejo, Flavio; Asprea, Marcelo; Sgroi, Mariana; Gobin, Pierre; Abramson, David H; Chantada, Guillermo; Schaiquevich, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Extraocular retinoblastoma is a major challenge worldwide, especially in developing countries. Current treatment involves the administration of systemic chemotherapy combined with radiation, but there is a clear need for improvement of chemotherapy bioavailability in the optic nerve. Our aim was to study the ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) local route for drug delivery assessing ocular and optic nerve exposure to chemotherapy and to compare it to exposure after intravenous infusion (IV) of the same dose in an animal model. Topotecan was used as a prototype drug that is active in retinoblastoma and based on the extensive knowledge of its pharmacokinetics in preclinical and clinical settings. Five Landrace pigs received 4mg of topotecan via OAC as performed in retinoblastoma patients. At the end of the infusion, the eyes were enucleated, the optic nerve and retina were dissected, and the vitreous and plasma were separated. After recovery and a wash-out period, the animals received a 30-min IV infusion of topotecan (4 mg). The remaining eye was enucleated and tissues and fluids were separated. All samples were stored until quantitation using HPLC. A significantly higher concentration of topotecan in the optic nerve, vitreous, and retina was obtained in eyes after OAC compared to IV infusion (p<0.05). The median (range) ratio between topotecan concentration attained after OAC to IV infusion in the optic nerve, retina and vitreous was 84(54-668), 143(49-200) and 246(56-687), respectively. However, topotecan systemic exposure after OAC and IV infusion remained comparable (p>0.05). The median optic nerve-to-plasma ratio after OAC and IV was 44 and 0.35, respectively. Topotecan OAC delivery attained an 80-fold higher concentration in the optic nerve compared to the systemic infusion of the same dose with similar plasma concentrations in a swine model. Patients with retinoblastoma extension into the optic nerve may benefit from OAC for tumor burden by increased

  12. Carpal arch and median nerve changes during radioulnar wrist compression in carpal tunnel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Tamara L; Evans, Peter J; Seitz, William H; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphological changes of the carpal arch and median nerve during the application of radiounlarly directed compressive force across the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Radioulnar compressive forces of 10 N and 20 N were applied at the distal level of the carpal tunnel in 10 female patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Immediately prior to force application and after 3 min of application, ultrasound images of the distal carpal tunnel were obtained. It was found that applying force across the wrist decreased the carpal arch width (p < 0.001) and resulted in increased carpal arch height (p < 0.01), increased carpal arch curvature (p < 0.001), and increased radial distribution of the carpal arch area (p < 0.05). It was also shown that wrist compression reduced the flattening of the median nerve, as indicated by changes in the nerve's circularity and flattening ratio (p < 0.001). This study demonstrated that the carpal arch can be non-invasively augmented by applying compressive force across the wrist, and that this strategy may decompress the median nerve providing symptom relief to patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1234-1240, 2016. PMID:26662276

  13. Post-traumatic Median Nerve Neuroma in Wrist. A Case Report and brief review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Ahmet; Konya, Mehmet Nuri; Sargin, Serdar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Distal median nerve masses may be developed post-traumatic or non-traumatic. In this paper, we aim to present a 52 year old female case with a postraumatic neuroma of the median nerve in the left wrist. Case Series: A 52-year-old female patient had accidental incised wound over her left wrist which was primarily sutured. She presented 6 months later with unrelieved pain and growing swelling at the wrist. USG showed solid mass of size 2x3 cms. Intraoperatively the mass was seen to arise from medial nerve and careful excision was done protecting the nerve. At one year follow up the patient is relived of her symptoms with no sensorimotor deficit. Conclusion: Post traumatic neuroma present as unrelieved pain and progressive swelling. A high index of suspicion should be kept in cases of wound that are primarily sutured over an area with superficial nerves. Careful excision of the lesion is very effective in relieving patients symptoms PMID:27298917

  14. Complications after selective embolization in the bilateral internal iliac arteries and the median sacral artery with gelfoam particles in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yetian; Wang, Wei; Wang, Guangye; Yin, Zongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The study aimed to observe the complications after the bilateral internal iliac arteries and the median sacral artery embolization by different severity and combinations of gelfoam particles. Methods: Sixteen healthy adult dogs were randomly divided into five groups. Under the monitoring of digital subtraction angiography (DSA), gelfoam particles with diameter of 50-150 μm were applied. In group A, embolization was performed up to the trunk of bilateral internal iliac arteries and the median sacral artery; in group B, embolization was up to the trunk of bilateral internal iliac arteries; in group C, embolization was up to the first branch of bilateral internal iliac arteries and the median sacral artery; in group D, embolization was up to the trunk of unilateral internal iliac artery and the median sacral artery; in group E embolization was performed up to the trunk of unilateral internal iliac artery. Results: Seven dogs died within 48 hours after embolization. In the dead animals of groups A, C and D, there were rectum necrosis and lamellar obfuscation and hemorrhage edema in bladder. In the histological examination, there are rectum and bladder cell dissociation, inflammatory cell infiltration and epithelial cell ablating in the dead animals. The embolization mainly presented in arterioles with a diameter of 100-200 μm. Conclusion: When gelfoam particles of 50-150 μm in diameter were applied for embolization in the internal iliac artery and median sacral artery, at least unilateral internal iliac artery should be preserved when embolization is performed in the proximal artery and the trunk. PMID:25356191

  15. Median Nerve Injury following K-wire Fixation of Bennett’s Fracture—Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sanath K.; Hanna, Amir W.

    2010-01-01

    Bennett's fracture is a relatively common injury. The fracture is unstable due to the displacing forces acting on the distal fragment and very commonly treated by stabilization with Kirschner wires. This would seem a relatively safe procedure, and injury to the median nerve has never been reported. We present this unusual complication following one such procedure with the evaluation of a safe approach utilizing the relevant surgical and radiological anatomy. PMID:22131930

  16. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the elbow with rdial, median and ulnar nerve compression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui; Chen, Qiang; Shen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare, idiopathic proliferative disorder of the synovium. While, PVNS of elbow is extremely rare. We report an 82-year-old female patient with 20-year-history of gradually increased PVNS in her left elbow. The multiple masses were located in anterior, medial and lateral of elbow. Her radial, median and ulnar nerves were compressed by the tumor. We resected tumor of extra-articular part piecemeally and released the compression of nerves. After the surgery, the patient gained a functional recovery. Two years after surgery she had a tumor recurrence, but without any symptoms of nerve compression syndromes. We discussed its clinical diagnosis, radiological features, MRI findings, pathophysiology, and treatment. PMID:26823718

  17. Carpal arch and median nerve changes during radioulnar wrist compression in carpal tunnel syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Tamara L.; Evans, Peter J.; Seitz, William H.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphological changes of the carpal arch and median nerve during the application of radiounlarly directed compressive force across the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Radioulnar compressive forces of 10 N and 20 N were applied at the distal level of the carpal tunnel in 10 female patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Immediately prior to force application and after 3 minutes of application, ultrasound images of the distal carpal tunnel were obtained. It was found that applying force across the wrist decreased the carpal arch width (p < 0.001) and resulted in increased carpal arch height (p < 0.01), increased carpal arch curvature (p < 0.001), and increased radial distribution of the carpal arch area (p < 0.05). It was also shown that wrist compression reduced the flattening of the median nerve, as indicated by changes in the nerve’s circularity and flattening ratio (p < 0.001). Statement of clinical significance This study demonstrated that the carpal arch can be non-invasively augmented by applying compressive force across the wrist, and that this strategy may decompress the median nerve providing symptom relief to patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26662276

  18. Microneurography in relation to intraneural topography: somatotopic organisation of median nerve fascicles in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hallin, R G

    1990-01-01

    Microneurography was performed in median nerve sensory fascicles with concentric needle electrodes and with conventional tungsten microneedles. The latter electrodes preferentially recorded activity from the myelinated fibres in the whole fascicle. By contrast, due to its special design, a concentric needle can record activity selectively from even a small part of a fascicle. High amplitude signals in C fibres can be discriminated close to Schwann cells that envelope unmyelinated axons. Apart from being biased for activity in thin fibres, the concentric needles can also record signals from nearby myelinated fibres. The palmar receptive fields of such fibre groups were not congruent with the areas traditionally attributed to multiunit skin afferents in humans, namely the innervation zone(s) of one or two adjacent digital nerve(s). Instead, the multiunit fields often comprised small parts of a digital nerve innervation area, frequently only the pulp of a finger. Single units were always localised within previously screened multiunit areas. Contrary to some previously accepted tenets it is probable that single unit activity in myelinated fibres in these studies is recorded extra-axonally near to a node of Ranvier. The findings also suggest the presence of a somatotopy in human limb nerve fascicles, comparable to that previously established in the spinal cord and the somatosensory cortex. Images PMID:2246655

  19. Median ulnar nerves communication in the forearm: a study with autopsy material.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Luis E; Forero, Pedro L; Quintero, Iván D

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of median-ulnar communication in the forearm presents variability in different population groups. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and morphologic expression of the median-ulnar communication in a sample of the Colombian population. One hundred and eight forearms of autopsy material at the National Institute of Forensic Medicine of Bucaramanga, Colombia were studied. Using an approach of the flexor compartment of forearm the median and ulnar nerves were dissected and the communications between these two structures were characterized. The communicating branch occurred in 28 (25.9%) forearms. It occurred unilaterally in 12 specimens and bilaterally in 8, with statistically significant difference (P=0.01). The communication between the anterior interosseous and ulnar nerves was most frequent, observed in 13 (46.4%) forearms. The length of the communicating branch was 56.9 +/- 8.3 mm. The distance of the proximal and distal points of the communicating branch to the bi- epicondylar line was 59.6 +/- 15.4 mm and 102.7 +/- 23.5 mm respectively. The length of the forearm was 269.8 +/- 15.9 mm. A projection of the communicating branch from the upper third to the midthird of the forearm was observed. The incidence of the median-ulnar communication in the present study is in the high rank reported in the literature; there is an agreement with prior studies in finding more numerous communicating branches in the right forearm. The median-ulnar communication should be taken into account for surgical approach of the forearm. PMID:26749683

  20. Sensory perturbations using suture and sutureless repair of transected median nerve in rats.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Sumaiya; Shortland, Peter; Lauto, Antonio; Barton, Matthew; Morley, John W; Mahns, David A

    2016-03-01

    The effects of changes to cold, mechanical, and heat thresholds following median nerve transection with repair by sutures (Su) or Rose Bengal adhesion (RA) were compared to sham-operated animals. Both nerve-injured groups showed a transient, ipsilateral hyposensitivity to mechanical and heat stimuli followed by a robust and long-lasting hypersensitivity (6-7 weeks) with gradual recovery towards pre-injury levels by 90 days post-repair. Both tactile and thermal hypersensitivity were seen in the contralateral limb that was similar in onset but differed in magnitude and resolved more rapidly compared to the injured limb. Prior to injury, no animals showed any signs of aversion to cold plate temperatures of 4-16 °C. After injury, animals showed cold allodynia, lasting for 7 weeks in RA-repaired rats before recovering towards pre-injury levels, but were still present at 12 weeks in Su-repaired rats. Additionally, sensory recovery in the RA group was faster compared to the Su group in all behavioural tests. Surprisingly, sham-operated rats showed similar bilateral behavioural changes to all sensory stimuli that were comparable in onset and magnitude to the nerve-injured groups but resolved more quickly compared to nerve-injured rats. These results suggest that nerve repair using a sutureless approach produces an accelerated recovery with reduced sensorimotor disturbances compared to direct suturing. They also describe, for the first time, that unilateral forelimb nerve injury produces mirror-image-like sensory perturbations in the contralateral limb, suggesting that the contralateral side is not a true control for sensory testing. The potential mechanisms involved in this altered behaviour are discussed. PMID:26899181

  1. Median Nerve Somatosensory Evoked Potential in HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Boostani, Reza; Poorzahed, Ali; Ahmadi, Zahra; Mellat, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a progressive Myelopathy that mainly involves the corticospinal tract. Despite pronounced involvement of the lower limbs, patients also have abnormalities in their upper limbs. So, we studied somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs) of the median nerve in HAM/TSP patients to determine the extent of the involvement of the pathway of the central nervous system, especially the cervical spinal cord. Methods In this cross sectional study, 48 patients with HAM/TSP who were referred to Qaem Hospital in Mashhad from October 2010 to October 2011 were evaluated for various indices, including SSEPs of the median nerve for N9, N11, N13, and N20 waveforms and also N11–13 and N13–20 Inter Peak Latency (IPL), severity of disease (based on Osama criteria), disease duration (less or more than 2 years), age, and gender. SPSS software was used for data analysis. The t-test was used for quantitative data, and the chi-squared test was used for the qualitative variables. Results Thirty-four patients (70.2%) were females. The mean age was 45.6 ± 14.2 years. About SSEPs indices of the median nerve, N9 and N11 were normal in all patients, but N13 (50%), N20 (16.7%), IPL11–13 (58.3%), and IPL13–20 (22.9%) were abnormal. No significant relationships were found between age, gender, disease duration, and SSEPs indices (p > 0.05), but IPL11–13 and IPL13–20 had significant relationships with disease disability (p = 0.017 and p = 0.01, respectively). Conclusion Despite the lack of obvious complaints of upper limbs, SSEPs indices of the median nerve from the cervical spinal cord to the cortex were abnormal, which indicated extension of the lesion from the thoracic spinal cord up to the cervical spinal cord and thalamocortical pathways. Also, abnormalities in the cervical spinal cord had a direct correlation with the severity of disability in patients with HAM/TSP. PMID:27382445

  2. Pressure Monitoring of Intraneural an Perineural Injections Into the Median, Radial, and Ulnar Nerves; Lessons From a Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Krol, Andrzej; Szarko, Matthew; Vala, Arber; De Andres, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nerve damage after regional anesthesia has been of great concern to anesthetists. Various modalities have been suggested to recognize and prevent its incidence. An understudied area is the measurement of intraneural pressure during peripheral nerve blockade. Previous investigations have produced contradicting results with only one study being conducted on human cadavers. Objectives: The purpose of this investigation was to systematically record intraneural and perineural injection pressures on the median, ulnar, and radial nerves exclusively as a primary outcome. Materials and Methods: Ultrasonography-guided injections of 1 mL of 0.9% NaCl over ten seconds were performed on phenol glycerine embalmed cadaveric median, ulnar, and radial nerves. A total of 60 injections were performed, 30 intraneural and 30 perineural injections. The injections pressure was measured using a controlled disc stimulation device. Anatomic dissection was used to confirm needle placement. Results: Intraneural needle placement produced significantly greater pressures than perineural injections did. The mean generated pressures in median, radial, and ulnar nerves were respectively 29.4 ± 9.3, 27.3 ± 8.5, and 17.9 ± 7.0 pound per square inch (psi) (1 psi = 51.7 mmHg) for the intraneural injections and respectively 7.2 ± 2.5, 8.3 ± 2.5, and 6.7 ± 1.8 psi for perineural injections. Additionally the intraneural injection pressures of the ulnar nerve were lower than those of the median and radial nerves. Conclusions: Obtained results demonstrate significant differences between intraneural and perineural injection pressures in the median, ulnar, and radial nerves. Intraneural injection pressures show low specificity but high sensitivity suggesting that pressure monitoring might be a valuable tool in improving the safety and efficacy of peripheral nerve blockade in regional anesthesia. Peripheral nerves “pressure mapping” hypothetically might show difference amongst various

  3. Acute effects of neural mobilization and infrared on the mechanics of the median nerve

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Monara Kedma; Fontenele dos Santos, Gabrielly; Martins e Silva, Diandra Caroline; Mota de Freitas, Ana Cláudia; Henriques, Isadora Ferreira; Andrade, Peterson Marco; Machado, Dionis de Castro; Teixeira, Silmar; Neves, Marco Orsini; Dias, Gildário; Silva-Júnior, Fernando; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study analyzed the acute effects of infrared and neural mobilization on the median nerve on the range of elbow extension of the dominant limb. [Subjects and Methods] Forty participants from university, neurologically asymptomatic, 12 males and 28 females (22.8 ± 1.9 years), were randomly divided into four groups: Group 1 (control) rested for 25 minutes in the supine position; Group 2 received the specific neural mobilization for the median nerve; Group 3 received an application of infrared for 15 minutes on the forearm; Group 4 received the same application of infrared followed by neural mobilization. The goniometric parameters of elbow extension were evaluated after the intervention. [Results] Significant differences of extension value were observed between Group 1 and Group 3 (15.75 degrees), and between Group 1 and Group 4 (14.60 degrees), and the average higher in Group 3 (26.35 degrees). [Conclusion] This research provides new experimental evidence that NM in relation to superficial heat produces an immediate effect on elbow range of motion versus NM isolated. PMID:27390402

  4. Acute effects of neural mobilization and infrared on the mechanics of the median nerve.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Monara Kedma; Fontenele Dos Santos, Gabrielly; Martins E Silva, Diandra Caroline; Mota de Freitas, Ana Cláudia; Henriques, Isadora Ferreira; Andrade, Peterson Marco; Machado, Dionis de Castro; Teixeira, Silmar; Neves, Marco Orsini; Dias, Gildário; Silva-Júnior, Fernando; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study analyzed the acute effects of infrared and neural mobilization on the median nerve on the range of elbow extension of the dominant limb. [Subjects and Methods] Forty participants from university, neurologically asymptomatic, 12 males and 28 females (22.8 ± 1.9 years), were randomly divided into four groups: Group 1 (control) rested for 25 minutes in the supine position; Group 2 received the specific neural mobilization for the median nerve; Group 3 received an application of infrared for 15 minutes on the forearm; Group 4 received the same application of infrared followed by neural mobilization. The goniometric parameters of elbow extension were evaluated after the intervention. [Results] Significant differences of extension value were observed between Group 1 and Group 3 (15.75 degrees), and between Group 1 and Group 4 (14.60 degrees), and the average higher in Group 3 (26.35 degrees). [Conclusion] This research provides new experimental evidence that NM in relation to superficial heat produces an immediate effect on elbow range of motion versus NM isolated. PMID:27390402

  5. Dipole source analyses of early median nerve SEP components obtained from subdural grid recordings.

    PubMed

    Baumgärtner, Ulf; Vogel, Hagen; Ohara, Shinji; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Lenz, Fred A

    2010-12-01

    The median nerve N20 and P22 SEP components constitute the initial response of the primary somatosensory cortex to somatosensory stimulation of the upper extremity. Knowledge of the underlying generators is important both for basic understanding of the initial sequence of cortical activation and to identify landmarks for eloquent areas to spare in resection planning of cortex in epilepsy surgery. We now set out to localize the N20 and P22 using subdural grid recording with special emphasis on the question of the origin of P22: Brodmann area 4 versus area 1. Electroencephalographic dipole source analysis of the N20 and P22 responses obtained from subdural grids over the primary somatosensory cortex after median nerve stimulation was performed in four patients undergoing epilepsy surgery. Based on anatomical landmarks, equivalent current dipoles of N20 and P22 were localized posterior to (n = 2) or on the central sulcus (n = 2). In three patients, the P22 dipole was located posterior to the N20 dipole, whereas in one patient, the P22 dipole was located on the same coordinate in anterior-posterior direction. On average, P22 sources were found to be 6.6 mm posterior [and 1 mm more superficial] compared with the N20 sources. These data strongly suggest a postcentral origin of the P22 SEP component in Brodmann area 1 and render a major precentral contribution to the earliest stages of processing from the primary motor cortex less likely. PMID:20861430

  6. Mechanosensitivity of the median nerve in patients with chronic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Zoghi, Maryam

    2013-04-01

    The aim was to investigate the relationship between the effects of median nerve strain during the elbow extension component of the upper limb neurodynamic test 1 (ULNT1) and the evoked musculoskeletal changes. 11 patients with chronic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and 11 matched asymptomatic controls participated in the study. In all subjects, elbow extension was carried out in both ULNT1 and neutral positions of the shoulder and arm. From these two starting positions a KIN-COM(®) dynamometer carried out passive elbow extension while EMG activity of 10 arm and shoulder muscles, elbow-flexor resistive torque and elbow extension ROM were measured concurrently. The result showed that, in the ULNT1 position, increased EMG activity of the involved muscles, increased elbow extension resistive torque and pain responses occurred much earlier in the range of elbow extension in the CTS group compared to healthy controls. These findings demonstrated increased mechanosensitivity of the median nerve in CTS patients compared to healthy controls. PMID:23561861

  7. The cholesterol levels in median nerve and post-mortem interval evaluation.

    PubMed

    Vacchiano, G; Maldonado, A Luna; Ros, M Matas; Di Lorenzo, P; Pieri, M

    2016-08-01

    Cholesterol levels in the median nerve were studied at various post-mortem intervals (PMIs). Single median nerve samples were collected from the wrists of 36 subjects during forensic autopsies of subjects with known circumstances and times of death. Although the absolute values varied, increments in cholesterol concentration were recorded. Subsequently, 16 subjects who did not suffer of any neurological and/or metabolic diseases with known times and circumstances of death were enrolled. For each enrolled subject, two samples were collected from the wrist at an interval of approximately two hours (t1 and t2). The obtained results revealed a gradual increase in cholesterol level with increasing time since death. The cholesterol concentration data obtained for each subject at t1 and t2 were correlated with the time since death, a linear interpolation was applied, and the PMI was back-calculated. Similar trends were obtained for the samples collected at similar PMIs; thus, three groups were considered: PMI<48h, 4878h. Good correlation coefficients were obtained, especially for the first group (R(2)=0.9362) for which the PMI could be calculated with an error that ranged from -4 to 5.9h. Although it requires further confirmation via analyses of larger numbers of samples, the method proposed here can currently be applied to PMI determinations. PMID:26826850

  8. An unusual case of left renal artery compression: a rare type of median arcuate ligament syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arazińska, Agata; Polguj, Michał; Wojciechowski, Andrzej; Trębiński, Łukasz; Stefańczyk, Ludomir

    2016-04-01

    Compression from median arcuate ligament was observed during multidetector 64-row computed tomography in a Caucasian 30-year-old female. The patient was referred for examination to exclude anatomical pathologies causing hypertension. The examination demonstrated that left renal artery, which had its origin in the chest (at the level of upper one-third of Th12), was compressed as it passed by median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm. In addition, aortic compression and kinked shape was also revealed. PMID:25940812

  9. Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A concurrent with schwannomas of the spinal cord and median nerve.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Joo Young; Chung, Ki Wha; Park, Eun Kyung; Park, Sun Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2009-08-01

    We identified Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) in a family with schwannomas in the spinal cord and median nerve. The CMT1A in this family showed an autosomal dominant pattern, like other CMT patients with PMP22 duplication, and the family also indicated a possible genetic predisposition to schwannomas by 'mother-to-son' transmission. CMT1A is mainly caused by duplication of chromosome 17p11.2-p12 (PMP22 gene duplication). A schwannoma is a benign encapsulated tumor originating from a Schwann cell. A case of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) concurrent with schwannoma has been previously reported. Although it seems that the co-occurrence of CMT1A and schwannomas in a family would be the result of independent events, we could not completely ignore the possibility that the coincidence of two diseases might be due to a shared genetic background. PMID:19654968

  10. A widely displaced Galeazzi-equivalent lesion with median nerve compromise

    PubMed Central

    Galanopoulos, Ilias; Fogg, Quentin; Ashwood, Neil; Fu, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 14-year-old boy with a right distal radial fracture accompanied by a severely displaced complete distal ulnar physeal separation and associated median nerve compromise. This injury is known as Galeazzi-equivalent lesion in children and is an extremely rare injury associated with growth arrest. Recognition of the lesion can be difficult but wide displacement may be associated with other significant injuries such as neurovascular compromise. Prompt intervention reversed the neurological symptoms. At 10-month postoperation there was neither growth arrest nor loss of motion. Complete separation of the ulna physis remains often because of soft tissue interposition or capsule problems and prompt reduction is recommended in the literature as a priority. PMID:22907852

  11. From the brachial plexus to the hand, multiple connections between the median and ulnar nerves may serve as bypass routes for nerve fibres.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Gil, Y; Kim, S; Bang, J; Choi, H; Lee, H Y

    2016-07-01

    Axons from the median and ulnar nerves can pass to each other through aberrant connections between them. Multiple interconnections between the nerves may provide a detour route for nerve fibres going to the hand. We investigated the incidence of variations and the associations between them in 90 cadaveric upper limbs. In 91% of upper limbs, one to five variations were found, with several statistically significant associations. The contribution of the C8 nerve to the lateral cord was positively associated with an accessory contribution of the lateral cord to the ulnar nerve. The latter variation showed positive association with the occurrence of any of the variations in the hand itself. Ulnar innervation of the superficial head of the flexor pollicis brevis was positively associated with the Riche-Cannieu communication. The co-existence of the variations and their associations may be the explanation for unusual clinical findings related to median and ulnar conduction, which appear contrary to anatomical knowledge. PMID:26763269

  12. Apparent transverse compressive material properties of the digital flexor tendons and the median nerve in the carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Main, Erin K; Goetz, Jessica E; Rudert, M James; Goreham-Voss, Curtis M; Brown, Thomas D

    2011-03-15

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a frequently encountered peripheral nerve disorder caused by mechanical insult to the median nerve, which may in part be a result of impingement by the adjacent digital flexor tendons. Realistic finite element (FE) analysis to determine contact stresses between the flexor tendons and median nerve depends upon the use of physiologically accurate material properties. To assess the transverse compressive properties of the digital flexor tendons and median nerve, these tissues from ten cadaveric forearm specimens were compressed transversely while under axial load. The experimental compression data were used in conjunction with an FE-based optimization routine to determine apparent hyperelastic coefficients (μ and α) for a first-order Ogden material property definition. The mean coefficient pairs were μ=35.3 kPa, α=8.5 for the superficial tendons, μ=39.4 kPa, α=9.2 for the deep tendons, μ=24.9 kPa, α=10.9 for the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon, and μ=12.9 kPa, α=6.5 for the median nerve. These mean Ogden coefficients indicate that the FPL tendon was more compliant at low strains than either the deep or superficial flexor tendons, and that there was no significant difference between superficial and deep flexor tendon compressive behavior. The median nerve was significantly more compliant than any of the flexor tendons. The material properties determined in this study can be used to better understand the functional mechanics of the carpal tunnel soft tissues and possible mechanisms of median nerve compressive insult, which may lead to the onset of carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:21194695

  13. Improving the radial nerve neurodynamic test: An observation of tension of the radial, median and ulnar nerves during upper limb positioning.

    PubMed

    Manvell, Joshua J; Manvell, Nicole; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Reid, Susan A

    2015-12-01

    The radial nerve neurodynamic test (ULNT2b), used to implicate symptoms arising from the radial nerve, is proposed to selectively increase strain of the nerve without increasing strain of adjacent tissue, though this has not been established. This study aimed to determine the upper limb position that results in: (1) the greatest tension of the radial nerve and (2) the greatest difference in tension between the radial nerve and the other two major nerves of the upper limb: median and ulnar. Tension (N) of the radial, median and ulnar nerves was measured simultaneously using three buckle force transducers during seven upper limb positions in the axilla of ten embalmed whole body human cadavers (n = 20 limbs). Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni post-hoc tests determined differences in tension between nerves and between limb positions. A Composite position consisting of ULNT2b (scapular depression, shoulder internal rotation, elbow extension, forearm pronation, wrist flexion) with the addition of shoulder abduction 40° and extension 25°, wrist ulnar deviation and thumb flexion demonstrated significantly greater tension of the radial nerve than any other tested position (mean tension 11.32N; 95% CI 10.25, 12.29, p < 0.01), including ULNT2b (2.20N; 1.84, 2.57; p < 0.01). Additionally, the Composite position demonstrated the greatest difference in tension between the radial and median (mean difference 4.88N; 95% CI 3.16, 6.61; p < 0.01) and radial and ulnar nerves (9.26N, 7.54, 10.99; p < 0.01). This position constitutes a biomechanically plausible test to detect neuropathic pain related to the radial nerve. PMID:25892706

  14. Distally based sural artery flap without sural nerve.

    PubMed

    Motamed, Sadrollah; Yavari, Masood; Mofrad, Hamid Reza Hallaj; Rafiee, Reza; Shahraki, Feaz Niazi

    2010-01-01

    The distal third of the tibia, ankle and heel area is difficult to reconstruct. For small to medium size defects, local flaps are often an easier alternative than free flap. In lower limb surgery, the sural flap is based on this principle and this flap is becoming increasingly popular. The distally based superficial sural artery flap, first described as a distally based neuro skin flap by masquelet et al., is a skin island flap supplied by the vascular axis of the sural nerve. The main disadvantage of distally based sural artery flap is sacrifice of the sural nerve because it is described the concept of neurocutaneus island flap. We describe one case of reverse sural flap without sural nerve .The aim of this paper is to establish the reliability of this flap even without sural nerve. PMID:21133008

  15. [Variations in the configuration of somatosensory evoked potentials following stimulation of the median nerve].

    PubMed

    Strenge, H

    1989-09-01

    The variants of waveform patterns of cervical and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials to median nerve stimulation at the wrist were analysed in 86 normal subjects aged 15 to 71 years. In cervical SEP recordings the components N13, N14 and the trough-shaped variant of P17 showed the highest short-term stability. Immediate changes of the amplitude proportions of subcomponents within the potential, i.e. a lack of uniformity in waveforms, have to be considered normal. Significant associations were found between the occurrence of components N14 and an arm length of more than 68 cm and between the appearance of a plateau configuration of P17 and an age of at least 40 years. Considering definite criteria the latency of P17 can be used as an additional reliable parameter. In cortical SEP recordings the combination of an initial V-shaped pattern and a following bifid W-configuration appeared as the most frequent waveform profile. All parts of the potential but the positive waves of the primary complex revealed a high intraindividual stability. PMID:2507276

  16. Short-Latency Median-Nerve Somatosensory-Evoked Potentials and Induced Gamma-Oscillations in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuda, Miho; Nishida, Masaaki; Juhasz, Csaba; Muzik, Otto; Sood, Sandeep; Chugani, Harry T.; Asano, Eishi

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that cortical gamma-oscillations are tightly linked with various forms of physiological activity. In the present study, the dynamic changes of intracranially recorded median-nerve somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) and somatosensory-induced gamma-oscillations were animated on a three-dimensional MR image, and the…

  17. Resuscitation therapy for traumatic brain injury-induced coma in rats: mechanisms of median nerve electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhen; Zhong, Ying-jun; Wang, Liang; Wei, Tian-qi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, rats were put into traumatic brain injury-induced coma and treated with median nerve electrical stimulation. We explored the wake-promoting effect, and possible mechanisms, of median nerve electrical stimulation. Electrical stimulation upregulated the expression levels of orexin-A and its receptor OX1R in the rat prefrontal cortex. Orexin-A expression gradually increased with increasing stimulation, while OX1R expression reached a peak at 12 hours and then decreased. In addition, after the OX1R antagonist, SB334867, was injected into the brain of rats after traumatic brain injury, fewer rats were restored to consciousness, and orexin-A and OXIR expression in the prefrontal cortex was downregulated. Our findings indicate that median nerve electrical stimulation induced an up-regulation of orexin-A and OX1R expression in the prefrontal cortex of traumatic brain injury-induced coma rats, which may be a potential mechanism involved in the wake-promoting effects of median nerve electrical stimulation. PMID:26170820

  18. Common iliac artery aneurysm presenting as acute sciatic nerve compression.

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, S. R.; Grimley, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    Aneurysms of the iliac arteries usually remain silent, but when they rupture the consequences can be dramatic. They produce few clinical signs suggestive of their presence. However, such aneurysms have been found to be the cause of non-vascular clinical situations. Often they present with features of compression on adjacent viscera. We present a case in which a large common iliac artery aneurysm was found to be causing symptoms of acute sciatic nerve compression. PMID:3447118

  19. A Rare Case of an Artery Passing through the Median Perforating Canal of the Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Joe; Watanabe, Koichi; Saga, Tsuyoshi; Tabira, Yoko; Yamaki, Koh-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Along with the popularization of dental implant surgery, there has been considerable research on the lingual foramen using cone-beam computed tomography. Anatomical research has also revealed that the arteries entering the lingual foramina are branches of the submental and sublingual arteries. There have been no reports, however, of the submental or sublingual artery entering the mandible from the lingual foramen, perforating it, and then distributing to the inferior labial region. A 69-year-old man who donated his body to our department in 2015 was dissected. The mandible with overlying soft tissue of the mental region was resected and examined with microcomputed tomography, which showed that the canal perforated from the lingual foramen to the midline of the labial cortical plate. The canal was thus named the median perforating canal. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no other reports of a perforating artery of the mandible, so this case is thought to be rare. Hence, the existence of perforating arteries, such as in the present case, should be taken into consideration in preoperative diagnoses such as for dental implant surgery. Thus, the fusion of anatomical and radiological study is useful and necessary to understand surgical anatomy. PMID:27213060

  20. Combined Cubital and Carpal Tunnel Release Results in Symptom Resolution Outside of the Median or Ulnar Nerve Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Chimenti, Peter C.; McIntyre, Allison W.; Childs, Sean M.; Hammert, Warren C.; Elfar, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resolution of symptoms including pain, numbness, and tingling outside of the median nerve distribution has been shown to occur following carpal tunnel release. We hypothesized that a similar effect would be found after combined release of the ulnar nerve at the elbow with simultaneous release of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel. Methods: 20 patients with combined cubital and carpal tunnel syndrome were prospectively enrolled. The upper extremity was divided into six zones and the location of pain, numbness, tingling, or strange sensations was recorded pre-operatively. Two-point discrimination, Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing, and validated questionnaires were collected pre-operatively and at six-week follow-up. Results: Probability of resolution was greater in the median nerve distribution than the ulnar nerve for numbness (71% vs. 43%), tingling (86% vs. 75%). Seventy percent of the cohort reported at least one extra-anatomic symptom pre-operatively, and greater than 80% of these resolved at early follow-up. There was a decrease in pain as measured by validated questionnaires. Conclusion: This study documents resolution of symptoms in both extra-ulnar and extra-median distributions after combined cubital and carpal tunnel release. Pre-operative patient counseling may therefore include the likelihood of symptomatic improvement in a non-expected nerve distribution after this procedure, assuming no other concomitant pathology which may cause persistent symptoms. Future studies could be directed at correlating pre-operative disease severity with probability of symptom resolution using a larger population. PMID:27347239

  1. Experimental study on nerve regeneration through the basement membrane tubes of the nerve, muscle, and artery.

    PubMed

    Itoh, S; Shinomiya, K; Samejima, H; Ohta, T; Ishizuki, M; Ichinose, S

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated neurotization after transplantation with lyophilized nerves, muscles, and arteries, and examined the possibility of practical application of long bridging grafts. Grafts of 10 mm and 25 mm of lyophilized nerves, muscles, and arteries harvested from Fisher rats were transplanted to the sciatic nerves of recipient Lewis rats. The histological changes undergone by short grafts were observed at weekly intervals. The sham-operated and isograft groups were used to compare the results of long grafts. In both the nerve and muscle-graft group, regenerated axons grew out through the residual basement membrane tube. But in the muscle graft group, phagocytosis of myofibril debris took longer than that of degenerated axons. No statistical differences were found between results of TSI, induced EMG, and quantitative analysis of myelinated axons in the nerve and muscle graft groups. No neurotization was noted in the long artery graft. In long grafts, laminin found on the basement membrane may not be sufficient to accelerate neurotization, and arteries should not be used for tubulization. PMID:9431514

  2. Prevalence of ulnar-to-median nerve motor fiber anastomosis (Riché-Cannieu communicating branch) in hand: An electrophysiological study

    PubMed Central

    Ahadi, Tannaz; Raissi, Gholam Reza; Yavari, Masood; Majidi, Lobat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Two main muscles studied in the hand for evaluation of median nerve injuries are opponens pollicis (OP) and abductor pollicis brevis (APB). However, Riché-Cannieu communicating branch (RCCB) may limit the use of these muscles in electrodiagnosis. This condition is confusing in the case of median nerve injuries. This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of RCCB. Methods: Twenty-three consecutive cases of complete median nerve injury were studied. Evoked responses via stimulation of median and ulnar nerves in the wrist and recording with needle in the thenar area were studied. Results: Of the patients, 82.6% exhibited RCCB. In 14 (60.8%) cases the OP and in 19(82.6%) cases APB was supplied by the ulnar nerve. Conclusion: RCCB was detected to be 60.8% in OP and 82.6% in APB, so OP is preferable to APB in the study of median nerve. PMID:27390694

  3. [Injury to the median nerve after minimally invasive decompression: discrepancy between the surgical report and actual course of surgery].

    PubMed

    Kernt, B; Neu, J

    2011-06-01

    A 72-year-old man suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome had undergone minimally invasive decompression by using a SafeGuard® Mini-Open Carpal Tunnel Release System. After the operation the patient presented with a paraesthesia in the median nerve distribution. Two months later an operative revision was performed in another hospital. A partial transection of the median nerve and an incomplete release was seen. The surgeon of the first operation stated that detailed informed consent including the risk of iatrogenic nerve injury had been obtained. Furthermore he referred to the operative report, which mentioned the accuracy of the procedure without any problems or complications during surgery. The Arbitration Board stated that the operative report could not exculpate the surgeon because the findings of the operative revision disagreed with the first operative report. The expert opinion declared that the lesion was a result of an inaccurate operative procedure as the surgeon was not able to demonstrate an anatomical variation of the median nerve. PMID:21604030

  4. The vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator for reconstruction of the inferior alveolar nerve defect.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Kenji; Hiroto, Saijo; Morooka, Shin; Kuwabara, Kaoru; Fujioka, Masaki

    2015-03-01

    The sural nerve has been described for nerve reconstruction of the maxillofacial region since it provides many advantages. We report a case of a vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator for immediate reconstruction after the removal of intraosseous neuroma originating in the inferior alveolar nerve. The patient had a neuroma caused by iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve. A 4-cm long neuroma existed in the inferior alveolar nerve and was resected. A peroneal perforator was chosen as the pedicle of the vascularized sural nerve graft for the nerve gap. The graft including the skin paddle for monitoring the perfusion supplied by this perforator was transferred to the lesion. The nerve gap between the two stumps of the inferior alveolar nerve was repaired using the 6-cm long vascularized sural nerve. The perforator of the peroneal artery was anastomosed to the branch of the facial artery in a perforator-to-perforator fashion. There was no need to sacrifice any main arteries. The skin paddle with 1 cm × 3 cm in size was inset into the incised medial neck. Perceptual function tests with a Semmes-Weinstein pressure esthesiometer and two-point discrimination in the lower lip and chin at 10 months after surgery showed recovery almost to the level of the normal side. This free vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator may be a good alternative for reconstruction of inferior alveolar nerve defects. PMID:25346479

  5. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy combined with schwannomas of the median and medial plantar nerves.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, Josef G; Dütsch, Matthias; Buslei, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    A 42-year-old woman was surgically treated for carpal tunnel syndrome, revealing schwannoma of the median nerve. A year later, she developed a tarsal tunnel syndrome. At time of this diagnosis, hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) was diagnosed genetically and a schwannoma of the medial plantar nerve was treated surgically. The occurrence of HNPP and schwannomas in the same patient might be purely coincidental, but it is tempting to speculate that they share a common genetic basis. PMID:16969831

  6. Median Nerve Injury Due to High-Pressure Water Jet Injection: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Emre, Ufuk; Unal, Aysun

    2009-08-01

    High-pressure injuries that occur accidentally are potentially destructive injuries that often affect the nondominant hands of young men. A variety of products such as paint, gasoline, grease, fuel oil, cement, thinner and solvents have been reported as destructive agents. High-pressure water jet injection injuries to soft tissues have rarely been reported. In this study, we present the first case of median nerve injury due to high-pressure water jet injection by a water spray gun. PMID:26815059

  7. Longitudinal design for sonographic measurement of median nerve swelling with controlled exposure to physical work using an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Roll, Shawn C.; Evans, Kevin D.; Volz, Kevin R.; Sommerich, Carolyn M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of a longitudinal design to sonographically measure swelling of the median nerve due to controlled exposure to a work task and to evaluate the relationship of changes in morphology to diagnostic standards. Fifteen macaca fascicularis pinched a lever in various wrist positions at a self-regulated pace (8 hours/day, 5 days/week, 18–20 weeks). Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and cross-sectional area (CSA) were obtained every two weeks from baseline through working and a 6-week recovery. Trending across all subjects showed that NCV slowed and CSA at the carpal tunnel increased in the working arm, while no changes were observed in CSA either at the forearm or for any measure in the non-working arm. There was a small negative correlation between NCV and CSA in the working arm. This study provides validation that swelling can be observed using a longitudinal design. Longitudinal human studies are needed to describe the trajectory of nerve swelling for early identification of median nerve pathology. PMID:24139197

  8. Characterization of tests of functional recovery after median and ulnar nerve injury and repair in the rat forelimb.

    PubMed

    Galtrey, Clare M; Fawcett, James W

    2007-03-01

    The majority of human peripheral nerve injuries occur in the upper limb but the majority of studies in the rat are performed in the hindlimb. The upper and lower limbs differ in dexterity and control by supraspinal systems, so an upper limb model is a better representation of the common form of human injury. The purpose of this study was to further develop a rat model involving lesions of the median and ulnar nerves. To produce different degrees of misdirection of axons following nerve repair, we studied nerve crush, cut and repair of the two nerves, and cut and repair with crossover. Assessment of functional recovery was performed using a battery of motor and sensory tests: the staircase test, which assesses skilled forepaw reaching; grip strength meter, which assesses grip strength; pawprint analysis, which assesses toe spread and print length; horizontal ladder, which assesses forepaw placement during skilled locomotion; modified Randall-Selitto device and electronic von Frey probes, which assess fine touch; and cold probes, which assess temperature sensation. All tests revealed deficits in forepaw function after nerve injury except the print length and modified Randall-Selitto device. The time course of functional recovery was observed over 15 weeks. The final degree of functional recovery achieved was related to the misdirection of axon regeneration. The tests that most clearly revealed the effects of axon misdirection on function were the skilled paw reaching and grip strength tests. The lesion model and functional tests that we have developed will be useful in testing therapeutic strategies for treating the consequences of inaccurate axon regeneration following peripheral nerve injury in humans. PMID:17374098

  9. Recurrent isolated abducens nerve paresis associated with persistent trigeminal artery variant.

    PubMed

    Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Mamada, Naomi; Shiigai, Masanari; Shimizu, Kotone; Koganezawa, Tadachika; Tamaoka, Akira

    2012-01-01

    We report a 74-year-old woman who presented with recurrent isolated abducens nerve paresis. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the right abducens nerve was sandwiched between the right internal carotid artery and a persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) variant, which might have led to neurovascular compression of the abducens nerve, resulting in abducens nerve damage. Normal variants of PTA, which are cerebellar arteries originating from a precavernous portion of the internal carotid artery, must be carefully observed as such variants can potentially cause a neurovascular compression of the abducens nerve. PMID:22892506

  10. Diagnostic value of median nerve ultrasonography for screening of carpal tunnel syndrome in hypothyroid patients: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Mirzaasgari, Zahra; Rohani, Mohammad; Safdarian, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common peripheral entrapment neuropathy in patients with hypothyroid. The diagnosis of CTS is usually clinical and confirmed by electrodiagnostic (EDX) procedures. This study aimed to describe the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution ultrasonography (US) as an alternative method to nerve conduction study (NCS) for the diagnosis of subclinical CTS in patients with hypothyroidism. Methods: Between April 2013 and November 2014, from the patients with the diagnosis of hypothyroidism referring to the institute of endocrinology and metabolism of Firoozgar Hospital, Tehran, Iran, those who met our inclusion criteria entered this cross-sectional study. The patients divided into two groups of subclinical CTS with the age- and gender-matched control group. US measurements of the median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA) in the CT inlet were compared with the NCS results as the gold standard diagnostic test. Results: A total number of 152 wrists of 76 hypothyroid patients were examined in this study. The mean of median nerve CSA at the tunnel inlet was 9.96 ± 2.20 mm2 for the CTS group and 7.08 ± 1.38 mm2 for the control group (P < 0.05). 31 wrists (20.4%) were diagnosed as CTS using NCS while US diagnosed 19 wrists (12.5%) as CTS. Using receiver-operating-characteristics analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of US at the diagnosis of CTS were 45.0 and 95.8%, respectively, with a median nerve CSA cutoff point of 9.8 mm2. Positive and negative predictive values of US were 87.2 and 85.5%, respectively, with a test accuracy of 85.5%. Conclusion: According to our findings, US has an acceptable diagnostic value to confirm CTS in hypothyroid patients. However, it may not replace NCS due to low sensitivity. PMID:27326360

  11. Changes in Clinical Symptoms, Functions, and the Median Nerve Cross-Sectional Area at the Carpal Tunnel Inlet after Open Carpal Tunnel Release

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Young-Do; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Shin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between clinical symptoms and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel inlet before and after open carpal tunnel release (CTR). Methods Thirty-two patients (53 hands) that underwent open CTR for idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome were prospectively enrolled. Median nerve CSA at the carpal tunnel inlet was measured preoperatively and at 2 and 12 weeks after CTR by high resolution ultrasonography. The Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire (BCTQ) was also completed at these times. Results BCTQ symptom (BCTQ-S) score was significantly improved at 2 weeks postoperatively, but BCTQ function (BCTQ-F) score and CSA were significantly improved at 12 weeks postoperatively. Preoperative CSA was significantly correlated with preoperative BCTQ-S and BCTQ-F scores but was not significantly correlated with postoperative BCTQ scores or postoperative changes in BCTQ scores. Postoperative median nerve CSA was not significantly correlated with postoperative BCTQ-S or BCTQ-F scores, and postoperative changes in median nerve CSA were not significantly correlated with postoperative changes in BCTQ-S or BCTQ-F scores. Conclusions The study shows clinical symptoms resolve rapidly after open CTR, but median nerve swelling and clinical function take several months to recover. In addition, preoperative median nerve swelling might predict preoperative severities of clinical symptoms and functional disabilities. However, postoperative reductions in median nerve swelling were not found to reflect postoperative reductions in clinical symptoms or functional disabilities. PMID:27583113

  12. Precision pinch performance in patients with sensory deficits of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Yen, Wei-Jang; Kuo, Yao-Lung; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Chen, Shu-Min; Kuan, Ta-Shen; Hsu, Hsiu-Yun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate how sensory symptoms impact the motor control of hands, in this study we examined the differences in conventional sensibility assessments and pinch force control in the pinch-holding-up activity (PHUA) test between carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients and healthy controls. CTS patients (n = 82) with 122 affected hands and an equal number of control subjects were recruited to participate in the threshold, discrimination, and PHUA tests. The patients showed significantly poorer hand sensibility and lower efficiency of force adjustment in the PHUA test as compared with the control subjects. Baseline pinch strength and the percentage of maximal pinch strength for the PHUA were significantly higher for the subgroup of sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) of <16 μV than for the subgroup of SNAP of 16 μV. Using a PHUA perspective to analyze the efficiency of force-adjustment could assist the clinical detection of sensory nerve dysfunction. PMID:24496877

  13. Sleep Deprivation Aggravates Median Nerve Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain and Enhances Microglial Activation by Suppressing Melatonin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Chiang, Rayleigh Ping-Ying; Chen, Chih-Li; Tsai, Yi-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep deprivation is common in patients with neuropathic pain, but the effect of sleep deprivation on pathological pain remains uncertain. This study investigated whether sleep deprivation aggravates neuropathic symptoms and enhances microglial activation in the cuneate nucleus (CN) in a median nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Also, we assessed if melatonin supplements during the sleep deprived period attenuates these effects. Design: Rats were subjected to sleep deprivation for 3 days by the disc-on-water method either before or after CCI. In the melatonin treatment group, CCI rats received melatonin supplements at doses of 37.5, 75, 150, or 300 mg/kg during sleep deprivation. Melatonin was administered at 23:00 once a day. Participants: Male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 180-250 g (n = 190), were used. Measurements: Seven days after CCI, behavioral testing was conducted, and immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for qualitative and quantitative analyses of microglial activation and measurements of proinflammatory cytokines. Results: In rats who underwent post-CCI sleep deprivation, microglia were more profoundly activated and neuropathic pain was worse than those receiving pre-CCI sleep deprivation. During the sleep deprived period, serum melatonin levels were low over the 24-h period. Administration of melatonin to CCI rats with sleep deprivation significantly attenuated activation of microglia and development of neuropathic pain, and markedly decreased concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusions: Sleep deprivation makes rats more vulnerable to nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, probably because of associated lower melatonin levels. Melatonin supplements to restore a circadian variation in melatonin concentrations during the sleep deprived period could alleviate nerve injury-induced behavioral hypersensitivity. Citation: Huang CT, Chiang RP, Chen CL, Tsai YJ. Sleep

  14. Enhancement of median nerve regeneration by mesenchymal stem cells engraftment in an absorbable conduit: improvement of peripheral nerve morphology with enlargement of somatosensory cortical representation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Julia T.; Bittencourt-Navarrete, Ruben Ernesto; de Almeida, Fernanda M.; Tonda-Turo, Chiara; Martinez, Ana Maria B.; Franca, João G.

    2014-01-01

    We studied the morphology and the cortical representation of the median nerve (MN), 10 weeks after a transection immediately followed by treatment with tubulization using a polycaprolactone (PCL) conduit with or without bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplant. In order to characterize the cutaneous representation of MN inputs in primary somatosensory cortex (S1), electrophysiological cortical mapping of the somatosensory representation of the forepaw and adjacent body parts was performed after acute lesion of all brachial plexus nerves, except for the MN. This was performed in ten adult male Wistar rats randomly assigned in three groups: MN Intact (n = 4), PCL-Only (n = 3), and PCL+MSC (n = 3). Ten weeks before mapping procedures in animals from PCL-Only and PCL+MSC groups, animal were subjected to MN transection with removal of a 4-mm-long segment, immediately followed by suturing a PCL conduit to the nerve stumps with (PCL+MSC group) or without (PCL-Only group) injection of MSC into the conduit. After mapping the representation of the MN in S1, animals had a segment of the regenerated nerve processed for light and transmission electron microscopy. For histomorphometric analysis of the nerve segment, sample size was increased to five animals per experimental group. The PCL+MSC group presented a higher number of myelinated fibers and a larger cortical representation of MN inputs in S1 (3,383 ± 390 fibers; 2.3 mm2, respectively) than the PCL-Only group (2,226 ± 575 fibers; 1.6 mm2). In conclusion, MSC-based therapy associated with PCL conduits can improve MN regeneration. This treatment seems to rescue the nerve representation in S1, thus minimizing the stabilization of new representations of adjacent body parts in regions previously responsive to the MN. PMID:25360086

  15. Carpal tunnel syndrome due to a plexiform neurofibroma of the median nerve in a neurofibromatosis type 1 patient: clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Daniel; Aido, Ricardo; Sousa, Marco; Costa, Luís; Oliveira, Vânia; Cardoso, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 56-year-old male patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) diagnosed during adolescence and with an insidious clinical evolution, characterised by an exuberant cutaneous involvement, referred to the orthopaedics outpatient clinic presenting with carpal tunnel syndrome secondary to a plexiform neurofibroma of the median nerve. A comprehensive clinical approach is discussed, considering the natural history of the disease and its potential complications, as well as the lack of consensus regarding standard therapeutic options for the compressive peripheral neuropathies in the NF1 disease. PMID:23853185

  16. Median Nerve Compression in Carpal Tunnel Caused by a Giant Lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Fazilleau, F.; Williams, T.; Richou, J.; Sauleau, V.; Le Nen, D.

    2014-01-01

    A lipoma is a common, benign soft-tissue tumor that rarely arises in the upper limb. When one does occur in the hand, the location of the lipoma can cause nerve compression, which can mimic carpal tunnel symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging is the visualization modality of choice for diagnosis and surgical planning of lipomas. Surgical resection is recommended to relieve the neurological manifestations of this disease. The surgeon should always suspect liposarcoma first before voluminous, atypical, or recurrent tumors are considered. PMID:24876983

  17. A single dose of lorazepam reduces paired-pulse suppression of median nerve evoked somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Stude, Philipp; Lenz, Melanie; Höffken, Oliver; Tegenthoff, Martin; Dinse, Hubert

    2016-05-01

    Paired-pulse behaviour in the somatosensory cortex is an approach to obtain insights into cortical processing modes and to obtain markers of changes of cortical excitability attributable to learning or pathological states. Numerous studies have demonstrated suppression of the response to the stimulus that follows a first one after a short interval, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive, although there is agreement that GABAergic mechanisms seem to play a crucial role. We therefore aimed to explore the influence of the GABAA agonist lorazepam on paired-pulse somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs). We recorded and analysed SEPs after paired median nerve stimulation in healthy individuals before and after they had received a single dose of 2.5 mg of lorazepam as compared with a control group receiving placebo. Paired-pulse suppression was expressed as a ratio of the amplitudes of the second and the first peaks. We found that, after lorazepam application, paired-pulse suppression of the cortical N20 component remained unchanged, but suppression of the N20-P25 complex was significantly reduced, indicative of GABAergic involvement in intracortical processing. Our data suggest that lorazepam most likely enhances inhibition within the cortical network of interneurons responsible for creating paired-pulse suppression, leading to reduced inhibitory drive with a subsequently reduced amount of suppression. The results provide further evidence that GABAA -mediated mechanisms are involved in the generation of median nerve evoked paired-pulse suppression. PMID:26929110

  18. Facial nerve palsy, Kawasaki disease, and coronary artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Robert C

    2015-09-01

    Kawasaki disease is rarely complicated by cranial nerve VII palsy. This report describes a 15-month-old female presenting with 3 days of fever, irritability, and rash who was subsequently diagnosed with Kawasaki disease and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. She was found to have mild coronary artery ectasia and developed an acute, transient, left-sided facial palsy on the sixth day of illness. Repeat echocardiography demonstrated worsening aneurysm and intravenous methylprednisolone was added to her treatment regimen. At 1 and 3 months post-discharge, echocardiography demonstrated resolution of her coronary aneurysm. This case makes 41 total described in the literature. Patients tend to be under 12-months-old and there is a higher association with coronary artery aneurysm in such patients compared to those without facial palsy who never even received treatment. Kawasaki disease associated with facial palsy may indicate increased inflammatory burden and patients may require additional anti-inflammatory agents and more vigilant echocardiography. PMID:26101056

  19. Schwannoma of the Median Nerve at the Wrist and Palmar Regions of the Hand: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kütahya, Harun; Güleç, Ali; Güzel, Yunus; Kacira, Burkay; Toker, Serdar

    2013-01-01

    Schwannomas are also known as neurolemmas that are usually originated from Schwann cells located in the peripheric nerve sheaths. They are the most common tumours of the hand (0.8–2%). They usually present solitary swelling along the course of the nerve however multiple lesions may be present in cases of NF type 1, familial neurofibromatosis, and sporadic schwannomatosis. Schwannomas are generally represented as an asymptomatic mass; however pain, numbness and fatigue may take place with the increasing size of the tumour. EMG (electromyelography), MRI (magnetic resonance imagination), and USG (ultrasound) are helpful in the diagnosis. Surgical removal is usually curative. In this paper, we present a 24-year-old male referred to our clinic for a lump located at the volar side of the left wrist and a lump located in his left palm and numbness at his 3rd and 4th fingers. Total excision was performed for both lesions. Histopathological examination of the masses revealed typical features of schwannoma. At the 6th-month followup the patient was symptom-free except for slight paresthesia of the 3rd and the 4th fingers. For our knowledge, this is the second case in the literature presenting wrist and palm involvement of the median nerve schwannoma. PMID:24062961

  20. Somatosensory evoked potentials in cervical spondylosis. Correlation of median, ulnar and posterior tibial nerve responses with clinical and radiological findings.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y L; Jones, S J

    1985-06-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) following median, ulnar and tibial nerve stimulation were recorded from sites over the shoulders, neck and scalp in 34 patients with cervical spondylosis. Twenty control subjects were matched for sex and age. Detailed clinical and radiological data were assembled, with particular attention to the sensory modalities impaired and the locus and severity of cord compression. The patients were divided clinically into 4 groups: combined myelopathy and radiculopathy (6 cases), myelopathy alone (15), radiculopathy (6) and neck pain (7). Four cases are described in detail. SEP abnormalities were strongly correlated with clinical myelopathy, but not with radiculopathy. Median and ulnar nerve responses were less often affected than tibial, even with myelopathy above C6 level. Tibial nerve SEP abnormalities were strongly correlated with posterior column signs on the same side of the body, but not with anterolateral column sensory signs. In myelopathy cases, the SEP examination appeared to be more sensitive to sensory pathway involvement than clinical sensory testing. SEP abnormalities were infrequent in cases of radiculopathy and neck pain, bearing no relation to the clinical locus of root lesions. Abnormal SEPs consistent with subclinical posterior column involvement, however, were recorded in 1 patient with radiculopathy and 2 with neck pain. Follow-up recordings made postoperatively in 7 myelopathy cases reflected the clinical course (improvement, deterioration or no change) in 4, but failed to reflect improvement in 3. The correlation of SEP findings with radiological data was generally poor. SEP abnormalities were detected in 6 out of 8 patients with clinical myelopathy but no radiological evidence of posterior cord compression, suggesting that impairment of the blood supply may be an important factor contributing to cord damage. An application for SEPs in the clinical management of cervical spondylosis may lie in the detection of

  1. [The impairment of A-delta fibers in median nerve compression at the wrist, using the cutaneous silent period].

    PubMed

    Duarte, Juan M; D'Onofrio, Héctor M; Rolón, Juan Ignacio; Bertotti, Alicia C

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel síndrome (CTS) is an entrapment neuropathy of the median nerve at the wrist, that leads to pain, paresthesia and painful dysesthesia. The electrophysiological diagnosis is based upon nerve conduction studies which evaluate thick nerve fibers. Our hypothesis is that there is an additional dysfunction of small fibers in CTS, which correlates with the degree of severity of the neuropathy. A retrospective study of 69 hands that belonged to 47 patients of both sexes (mean age 53.8, years, range 22-87) was performed, and, as a control group, 21 hands which corresponded to the asymptomatic side of those patients were evaluated. Motor and sensory conduction studies, as well as F-waves were performed to classify the neuropathy according to the degree of severity. Cutaneous silent period (CSP) was elicited in all hands. Mean onset latencies and durations of CSP were evaluated. Mean onset latencies were significantly prolonged in neuropathic hands (84.3 ± 16.3 msec) compared to asymptomatic hands (74.8 ± 11.6 msec) (p < 0.05). Mean latencies of the CSP were even prolonged (p < 0.05) in hands affected by a more severe neuropathy. In the 3 hands with most severe neuropathy, a CSP could not be elicited. In CTS an impairment of A-delta fibers was recorded through the CSP. The more severe the neuropathy is, the more impairment of A-delta fibers can be found. CSP may be assessed as a complement of motor and sensory nerve conduction studies in this neuropathy. PMID:27576280

  2. Fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the median nerve: A cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a three-year-old child: A case report and comprehensive literature review

    PubMed Central

    Senger, Jenna-Lynn; Classen, Dale; Bruce, Garth; Kanthan, Rani

    2014-01-01

    A three-year-old boy was investigated for inexplicable incessant crying. On examination, his left wrist was mildly swollen (three to four months) and sensitive. Exploration and carpal tunnel decompression of the left wrist with incisional biopsy was performed for the presence of a fusiform swelling intimately associated with the median nerve. Histopathology revealed the presence of enlarged nerve bundles admixed with mature fat cells and diffuse fibroblastic proliferation. Three months later, he underwent urgent contralateral carpal tunnel decompression for a similar presentation. The final diagnosis was bilateral fibrolipomatous hamartoma (FLH) of the median nerves causing acute bilateral compression neuropathy. FLH of the median nerve is an extremely unusual cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a young child presenting with ‘incessant crying’. A comprehensive review of FLH including epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, imaging, pathology, treatment and prognosis is discussed. PMID:25332651

  3. Intraoperative protection of cranial nerves and arteries by split silicone tube.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Kobayashi, S; Hongo, K; Oikawa, S

    1993-09-01

    The authors describe the usefulness of split silicone tubing to protect the cranial nerves and arteries during microneurosurgery. The inner diameter of the tube varied from 1.0 to 3.3 mm with a thickness of 0.125 mm. Application of the tube protects the nerves and arteries from mechanical trauma, electrical injury, and dryness. PMID:8413888

  4. The role of median nerve terminal latency index in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome in comparison with other electrodiagnostic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Khosrawi, Saeid; Chatraei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) considers the most common compression neuropathy, which nerve conduction studies (NCSs) used for its detection routinely and universally. This study was performed to determine the value of the median TLI and other NCS variables and to investigate their sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of CTS. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out among 100 hands of healthy volunteers and 50 hands of patients who had a positive history of paresthesia and numbness in upper extremities. Information including age, gender, and result of sensory and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), peak latency difference of median and ulnar nerves of fourth digit (M4-U4 peak latency difference), and TLI were recorded for analysis. Sensitivity and specificity of electro diagnostic parameters in the diagnosis of CTS was investigated. Results: Normal range of the median nerve TLI was 0.43 ± 0.077. There was no significant difference between two groups for MNCV means (P = 0. 45). Distal sensory latency and distal motor latency (DML) of median nerve and fourth digit median-ulnar peak latency differences (PM4-PU4) for CTS group was significantly higher (P < 0.001) and mean for sensory nerve conduction velocity was significantly higher in control group (P < 0.001). The most sensitive electrophysiological finding in CTS patients was median TLI (82%), but the most specific one was DML (98%). Conclusion: Although in early stages of CTS, we usually expect only abnormalities in the sensory studies, but TLI may better demonstrate the effect on median nerve motor fiber even in mild cases of CTS. PMID:27376049

  5. Complete Oculomotor Nerve Palsy Caused by Direct Compression of the Posterior Cerebral Artery.

    PubMed

    Jo, Yoon-Sik; Kim, Shin Kyoung; Kim, Dae Ho; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Na, Sang-Jun

    2015-07-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy frequently occurs because of external compression by an internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm and diabetes mellitus. In addition, pontine infarction, cavernous sinus tumors, demyelinating disease, and autoimmune disorder are well-known causes of oculomotor nerve palsy. However, cases of complete oculomotor nerve palsy by neurovascular conflicts presented with a sudden onset of clinical symptoms are extremely rare. We experienced a rare case of complete oculomotor nerve palsy because of direct vascular compression of the oculomotor nerve by the posterior cerebral artery. PMID:25939862

  6. A case of pancreatic cancer with concomitant median arcuate ligament syndrome treated successfully using an allograft arterial transposition

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Sebahattin; Ringe, Kristina I.; Boru, Cristian E.; Constantinica, Victor; Bektas, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    An association of pancreatic cancer and median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS) is a rare and challenging situation in terms of treatment. A 60-year-old man diagnosed with pancreatic cancer underwent laparotomy. A pancreaticoduodenectomy was planned, but during the resection part of the operation, a celiac artery stenosis was noticed. The patient was diagnosed with MALS causing almost total celiac artery occlusion, with no radiological solution. The patient was re-operated the next day, and an iliac artery allograft was used for aorta-proper hepatic artery reconstruction, concomitant with the total pancreaticoduodenectomy. Preoperative meticulous evaluation of vascular structures of the celiac trunk and its branches is important, especially in pancreatic surgery. A vascular allograft may be a lifesaving alternative when vascular reconstruction is necessary. PMID:26715412

  7. Assessment of the Kinetic Trajectory of the Median Nerve in the Wrist by High-Frequency Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Hsun; Hsieh, Mei-Yu; Su, Fong-Chin; Wang, Shyh-Hau

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is typically diagnosed by physical examination or nerve conduction measurements. With these diagnostics however it is difficult to obtain anatomical information in the carpal tunnel. To further improve the diagnosis of CTS, an attempt using 30 MHz high-frequency ultrasound to noninvasively detect the local anatomical structures and the kinetic trajectory of the median nerve (MN) in the wrist was explored. Measurements were performed on the right wrist of 14 asymptomatic volunteers. The kinetic trajectory of the MN corresponding to flexion (from 0° to 90°) and extension (from 90° to 0°) movements of the fingers were detected by a cross correlation-based motion tracking technique. The average displacements of the MN according to finger movements were measured to be 3.74 and 2.04 mm for male and female subjects, respectively. Moreover, the kinetic trajectory of the MN in both the ulnar-palmar and total directions generally follows a sigmoidal curve tendency. This study has verified that the use of high-frequency ultrasound imaging and a motion tracking technique to sensitively detect the displacement and kinetic trajectory of the MN for the assessment of CTS patients is feasible. PMID:24787637

  8. Assessment of the kinetic trajectory of the median nerve in the wrist by high-frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hsun; Hsieh, Mei-Yu; Su, Fong-Chin; Wang, Shyh-Hau

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is typically diagnosed by physical examination or nerve conduction measurements. With these diagnostics however it is difficult to obtain anatomical information in the carpal tunnel. To further improve the diagnosis of CTS, an attempt using 30 MHz high-frequency ultrasound to noninvasively detect the local anatomical structures and the kinetic trajectory of the median nerve (MN) in the wrist was explored. Measurements were performed on the right wrist of 14 asymptomatic volunteers. The kinetic trajectory of the MN corresponding to flexion (from 0° to 90°) and extension (from 90° to 0°) movements of the fingers were detected by a cross correlation-based motion tracking technique. The average displacements of the MN according to finger movements were measured to be 3.74 and 2.04 mm for male and female subjects, respectively. Moreover, the kinetic trajectory of the MN in both the ulnar-palmar and total directions generally follows a sigmoidal curve tendency. This study has verified that the use of high-frequency ultrasound imaging and a motion tracking technique to sensitively detect the displacement and kinetic trajectory of the MN for the assessment of CTS patients is feasible. PMID:24787637

  9. Ultrasound assessment of the median nerve: a biomarker that can help in setting a treat to target approach tailored for carpal tunnel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    El Miedany, Yasser; El Gaafary, Maha; Youssef, Sally; Ahmed, Ihab; Nasr, Annie

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is a valuable tool for confirming the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) as it enables the detection of changes in the median nerve shape and rule out anatomic variants as well as space-occupying lesions such as ganglion cysts or tenosynovitis. This work was carried out aiming at: 1. Ultrasonography assessment of the median nerve and its neurovascular blood-flow in CTS patients before and after management. 2. Verify the possibility of using baseline US parameters as a biomarker to predict likely outcomes and frame a treatment plan for CTS patients. 233 CTS subjects diagnosed based on clinical and electrophysiological (NCS) testing were included in this work. US measures at the tunnel inlet included: cross sectional area, flattening ratio and neural Power Doppler (PD) signals. Patients who had severe NCS outcomes or neurological deficit were referred for open surgical decompression; the remaining patients were given the choice of either conservative or surgical management. The main outcome variable was improvement >70% in CTS symptoms. Assessments were carried out at baseline, 1-week, 1-month and 6-months post treatment. Results revealed an inverse relation between the neural vasculature and CTS severity defined by NCS (r = - 0.648). In CTS cases treated conservatively, the US measures started to improve within 1-week, whereas in the surgically treated cohort there was an initial phase of post-operative nerve measures increase, before settling at 1-month time of follow-up. The risk of poor outcomes was significantly higher (RR 3.3) in patients with high median nerve flattening ratio. This risk was most marked in the cohort with nerve flattening associated with longer duration of illness (RR 4.3) and low PD signal (RR 4.1). The results revealed that in addition to the diagnostic value of US in CTS, the detection of increased median nerve neuro-vasculature has a good prognostic value as an indicator of early median nerve affection. PMID

  10. Perineural Dexmedetomidine as an Adjuvant Reduces the Median Effective Concentration of Lidocaine for Obturator Nerve Blocking: A Double-Blinded Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuechun; Sun, Jian; Zhuang, Xinqi; Lv, Guoyi; Li, Yize; Wang, Haiyun; Wang, Guolin

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that the addition of dexmedetomidine to local anesthetics can prolong peripheral nerve blocks; however, it is not known whether dexmedetomidine can reduce the quantity of local anesthetic needed. We hypothesized that adding dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to an obturator nerve block could reduce the median effective concentration of lidocaine. In this double-blinded randomized trial, 60 patients scheduled for elective transurethral resection of bladder tumors on the lateral wall were randomly divided into two groups: the control group (C group, n = 30) and the dexmedetomidine group (D group, n = 30). Two main branches of the obturator nerve (i.e., anterior and posterior) were identified using neural stimulation at the inguinal level, with only lidocaine used for the C group and 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine combined with lidocaine used for the D group. The median effective concentration was determined by an up-and-down sequential trial. The ratio of two consecutive concentrations was 1.2. The median effective concentration (95% confidence interval) of lidocaine was 0.57% (0.54%-0.62%) in the C group and 0.29% (0.28%-0.38%) in the D group. The median effective concentration of lidocaine was significantly lower in the D group than in the C group (p < 0.05). These results indicate that dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg) in combination with lidocaine for obturator nerve block decreases the median effective concentration of lidocaine. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02066727 PMID:27341450

  11. Sixth cranial nerve palsy caused by compression from a dolichoectatic vertebral artery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Thulborn, Keith; Curnyn, Kimberlee; Goodwin, James

    2005-06-01

    A 68-year-old man had an unremitting left sixth cranial nerve palsy immediately after completing a long bicycle trip. High-resolution (3 Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a dolichoectatic vertebral artery that compressed the left sixth cranial nerve against the belly of the pons at its root exit zone. It was postulated that increased blood flow in the vessel during the unusually prolonged aerobic exercise precipitated the palsy. Compressive palsies of cranial nerves caused by a dolichoectatic basilar artery have often been documented; compressive palsy caused by a dolichoectatic vertebral artery is less well-recognized. PMID:15937439

  12. Nerve growth factor facilitates redistribution of adrenergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic perivascular nerves injured by phenol in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Yokomizo, Ayako; Takatori, Shingo; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Goda, Mitsuhiro; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that nerve growth factor (NGF) facilitated perivascular sympathetic neuropeptide Y (NPY)- and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves injured by the topical application of phenol in the rat mesenteric artery. We also demonstrated that mesenteric arterial nerves were distributed into tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-, substance P (SP)-, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-containing nerves, which had axo-axonal interactions. In the present study, we examined the effects of NGF on phenol-injured perivascular nerves, including TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves, in rat mesenteric arteries in more detail. Wistar rats underwent the in vivo topical application of 10% phenol to the superior mesenteric artery, proximal to the abdominal aorta, under pentobarbital-Na anesthesia. The distribution of perivascular nerves in the mesenteric arteries of the 2nd to 3rd-order branches isolated from 8-week-old Wistar rats was investigated immunohistochemically using antibodies against TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves. The topical phenol treatment markedly reduced the density of all nerves in these arteries. The administration of NGF at a dose of 20µg/kg/day with an osmotic pump for 7 days significantly increased the density of all perivascular nerves over that of sham control levels. These results suggest that NGF facilitates the reinnervation of all perivascular nerves injured by phenol in small resistance arteries. PMID:26671004

  13. The effect of tendon excursion velocity on longitudinal median nerve displacement: differences between carpal tunnel syndrome patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Filius, Anika; Thoreson, Andrew R; Wang, Yuexiang; Passe, Sandra M; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2015-04-01

    The subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) is a viscoelastic structure connecting the median nerve (MN) and the flexor tendons in the carpal tunnel. Increased strain rates increases stiffness in viscoelastic tissues, and thereby its capacity to transfer shear load. Therefore, tendon excursion velocity may impact the MN displacement. In carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) the SSCT is fibrotic and may be ruptured, and this may affect MN motion. In this study, ultrasonography was performed on 14 wrists of healthy controls and 25 wrists of CTS patients during controlled finger motions performed at three different velocities. Longitudinal MN and tendon excursion were assessed using a custom speckle tracking algorithm and compared across the three different velocities. CTS patients exhibited significantly less MN motion than controls (p ≤ 0.002). While in general, MN displacement increased with increasing tendon excursion velocity (p ≤ 0.031). These findings are consistent with current knowledge of SSCT mechanics in CTS, in which in some patients the fibrotic SSCT appears to have ruptured from the tendon surface. PMID:25640903

  14. Diagnostic Significance of Ultrasonographic Measurements and Median-Ulnar Ratio in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Correlation with Nerve Conduction Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mesci, Nilgün; Çetinkaya, Yilmaz; Geler Külcü, Duygu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We determined the reliability of ultrasonography (US) measurements for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and their correlation with symptom duration and electrophysiology findings. We determined whether the ratio of the median-to-ulnar cross-sectional areas (CSAs) can support CTS diagnoses. Methods The pisiform CSA (CSApisiform), swelling ratio (SR), palmar bowing, and CSApisiform/ulnar CSA (CSAulnar) measurements made in two subgroups of CTS patients (having sensory affection alone or having both sensory and motor affection) were compared with controls. CSAulnar was measured in Guyon's canal at the level of most-protuberant portion of the pisiform bone. Results The values of all of the measured US parameters were higher in patients with CTS (n=50) than in controls (n=62). CSApisiform could be used to diagnose CTS of mild severity. All of the parameters were positively correlated with the distal latency of the compound muscle action potential, and all of them except for SR were negatively correlated with the sensory nerve conduction velocity. A CSApisiform/CSAulnar ratio of ≥1.79 had a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 76% for diagnosing CTS. Conclusions Only CSApisiform measurements were reliable for diagnosing early stages of CTS, and CSApisiform/CSAulnar had a lower diagnostic value for diagnosing CTS. PMID:27095524

  15. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the median nerve facilitates low motor cortex excitability in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Chung; Chuang, Yu-Fen; Yang, Hsiao-Chu; Hsu, Miao-Ju; Huang, Ying-Zu; Chang, Ya-Ju

    2015-02-01

    The neuromodulation of motor excitability has been shown to improve functional movement in people with central nervous system damage. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of peripheral neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) in motor excitability and its effects in people with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). This single-blind case-control study was conducted on young control (n=9), age-matched control (n=9), and SCA participants (n=9; 7 SCAIII and 2 sporadic). All participants received an accumulated 30 min of NMES (25 Hz, 800 ms on/800 ms off) of the median nerve. The central motor excitability, measured by motor evoked potential (MEP) and silent period, and the peripheral motor excitability, measured by the H-reflex and M-wave, were recorded in flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle before, during, and after the NMES was applied. The results showed that NMES significantly enhanced the MEP in all 3 groups. The silent period, H-reflex and maximum M-wave were not changed by NMES. We conclude that NMES enhances low motor excitability in patients with SCA and that the mechanism of the neuromodulation was supra-segmental. These findings are potentially relevant to the utilization of NMES for preparation of motor excitability. The protocol was registered at Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02103075). PMID:25434572

  16. Median nerve fascicle transfer versus ulnar nerve fascicle transfer to the biceps motor branch in C5-C6 and C5-C7 brachial plexus injuries: nonrandomized prospective study of 23 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Cho, Alvaro Baik; Paulos, Renata Gregorio; de Resende, Marcelo Rosa; Kiyohara, Leandro Yoshinobu; Sorrenti, Luiz; Wei, Teng Hsiang; Bolliger Neto, Raul; Mattar Júnior, Rames

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe whether the results of the median nerve fascicle transfer to the biceps are equivalent to the classical ulnar nerve fascicle transfer, in terms of elbow flexion strength and donor nerve morbidity. Twenty-five consecutive patients were operated between March 2007 and July 2013. The patients were divided into two groups. In Group 1 (n = 8), the patients received an ulnar nerve fascicle transfer to the biceps motor branch. In Group 2 (n = 15), the patients received a median nerve fascicle transfer to the biceps motor branch. Two patients with follow-up less than six months were excluded. Both groups were similar regarding age (P = 0.070), interval of injury (P = 0.185), and follow-up period (P = 0.477). Elbow flexion against gravity was achieved in 7 of 8 (87.5%) patients in Group 1, versus 14 of 15 (93.3%) patients in Group 2 (P = 1.000). The level of injury (C5-C6 or C5-C7) did not affect anti-gravity elbow flexion recovery in both the groups (P = 1.000). It was concluded that the median nerve fascicle transfer to the biceps is as good as the ulnar nerve fascicle transfer, even in C5-C7 injuries. PMID:24753064

  17. Repeatability and Minimal Detectable Change in Longitudinal Median Nerve Excursion Measures During Upper Limb Neurodynamic Techniques in a Mixed Population: A Pilot Study Using Musculoskeletal Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Philippe; Lamontagne, Martin; Higgins, Johanne; Gagnon, Dany H

    2015-07-01

    This study determined test-retest reliability and minimum detectable change in longitudinal median nerve excursion during upper limb neurodynamic tests (ULNTs). Seven participants with unilateral or bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome and 11 healthy participants were randomly tested with two ULNTs (i.e., tensioner and slider). Each ULNT was performed three times each at 45° and 90° of shoulder abduction on two separate visits. Video sequences of median nerve excursion, recorded by a physical therapist using ultrasound imaging, were quantified using computer software. The generalizability theory, encompassing a G-Study and a D-study, measured the dependability coefficient (Φ) along with standard error of measurement (SEM) accuracy and allowed various testing protocols to be proposed. The highest reliability (Φ = 0.84) and lowest minimal measurement error (SEM = 0.58 mm) of the longitudinal median nerve excursion were reached during the ULNT-slider performed with 45° of shoulder abduction and when measures obtained from three different image sequences recorded during a single visit were averaged. It is recommended that longitudinal median nerve excursion measures computed from three separate image sequences recorded during a single visit be averaged in clinical practice. Ideally, adding a second visit (six image sequences) is also suggested in research protocols. PMID:25868536

  18. The Prevalence of Anatomical Variations of the Median Nerve in the Carpal Tunnel: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Joyeeta; Vikse, Jens; Ramakrishnan, Piravin Kumar; Walocha, Jerzy A.; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective The course and branches of the median nerve (MN) in the wrist vary widely among the population. Due to significant differences in the reported prevalence of such variations, extensive knowledge on the anatomy of the MN is essential to avoid iatrogenic nerve injury. Our aim was to determine the prevalence rates of anatomical variations of the MN in the carpal tunnel and the most common course patterns and variations in its thenar motor branch (TMB). Study Design A systematic search of all major databases was performed to identify articles that studied the prevalence of MN variations in the carpal tunnel and the TMB. No date or language restrictions were set. Extracted data was classified according to Lanz's classification system: variations in the course of the single TMB—extraligamentous, subligamentous, and transligamentous (type 1); accessory branches of the MN at the distal carpal tunnel (type 2); high division of the MN (type 3); and the MN and its accessory branches proximal to the carpal tunnel (type 4). Pooled prevalence rates were calculated using MetaXL 2.0. Results Thirty-one studies (n = 3918 hands) were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence rates of the extraligamentous, subligamentous, and transligamentous courses were 75.2% (95%CI:55.4%-84.7%), 13.5% (95%CI:3.6%-25.7%), and 11.3% (95%CI:2.4%-23.0%), respectively. The prevalence of Lanz group 2, 3, and 4 were 4.6% (95%CI:1.6%-9.1%), 2.6% (95%CI:0.1%-2.8%), and 2.3% (95%CI:0.3%-5.6%), respectively. Ulnar side of branching of the TMB was found in 2.1% (95%CI:0.9%-3.6%) of hands. The prevalence of hypertrophic thenar muscles over the transverse carpal ligament was 18.2% (95%CI:6.8%-33.0%). A transligamentous course of the TMB was more commonly found in hands with hypertrophic thenar muscles (23.4%, 95%CI:5.0%-43.4%) compared to those without hypertrophic musculature (1.7%, 95%CI:0%-100%). In four studies (n = 423 hands), identical bilateral course of the TMB was

  19. Transverse Movement of the Median Nerve in the Carpal Tunnel during Wrist and Finger Motion in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nanno, Mitsuhiko; Sawaizumi, Takuya; Kodera, Norie; Tomori, Yuji; Takai, Shinro

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral compression neuropathy of the upper extremity. Repetitive wrist and finger motion has been suggested as a major factor of pathogenesis of CTS. However, little is known about the pathomechanics of CTS. We aimed to evaluate the movement of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel during wrist and finger motions using transverse ultrasound in 21 patients with CTS (5 men and 16 women with mean age 69.0 years). We examined quantitatively the median nerve location as a coordinate within the carpal tunnel at varied wrist positions with all fingers full extension and flexion respectively in the affected and unaffected sides. We thus found that at all wrist positions during finger motion, the median nerve moved significantly more ulnopalmarly in the affected side compared to the unaffected side (p < 0.05). Especially, at the wrist palmar-flexion position as a provocative test, the nerve moved significantly (p < 0.05) the most ulnopalmarly among all wrist positions in the affected side. The nerve was the most strongly compressed against the transverse carpal ligament by the flexor tendons. Additionally, the displacement amount of the nerve in the dorsal-palmar direction was significantly smaller in the affected side than in the unaffected side. These findings indicate that such a pattern of nerve movement has the potential to distinguish affected from unaffected individuals. This ultrasound information could be useful in better understanding of the pathomechanics of CTS, and in further improvement of diagnosis and treatment for CTS. PMID:26133190

  20. Topography of human ankle joint: focused on posterior tibial artery and tibial nerve.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deog-Im; Kim, Yi-Suk; Han, Seung-Ho

    2015-06-01

    Most of foot pain occurs by the entrapment of the tibial nerve and its branches. Some studies have reported the location of the tibial nerve; however, textbooks and researches have not described the posterior tibial artery and the relationship between the tibal nerve and the posterior tibial artery in detail. The purpose of this study was to analyze the location of neurovascular structures and bifurcations of the nerve and artery in the ankle region based on the anatomical landmarks. Ninety feet of embalmed human cadavers were examined. All measurements were evaluated based on a reference line. Neurovascular structures were classified based on the relationship between the tibial nerve and the posterior tibial artery. The bifurcation of arteries and nerves were expressed by X- and Y-coordinates. Based on the reference line, 9 measurements were examined. The most common type I (55.6%), was the posterior tibial artery located medial to the tibial nerve. Neurovascular structures were located less than 50% of the distance between M and C from M at the reference line. The bifurcation of the posterior tibial artery was 41% in X-coordinate, -38% in Y-coordinate, and that of the tibial nerve was 48%, and -10%, respectively. Thirteen measurements and classification showed statistically significant differences between both sexes (P<0.05). It is determined the average position of neurovascular structures in the human ankle region and recorded the differences between the sexes and amongst the populations. These results would be helpful for the diagnosis and treatment of foot pain. PMID:26140224

  1. [Spontaneous dissection of the internal carotid artery: description of a case with lower cranial nerve palsy].

    PubMed

    Macarini, Luca; Zeppa, Pio; Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Scialpi, Michele; Raucci, Antonio

    2012-11-01

    Spontaneous dissection of the extracranial internal carotid artery is a well recognized cause of headache and juvenile stroke; lower cranial nerve palsy as a complication of dissection is rare. We report the case of a female patient with bilateral dissecting aneurysm of the internal carotid artery, associated with unilateral cranial nerve XII palsy and oculosympathetic palsy. Neuroradiological findings, in particular those obtained by Magnetic Resonance imaging, allow the identification of the dissecting pathology and the correlation of the aneurysmal formation with nerve palsy. PMID:23096747

  2. Dissecting aneurysm of vertebral artery manifestating as contralateral abducens nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Sue; Lee, Sang Hyung; Son, Young-Je; Chung, Young Seob

    2013-03-01

    Isolated abducens nerve paresis related to ruptured vertebral artery (VA) aneurysm is rare. It usually occurs bilaterally or ipsilaterally to the pathologic lesions. We report the case of a contralateral sixth nerve palsy following ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. A 38-year-old man was admitted for the evaluation of a 6-day history of headache. Abnormalities were not seen on initial computed tomography (CT). On admission, the patient was alert and no signs reflecting neurologic deficits were noted. Time of flight magnetic resonance angiography revealed a fusiform dilatation of the right VA involving origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient suddenly suffered from severe headache with diplopia the day before the scheduled cerebral angiography. Neurologic examination disclosed nuchal rigidity and isolated left abducens nerve palsy. Emergent CT scan showed high density in the basal and prepontine cistern compatible with ruptured aneurismal hemorrhage. Right vertebral angiography illustrated a right VA dissecting aneurysm with prominent displaced vertebrobasilar artery to inferiorly on left side. Double-stent placement was conducted for the treatment of ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. No diffusion restriction signals were observed in follow-up magnetic resonance imaging of the brain stem. Eleven weeks later, full recovery of left sixth nerve palsy was documented photographically. In conclusion, isolated contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with ruptured VA aneurysm may develop due to direct nerve compression by displaced verterobasilar artery triggered by primary thick clot in the prepontine cistern. PMID:23634273

  3. Aligned Nanofibers for Regenerating Arteries, Nerves, and Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClendon, Mark Trosper

    annular gap containing PA solution with a rotating rod. Using the shear aligning properties of PA solutions this rotating surface in contact with the PA solution induced a high degree of alignment in the nanofibers which was subsequently locked in place by introducing gelating calcium ions. again say something about what this fabrication procedure entails Cells encapsulated within these tubes responded to the alignment by extending in the circumferential direction mimicking the same cellular alignment observed in native arteries. A similar design strategy was also used to align nanofibers within the core of biopolymer nerve conduits, and these scaffolds were implanted in a rat sciatic nerve model. Histological and behavioral observations confirmed that PA implants sustained regeneration rates comparable to autologous grafts and significantly better than empty biopolymer grafts. Furthermore, these nanofiber gels were used as a vehicle to deliver stem cells into muscle tissue. A specialized injector was designed to introduce aligned PA gels into mouse leg muscles in a 1cm long channel. Bioluminescence and histology showed that stem cell engraftment into myofibers was greatly enhanced when delivered by PA gels compared to saline solution. The final section of this thesis describes a new series of PA molecules designed to degrade upon exposure to UV lightstate here why is this of interest in the context of the work described in the thesis. This was done to understand the degradation behavior of PA nanofibers and provide a controlled approach to changing the rheological properties post gelation.The three PA molecules in this series contained the same peptide sequence V3A3E3, while varying the location of a nitrobenzyl UV-reactive group along the backbone of the molecule. This system allowed for a quick reaction that cleaves the molecule at the reactive nitrobenzyl site without introducing any other reactive molecules. While all three molecules produced nanofibers that remained

  4. Effects of 90 min of manual repetitive work on skin temperature and median and ulnar nerve conduction parameters: a pilot study in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Bonfiglioli, Roberta; Mussoni, Patrizia; Graziosi, Francesca; Calabrese, Monica; Farioli, Andrea; Marinelli, Francesco; Violante, Francesco S

    2013-02-01

    To test whether the influence of manual activity should be considered when interpreting the results of nerve conduction study (NCS) of the upper limbs performed during work shifts, we evaluated the short-term effect of 90-min repetitive manual work on NCS parameters. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers underwent NCS of the dominant limb at the end of an interview (T(0)), after a 30-min rest in sitting position (T(1)) and after performing a standardized 90-min manual task (T(2)). The task was designed to simulate typical assembly and packing activities. No significant differences were observed for skin temperature (Ts) and NCS parameters between T(0) and T(1). Significantly (p < 0.001) higher Ts mean values were found at T(2) as compared to the previous tests for both females and males. The regression analysis showed an association between temperature variation and nerve conduction velocity values for the median and ulnar nerve at T(2) as compared to T(1). In females, a reduction of the mean sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitude at T(2) was recorded, whereas an opposite trend was observed among males. Manual work is able to influence hand Ts and to modify NCS parameters. SNAP amplitudes changes suggest gender differences in peripheral nerve characteristics that deserve further investigation. PMID:23063257

  5. Tail arteries from chronically spinalized rats have potentiated responses to nerve stimulation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Melanie; McLachlan, Elspeth M; Brock, James A

    2004-01-01

    Patients with severe spinal cord lesions that damage descending autonomic pathways generally have low resting arterial pressure but bladder or colon distension or unheeded injuries may elicit a life-threatening hypertensive episode. Such episodes (known as autonomic dysreflexia) are thought to result from the loss of descending baroreflex inhibition and/or plasticity within the spinal cord. However, it is not clear whether changes in the periphery contribute to the exaggerated reflex vasoconstriction. The effects of spinal transection at T7–8 on nerve- and agonist-evoked contractions of the rat tail artery were investigated in vitro. Isometric contractions of arterial segments were recorded and responses of arteries from spinalized animals (‘spinalized arteries’) and age-matched and sham-operated controls were compared. Two and eight weeks after transection, nerve stimulation at 0.1–10 Hz produced contractions of greater force and duration in spinalized arteries. At both stages, the α-adrenoceptor antagonists prazosin (10 nm) and idazoxan (0.1 μm) produced less blockade of nerve-evoked contraction in spinalized arteries. Two weeks after transection, spinalized arteries were supersensitive to the α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine, and the α2-adrenoceptor agonist, clonidine, but 8 weeks after transection, spinalized arteries were supersensitive only to clonidine. Contractions of spinalized arteries elicited by 60 mm K+ were larger and decayed more slowly at both stages. These findings demonstrate that spinal transection markedly increases nerve-evoked contractions and this can, in part, be accounted for by increased reactivity of the vascular smooth muscle to vasoconstrictor agents. This hyper-reactivity may contribute to the genesis of autonomic dysreflexia in patients. PMID:14766944

  6. Aligned Nanofibers for Regenerating Arteries, Nerves, and Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClendon, Mark Trosper

    annular gap containing PA solution with a rotating rod. Using the shear aligning properties of PA solutions this rotating surface in contact with the PA solution induced a high degree of alignment in the nanofibers which was subsequently locked in place by introducing gelating calcium ions. again say something about what this fabrication procedure entails Cells encapsulated within these tubes responded to the alignment by extending in the circumferential direction mimicking the same cellular alignment observed in native arteries. A similar design strategy was also used to align nanofibers within the core of biopolymer nerve conduits, and these scaffolds were implanted in a rat sciatic nerve model. Histological and behavioral observations confirmed that PA implants sustained regeneration rates comparable to autologous grafts and significantly better than empty biopolymer grafts. Furthermore, these nanofiber gels were used as a vehicle to deliver stem cells into muscle tissue. A specialized injector was designed to introduce aligned PA gels into mouse leg muscles in a 1cm long channel. Bioluminescence and histology showed that stem cell engraftment into myofibers was greatly enhanced when delivered by PA gels compared to saline solution. The final section of this thesis describes a new series of PA molecules designed to degrade upon exposure to UV lightstate here why is this of interest in the context of the work described in the thesis. This was done to understand the degradation behavior of PA nanofibers and provide a controlled approach to changing the rheological properties post gelation.The three PA molecules in this series contained the same peptide sequence V3A3E3, while varying the location of a nitrobenzyl UV-reactive group along the backbone of the molecule. This system allowed for a quick reaction that cleaves the molecule at the reactive nitrobenzyl site without introducing any other reactive molecules. While all three molecules produced nanofibers that remained

  7. Ruptured aneurysm at the origin of the median artery of the corpus callosum associated with accessory middle cerebral artery--case report.

    PubMed

    Yanaka, K; Shirai, S; Shibata, Y; Nose, T

    2000-10-01

    A 62-year-old male presented with ruptured anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm manifesting as severe headache associated with the rare combination of median artery of the corpus callosum (MACC) and accessory middle cerebral artery (MCA). Computed tomography demonstrated diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage. Left carotid angiography demonstrated an anomalous vessel originating from the ACoA complex and passing forward in the interhemispheric fissure between the two companion A2 segments. This vessel was identified as the MACC. Another anomalous vessel originated from the left A1-A2 segment and passed into the sylvian fissure. This vessel was identified as the accessory MCA. Left frontotemporal craniotomy was performed to clip the neck of the aneurysm. After identifying both A1 and A2 segments, accessory MCA, and the MACC, the aneurysm neck was occluded successfully. The ACoA complex is one of the most frequent sites of vascular anomalies. Preoperative and intraoperative care is required to identify the presence of anomalies of the ACoA complex prior to clip placement, to avoid accidental damage or clipping, which may result in severe neurological deficits. PMID:11098636

  8. Nicotine facilitates reinnervation of phenol-injured perivascular adrenergic nerves in the rat mesenteric resistance artery.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Shingo; Fujiwara, Hidetoshi; Hagimori, Kenta; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Yokomizo, Ayako; Takayama, Fusako; Tangsucharit, Panot; Ono, Nobufumi; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2015-02-01

    Nicotine has been shown to have neuroprotective and neurotrophic actions in the central nervous system. To elucidate the peripheral neurotrophic effects of nicotine, we determined whether nicotine affected the reinnervation of mesenteric perivascular nerves following a topical phenol treatment. A topical phenol treatment was applied to the superior mesenteric artery proximal to the abdominal aorta in Wistar rats. We examined the immunohistochemistry of the distal small arteries 7 days after the treatment. The topical phenol treatment markedly reduced the density of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-LI and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-LI fibers in these arteries. The administration of nicotine at a dose of 3 mg/kg/day (1.5 mg/kg/injection, twice a day), but not once a day or its continuous infusion using a mini-pump significantly increased the density of TH-LI nerves without affecting CGRP-LI nerves. A pretreatment with nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists hexamethonium, mecamylamine, and methyllycaconitine, but not dextrometorphan, canceled the TH-LI nerve reinnervation induced by nicotine. Nicotine significantly increased NGF levels in the superior cervical ganglia (SCG) and mesenteric arteries, but not in the dorsal root ganglia, and also up-regulated the expression of NGF receptors (TrkA) in the SCG, which were canceled by hexamethonium. These results suggested that nicotine exhibited neurotrophic effects that facilitated the reinnervation of adrenergic TH-LI nerves by activating α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and NGF in the SCG. PMID:25514605

  9. Brachial artery perforator-based propeller flap coverage for prevention of readhesion after ulnar nerve neurolysis.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Hirotake; Motomiya, Makoto; Sakurai, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Dai; Funakoshi, Tadanao; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2015-02-01

    It is difficult for most plastic and orthopaedic surgeons to treat nerve dysfunction related to neural adhesion because the pathophysiology and suitable treatment have not been clarified. In the current report, we describe our experience of surgical treatment for adhesive ulnar neuropathy. A 58-year-old male complained of pain radiating to the ulnar nerve-innervated area during elbow and wrist motion caused by adhesive ulnar neuropathy after complex open trauma of the elbow joint. The patient obtained a good clinical outcome by surgical neurolysis of the ulnar nerve combined with a brachial artery perforator-based propeller flap to cover the soft tissue defect after resection of the scar tissue and to prevent readhesion of the ulnar nerve. This flap may be a useful option for ulnar nerve coverage after neurolysis without microvascular anastomosis in specific cases. PMID:25088214

  10. Resolution of third nerve palsy despite persistent aneurysmal mass effect after flow diversion embolization of posterior communicating artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Binyamin, Tamar R; Dahlin, Brian C; Waldau, Ben

    2016-09-01

    Posterior communicating artery (PCOM) aneurysms may cause third nerve palsies. The optimal treatment with clipping versus coiling remains controversial. Here we report on two cases of resolution of third nerve palsy after flow diversion embolization of large and giant PCOM aneurysms without adjuvant coil placement. The resolution of third nerve palsy was not preceded by significant shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac on MRI. However, one patient showed resolution of T2-weighted signal abnormalities in the midbrain and mesial temporal lobe despite a similar size of the aneurysm. Therefore, flow diversion embolization of a PCOM aneurysm may resolve oculomotor nerve palsies through decreasing arterial pulsations against the nerve or midbrain. PMID:27183957

  11. Multidimensional ultrasound imaging of the wrist: Changes of shape and displacement of the median nerve and tendons in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Filius, Anika; Scheltens, Marjan; Bosch, Hans G; van Doorn, Pieter A; Stam, Henk J; Hovius, Steven E R; Amadio, Peter C; Selles, Ruud W

    2015-09-01

    Dynamics of structures within the carpal tunnel may alter in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) due to fibrotic changes and increased carpal tunnel pressure. Ultrasound can visualize these potential changes, making ultrasound potentially an accurate diagnostic tool. To study this, we imaged the carpal tunnel of 113 patients and 42 controls. CTS severity was classified according to validated clinical and nerve conduction study (NCS) classifications. Transversal and longitudinal displacement and shape (changes) were calculated for the median nerve, tendons and surrounding tissue. To predict diagnostic value binary logistic regression modeling was applied. Reduced longitudinal nerve displacement (p≤ 0.019), increased nerve cross-sectional area (p≤ 0.006) and perimeter (p≤ 0.007), and a trend of relatively changed tendon displacements were seen in patients. Changes were more convincing when CTS was classified as more severe. Binary logistic modeling to diagnose CTS using ultrasound showed a sensitivity of 70-71% and specificity of 80-84%. In conclusion, CTS patients have altered dynamics of structures within the carpal tunnel. PMID:25865180

  12. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Assessment with Ultrasonography: Value of Inlet-to-Outlet Median Nerve Area Ratio in Patients versus Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Zhu, Jiaan; Ye, Dongmei; Feng, Xianxuan; Xu, Yiming; Wang, Gang; Bai, Yuehong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic value of the Inlet-to-outlet median nerve area ratio (IOR) in patients with clinically and electrophysiologically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods Forty-six wrists in 46 consecutive patients with clinical and electrodiagnostic evidence of CTS and forty-four wrists in 44 healthy volunteers were examined with ultrasonography. The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve was measured at the carpal tunnel inlet (the level of scaphoid-pisiform) and outlet (the level of the hook of the hamate), and the IOR was calculated for each wrist. Ultrasonography and electrodiagnostic tests were performed under blinded conditions. Electrodiagnostic testing combined with clinical symptoms were considered to be the gold standard test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the diagnostic value between the inlet CSA and IOR. Results The study population included 16 men and 30 women (mean age, 45.3 years; range, 18–83 years). The control population included 18 men and 26 women (mean age, 50.4 years; range, 18–79 years). The mean inlet CSA was 8.7 mm2 in healthy controls and 14.6mm2 in CTS group (P<0.001). The mean IOR in healthy volunteers (1.0) was smaller than that in patients (1.6, P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed a diagnostic advantage to using the IOR rather than the inlet CSA (P<0.01). An IOR cutoff value of ≥ 1.3 would yield 93% specificity and 91% sensitivity in the diagnosis of CTS. Conclusion The IOR of median nerve area promises to be an effective means in the diagnosis of CTS. A large-scale, randomized controlled trial is required to determine how and when this parameter will be used. PMID:25617835

  13. Anterior shoulder dislocation with axillary artery and nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Razif, M A Mohamed; Rajasingam, V

    2002-12-01

    We report a rare case of left axillary artery injury associated with anterior dislocation of the left shoulder in a 25 yrs old male as a result of a road traffic accident. The shoulder dislocation was reduced. A left upper limb angiogram showed an obstructed left axillary artery. The obstructed segment was surgically reconstructed with a Dacron graft. Six months post operation in follow up, he was found to have good left shoulder function and no neurovascular deficit. This is an injury that could have been easily missed without a simple clinical examination. PMID:12733178

  14. Serious axillary nerve injury caused by subscapular artery compression resulting from use of backpacks.

    PubMed

    Haninec, Pavel; Mencl, Libor; Bačinský, Peter; Kaiser, Radek

    2013-12-01

    A palsy of the brachial plexus elements caused by carrying a heavy backpack is a very rare injury usually occurring in soldiers or hikers, and recovery is usually spontaneous. We describe here the case of male civilian presenting with an isolated serious axillary nerve palsy associated with chronic backpack use. During the surgery, a dumbbell-shaped neuroma-in-continuity was found which was caused by direct pressure from the subscapular artery. After resection of the neuroma, a nerve graft from the sural nerve was used to reconstruct the nerve. Reinnervation was successful and the patient was able to abduct his arm to its full range, with full muscle strength, within 24 months. PMID:23696291

  15. Afferent fibres from pulmonary arterial baroreceptors in the left cardiac sympathetic nerve of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, K.; Sakanashi, M.; Takenaka, F.

    1974-01-01

    1. Afferent discharges were recorded from the left cardiac sympathetic nerve or the third sympathetic ramus communicans of anaesthetized cats. Twenty-one single units with baroreceptor activity were obtained. 2. The receptors of each unit were localized to the extrapulmonary part of the pulmonary artery, determined by direct mechanical probing of the wall of the pulmonary artery after death of the animals. Conduction velocity of the fibres ranged from 2·5 to 15·7 m/sec. 3. Afferent discharges occurred irregularly under artificial ventilation. The impulse activity was increased when pulmonary arterial pressure was raised by an intravenous infusion of Locke solution, or by occlusion of lung roots, and decreased by bleeding the animal from the femoral artery. 4. Above a threshold pressure, discharges occurred synchronously with the systolic pressure pulse in the pulmonary artery. A progressive further rise in pressure did not produce an increase in the number of impulses per heart beat. Occlusion of lung roots initially elicited a burst of discharges but the number of impulses for each cardiac cycle gradually decreased. 5. The receptors responded to repetitive mechanical stimuli up to a frequency of 10/sec, but failed to respond to stimuli delivered at 20/sec. 6. The results provide further evidence for the presence of afferent fibres in the cardiac sympathetic nerve. These afferent fibres are likely to provide the spinal cord with specific information only on transient changes in pulmonary arterial pressure. PMID:4850456

  16. Isometric handgrip training reduces arterial pressure at rest without changes in sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carrasco, D. I.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether isometric handgrip (IHG) training reduces arterial pressure and whether reductions in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) mediate this drop in arterial pressure. Normotensive subjects were assigned to training (n = 9), sham training (n = 7), or control (n = 8) groups. The training protocol consisted of four 3-min bouts of IHG exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) separated by 5-min rest periods. Training was performed four times per week for 5 wk. Subjects' resting arterial pressure and heart rate were measured three times on 3 consecutive days before and after training, with resting MSNA (peroneal nerve) recorded on the third day. Additionally, subjects performed IHG exercise at 30% of MVC to fatigue followed by muscle ischemia. In the trained group, resting diastolic (67 +/- 1 to 62 +/- 1 mmHg) and mean arterial pressure (86 +/- 1 to 82 +/- 1 mmHg) significantly decreased, whereas systolic arterial pressure (116 +/- 3 to 113 +/- 2 mmHg), heart rate (67 +/- 4 to 66 +/- 4 beats/min), and MSNA (14 +/- 2 to 15 +/- 2 bursts/min) did not significantly change following training. MSNA and cardiovascular responses to exercise and postexercise muscle ischemia were unchanged by training. There were no significant changes in any variables for the sham training and control groups. The results indicate that IHG training is an effective nonpharmacological intervention in lowering arterial pressure.

  17. Pudendal Nerve and Internal Pudendal Artery Damage May Contribute to Radiation-Induced Erectile Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Michael W.; Marolf, Angela J.; Ehrhart, E.J.; Rao, Sangeeta; Kraft, Susan L.; Engel, Stephanie; Yoshikawa, Hiroto; Golden, Anne E.; Wasserman, Todd H.; LaRue, Susan M.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose/Objectives: Erectile dysfunction is common after radiation therapy for prostate cancer; yet, the etiopathology of radiation-induced erectile dysfunction (RI-ED) remains poorly understood. A novel animal model was developed to study RI-ED, wherein stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was used to irradiate the prostate, neurovascular bundles (NVB), and penile bulb (PB) of dogs. The purpose was to describe vascular and neurogenic injuries after the irradiation of only the NVB or the PB, and after irradiation of all 3 sites (prostate, NVB, and PB) with varying doses of radiation. Methods and Materials: Dogs were treated with 50, 40, or 30 Gy to the prostate, NVB, and PB, or 50 Gy to either the NVB or the PB, by 5-fraction SBRT. Electrophysiologic studies of the pudendal nerve and bulbospongiosus muscles and ultrasound studies of pelvic perfusion were performed before and after SBRT. The results of these bioassays were correlated with histopathologic changes. Results: SBRT caused slowing of the systolic rise time, which corresponded to decreased arterial patency. Alterations in the response of the internal pudendal artery to vasoactive drugs were observed, wherein SBRT caused a paradoxical response to papaverine, slowing the systolic rise time after 40 and 50 Gy; these changes appeared to have some dose dependency. The neurofilament content of penile nerves was also decreased at high doses and was more profound when the PB was irradiated than when the NVB was irradiated. These findings are coincident with slowing of motor nerve conduction velocities in the pudendal nerve after SBRT. Conclusions: This is the first report in which prostatic irradiation was shown to cause morphologic arterial damage that was coincident with altered internal pudendal arterial tone, and in which decreased motor function in the pudendal nerve was attributed to axonal degeneration and loss. Further investigation of the role played by damage to these structures in RI-ED is

  18. Low-energy laser action on median and radial nerve post-traumatic lesion after surgical suture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipa, Ciprian; Bunila, Daniela; Crangulescu, Nicolae; Nacu, Mihaela; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.; Stanciulescu, Viorica; Vasiliu, Virgil V.

    1996-01-01

    The low energy laser (LEL) biostimulatory effects on nervous tissue regeneration are well known. Thirty two patients with medial and/or radial nerve traumatic forearm lesion after surgical suture were divided into two groups: A-18 patients were treated with LEL; B-14 patients, witness, were treated with placebo lasers and classical medical and physical therapy. Lasers used were: HeNe, 632.5 nm wavelength, 2 mW power, and GaAlAs diode laser, 880 nm wavelength, pulsed emission with an output power 2 mW. Before, during, and after treatment EMG was done in order to measure objectively the efficiency of the treatment. We obtained good results after 4 - 5 months at 14 patients (77.7%) from group A and about the same results at 10 patients (71.3%) from group B, but after at least 8 months the good results were noticed concerning the improvements of EMG registration and on movements and force of the fingers. Finally we can say that the favorable results were obtained in at least twice shorter time with LEL treatment than with classical therapy.

  19. [Nerve and deep vein compression by femoral artery pseudoaneurysm in a patient with multiple exostosis].

    PubMed

    Aouini, F; Garali, W; Saaidi, A; El Mahdi, A; Mechergui, S; Jabeur, C; Ben Romdhane, N; Manaa, J

    2015-04-01

    The multiple exostosis is a hereditary bone tumour. Generally, its complications are benign and are related to compressing surrounding structures such as nerves and vessels. This is the case of a 52-year-old woman with a family history of multiple exostosis, which was complicated by a pseudoaneurysm of the right superficial femoral artery. The delay in diagnosis was allowed to develop this pseudoaneurysm which caused nervous and deep venous compression. PMID:25638780

  20. Microvascular decompression of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery for intermediate nerve neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Humberto Kluge; Neville, Iuri Santana; de Andrade, Daniel Ciampi; Lepski, Guilherme Alves; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Duarte, Kleber Paiva

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intermediate nerve neuralgia (INN) is an extremely rare craniofacial pain disorder mainly caused by neurovascular compression. Case Description: We present the case of a 48-year-old female with a 20-month history of intractable paroxysmal INN on the right side. The patient described feeling paroxysmal pain in her auditory canal, pinna, deep in the jaw, and adjacent retromastoid area on the right side. She described the pain as being like a burning sensation. Magnetic resonance imaging showed the right posterior cerebellar artery crossing the cerebellopontine cistern in close contact with the right VII and VIII nerves. Surgical exploration via retromastoid craniotomy revealed vascular compression of the intermediate nerve by the posterior cerebellar artery. We therefore performed microvascular nerve decompression to relieve pain, and the patient remained pain-free at the 6-month follow-up visit. Conclusion: INN should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases with atypical facial neuralgia, and microvascular decompression is an effective treatment option that can provide optimal pain relief. PMID:25883844

  1. Management of carotid Dacron patch infection: a case report using median sternotomy for proximal common carotid artery control and in situ polytetrafluoroethylene grafting.

    PubMed

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calio', Francesco G; D'Urso, Antonio; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Pacilè, Maria Antonietta

    2009-01-01

    We report on a 58-year-old male who presented with an enlarging cervical hematoma 3 months following carotid endarterectomy with Dacron patch repair, due to septic disruption of the Dacron patch secondary to presumed infection. The essential features of this case are the control of the proximal common carotid artery gained through a median sternotomy, because the patient was markedly obese with minimal thyromental distance, and the treatment consisting of in situ polytetrafluoroethylene bypass grafting, due to the absence of a suitable autogenous saphenous vein. Median sternotomy is rarely required in case of reintervention for septic false aneurysms and hematomas following carotid endarterectomy but should be considered whenever difficult control of the common carotid artery, when entering the previous cervicotomy, is anticipated. In situ polytetrafluoroethylene grafting can be considered if autogenous vein material is lacking. PMID:19875014

  2. Mechanisms responsible for the effect of median nerve electrical stimulation on traumatic brain injury-induced coma: orexin-A-mediated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhen; Du, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the median nerve is a noninvasive technique that facilitates awakening from coma. In rats with traumatic brain injury-induced coma, median nerve stimulation markedly enhances prefrontal cortex expression of orexin-A and its receptor, orexin receptor 1. To further understand the mechanism underlying wakefulness mediated by electrical stimulation of the median nerve, we evaluated its effects on the expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 in the prefrontal cortex in rat models of traumatic brain injury-induced coma, using immunohistochemistry and western blot assays. In rats with traumatic brain injury, NR1 expression increased with time after injury. Rats that underwent electrical stimulation of the median nerve (30 Hz, 0.5 ms, 1.0 mA for 15 minutes) showed elevated NR1 expression and greater recovery of consciousness than those without stimulation. These effects were reduced by intracerebroventricular injection of the orexin receptor 1 antagonist SB334867. Our results indicate that electrical stimulation of the median nerve promotes recovery from traumatic brain injury-induced coma by increasing prefrontal cortex NR1 expression via an orexin-A-mediated pathway. PMID:27482224

  3. Mechanisms responsible for the effect of median nerve electrical stimulation on traumatic brain injury-induced coma: orexin-A-mediated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhen; Du, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Electrical stimulation of the median nerve is a noninvasive technique that facilitates awakening from coma. In rats with traumatic brain injury-induced coma, median nerve stimulation markedly enhances prefrontal cortex expression of orexin-A and its receptor, orexin receptor 1. To further understand the mechanism underlying wakefulness mediated by electrical stimulation of the median nerve, we evaluated its effects on the expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 in the prefrontal cortex in rat models of traumatic brain injury-induced coma, using immunohistochemistry and western blot assays. In rats with traumatic brain injury, NR1 expression increased with time after injury. Rats that underwent electrical stimulation of the median nerve (30 Hz, 0.5 ms, 1.0 mA for 15 minutes) showed elevated NR1 expression and greater recovery of consciousness than those without stimulation. These effects were reduced by intracerebroventricular injection of the orexin receptor 1 antagonist SB334867. Our results indicate that electrical stimulation of the median nerve promotes recovery from traumatic brain injury-induced coma by increasing prefrontal cortex NR1 expression via an orexin-A-mediated pathway. PMID:27482224

  4. Sympathetic nerve stimulation induces local endothelial Ca2+ signals to oppose vasoconstriction of mouse mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Nausch, Lydia W. M.; Bonev, Adrian D.; Heppner, Thomas J.; Tallini, Yvonne; Kotlikoff, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the endothelium regulates vascular tone independent of the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the activation of sympathetic nerves engages the endothelium to oppose vasoconstriction. Local inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-mediated Ca2+ signals (“pulsars”) in or near endothelial projections to vascular smooth muscle (VSM) were measured in an en face mouse mesenteric artery preparation. Electrical field stimulation of sympathetic nerves induced an increase in endothelial cell (EC) Ca2+ pulsars, recruiting new pulsar sites without affecting activity at existing sites. This increase in Ca2+ pulsars was blocked by bath application of the α-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin or by TTX but was unaffected by directly picospritzing the α-adrenergic receptor agonist phenylephrine onto the vascular endothelium, indicating that nerve-derived norepinephrine acted through α-adrenergic receptors on smooth muscle cells. Moreover, EC Ca2+ signaling was not blocked by inhibitors of purinergic receptors, ryanodine receptors, or voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, suggesting a role for IP3, rather than Ca2+, in VSM-to-endothelium communication. Block of intermediate-conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels, which have been shown to colocalize with IP3 receptors in endothelial projections to VSM, enhanced nerve-evoked constriction. Collectively, our results support the concept of a transcellular negative feedback module whereby sympathetic nerve stimulation elevates EC Ca2+ signals to oppose vasoconstriction. PMID:22140050

  5. Anatomic study of the superficial sural artery and its implication in the neurocutaneous vascularized sural nerve free flap.

    PubMed

    Leclère, Franck Marie; Eggli, Simone; Mathys, Lukas; Vögelin, Esther

    2013-10-01

    Combined extended nerve and soft tissue defects of the upper extremity require nerve reconstruction and adequate soft tissue coverage. This study focuses on the reliability of the free vascularized sural nerve graft combined with a fasciocutaneous posterior calf flap within this indication. An anatomical study was performed on 26 cadaveric lower extremities that had been Thiel fixated and color silicone injected. Dissection of the fasciocutaneous posterior calf flap involved the medial sural nerve and superficial sural artery (SSA) with its septocutaneous perforators, extended laterally to include the lateral cutaneous branch of the sural nerve and continued to the popliteal origin of the vascular pedicle and the nerves. The vessel and nerves diameter were measured with an eyepiece reticle at 4.5× magnification. Length and diameter of the nerves and vessels were carefully assessed and reported in the dissection book. A total of 26 flaps were dissected. The SSA originated from the medial sural artery (13 cases), the popliteal artery (12 cases), or the lateral sural artery (one case). The average size of the SSA was 1.4 ± 0.4 mm. The mean pedicle length before the artery joined the sural nerve was 4.5 ± 1.9 cm. A comitant vein was present in 21 cases with an average diameter of 2.0 ± 0.8 mm, in 5 cases a separate vein needed to be dissected with an average diameter of 3.5 ± 0.4 mm. The mean medial vascularized sural nerve length was 21.2 ± 8.9 cm. Because of inclusion of the vascularized part of the lateral branch of the sural nerve (mean length of 16.7 ± 4.8 cm), a total of 35.0 ± 9.6 cm mean length of vascularized nerve could be gained from each extremity. The free vascularized sural nerve graft combined with a fasciocutaneous posterior calf flap pedicled on the SSA offers a reliable solution for complex tissue and nerve defect. PMID:22467447

  6. Recovery of Third Nerve Palsy after Endovascular Packing of Internal Carotid-Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Mavilio, N.; Pisani, R.; Rivano, C.; Testa, V.; Spaziante, R.; Rosa, M.

    2000-01-01

    Summary Endovascular packing of intracranial aneurysm with preservation of the parent vessel has become in many cases a valid alternative to surgical clipping. Regression of oculomotor disorders after clipping of internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (ICA-PCoA) aneurysms has been well assessed. This report focuses on the reversal of third nerve palsy after endovascular packing of ICA-PCoA aneurysms. To this end, clinical appearances, neuroradiological features, and endovascular interventional procedures of six treated patient are reported and discussed in the light of the very few previous case observations found in the literature. Results indicate that endovascular packing of ICA-PCoA aneurysms may produce effective recovery of correlated third nerve dysfunction. PMID:20667199

  7. Toxicity and median effective doses of oxime therapies against percutaneous organophosphorus pesticide and nerve agent challenges in the Hartley guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Snider, Thomas H; Babin, Michael C; Jett, David A; Platoff, Gennady E; Yeung, David T

    2016-01-01

    Anticholinesterases, such as organophosphorus pesticides and warfare nerve agents, present a significant health threat. Onset of symptoms after exposure can be rapid, requiring quick-acting, efficacious therapy to mitigate the effects. The goal of the current study was to identify the safest antidote with the highest therapeutic index (TI = oxime 24-hr LD50/oxime ED50) from a panel of four oximes deemed most efficacious in a previous study. The oximes tested were pralidoxime chloride (2-PAM Cl), MMB4 DMS, HLö-7 DMS, and obidoxime Cl2. The 24-hr median lethal dose (LD50) for the four by intramuscular (IM) injection and the median effective dose (ED50) were determined. In the ED50 study, male guinea pigs clipped of hair received 2x LD50 topical challenges of undiluted Russian VX (VR), VX, or phorate oxon (PHO) and, at the onset of cholinergic signs, IM therapy of atropine (0.4 mg/kg) and varying levels of oxime. Survival was assessed at 3 hr after onset clinical signs. The 3-hr 90th percentile dose (ED90) for each oxime was compared to the guinea pig pre-hospital human-equivalent dose of 2-PAM Cl, 149 µmol/kg. The TI was calculated for each OP/oxime combination. Against VR, MMB4 DMS had a higher TI than HLö-7 DMS, whereas 2-PAM Cl and obidoxime Cl2 were ineffective. Against VX, MMB4 DMS > HLö-7 DMS > 2-PAM Cl > obidoxime Cl2. Against PHO, all performed better than 2-PAM Cl. MMB4 DMS was the most effective oxime as it was the only oxime with ED90 < 149 µmol/kg against all three topical OPs tested. PMID:27432237

  8. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kokkalis, Zinon T.; Tolis, Konstantinos E.; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D.; Panagopoulos, Georgios N.; Igoumenou, Vasilios G.; Mavrogenis, Andreas F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  9. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Tolis, Konstantinos E; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Igoumenou, Vasilios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F

    2016-06-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  10. [Unilateral visual field defect due to optic nerve compression by sclerotic internal carotid artery: a case report].

    PubMed

    Uchino, M; Nemoto, M; Ohtsuka, T; Kuramitsu, T; Isobe, Y

    1999-02-01

    A case of unilateral visual field defect due to optic nerve compression by a sclerotic internal carotid artery was reported. A 71-year-old woman was admitted to our department because of constricted visual field of the right eye. MRI showed elevation of the right optic nerve compressed by an internal carotid artery. The right carotid angiography revealed elevation and distortion of the C1-2 portion. Frontal craniotomy was carried out and the optic nerve was visualized on this side. The right optic nerve was found to have been compressed by the sclerotic internal carotid artery. The optic canal was then unroofed. The post-operative course was uneventful. The visual field was improved. When last seen 6 months after surgery, her visual field remained in the improved condition. Nasal field abnormalities are most frequently encountered in retinal and anterior optic nerve pathology. Our success in improving the visual field disturbance may be accounted for by the fact that the preoperative period was short and the operation was performed before atrophy of ocular fundi occurred. Nasal field loss caused by intracranial lesions of the optic pathway is rare. It is probably impossible to determine degree of the symptomatology caused by direct-pressure compression as opposed to that caused by ischemia secondary to occlusion of small arterial supply branches. Vascular compressive neuropathy of optic nerve should not be diagnosed simply by the radiological finding of the optic nerve dislocation. However, optic nerve compression by surrounding arteries should be remembered as one of the possible causes of visual field defect which needs to be treated surgically. PMID:10065453

  11. Intermittent hypoglossal nerve palsy caused by a calcified persistent hypoglossal artery: an uncommon neurovascular compression syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meila, Dan; Wetter, Axel; Brassel, Friedhelm; Nacimiento, Wilhelm

    2012-12-15

    Neurovascular compression is assumed to cause symptoms like trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm and vestibular paroxysmia. We present a patient with recurrent episodes of transient dysarthria due to isolated right hypoglossal nerve (HN) palsy. We describe the first case of a calcified persistent hypoglossal artery (PHA) as the putative cause of a hypoglossal neurovascular compression syndrome. Our patient received a daily low-dose medication of carbamazepine resulting in complete relief of symptoms. In conclusion, PHA is not only an anatomic variation but also a possible cause of a neurovascular compression syndrome leading to intermittent HN palsy. PMID:23020989

  12. Intraneural perineurioma of unilateral radial and median nerves manifesting with long-standing focal amyotrophy in a 14-year-old-boy.

    PubMed

    Nagappa, Madhu; Chickabasaviah, Yasha T; Bharath, Rose D; Bindu, Parayil S; Sinha, Sanjib; Taly, Arun B

    2013-12-01

    Intraneural perineuriomas are rare tumors of the peripheral nerves with unique immunohistochemical findings. In this report, we highlight the clinical and imaging findings of an adolescent male with histologically proven intraneural perineurioma involving multiple nerves. The salient features included a clinically progressive course, imaging evidence of involvement of long segments of multiple nerves, enlargement of individual fascicles within the affected nerves, and intense contrast enhancement of the enlarged fascicles. The identification of enlarged fascicles with intense contrast enhancement within the affected and distended nerve segments may aid in distinguishing intraneural perineurioma from other tumors affecting the peripheral nerves. PMID:24263031

  13. Vasopressin responses to unloading arterial baroreceptors during cardiac nerve blockade in conscious dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, C. P.; Keil, L. C.; Thrasher, T. N.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the relative contributions of afferent input from the heart and from arterial baroreceptors in the stimulation of arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion in response to hypotension caused by thoracic inferior vena caval constriction (TIVCC). Afferent input from cardiac receptors was reversibly blocked by infusing 2% procaine into the pericardial space to anesthetize the cardiac nerves. Acute cardiac nerve blockade (CNB) alone caused a rise in mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 24 +/- 3 mmHg but no change in plasma AVP. If the rise in MAP was prevented by TIVCC, plasma AVP increased by 39 +/- 15 pg/ml, and if MAP was allowed to increase and then was forced back to control by TIVCC, plasma AVP increased by 34 +/- 15 pg/ml. Thus the rise in MAP during CNB stimulated arterial baroreceptors, which in turn compensated for the loss of inhibitory input from cardiac receptors on AVP secretion. These results indicate that the maximum secretory response resulting from complete unloading of cardiac receptors at a normal MAP results in a mean increase in plasma AVP of 39 pg/ml in this group of dogs. When MAP was reduced 25% below control levels (from 95 +/- 5 to 69 +/- 3 mmHg) by TIVCC during pericardial saline infusion, plasma AVP increased by 79 +/- 42 pg/ml. However, the same degree of hypotension during CNB (MAP was reduced from 120 +/- 5 to 71 +/- 3 mmHg) led to a greater (P less than 0.05) increase in plasma AVP of 130 +/- 33 pg/ml. Because completely unloading cardiac receptors can account for an increase of only 39 pg/ml on average in this group of dogs, the remainder of the increase in plasma AVP must be due to other sources of stimulation. We suggest that the principal stimulus to AVP secretion after acute CNB in these studies arises from unloading the arterial baroreceptors.

  14. Effects of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Cardiac Nerves on Atrial Arrhythmia in Experimental Pulmonary Artery Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qingyan; Deng, Hongping; Jiang, Xuejun; Dai, Zixuan; Wang, Xiaozhan; Wang, Xule; Guo, Zongwen; Hu, Wei; Yu, Shengbo; Yang, Bo; Tang, Yanhong; Huang, Congxin

    2015-11-01

    Atrial arrhythmia, which includes atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter (AFL), is common in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), who often have increased sympathetic nerve activity. Here, we tested the hypothesis that autonomic nerves play important roles in vulnerability to AF/AFL in PAH. The atrial effective refractory period and AF/AFL inducibility at baseline and after anterior right ganglionated plexi ablation were determined during left stellate ganglion stimulation or left renal sympathetic nerve stimulation in beagle dogs with or without PAH. Then, sympathetic nerve, β-adrenergic receptor densities and connexin 43 expression in atrial tissues were assessed. The sum of the window of vulnerability to AF/AFL was increased in the right atrium compared with the left atrium at baseline in the PAH dogs but not in the controls. The atrial effective refractory period dispersion was increased in the control dogs, but not in the PAH dogs, during left stellate ganglion stimulation. The voltage thresholds for inducing AF/AFL during anterior right ganglionated plexi stimulation were lower in the PAH dogs than in the controls. The AF/AFL inducibility was suppressed after ablation of the anterior right ganglionated plexi in the PAH dogs. The PAH dogs had higher sympathetic nerve and β1-adrenergic receptor densities, increased levels of nonphosphorylated connexin 43, and heterogeneous connexin 43 expression in the right atrium when compared with the control dogs. The anterior right ganglionated plexi play important roles in the induction of AF/AFL. AF/AFL induction was associated with right atrium substrate remodeling in dogs with PAH. PMID:26418021

  15. Restoring motor control and sensory feedback in people with upper extremity amputations using arrays of 96 microelectrodes implanted in the median and ulnar nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. S.; Wark, H. A. C.; Hutchinson, D. T.; Warren, D. J.; O'Neill, K.; Scheinblum, T.; Clark, G. A.; Normann, R. A.; Greger, B.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. An important goal of neuroprosthetic research is to establish bidirectional communication between the user and new prosthetic limbs that are capable of controlling >20 different movements. One strategy for achieving this goal is to interface the prosthetic limb directly with efferent and afferent fibres in the peripheral nervous system using an array of intrafascicular microelectrodes. This approach would provide access to a large number of independent neural pathways for controlling high degree-of-freedom prosthetic limbs, as well as evoking multiple-complex sensory percepts. Approach. Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs, 96 recording/stimulating electrodes) were implanted for 30 days into the median (Subject 1-M, 31 years post-amputation) or ulnar (Subject 2-U, 1.5 years post-amputation) nerves of two amputees. Neural activity was recorded during intended movements of the subject’s phantom fingers and a linear Kalman filter was used to decode the neural data. Microelectrode stimulation of varying amplitudes and frequencies was delivered via single or multiple electrodes to investigate the number, size and quality of sensory percepts that could be evoked. Device performance over time was assessed by measuring: electrode impedances, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), stimulation thresholds, number and stability of evoked percepts. Main results. The subjects were able to proportionally, control individual fingers of a virtual robotic hand, with 13 different movements decoded offline (r = 0.48) and two movements decoded online. Electrical stimulation across one USEA evoked >80 sensory percepts. Varying the stimulation parameters modulated percept quality. Devices remained intrafascicularly implanted for the duration of the study with no significant changes in the SNRs or percept thresholds. Significance. This study demonstrated that an array of 96 microelectrodes can be implanted into the human peripheral nervous system for up to 1 month durations. Such an

  16. Characterization of nerve and microvessel damage and recovery in type 1 diabetic mice after permanent femoral artery ligation.

    PubMed

    Lozeron, Pierre; Mantsounga, Chris S; Broqueres-You, Dong; Dohan, Anthony; Polivka, Marc; Deroide, Nicolas; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Kubis, Nathalie; Lévy, Bernard I

    2015-09-01

    Neuropathy is the most common complication of the peripheral nervous system during the progression of diabetes. The pathophysiology is unclear but may involve microangiopathy, reduced endoneurial blood flow, and tissue ischemia. We used a mouse model of type 1 diabetes to study parallel alterations of nerves and microvessels following tissue ischemia. We designed an easily reproducible model of ischemic neuropathy induced by irreversible ligation of the femoral artery. We studied the evolution of behavioral function, epineurial and endoneurial vessel impairment, and large nerve myelinated fiber as well as small cutaneous unmyelinated fiber impairment for 1 month following the onset of ischemia. We observed a more severe hindlimb dysfunction and delayed recovery in diabetic animals. This was associated with reduced density of large arteries in the hindlimb and reduced sciatic nerve epineurial blood flow. A reduction in sciatic nerve endoneurial capillary density was also observed, associated with a reduction in small unmyelinated epidermal fiber number and large myelinated sciatic nerve fiber dysfunction. Moreover, vascular recovery was delayed, and nerve dysfunction was still present in diabetic animals at day 28. This easily reproducible model provides clear insight into the evolution over time of the impact of ischemia on nerve and microvessel homeostasis in the setting of diabetes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25944265

  17. Optic Nerve Head Blood Flow Autoregulation during Changes in Arterial Blood Pressure in Healthy Young Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Boltz, Agnes; Told, Reinhard; Napora, Katarzyna J.; Palkovits, Stefan; Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Popa-Cherecheanu, Alina; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2013-01-01

    Aim In the present study the response of optic nerve head blood flow to an increase in ocular perfusion pressure during isometric exercise was studied. Based on our previous studies we hypothesized that subjects with an abnormal blood flow response, defined as a decrease in blood flow of more than 10% during or after isometric exercise, could be identified. Methods A total of 40 healthy subjects were included in this study. Three periods of isometric exercise were scheduled, each consisting of 2 minutes of handgripping. Optic nerve head blood flow was measured continuously before, during and after handgripping using laser Doppler flowmetry. Blood pressure was measured non-invasively in one-minute intervals. Intraocular pressure was measured at the beginning and the end of the measurements and ocular perfusion pressure was calculated as 2/3*mean arterial pressure –intraocular pressure. Results Isometric exercise was associated with an increase in ocular perfusion pressure during all handgripping periods (p < 0.001). By contrast no change in optic nerve head blood flow was seen. However, in a subgroup of three subjects blood flow showed a consistent decrease of more than 10% during isometric exercise although their blood pressure values increased. In addition, three other subjects showed a consistent decline of blood flow of more than 10% during the recovery periods. Conclusion Our data confirm previous results indicating that optic nerve head blood flow is autoregulated during an increase in perfusion pressure. In addition, we observed a subgroup of 6 subjects (15%) that showed an abnormal response, which is in keeping with our previous data. The mechanisms underlying this abnormal response remain to be shown. PMID:24324774

  18. Case of Behçet's disease complicated by oculomotor nerve palsy associated with internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Toshifumi; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a relapsing systemic inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology involving systemic vasculitis. Vasculitis in BD results from the involvement of arteries, veins and blood vessels of all sizes, which leads to the three major manifestations of this condition: venous occlusion, arterial occlusion and aneurysm formation. Therefore, whole-body vascular involvement should always be considered in BD patients. Here, we describe the first appearance of an internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm, resulting in complete oculomotor nerve palsy in a BD patient. A 44-year-old Japanese man suffered from recurrent episodes of erythema nodosum that had presented on the lower extremities for the past 2 years. His condition was diagnosed as an incomplete type of BD based on relapsing oral and genital ulcers, skin eruptions, such as erythema nodosum and folliculitis, a positive pathergy test and systemic arthralgia. Ten years after his initial clinical presentation, he had manifestations of right-sided ptosis and cyclic dull pain in his right temporal region. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiography revealed a right internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm. Although oculomotor nerve palsy associated with internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery aneurysm in a BD patient has not been reported previously, our report highlights the fact that this abnormal manifestation should be considered in those with vasculo-BD. PMID:25573207

  19. Arterial baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity during acute hypotension: effect of fitness.

    PubMed

    Fadel, P J; Stromstad, M; Hansen, J; Sander, M; Horn, K; Ogoh, S; Smith, M L; Secher, N H; Raven, P B

    2001-06-01

    We examined arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during abrupt decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and evaluated whether endurance training alters baroreflex function. Acute hypotension was induced nonpharmacologically in 14 healthy subjects, of which 7 were of high fitness (HF) and 7 were of average fitness (AF), by releasing a unilateral arterial thigh cuff after 9 min of resting ischemia under two conditions: control, which used aortic and carotid baroreflex (ABR and CBR, respectively) deactivation; and suction, which used ABR deactivation alone. The application of neck suction to counteract changes in carotid sinus transmural pressure during cuff release significantly attenuated the MSNA response (which increased 134 +/- 32 U/14 s) compared with control (which increased 195 +/- 43 U/14 s) and caused a greater decrease in MAP (19 +/- 2 vs. 15 +/- 2 mmHg; P < 0.05). Furthermore, during both trials, the HF subjects exhibited a greater decrease in MAP compared with AF subjects despite an augmented baroreflex control of MSNA. These data indicate that the CBR contributes importantly to the MSNA response during acute systemic hypotension. Additionally, we suggest that an impaired control of vascular reactivity hinders blood pressure regulation in HF subjects. PMID:11356607

  20. Variable relations of the trochlear nerve with the pontomesencephalic segment of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Vrapciu, Alexandra Diana; Pătraşcu, Jenel Marian

    2015-07-01

    The superior cerebellar artery (SCA) is, perhaps, the most anatomically constant cerebellar artery which, in its lateral pontomesencephalic course, is crossed above by the trochlear nerve (CNIV). The SCA may determine, as an offending vessel, CNIV compression and superior oblique myokymia and thus surgical decompression may be indicated. In this regard an accurate knowledge of the variational possibilities of the SCA-CNIV is needed. Such rare neurovascular variants are reported here. The variables are determined by the length of the SCA, and the course of the CNIV as referred to the rostral (RT) and caudal (CT) trunks of the SCA. The CNIV may be pinched between the origins of the RT and CT, may pass above the RT or the SCA main trunk, and even between the primary branches of the RT. The CNIV was found compressed between the RT and the brainstem. Perhaps the most spectacular variation was a CNIV coursing through an arterial ring formed by the RT and CT which were anastomosed distally to the CNIV. The possibilities of neurovascular relations between the CNIV and the SCA should be considered when CNIV palsy, or surgical decompression, are estimated. PMID:25234318

  1. Arterial baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity during acute hypotension: effect of fitness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fadel, P. J.; Stromstad, M.; Hansen, J.; Sander, M.; Horn, K.; Ogoh, S.; Smith, M. L.; Secher, N. H.; Raven, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    We examined arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during abrupt decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and evaluated whether endurance training alters baroreflex function. Acute hypotension was induced nonpharmacologically in 14 healthy subjects, of which 7 were of high fitness (HF) and 7 were of average fitness (AF), by releasing a unilateral arterial thigh cuff after 9 min of resting ischemia under two conditions: control, which used aortic and carotid baroreflex (ABR and CBR, respectively) deactivation; and suction, which used ABR deactivation alone. The application of neck suction to counteract changes in carotid sinus transmural pressure during cuff release significantly attenuated the MSNA response (which increased 134 +/- 32 U/14 s) compared with control (which increased 195 +/- 43 U/14 s) and caused a greater decrease in MAP (19 +/- 2 vs. 15 +/- 2 mmHg; P < 0.05). Furthermore, during both trials, the HF subjects exhibited a greater decrease in MAP compared with AF subjects despite an augmented baroreflex control of MSNA. These data indicate that the CBR contributes importantly to the MSNA response during acute systemic hypotension. Additionally, we suggest that an impaired control of vascular reactivity hinders blood pressure regulation in HF subjects.

  2. An artery accompanying the sciatic nerve (arteria comitans nervi ischiadici) and the position of the hip joint: a comparative histological study using chick, mouse, and human foetal specimens.

    PubMed

    Ishizawa, A; Hayashi, S; Nasu, H; Abe, H; Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Murakami, G

    2013-02-01

    Birds and reptiles always carry a long and thick artery accompanying the sciatic nerve (i.e., the sciatic artery), whereas mammals do not. We attempted to demonstrate a difference in courses of the nerve and artery in fetuses in relation with the hip joint posture. Eight mid-term human fetuses (15-18 weeks), five mouse fetuses (E18) and five chick embryos (11 days after incubation) were examined histologically. Thin feeding arteries in the sciatic nerve were consistently observed in human fetuses in spite of the long, inferiorly curved course of the nerve around the ischium. The tissue around the human sciatic nerve was not so tight because of the medial and inferior shift of the nerve away from the hip joint. The fetal hip joint position differed among the species, being highly flexed in humans and almost at right angle flexion in mice and chicks. Because of deep adduction of the hip joint in the mouse, the knee was located near the midline of the body. The mouse sciatic nerve ran through the tight tissue along the head of the femur, whereas the chick nerve ran through the loose space even in the gluteal region. In birds, evolution of the pelvis including the hip joint without adduction seemed to make the arterial development possible. In mammals, highly flexed or adducted hip joint seemed to be one of the disturbing factors against development of the long and thick artery. A slight change in posture may cause significant arterial variation. PMID:23749710

  3. Vanilloid receptors mediate adrenergic nerve- and CGRP-containing nerve-dependent vasodilation induced by nicotine in rat mesenteric resistance arteries

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Shinji; Tezuka, Satoko; Hobara, Narumi; Akiyama, Shinji; Kurosaki, Yuji; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies showed that nicotine induces adrenergic nerve-dependent vasodilation that is mediated by endogenous calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) released from CGRP-containing (CGRPergic) nerves. The mechanisms underlying the nicotine-induced vasodilation were further studied. Rat mesenteric vascular beds without endothelium were contracted by perfusion with Krebs solution containing methoxamine, and the perfusion pressure was measured with a pressure transducer. Perfusion of nicotine (1–100 μM) for 1 min caused concentration-dependent vasodilation. Capsazepine (vanilloid receptor-1 antagonist; 1–10 μM) and ruthenium red (inhibitor of vanilloid response; 1–30 μM) concentration-dependently inhibited the nicotine-induced vasodilation without affecting the vasodilator response to exogenous CGRP. Nicotine-induced vasodilation was not inhibited by treatment with 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) receptor antagonist (L-DOPA cyclohexyl ester; 0.001–10 μM), dopamine D1 receptor-selective antagonist (SCH23390; 1–10 μM), dopamine D2 receptor antagonist (haloperidol; 0.1–0.5 μM), ATP P2x receptor-desensitizing agonist (α,β-methylene ATP; 1–10 μM), adenosine A2 receptor antagonist (8(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline; 10–50 μM) or neuropeptide Y (NPY)-Y1 receptor antagonist (BIBP3226; 0.1–0.5 μM). Immunohistochemical staining of the mesenteric artery showed dense innervation of CGRP- and vanilloid receptor-1-positive nerves, with both immunostainings appearing in the same neuron. The mesenteric artery was also densely innervated by NPY-positive nerves. Double immunostainings showed that both NPY and CGRP immunoreactivities appeared in the same neuron of the artery. These results suggest that nicotine acts on presynaptic nicotinic receptors to release adrenergic neurotransmitter(s) or related substance(s), which then stimulate vanilloid receptor-1 on CGRPergic nerves, resulting in CGRP release and vasodilation. PMID:15249421

  4. Sympathetic nerves and the endothelium influence the vasoconstrictor effect of low concentrations of ouabain in pressurized small arteries

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Hema; Zhang, Qingli; Rhee, Albert Y.; Pallone, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that in salt-dependent forms of hypertension, endogenous ouabain acts on arterial smooth muscle to cause enhanced vasoconstriction. Here, we tested for the involvement of the arterial endothelium and perivascular sympathetic nerve terminals in ouabain-induced vasoconstriction. Segments of rat mesenteric or renal interlobar arteries were pressurized to 70 mmHg at 37°C and exposed to ouabain (10−11–10−7 M). Removal of the endothelium enhanced ouabain-induced vasoconstriction by as much as twofold (at an ouabain concentration of 10−9 M). A component of the ouabain-induced vasoconstriction is due to the enhanced spontaneous release of norepinephrine (NE) from nerve terminals in the arterial wall. The α1-adrenoceptor blocker prazosin (10−6 M) decreased ouabain-induced vasoconstrictions by as much as 50%. However, neither the contraction induced by sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) nor the NE release evoked by SNA (measured directly by carbon fiber amperometry) was increased by ouabain (<10−7 M). Nevertheless, the converse case was true: after brief bursts of SNA, vasoconstrictor responses to ouabain were transiently increased (1.75-fold). This effect may be mediated by neuropeptide Y and Y1 receptors on smooth muscle. In arteries lacking the endothelium and exposed to prazosin, ouabain (10−11 M and greater) caused vasoconstriction, indicating a direct effect of very “low” concentrations of ouabain on arterial smooth muscle. In conclusion, in intact arteries, the endothelium opposes ouabain (10−11–10−7M)-induced vasoconstriction, which is caused by both enhanced spontaneous NE release and direct effects on smooth muscle. Ouabain (<10−7M) does not enhance SNA-mediated contractions, but SNA enhances ouabain-induced contractions. The effects of endogenous ouabain may be accentuated in forms of hypertension that involve sympathetic nerve hyperactivity and/or endothelial dysfunction. PMID:20382851

  5. Sex comparisons in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and arterial pressure oscillations during progressive central hypovolemia

    PubMed Central

    Carter III, Robert; Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Convertino, Victor A

    2015-01-01

    Increased tolerance to central hypovolemia is generally associated with greater sympathoexcitation, high-frequency oscillatory patterns of mean arterial pressure (MAP), and tachycardia. On average, women are less tolerant to central hypovolemia than men; however, the autonomic mechanisms governing these comparisons are not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that women with relatively high tolerance (HT) to central hypovolemia would display similar physiological reserve capacity for sympathoexcitation and oscillations in MAP at presyncope compared to HT men. About 10 men and five women were exposed to progressive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) until the presence of presyncopal symptoms. Based on our previous classification system, all subjects were classified as HT because they completed at least −60 mmHg LBNP. Muscle sympathetic serve activity (MSNA) was measured directly from the peroneal nerve via microneurography and arterial pressure (AP) was measured at the finger by photoplethysmography. LBNP time to presyncope was less (P < 0.01) in women (1727 ± 70 sec) than in men (2022 ± 201 sec). At presyncope, average MSNA in men (50 ± 12 bursts/min) and women (51 ± 7 bursts/min) was similar (P = 0.87). Coincident with similar stroke volume (SV) at presyncope, women had similar MAP and heart rates. However, women had less physiological reserve capacity for SV, AP-MSNA coherence, and oscillations in the high-frequency (HF) components of arterial pressure compared to men. Contrary to our hypothesis, lower tolerance to central hypovolemia in women was not associated with sympathoexcitation, but can be explained, in part by lower physiological reserve to elicit oscillatory patterns in AP, maintenance of AP-MSNA coherence and SV when compared to men. PMID:26109186

  6. Sex comparisons in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and arterial pressure oscillations during progressive central hypovolemia.

    PubMed

    Carter, Robert; Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Convertino, Victor A

    2015-06-01

    Increased tolerance to central hypovolemia is generally associated with greater sympathoexcitation, high-frequency oscillatory patterns of mean arterial pressure (MAP), and tachycardia. On average, women are less tolerant to central hypovolemia than men; however, the autonomic mechanisms governing these comparisons are not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that women with relatively high tolerance (HT) to central hypovolemia would display similar physiological reserve capacity for sympathoexcitation and oscillations in MAP at presyncope compared to HT men. About 10 men and five women were exposed to progressive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) until the presence of presyncopal symptoms. Based on our previous classification system, all subjects were classified as HT because they completed at least -60 mmHg LBNP. Muscle sympathetic serve activity (MSNA) was measured directly from the peroneal nerve via microneurography and arterial pressure (AP) was measured at the finger by photoplethysmography. LBNP time to presyncope was less (P < 0.01) in women (1727 ± 70 sec) than in men (2022 ± 201 sec). At presyncope, average MSNA in men (50 ± 12 bursts/min) and women (51 ± 7 bursts/min) was similar (P = 0.87). Coincident with similar stroke volume (SV) at presyncope, women had similar MAP and heart rates. However, women had less physiological reserve capacity for SV, AP-MSNA coherence, and oscillations in the high-frequency (HF) components of arterial pressure compared to men. Contrary to our hypothesis, lower tolerance to central hypovolemia in women was not associated with sympathoexcitation, but can be explained, in part by lower physiological reserve to elicit oscillatory patterns in AP, maintenance of AP-MSNA coherence and SV when compared to men. PMID:26109186

  7. Real-Time Automatic Artery Segmentation, Reconstruction and Registration for Ultrasound-Guided Regional Anaesthesia of the Femoral Nerve.

    PubMed

    Smistad, Erik; Lindseth, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The goal is to create an assistant for ultrasound- guided femoral nerve block. By segmenting and visualizing the important structures such as the femoral artery, we hope to improve the success of these procedures. This article is the first step towards this goal and presents novel real-time methods for identifying and reconstructing the femoral artery, and registering a model of the surrounding anatomy to the ultrasound images. The femoral artery is modelled as an ellipse. The artery is first detected by a novel algorithm which initializes the artery tracking. This algorithm is completely automatic and requires no user interaction. Artery tracking is achieved with a Kalman filter. The 3D artery is reconstructed in real-time with a novel algorithm and a tracked ultrasound probe. A mesh model of the surrounding anatomy was created from a CT dataset. Registration of this model is achieved by landmark registration using the centerpoints from the artery tracking and the femoral artery centerline of the model. The artery detection method was able to automatically detect the femoral artery and initialize the tracking in all 48 ultrasound sequences. The tracking algorithm achieved an average dice similarity coefficient of 0.91, absolute distance of 0.33 mm, and Hausdorff distance 1.05 mm. The mean registration error was 2.7 mm, while the average maximum error was 12.4 mm. The average runtime was measured to be 38, 8, 46 and 0.2 milliseconds for the artery detection, tracking, reconstruction and registration methods respectively. PMID:26513782

  8. [Studies on distortion of the optic nerve by the internal carotid artery].

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, T; Sohma, T; Tsuruno, T; Shinya, T; Takeda, M; Mori, S

    1995-03-01

    The optic nerve (ON) is sometimes distorted by an atherosclerotic internal carotid artery (IC) which we observe during operations. However the distortion seldom causes visual dysfunction. In this paper, 102 nonoperative cases without severe visual disturbance or marked effect on the visual system were studied, using coronal section of MRI and IC angiography, to ascertion ON distortion by IC. The grading of the distortion was determined by coronal section of MRI. Grade (Gr) 0: No distortion of ON, Gr 1: Distortion of ON without chiasmal dislocation, Gr 2: Distortion of ON with chiasmal dislocation. The rate of Gr 0, Gr 1, and Gr 2 were 62.7, 21.6 and 15.7%, respectively. The age of Gr 0, Gr 1 and Gr 2 were 55.4 +/- 19.6, 63.5 +/- 14.7 and 68.9 +/- 5.0 years old, respectively (Gr 2 was different from Gr 0). The occupying rate was calculated by the following formula. The areas were measured by IC angiography of the optic canal: The area of IC in optic canal/The area of optic anal x 100%. The rate of Gr 0, Gr 1 and Gr 2 were 24.2 +/- 19.8, 76.3 +/- 13.2 and 62.0 +/- 28.2%, respectively (Gr 1 and 2 differed from Gr 0). With a rate of more than 70%, the patient had ON distortion by IC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7700491

  9. Median arcuate ligament syndrome: a nonvascular, vascular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Skeik, Nedaa; Cooper, Leslie T; Duncan, Audra A; Jabr, Fadi I

    2011-07-01

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS) is often diagnosed when idiopathic, episodic abdominal pain is associated with dynamic compression of the proximal celiac artery by fibers of the median arcuate ligament. The character of the abdominal pain is often postprandial and associated with gradual weight loss from poor food intake, suggestive of chronic mesenteric ischemia. However, the pathognomonic imaging feature of dynamic, ostial celiac artery compression with expiration does not consistently predict clinical improvement from revascularization. Proposed but unproven pathophysiological mechanisms include neurogenic pain from compression of the splanchnic nerve plexus and intermittent ischemia from compression of the celiac artery. Alterations in blood flow and ganglion compression are both associated with delayed gastric emptying, another physiological correlate of the clinical syndrome. Published reports describe a variable response to revascularization and nerve plexus resection suggest a need for translational research to better characterize this poorly understood clinical entity. We illustrate the current gaps in our knowledge of MALS with the case of a 51-year-old woman with a 4-year history of chronic abdominal pain who responded to a combination of ganglion resection and celiac artery reconstruction. PMID:21536596

  10. Arterial baroreceptor reflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity following chronic myocardial infarction in male, female, and ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Whalley, Gillian A; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Malpas, Simon C; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2015-07-15

    There is controversy regarding whether the arterial baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in heart failure is altered. We investigated the impact of sex and ovarian hormones on changes in the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA following a chronic myocardial infarction (MI). Renal SNA and arterial pressure were recorded in chloralose-urethane anesthetized male, female, and ovariectomized female (OVX) Wistar rats 6-7 wk postsham or MI surgery. Animals were grouped according to MI size (sham, small and large MI). Ovary-intact females had a lower mortality rate post-MI (24%) compared with both males (38%) and OVX (50%) (P < 0.05). Males and OVX with large MI, but not small MI, displayed an impaired ability of the arterial baroreflex to inhibit renal SNA. As a result, the male large MI group (49 ± 6 vs. 84 ± 5% in male sham group) and OVX large MI group (37 ± 3 vs. 75 ± 5% in OVX sham group) displayed significantly reduced arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA (P < 0.05). In ovary-intact females, arterial baroreflex control of normalized renal SNA was unchanged regardless of MI size. In males and OVX there was a significant, positive correlation between left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction and arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA, but not absolute renal SNA, that was not evident in ovary-intact females. The current findings demonstrate that the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA post-MI is preserved in ovary-intact females, and the state of left ventricular dysfunction significantly impacts on the changes in the arterial baroreflex post-MI. PMID:25994953

  11. Persistent trigeminal artery supply to an intrinsic trigeminal nerve arteriovenous malformation: a rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Omar; Heit, Jeremy J; Feroze, Abdullah H; Chang, Steven D; Dodd, Robert L; Steinberg, Gary K

    2015-02-01

    Infratentorial arteriovenous malformations (AVM) associated with the trigeminal nerve root entry zone are a known cause of secondary trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The treatment of both TN and AVM can be challenging, especially if the AVM is embedded within the trigeminal nerve. A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) can rarely supply these intrinsic trigeminal nerve AVM. We present a 64-year-old man with TN from a right trigeminal nerve AVM supplied by a PTA variant. The patient underwent microvascular decompression and a partial resection of the AVM with relief of facial pain symptoms. His residual AVM was subsequently treated with CyberKnife radiosurgery (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA, USA). A multimodality approach may be required for the treatment of trigeminal nerve associated PTA AVM and important anatomic patterns need to be recognized before any treatment. Herein, we report to our knowledge the third documented patient with a posterior fossa AVM supplied by a PTA and the first PTA AVM presenting as facial pain. PMID:25070632

  12. A Morphometric Study of the Obturator Nerve around the Obturator Foramen

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Se Yeong; Chang, Jae Chil; Bae, Hack Gun; Oh, Jae-Sang; Heo, Juneyoung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obturator neuropathy is a rare condition. Many neurosurgeons are unfamiliar with the obturator nerve anatomy. The purpose of this study was to define obturator nerve landmarks around the obturator foramen. Methods Fourteen cadavers were studied bilaterally to measure the distances from the nerve root to relevant anatomical landmarks near the obturator nerve, including the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS), the pubic tubercle, the inguinal ligament, the femoral artery, and the adductor longus. Results The obturator nerve exits the obturator foramen and travels infero-medially between the adductors longus and brevis. The median distances from the obturator nerve exit zone (ONEZ) to the ASIS and pubic tubercle were 114 mm and 30 mm, respectively. The median horizontal and vertical distances between the pubic tubercle and the ONEZ were 17 mm and 27 mm, respectively. The shortest median distance from the ONEZ to the inguinal ligament was 19 mm. The median inguinal ligament lengths from the ASIS and the median pubic tubercle to the shortest point were 103 mm and 24 mm, respectively. The median obturator nerve lengths between the ONEZ and the adductor longus and femoral artery were 41 mm and 28 mm, respectively. Conclusion The obturator nerve exits the foramen 17 mm and 27 mm on the horizontal and sagittal planes, respectively, from the pubic tubercle below the pectineus muscle. The shallowest area is approximately one-fifth medially from the inguinal ligament. This study will help improve the accuracy of obturator nerve surgeries to better establish therapeutic plans and decrease complications. PMID:27226861

  13. Sciatic nerve regeneration induced by transplantation of in vitro bone marrow stromal cells into an inside-out artery graft in rat.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Rahim; Vahabzadeh, Behnam; Amini, Keyvan

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic injury to peripheral nerves results in considerable motor and sensory disability. Several research groups have tried to improve the regeneration of traumatized nerves by invention of favorable microsurgery. Effect of undifferentiated bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) combined with artery graft on peripheral nerve regeneration was studied using a rat sciatic nerve regeneration model. A 10-mm sciatic nerve defect was bridged using an artery graft (IOAG) filled with undifferentiated BMSCs (2 × 10(7) cells/mL). In control group, the graft was filled with phosphated buffer saline alone. The regenerated fibers were studied 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. Assessment of nerve regeneration was based on behavioral, functional (Walking Track Analysis), electrophysiological, histomorphometric and immuohistochemical (Schwann cell detection by S-100 expression) criteria. The behavioral, functional and electrophysiological studies confirmed significant recovery of regenerated axons in IOAG/BMSC group (P < 0.05). Quantitative morphometric analyses of regenerated fibers showed the number and diameter of myelinated fibers in IOAG/BMSC group were significantly higher than in the control group (P < 0.05). This demonstrates the potential of using undifferentiated BMSCs combined with artery graft in peripheral nerve regeneration without limitations of donor-site morbidity associated with isolation of Schwann cells. It is also cost saving due to reduction in interval from tissue collection until cell injection, simplicity of laboratory procedures compared to differentiated BMSCs and may have clinical implications for the surgical management of patients after facial nerve transection. PMID:24942097

  14. Hemodynamic and morphological characteristics of unruptured posterior communicating artery aneurysms with oculomotor nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Lv, Nan; Yu, Ying; Xu, Jinyu; Karmonik, Christof; Liu, Jianmin; Huang, Qinghai

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Unruptured posterior communicating artery (PCoA) aneurysms with oculomotor nerve palsy (ONP) have a very high risk of rupture. This study investigated the hemodynamic and morphological characteristics of intracranial aneurysms with high rupture risk by analyzing PCoA aneurysms with ONP. METHODS Fourteen unruptured PCoA aneurysms with ONP, 33 ruptured PCoA aneurysms, and 21 asymptomatic unruptured PCoA aneurysms were included in this study. The clinical, morphological, and hemodynamic characteristics were compared among the different groups. RESULTS The clinical characteristics did not differ among the 3 groups (p > 0.05), whereas the morphological and hemodynamic analyses showed that size, aspect ratio, size ratio, undulation index, nonsphericity index, ellipticity index, normalized wall shear stress (WSS), and percentage of low WSS area differed significantly (p < 0.05) among the 3 groups. Furthermore, multiple comparisons revealed that these parameters differed significantly between the ONP group and the asymptomatic unruptured group and between the ruptured group and the asymptomatic unruptured group, except for size, which differed significantly only between the ONP group and the asymptomatic unruptured group (p = 0.0005). No morphological or hemodynamic parameters differed between the ONP group and the ruptured group. CONCLUSIONS Unruptured PCoA aneurysms with ONP demonstrated a distinctive morphological-hemodynamic pattern that was significantly different compared with asymptomatic unruptured PCoA aneurysms and was similar to ruptured PCoA aneurysms. The larger size, more irregular shape, and lower WSS might be related to the high rupture risk of PCoA aneurysms. PMID:26636379

  15. Patterns of nerve injury and neuropathic pain in ischemic neuropathy after ligation-reperfusion of femoral artery in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jing-Er; Wang, Kuo-Chuan; Chiang, Hou-Yu; Hsieh, Jung-Hsien; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2012-09-01

    Ischemia is an important etiology of painful neuropathies. We generated a mouse system of ischemic neuropathy by ligation-reperfusion of the femoral artery to mimic neuropathic pain and nerve injury patterns observed clinically. Mice exhibited spontaneous neuropathic pain behaviors, which were most obvious after ischemia for 5 h. Mechanical and cold allodynia developed by post-operative day (POD) 7 and persisted through the experimental period up to POD 56. Neuropathic pain behaviors were alleviated with intraperitoneal gabapentin (50 and 100 mg/kg) in a dose-dependent manner. Large-fiber deficit assessed with nerve conduction studies was demonstrated by reduced amplitudes of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) on POD 7 (48.4% of the control side, p < 0.001). Small-fiber impairment was demonstrated by decreased epidermal nerve density (END) on POD 7 (29.1% of the control side, p < 0.001). Reductions in CMAP amplitudes and ENDs persisted through POD 56. Our system replicated the clinical manifestations of ischemic neuropathy: (1) neuropathic pain with cold and mechanical allodynia and (2) nerve injury to both large and small fibers with pathologic and physiologic evidence. This system produced by a simple procedure provides an opportunity to investigate mechanisms and further treatments of ischemic neuropathy on genetically engineered mice. PMID:22971092

  16. Ipsilateral common iliac artery plus femoral artery clamping for inducing sciatic nerve ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats: a reliable and simple method

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a practical model of sciatic ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury producing serious neurologic deficits and being technically feasible compared with the current time consuming or ineffective models. Thirty rats were divided into 6 groups (n = 5). Animal were anesthetized by using ketamine (50 mg/kg) and xylazine (4 mg/kg). Experimental groups included a sham-operated group and five I/R groups with different reperfusion time intervals (0 h, 3 h, 1 d, 4 d, 7 d). In I/R groups, the right common iliac artery and the right femoral artery were clamped for 3 hrs. Sham-operated animals underwent only laparotomy without induction of ischemia. Just before euthanasia, behavioral scores (based on gait, grasp, paw position, and pinch sensitivity) were obtained and then sciatic nerves were removed for light-microscopy studies (for ischemic fiber degeneration (IFD) and edema). Behavioral score deteriorated among the ischemic groups compared with the control group (p < 0.01), with maximal behavioral deficit occurring at 4 days of reperfusion. Axonal swelling and IFD were found to happen only after 4 and 7 days, respectively. Our observations led to an easy-to-use but strong enough method for inducing and studying I/R injury in peripheral nerves. PMID:19102739

  17. Accompanying artery of sciatic nerve as recipient vessel for free-flap transfer: a computed tomographic angiography study and case reports.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shimpei; Fukunaga, Yutaka; Fujiki, Masahide; Nakatni, Fumihiko; Tanzawa, Yoshikazu; Sakuraba, Minoru

    2015-05-01

    Suitable recipient vessels for free-flap transfer are hard to find in the posterior thigh. To investigate the versatility of accompanying artery of sciatic nerve as a recipient vessel in this region, we performed computed tomographic angiographic study of 20 consecutive healthy thighs in 10 patients. The presence and internal diameter of the accompanying artery were studied. The accompanying artery of the sciatic nerve was present in 11 thighs (55%) and the internal diameter of the artery at the mid-thigh level ranged from 2.1 to 3.2 mm. We used this artery as a recipient vessel for free flaps transferred to reconstruct extensive thigh defects in three patients with sarcomas. In all patients the flaps survived without vascular compromise. No sensory or motor dysfunction in the sciatic nerve distribution occurred in any patients. We believe that the accompanying artery of the sciatic nerve may be a recipient vessel for free-flap transfer in selected patients. PMID:25196891

  18. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by vascular nerve impairment treated with open release of the carpal tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Juul, Rasmus; Tarnowski, Jan R.; Houe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present a patient suffering from classical unilateral symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, where the results of electrophysiological examinations were negative. Ultrasound showed at pulsatile median artery that led to direct mechanical impact on the median nerve. The patient was successfully treated with open release of the carpal tunnel.

  19. Regulation of optic nerve head blood flow during combined changes in intraocular pressure and arterial blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Boltz, Agnes; Schmidl, Doreen; Werkmeister, René M; Lasta, Michael; Kaya, Semira; Palkovits, Stefan; Told, Reinhard; Napora, Katarzyna J; Popa-Cherecheanu, Alina; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2013-01-01

    In the choroid, there is evidence that blood flow does not only depend on ocular perfusion pressure (OPP), but also on absolute mean arterial pressure (MAP) and intraocular pressure (IOP). The present study included 40 healthy subjects to investigate whether such behavior is also found in the optic nerve head (ONH). The ONH blood flow (ONHBF) was studied using laser Doppler flowmetry during a separate increase in IOP and MAP as well as during a combined elevation. Mean arterial pressure was increased by isometric exercise and IOP by the suction method. During both, the change in ONHBF was less pronounced than the change in OPP indicating autoregulation. Correlation analysis was performed for the combined experiments after pooling all data according to IOP and MAP values. A correlation between ONHBF and MAP was found at IOPs ⩽25 mm Hg (P<0.001), but not at IOPs>25 mm Hg (P=0.79). Optic nerve head blood flow and IOP were significantly correlated (P<0.001), and ONHBF was only slightly dependent on MAP. The data of the present study indicate a complex regulation of ONHBF during combined changes in MAP and IOP. Our results may be compatible with myogenic mechanisms underlying autoregulation, and indicate better ONHBF regulation during an increase in MAP than during an increase in IOP. PMID:23921903

  20. Regulation of optic nerve head blood flow during combined changes in intraocular pressure and arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Agnes; Schmidl, Doreen; Werkmeister, René M; Lasta, Michael; Kaya, Semira; Palkovits, Stefan; Told, Reinhard; Napora, Katarzyna J; Popa-Cherecheanu, Alina; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2013-12-01

    In the choroid, there is evidence that blood flow does not only depend on ocular perfusion pressure (OPP), but also on absolute mean arterial pressure (MAP) and intraocular pressure (IOP). The present study included 40 healthy subjects to investigate whether such behavior is also found in the optic nerve head (ONH). The ONH blood flow (ONHBF) was studied using laser Doppler flowmetry during a separate increase in IOP and MAP as well as during a combined elevation. Mean arterial pressure was increased by isometric exercise and IOP by the suction method. During both, the change in ONHBF was less pronounced than the change in OPP indicating autoregulation. Correlation analysis was performed for the combined experiments after pooling all data according to IOP and MAP values. A correlation between ONHBF and MAP was found at IOPs 25 mm Hg (P<0.001), but not at IOPs>25 mm Hg (P=0.79). Optic nerve head blood flow and IOP were significantly correlated (P<0.001), and ONHBF was only slightly dependent on MAP. The data of the present study indicate a complex regulation of ONHBF during combined changes in MAP and IOP. Our results may be compatible with myogenic mechanisms underlying autoregulation, and indicate better ONHBF regulation during an increase in MAP than during an increase in IOP. PMID:23921903

  1. Circumferential targeted renal sympathetic nerve denervation with preservation of the renal arterial wall using intra-luminal ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Austin; Coleman, Leslie; Sakakura, Kenichi; Ladich, Elena; Virmani, Renu

    2015-03-01

    An intra-luminal ultrasound catheter system (ReCor Medical's Paradise System) has been developed to provide circumferential denervation of the renal sympathetic nerves, while preserving the renal arterial intimal and medial layers, in order to treat hypertension. The Paradise System features a cylindrical non-focused ultrasound transducer centered within a balloon that circulates cooling fluid and that outputs a uniform circumferential energy pattern designed to ablate tissues located 1-6 mm from the arterial wall and protect tissues within 1 mm. RF power and cooling flow rate are controlled by the Paradise Generator which can energize transducers in the 8.5-9.5 MHz frequency range. Computer simulations and tissue-mimicking phantom models were used to develop the proper power, cooling flow rate and sonication duration settings to provide consistent tissue ablation for renal arteries ranging from 5-8 mm in diameter. The modulation of these three parameters allows for control over the near-field (border of lesion closest to arterial wall) and far-field (border of lesion farthest from arterial wall, consisting of the adventitial and peri-adventitial spaces) depths of the tissue lesion formed by the absorption of ultrasonic energy and conduction of heat. Porcine studies have confirmed the safety (protected intimal and medial layers) and effectiveness (ablation of 1-6 mm region) of the system and provided near-field and far-field depth data to correlate with bench and computer simulation models. The safety and effectiveness of the Paradise System, developed through computer model, bench and in vivo studies, has been demonstrated in human clinical studies.

  2. Exercise training prevents the deterioration in the arterial baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity in chronic heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Groehs, Raphaela V.; Toschi-Dias, Edgar; Antunes-Correa, Ligia M.; Trevizan, Patrícia F.; Rondon, Maria Urbana P. B.; Oliveira, Patrícia; Alves, Maria J. N. N.; Almeida, Dirceu R.; Middlekauff, Holly R.

    2015-01-01

    Arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (ABRMSNA) is impaired in chronic systolic heart failure (CHF). The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that exercise training would improve the gain and reduce the time delay of ABRMSNA in CHF patients. Twenty-six CHF patients, New York Heart Association Functional Class II-III, EF ≤ 40%, peak V̇o2 ≤ 20 ml·kg−1·min−1 were divided into two groups: untrained (UT, n = 13, 57 ± 3 years) and exercise trained (ET, n = 13, 49 ± 3 years). Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was directly recorded by microneurography technique. Arterial pressure was measured on a beat-to-beat basis. Time series of MSNA and systolic arterial pressure were analyzed by autoregressive spectral analysis. The gain and time delay of ABRMSNA was obtained by bivariate autoregressive analysis. Exercise training was performed on a cycle ergometer at moderate intensity, three 60-min sessions per week for 16 wk. Baseline MSNA, gain and time delay of ABRMSNA, and low frequency of MSNA (LFMSNA) to high-frequency ratio (HFMSNA) (LFMSNA/HFMSNA) were similar between groups. ET significantly decreased MSNA. MSNA was unchanged in the UT patients. The gain and time delay of ABRMSNA were unchanged in the ET patients. In contrast, the gain of ABRMSNA was significantly reduced [3.5 ± 0.7 vs. 1.8 ± 0.2, arbitrary units (au)/mmHg, P = 0.04] and the time delay of ABRMSNA was significantly increased (4.6 ± 0.8 vs. 7.9 ± 1.0 s, P = 0.05) in the UT patients. LFMSNA-to-HFMSNA ratio tended to be lower in the ET patients (P < 0.08). Exercise training prevents the deterioration of ABRMSNA in CHF patients. PMID:25747752

  3. Exercise training prevents the deterioration in the arterial baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity in chronic heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Groehs, Raphaela V; Toschi-Dias, Edgar; Antunes-Correa, Ligia M; Trevizan, Patrícia F; Rondon, Maria Urbana P B; Oliveira, Patrícia; Alves, Maria J N N; Almeida, Dirceu R; Middlekauff, Holly R; Negrão, Carlos E

    2015-05-01

    Arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (ABRMSNA) is impaired in chronic systolic heart failure (CHF). The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that exercise training would improve the gain and reduce the time delay of ABRMSNA in CHF patients. Twenty-six CHF patients, New York Heart Association Functional Class II-III, EF ≤ 40%, peak V̇o2 ≤ 20 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) were divided into two groups: untrained (UT, n = 13, 57 ± 3 years) and exercise trained (ET, n = 13, 49 ± 3 years). Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was directly recorded by microneurography technique. Arterial pressure was measured on a beat-to-beat basis. Time series of MSNA and systolic arterial pressure were analyzed by autoregressive spectral analysis. The gain and time delay of ABRMSNA was obtained by bivariate autoregressive analysis. Exercise training was performed on a cycle ergometer at moderate intensity, three 60-min sessions per week for 16 wk. Baseline MSNA, gain and time delay of ABRMSNA, and low frequency of MSNA (LFMSNA) to high-frequency ratio (HFMSNA) (LFMSNA/HFMSNA) were similar between groups. ET significantly decreased MSNA. MSNA was unchanged in the UT patients. The gain and time delay of ABRMSNA were unchanged in the ET patients. In contrast, the gain of ABRMSNA was significantly reduced [3.5 ± 0.7 vs. 1.8 ± 0.2, arbitrary units (au)/mmHg, P = 0.04] and the time delay of ABRMSNA was significantly increased (4.6 ± 0.8 vs. 7.9 ± 1.0 s, P = 0.05) in the UT patients. LFMSNA-to-HFMSNA ratio tended to be lower in the ET patients (P < 0.08). Exercise training prevents the deterioration of ABRMSNA in CHF patients. PMID:25747752

  4. Crucifixion and median neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jacqueline M; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Watson, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    Crucifixion as a means of torture and execution was first developed in the 6th century B.C. and remained popular for over 1000 years. Details of the practice, which claimed hundreds of thousands of lives, have intrigued scholars as historical records and archaeological findings from the era are limited. As a result, various aspects of crucifixion, including the type of crosses used, methods of securing victims to crosses, the length of time victims survived on the cross, and the exact mechanisms of death, remain topics of debate. One aspect of crucifixion not previously explored in detail is the characteristic hand posture often depicted in artistic renditions of crucifixion. In this posture, the hand is clenched in a peculiar and characteristic fashion: there is complete failure of flexion of the thumb and index finger with partial failure of flexion of the middle finger. Such a “crucified clench” is depicted across different cultures and from different eras. A review of crucifixion history and techniques, median nerve anatomy and function, and the historical artistic depiction of crucifixion was performed to support the hypothesis that the “crucified clench” results from proximal median neuropathy due to positioning on the cross, rather than from direct trauma of impalement of the hand or wrist. PMID:23785656

  5. Isolated median sensory neuropathy after acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Ho; Hyun, Jung Keun; Lee, Seong Jae

    2008-12-01

    A 47-year-old left-handed man presented with pain and numbness in his left thumb and index finger after acupuncture treatment on an acupoint in his left wrist. A technique of herbal acupuncture, involving the use of a needle coated with apricot seed extract, was used. Median nerve conduction study showed an absence of sensory nerve action potential in the left index finger, whereas the results were normal in all other fingers. The radial and ulnar nerves in the left thumb and ring finger, respectively, showed no abnormality. Infrared thermography of the left index finger showed severe hypothermia. The patient was diagnosed as having an isolated injury to the sensory nerve fibers of the median nerve innervating the index finger. This is the first case report of complications from an herbal acupuncture treatment, and it highlights the possibility of focal peripheral nerve injury caused by acupuncture. PMID:19061751

  6. An unusual course of the radial artery.

    PubMed

    Pelin, C; Zagyapan, R; Mas, N; Karabay, G

    2006-11-01

    Radial artery variations are of importance for clinicians, whether in angiographic examinations or surgical approaches. The high origin radial artery is the most frequent arterial variation observed in the upper limb, showing an incidence of 14.27% in dissection material and 9.75% in angiographic examination. In the present study an unusual course of the radial artery and its relation with the median nerve has been evaluated. During embryological development the radial artery sprouts from two arterial buds arising from the lateral side of the brachial artery and coalescing with each other. The artery lies in the forearm and is overlapped by the brachioradial muscle. In this particular case the radial artery originated from the medial side of the brachial artery and crossed the median nerve twice in an unusual manner 8 cm below the point at which the deep brachial artery arose and 12 cm above the intercondylar line. These results will enhance anatomical knowledge of the region and reduce complication in surgical approaches. PMID:17171625

  7. Uncultured undifferentiated adipose-derived nucleated cell fractions combined with inside-out artery graft accelerate sciatic nerve regeneration and functional recovery.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, R; Asadollahi, A; Amini, K

    2014-09-01

    Effects of transplantation of adipose-derived nucleated cell fractions (ADNCs) on sciatic nerve regeneration were studied. A 10-mm sciatic nerve defect was bridged using artery graft filled with ADNCs. In control group, artery graft was filled with saline alone. Regenerated nerve fibres were studied for 12 weeks. In sham-operated group, sciatic nerve was only exposed and manipulated. Behavioural and functional studies confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in ADNCs transplanted animals than in control group (P<0.05). At the end of study period, animals in ADNCs transplanted group achieved a sciatic functional index (SFI) value of -31.6 ± -3.14, whereas in control group a value of -42.5 ± -3.7 was found. Gastrocnemius muscle mass in ADNCs transplanted animals was found to be significantly higher than that in control group (P=0.001). Morphometric indices of regenerated fibres showed the number and diameter of myelinated fibres to be significantly higher in ADNCs transplanted animals than in control group (P=0.001). On immunohistochemistry, there was more positive staining of S100 in the ADNCs transplanted animals than in control group. ADNCs transplantation into an artery graft could be considered a readily accessible technique that improves functional recovery of sciatic nerve. PMID:24951175

  8. [A Case of Left Vertebral Artery Aneurysm Showing Evoked Potentials on Bilateral Electrode by the Left Vagus Nerve Stimulation to Electromyographic Tracheal Tube].

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Tatsuo; Uehara, Hirofumi; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Shiraishi, Munehiro; Kinoshita, Yuki; Joyashiki, Takeshi; Enokida, Kengo

    2016-02-01

    Previously, we reported a case of brainstem cavernous hemangioma showing false positive responses to electromyographic tracheal tube (EMG tube). We concluded that the cause was spontaneous respiration accompanied by vocal cord movement. We report a case of left vertebral artery aneurysm showing evoked potentials on bilateral electrodes by the left vagus nerve stimulation to EMG tube. An 82-year-old woman underwent clipping of a left unruptured vertebral artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysm. General anesthesia was induced with remifentanil, propofol and suxamethonium, and was maintained with oxygen, air, remifentanil and propofol. We monitored somatosensory evoked potentials, motor evoked potentials, and electromyogram of the vocal cord. When the manipulation reached brainstem and the instrument touched the left vagus nerve, evoked potentials appeared on bilateral electrodes. EMG tube is equipped with two electrodes on both sides. We concluded that the left vagus nerve stimulation generated evoked potentials of the left laryngeal muscles, and they were simultaneously detected as potential difference between two electrodes on both sides. EMG tube is used to identify the vagus nerve. However, it is necessary to bear in mind that each vagus nerve stimulation inevitably generates evoked potentials on bilateral electrodes. PMID:27017772

  9. Intraoperative radiation of canine carotid artery, internal jugular vein, and vagus nerve. Therapeutic applications in the management of advanced head and neck cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, B.B.; Pelzer, H.; Tsao, C.S.; Ward, W.F.; Johnson, P.; Friedman, C.; Sisson, G.A. Sr.; Kies, M. )

    1990-12-01

    As a step in the application of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for treating advanced head and neck cancers, preliminary information was obtained on the radiation tolerance of the canine common carotid artery, internal jugular vein, and vagus nerve to a single, high-dose electron beam. Both sides of the neck of eight mongrel dogs were operated on to expose an 8-cm segment of common carotid artery, internal jugular vein, and vagus nerve. One side of the neck was irradiated, using escalating doses of 2500, 3500, 4500, and 5500 cGy. The contralateral side of the neck served as the unirradiated control. At 3 and 6 months after IORT, one dog at each dose level was killed. None of the dogs developed carotid bleeding at any time after IORT. Light microscopic investigations using hematoxylin-eosin staining on the common carotid artery and internal jugular vein showed no consistent changes that suggested radiation damage; however, the Masson trichrome stain and hydroxyproline concentration of irradiated common carotid artery indicated an increase in the collagen content of the tunica media. Marked changes in the irradiated vagus nerve were seen, indicating severe demyelination and loss of nerve fibers, which appeared to be radiation-dose dependent. Four patients with advanced recurrent head and neck cancer were treated with surgical resection and IORT without any acute or subacute complications. The role of IORT as a supplement to surgery, external beam irradiation, and chemotherapy in selected patients with advanced head and neck cancer needs further exploration.

  10. Microvascular decompression of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery for intermediate nerve neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Younes, Walid M; Capelle, Hans-Holger; Krauss, Joachim K

    2010-01-01

    The authors present the case of a 63-year-old woman with a 5-year history of intractable paroxysmal 'atypical' otofacial pain. The patient's pain attacks were not typical for either trigeminal or vagoglossopharyngeal neuralgia. Surgical exploration via a suboccipital retromastoid craniotomy showed vascular compression of the nervus intermedius by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery and the patient's pain was successfully managed with microvascular decompression. PMID:20431332

  11. Treatment of Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Spontaneous Dissection with Pseudoaneurysm and Unilateral Lower Cranial Nerves Palsy by Two Silk Flow Diverters

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Zelenakova, Jana; DeRiggo, Julius; Kurca, Egon; Kantorova, Ema; Polacek, Hubert

    2013-08-01

    Internal carotid artery (ICA) lesions in the parapharyngeal space (a dissection and a pseudoaneurysm) may present as isolated lower cranial nerves (IX, X, XI, and XII) palsy (Collet-Sicard syndrome). Some arteriopathies such as fibromuscular dysplasia and tortuosity make a vessel predisposed to dissection. Extreme vessel tortuosity makes the treatment by a stent graft impossible. Two Silk stents were used in a 46 year-old man with left lower cranial nerves (IX-XII) palsy for the treatment of left ICA spontaneous dissection with pseudoaneurysm. A follow-up angiogram 5 months later confirmed pseudoaneurysm thrombosis and patency of the left ICA. The patient recovered completely from the deficits.

  12. Superior Hypogastric Nerve Block to Reduce Pain After Uterine Artery Embolization: Advanced Technique and Comparison to Epidural Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Binkert, Christoph A.; Hirzel, Florian C.; Gutzeit, Andreas; Zollikofer, Christoph L.; Hess, Thomas

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate a modified superior hypogastric nerve block (SHNB) to reduce pain after uterine artery embolization (UAE) compared to epidural anesthesia.Materials and methodsIn this retrospective study, the amount of opiate drugs needed after UAE was compared between SHNB and epidural anesthesia. Eighty one consecutive women (mean age: 43.67 years) were in the SHNB group and 27 consecutive women (mean age: 43.48 years) treated earlier at the same institution in the epidural anesthesia group. UAE was performed from a unilateral femoral artery approach using a 4F catheter. 500–700 or 700–900 μm trisacryl gelatine microspheres were used as embolic agents. The SHNB was performed by advancing a 21G from the abdominal wall below the umbilicus to the anterior portion of the 5th vertebral body. For optimal guidance a cranio-caudal tilt of 5°–15° was used. On a lateral view the correct contrast distribution in front of the vertebral body is confirmed. Then 20 ml local anesthesia (ropivacain 0.75 %) is injected. In case of an asymmetric right–left distribution the needle was repositioned.ResultsAll SHNB were successful without severe complications. The mean time for the SHNB was 4 min 38 s (2 min 38 s–9 min 27 s). The needle was repositioned in average 0.87 times. The opiate dose for the SHNB group was 19.33 ± 22.17 mg which was significantly lower. The average time to receive an opiate drug after SHNB was 4 h 41 min.ConclusionThe SHNB is a safe and minimally time-consuming way to reduce pain after UAE especially within the first 4 h.

  13. Transcutaenous electrical nerve stimulation to manage a lower extremity wound complicated by peripheral arterial disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yarboro, Douglas D; Smith, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is used to alleviate muscle pain, and there is some evidence it may affect healing in chronic wounds. An 80-year-old male patient with a chronic left lower extremity wound and a history of peripheral arterial disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer presented for treatment. Previous protocols of care, mainly consisting of sharp debridement and daily dressing changes, had not resulted in a decrease in wound size. The patient had right and left iliac artery stenosis - not amenable to surgical intervention - and an ankle brachial index (ABI) of 0.63 on the left and 0.59 on the right lower extremities. On presentation, the wound measured 3.0 cm x 2.0 cm with a depth of 0.3 cm and a 0.5-cm tract at the 5 o'clock position. Treatment was changed to application of an ionic silver-containing Hydrofiber™ dressing and low-frequency TENS. Electrodes were applied 2 cm superior and inferior to the wound margin at a frequency of 2 Hz with a pulse width of 250 microseconds and amplitude of 33 mA. Treatment time was 45 minutes, twice daily, for 3 months, performed at home by the patient and his caregiver. After 4 weeks, wound dimensions decreased by 1.51% per day, and the wound was completely healed (100% epithelialized) after 12 weeks. At that time, the ABI of the left (treated) leg had increased to 0.71. Research is needed to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of low-frequency TENS to help clinicians provide evidenced-based treatment for wounds complicated by decreased blood flow. PMID:25019248

  14. Nerve regeneration and elastin formation within poly(glycerol sebacate)-based synthetic arterial grafts one-year post-implantation in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Robert A.; Wu, Wei; Yao, Mingyi; Dutta, Debaditya; Duan, Xinjie; Bachman, Timothy N.; Champion, Hunter C.; Stolz, Donna B.; Robertson, Anne M.; Kim, Kang; Isenberg, Jeffrey S.; Wang, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the long term performance of cell-free vascular grafts made from a fast-degrading elastic polymer. We fabricated small arterial grafts from microporous tubes of poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) reinforced with polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers on the outer surface. Grafts were interpositioned in rat abdominal aortas and characterized at 1 year post-implant. Grafts remodeled into “neoarteries” (regenerated arteries) with similar gross appearance to native rat aortas. Neoarteries mimic arterial tissue architecture with a confluent endothelium and media and adventita-like layers. Patent vessels (80%) showed no significant stenosis, dilation, or calcification. Neoarteries contain nerves and have the same amount of mature elastin as native arteries. Despite some differences in matrix organization, regenerated arteries had similar dynamic mechanical compliance to native arteries in vivo. Neoarteries responded to vasomotor agents, albeit with different magnitude than native aortas. These data suggest that an elastic vascular graft that resorbs quickly has potential to improve the performance of vascular grafts used in small arteries. This design may also promote constructive remodeling in other soft tissues. PMID:24119457

  15. Electrophrenic respiration after intercostal to phrenic nerve anastomosis in a patient with anterior spinal artery syndrome: technical case report.

    PubMed

    Krieger, A J; Gropper, M R; Adler, R J

    1994-10-01

    Long-term positive pressure mechanical ventilation has been the standard of care for patients with respiratory insufficiency caused by high cervical spine injury. Stimulation of the phrenic nerves, and thus the diaphragm, with an implanted phrenic nerve pacemaker has provided adequate ventilation and an alternative to the standard. Diaphragmatic pacing, also known as electrophrenic respiration, requires an intact phrenic nerve to act as a conduit for the applied stimulus. Propagation of the stimulus is impossible if the injury sustained has led to axonal loss in the phrenic nerve. This may be expected if the damage to the spinal cord is at the C3-C5 level. If the cell bodies of the motor neurons in this region have been damaged, or direct injury to the phrenic nerve has occurred, then diaphragmatic pacing is not feasible by the traditional method. Microsurgical repair of peripheral nerves and nerve grafting have provided the impetus for research into anastomosis of a viable intercostal nerve to a nonfunctional phrenic nerve, with subsequent reinnervation of the diaphragm. Once successful axonal regeneration and diaphragmatic reinnervation have occurred, the distal phrenic nerve may then be paced. This case documents the first successful institution of electrophrenic respiration after intercostal to phrenic nerve anastomosis. PMID:7808625

  16. Effect of acute high-intensity resistance exercise on optic nerve sheath diameter and ophthalmic artery blood flow pulsatility.

    PubMed

    Lefferts, W K; Hughes, W E; Heffernan, K S

    2015-12-01

    Exertional hypertension associated with acute high-intensity resistance exercise (RE) increases both intravascular and intracranial pressure (ICP), maintaining cerebrovascular transmural pressure. Carotid intravascular pressure pulsatility remains elevated after RE. Whether ICP also remains elevated after acute RE in an attempt to maintain the vessel wall transmural pressure is unknown. Optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD), a valid proxy of ICP, was measured in 20 participants (6 female; 24 ± 4 yr, 24.2 ± 3.9 kg m(-)(2)) at rest (baseline), following a time-control condition, and following RE (5 sets, 5 repetition maximum bench press, 5 sets 10 repetition maximum biceps curls) using ultrasound. Additionally, intracranial hemodynamic pulsatility index (PI) was assessed in the ophthalmic artery (OA) by using Doppler. Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was obtained from synthesized aortic pressure waveforms obtained via a brachial oscillometric cuff and carotid pulse pressure was measured by using applanation tonometry. Aortic PWV (5.2 ± 0.5-6.0 ± 0.7 m s(-1), P < 0.05) and carotid pulse pressure (45 ± 17-59 ± 19 mm Hg, P < 0.05) were significantly elevated post RE compared with baseline. There were no significant changes in ONSD (5.09 ± 0.7-5.09 ± 0.7 mm, P > 0.05) or OA flow PI (1.35 ± 0.2-1.38 ± 0.3, P > 0.05) following acute RE. In conclusion, during recovery from acute high-intensity RE, there are increases in aortic stiffness and extracranial pressure pulsatility in the absence of changes in ICP and flow pulsatility. These findings may have implications for alterations in cerebral transmural pressure and cerebral aneurysmal wall stress following RE. PMID:25739332

  17. Reappearance of Cranial Nerve Dysfunction Symptoms Caused by New Artery Compression More than 20 Years after Initially Successful Microvascular Decompression: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    INOUE, Hiroto; KONDO, Akinori; SHIMANO, Hiroshi; YASUDA, Soichiro; MURAO, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Reappearance of symptoms of cranial nerve dysfunction is not uncommon after successful microvascular decompression (MVD). The purpose of this study was to report two quite unusual cases of recurrent and newly developed hemifacial spasm (HFS) caused by a new conflicting artery more than 20 years after the first successful surgery. In Case 1, the first MVD was performed for HFS caused by the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) when the patient was 38 years old. After 26 symptom-free years, HFS recurred on the same side of the face due to compression by the newly developed offending AICA. In Case 2, the patient was first operated on for trigeminal neuralgia by transposition of the AICA at 49 years old, but 20 symptom-free years after the first MVD, a new offending PICA compressed the facial nerve on the same side, causing HFS. These two patients underwent reoperation and gained satisfactory results postoperatively. Reappearance of symptoms related to compression of the root exit zone (REZ) by a new offending artery after such a long symptom-free interval since the first effective MVD is rare. Here, we describe two such unusual cases and discuss how to manage and prevent such reappearance of symptoms after a long time interval. PMID:26804190

  18. Reappearance of Cranial Nerve Dysfunction Symptoms Caused by New Artery Compression More than 20 Years after Initially Successful Microvascular Decompression: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroto; Kondo, Akinori; Shimano, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Soichiro; Murao, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Reappearance of symptoms of cranial nerve dysfunction is not uncommon after successful microvascular decompression (MVD). The purpose of this study was to report two quite unusual cases of recurrent and newly developed hemifacial spasm (HFS) caused by a new conflicting artery more than 20 years after the first successful surgery. In Case 1, the first MVD was performed for HFS caused by the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) when the patient was 38 years old. After 26 symptom-free years, HFS recurred on the same side of the face due to compression by the newly developed offending AICA. In Case 2, the patient was first operated on for trigeminal neuralgia by transposition of the AICA at 49 years old, but 20 symptom-free years after the first MVD, a new offending PICA compressed the facial nerve on the same side, causing HFS. These two patients underwent reoperation and gained satisfactory results postoperatively. Reappearance of symptoms related to compression of the root exit zone (REZ) by a new offending artery after such a long symptom-free interval since the first effective MVD is rare. Here, we describe two such unusual cases and discuss how to manage and prevent such reappearance of symptoms after a long time interval. PMID:26804190

  19. Modified Cytoplasmic Ca2+ Sequestration Contributes to Spinal Cord Injury-Induced Augmentation of Nerve-Evoked Contractions in the Rat Tail Artery

    PubMed Central

    Al Dera, Hussain; Callaghan, Brid P.; Brock, James A.

    2014-01-01

    In rat tail artery (RTA), spinal cord injury (SCI) increases nerve-evoked contractions and the contribution of L-type Ca2+ channels to these responses. In RTAs from unoperated rats, these channels play a minor role in contractions and Bay K8644 (L-type channel agonist) mimics the effects of SCI. Here we investigated the mechanisms underlying the facilitatory actions of SCI and Bay K8644 on nerve-evoked contractions of RTAs and the hypothesis that Ca2+ entering via L-type Ca2+ channels is rapidly sequestered by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) limiting its role in contraction. In situ electrochemical detection of noradrenaline was used to assess if Bay K8644 increased noradrenaline release. Perforated patch recordings were used to assess if SCI changed the Ca2+ current recorded in RTA myocytes. Wire myography was used to assess if SCI modified the effects of Bay K8644 and of interrupting SR Ca2+ uptake on nerve-evoked contractions. Bay K8644 did not change noradrenaline-induced oxidation currents. Neither the size nor gating of Ca2+ currents differed between myocytes from sham-operated (control) and SCI rats. Bay K8644 increased nerve-evoked contractions in RTAs from both control and SCI rats, but the magnitude of this effect was reduced by SCI. By contrast, depleting SR Ca2+ stores with ryanodine or cyclopiazonic acid selectively increased nerve-evoked contractions in control RTAs. Cyclopiazonic acid also selectively increased the blockade of these responses by nifedipine (L-type channel blocker) in control RTAs, whereas ryanodine increased the blockade produced by nifedipine in both groups of RTAs. These findings suggest that Ca2+ entering via L-type channels is normally rapidly sequestered limiting its access to the contractile mechanism. Furthermore, the findings suggest SCI reduces the role of this mechanism. PMID:25350563

  20. Anatomic delineation of the ulnar nerve and ulnar artery in relation to the carpal tunnel by axial magnetic resonance imaging scanning.

    PubMed

    Netscher, D; Polsen, C; Thornby, J; Choi, H; Udeh, J

    1996-03-01

    In a number of publications the distal branches of both the ulnar artery and ulnar nerve have been identified as being positioned ulnar to the hook of the hamate. We undertook a magnetic resonance imaging project in patients who presented for carpal tunnel release to determine how far radially vital structures of Guyon's canal may be located and if they may overlap the carpal tunnel at the hook of the hamate. Cross-sectional magnetic resonance imaging scans of 20 patients were performed prior to carpal tunnel release with the wrist positioned in neutral, flexed, and extended positions. Linear measurements were made either radial or ulnar to the hook of the hamate taken as the reference point. In the neutral position, the ulnar nerve was found to be, on average, 3.6 mm ulnar to the hook of the hamate (range of 5.8 mm radial to 7.5 mm ulnar). The ulnar artery averaged 0.7 mm to the radial side of the hook of the hamate (range 7.8 mm radial to 2.8 mm ulnar). Guyon's canal extended 28% of the way across the carpal ligament (range 9 to 63%). With the wrist in flexion and extension, there was an ulnar displacement and a radial displacement, respectively, of these structures relative to the hook of the hamate. PMID:8683062

  1. High Vascular Tone of Mouse Femoral Arteries In Vivo Is Determined by Sympathetic Nerve Activity Via α1A- and α1D-Adrenoceptor Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Hema; Fisher, Steven A.; Wier, Withrow G.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Determining the role of vascular receptors in vivo is difficult and not readily accomplished by systemic application of antagonists or genetic manipulations. Here we used intravital microscopy to measure the contributions of sympathetic receptors, particularly α1-adrenoceptor subtypes, to contractile activation of femoral artery in vivo. Experimental approach Diameter and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) in femoral arteries were determined by intravital fluorescence microscopy in mice expressing a Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK) based calcium-calmodulin biosensor. Pharmacological agents were applied locally to the femoral artery to determine the contributions of vascular receptors to tonic contraction and [Ca2+]i,. Key results In the anesthetized animal, femoral arteries were constricted to a diameter equal to 54% of their passive diameter (i.e. tone = 46%). Of this total basal tone, 16% was blocked by RS79948 (0.1 µM) and thus attributable to α2-adrenoceptors. A further 46% was blocked by prazosin (0.1 µM) and thus attributable to α1-adrenoceptors. Blockade of P2X and NPY1 receptors with suramin (0.5 mM) and BIBP3226 (1.0 µM) respectively, reduced tone by a further 22%, leaving 16% of basal tone unaffected at these concentrations of antagonists. Application of RS100329 (α1A-selective antagonist) and BMY7378 (α1D-selective) decreased tone by 29% and 26%, respectively, and reduced [Ca2+]i. Chloroethylclonidine (1 µM preferential for α1B-) had no effect. Abolition of sympathetic nerve activity (hexamethonium, i.p.) reduced basal tone by 90%. Conclusion and Implications Tone of mouse femoral arteries in vivo is almost entirely sympathetic in origin. Activation of α1A- and α1D-adrenoceptors elevates [Ca2+]i and accounts for at least 55% of the tone. PMID:23776582

  2. Brachiomedian artery (arteria brachiomediana) revisited: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Kachlik, David; Konarik, Marek; Riedlova, Jitka; Baca, Vaclav

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews in detail the superficial brachiomedian artery (arteria brachiomediana superficialis), a very rare variant of the main arterial trunks of the upper limb. It branches either from the axillary artery or the brachial artery, descends superficially in the arm (similar to the course of the superficial brachial artery) and continues across the cubital fossa, runs superficially in the forearm, approaches the median nerve and enters the carpal canal to reach the hand. It usually terminates in the superficial palmar arch. The first drawing was published, in 1830, and the first description was published, in 1844. Altogether, to our knowledge, only 31 cases of a true, superficial brachiomedian artery have been reported (Some cases are incorrectly reported as superficial brachioradiomedian artery or superficial brachioulnomedian artery). Based on a meta-analysis of known, available studies, the incidence is 0.23% in Caucasians and 1.48% in Mongolians. Knowing whether or not this arterial variant is present is important in clinical medicine and relevant for: The catheterization via the radial or ulnar artery; harvesting the vascular pedicle for a forearm flap based on the radial, ulnar or superficial brachiomedian arteries; the possible collateral circulation in cases of the arterial closure; and the surgical management of carpal tunnel syndrome. Its presence can elevate the danger of an injury to the superficially located variant artery or of an accidental injection. PMID:27131025

  3. Somatosensory evoked potential monitoring of the brachial plexus to predict nerve injury during internal mammary artery harvest: intraoperative comparisons of the Rultract and Pittman sternal retractors.

    PubMed

    Jellish, W S; Martucci, J; Blakeman, B; Hudson, E

    1994-08-01

    Brachial plexus injury after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) continues to be a common problem postoperatively. With the use of somatosensory evoked potential monitoring (SSEP), neurologic integrity of the brachial plexus during internal mammary artery (IMA) harvest was assessed and the Rultract and Pittman sternal retractors were compared to determine what effect they had on SSEP characteristics. Results showed that the Rultract and Pittman retractors caused large decreases in SSEP amplitudes after insertion, (1.25 +/- 0.14 versus 0.72 +/- 0.09, P < 0.05; and 1.64 +/- 0.27 versus 0.91 +/- 0.14, P < 0.05) respectively. This decrease was noted in 85% of Rultract and 68.75% of Pittman patients, respectively. Amplitudes increased after retractor removal but never returned to baseline values. Cooley retractor placement in the patients not undergoing IMA harvest (control) produced only mild decreases in amplitude. Waveform latency increased in all groups after retractor placement, but these increases were thought to be clinically insignificant. Postoperatively, three patients in each of the IMA retractor groups had brachial plexus symptoms (18%), whereas only one patient in the control group had symptoms. Somatosensory evoked potential monitoring seems to be a sensitive intraoperative monitor for assessing brachial plexus injury during CABG. The nerve plexus seems to be most at risk for pathologic injury during retraction of the sternum for IMA harvest. Though the Rultract retractor caused greater changes in SSEP characteristics than the Pittman, no clinical outcome differences between the two could be ascertained. Using SSEP monitoring may reduce brachial plexus injury during IMA harvest by allowing early detection of nerve compromise and therapeutic interventions to alleviate the insult while under general anesthesia. PMID:7948794

  4. Fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the inferior calcaneal nerve (Baxter nerve).

    PubMed

    Zeng, Rong; Frederick-Dyer, Katherine; Ferguson, N Lynn; Lewis, James; Fu, Yitong

    2012-09-01

    Fibrolipomatous hamartoma (FLH) is a rare, benign lesion of the peripheral nerves most frequently involving the median nerve and its digital branches (80 %). Pathognomonic MR features of FLH such as coaxial-cable-like appearance on axial planes and a spaghetti-like appearance on coronal planes have been described by Marom and Helms, obviating the need for diagnostic biopsy. We present a case of fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the inferior calcaneal nerve (Baxter nerve) with associated subcutaneous fat proliferation. PMID:22526881

  5. Spike rate of multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve fibers after catheter-based renal nerve ablation.

    PubMed

    Tank, Jens; Heusser, Karsten; Brinkmann, Julia; Schmidt, Bernhard M; Menne, Jan; Bauersachs, Johann; Haller, Hermann; Diedrich, André; Jordan, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Patients with treatment-resistant arterial hypertension exhibited profound reductions in single sympathetic vasoconstrictor fiber firing rates after renal nerve ablation. In contrast, integrated multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) changed little or not at all. We hypothesized that conventional MSNA analysis may have missed single fiber discharges, thus, obscuring sympathetic inhibition after renal denervation. We studied patients with difficult-to-control arterial hypertension (age 45-74 years) before, 6 (n = 11), and 12 months (n = 8) after renal nerve ablation. Electrocardiogram, respiration, brachial, and finger arterial blood pressure (BP), as well as the MSNA and raw MSNA signals were analyzed. We detected MSNA action-potential spikes using 2 stage kurtosis wavelet denoising techniques to assess mean, median, and maximum spike rates for each beat-to-beat interval. Supine heart rate and systolic BP did not change at 6 (ΔHR: -2 ± 3 bpm; ΔSBP: 2 ± 9 mm Hg) or at 12 months (ΔHR: -1 ± 3 mm Hg, ΔSBP: -1 ± 9 mm Hg) after renal nerve ablation. Mean burst frequency and mean spike frequency at baseline were 34 ± 3 bursts per minute and 8 ± 1 spikes per second. Both measurements did not change at 6 months (-1.4 ± 3.6 bursts/minute; -0.6 ± 1.4 spikes/second) or at 12 months (-2.5 ± 4.0 bursts/minute; -2.0 ± 1.6 spikes/second) after renal nerve ablation. After renal nerve ablation, BP decreased in 3 of 11 patients. BP and MSNA spike frequency changes were not correlated (slope = -0.06; P = .369). Spike rate analysis of multi-unit MSNA neurograms further suggests that profound sympathetic inhibition is not a consistent finding after renal nerve ablation. PMID:26324745

  6. Intracerebral malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a child with neurofibromatosis Type 1 and middle cerebral artery aneurysm treated with endovascular coil embolization.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael J; Cheshier, Samuel; Sharma, Sunjay; Armstrong, Derek; Hawkins, Cynthia; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T; Taylor, Michael D

    2011-10-01

    Among the neoplastic conditions that affect patients with neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) are malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), which typically arise from peripheral nerves of the limbs, trunk, and lumbar and brachial plexuses. Ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for MPNST development, especially in susceptible patients such as those with NF1. Patients with NF1 are also at risk for intracranial aneurysms, which are increasingly being successfully managed with endovascular therapies. The authors describe the case of a 9-year-old, previously healthy girl who presented in extremis with a right frontal intracerebral hemorrhage resulting from a ruptured right middle cerebral artery (MCA) trifurcation aneurysm. Following urgent decompressive craniectomy, the patient underwent endovascular coil embolization of the MCA aneurysm without complication. Given her mother's history of NF1, the child underwent genetic testing, which disclosed signs positive for NF1. The patient recovered well, but follow-up MR imaging and MR angiography performed at 14 months demonstrated a large frontotemporal mass encasing the right MCA trifurcation. The patient underwent frontotemporal craniotomy and subtotal resection of the mass, which was histologically found to be an intracranial MPNST. The patient received chemotherapy and focal radiation therapy and remains alive at 6 months postresection. To the authors' knowledge, this represents the only known case of intracranial neoplasm arising in the region of an intracranial aneurysm repaired by endovascular coil embolization. While patients with NF1 represent a population with genetic susceptibility to radiation-induced tumors, the pathogenesis of intracerebral MPNSTs remains poorly understood. PMID:21961539

  7. Popliteal Artery Pseudoaneurysm with Secondary Chronic Common Peroneal Nerve Neuropathy and Foot Drop after Total Knee Replacement.

    PubMed

    Ghazala, Christopher George; Elsaid, Tarek Afifi; Mudawi, Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    Total knee replacements (TKRs) are performed to treat debilitating arthritis and are one of the most routinely performed surgical procedures in the United Kingdom. Complications of infection and deep vein thrombosis are well recognized and managed, whereas neurovascular injuries are rarely reported although should not be disregarded. We report on the case of a 72-year-old man who presented 5 weeks after a TKR with symptoms of a progressively worsening ipsilateral foot drop. A diagnosis of common peroneal nerve neuropathy secondary to the compressive effects of a popliteal pseudoaneurysm was made, and he underwent uneventful patch repair of the pseudoaneurysm. Unique to the literature is the chronicity of the foot drop, which still persisted at follow-up 6 weeks later. PMID:26140945

  8. Nerve Transfers for the Restoration of Wrist, Finger, and Thumb Extension After High Radial Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Pet, Mitchell A; Lipira, Angelo B; Ko, Jason H

    2016-05-01

    High radial nerve injury is a common pattern of peripheral nerve injury most often associated with orthopedic trauma. Nerve transfers to the wrist and finger extensors, often from the median nerve, offer several advantages when compared to nerve repair or grafting and tendon transfer. In this article, we discuss the forearm anatomy pertinent to performing these nerve transfers and review the literature surrounding nerve transfers for wrist, finger, and thumb extension. A suggested algorithm for management of acute traumatic high radial nerve palsy is offered, and our preferred surgical technique for treatment of high radial nerve palsy is provided. PMID:27094891

  9. Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Nerve Procedures.

    PubMed

    Strakowski, Jeffrey A

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound guidance allows real-time visualization of the needle in peripheral nerve procedures, improving accuracy and safety. Sonographic visualization of the peripheral nerve and surrounding anatomy can provide valuable information for diagnostic purposes and procedure enhancement. Common procedures discussed are the suprascapular nerve at the suprascapular notch, deep branch of the radial nerve at the supinator, median nerve at the pronator teres and carpal tunnel, lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh, superficial fibular nerve at the leg, tibial nerve at the ankle, and interdigital neuroma. For each procedure, the indications, relevant anatomy, preprocedural scanning technique, and injection procedure itself are detailed. PMID:27468673

  10. Identification of the Bony Canal of the Posterior Superior Alveolar Nerve and Artery in the Maxillary Sinus: Tomographic, Radiographic, and Macroscopic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    German, Iris Jasmin Santos; Buchaim, Daniela Vieira; Andreo, Jesus Carlos; Shinohara, Elio Hitoshi; Capelozza, Ana Lúcia Alvares; Shinohara, Andre Luis; Pereira, Mizael; Buchaim, Rogerio Leone

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the shape and route of the bony canal of the posterior superior alveolar artery (PSAA) and posterior superior alveolar nerve (PSAN) using different identification methods, including computed tomography (CT), panoramic radiograph, and macroscopic evaluation (corpse and dry skull). Twenty-four patients were analyzed by CT and panoramic and posterior anterior (PA) radiographs; additionally, 90 dry skulls and 21 dissected anatomical specimens were examined. Three-dimensional-CT revealed that the lateral wall of the maxillary sinus resembled a tunnel format in 60% of the treated patients. Out of all 24 patients, the panoramic radiograph identified the bony canal in only one patient; whereas the PA radiograph identified it in 80% of the patients. The dry skulls showed tunnellike routes of the PSAA and PSAN in 65% of the cases. Moreover, the pathway was also visibly observed in the dissected anatomical specimens as a straight shape in 85% of the cases. Thus, our results demonstrated that the most common shape of the bony canal of the PSAA and PSAN is the tunnel format with a straight route by 3D-CT, posterior anterior radiography, and macroscopic evaluation. However, in the panoramic radiographs, it was difficult to identify this canal. PMID:25861685

  11. Differential effects of calcium antagonists and Bay K 8644 on contractile responses to exogenous noradrenaline and adrenergic nerve stimulation in the rabbit ear artery.

    PubMed Central

    Skärby, T. V.; Högestätt, E. D.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of three calcium antagonists (nifedipine, verapamil, diltiazem) and the calcium agonist Bay K 8644 were compared on contractile responses of similar amplitude elicited by noradrenaline (NA) and electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) in the rabbit isolated ear artery. 2. Contractions induced by both NA (3 x 10(-7) M) and ENS (10 Hz, 10s) were almost exclusively mediated by alpha 1-adrenoceptors, since 10(-7) M prazosin abolished (NA) or almost abolished (ENS) the responses, and prazosin was more than three orders of magnitude more potent than rauwolscine on both types of response. 3. ENS-induced contractions were considerably less inhibited by nifedipine, verapamil and diltiazem than were those elicited by NA. Bay K 8644 enhanced responses to NA more than those to ENS. 4. The inhibitory effect of nifedipine and Ca2+ deprivation on NA-induced contractions decreased with increasing NA concentration. Reduction of the NA response by prazosin or phenoxybenzamine increased the nifedipine inhibition. 5. Reduction of the ENS-induced contractions by prazosin or phenoxybenzamine, or by use of a lower stimulation frequency did not increase the inhibitory effect of nifedipine. 6. In conclusion, the differential effects of the calcium antagonists on NA- and ENS-induced contractions were not related to differences in alpha-adrenoceptor subtype (alpha 1/alpha 2), receptor reserve or response amplitude, but may rather reflect temporal and spatial differences in alpha-adrenoceptor activation between the responses. PMID:1707708

  12. The Diagnostic Value of Nerve Ultrasound in an Atypical Palmar Cutaneous Nerve Lesion.

    PubMed

    Zanette, Giampietro; Tamburin, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    Detailed knowledge of the fascicular anatomy of peripheral nerves is important for microsurgical repair and functional electrostimulation.We report a patient with a lesion on the left palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve (PCBMN) and sensory signs expanding outside the PCBMN cutaneous innervation territory. Nerve conduction study showed the absence of left PCBMN sensory nerve action potential, but apparently, no median nerve (MN) involvement. Nerve ultrasound documented a neuroma of the left PCBMN and a coexistent lateral neuroma of the left MN in the carpal tunnel after the PCBMN left the main nerve trunk.Nerve ultrasound may offer important information in patients with peripheral nerve lesions and atypical clinical and/or nerve conduction study findings. The present case may shed some light on the somatotopy of MN fascicles at the wrist. PMID:26945219

  13. Pinched Nerve

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Pinched Nerve Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Pinched Nerve? The term "pinched nerve" is a colloquial term ...

  14. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy may be done to help diagnose: Axon degeneration (destruction of the axon portion of the nerve cell) Damage to the ... Demyelination Inflammation of the nerve Leprosy Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis

  15. An IIR median hybrid filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Peter H.; Sartori, Michael A.; Bryden, Timothy M.

    1992-01-01

    A new class of nonlinear filters, the so-called class of multidirectional infinite impulse response median hybrid filters, is presented and analyzed. The input signal is processed twice using a linear shift-invariant infinite impulse response filtering module: once with normal causality and a second time with inverted causality. The final output of the MIMH filter is the median of the two-directional outputs and the original input signal. Thus, the MIMH filter is a concatenation of linear filtering and nonlinear filtering (a median filtering module). Because of this unique scheme, the MIMH filter possesses many desirable properties which are both proven and analyzed (including impulse removal, step preservation, and noise suppression). A comparison to other existing median type filters is also provided.

  16. Anterior interosseous nerve syndrome diagnosis and intraoperative findings: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Aljawder, Abdulla; Faqi, Mohammed Khalid; Mohamed, Abeer; Alkhalifa, Fahad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anterior Interosseous Nerve (AIN) is a motor branch from the Median nerve and runs deep in the forearm along with the anterior interosseous artery. It innervates three muscles in the forearm; an isolated palsy of these muscles is known as AIN Syndrome. There are several documented causes of AIN syndrome but its pathophysiology remains unclear. Presentation of case A 48-year old male that presented with right elbow pain and inability to flex his right interphalangeal joint of the thumb and the distal interphalangeal joint of the index finger. MR images denoted mild atrophy of the radial half of the flexor digitorum profundus and the pronator quadratus. Although there were no compressing lesions identifiable on MRI, Electrodiagnostic studies suggested compression neuropathy affecting the AIN. During surgical decompression of the median nerve in the proximal forearm, the operative findings were several tendinous fasciae and a tight fibrous arch of the flexor digitorum superficialis compressing the median nerve at the level of the AIN branch. Discussion Different treatment schemes with reasonable outcome have been reported. Both nonsurgical and surgical intervention have been described in most of these schemes but differed in the timing of intervention with variable outcome. Conclusion Clinical suspicion should arise in the presence of isolated paralysis of the AIN-supplied muscles. MRI and electrodiagnostic studies will confirm the diagnosis and identify the etiology. The optimal treatment of AIN syndrome has not been established. We recommend surgical intervention in confirmed AIN syndrome from compression neuropathy, refractive to conservative therapy. PMID:26921536

  17. 21 CFR 870.3850 - Carotid sinus nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carotid sinus nerve stimulator. 870.3850 Section... nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. A carotid sinus nerve stimulator is an implantable device used to decrease arterial pressure by stimulating Hering's nerve at the carotid sinus. (b) Classification....

  18. 21 CFR 870.3850 - Carotid sinus nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Carotid sinus nerve stimulator. 870.3850 Section... nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. A carotid sinus nerve stimulator is an implantable device used to decrease arterial pressure by stimulating Hering's nerve at the carotid sinus. (b) Classification....

  19. 21 CFR 870.3850 - Carotid sinus nerve stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Carotid sinus nerve stimulator. 870.3850 Section... nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. A carotid sinus nerve stimulator is an implantable device used to decrease arterial pressure by stimulating Hering's nerve at the carotid sinus. (b) Classification....

  20. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  1. Epidermal cyst of median raphe.

    PubMed

    LaNasa, J A

    1976-10-01

    Cysts of the penis are rare and references to them in standard textbooks are sketchy. A case report of a congenital epidermal cyst of the median raphe of the penis is presented; therapy involved excision of the mass. Review of the literature is given. PMID:973298

  2. Congenital Median Upper Lip Fistula

    PubMed Central

    al Aithan, Bandar

    2012-01-01

    Congenital median upper lip fistula (MULF) is an extremely rare condition resulting from abnormal fusion of embryologic structures. We present a new case of congenital medial upper lip fistula located in the midline of the philtrum of a 6 year old girl. PMID:22953305

  3. Ultrasonography for nerve compression syndromes of the upper extremity

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Jung; Ahn, Jae Hong; Ryu, Dae Shik; Kang, Chae Hoon; Jung, Seung Mun; Park, Man Soo; Shin, Dong-Rock

    2015-01-01

    Nerve compression syndromes commonly involve the nerves in the upper extremity. High-resolution ultrasonography (US) can satisfactorily assess these nerves and may detect the morphological changes of the nerves. US can also reveal the causes of nerve compression when structural abnormalities or space-occupying lesions are present. The most common US finding of compression neuropathy is nerve swelling proximal to the compression site. This article reviews the normal anatomic location and US appearances of the median, ulnar, and radial nerves. Common nerve compression syndromes in the upper extremity and their US findings are also reviewed. PMID:25682987

  4. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Update Date 6/1/2015 ...

  5. Nerve conduction

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the spinal cord to muscles and sensory receptors. A peripheral nerve is composed of nerve bundles (fascicles) ... two neurons, it must first be converted to a chemical signal, which then crosses a space of ...

  6. Localization of nerve depolarization with magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Odderson, I R; Halar, E M

    1992-06-01

    The specific location on the magnetic stimulation (MS) coil that may correspond to the area of nerve depolarization has not been determined. In order to localize such an area, MS with 9-cm and 5-cm diameter coils was compared with conventional percutaneous electric stimulation (ES). On the 9-cm coil the distribution of points of nerve depolarization corresponded to that quarter of the coil which was placed over and parallel to the median nerve, whereas on the 5-cm coil, this area also extended outside the coil. The points of median nerve depolarization with MS were distributed over a distance of 7 cm on the stimulator head and was nearly identical for the 2 coil sizes at the wrist and elbow. Ulnar nerve costimulation was less frequent with the smaller coil at the wrist. A calculated reference point on the coil is suggested for more accurate NCV determinations. PMID:1508235

  7. Giant somatosensory evoked potentials in a patient with the anterior spinal artery syndrome.

    PubMed

    Triggs, W J; Berić, A

    1993-05-01

    We studied a previously healthy 25-year-old woman with the anterior spinal artery syndrome, a rare thoracocervical myelopathy with multiple potential etiologies. Quantitative and clinical sensory examination showed dissociated loss of pin-prick and temperature discrimination below the level of the lesion, with normal light touch, vibratory, and position sense. Magnetic resonance imaging was consistent with cervical spinal cord infarction. Median SEPs showed normal Erb's potential with absent spinal N13- and normal scalp N20- latency. Tibial SEPs showed normal lumbosacral responses and normal scalp P30- latency. Both median and tibial nerve stimulation produced cortical responses of unusually large amplitude (median 38 microV, tibial 17 microV). We hypothesize that large SEP amplitudes in this patient resulted from loss of anterolateral inhibitory influences on the dorsal column-medial lemniscal system. PMID:8515757

  8. Tracheoinnominate artery fistula following tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Keçeligil, H T; Erk, M K; Kolbakir, F; Yildirim, A; Yilman, M; Unal, R

    1995-10-01

    Tracheoinnominate artery fistula is a relatively rare but highly lethal complication occurring in patients with long-standing tracheostomies. Early evaluation of this problem and prompt aggressive therapy are necessary. When massive haemorrhage begins, immediate arterial compression, control of the airway and subsequent treatment of the injured artery may be lifesaving. Immediate surgical exploration through a median sternotomy is necessary to control the proximal and distal innominate artery. After the damaged artery has been excised, vascular reconstruction can be performed to preserve the connection between the proximal and distal ends of the innominate artery. A pedicled pericardial patch was successfully used for the tracheal reconstruction. PMID:8574535

  9. The distance between the posterior communicating arteries and their relation to the endoscopic third ventriculostomy in adults: An anatomic study

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Alicia Del Carmen Becerra; da Silva, Carlos Eduardo; de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Pires

    2011-01-01

    Background: The diencephalic leaf of the Liliequist's membrane is a continuous structure that should be perforated in the endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Its lateral borders are penetrated by the third cranial nerve and the posterior communicating arteries. The most important complication of endoscopic third ventriculostomy is the vascular injury, such as the posterior communicating artery. The purpose of this study is to measure the distance between posterior communicating arteries located below the third ventricle floor and anterior of the mammillary bodies. Methods: In this observational prospective study 20 fresh brains from cadavers were utilized to measure the distance between the posterior communicating arteries in April 2008 at the Death Check Unit of our Institution. A digital photograph of the posterior communicating arteries was taken and the distance between the arteries was measured. The measurement was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: In the descriptive analysis of the 20 specimens, the posterior communicating arteries distance was 9 to 18.9 mm, a mean of 12.5 mm, median of 12.2 mm, standard deviation of 2.3 mm. Conclusion: The detailed knowledge of vascular structures involved in the endoscopic third ventriculostomy as to the posterior communicating arteries distance provides a safe lateral vascular border when performing such procedure. PMID:21748043

  10. Ulnar Nerve Compression in Guyon's Canal by Ganglion Cyst.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Kyung-Woo; Kim, Min-Su; Chang, Chul-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Ho

    2011-02-01

    Compression of the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal can result from repeated blunt trauma, fracture of the hamate's hook, and arterial thrombosis or aneurysm. In addition, conditions such as ganglia, rheumatoid arthritis and ulnar artery disease can rapidly compress the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal. A ganglion cyst can acutely protrude or grow, which also might compress the ulnar nerve. So, clinicians should consider a ganglion cyst in Guyon's canal as a possible underlying cause of ulnar nerve compression in patients with a sudden decrease in hand strength. We believe that early decompression with removal of the ganglion is very important to promote complete recovery. PMID:21519507

  11. Ulnar Nerve Compression in Guyon's Canal by Ganglion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Kyung-Woo; Kim, Min-Su; Chang, Chul-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Compression of the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal can result from repeated blunt trauma, fracture of the hamate's hook, and arterial thrombosis or aneurysm. In addition, conditions such as ganglia, rheumatoid arthritis and ulnar artery disease can rapidly compress the ulnar nerve in Guyon's canal. A ganglion cyst can acutely protrude or grow, which also might compress the ulnar nerve. So, clinicians should consider a ganglion cyst in Guyon's canal as a possible underlying cause of ulnar nerve compression in patients with a sudden decrease in hand strength. We believe that early decompression with removal of the ganglion is very important to promote complete recovery. PMID:21519507

  12. Stem cell salvage of injured peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Grimoldi, Nadia; Colleoni, Federica; Tiberio, Francesca; Vetrano, Ignazio G; Cappellari, Alberto; Costa, Antonella; Belicchi, Marzia; Razini, Paola; Giordano, Rosaria; Spagnoli, Diego; Pluderi, Mauro; Gatti, Stefano; Morbin, Michela; Gaini, Sergio M; Rebulla, Paolo; Bresolin, Nereo; Torrente, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    We previously developed a collagen tube filled with autologous skin-derived stem cells (SDSCs) for bridging long rat sciatic nerve gaps. Here we present a case report describing a compassionate use of this graft for repairing the polyinjured motor and sensory nerves of the upper arms of a patient. Preclinical assessment was performed with collagen/SDSC implantation in rats after sectioning the sciatic nerve. For the patient, during the 3-year follow-up period, functional recovery of injured median and ulnar nerves was assessed by pinch gauge test and static two-point discrimination and touch test with monofilaments, along with electrophysiological and MRI examinations. Preclinical experiments in rats revealed rescue of sciatic nerve and no side effects of patient-derived SDSC transplantation (30 and 180 days of treatment). In the patient treatment, motor and sensory functions of the median nerve demonstrated ongoing recovery postimplantation during the follow-up period. The results indicate that the collagen/SDSC artificial nerve graft could be used for surgical repair of larger defects in major lesions of peripheral nerves, increasing patient quality of life by saving the upper arms from amputation. PMID:24268028

  13. Analgesic effects of maxillary and inferior alveolar nerve blocks in cats undergoing dental extractions.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Joana; Chebroux, Alexandre; Martinez-Taboada, Fernando; Leece, Elizabeth A

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effects of maxillary and/or inferior alveolar nerve blocks with lidocaine and bupivacaine in cats undergoing dental extractions. Twenty-nine cats were enrolled. Using an adapted composite pain scale, cats were pain scored before the dental procedure and 30 mins, and 1, 2 and 4 h after isoflurane disconnection. Cats were sedated with buprenorphine (20 µg/kg), medetomidine (10 µg/kg) and acepromazine (20 µg/kg) intramuscularly. Anaesthesia was induced using alfaxalone (1-2 mg/kg) intravenously and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. Each cat was randomly assigned to receive maxillary and/or inferior alveolar nerve blocks or no nerve blocks prior to dental extractions. Each nerve block was performed using lidocaine (0.25 mg/kg) and bupivacaine (0.25 mg/kg). Heart rate, systolic arterial blood pressure, respiratory rate, end tidal carbon dioxide and isoflurane vaporiser settings were recorded 5 mins before and after the dental extractions, and the difference calculated. Group mean differences (mean ± SD) for heart rate (-9.7 ± 10.6 vs 7.6 ± 9.5 beats/min [nerve block vs control group, respectively], P <0.0001), systolic arterial blood pressure (-10.33 ± 18.44 vs 5.21 ± 15.23 mmHg, P = 0.02) and vaporiser settings (-0.2 ± 0.2 vs 0.1 ± 0.4, P = 0.023) were significantly different between groups. The control group had higher postoperative pain scores (median [interquartile range]) at 2 h (3 [1.75-4.00] vs 1 [0-2], P = 0.008) and 4 h (4 [2-6] vs 2 [1-2], P = 0.006) after the dental extractions. Maxillary and inferior alveolar nerve blocks with lidocaine and bupivacaine administered prior to dental extractions resulted in a reduction in heart rate and blood pressure while allowing for a reduction in isoflurane. Cats receiving nerve blocks had lower postoperative pain scores than the group without nerve blocks. PMID:24820999

  14. Median raphe cyst of the penis.

    PubMed

    Terao, Y; Hamada, T

    1984-11-01

    A case of median raphe cyst of the penis in a 7-year-old boy is reported. Although the lesion is rare, characteristic clinical features makes it easy to diagnose median raphe cyst of the penis, which has been mistakenly reported as apocrine hidrocystoma. Surgical excision must be performed to prevent recurrence. PMID:6499536

  15. Determination of oxygen saturation of the optic nerve head and overlying artery and vein using a snapshot multi-spectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoobehi, Bahram; Eaton, Alexander; Wafapoor, Hussein; Fournier, Paul; Firn, Kim; Peters, Matt; Rodebeck, Ellie; Templet, Brian

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a snapshot optical imaging system capable of taking multiple images simultaneously and sending them to a CCD detector. Using an innovative lens array design, the beam obtained from the fundus camera is segmented into several different images passed through several different bandpass filters. Each bandpass filter defines a unique spectral region of imaging. The images are taken simultaneously into a large silicone chip with a dynamic range of 16 bits (highly sensitive) and are integrated with a single optical connection to a digital fundus camera. Our algorithm maps blood oxygen saturation of the retina using several wavelengths. These wavelengths are capable of approximating the whole hemoglobin spectrum and have been found from a previously developed hyperspectral algorithm. They include four isosbestic points (522, 548, 569, and 586 nm) and three oxygen-sensitive points (542, 560, and 586 nm) where the difference between fully oxygenated and deoxygenated blood is at a maximum. Using MatLab code, color maps of oxygen saturation are produced. The average value taken from all vein areas was 60.53%, assuming that the artery oxygen saturation value is 98%. Oxygen saturation of the tissue was 75.78%. Oxygen saturations of the temporal/inferior/nasal veins ranged from 61.86% to 63.37%; the superior vein was significantly lower (54.19%). Tissue oxygen saturations in different quadrants of the eye ranged from 74.17% to 76.74%. Our algorithm has been developed for measuring oxygen saturation of the retina clinically. This was done for one subject only; further work can extend the measurements to different pigments.

  16. Role of renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Whether activation of afferent renal nerves contributes to the regulation of arterial pressure and sodium balance has been long overlooked. In normotensive rats, activating renal mechanosensory nerves decrease efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity (ERSNA) and increase urinary sodium excretion, an inhibitory renorenal reflex. There is an interaction between efferent and afferent renal nerves, whereby increases in ERSNA increase afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA), leading to decreases in ERSNA by activation of the renorenal reflexes to maintain low ERSNA to minimize sodium retention. High-sodium diet enhances the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, while low dietary sodium reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, thus producing physiologically appropriate responses to maintain sodium balance. Increased renal ANG II reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, including hypertension, congestive heart failure, and ischemia-induced acute renal failure. Impairment of inhibitory renorenal reflexes in these pathological states would contribute to the hypertension and sodium retention. When the inhibitory renorenal reflexes are suppressed, excitatory reflexes may prevail. Renal denervation reduces arterial pressure in experimental hypertension and in treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. The fall in arterial pressure is associated with a fall in muscle sympathetic nerve activity, suggesting that increased ARNA contributes to increased arterial pressure in these patients. Although removal of both renal sympathetic and afferent renal sensory nerves most likely contributes to the arterial pressure reduction initially, additional mechanisms may be involved in long-term arterial pressure reduction since sympathetic and sensory nerves reinnervate renal tissue in a similar time-dependent fashion following renal denervation. PMID:25411364

  17. Optic nerve atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Optic nerve atrophy is damage to the optic nerve. The optic nerve carries images of what the eye sees to ... problem most often affects older adults. The optic nerve can also be damaged by shock, toxins, radiation, ...

  18. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  19. Peripheral Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain ... body. There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. ...

  20. Locoregional use of lateral thoracic artery perforator flap as a propeller flap.

    PubMed

    Baghaki, Semih; Cevirme, Mirza; Diyarbakirli, Murat; Tatar, Cihad; Aydin, Yagmur

    2015-05-01

    Although thoracodorsal system is a fundamental source of various flaps, lateral thoracic region has not been a popular flap donor area. There is limited data on the use of lateral intercostal artery perforator flap and lateral thoracic artery perforator flap. In this case series, lateral thoracic artery perforator flap has been used in locoregional (axilla, pectoral region, and arm) reconstruction as an island or propeller flap.Eighteen patients have been operated on between September 2010 and January 2013. The age of the patients ranged between 16 and 68 years with a median of 38 years. A thorough chart review has been performed with preoperative and postoperative photographs. Duration of hospitalization, complication rate and long term results have been documented.Nine patients had severe burn contracture of axilla, 7 patients had axillary hidradenitis suppurativa, 1 patient had giant neurofibroma of arm, and 1 patient had malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of pectoral area. Seventeen flaps survived totally, and in 1 flap, distal superficial slough of skin has been observed. No recurrence in hidradenitis or peripheral nerve sheath tumor has been observed. Donor site scar is well hidden in anatomical position. The range of motion of affected extremities returned to normal after reconstruction.Lateral thoracic area provides a reliable flap option with a wide arc of rotation when lateral thoracic artery perforators are used. PMID:25875722

  1. Median Approximations for Genomes Modeled as Matrices.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Joao Paulo Pereira; Biller, Priscila; Meidanis, Joao

    2016-04-01

    The genome median problem is an important problem in phylogenetic reconstruction under rearrangement models. It can be stated as follows: Given three genomes, find a fourth that minimizes the sum of the pairwise rearrangement distances between it and the three input genomes. In this paper, we model genomes as matrices and study the matrix median problem using the rank distance. It is known that, for any metric distance, at least one of the corners is a [Formula: see text]-approximation of the median. Our results allow us to compute up to three additional matrix median candidates, all of them with approximation ratios at least as good as the best corner, when the input matrices come from genomes. We also show a class of instances where our candidates are optimal. From the application point of view, it is usually more interesting to locate medians farther from the corners, and therefore, these new candidates are potentially more useful. In addition to the approximation algorithm, we suggest a heuristic to get a genome from an arbitrary square matrix. This is useful to translate the results of our median approximation algorithm back to genomes, and it has good results in our tests. To assess the relevance of our approach in the biological context, we ran simulated evolution tests and compared our solutions to those of an exact DCJ median solver. The results show that our method is capable of producing very good candidates. PMID:27072561

  2. Sensitivity of three median-to-ulnar comparative tests in diagnosis of mild carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uncini, A; Di Muzio, A; Awad, J; Manente, G; Tafuro, M; Gambi, D

    1993-12-01

    We studied 193 hands of 113 patients referred for typical carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Ninety-five (49%) hands had normal median distal motor latency (< or = 4.2 ms) and normal or borderline sensory conduction velocity from digit 2 stimulation (> or = 45 m/s). In these cases we performed three median to ulnar comparative tests: (1) difference between median and ulnar distal motor latencies recorded from the second lumbrical and interossei muscles (2L-INT); (2) difference between median and ulnar sensory latencies from digit 4 stimulation (D4M-D4U); and (3) difference between median and ulnar mixed nerve latencies from palmar stimulation (PM-PU). The 2L-INT difference was > or = 0.6 ms in 10% of hands. PM-PU and D4M-D4U were > or = 0.5 ms in 56% and 77% of hands, respectively. The greater sensitivity of D4M-D4U might be explained by the funicular topography and consequent greater susceptibility to compression of the cutaneous fibers from the third interspace which, at the distal carpal tunnel, are clumped superficially in the anteroulnar portion of the median nerve just beneath the transverse ligament. PMID:8232394

  3. Extralaryngeal division of the recurrent laryngeal nerve: a new description for the inferior laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Bulent; Tunali, Selcuk; Ozan, Hasan

    2008-05-01

    Extralaryngeal division of the recurrent laryngeal nerve was contradictory in the literature. We aimed to investigate extralaryngeal division of the nerve, and also propose a new description for the inferior laryngeal nerve. Sixty specimens (120 sides) were examined for this project, including 41 men and 19 women cadavers between the ages of 40 and 89 years at death. In one right side, terminal segment of the nerve gave off many small branches surrounding the inferior thyroid artery then reaching the larynx, trachea, thyroid gland and esophagus. In eight sides, terminal segment of the nerve had no extralaryngeal division and entered the larynx as a single trunk. In 110 sides, the nerve had extralaryngeal division. One hundred and three nerves had two laryngeal and one to three extralaryngeal branches. Two types were described in this group. In type I (66 nerves), both branches arose from the same level of nerve. Type I had two subtypes: type Ia, the origin of the branches was just below the inferior constrictor muscle; type Ib, the origin of the branches was 15-35 mm below the muscle. In type II (37 nerves), the laryngeal branches arose just 3-5 mm above the extralaryngeal branches. We observed that the laryngeal and extralaryngeal branches arose generally from the same point of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. The inferior laryngeal nerve is thus very short, or even nonexistent. Therefore, we suggest that if the term "superior laryngeal nerve" is a given, standard, and accepted term, then the term "inferior laryngeal nerve" should also be accepted instead of the term "recurrent laryngeal nerve." PMID:18292961

  4. Nerve conduction velocity in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Halar, E M; Stewart, D T; Venkatesh, B; Chrissian, S A

    1978-01-01

    Due to conflicting reports in the literature regarding nerve conduction velocities (NCVs) in hypertensives, peroneal and sural NCVs and facial nerve conduction latencies were studied in 30 hypertensives and in 30 controls. An improved technique of NCV measurement was used. Twenty-one of the hypertensives were retested after five weeks, and five of them were tested for motor and sensory NCVs of the median nerve during a short period of partial occlusion of blood flow in the arm. No changes were found that could be related to blood pressure, duration of hypertension, eyeground changes, or partial restriction of blood flow. PMID:619818

  5. [An autopsy case of neuronal type Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (HMSN type II) with nerve deafness and psychiatric symptoms].

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, I; Yoshimura, N; Hanazono, T; Usutani, S; Muramoto, Y; Fukushima, Y

    1992-06-01

    The clinical and pathological findings of a 41-year-old male patient with atypical Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease were reported. There were 3 cases of subarachnoid haemorrhage, 2 nerve deafness and 2 hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) in his family. He had suffered from progressive nerve deafness since 5 years old and gait disturbance since 37 years old. He had been admitted to the psychiatric hospital 3 times because of hallucinatory-delusional state and behavior abnormalities. Neurological examinations at 39 years old revealed that he had mental deterioration (IQ 66), nerve deafness, diffuse muscle atrophy, most marked distally, sensory disturbance, areflexia, positive Romberg's sign, orthostatic hypotension, dysphagia and slurred speech. MCV of median nerve was 27.8 m/sec, and SCV was not evoked. EEG revealed nonspecific dysfunction of the brain. He died of ileus-like condition at 41 years old. General autopsy showed haemorrhagic infarction of the jejunum and ileum due to compression of the superior mesenteric artery and vein by an adhesion band of connective tissue formed after previous appendectomy. Neuropathological examinations revealed axonal degeneration and loss of myelinated fibers with schwannosis of anterior and posterior spinal nerve roots as well as peripheral nerves. The posterior roots were more severely affected than the anterior ones. Ganglion cells of the posterior root ganglia showed remarkable degeneration and loss. There was severe degeneration of the posterior columns, especially in the gracilis, of the spinal cord. Nerve cells in the anterior horns and Clarke's columns also displayed conspicuous atrophy or central chromatolysis followed by gliosis. There was slight degeneration of the posterior spinocerebellar tracts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1389565

  6. Switching non-local median filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Jyohei; Koga, Takanori; Suetake, Noriaki; Uchino, Eiji

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a novel image filtering method for removal of random-valued impulse noise superimposed on grayscale images. Generally, it is well known that switching-type median filters are effective for impulse noise removal. In this paper, we propose a more sophisticated switching-type impulse noise removal method in terms of detail-preserving performance. Specifically, the noise detector of the proposed method finds out noise-corrupted pixels by focusing attention on the difference between the value of a pixel of interest (POI) and the median of its neighboring pixel values, and on the POI's isolation tendency from the surrounding pixels. Furthermore, the removal of the detected noise is performed by the newly proposed median filter based on non-local processing, which has superior detail-preservation capability compared to the conventional median filter. The effectiveness and the validity of the proposed method are verified by some experiments using natural grayscale images.

  7. Pulmonary Artery Denervation Reduces Pulmonary Artery Pressure and Induces Histological Changes in an Acute Porcine Model of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Nadine D.; Chang, William; Watson, Oliver; Swift, Andrew J.; Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charlie A.; Kiely, David G.; Suvarna, S. Kim; Gunn, Julian; Lawrie, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background— Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a devastating disease with high morbidity and mortality and limited treatment options. Recent studies have shown that pulmonary artery denervation improves pulmonary hemodynamics in an experimental model and in an early clinical trial. We aimed to evaluate the nerve distribution around the pulmonary artery, to determine the effect of radiofrequency pulmonary artery denervation on acute pulmonary hypertension induced by vasoconstriction, and to demonstrate denervation of the pulmonary artery at a histological level. Methods and Results— Histological evaluation identified a circumferential distribution of nerves around the proximal pulmonary arteries. Nerves were smaller in diameter, greater in number, and located in closer proximity to the luminal aspect of the pulmonary arterial wall beyond the pulmonary artery bifurcation. To determine the effect of pulmonary arterial denervation acute pulmonary hypertension was induced in 8 pigs by intravenous infusion of thromboxane A2 analogue. Animals were assigned to either pulmonary artery denervation, using a prototype radiofrequency catheter and generator, or a sham procedure. Pulmonary artery denervation resulted in reduced mean pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance and increased cardiac output. Ablation lesions on the luminal surface of the pulmonary artery were accompanied by histological and biochemical alteration in adventitial nerves and correlated with improved hemodynamic parameters. Conclusions— Pulmonary artery denervation offers the possibility of a new treatment option for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Further work is required to determine the long-term efficacy and safety. PMID:26553697

  8. Median raphe cysts of the penis.

    PubMed

    Asarch, R G; Golitz, L E; Sausker, W F; Kreye, G M

    1979-09-01

    The occurrence of a ventral cystic lesion of the penis should alert the clinician to the diagnosis of a median raphe cyst. The lesions, which are most common near the glans penis, may occur anywhere from the urethral meatus to the anus. Cysts of the median raphe represent defects in the embryologic development of the genitalia and are usually lined by entodermal epithelium. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice. PMID:485186

  9. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Improves Walking Performance in Patients With Intermittent Claudication.

    PubMed

    Seenan, Chris; McSwiggan, Steve; Roche, Patricia A; Tan, Chee-Wee; Mercer, Tom; Belch, Jill J F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 2 types of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on walking distance and measures of pain in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and intermittent claudication (IC). In a phase 2a study, 40 participants with PAD and IC completed a graded treadmill test on 2 separate testing occasions. Active TENS was applied to the lower limb on the first occasion; and placebo TENS, on the second. The participants were divided into 2 experimental groups. One group received high-frequency TENS; and the other, low-frequency TENS. Measures taken were initial claudication distance, functional claudication distance, and absolute claudication distance. The McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) vocabulary was completed at the end of the intervention, and the MPQ-Pain Rating Index score was calculated. Four participants were excluded from the final analysis because of noncompletion of the experimental procedure. Median walking distance increased with high-frequency TENS for all measures (P < .05, Wilcoxon signed rank test, all measures). Only absolute claudication distance increased significantly with low-frequency TENS compared with placebo (median, 179-228; Ws = 39; z = 2.025; P = .043; r = 0.48). No difference was observed between reported median MPQ-Pain Rating Index scores: 21.5 with placebo TENS and 21.5 with active TENS (P = .41). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied to the lower limb of the patients with PAD and IC was associated with increased walking distance on a treadmill but not with any reduction in pain. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may be a useful adjunctive intervention to help increase walking performance in patients with IC. PMID:27299758

  10. Some Statistical Properties Of The Median Window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieden, B. R.

    1984-02-01

    Abstract. The median window operation is being increasingly used to process images. Although the deterministic properties of the median are fairly well known, its statistical properties are not. Consider a median window of width N scanning a noisy background image with white power spectrum. We present here the probability law for the median outputs, its mean, variance, and signal-to-noise ratio, and the probability that two successive median outputs are equal. Specialization is made to speckle imagery. Key results are as follows: the probability law is of a Bernoulli multinomial form; the mean is asymptotic with N to the average background times In 2, and hence is about 30% less than the background value; the variance is asymptotic with N to a 1/N dependence; signal-to-noise ratio is asymptotic with N to Ni171 In 2. Finally, the probability that two successive median outputs are equal is 2-1(N-1)/N, or slightly less than 0.5 for N >~ 7. This is independent of the type of image data at hand, i.e., whether speckle, Poisson, or normal, provided that it has a white power spectrum.

  11. Arterial embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... the artery (arterial bypass) to create a second source of blood supply Clot removal through a balloon catheter placed into the affected artery or through open surgery on the artery (embolectomy) Opening of the ...

  12. Electrophysiologic studies of cutaneous nerves of the forelimb of the cat.

    PubMed

    Kitchell, R L; Canton, D D; Johnson, R D; Maxwell, S A

    1982-10-01

    The cutaneous innervation of the forelimb was investigated in 20 barbiturate-anesthetized cats by using electrophysiological techniques. The cutaneous area (CA) innervated by each cutaneous nerve was delineated in at least six cats by brushing the hair in the CA with a small watercolor brush while recording from the nerve. Mapping of adjacent CA revealed larger overlap zones (OZ) than were noted in the dog. Remarkable findings were that the brachiocephalic nerve arose from the axillary nerve and the CA comparable to that supplied by the cutaneous branch of the brachiocephalic nerve in the dog was supplied by a cutaneous branch of the suprascapular nerve. The CA supplied by the communicating branch from the musculocutaneous to the median nerve was similar in both species except that the communicating branch arose proximal to any other branches of the musculocutaneous nerve in the cat, whereas it was a terminal branch in the dog. The superficial branch of the radial nerve gave off cutaneous brachial branches in the cat proximal to the lateral cutaneous antebrachial nerve. The CA of the palmar branches of the ulnar nerve did not completely overlap the CA of the palmar branches of the median nerve as occurred in the dog; thus an autonomous zone (AZ) for the CA of the palmar branches of the median nerve is present in the cat, whereas no AZ existed for the CA of this nerve in the dog. PMID:7142449

  13. Adaptive Mallow's optimization for weighted median filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachuri, Raghu; Rao, Sathyanarayana S.

    2002-05-01

    This work extends the idea of spectral optimization for the design of Weighted Median filters and employ adaptive filtering that updates the coefficients of the FIR filter from which the weights of the median filters are derived. Mallows' theory of non-linear smoothers [1] has proven to be of great theoretical significance providing simple design guidelines for non-linear smoothers. It allows us to find a set of positive weights for a WM filter whose sample selection probabilities (SSP's) are as close as possible to a SSP set predetermined by Mallow's. Sample selection probabilities have been used as a basis for designing stack smoothers as they give a measure of the filter's detail preserving ability and give non-negative filter weights. We will extend this idea to design weighted median filters admitting negative weights. The new method first finds the linear FIR filter coefficients adaptively, which are then used to determine the weights of the median filter. WM filters can be designed to have band-pass, high-pass as well as low-pass frequency characteristics. Unlike the linear filters, however, the weighted median filters are robust in the presence of impulsive noise, as shown by the simulation results.

  14. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Peripheral Nerve Internal Fascicular Groups

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yingchun; Wang, Liping; Dong, Jianghui; Zhang, Yi; Luo, Peng; Qi, Jian; Liu, Xiaolin; Xian, Cory J.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerves are important pathways for receiving afferent sensory impulses and sending out efferent motor instructions, as carried out by sensory nerve fibers and motor nerve fibers. It has remained a great challenge to functionally reconnect nerve internal fiber bundles (or fascicles) in nerve repair. One possible solution may be to establish a 3D nerve fascicle visualization system. This study described the key technology of 3D peripheral nerve fascicle reconstruction. Firstly, fixed nerve segments were embedded with position lines, cryostat-sectioned continuously, stained and imaged histologically. Position line cross-sections were identified using a trained support vector machine method, and the coordinates of their central pixels were obtained. Then, nerve section images were registered using the bilinear method, and edges of fascicles were extracted using an improved gradient vector flow snake method. Subsequently, fascicle types were identified automatically using the multi-directional gradient and second-order gradient method. Finally, a 3D virtual model of internal fascicles was obtained after section images were processed. This technique was successfully applied for 3D reconstruction for the median nerve of the hand-wrist and cubital fossa regions and the gastrocnemius nerve. This nerve internal fascicle 3D reconstruction technology would be helpful for aiding peripheral nerve repair and virtual surgery. PMID:26596642

  15. Median Nail Dystrophy Involving the Thumb Nail

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Rahulkrishna; Pilani, Abhishek; Nair, Pragya Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Median canaliform dystrophy of Heller is a rare entity characterized by a midline or a paramedian ridge or split and canal formation in nail plate of one or both the thumb nails. It is an acquired condition resulting from a temporary defect in the matrix that interferes with nail formation. Habitual picking of the nail base may be responsible for some cases. Histopathology classically shows parakeratosis, accumulation of melanin within and between the nail bed keratinocytes. Treatment of median nail dystrophy includes injectable triamcinalone acetonide, topical 0.1% tacrolimus, and tazarotene 0.05%, which is many a times challenging for a dermatologist. Psychiatric opinion should be taken when associated with the depressive, obsessive-compulsive, or impulse-control disorder. We report a case of 19-year-old male diagnosed as median nail dystrophy. PMID:26955129

  16. Switching non-local vector median filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Jyohei; Koga, Takanori; Suetake, Noriaki; Uchino, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a novel image filtering method that removes random-valued impulse noise superimposed on a natural color image. In impulse noise removal, it is essential to employ a switching-type filtering method, as used in the well-known switching median filter, to preserve the detail of an original image with good quality. In color image filtering, it is generally preferable to deal with the red (R), green (G), and blue (B) components of each pixel of a color image as elements of a vectorized signal, as in the well-known vector median filter, rather than as component-wise signals to prevent a color shift after filtering. By taking these fundamentals into consideration, we propose a switching-type vector median filter with non-local processing that mainly consists of a noise detector and a noise removal filter. Concretely, we propose a noise detector that proactively detects noise-corrupted pixels by focusing attention on the isolation tendencies of pixels of interest not in an input image but in difference images between RGB components. Furthermore, as the noise removal filter, we propose an extended version of the non-local median filter, we proposed previously for grayscale image processing, named the non-local vector median filter, which is designed for color image processing. The proposed method realizes a superior balance between the preservation of detail and impulse noise removal by proactive noise detection and non-local switching vector median filtering, respectively. The effectiveness and validity of the proposed method are verified in a series of experiments using natural color images.

  17. Neuromuscular block after intra-arterially injected acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Tonali, P.; Gambi, D.

    1973-01-01

    The neuromuscular depolarizing block induced by intra-arterially injected ACh was studied to determine the variability in the same subject and in different subjects without disorders at the motor end-plate. Amplitude of action potentials of the opponens pollicis muscle evoked by intermittent repetitive supramaximal stimulation of the median nerve at the wrist were recorded for one hour from the beginning of ACh injection. The features of prompt and late depression stages after the injection were analysed statistically. Re-testing of the same subjects after a while shows that, in spite of all efforts to maintain the same experimental conditions, variations do occur in late depression. Time course and duration are particularly affected, while the degree of depression is altered but slightly. The presence of such variations limits this test to evaluation of the influence of other factors only within their already established statistical limits. Images PMID:4350703

  18. Nonparametric inference on median residual life function.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong-Hyeon; Jung, Sin-Ho; Costantino, Joseph P

    2008-03-01

    A simple approach to the estimation of the median residual lifetime is proposed for a single group by inverting a function of the Kaplan-Meier estimators. A test statistic is proposed to compare two median residual lifetimes at any fixed time point. The test statistic does not involve estimation of the underlying probability density function of failure times under censoring. Extensive simulation studies are performed to validate the proposed test statistic in terms of type I error probabilities and powers at various time points. One of the oldest data sets from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP), which has more than a quarter century of follow-up, is used to illustrate the method. The analysis results indicate that, without systematic post-operative therapy, a significant difference in median residual lifetimes between node-negative and node-positive breast cancer patients persists for about 10 years after surgery. The new estimates of the median residual lifetime could serve as a baseline for physicians to explain any incremental effects of post-operative treatments in terms of delaying breast cancer recurrence or prolonging remaining lifetimes of breast cancer patients. PMID:17501936

  19. Pigmented median raphe cysts of the penis.

    PubMed

    Urahashi, J; Hara, H; Yamaguchi, Z; Morishima, T

    2000-01-01

    Two cases of median raphe cysts of the penis with melanosis are presented. The presence of melanocytes was observed in the lining of the cysts by light and electron microscopy. The possible mechanism of the embryological development of the cysts is discussed in the context of the published literature. PMID:11028867

  20. Gonococcal infection of the median penile raphe.

    PubMed

    Clifford, G R; Krieger, J N; Rein, M F

    1983-07-01

    Atypical involvement of the male genitourinary tract by Neisseria gonorrhoeae, such as isolated accessory glandular infection without urethritis, is a rare presentation of a common disease. We report a case of gonococcal abscess of the median raphe of the penis. PMID:6864898

  1. Use of superficial peroneal nerve graft for treating peripheral nerve injuries☆

    PubMed Central

    Ribak, Samuel; da Silva Filho, Paulo Roberto Ferreira; Tietzmann, Alexandre; Hirata, Helton Hiroshi; de Mattos, Carlos Augusto; da Gama, Sérgio Augusto Machado

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical results from treating chronic peripheral nerve injuries using the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft donor source. Methods This was a study on eleven patients with peripheral nerve injuries in the upper limbs that were treated with grafts from the sensitive branch of the superficial peroneal nerve. The mean time interval between the dates of the injury and surgery was 93 days. The ulnar nerve was injured in eight cases and the median nerve in six. There were three cases of injury to both nerves. In the surgery, a longitudinal incision was made on the anterolateral face of the ankle, thus viewing the superficial peroneal nerve, which was located anteriorly to the extensor digitorum longus muscle. Proximally, the deep fascia between the extensor digitorum longus and the peroneal longus muscles was dissected. Next, the motor branch of the short peroneal muscle (one of the branches of the superficial peroneal nerve) was identified. The proximal limit of the sensitive branch was found at this point. Results The average space between the nerve stumps was 3.8 cm. The average length of the grafts was 16.44 cm. The number of segments used was two to four cables. In evaluating the recovery of sensitivity, 27.2% evolved to S2+, 54.5% to S3 and 18.1% to S3+. Regarding motor recovery, 72.7% presented grade 4 and 27.2% grade 3. There was no motor deficit in the donor area. A sensitive deficit in the lateral dorsal region of the ankle and the dorsal region of the foot was observed. None of the patients presented complaints in relation to walking. Conclusions Use of the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft source for treating peripheral nerve injuries is safe and provides good clinical results similar to those from other nerve graft sources. PMID:26962502

  2. Peripheral nerve injuries in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, J H; Nadler, S F; Krivickas, L S

    1997-12-01

    outcome. Proximal nerve injuries have a poorer prognosis for neurological recovery. The most common peripheral nerve injury in the athlete is the burner syndrome. Though primarily a football injury, burners have been reported in wrestling, hockey, basketball and weight-lifting as a result of acute head, neck and/or shoulder trauma. Most burners are self-limiting, but they occasionally produce permanent neurological deficits. The axillary nerve is commonly injured with shoulder dislocations but is also susceptible to injury by direct compression. The sciatic and common peroneal nerves can be injured by trauma. The suprascapular, musculocutaneous, ulnar, median and tibial nerves are susceptible to entrapment. The long thoracic and femoral nerves can be injured by severe traction. PMID:9421863

  3. The median forehead flap reviewed: a histologic study on vascular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Skaria, A M

    2015-05-01

    Local skin flaps can be divided into two types: random flaps and axial flaps. An axial flap is defined as a flap containing a named artery in its pedicle. For the paramedian forehead flap (PMFF) a lot of surgeons insist on the point that the pedicle must contain the supratrochlear artery. To demonstrate that median forehead flaps (MFF) need not contain a named artery, we selected first 8 patients with a PMFF and further 12 patients who had undergone reconstructive surgery using a MFF. After division, we analysed the pedicle of the flap histologically and measured the diameter of the arteries or arterioles and compared them to anatomical descriptions of the frontal arteries. In none of the 12 cases could we find a functional artery of approximately 1 mm in diameter that could correspond to the supratrochlear artery. The MFF is an axial flap but not in accordance with the current definition of this term. In contrast to published literature, we show that only in a part of cases a named artery was present in the pedicle. Despite this fact, the MFF is a secure flap for full thickness defect repair on the nose. PMID:24756613

  4. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see how fast electrical signals move through a nerve. ... normal body temperature. Being too cold slows nerve conduction. Tell your doctor if you have a cardiac ...

  5. Femoral nerve damage (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The femoral nerve is located in the leg and supplies the muscles that assist help straighten the leg. It supplies sensation ... leg. One risk of damage to the femoral nerve is pelvic fracture. Symptoms of femoral nerve damage ...

  6. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The ulnar nerve originates from the brachial plexus and travels down arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near the surface of the body where ...

  7. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... hot or cold When the nerves that control digestion are affected, you may have trouble digesting food. ... harder to control. Damage to nerves that control digestion almost always occurs in people with severe nerve ...

  8. Diagnosis of Severe Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Using Nerve Conduction Study and Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Kazuhiro; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Kido, Kenji; Imajo, Yasuaki; Funaba, Masahiro; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the correlation between nerve conduction study and ultrasonographic findings for assessment of the usefulness of ultrasonography in determining carpal tunnel syndrome severity. Hands of adults with carpal tunnel syndrome were assessed using ultrasound and nerve conduction studies and grouped according to median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA). There were significant differences (p < 0.01) in mean median nerve CSA between controls, patients with median sensory nerve conduction velocity ≤40 m/s and patients with absent sensory nerve action potential and between controls, patients with median nerve distal motor latency ≥4.5 ms and patients with absent compound muscle action potentials of the abductor pollicis brevis. This is the first report to define median nerve CSA cutoff values (18 mm(2)) for determining carpal tunnel syndrome severity in patients with absent compound muscle action potentials of the abductor pollicis brevis. Median nerve CSA values below the cutoff values should prompt clinicians to consider other disorders, such as cervical compressive myelopathy. PMID:26111913

  9. An Investigation of the Median-Median Method of Linear Regression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Elizabeth J.; Morrell, Christopher H.; Auer, Richard E.

    2006-01-01

    Least squares regression is the most common method of fitting a straight line to a set of bivariate data. Another less known method that is available on Texas Instruments graphing calculators is median-median regression. This method is proposed as a simple method that may be used with middle and high school students to motivate the idea of fitting…

  10. The symptomatology of megadolicho basilar artery.

    PubMed

    Herpers, M; Lodder, J; Janevski, B; van der Lugt, P J

    1983-01-01

    Cranial nerve dysfunction, obstruction hydrocephalus, signs of brain stem dysfunction, and signs of a space-occupying lesion in the posterior fossa are presumed to be related to a megadolicho basilar artery, if present. Since there are no large series of patients with such vascular anomaly, a bias in relating symptoms with the presence of a megadolicho basilar artery is not excluded. We therefore studied retrospectively the incidence of megadolicho and dolicho basilar artery on cranial CT-scan of 3332 patients of 50 years and older. Patient records were reviewed for the above mentioned symptoms. 12 out of 22 patients with a megadolicho basilar artery and 2 patients out of 40 with a dolicho basilar artery had one or two of these symptoms. It is concluded that a megadolicho basilar artery can cause cranial nerve dysfunction, obstruction hydrocephalus, signs of brain stem dysfunction, and signs of a space-occupying lesion in the posterior fossa. PMID:6317247

  11. Median Citation Index vs Journal Impact Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonoyiannakis, Manolis

    2015-03-01

    The Journal Impact Factor is an arithmetic mean: It is the average number of citations, in a year, to a journal's articles that were published the previous two years. But for the vast majority of scholarly journals, the distribution of these citations is skewed (non-symmetric). We argue that a more representative member of the skewed distribution of citations is its median, not the mean. We thus introduce the Median Citation Index (MCI) and compare it to the journal Impact Factor (JIF) as a potentially more suitable choice of the ``center'' of the distribution, or its typical value. Unlike the JIF, the MCI is far less sensitive to outlier (very highly cited) papers or to gaming, and does not lend itself to the hype of calculating it to three decimal digits.

  12. Median Facial Cleft in Amniotic Band Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debabrata; Das, Gobinda; Gayen, Sibnath; Konar, Arpita

    2011-01-01

    Amniotic band syndrome manifests at birth with a variety of malformations ranging from constriction ring to defects incompatible to life, in various parts of the body. Although some theories have been proposed for the development of this syndrome, the exact cause remains unknown. The median facial cleft is an extremely rare manifestation of amniotic band syndrome with a relative paucity of reports available in the literature. Here, we report one such case. PMID:21731335

  13. Median raphe canals of the penis.

    PubMed

    Golitz, L E; Robin, M

    1981-02-01

    Developmental abnormalities of the male genitalia can result in epithelial-lined canals or cysts which occur along the ventral median raphe from the glans penis to the anus. Although usually asymptomatic, secondary infection may produce swelling, tenderness and a purulent discharge. The canals are lined by stratified squamous epithelium which does not communicate with the urethra. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice. PMID:7226886

  14. Portfolio optimization using median-variance approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan Mohd, Wan Rosanisah; Mohamad, Daud; Mohamed, Zulkifli

    2013-04-01

    Optimization models have been applied in many decision-making problems particularly in portfolio selection. Since the introduction of Markowitz's theory of portfolio selection, various approaches based on mathematical programming have been introduced such as mean-variance, mean-absolute deviation, mean-variance-skewness and conditional value-at-risk (CVaR) mainly to maximize return and minimize risk. However most of the approaches assume that the distribution of data is normal and this is not generally true. As an alternative, in this paper, we employ the median-variance approach to improve the portfolio optimization. This approach has successfully catered both types of normal and non-normal distribution of data. With this actual representation, we analyze and compare the rate of return and risk between the mean-variance and the median-variance based portfolio which consist of 30 stocks from Bursa Malaysia. The results in this study show that the median-variance approach is capable to produce a lower risk for each return earning as compared to the mean-variance approach.

  15. The gross anatomy of the renal sympathetic nerves revisited.

    PubMed

    Mompeo, Blanca; Maranillo, Eva; Garcia-Touchard, Arturo; Larkin, Theresa; Sanudo, Jose

    2016-07-01

    Catheter-based renal denervation techniques focus on reducing blood pressure in resistant hypertension. This procedure requires exact knowledge of the anatomical interrelation between the renal arteries and the targeted renal nervous plexus. The aim of this work was to build on classical anatomical studies and describe the gross anatomy and anatomical relationships of the renal arteries and nerve supply to the kidneys in a sample of human cadavers. Twelve human cadavers (six males and six females), age range 73 to 94 years, were dissected. The nervous fibers and renal arteries were dissected using a surgical microscope. The renal plexus along the hilar renal artery comprised a fiber-ganglionic ring surrounding the proximal third of the renal artery, a neural network along the middle and distal thirds, and smaller accessory ganglia along the course of the nerve fibers. The fibers of the neural network were mainly located on the superior (95.83%) and inferior (91.66%) surfaces of the renal artery and they were sparsely interconnected by diagonal fibers. Polar arteries were present in 33.33% of cases and the renal nerve pattern for these was similar to that of the hilar arteries. Effective renal denervation needs to target the superior and inferior surfaces of the hilar and polar arteries, where the fibers of the neural network are present. Clin. Anat. 29:660-664, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27090982

  16. Anomalous course of the external carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Katsushi

    2016-09-01

    The course and the branching patterns of the external carotid artery were investigated macroscopically in a total of 550 bodies or 1100 head sides of Japanese subjects, donated for student dissection at Kumamoto University from 1994 to 2014. With the exception of 14 head sides, the external carotid arteries running between the posterior belly of the digastric and stylohyoid muscles were found in 42 (3.87 %) out of 1086 head sides. Strictly speaking, they passed between the stylohyoid muscle and the stylohyoid branch of the facial nerve in 23 out of these 42 head sides. In the remaining 19 instances, the stylohyoid branch of the facial nerve was cut and its relationship to the external carotid artery was not clear. The external carotid artery running lateral to the intact stylohyoid branch of the facial nerve, medial to the digastric muscle was not found. The external carotid arteries running lateral to the digastric muscle were found in 4 (0.37 %) out of 1086 head sides. As a result, it is proposed that plural, potential courses of the external carotid artery originally exist and that some parts of such potential courses remain as branches of the external carotid artery in the usual instance, while the anomalous courses of the external carotid artery are induced mainly by anastomosis between the muscular branches supplying the wall of the head and neck in contrast to the usual external carotid artery induced mainly by the branches originally supplying the pharynx. PMID:26439732

  17. Case report: Double nerve transfer of the anterior and posterior interosseous nerves to treat a high ulnar nerve defect at the elbow.

    PubMed

    Delclaux, S; Aprédoaei, C; Mansat, P; Rongières, M; Bonnevialle, P

    2014-10-01

    Double neurotization of the deep branch of ulnar nerve (DBUN) and superficial branch of ulnar nerve using the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) and the recurrent (thenar) branch of the median nerve was first described by Battiston and Lanzetta. This article details the postoperative results after 18 months of a patient who underwent this technique using the posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) instead of the recurrent branch of the median nerve for sensory reconstruction. A 35-year-old, right-handed man suffered major trauma to his right upper limb following a serious motor vehicle accident. One year later, a pseudocystic neuroma of the ulnar nerve was evident on ultrasound examination and MRI. After the neuroma had been resected, the nerve defect was estimated at 8 cm. One and a half years after the initial trauma, with the patient still at M0/S0, we transferred the AIN and PIN onto the deep and superficial branches of the ulnar nerve respectively. Nerve recovery was monitored clinically every month and by electromyography (EMG) every three months initially and then every six months. At 18 months postoperative, 5th digit abduction/adduction was 28 mm. Sensation was present at the base of the 5th digit. The patient was graded M3/S2. Clear re-innervation of the abductor digiti minimi was demonstrated by EMG (motor conduction velocity 50 m/s). Given that the ulnar nerve could not be excited at the elbow, this re-innervation had to be the result of the double nerve transfer. Neurotization of the DBUN using the AIN produces functional results as early as 1 year after surgery. Using PIN for sensory neurotization is easy to perform, has no negative consequences for the donor site, and leads to good recovery of sensation (graded as S2) after 18 months. PMID:25260763

  18. Arterial stick

    MedlinePlus

    ... venous blood) mainly in its content of dissolved gases . Testing arterial blood shows the makeup of the ... arteries. Blood samples are mainly taken to measure gases in the arteries. Abnormal results may point to ...

  19. Intraoperative nerve monitoring during total shoulder arthroplasty surgery

    PubMed Central

    Aresti, Nick; Plumb, Karen; Cowan, Joseph; Higgs, Deborah; Lambert, Simon; Falworth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Background Nerve injury is an acknowledged complication of total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). Although the incidence of postoperative neurological deficit has been reported to be between 1% and 16%, the true incidence of nerve damage is considered to be higher. The present study aimed to identify the rate of intraoperative nerve injury during total shoulder arthroplasty and to determine potential risk factors. Methods A prospective study of nerve conduction in 21 patients who underwent primary or revision TSA was carried out over a 12-month period. Nerve conduction was monitored by measuring intraoperative sensory evoked potentials (SEP). A significant neurophysiological signal change was defined as either a unilateral or bilateral decrease in SEP signal of ≥50%, a latency increase of ≥10% or a change in waveform morphology, not caused by operative or anaesthetic technique. Results Seven (33%) patients had a SEP signal change. The only significant risk factor identified for signal change was male sex (odds ratio 15.00, 95% confidence interval). The median nerve was the most affected nerve in the operated arm. All but one signal change returned to normal before completion of the operation and no patient had a persisting postoperative clinical neurological deficit. Conclusions The incidence of intraoperative nerve damage may be more common than previously reported. However, the loss of SEP signal is reversible and does not correlate with persisting clinical neurological deficits. The median nerve appears to be most at risk. Monitoring SEPs in the operated limb during TSA may be a valuable tool during TSA.

  20. Aldose reductase inhibition improves nerve conduction velocity in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Judzewitsch, R G; Jaspan, J B; Polonsky, K S; Weinberg, C R; Halter, J B; Halar, E; Pfeifer, M A; Vukadinovic, C; Bernstein, L; Schneider, M; Liang, K Y; Gabbay, K H; Rubenstein, A H; Porte, D

    1983-01-20

    To assess the potential role of polyol-pathway activity in diabetic neuropathy, we measured the effects of sorbinil--a potent inhibitor of the key polyol-pathway enzyme aldose reductase--on nerve conduction velocity in 39 stable diabetics in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial. During nine weeks of treatment with sorbinil (250 mg per day), nerve conduction velocity was greater than during a nine-week placebo period for all three nerves tested: the peroneal motor nerve (mean increase [+/- S.E.M.], 0.70 +/- 0.24 m per second, P less than 0.008), the median motor nerve (mean increase, 0.66 +/- 0.27, P less than 0.005), and the median sensory nerve (mean increase, 1.16 +/- 0.50, P less than 0.035). Conduction velocity for all three nerves declined significantly within three weeks after cessation of the drug. These effects of sorbinil were not related to glycemic control, which was constant during the study. Although the effect of sorbinil in improving nerve conduction velocity in diabetics was small, the findings suggest that polyol-pathway activity contributes to slowed nerve conduction in diabetics. The clinical applicability of these observations remains to be determined, but they encourage further exploration of this approach to the treatment or prevention of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:6401351

  1. Electrophysiology and nerve biopsy in men exposed to lead

    PubMed Central

    Buchthal, F.; Behse, F.

    1979-01-01

    ABSTRACT Twenty lead-exposed men were selected on the basis of a maximum level of lead in the blood of 70-140 μg/100 ml within the past year. There was no clinical evidence of neuropathy attributable to lead and haemoglobin levels were normal. In individuals, maximum motor and sensory conduction and the amplitude of the evoked potentials were normal or borderline in the median, peroneal and sural nerves, except in the distal portion of the deep peroneal nerve. In this nerve, motor conduction was slowed because of compression by metal-lined safety shoes; changes in this segment are not included in the findings. When the average conduction velocity in lead-exposed men was compared with the average in nerves of controls matched for age, distal motor latency was slightly prolonged in the median nerve. The average latency for proximal muscle supplied by the peroneal nerve was prolonged, and the maximum motor conduction velocity was slowed in the median nerve from elbow to wrist (0·01 > p <0·001). In addition, the average maximum sensory conduction was slightly slowed along the distal and intermediate portion of the superficial peroneal and sural nerves (p <0·001). The average minimum sensory conduction velocities were normal, as were the average amplitudes of the evoked muscle action potentials and the average ratio of amplitude of the muscle action potential evoked by stimuli at a proximal and a distal nerve site. The average amplitude of the sensory potentials recorded in the median and the superficial peroneal nerves tended to be increased. Electromyography of the abductor pollicis brevis and anterior tibial muscles showed that the only abnormality was an increased incidence of polyphasic potentials in the anterior tibial muscle of seven men. Neither the slowing in conduction nor the histological findings in the sural nerves of eight men were related to the level of lead in the blood. The slight slowing in conduction suggests a minor defect in the excitable

  2. Hyperdensity of the Basilar Artery on Postmortem CT: A Potential Indicator for Basilar Artery Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Garland, Jack; Tse, Rexson; Beh, Raymond J; Lyons, Timothy J; Cala, Allan D

    2016-06-01

    Basilar artery thrombosis constitutes 1% of all types of stroke, carries a mortality rate of up to 90%, and is one of the rarer causes of sudden death. It leads to brain stem ischemia and commonly presents with impaired consciousness, cranial nerve palsy, hemiplegia or quadriplegia, and sudden collapse. Clinically, the diagnosis of basilar artery thrombosis is made on clinical symptoms, along with a hyperdense basilar artery in antemortem computed tomography (CT) scan. To our knowledge, whether a hyperdense basilar artery indicates basilar artery thrombosis on postmortem CT scan is not documented in the literature. We present a case report of a 55-year-old man who on postmortem CT scan showed a hyperdense basilar artery and was subsequently confirmed to be a fatal basilar artery thrombosis. We suggest that a hyperdense basilar artery on postmortem CT should prompt the pathologist to consider basilar artery thrombosis. PMID:27049662

  3. Late onset brachial artery thrombosis and total temporary peripheral neuropathy in a child with humerus supracondylar fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ege, Tolga; Türkkan, Selim; Günay, Celalettin; Külahçı, Yalçın; Kürklü, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric supracondylar fractures of the humerus are generally associated with neurovascular complications due to the deformity and sharp nature of bone fragments. When treated inadequately, these injuries may result in catastrophic complications, such as Volkmann's contracture and amputation. To our knowledge, late onset brachial arterial thrombosis and total temporary peripheral neuropathy after surgery of pediatric supracondylar fracture in the setting of normal preoperative vascular examination has not been reported yet. In this study, a 2-year and 6- month-old girl, who had delayed brachial arterial thrombosis after a displaced humerus supracondylar fracture surgery treated with embolectomy, was reported. Total lesion of median, ulnar and radial nerves completely resolved four months after surgery. Close neurovascular monitoring on the postoperative phase especially in severely displaced supracondylar fractures is strongly emphasized even in the setting of well-perfused hand. PMID:25779718

  4. Complete oculomotor palsy caused by persistent trigeminal artery.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Domenico; Consoli, Domenico; Lanza, Pier Luigi; Plastino, Massimiliano; Nicoletti, Francesco; Ceccotti, Claudio

    2010-10-01

    Primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most frequent embryonic communication between the carotid and vertebro-basilar system. PTA is a pathophysiology phenomenon which has been implicated as a rare cause of cranial nerve dysfunction. We report the case of a 40-year-old woman who developed a complete oculomotor nerve palsy caused by a persistent ecstatic trigeminal artery. Brain MRI and MRA studies documented a neurovascular conflict between the oculomotor nerve and a PTA. To the best of our knowledge there is no report about complete third cranial nerve palsy NC due to a PTA. A role of this rare vascular condition is discussed. PMID:20552240

  5. Ulnar Nerve Tendon Transfers for Pinch.

    PubMed

    Cook, Shane; Gaston, R Glenn; Lourie, Gary M

    2016-08-01

    Power and tip pinch are an integral part of intrinsic hand function that can be significantly compromised with dysfunction of the ulnar nerve. Loss of power pinch is one component that can significantly affect an individual's ability to perform simple daily tasks. Tip pinch is less affected, as this task has significant contributions from the median nerve. To restore power pinch, the primary focus must be on restoring the action of the adductor pollicis primarily, and if indicated the first dorsal interosseous muscle and flexor pollicis brevis. PMID:27387080

  6. Hoarseness after pulmonary arterial stenting and occlusion of the arterial duct.

    PubMed

    Assaqqat, Mervat; Siblini, Ghassan; Fadley, Fadel Al

    2003-06-01

    We report a 12-year-old girl who had multiple congenital cardiac lesions, specifically an arterial duct, left pulmonary arterial stenosis, an atrial septal defect in the oval fossa, and mild Ebstein's malformation of the tricuspid valve. Therapeutic transcatheter intervention was performed to stent the left pulmonary artery, occlude the arterial duct with a coil, and place a device to close the atrial septal defect. Subsequent to the catheterization, she complained of hoarseness, which was shown to be due to entrapment of the left recurrent laryngeal nerve between the coil used to close the arterial duct and the stent placed in the left pulmonary artery. Laryngoscopy confirmed paralysis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. PMID:12903881

  7. Morphological Assessment of Cadaveric Radial, Brachial and Subclavian Arteries: A Neurointerventional Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Ali; Ozkul, Ayca; Shin, Dong Seong; Im, Soo-Bin; Yoon, Seok-Mann

    2015-01-01

    Objective The transradial catheterization (TRC) is becoming widespread, primarily for neurointerventions. Therefore, the evaluation of radial artery puncture in clinical practice and a better understanding of the anatomy are important to improve the safety of neuroendovascular surgery. Methods Ten formalin-fixed adult Korean cadavers were dissected to expose radial artery (RA), brachial artery (BrA) and subclvian artery (ScA), bilaterally. Vessel lengths and diameters were meaured using a caliper and distance between the specific point of vessels and the anatomical landmarks including the radial styloid process, the medial epicondyle of the humerus, the sternoclavicular joint, and the vertebral artery orifice were also measured. Results The average length between the radial (RAPS) and the BrA puncture sites (BrAPS) and between the vertebral artery orifice (VAO) and the BrA bifurcation (BrAB) did not differ between sides (p>0.05). The average length between the radial styloid process (RSP) and the RAPS was 13.41±2.19 mm, and the RSP was 26.85±2.47 mm from the median nerve (MN). The mean length between the medial epicondyle (ME) and the BrAPS as 44.23±5.47 mm, whereas the distance between the ME and the MN was 42.23±4.77 mm. The average VAO-ScA angle was 70.94±6.12°, and the length between the ScA junction (SCJ) and the VAO was 60.30±8.48 mm. Conclusion This study provides basic anatomical information about the radial artery and the brachial route and can help improving new techniques, selection of size and shape of catheters for TRC. This can help neurointerventionists who adopt a transradial neuroendovascular approach and offers comprehensive and safe care to their patients. PMID:26819682

  8. Vascularized Nerve Bypass Graft: A Case Report of an Additional Treatment for Poor Sensory Recovery.

    PubMed

    Usami, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kentaro; Ohkubo, Alisa; Okazaki, Mutsumi

    2016-04-01

    End-to-side neurorrhaphy has proven effective in basic research and in clinical application. One of the methods of end-to-side neurorrhaphy, nerve bypass technique, has been reported and axon regeneration has been proven. In clinical application, the utility of the nerve bypass technique has been revealed in some cases; however, these bypasses were performed using nonvascularized nerves. We initially used the vascularized nerve bypass graft technique with the sural nerve as a secondary clinical procedure after median nerve injury in a 61-year-old patient and achieved motor and sensory nerve regeneration, as supported by a nerve conduction study and clinical sensory test. This technique has the potential to become one of the choices for salvage procedure of severe nerve injury. PMID:27200248

  9. Vascularized Nerve Bypass Graft: A Case Report of an Additional Treatment for Poor Sensory Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kentaro; Ohkubo, Alisa; Okazaki, Mutsumi

    2016-01-01

    Summary: End-to-side neurorrhaphy has proven effective in basic research and in clinical application. One of the methods of end-to-side neurorrhaphy, nerve bypass technique, has been reported and axon regeneration has been proven. In clinical application, the utility of the nerve bypass technique has been revealed in some cases; however, these bypasses were performed using nonvascularized nerves. We initially used the vascularized nerve bypass graft technique with the sural nerve as a secondary clinical procedure after median nerve injury in a 61-year-old patient and achieved motor and sensory nerve regeneration, as supported by a nerve conduction study and clinical sensory test. This technique has the potential to become one of the choices for salvage procedure of severe nerve injury. PMID:27200248

  10. Median raphe cyst of the penis.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Raquel; Freitas, João Duarte; Reis, José Pedro; Tellechea, Oscar

    2005-01-01

    Cysts of the median raphe are uncommon. We describe a 43-year-old man with an asymptomatic nodule on the glans penis. Excision of the lesion was performed followed by histological and immunohistochemical studies. Histopathological examination revealed a solitary unilocular cystic cavity in the corium, lined by a pseudostratified columnar epithelium, among which mucinous cells where identified. Hints of decapitation secretion occurred at the apex of the luminal layer. An immunohistochemical study using a standard avidin-biotin peroxidase method disclosed CK7 and CK13 reactivity in the columnar cells. Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and carcinoembryonic (CEA) antigen immunoreactivity occurred at the apical border of the luminal cells. No staining was obtained with anti-CK20, human milk fat globulin 1 (HMFG1) and anti- S100 protein. The study supports its histogenetic relationship with the urothelium. PMID:16409933

  11. Robust Mediation Analysis Based on Median Regression

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ying; MacKinnon, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Mediation analysis has many applications in psychology and the social sciences. The most prevalent methods typically assume that the error distribution is normal and homoscedastic. However, this assumption may rarely be met in practice, which can affect the validity of the mediation analysis. To address this problem, we propose robust mediation analysis based on median regression. Our approach is robust to various departures from the assumption of homoscedasticity and normality, including heavy-tailed, skewed, contaminated, and heteroscedastic distributions. Simulation studies show that under these circumstances, the proposed method is more efficient and powerful than standard mediation analysis. We further extend the proposed robust method to multilevel mediation analysis, and demonstrate through simulation studies that the new approach outperforms the standard multilevel mediation analysis. We illustrate the proposed method using data from a program designed to increase reemployment and enhance mental health of job seekers. PMID:24079925

  12. Popliteal Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young-Soo; Hwang, Yeok-Gu; Savale, Abhijit Prakash

    2014-01-01

    An early diagnosis of popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm-a sequela of popliteal artery trauma-is difficult owing to its late presentation following total knee arthroplasty. The incidence of a popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm with a hematoma presenting only a peripheral nerve injury after total knee arthroplasty is also uncommon in the absence of common diagnostic features such as a pulsatile swelling with an audible bruit on auscultation. In the present report, we describe popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm following total knee arthroplasty. PMID:24944978

  13. Abnormal Origin and Course of the Accessory Phrenic Nerve: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, George; Koutsouflianiotis, Konstantinos; Kitsoulis, Panagiotis; Spyridakis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    In the current cadaveric study an unusual sizeable accessory phrenic nerve (APN) was encountered emerging from the trunk of the supraclavicular nerves and forming a triangular loop that was anastomosing with the phrenic nerve. That neural loop surrounded the superficial cervical artery which displayed a spiral course. The form of a triangular loop of APN involving the aforementioned artery and originating from the supraclavicular nerve to the best of our knowledge has not been documented previously in the literature. The variable morphological features of the APN along with its clinical applications are briefly discussed. PMID:27526310

  14. The artery blood supply variant of the upper limb

    PubMed Central

    MASLARSKI, IVAN

    2015-01-01

    Variations of arterial patterns in the upper limb have represented the most common subject of vascular anatomy. Different types of artery branching pattern of the upper limb are very important for orthopedists in angiographic and microvascular surgical practice. The brachial artery (BA) is the most important vessel in the normal vascular anatomy of the upper limb. The classical pattern of the palmar hand region distribution shows the superficial palmar arch. Normally this arch is formed by the superficial branch of the ulnar artery and completed on the lateral side by one of these arteries: the superficial palmar branch of the radial artery, the princeps pollicis artery, the superficial palmar branch of the radial artery or the median artery. After the routine dissection of the right upper limb of an adult male cadaver, we found a very rare variant of the superficial arch artery – a division in a higher level brachial artery. We found this division at 10.4 cm from the beginning of the brachial artery. This superficial brachial artery became a radial artery and was not involved in the formation of the palm arch. In the forearm region, the artery variant was present with the median artery and the ulnar artery, which form the superficial palm arch. PMID:26733754

  15. Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome Confirmed with the Use of Intravascular Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    de Lara, Fernando Vazquez; Higgins, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome, a rarely reported condition, is characterized by postprandial abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. Its cause is unclear. We present the case of a 45-year-old woman who had intermittent chronic positional abdominal pain without weight loss. Magnetic resonance angiograms and computed tomograms revealed stenosis of the celiac artery. Ostial compression was confirmed on catheter angiographic and intravascular ultrasonographic images. Intravascular ultrasound revealed far greater stenosis than did the initial imaging methods and confirmed a diagnosis of median arcuate ligament syndrome. In lieu of surgery, the patient underwent a celiac ganglion block procedure that substantially relieved her symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of intravascular ultrasound in the diagnosis of median arcuate ligament syndrome. We recommend using this imaging method preoperatively in other suspected cases of the syndrome, to better identify patients who might benefit from corrective surgery. PMID:24512402

  16. Netrin-1 controls sympathetic arterial innervation

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Isabelle; Gordon, Emma; Han, Jinah; Cristofaro, Brunella; Broqueres-You, Dong; Liu, Chun; Bouvrée, Karine; Zhang, Jiasheng; del Toro, Raquel; Mathivet, Thomas; Larrivée, Bruno; Jagu, Julia; Pibouin-Fragner, Laurence; Pardanaud, Luc; Machado, Maria J.C.; Kennedy, Timothy E.; Zhuang, Zhen; Simons, Michael; Levy, Bernard I.; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger; Eichmann, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic sympathetic nerves innervate peripheral resistance arteries, thereby regulating vascular tone and controlling blood supply to organs. Despite the fundamental importance of blood flow control, how sympathetic arterial innervation develops remains largely unknown. Here, we identified the axon guidance cue netrin-1 as an essential factor required for development of arterial innervation in mice. Netrin-1 was produced by arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) at the onset of innervation, and arterial innervation required the interaction of netrin-1 with its receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), on sympathetic growth cones. Function-blocking approaches, including cell type–specific deletion of the genes encoding Ntn1 in SMCs and Dcc in sympathetic neurons, led to severe and selective reduction of sympathetic innervation and to defective vasoconstriction in resistance arteries. These findings indicate that netrin-1 and DCC are critical for the control of arterial innervation and blood flow regulation in peripheral organs. PMID:24937433

  17. Significant Differences in Sympathetic Nerve Fiber Density Among the Facial Skin Nerves: A Histologic Study Using Human Cadaveric Specimens.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Tadatoshi; Cho, Kwang Ho; Jang, Hyung Suk; Murakami, Gen; Yamamoto, Masahito; Abe, Shin-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    Sympathetic nerve fibers in the skin nerves are connected with vasomotor, thermoregulatory, sensory input modulatory, and immunologic events; however, to our knowledge, no histological information is available for skin nerves in the human face. Using specimens from 17 donated cadavers (mean age, 86 years), we measured a sectional area of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive fibers in (1) the frontal nerve (V1), (2) the infraorbital nerve (V2), (3) the mental nerve (V3), (4) the greater auricular nerve (C2), (5) the auriculotemporal nerve (ATN), and (6) the zygomatic branch of the facial nerve (VII). The V1, V2, and V3 were obtained at their entrances to the subcutaneous tissue from the bony canal or notch. The V1, C2, ATN, and/or VII usually contained abundant TH-positive fibers (almost 3%-8% of the nerve sectional area), whereas the V2 and V3 consistently carried few TH-positive fibers (<1%). The difference between these two groups was quite significant (P < 0.001). Thus, from the superior cervical ganglion, the sympathetic nerve fibers reached the forehead through the frontal nerve trunk, whereas artery-bounded fibers came to the cheek, nose, and mouth. The sympathetic palsy caused by trigeminal nerve involvement is mainly characterized by the symptoms seen in the distribution of the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve, such as in Horner's syndrome. It suggests that the forehead and the other facial areas are representative parts of those different sympathetic innervations that could be useful for evaluating the sympathetic function of the face in various diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1054-1059, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27072367

  18. Geometric median for missing rainfall data imputation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burhanuddin, Siti Nur Zahrah Amin; Deni, Sayang Mohd; Ramli, Norazan Mohamed

    2015-02-01

    Missing data is a common problem faced by researchers in environmental studies. Environmental data, particularly, rainfall data are highly vulnerable to be missed, which is due to several reasons, such as malfunction instrument, incorrect measurements, and relocation of stations. Rainfall data are also affected by the presence of outliers due to the temporal and spatial variability of rainfall measurements. These problems may harm the quality of rainfall data and subsequently, produce inaccuracy in the results of analysis. Thus, this study is aimed to propose an imputation method that is robust towards the presence of outliers for treating the missing rainfall data. Geometric median was applied to estimate the missing values based on the available rainfall data from neighbouring stations. The method was compared with several conventional methods, such as normal ratio and inverse distance weighting methods, in order to evaluate its performance. Thirteen rainfall stations in Peninsular Malaysia were selected for the application of the imputation methods. The results indicated that the proposed method provided the most accurate estimation values compared to both conventional methods based on the least mean absolute error. The normal ratio was found to be the worst method in estimating the missing rainfall values.

  19. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near ... surface of the body where it crosses the elbow, so prolonged pressure on the elbow or entrapment ...

  20. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  1. Radial nerve dysfunction (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The radial nerve travels down the arm and supplies movement to the triceps muscle at the back of the upper arm. ... the wrist and hand. The usual causes of nerve dysfunction are direct trauma, prolonged pressure on the ...

  2. Tibial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... a loss of movement or sensation in the foot from damage to the tibial nerve. ... Tibial nerve dysfunction is an unusual form of peripheral ... the calf and foot muscles. A problem in function with a single ...

  3. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see how ...

  4. Assessing nerves in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Garbino, José Antonio; Heise, Carlos Otto; Marques, Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy neuropathy is dependent on the patient's immune response and expresses itself as a focal or multifocal neuropathy with asymmetric involvement. Leprosy neuropathy evolves chronically but recurrently develops periods of exacerbation during type 1 or type 2 reactions, leading to acute neuropathy. Nerve enlargement leading to entrapment syndromes is also a common manifestation. Pain may be either of inflammatory or neuropathic origin. A thorough and detailed evaluation is mandatory for adequate patient follow-up, including nerve palpation, pain assessment, graded sensory mapping, muscle power testing, and autonomic evaluation. Nerve conduction studies are a sensitive tool for nerve dysfunction, including new lesions during reaction periods or development of entrapment syndromes. Nerve ultrasonography is also a very promising method for nerve evaluation in leprosy. The authors propose a composite nerve clinical score for nerve function assessment that can be useful for longitudinal evaluation. PMID:26773623

  5. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  6. Radial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... nerve leads to problems with movement in the arm and wrist and with sensation in the back of the arm or hand. ... to the radial nerve, which travels down the arm and controls movement of the triceps muscle at ...

  7. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many ... viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ...

  8. Chitosan crosslinked flat scaffolds for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fregnan, F; Ciglieri, E; Tos, P; Crosio, A; Ciardelli, G; Ruini, F; Tonda-Turo, C; Geuna, S; Raimondo, S

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (CS) has been widely used in a variety of biomedical applications, including peripheral nerve repair, due to its excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability, readily availability and antibacterial activity. In this study, CS flat membranes, crosslinked with dibasic sodium phosphate (DSP) alone (CS/DSP) or in association with the γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (CS/GPTMS_DSP), were fabricated with a solvent casting technique. The constituent ratio of crosslinking agents and CS were previously selected to obtain a composite material having both adequate mechanical properties and high biocompatibility. In vitro cytotoxicity tests showed that both CS membranes allowed cell survival and proliferation. Moreover, CS/GPTMS_DSP membranes promoted cell adhesion, induced Schwann cell-like morphology and supported neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia explants. Preliminary in vivo tests carried out on both types of nerve scaffolds (CS/DSP and CS/GPTMS_DSP membranes) demonstrated their potential for: (i) protecting, as a membrane, the site of nerve crush or repair by end-to-end surgery and avoiding post-operative nerve adhesion; (ii) bridging, as a conduit, the two nerve stumps after a severe peripheral nerve lesion with substance loss. A 1 cm gap on rat median nerve was repaired using CS/DSP and CS/GPTMS_DSP conduits to further investigate their ability to induce nerve regeneration in vivo. CS/GPTMS_DSP tubes resulted to be more fragile during suturing and, along a 12 week post-operative lapse of time, they detached from the distal nerve stump. On the contrary CS/DSP conduits promoted nerve fiber regeneration and functional recovery, leading to an outcome comparable to median nerve repaired by autograft. PMID:27508969

  9. Laryngeal nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Laryngeal nerve damage is injury to one or both of the nerves that are attached to the voice box. ... Injury to the laryngeal nerves is uncommon. When it does occur, it can be from: A complication of neck or chest surgery (especially thyroid, lung, ...

  10. Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hall, Roger K

    2006-01-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (SMMCI) is a complex disorder consisting of multiple, mainly midline defects of development resulting from unknown factor(s) operating in utero about the 35th-38th day(s) from conception. It is estimated to occur in 1:50,000 live births. Aetiology is uncertain. Missense mutation in the SHH gene (I111F) at 7q36 may be associated with SMMCI. The SMMCI tooth differs from the normal central incisor, in that the crown form is symmetric; it develops and erupts precisely in the midline of the maxillary dental arch in both primary and permanent dentitions. Congenital nasal malformation (choanal atresia, midnasal stenosis or congenital pyriform aperture stenosis) is positively associated with SMMCI. The presence of an SMMCI tooth can predict associated anomalies and in particular the serious anomaly holoprosencephaly. Common congenital anomalies associated with SMMCI are: severe to mild intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, cleft lip and/or palate and less frequently, microcephaly, hypopituitarism, hypotelorism, convergent strabismus, oesophageal and duodenal atresia, cervical hemivertebrae, cervical dermoid, hypothyroidism, scoliosis, absent kidney, micropenis and ambiguous genitalia. Short stature is present in half the children. Diagnosis should be made by eight months of age, but can be made at birth and even prenatally at 18-22 weeks from the routine mid-trimester ultrasound scan. Management depends upon the individual anomalies present. Choanal stenosis requires emergency surgical treatment. Short stature may require growth hormone therapy. SMMCI tooth itself is mainly an aesthetic problem, which is ideally managed by combined orthodontic, prosthodontic and oral surgical treatment; alternatively, it can be left untreated. PMID:16722608

  11. Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Roger K

    2006-01-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (SMMCI) is a complex disorder consisting of multiple, mainly midline defects of development resulting from unknown factor(s) operating in utero about the 35th–38th day(s) from conception. It is estimated to occur in 1:50,000 live births. Aetiology is uncertain. Missense mutation in the SHH gene (I111F) at 7q36 may be associated with SMMCI. The SMMCI tooth differs from the normal central incisor, in that the crown form is symmetric; it develops and erupts precisely in the midline of the maxillary dental arch in both primary and permanent dentitions. Congenital nasal malformation (choanal atresia, midnasal stenosis or congenital pyriform aperture stenosis) is positively associated with SMMCI. The presence of an SMMCI tooth can predict associated anomalies and in particular the serious anomaly holoprosencephaly. Common congenital anomalies associated with SMMCI are: severe to mild intellectual disability, congenital heart disease, cleft lip and/or palate and less frequently, microcephaly, hypopituitarism, hypotelorism, convergent strabismus, oesophageal and duodenal atresia, cervical hemivertebrae, cervical dermoid, hypothyroidism, scoliosis, absent kidney, micropenis and ambiguous genitalia. Short stature is present in half the children. Diagnosis should be made by eight months of age, but can be made at birth and even prenatally at 18–22 weeks from the routine mid-trimester ultrasound scan. Management depends upon the individual anomalies present. Choanal stenosis requires emergency surgical treatment. Short stature may require growth hormone therapy. SMMCI tooth itself is mainly an aesthetic problem, which is ideally managed by combined orthodontic, prosthodontic and oral surgical treatment; alternatively, it can be left untreated. PMID:16722608

  12. Stretch-induced nerve injury: a proposed technique for the study of nerve regeneration and evaluation of the influence of gabapentin on this model

    PubMed Central

    Machado, J.A.; Ghizoni, M.F.; Bertelli, J.; Teske, Gabriel C.; Teske, Guilherme C.; Martins, D.F.; Mazzardo-Martins, L.; Cargnin-Ferreira, E.; Santos, A.R.S.; Piovezan, A.P.

    2013-01-01

    The rat models currently employed for studies of nerve regeneration present distinct disadvantages. We propose a new technique of stretch-induced nerve injury, used here to evaluate the influence of gabapentin (GBP) on nerve regeneration. Male Wistar rats (300 g; n=36) underwent surgery and exposure of the median nerve in the right forelimbs, either with or without nerve injury. The technique was performed using distal and proximal clamps separated by a distance of 2 cm and a sliding distance of 3 mm. The nerve was compressed and stretched for 5 s until the bands of Fontana disappeared. The animals were evaluated in relation to functional, biochemical and histological parameters. Stretching of the median nerve led to complete loss of motor function up to 12 days after the lesion (P<0.001), compared to non-injured nerves, as assessed in the grasping test. Grasping force in the nerve-injured animals did not return to control values up to 30 days after surgery (P<0.05). Nerve injury also caused an increase in the time of sensory recovery, as well as in the electrical and mechanical stimulation tests. Treatment of the animals with GBP promoted an improvement in the morphometric analysis of median nerve cross-sections compared with the operated vehicle group, as observed in the area of myelinated fibers or connective tissue (P<0.001), in the density of myelinated fibers/mm2 (P<0.05) and in the degeneration fragments (P<0.01). Stretch-induced nerve injury seems to be a simple and relevant model for evaluating nerve regeneration. PMID:24270909

  13. [Ganglia of peripheral nerves].

    PubMed

    Tatagiba, M; Penkert, G; Samii, M

    1993-01-01

    The authors present two different types of ganglion affecting the peripheral nerves: extraneural and intraneural ganglion. Compression of peripheral nerves by articular ganglions is well known. The surgical management involves the complete removal of the lesion with preservation of most nerve fascicles. Intraneural ganglion is an uncommon lesion which affects the nerve diffusely. The nerve fascicles are usually intimately involved between the cysts, making complete removal of all cysts impossible. There is no agreement about the best surgical management to be applied in these cases. Two possibilities are available: opening of the epineural sheath lengthwise and pressing out the lesion; or resection of the affected part of the nerve and performing a nerve reconstruction. While in case of extraneural ganglion the postoperative clinical evolution is very favourable, only long follow up studies will reveal in case of intraneural ganglion the best surgical approach. PMID:8128785

  14. Acetylcholinesterase-positive nerves of the rhesus monkey bronchial tree.

    PubMed Central

    El-Bermani, A W; Grant, M

    1975-01-01

    The rhesus monkey lung was stained both by histological methods and histochemically for specific acetylcholinesterase (AChE). AChE-containing nerves in bundles were demonstrated in connective tissue of the hilum and in association with clusters of ganglion cells. These bundles become associated with the bronchial tree as they enter the lung parenchyma, and their numbers of myelinated fibres diminish as they pass scattered ganglion cells along the bronchial system. Extrachondral and subchondral plexuses of nerves were found to be interconnected and to contribute to the perimuscular varicose nerve plexus of the bronchi and bronchioles. These nerve plexuses were found to extend as far as the respiratory bronchioles. In the bronchial submucosa there are AChE-positive nerve plexuses which arise from three sources: (1) the adventitial plexus in bronchioles, or the subchondral plexus in bronchi, (2) the perimuscular nerve plexus, and (3) AChe-containing nerves associated with the bronchial artery. The submucosal plexus appears to innervate the acinar submucosal glands in bronchi as well as continuing as central nerves in the mucosal folds. In the bronchioles the nerves in the mucosal fold are in close relationship with the mucosa. Images PMID:1179313

  15. Assessment of nerve morphology in nerve activation during electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Tames, Jose; Yu, Wenwei

    2013-10-01

    The distance between nerve and stimulation electrode is fundamental for nerve activation in Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation (TES). However, it is not clear the need to have an approximate representation of the morphology of peripheral nerves in simulation models and its influence in the nerve activation. In this work, depth and curvature of a nerve are investigated around the middle thigh. As preliminary result, the curvature of the nerve helps to reduce the simulation amplitude necessary for nerve activation from far field stimulation.

  16. Effect of long-term implanted nerve cuff electrodes on the electrophysiological properties of human sensory nerves.

    PubMed

    Slot, P J; Selmar, P; Rasmussen, A; Sinkjaer, T

    1997-03-01

    During a long-term implantation (307 days) of a tripolar split cuff electrode around the palmar digital nerve to the radial side of the left index finger, branching off the median nerve in a medullary lesioned C6 patient, the physiological state of the nerve was intensively monitored. The resulting sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitude was recorded, using both near-nerve electrodes and the implanted cuff electrode. The SNAP amplitude declined within 10 days to approximately 50% of the first SNAP cuff amplitude measured on Day 2 after implantation and recovered to the initial amplitude within 3 months. The SNAP amplitude measurements made with near-nerve electrodes were consistent with the cuff results; the SNAP conduction velocity (CV) recorded by the near-nerve electrodes and the cuff electrode was constant during the whole implantation period. This is in agreement with the results from two other patients: one with a cuff implanted around the sural nerve, and the other with a cuff implanted around a branch of the tibial nerve. These results and animals studies show that the cuff electrode is an electrically stable neural-electrical transducer. PMID:9148706

  17. Neuromuscular block after intra-arterially injected acetylcholine. 1. Introduction, methods, and technique.

    PubMed

    Tonali, P; Gambi, D

    1973-04-01

    The neuromuscular depolarizing block induced by intra-arterially injected ACh was studied to determine the variability in the same subject and in different subjects without disorders at the motor end-plate. Amplitude of action potentials of the opponens pollicis muscle evoked by intermittent repetitive supramaximal stimulation of the median nerve at the wrist were recorded for one hour from the beginning of ACh injection. The features of prompt and late depression stages after the injection were analysed statistically. Re-testing of the same subjects after a while shows that, in spite of all efforts to maintain the same experimental conditions, variations do occur in late depression. Time course and duration are particularly affected, while the degree of depression is altered but slightly. The presence of such variations limits this test to evaluation of the influence of other factors only within their already established statistical limits. PMID:4350703

  18. The Heterogeneous P-Median Problem for Categorization Based Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Simon J.; Aloise, Daniel; DeSarbo, Wayne S.

    2012-01-01

    The p-median offers an alternative to centroid-based clustering algorithms for identifying unobserved categories. However, existing p-median formulations typically require data aggregation into a single proximity matrix, resulting in masked respondent heterogeneity. A proposed three-way formulation of the p-median problem explicitly considers…

  19. Nerve conduction abnormalities in untreated maturity-onset diabetes: relation to levels of fasting plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Graf, R J; Halter, J B; Halar, E; Porte, D

    1979-03-01

    The role of metabolic abnormalities in the development of diabetic neuropathy is controversial. To investigate the influence of hyperglycemia on nerve conduction, we studied 20 untreated maturity-onset diabetic patients and 23 normal control subjects of similar age. Nerve conduction velocity of motor (median, peroneal, and tibial) and sensory (median and sural) nerves in diabetic patients was significantly slowed and H-reflex latency time prolonged. Levels of fasting plasma glucose in diabetic subjects were correlated with slowed motor conduction velocity of the median, peroneal, and tibial nerves but not with sensory nerve conduction velocities. Levels of glycosylated hemoglobin, an index of long-term glycemia, were correlated with slowing of peroneal motor conduction velocity in diabetic patients. These associations could not be explained by patient age or duration of diabetes. These findings suggest that the degree of hyperglycemia of untreated maturity-onset diabetes contributes to the motor nerve conduction abnormalities in this disease. PMID:426398

  20. Fusiform aneurysm of a persistent trigeminal artery associated with rare intracranial arterial variations and subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kimball, David; Ples, Horia; Kimball, Heather; Miclaus, Gratian D; Matusz, Petru; Loukas, Marios

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminal artery is one of four primitive anastomoses between the internal carotid artery and vertebrobasilar system that regresses in the sixth week of fetal development. A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is generally an incidental finding but may also be associated with intracranial vascular pathologies such as aneurysms, arteriovenous malformations, and cranial nerve compression syndromes. We present an extremely rare case of a right PTA with an associated bleeding fusiform aneurysm located in the carotidian (lateral) part of the PTA. In addition, this rare anatomic variation was associated with bilateral absence of the posterior communicating arteries, a left posterior cerebral artery originating from the left internal carotid artery, and agenesis of the A1 segment of the left anterior cerebral artery. PMID:25053265

  1. Neuroanatomy and immunocytochemistry of the median neuroendocrine cells of the subesophageal ganglion of the tobacco hawkmoth, Manduca sexta: immunoreactivities to PBAN and other neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Davis, N T; Homberg, U; Teal, P E; Altstein, M; Agricola, H J; Hildebrand, J G

    1996-10-15

    The median neuroendocrine cells of the subesophageal ganglion, important components of the neuroendocrine system of the tobacco hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, have not been well investigated. Therefore, we studied the anatomy of these cells by axonal backfills and characterized their peptide immunoreactivities. Both larvae and adults were examined, and developmental changes in these neuroendocrine cells were followed. Processes of the median neuroendocrine cells project to terminations in the corpora cardiaca via the third and the ventral nerves of this neurohemal organ, but the ventral nerve of the corpus cardiacum is the principal neurohemal surface for this system. Cobalt backfills of the third cardiacal nerves revealed lateral cells in the maxillary neuromere and a ventro-median pair in the labial neuromere. Backfills of the ventral cardiacal nerves revealed two ventro-median pairs of cells in the mandibular neuromere and two ventro-median triplets in the maxillary neuromere. The efferent projections of these cells are contralateral. The anatomy of the system is basically the same in larvae and adults. The three sets of median neuroendocrine cells are PBAN- and FMRFamide-immunoreactive, but only the mandibular and maxillary cells are proctolin-immunoreactive. During metamorphosis, the mandibular and maxillary cells also acquire CCK-like immunoreactivity and the labial cells become SCP- and sulfakinin-immunoreactive. Characteristics of FMRFamide-like immunostaining suggest that the median neuroendocrine cells may contain one or more of the FLRFamides that have been identified in M. sexta. The mandibular and maxillary neuroendocrine cells appear to produce the same set of hormones, and a somewhat different set of hormones is produced by the labial neuroendocrine cells. Two pairs of interneurons immunologically related to the neurosecretory cells are associated with the median maxillary neuroendocrine cells. These cells are PBAN-, FMRFamide-, SCP-, and sulfakinin

  2. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidneys need a good blood supply. The main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. ...

  3. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  4. The Furcal Nerve Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Dabke, Harshad V.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical sciatica and discrepancy between clinical presentation and imaging findings is a dilemma for treating surgeon in management of lumbar disc herniation. It also constitutes ground for failed back surgery and potential litigations thereof. Furcal nerve (Furcal = forked) is an independent nerve with its own ventral and dorsal branches (rootlets) and forms a link nerve that connects lumbar and sacral plexus. Its fibers branch out to be part of femoral and obturator nerves in-addition to the lumbosacral trunk. It is most commonly found at L4 level and is the most common cause of atypical presentation of radiculopathy/sciatica. Very little is published about the furcal nerve and many are unaware of its existence. This article summarizes all the existing evidence about furcal nerve in English literature in an attempt to create awareness and offer insight about this unique entity to fellow colleagues/professionals involved in spine care. PMID:25317309

  5. Sciatic nerve injection injury.

    PubMed

    Jung Kim, Hyun; Hyun Park, Sang

    2014-06-11

    Nerve injury is a common complication following intramuscular injection and the sciatic nerve is the most frequently affected nerve, especially in children, the elderly and underweight patients. The neurological presentation may range from minor transient pain to severe sensory disturbance and motor loss with poor recovery. Management of nerve injection injury includes drug treatment of pain, physiotherapy, use of assistive devices and surgical exploration. Early recognition of nerve injection injury and appropriate management are crucial in order to reduce neurological deficit and to maximize recovery. Sciatic nerve injection injury is a preventable event. Total avoidance of intramuscular injection is recommended if other administration routes can be used. If the injection has to be administered into the gluteal muscle, the ventrogluteal region (gluteal triangle) has a more favourable safety profile than the dorsogluteal region (the upper outer quadrant of the buttock). PMID:24920643

  6. Comparison of the Volar and Medial Approach in Peripheral Block of Ulnar Nerve at the Wrist – A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Praisy; Satyanandan, Cephas

    2014-01-01

    Context: Two standard approaches are described to block the ulnar nerve at wrist. These include a) the traditional Volar approach where the needle is inserted lateral to tendon of flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) b) Medial approach where the needle is inserted posterior to the tendon of FCU. Caution must be exercised to avoid puncture of the ulnar artery and/or intraneural injection of the ulnar nerve in both the approaches. Aim: This study compares the volar and medial approach to the peripheral block of ulnar nerve at the wrist. The objective was two fold: a) to analyze the position of the ulnar nerve and the ulnar artery in relation to the Flexor Carpi Ulnaris tendon b) to assess the risk of injury to ulnar artery in both the volar and medial approach. Settings and Designs: Twelve cadaveric upper limbs were used and both approaches compared by an observational study. Materials and Methods: Two 18 G needles were inserted up to a depth of 7 mm using the standard volar and medial approach. The pattern of arrangement and positions of the ulnar artery and nerve in relation to FCU tendon were observed. The distance between the tip of needle and its proximity to the ulnar artery, and risk of injury were determined. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS for Windows, Version 16.0. Chicago, SPSS Inc. Results: Three patterns of arrangement and position of the ulnar nerve and artery were observed. Puncture of ulnar artery was seen in 50% of cases in the volar approach as compared to no injury at all in the medial approach. The ulnar artery is highly liable to injury during the volar approach in type I and II and safe only in type III arrangement of ulnar artery. The medial approach showed no injury to the ulnar artery or nerve at a penetration depth of 7mm. Conclusion: The medial approach is safer compared to volar approach for peripheral block of ulnar nerve at wrist. PMID:25584201

  7. Endoscopic Facial Nerve Surgery.

    PubMed

    Marchioni, Daniele; Soloperto, Davide; Rubini, Alessia; Nogueira, João Flávio; Badr-El-Dine, Mohamed; Presutti, Livio

    2016-10-01

    Tympanic facial nerve segment surgery has been traditionally performed using microscopic approaches, but currently, exclusive endoscopic approaches have been performed for traumatic, neoplastic, or inflammatory diseases, specially located at the geniculate ganglion, greater petrosal nerve, and second tract of the facial nerve, until the second genu. The tympanic segment of the facial nerve can be reached and visualized using an exclusive transcanal endoscopic approach, even in poorly accessible regions such as the second genu and geniculate ganglion, avoiding mastoidectomy, bony demolition, and meningeal or cerebral lobe tractions, with low complication rates using a minimally invasive surgical route. PMID:27468633

  8. Angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia and entrapment of the ulnar nerve

    PubMed Central

    Di Vitantonio, Hambra; De Paulis, Danilo; Ricci, Alessandro; Raysi, Soheila Dehcordi; Marzi, Sara; Del Maestro, Mattia; Galzio, Renato Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background: The angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (ALHE) is a sporadic vasoproliferative lesion of uncertain etiology involving the skin and the subcutaneous tissue. Occasionally, it involves also the large arteries compressing the near nerves. ALHE is commonly confused with Kimura's disease because of their clinical and histological similarities. Case Description: We report a case of a 52-year-old female suffering from a 6-month pain and paresthesias in the fourth and fifth finger of the right hand. The angiography showed a pseudoaneurysm in the proximal third of the right ulnar artery. A complete surgical excision of the vascular lesion was undertaken. The lesion forced the right ulnar nerve. The histopathological diagnosis deposed for ALHE. Conclusion: Up to now, literature has described 8 cases of ALHE involving the arteries, and only one case originating from the ulnar nerve. The authors report a case of a female with ALHE involving the ulnar artery that compressed the ulnar nerve. Clinical aspects, radiological features, surgical treatment, and operative findings are discussed reviewing the pertinent literature. PMID:27069750

  9. Divided maxillary artery in relation to the lateral pterygoid muscle.

    PubMed

    Aland, R Claire; Shaw, Vivien

    2016-03-01

    We describe an anatomical variation of the right maxillary artery. The variation loops deep, giving off a middle meningeal artery with an extremely short extracranial segment, then bifurcates into unequal branches. The smaller branch passes superficial to the lateral pterygoid head and distributes primarily to the masticatory muscles. The larger partially pierces the lateral pterygoid lower head, re-emerges superficially, branches again and passes into the pterygopalatine fossa. The larger lies superficial to the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves and deep to the buccal nerve. An embryonic development origin of the cranial arteries is suggested. PMID:26077959

  10. Arterial stick

    MedlinePlus

    ... limit tissue damage. Alternative Names Blood sample - arterial ... by: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, ...

  11. Arterial Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... rial line can provide valuable information to adjust oxygen therapy or mechanical ventilator (respirator; breathing machine) settings. The blood oxygen pres- sure measures from an arterial line give ...

  12. Arteriovenous malformation of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Adam; Tsuji, Masao; Yamada, Yoshitaka; Hanabusa, Kenichiro; Ukita, Tohru; Miyake, Hiroji; Ohmura, Takehisa

    2015-01-01

    We describe a rare case of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) embedded in the vestibulocochlear nerve presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) treated by microsurgical elimination of the main feeding artery and partial nidus volume reduction with no permanent deficits. This 70-year-old woman was incidentally diagnosed 4 years previously with two small unruptured tandem aneurysms (ANs) on the right anterior inferior cerebral artery feeding a small right cerebellopontine angle AVM. The patient was followed conservatively until she developed sudden headache, nausea and vomiting and presented to our outpatient clinic after several days. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated findings suggestive of early subacute SAH in the quadrigeminal cistern. A microsurgical flow reduction technique via clipping between the two ANs and partial electrocoagulation of the nidus buried within the eighth cranial nerve provided radiographical devascularization of the ANs with residual AVM shunt flow and no major deficits during the 2.5 year follow-up. This is only the second report of an auditory nerve AVM. In the event of recurrence, reoperation or application of alternative therapies may be considered. PMID:26244159

  13. A need for logical and consistent anatomical nomenclature for cutaneous nerves of the limbs.

    PubMed

    Gest, Thomas R; Burkel, William E; Cortright, Gerald W

    2009-01-01

    The system of anatomical nomenclature needs to be logical and consistent. However, variations in translation to English of the Latin and Greek terminology used in Nomina Anatomica and Terminologia Anatomica have led to some inconsistency in the nomenclature of cutaneous nerves in the limbs. An historical review of cutaneous nerve nomenclature reveals that there are two general naming conventions: one primarily American and one primarily British. The American convention presents cutaneous nerves of the limbs in the format "medial brachial cutaneous nerve," while the British convention presents the same nerve as "medial cutaneous nerve of the arm," thereby translating "brachii" to "of the arm." If logically and consistently applied throughout the body, the British convention would rename the sural nerve to the "nerve of the calf," the brachial artery would become the "artery of the arm," the femoral nerve would be "nerve of the thigh," and femur would be "bone of the thigh" or "thigh bone." The British convention leads to many other nomenclatural inconsistencies, which would seem to make learning anatomy more difficult for the beginning student. In this era of contracting anatomy curricula, every effort should be made to keep anatomical nomenclature simple, logical, and consistent. PMID:19496151

  14. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Facial Nerve Schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenyin; Jain, Varsha; Kim, Hyun; Champ, Colin; Jain, Gaurav; Farrell, Christopher; Andrews, David W; Judy, Kevin; Liu, Haisong; Artz, Gregory; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Evans, James J

    2016-02-01

    Purpose Data on the clinical course of irradiated facial nerve schwannomas (FNS) are lacking. We evaluated fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for FNS. Methods Eight consecutive patients with FNS treated at our institution between 1998 and 2011 were included. Patients were treated with FSRT to a median dose of 50.4 Gy (range: 46.8-54 Gy) in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy fractions. We report the radiographic response, symptom control, and toxicity associated with FSRT for FNS. Results The median follow-up time was 43 months (range: 10-75 months). All patients presented with symptoms including pain, tinnitus, facial asymmetry, diplopia, and hearing loss. The median tumor volume was 1.57 cc. On the most recent follow-up imaging, five patients were noted to have stable tumor size; three patients had a net reduction in tumor volume. Additionally, six patients had improvement in clinical symptoms, one patient had stable clinical findings, and one patient had worsened House-Brackmann grade due to cystic degeneration. Conclusion FSRT treatment of FNS results in excellent control of growth and symptoms with a small rate of radiation toxicity. Given the importance of maintaining facial nerve function, FSRT could be considered as a primary management modality for enlarging or symptomatic FNS. PMID:26949592

  15. Intraoperative vagal nerve monitoring.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, J P; Jellish, W S; Warf, P; Hudson, E

    1996-08-01

    A variety of benign and malignant neoplasms occur in the superior cervical neck, parapharyngeal space or the infratemporal fossa. The surgical resection of these lesions may result in postoperative iatrogenic injury to the vagus nerve with associated dysfunctional swallowing and airway protection. Anatomic and functional preservation of this critical cranial nerve will contribute to a favorable surgical outcome. Fourteen patients with tumors of the cervical neck or adjacent skull base underwent intraoperative vagal nerve monitoring in an attempt to preserve neural integrity following tumor removal. Of the 11 patients with anatomically preserved vagal nerves in this group, seven patients had normal vocal cord mobility following surgery and all 11 patients demonstrated normal vocal cord movement by six months. In an earlier series of 23 patients with tumors in the same region who underwent tumor resection without vagal nerve monitoring, 18 patients had anatomically preserved vagal nerves. Within this group, five patients had normal vocal cord movement at one month and 13 patients demonstrated normal vocal cord movement at six months. This paper will outline a technique for intraoperative vagal nerve monitoring utilizing transcricothyroid membrane placement of bipolar hook-wire electrodes in the vocalis muscle. Our results with the surgical treatment of cervical neck and lateral skull base tumors for patients with unmonitored and monitored vagal nerves will be outlined. PMID:8828272

  16. Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning.

    PubMed

    Louis, P J

    2001-09-01

    Nerve repositioning is a viable alternative for patients with an atrophic edentulous posterior mandible. Patients, however, should be informed of the potential risks of neurosensory disturbance. Documentation of the patient's baseline neurosensory function should be performed with a two-point discrimination test or directional brush stroke test preoperatively and postoperatively. Recovery of nerve function should be expected in 3 to 6 months. The potential for mandibular fracture when combining nerve repositioning with implant placement also should be discussed with the patient. This can be avoided by minimizing the amount of buccal cortical plate removal during localization of the nerve and maintaining the integrity of the inferior cortex of the mandible. Additionally, avoid overseating the implant, thus avoiding stress along the inferior border of the mandible. The procedure does allow for the placement of longer implants, which should improve implant longevity. Patients undergoing this procedure have expressed overall satisfaction with the results. Nerve repositioning also can be used to preserve the inferior alveolar nerve during resection of benign tumors or cysts of the mandible. This procedure allows the surgeon to maintain nerve function in situations in which the nerve would otherwise have to be resected. PMID:11665379

  17. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePlus

    ... canals). The optic nerve is the “nerve of vision” and extends from the brain, through your skull, and into your eye. A ... limited to, the following: loss of vision, double vision, inadequate ... leakage of brain fluid (CSF), meningitis, nasal bleeding, infection of the ...

  18. Pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm associated with coeliac artery occlusion from an aortic intramural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Sakatani, Akihiko; Doi, Yoshinori; Kitayama, Toshiaki; Matsuda, Takaaki; Sasai, Yasutaka; Nishida, Naohiro; Sakamoto, Megumi; Uenoyama, Naoto; Kinoshita, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms are a rare type of visceral artery aneurysm, whose rupture is associated with high mortality. These aneurysms are of particular interest because local haemodynamic change caused by coeliac artery obstruction plays an important role in their development. However, the pathophysiological mechanism of coeliac artery obstruction is not completely understood. Pressure from the median arcuate ligament is most frequently reported cause. Although it is well-known that stenosis or occlusion of the visceral vessels may be caused by aortic syndrome, reports of pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm associated with coeliac artery occlusion due to aortic syndrome are extremely rare. Our case indicates a new aetiology for a pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm and demonstrates the rapid deterioration of the patient affected. PMID:27122676

  19. Preoperative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for localizing superficial nerve paths.

    PubMed

    Natori, Yuhei; Yoshizawa, Hidekazu; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Ayato

    2015-12-01

    During surgery, peripheral nerves are often seen to follow unpredictable paths because of previous surgeries and/or compression caused by a tumor. Iatrogenic nerve injury is a serious complication that must be avoided, and preoperative evaluation of nerve paths is important for preventing it. In this study, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was used for an in-depth analysis of peripheral nerve paths. This study included 27 patients who underwent the TENS procedure to evaluate the peripheral nerve path (17 males and 10 females; mean age: 59.9 years, range: 18-83 years) of each patient preoperatively. An electrode pen coupled to an electrical nerve stimulator was used for superficial nerve mapping. The TENS procedure was performed on patients' major peripheral nerves that passed close to the surgical field of tumor resection or trauma surgery, and intraoperative damage to those nerves was apprehensive. The paths of the target nerve were detected in most patients preoperatively. The nerve paths of 26 patients were precisely under the markings drawn preoperatively. The nerve path of one patient substantially differed from the preoperative markings with numbness at the surgical region. During surgery, the nerve paths could be accurately mapped preoperatively using the TENS procedure as confirmed by direct visualization of the nerve. This stimulation device is easy to use and offers highly accurate mapping of nerves for surgical planning without major complications. The authors conclude that TENS is a useful tool for noninvasive nerve localization and makes tumor resection a safe and smooth procedure. PMID:26420473

  20. Multifocal motor neuropathy: correlation of nerve ultrasound, electrophysiological, and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Kerasnoudis, Antonios; Pitarokoili, Kalliopi; Behrendt, Volker; Gold, Ralf; Yoon, Min-Suk

    2014-06-01

    We present nerve ultrasound findings in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and examine their correlation with electrophysiology and functional disability. Eighty healthy controls and 12 MMN patients underwent clinical, sonographic, and electrophysiological evaluation a mean of 3.5 years (standard deviation [SD] ± 2.1) after disease onset. Nerve ultrasound revealed significantly higher cross-sectional area (CSA) values of the median (forearm, p < 0.001), ulnar (p < 0.001), and tibial nerve (ankle, p < 0.001) when compared with controls. Electroneurography documented signs of significantly lower values of the motor conduction velocity and compound muscle action potentials (cMAPs) in the upper arm nerves (median, ulnar, radial, p < 0.001). A significant correlation between sonographic and electrophysiological findings in the MMN group was found only between cMAP and CSA of the median nerve at the upper arm (r = 0.851, p < 0.001). Neither nerve sonography nor electrophysiology correlated with functional disability. MMN seems to show inhomogeneous CSA enlargement in various peripheral nerves, with weak correlation to electrophysiological findings. Neither nerve sonography nor electrophysiology correlated with functional disability. Multicentre, prospective studies are required to prove the applicability and diagnostic values of these findings. PMID:24862982

  1. Normal threshold values for a monofilament sensory test in sural and radial cutaneous nerves in Indian and Nepali volunteers.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Inge; Brandsma, Wim; Post, Erik; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2014-12-01

    The monofilament test (MFT) is a reliable method to assess sensory nerve function in leprosy and other neuropathies. Assessment of the radial cutaneous and sural nerves, in addition to nerves usually tested, can help improve diagnosis and monitoring of nerve function impairment (NFI). To enable the detection of impairments in leprosy patients, it is essential to know the monofilament threshold of these two nerves in normal subjects. The radial cutaneous, sural, ulnar, median and posterior tibial nerves of 245 volunteers were tested. All nerves were tested at three sites on both left and right sides. Normal monofilament thresholds were calculated per test-site and per nerve. We assessed 490 radial cutaneous and 482 sural nerves. The normal monofilament was 2 g (Filament Index Number (FIN) 4.31) for the radial cutaneous and 4 g (FIN 4.56) for the sural nerve, although heavy manual laborers demonstrated a threshold of 10 g (FIN 5.07) for the sural nerve. For median and ulnar nerves, the 200 mg (FIN 3.61) filament was confirmed as normal while the 4 g (FIN 4.56) filament was normal for the posterior tibial. Age and occupation have an effect on the mean touch sensitivity but do not affect the normal threshold for the radial cutaneous and sural nerves. The normal thresholds for the radial cutaneous and sural nerves are determined as the 2 g (FIN 4.31) and the 4 g (FIN 4.56) filaments, respectively. The addition of the radial cutaneous and sural nerve to sensory nerve assessment may improve the diagnosis of patients with impaired sensory nerve function. PMID:25675652

  2. Hypoglossal nerve conduction findings in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandren, Sindhu; Gruis, Kirsten L.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Concannon, Maryann; Wolfe, James; Albers, James W.; Brown, Devin L.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Denervation of oropharyngeal muscles in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been suggested by needle EMG and muscle biopsy, but little is known about oropharyngeal nerve conduction abnormalities in OSA. We sought to compare hypoglossal nerve conduction studies in patients with and without OSA. Methods Unilateral hypoglossal nerve conduction studies were performed on 20 subjects with OSA and 20 age-matched controls using standard techniques. Results Median age was 48 in OSA subjects and 47 in controls. Hypoglossal compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes were significantly reduced (Wilcoxon Signed Rank test, p =0.01), but prolongation of latencies in OSA subjects did not reach significance in comparison to those in controls. Among a subgroup of subjects without polyneuropathy (15 pairs), reduced amplitudes in OSA subjects retained borderline significance (p=0.05). Discussion Hypoglossal nerve conduction abnormalities may distinguish patients with OSA from controls. These abnormalities could potentially contribute to, or arise from, OSA. PMID:20544939

  3. Nerve Growth Factor Decreases in Sympathetic and Sensory Nerves of Rats with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays a critical role in the maintenance and survival of both sympathetic and sensory nerves. Also, NGF can regulate receptor expression and neuronal activity in the sympathetic and sensory neurons. Abnormalities in NGF regulation are observed in patients and animals with heart failure (HF). Nevertheless, the effects of chronic HF on the levels of NGF within the sympathetic and sensory nerves are not known. Thus, the ELISA method was used to assess the levels of NGF in the stellate ganglion (SG) and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of control rats and rats with chronic HF induced by myocardial infarction. Our data show for the first time that the levels of NGF were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in the SG and DRG neurons 6–20 weeks after ligation of the coronary artery. In addition, a close relation was observed between the NGF levels and the left ventricular function. In conclusion, chronic HF impairs the expression of NGF in the sympathetic and sensory nerves. Given that sensory afferent nerves are engaged in the sympathetic nervous responses to somatic stimulation (i.e. muscle activity during exercise) via a reflex mechanism, our data indicate that NGF is likely responsible for the development of muscle reflex-mediated abnormal sympathetic responsiveness observed in chronic HF. PMID:24913185

  4. Partial oculomotor nerve palsy in a 7-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Israni, Anil; Chakrabarty, Biswaroop; Kumar, Atin; Gulati, Sheffali

    2016-01-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy can be due to varied causes that include diabetic neuropathy, myasthenia gravis, brainstem infarction, demyelinating conditions, and cerebral aneurysms. Among the aneurysmal causes of oculomotor nerve palsy, aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery has been observed to be the most common. Pupillary dysfunction is considered to be an important feature of aneurysmal oculomotor nerve paresis. A case of a 7-year-old boy with partial oculomotor nerve palsy with pupillary sparing is being reported here, the etiology of which is tortuous and ectatic distal internal carotid artery. This is a rare cause of oculomotor nerve paresis and to the best of our knowledge has not yet been reported in children. Ischemia rather than compression seems to be the most plausible cause in this case. PMID:27606031

  5. Partial oculomotor nerve palsy in a 7-year-old child

    PubMed Central

    Israni, Anil; Chakrabarty, Biswaroop; Kumar, Atin; Gulati, Sheffali

    2016-01-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy can be due to varied causes that include diabetic neuropathy, myasthenia gravis, brainstem infarction, demyelinating conditions, and cerebral aneurysms. Among the aneurysmal causes of oculomotor nerve palsy, aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery has been observed to be the most common. Pupillary dysfunction is considered to be an important feature of aneurysmal oculomotor nerve paresis. A case of a 7-year-old boy with partial oculomotor nerve palsy with pupillary sparing is being reported here, the etiology of which is tortuous and ectatic distal internal carotid artery. This is a rare cause of oculomotor nerve paresis and to the best of our knowledge has not yet been reported in children. Ischemia rather than compression seems to be the most plausible cause in this case. PMID:27606031

  6. Gross anatomical study of the sympathetic cardiac nerves in the house musk shrew (Suncus murinus).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ai; Tanaka, Shigenori; Miyamoto, Kensaku; Yi, Shuang-Qin; Nakatani, Toshio

    2007-05-01

    The sympathetic cardiac nerves originating from the cervical and upper thoracic sympathetic ganglia in the house musk shrew (Suncus murinus) were examined using macroscopic and whole-mount immunohistochemical methods. Based on the results, the nerves were macroscopically classified into the following three groups: nerves innervating the cervical sympathetic ganglia mainly to the arterial porta of the heart; nerves supplying the stellate and thoracic sympathetic ganglia at the level of T2-T5 or T6 for both the arterial and venous portae of the heart; and nerves innervating the thoracic sympathetic ganglia at the level of T4-T9 to the esophagus and lung and then the heart via the blood vessels within the mediastinal pleura. These findings in the house musk shrew suggest a possible primitive morphological pattern of the cervical and thoracic sympathetic nervous system that may be related to those in other mammals, including humans. PMID:17393537

  7. Unilateral optical nerve hypoplasia in a Beagle dog.

    PubMed

    Negishi, H; Hoshiya, T; Tsuda, Y; Doi, K; Kanemaki, N

    2008-07-01

    Unilateral (left eye) optic nerve hypoplasia was detected in a six-month-old male Beagle dog. Vision testing indicated that the left eye had poor vision and testing the pupillary light reflex showed the left eye to have an absence of the afferent pathway of the reflex but it had a normal efferent pathway. Ophthalmoscopy revealed a small-sized optic disc, winding retinal artery and dilated retinal vasculature in the left globe. Electroretinography showed no abnormal findings even in the left globe. Histopathologically, the left optic nerve was markedly hypoplastic and was composed of sparse neural elements and a moderate amount of connective and glial tissues. In the retina of the left globe, the nerve fibre layer and the ganglion cell layer were reduced in thickness, although a small number of ganglion cells were still present. There were no abnormal findings detected in the right globe and the right optic nerve. The brain appeared normal macroscopically. PMID:18625594

  8. Vestibular activation of sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carter, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The vestibulosympathetic reflex refers to sympathetic nerve activation by the vestibular system. Animal studies indicate that the vestibular system assists in blood pressure regulation during orthostasis. Although human studies clearly demonstrate activation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during engagement of the otolith organs, the role of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in maintaining blood pressure during orthostasis is not well-established. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes indicates that it is a powerful and independent reflex. Ageing, which is associated with an increased risk for orthostatic hypotension, attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex. The attenuated reflex is associated with a reduction in arterial pressure. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the vestibulosympathetic reflex assists in blood pressure regulation in humans, but future studies examining this reflex in other orthostatically intolerant populations are necessary to address this hypothesis.

  9. Angioplasty and stent placement -- peripheral arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery; PTA - peripheral artery; Angioplasty - peripheral arteries; Iliac artery -angioplasty; Femoral artery - angioplasty; Popliteal artery - angioplasty; Tibial artery - angioplasty; Peroneal artery - ...

  10. Mean, Median, and Skew: Correcting a Textbook Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hippel, Paul T.

    2005-01-01

    Many textbooks teach a rule of thumb stating that the mean is right of the median under right skew, and left of the median under left skew. This rule fails with surprising frequency. It can fail in multimodal distributions, or in distributions where one tail is long but the other is heavy. Most commonly, though, the rule fails in discrete…

  11. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dead bowel - mesenteric; Dead gut - mesenteric; Atherosclerosis - mesenteric artery; Hardening of the arteries - mesenteric artery ... The arteries that supply blood to the intestines run directly from the aorta, the main artery from the heart. ...

  12. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) Peripheral artery disease (PAD) refers to ... is peripheral artery disease treated? What is peripheral artery disease (PAD)? Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, refers ...

  13. Estimation of Median Streamflows at Perennial Stream Sites in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fontaine, Richard A.; Wong, Michael F.; Matsuoka, Iwao

    1992-01-01

    The most accurate estimates of median streamflows at perennial stream sites in Hawaii are those made at streamflow-gaging stations. Two alternative methods for estimating median streamflows at ungaged sites are described in this report. Multiple-regression equations were developed for estimating median streamflows at ungaged, unregulated, perennial stream sites. The equations relate combinations of drainage area, mean altitude of the main stream channel, and mean annual precipitation to median streamflow. Streamflow data from 56 long-term continuous-record gaging stations were used in the analysis. Median-streamflow data for all 56 sites were adjusted using record-extension techniques to reflect base period (1912 through 1986) conditions. Hawaii was subdivided into two geographic groups and multiple-regression equations were developed for each. The standard error of predication for the equation developed for the first group, the islands of Oahu, Molokai, and Hawaii, is 41 percent. The standard error of predication for the equation developed for the second group, the islands of Kauai and Maui, is 54 percent. A method for estimating median-streamflow, based on discharge measurements and data from nearby streamflow-gaging stations, was also developed for 27 regulated, perennial windward Oahu sites. Standard errors of prediction for 23 of the sites range from 5 to 34 percent. Median-streamflow estimates for the four remaining sites were considered poor and no measures of accuracy are provided. Discharge measurements can be used to make estimates of median streamflows at ungaged, regulated sites where the regression equations developed in this report are not applicable. Discharge measurements can also be used to make estimates of median streamflows at ungaged, unregulated sites. Estimates of median streamflows based on discharge measurements have greater standard errors than estimates based on continuous streamflow records and in general have smaller standard errors

  14. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  15. High Ulnar Nerve Injuries: Nerve Transfers to Restore Function.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jennifer Megan M

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are challenging problems. Nerve transfers are one of many options available to surgeons caring for these patients, although they do not replace tendon transfers, nerve graft, or primary repair in all patients. Distal nerve transfers for the treatment of high ulnar nerve injuries allow for a shorter reinnervation period and improved ulnar intrinsic recovery, which are critical to function of the hand. PMID:27094893

  16. Feasibility of an endoscopic approach to the axillary nerve and the nerve to the long head of the triceps brachii with the help of the Da Vinci Robot.

    PubMed

    Porto de Melo, P M; Garcia, J C; Montero, E F de Souza; Atik, T; Robert, E-G; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P-A

    2013-09-01

    Surgery to transfer the axillary nerve and the nerve of the long head of the triceps presents two obstacles: 1) the access portals are not standardized and 2) the nerves are for their larger part approached through large incisions. The goal of this study was to explore the feasibility of an endoscopic microsurgical approach. The posterior aspect of a cadaver shoulder was approached through three communicating mini-incisions. The Da Vinci robot camera was installed on a central trocart, and the instrument arms on the adjacent trocarts. A gas insufflation distended the soft tissues up to the lateral axillary space. The branches of the axillary nerve and the nerve to the long head of the triceps brachii muscle were identified. The dissection of the axillary nerve trunk and its branches was easy. The posterior humeral circumflex veins and artery were dissected as well without any difficulty. Finding the nerve to the long head of the triceps brachii was found to be more challenging because of its deeper location. Robots properties allow performing conventional microsurgery: elimination of the physiologic tremor and multiplication of the movements. They also facilitate the endoscopic approach of the peripheral nerves, as seen in our results on the terminal branches of the axillary nerve and the nerve to the long head of the triceps brachii. PMID:23867724

  17. Consistent Estimation in Mendelian Randomization with Some Invalid Instruments Using a Weighted Median Estimator.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Jack; Davey Smith, George; Haycock, Philip C; Burgess, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Developments in genome-wide association studies and the increasing availability of summary genetic association data have made application of Mendelian randomization relatively straightforward. However, obtaining reliable results from a Mendelian randomization investigation remains problematic, as the conventional inverse-variance weighted method only gives consistent estimates if all of the genetic variants in the analysis are valid instrumental variables. We present a novel weighted median estimator for combining data on multiple genetic variants into a single causal estimate. This estimator is consistent even when up to 50% of the information comes from invalid instrumental variables. In a simulation analysis, it is shown to have better finite-sample Type 1 error rates than the inverse-variance weighted method, and is complementary to the recently proposed MR-Egger (Mendelian randomization-Egger) regression method. In analyses of the causal effects of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol on coronary artery disease risk, the inverse-variance weighted method suggests a causal effect of both lipid fractions, whereas the weighted median and MR-Egger regression methods suggest a null effect of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol that corresponds with the experimental evidence. Both median-based and MR-Egger regression methods should be considered as sensitivity analyses for Mendelian randomization investigations with multiple genetic variants. PMID:27061298

  18. Coronary Arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... side of the heart is smaller because it pumps blood only to the lungs. The left coronary artery, ... heart is larger and more muscular because it pumps blood to the rest of the body. Updated August ...

  19. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure on the elbow An elbow fracture or dislocation Temporary pain and tingling of this nerve can ... Saunders; 2011:chap 428. Read More Broken bone Dislocation Mononeuritis multiplex Mononeuropathy Myelin Peripheral neuropathy Systemic Update ...

  20. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get ... you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. ...

  1. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... surface of the body where it crosses the elbow. The damage destroys the nerve covering ( myelin sheath) ... be caused by: Long-term pressure on the elbow An elbow fracture or dislocation Temporary pain and ...

  2. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  3. Common peroneal nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... people: Who are very thin (for example, from anorexia nervosa ) Who have certain autoimmune conditions, such as ... Elsevier; 2013:chap 22. Read More Alertness - decreased Anorexia Broken bone Diabetes and nerve damage Mononeuritis multiplex ...

  4. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... An abnormal knee reflex Smaller than normal quadriceps muscles on the front of the thigh Tests that may be done include: Electromyography ( EMG ) Nerve conduction tests ( NCV ), usually done at ...

  5. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Craig EJ, Clinchot DM. Femoral neuropathy. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain, and Rehabilitation . 3rd ...

  6. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

  7. Electrodiagnostic study of peripheral nerves in high-voltage electrical injury.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ki Han; Kim, Se Hoon; Minn, Yang Ki

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that peripheral nerves are very vulnerable to electricity. However, only a small portion of individuals who have had high-voltage electrical injury exhibit peripheral nerve damage. The aim of this study was to investigate peripheral nerve damage in high-voltage electrical injury, which often occurs in the industrial field. The authors reviewed the medical records of patients who were admitted to their hospital from January 2009 to December 2011, because of electrical injuries. The results of nerve conduction studies (NCSs) were reviewed retrospectively. NCS data of the injured site were compared with those of the opposite noninjured site and follow-up data. Thirty-seven extremities were reviewed. The authors found that 18 of 33 median nerves (48.6%) showed abnormalities in at least one parameter and 15 of 36 ulnar nerves (41.7%) exhibited abnormalities. There was no evidence of demyelination. Eight patients had undergone NCS on the opposite normal extremities. The compound muscle action potential and nerve conduction velocity were higher at the normal site. Follow-up NCS were performed in 14 patients: the compound muscle action potential and nerve conduction velocity values of all patients were improved. High-voltage electricity damaged peripheral nerves by causing axonal injury rather than demyelinating injury. Hence, even if NCSs yield normal findings, peripheral nerves may be damaged. F/U studies and opposite examinations are required for the exact evaluation of peripheral nerve damage. PMID:23877148

  8. Schwannoma of Extraocular Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Niazi, Wasim; Boggan, James E.

    1994-01-01

    An unusual case of schwannoma arising from the third cranial nerve in a thirteen year old male is reported. The patient presented with paresis of the right oculomotor nerve and ipsilateral hemiparesis. The clinical features of this case are discussed and the pertinent medical literature reviewed. ImagesFigure 1p220-bFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:17171175

  9. Microsphere embolization of nerve capillaries and fiber degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    Nukada, H.; Dyck, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    Polystyrene microspheres, the size chosen to plug capillaries and precapillaries, were injected into the arterial supply of rat sciatic nerves. They produced widespread segmental occlusion of capillaries in lower limb nerves. The clinical and pathologic effect was dose-related. One million microspheres produced selective capillary occlusion but no nerve fiber degeneration; approximately 6 million microspheres also produced selective capillary occlusion and associated foot and leg weakness, sensory loss, and fiber degeneration, beginning in a central core of the distal sciatic nerve; 30 million microspheres caused both capillary and arterial occlusion and a greater neuropathologic deficit. From these observations it is inferred that 1) occlusion of isolated precapillaries and capillaries does not produce ischemic fiber degeneration; 2) occlusion of many microvessels results in central fascicular fiber degeneration, indicating that these cores are watershed regions of poor perfusion; and 3) stereotyped pathologic alterations of nerve fibers and Schwann cells are related to dose, anatomic site, and time elapsed since injection. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:6326580

  10. Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Avolio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Stiffness of large arteries has been long recognized as a significant determinant of pulse pressure. However, it is only in recent decades, with the accumulation of longitudinal data from large and varied epidemiological studies of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease, that it has emerged as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. This has generated substantial interest in investigations related to intrinsic causative and associated factors responsible for the alteration of mechanical properties of the arterial wall, with the aim to uncover specific pathways that could be interrogated to prevent or reverse arterial stiffening. Much has been written on the haemodynamic relevance of arterial stiffness in terms of the quantification of pulsatile relationships of blood pressure and flow in conduit arteries. Indeed, much of this early work regarded blood vessels as passive elastic conduits, with the endothelial layer considered as an inactive lining of the lumen and as an interface to flowing blood. However, recent advances in molecular biology and increased technological sophistication for the detection of low concentrations of biochemical compounds have elucidated the highly important regulatory role of the endothelial cell affecting vascular function. These techniques have enabled research into the interaction of the underlying passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall with the active cellular and molecular processes that regulate the local environment of the load-bearing components. This review addresses these emerging concepts. PMID:26587425

  11. Dopamine D1 and D2 Receptor Immunoreactivities in the Arcuate-Median Eminence Complex and their Link to the Tubero-Infundibular Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Fernandez, W.; Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Vargas-Barroso, V.; Narváez, M.; Di Palma, M.; Agnati, L.F.; Sahd, J. Larriva

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunohistochemistry and Golgi techniques were used to study the structure of the adult rat arcuate-median eminence complex, and determine the distribution of the dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities therein, particularly in relation to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons. Punctate dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities, likely located on nerve terminals, were enriched in the lateral palisade zone built up of nerve terminals, while the densities were low to modest in the medial palisade zone. A codistribution of dopamine D1 receptor or dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactive puncta with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve terminals was demonstrated in the external layer. Dopamine D1 receptor but not dopamine D2 receptor immnunoreactivites nerve cell bodies were found in the ventromedial part of the arcuate nucleus and in the lateral part of the internal layer of the median eminence forming a continuous cell mass presumably representing neuropeptide Y immunoreactive nerve cell bodies. The major arcuate dopamine/ tyrosine hydroxylase nerve cell group was found in the dorsomedial part. A large number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve cell bodies in this region demonstrated punctate dopamine D1 receptor immunoreactivity but only a few presented dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactivity which were mainly found in a substantial number of tyrosine hydroxylase cell bodies of the ventral periventricular hypothalamic nucleus, also belonging to the tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons. Structural evidence for projections of the arcuate nerve cells into the median eminence was also obtained. Distal axons formed horizontal axons in the internal layer issuing a variable number of collaterals classified into single or multiple strands located in the external layer increasing our understanding of the dopamine nerve terminal networks in this region. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptors may therefore directly and differentially

  12. Sural nerve defects after nerve biopsy or nerve transfer as a sensory regeneration model for peripheral nerve conduit implantation.

    PubMed

    Radtke, C; Kocsis, J D; Reimers, K; Allmeling, C; Vogt, P M

    2013-09-01

    Nerve repair after injury can be effectively accomplished by direct suture approximation of the proximal and distal segments. This is more successful if coadaptation can be achieved without tension. Currently, the gold standard repair of larger deficits is the transplantation of an autologous sensory sural nerve graft. However, a significant disadvantage of this technique is the inevitable donor morbidity (sensory loss, neuroma and scar formation) after harvesting of the sural nerve. Moreover, limitation of autologous donor nerve length and fixed diameter of the available sural nerve are major drawbacks of current autograft treatment. Another approach that was introduced for nerve repair is the implantation of alloplastic nerve tubes made of, for example, poly-L-lactide. In these, nerve stumps of the transected nerves are surgically bridged using the biosynthetic conduit. A number of experimental studies, primarily in rodents, indicate axonal regeneration and remyelination after implantation of various conduits. However, only limited clinical studies with conduit implantation have been performed in acute peripheral nerve injuries particularly on digital nerves. Clinical transfer of animal studies, which can be carefully calibrated for site and extent of injury, to humans is difficult to interpret due to the intrinsic variability in human nerve injuries. This prevents effective quantification of improvement and induces bias in the study. Therefore, standardization of lesion/repair in human studies is warranted. Here we propose to use sural nerve defects, induced due to nerve graft harvesting or from diagnostic nerve biopsies as a model site to enable standardization of nerve conduit implantation. This would help better with the characterization of the implants and its effectiveness in axonal regeneration and remyelination. Nerve regeneration can be assessed, for example, by recovery of sensation, measured non-invasively by threshold to von Frey filaments and cold

  13. Otic artery: a review of normal and pathological features.

    PubMed

    Vasović, Ljiljana; Arsić, Stojanka; Vlajković, Slobodan; Jovanović, Ivan; Jovanović, Predrag; Ugrenović, Sladjana; Andjelković, Zlatibor

    2010-05-01

    Three primitive arteries - the trigeminal, otic and hypoglossal take the names according to their close relation with the V, VIII and XII cranial nerves, while at the cervical level, the first segmental artery is named the primitive proatlantal intersegmental artery. When the human embryo is 4 mm long, these arteries serve as transitory anastomoses between primitive internal carotid arteries and bilateral longitudinal neural arterial plexus, which is the precursor of future basilar artery. Normal and/or abnormal morphofunctional aspects of the prenatal and postnatal forms of the otic artery are described according to the personal and literature data. Many (ab) normal arteries are also noted in differential diagnosis of the otic artery. Postnatally, individual incidence rates of the carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses have been found to be inversely related to their order of disappearance. The persistent trigeminal artery has a reported incidence from 0.06-0.6%, whereas the persistent primitive otic artery has been convincingly documented only in minor rates. Persistent carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses between the anterior and posterior cranial circulation are important to recognize during angiography for endovascular and surgical planning. Most frequently, the otic artery was an incidental finding. PMID:20424561

  14. 223. FREQUENTLY REPRODUCED VIEW OF GWMP SHOWING VARIABLE WIDTH MEDIANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    223. FREQUENTLY REPRODUCED VIEW OF GWMP SHOWING VARIABLE WIDTH MEDIANS WITH INDEPENDENT ALIGNMENTS FROM KEY BRIDGE LOOKING NORTHWEST, 1953. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  15. 1. VIEW OF MEDIAN FROM GORDON HIGHWAY OVERPASS, LOOKING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF MEDIAN FROM GORDON HIGHWAY OVERPASS, LOOKING WEST SHOWING REVOLUTIONARY WAR MONUMENT 56/1 - Greene Street Historic District, Greene Street, Gordon Highway to Augusta Canal Bridge, Augusta, Richmond County, GA

  16. 12. VIEW FROM PARKWAY MEDIAN TO SPORT HILL ROAD BRIDGE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW FROM PARKWAY MEDIAN TO SPORT HILL ROAD BRIDGE, Copy of photograph ca. 1940. Collection Connecticut Department of Transportation. - Merritt Parkway, Bridge No. 744, Spanning Merritt Parkway at Route 59, Fairfield, Fairfield County, CT

  17. 54. AERIAL VIEW OF WIDE MEDIAN JUST SOUTH OF WASHINGTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. AERIAL VIEW OF WIDE MEDIAN JUST SOUTH OF WASHINGTON SAILING MARINA LOOKING NORTH. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  18. 174. WIDE MEDIAN BETWEEN NORTH END OF ALEXANDRIA AND WASHINGTON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    174. WIDE MEDIAN BETWEEN NORTH END OF ALEXANDRIA AND WASHINGTON SAILING MARINA LOOKING NORTH. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  19. 56. AERIAL VIEW OF WIDE MEDIAN NEXT TO WASHINGTON SAILING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. AERIAL VIEW OF WIDE MEDIAN NEXT TO WASHINGTON SAILING MARINA LOOKING NORTH. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  20. Ultrasound in Dual Nerve Impairment after Proximal Radial Nerve Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Lämmer, Alexandra B; Schwab, Stefan; Schramm, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sonography in classical nerve entrapment syndromes is an established and validated method. In contrast, few publications highlight lesions of the radial nerve, particularly of the posterior interosseus nerve (PIN). Method Five patients with a radial nerve lesion were investigated by electromyography, nerve conduction velocity and ultrasound. Further normative values of 26 healthy subjects were evaluated. Results Four patients presented a clinical and electrophysiological proximal axonal radial nerve lesion and one patient showed a typical posterior interosseous nerve syndrome (PINS). The patient with PINS presented an enlargement of the PIN anterior to the supinator muscle. However four patients with proximal lesions showed an unexpected significant enlargement of the PIN within the supinator muscle. Conclusion High-resolution sonography is a feasible method to demonstrate the radial nerve including its distal branches. At least in axonal radial nerve lesions, sonography might reveal abnormalities far distant from a primary proximal lesion site clearly distinct from the appearance in classical PINS. PMID:25992766

  1. Adaptive median filtering for preprocessing of time series measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paunonen, Matti

    1993-01-01

    A median (L1-norm) filtering program using polynomials was developed. This program was used in automatic recycling data screening. Additionally, a special adaptive program to work with asymmetric distributions was developed. Examples of adaptive median filtering of satellite laser range observations and TV satellite time measurements are given. The program proved to be versatile and time saving in data screening of time series measurements.

  2. Side-to-side range of movement variability in variants of the median and radial neurodynamic test sequences in asymptomatic people.

    PubMed

    Stalioraitis, Vaidas; Robinson, Kim; Hall, Toby

    2014-08-01

    Side-to-side discrepancy in range of motion (ROM) during upper limb neurodynamic testing is used in part to identify abnormal peripheral nerve mechanosensitivity and is one of three factors to consider in determining a positive test. Large side-to-side variability is reported for some variants of the upper limb neurodynamic test sequences, however discrepancies for other test variants are unknown. Hence the purpose of this study was to evaluate side-to-side discrepancy in elbow flexion ROM during two variants of upper limb neurodynamic test sequence for the median and radial nerves. 51 asymptomatic subjects (26 females, mean age 29.69 years) were evaluated. A uniaxial electrogoniometer was used to measure elbow flexion ROM at onset of resistance (R1) and onset of discomfort (P1) during the median and radial neurodynamic tests on each side. Reliability was determined by testing 20 subjects twice and was found to be good (ICC greater than 0.88 and SEM less than 4.02°). There was no significant difference in mean ROM between sides. Lower-bound scores indicate that intra-individual, inter-limb differences of more than 15° for the median nerve and 11° for the radial nerve exceeds the range of normal ROM asymmetry on neurodynamic testing at R1 and P1. Correlation of ROM between limbs was significant with R(2) values of 0.62 and 0.85 for the median and radial nerves respectively. These finding provide clinicians with information regarding normal side-to-side variability in ROM during two commonly used variants of neurodynamic tests. PMID:24703935

  3. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  4. Higher sympathetic nerve activity during ventricular (VVI) than during dual-chamber (DDD) pacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. A.; Morillo, C. A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We determined the short-term effects of single-chamber ventricular pacing and dual-chamber atrioventricular (AV) pacing on directly measured sympathetic nerve activity. BACKGROUND: Dual-chamber AV cardiac pacing results in greater cardiac output and lower systemic vascular resistance than does single-chamber ventricular pacing. However, it is unclear whether these hemodynamic advantages result in less sympathetic nervous system outflow. METHODS: In 13 patients with a dual-chamber pacemaker, we recorded the electrocardiogram, noninvasive arterial pressure (Finapres), respiration and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography) during 3 min of underlying basal heart rate and 3 min of ventricular and AV pacing at rates of 60 and 100 beats/min. RESULTS: Arterial pressure was lowest and muscle sympathetic nerve activity was highest at the underlying basal heart rate. Arterial pressure increased with cardiac pacing and was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (change in mean blood pressure +/- SE: 10 +/- 3 vs. 2 +/- 2 mm Hg at 60 beats/min; 21 +/- 5 vs. 14 +/- 2 mm Hg at 100 beats/min; p < 0.05). Sympathetic nerve activity decreased with cardiac pacing and the decline was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (60 beats/min -40 +/- 11% vs. -17 +/- 7%; 100 beats/min -60 +/- 9% vs. -48 +/- 10%; p < 0.05). Although most patients showed a strong inverse relation between arterial pressure and muscle sympathetic nerve activity, three patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction < or = 30%) showed no relation between arterial pressure and sympathetic activity. CONCLUSIONS: Short-term AV pacing results in lower sympathetic nerve activity and higher arterial pressure than does ventricular pacing, indicating that cardiac pacing mode may influence sympathetic outflow simply through arterial baroreflex mechanisms. We speculate that the greater incidence of adverse outcomes in patients treated with single-chamber ventricular

  5. [Biophysics of nerve excitation].

    PubMed

    Kol'e, O R; Maksimov, G V

    2010-01-01

    The studies testifying to the presence of the interrelation between the physiological functions of the organism and physical and chemical processes in nerves are discussed. Changes in some physical and chemical parameters observed both upon elicited rhythmic exaltation of nerves and during the spontaneous rhythmic activity of neurons are analyzed. Upon rhythmic exaltation, a complex of physical and chemical processes is triggered, and reversible structural and metabolic rearrangements at the subcellular and molecular levels occur that do not take place during the generation of a single action potential. Thus, only in conditions of rhythmic exaltation of a nerve, it is possible to reveal those processes that provide exaltation of nerves in the organism. The future possibilities of the investigations combining the biophysical and physiological approaches are substantiated. Characteristic changes in physicochemical parameters are observed in nerves during the generation of a series of action potentials of different frequency and duration ("frequency dependence") under normal physiological conditions, as well as in extreme situations and in nerve pathology. The structural and metabolic rearrangements are directly related to the mode of rhythmic exaltation and proceed both in the course of rhythmic exaltation and after its termination. Participation and the basic components of the nervous fulcrum (an axon, Shwan cell, myelin, subcellular organelles) in the realization of rhythmic exaltation is shown. In the coordination of all processes involved in rhythmic exaltation, the main role is played by the systems of redistribution and transport of intercellular and endocellular calcium. The idea is put forward that myelin of nerve fibers is not only an isolator, but also an "intercellular depot" of calcium and participates in the redistribution of different ions. Thus, the rhythmic excitation is of great importance in the realization of some physiological functions, the

  6. Trigeminal neuralgia caused by an anomalous posterior inferior cerebellar artery from the primitive trigeminal artery: case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Koh, Jun Seok; Lee, Cheol Young

    2011-06-01

    A 61-year-old woman presented with typical trigeminal neuralgia (TN), caused by an aberrant posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) associated with the primitive trigeminal artery (PTA). Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography clearly showed an anomalous artery directly originating from the PTA and coursing into the PICA territory at the cerebellum. During microvascular decompression (MVD), we confirmed and decompressed vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve by this anomalous, PICA-variant type of PTA. The PTA did not conflict with the trigeminal nerve, and the anomalous PICA only compressed the caudolateral part of the trigeminal nerve, without the more common compression at its root entry zone. This case is informative due not only to its very unusual angioanatomical variation but also to its helpfulness for surgeons preparing a MVD for a TN associated with such a rare vascular anomaly. PMID:21279490

  7. Recurrent facial hemiparesis due to dolichoectatic vertebrobasilar artery: an unusual and ignored cause.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vijay Nath; Chaurasia, Rameshwar Nath; Gupta, Shailesh; Joshi, Deepika

    2013-01-01

    Dolichoectatic arteries are elongated tortuous aneurysms of intracranial arteries most commonly of vertebrobasilar tree presenting with ischaemic, haemorrhagic, thromboembolic lesions or with cranial nerve compression. The clinical presentation includes tic douloureux, neuralgia, tinnitus, vertigo, motor or sensory deficits, ataxia, dementia, Parkinsonism, hydrocephalus, headache, migraine, aneurysm, neoplasm, stroke/transient ischaemic attacks, leukoencephalopathy, central sleep apnoea and cerebellar dysfunctions. We present a case of recurrent facial nerve palsy secondary to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia, an interesting and rare condition. PMID:23505276

  8. Clinical Features and Management of a Median Cleft Lip

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Yeon; Oh, Tae Suk

    2016-01-01

    Background Median cleft lip is a rare anomaly consisting of a midline vertical cleft through the upper lip. It can also involve the premaxillary bone, the nasal septum, and the central nervous system. In our current report, we present the clinical features of 6 patients with a median cleft lip and their surgical management according to the accompanying anomalies. Methods From December 2010 to January 2014, 6 patients with a median cleft lip were reviewed. Five of these cases underwent surgical correction; alveolar bone grafting was performed in a patient with a median alveolar cleft. The surgical technique included inverted-U excision of the upper lip and repair of the orbicularis oris muscle. The mean follow-up period was 20.4 months (range, 7.4–44.0 months). Results The study patients presented various anomalous features. Five patients received surgical correction, 4 with repair of the median cleft lip, and one with iliac bone grafting for median alveolar cleft. A patient with basal sphenoethmoidal meningocele was managed with transoral endoscopic surgery for repair of the meningocele. Successful surgical repair was achieved in all cases with no postoperative complications. Conclusions Relatively mild forms of median cleft lip can be corrected with inverted-U excision with good aesthetic outcomes. In addition, there is a broad spectrum of clinical features and various anomalies, such as nasal deformity, alveolar cleft, and short upper frenulum, which require close evaluation. The timing of the operation should be decided considering the presence of other anomalies that can threaten patient survival. PMID:27218021

  9. Vasoactive intestinal peptide may participate in the vasodilation of the dog hepatic artery

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, G.; Kiss, J.Z.; Papp, M.; Vizi, E.S.

    1986-08-01

    The possible direct action of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on dog hepatic arterial wall or on the noradrenergic innervation of the artery was investigated in vitro. In addition, VIP-containing nerve fibers and terminals were located in the wall of the artery with immunochemical staining. Direct evidence showed that VIP did not affect the release of (TH)norepinephrine but reduced the response of the isolated hepatic artery to electrical field stimulation and exogenous norepinephrine. This suggest that the effect of VIP is postjunctional on the smooth muscle of the artery. VIP-containing nerve fibers and varicosities were observed in the adventitial and medial layer of the arterial wall. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that vasoactive intestinal peptide is a physiological mediator of vasodilation in the hepatic artery.

  10. Injection nerve palsy

    PubMed Central

    Kakati, Arindhom; Bhat, Dhananjaya; Devi, Bhagavathula Indira; Shukla, Dhaval

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical profile and outcome of surgery for injection nerve palsies. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients with INP who were treated at our institute during May 2000 to May 2009. Clinical, electroneuromyography (ENMG), and operative findings were noted. Intraoperative nerve action potential monitoring was not used in any case. Outcome of patients who were followed was reviewed. Results: INP comprised 92 (11%) of 837 nerve injury patients. Seventy one patients were children less than 16 years. The nerves involved were sciatic in 80 patients, radial in 8, and others in four. Fifty seven patients had power, grade 0/5. ENMG studies revealed absent compound muscle action potential in 64 and absent sensory nerve action potential in 67 patients. Thirty nine (42.3%) of 92 patients underwent surgery. The mean duration since injury in these patients was 5.2 months (3 months to 11 months). All underwent neurolysis. Only 18 patients who underwent surgery had a follow up of more than 3 months. Ten (55.5%) patients had good or fair outcome after surgery. Except for grade of motor deficit prior to surgery, none of the variables were found to significantly affect the outcome. Conclusion: The outcome of INP is generally good and many patients recover spontaneously. The outcome of surgery is dependent on preoperative motor power. PMID:23546341

  11. Cortical plasticity induced by different degrees of peripheral nerve injuries: a rat functional magnetic resonance imaging study under 9.4 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Major peripheral nerve injuries not only result in local deficits but may also cause distal atrophy of target muscles or permanent loss of sensation. Likewise, these injuries have been shown to instigate long-lasting central cortical reorganization. Methods Cortical plasticity changes induced after various types of major peripheral nerve injury using an electrical stimulation technique to the rat upper extremity and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were examined. Studies were completed out immediately after injury (acute stage) and at two weeks (subacute stage) to evaluate time affect on plasticity. Results After right-side median nerve transection, cortical representation of activation of the right-side ulnar nerve expanded intra-hemispherically into the cortical region that had been occupied by the median nerve representation After unilateral transection of both median and ulnar nerves, cortical representation of activation of the radial nerve on the same side of the body also demonstrated intra-hemispheric expansion. However, simultaneous electrical stimulation of the contralateral uninjured median and ulnar nerves resulted in a representation that had expanded both intra- and inter-hemispherically into the cortical region previously occupied by the two transected nerve representations. Conclusions After major peripheral nerve injury, an adjacent nerve, with similar function to the injured nerve, may become significantly over-activated in the cortex when stimulated. This results in intra-hemispheric cortical expansion as the only component of cortical plasticity. When all nerves responsible for a certain function are injured, the same nerves on the contralateral side of the body are affected and become significantly over-activated during a task. Both intra- and inter-hemispheric cortical expansion exist, while the latter dominates cortical plasticity. PMID:23659705

  12. Ultrasonographic reference values for assessing normal radial nerve ultrasonography in the normal population

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Wu, Shan; Ren, Jun

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasound has been used recently to characterize median and ulnar nerves, but is seldom used to characterize radial nerves. The radial nerve is more frequently involved in entrapment syndromes than the ulnar and median nerves. However, the reference standard for normal radial nerves has not been established. Thus, this study measured the cross-sectional areas of radial nerves of 200 healthy male or female volunteers, aged 18 to 75, using high-resolution ultrasound. The results showed that mean cross-sectional areas of radial nerves at 4 cm upon the lateral epicondyle of the humerus and mid-humerus (midpoint between the elbow crease and axilla) were 5.14 ± 1.24 and 5.08 ± 1.23 mm2, respectively. The age and the dominant side did not affect the results, but the above-mentioned cross-sectional areas were larger in males (5.31 ± 1.25 and 5.19 ± 1.23 mm2) than in females (4.93 ± 1.21 and 4.93 ± 1.23 mm2, respectively). In addition, the cross-sectional areas of radial nerves were positively correlated with height and weight (r = 0.38, 0.36, respectively, both P < 0.05). These data provide basic clinical data for the use of high-resolution ultrasound for the future diagnosis, treatment, and prognostic evaluation of peripheral neuropathies. PMID:25422648

  13. Unusual Origin of a Double Upper Subscapular Nerve from the Suprascapular Nerve and the Posterior Division of the Upper Trunk of the Brachial Plexus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Koutsouflianiotis, Konstantinos; Iliou, Kalliopi; Bitsis, Theodosios; Kitsoulis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    A double upper subscapular nerve on the right side was detected in a male cadaver, with the proximal one arising from the suprascapular nerve and the distal one from the posterior division of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. Both of them penetrated and supplied the uppermost portion of the right subscapularis muscle. That anatomic variation was associated with a median nerve formed by two lateral roots. The origin and pattern of the upper subscapular nerve displays high variability, however the presented combination of the variable origin of a double upper subscapular nerve has rarely been described in the literature. The knowledge of such an anatomic variation is essential for the surgeon operating in the region especially in instances of brachial plexus’ repair after any traumatic injury. Moreover, the awareness of the precise origin and topography of these nerves is important for the physician attempting to block these nerves or utilizing these nerves as grafts for neurotization of adjacent damaged nerves of the brachial plexus. PMID:27504272

  14. Unusual Origin of a Double Upper Subscapular Nerve from the Suprascapular Nerve and the Posterior Division of the Upper Trunk of the Brachial Plexus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, George; Koutsouflianiotis, Konstantinos; Iliou, Kalliopi; Bitsis, Theodosios; Kitsoulis, Panagiotis

    2016-06-01

    A double upper subscapular nerve on the right side was detected in a male cadaver, with the proximal one arising from the suprascapular nerve and the distal one from the posterior division of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. Both of them penetrated and supplied the uppermost portion of the right subscapularis muscle. That anatomic variation was associated with a median nerve formed by two lateral roots. The origin and pattern of the upper subscapular nerve displays high variability, however the presented combination of the variable origin of a double upper subscapular nerve has rarely been described in the literature. The knowledge of such an anatomic variation is essential for the surgeon operating in the region especially in instances of brachial plexus' repair after any traumatic injury. Moreover, the awareness of the precise origin and topography of these nerves is important for the physician attempting to block these nerves or utilizing these nerves as grafts for neurotization of adjacent damaged nerves of the brachial plexus. PMID:27504272

  15. Barriers of the peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    Peltonen, Sirkku; Alanne, Maria; Peltonen, Juha

    2013-01-01

    This review introduces the traditionally defined anatomic compartments of the peripheral nerves based on light and electron microscopic topography and then explores the cellular and the most recent molecular basis of the different barrier functions operative in peripheral nerves. We also elucidate where, and how, the homeostasis of the normal human peripheral nerve is controlled in situ and how claudin-containing tight junctions contribute to the barriers of peripheral nerve. Also, the human timeline of the development of the barriers of the peripheral nerve is depicted. Finally, potential future therapeutic modalities interfering with the barriers of the peripheral nerve are discussed. PMID:24665400

  16. Vein to artery grafts. An experimental study of reinnervation of the graft wall.

    PubMed Central

    Meagher, S; McGeachie, J; Prendergast, F

    1984-01-01

    Iliolumbar vein to iliac artery grafts were placed in 21 rats by microsurgical techniques. Graft innervation was examined at five time intervals between 1 and 32 weeks after surgery. Nerve fibers were demonstrated microscopically by formaldehyde-induced fluorescence of catecholamines. The morphology and degree of graft innervation were assessed, semiquantitatively, relative to the contralateral iliac artery (control) within each animal. Nerves were seen in the graft region as early as 2 weeks, but it was not until 4 weeks that they were present along its length (5 mm). The formation of a nerve plexus in the adventitia surrounding the graft was evident at 8 weeks. By 16 weeks the degree of innervation in the graft had increased to a level that was greater than the control iliac artery in three of four animals examined. Grafts at 32 weeks were also hyperinnervated. However, the morphology of this innervation was different from the control arteries; nerve fibers were finer, not varicosed, and were located at a greater distance from the outer layer of smooth muscle cells. The origin of the nerves appeared to be collateral sprouts from nerves supplying the adjacent iliac vein and also from invading vasa vasorum. The host iliac artery nerve plexus did not contribute to graft innervation. Images FIG. 1. PMID:6465969

  17. The Relationship between Nerve Conduction Study and Clinical Grading of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cheluvaiah, Janardhan D.; Agadi, Jagadish B.; Nagaraj, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is the most common nerve entrapment. Subjective sensory symptoms are common place in patients with CTS, but sometimes they are not supported by objective findings in the neurological examination. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) studies are a valid and reliable means of confirming the diagnosis. The amplitudes along with the conduction velocities of the sensory nerve action potential and motor nerve action potential reflect the functional state of axons, and are useful parameters and complement the clinical grading in the assessment of severity of CTS. Aim To conduct median nerve sensory and motor conduction studies on patients with carpal tunnel syndrome and correlate the relationship between nerve conduction study parameters and the clinical severity grading. Materials and Methods Based on clinical assessment, the study patients were divided into 03 groups with mild CTS, moderate CTS and severe CTS respectively as per Mackinnson’s classification. Median and ulnar nerve conduction studies were performed on bilateral upper limbs of 50 patients with symptoms of CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects. The relationship between the clinical severity grade and various nerve conduction study parameters were correlated. Results In this prospective case control study, 50 patients with symptoms consistent with CTS and 50 age and sex matched healthy control subjects were examined over a 10 month period. A total of 30 patients had unilateral CTS (right upper limb in 19 and left upper limb in 11) and 20 patients had bilateral CTS. Female to male ratio was 3.54 to 1. Age ranged from 25 to 81 years. The mean age at presentation was 49.68±11.7 years. Tingling paresthesias of hand and first three fingers were the most frequent symptoms 48 (98%). Tinel’s and Phalen’s sign were positive in 36 (72%) and 44 (88%) patients respectively. The mean duration of symptoms at presentation was 52.68±99.81 weeks. 16 patients (32%) had

  18. Identification of a persistent primitive trigeminal artery following the transposition technique for trigeminal neuralgia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Naoki; Tanaka, Toshihide; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Arai, Takao; Hasegawa, Yuzuru; Abe, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    A patient who presented with trigeminal neuralgia associated with a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) is presented. A 62-year-old woman suffering from right orbital pain was admitted to the hospital. Medical treatment for three months was ineffective, and her neuralgia had deteriorated and gradually spread in the maxillary division. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the flow void signal attached to the right trigeminal nerve. Thus, microvascular decompression was performed. The superior cerebellar artery was the responsible artery, and it was transposed to decompress the trigeminal nerve. After this manoeuvre, an artery was identified running parallel to the trigeminal nerve toward Meckel’s cave. The artery, which turned out to be a PPTA, communicated with the basilar artery. The PPTA was carefully observed, and it was found not to be the artery causing the neuralgia because it did not compress the nerve at surgical observation. No additional procedure between the PPTA and the trigeminal nerve was performed. The patient’s symptom improved dramatically following surgery, and her postoperative course was uneventful. Postoperative three-dimensional computed tomography showed the PPTA. The findings in the present case suggest that transposition of the responsible artery effectively decompresses the root entry zone and assists in determining whether the PPTA is affecting the trigeminal nerve. PMID:22059208

  19. Identification of a persistent primitive trigeminal artery following the transposition technique for trigeminal neuralgia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kato, Naoki; Tanaka, Toshihide; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Arai, Takao; Hasegawa, Yuzuru; Abe, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    A patient who presented with trigeminal neuralgia associated with a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) is presented. A 62-year-old woman suffering from right orbital pain was admitted to the hospital. Medical treatment for three months was ineffective, and her neuralgia had deteriorated and gradually spread in the maxillary division. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the flow void signal attached to the right trigeminal nerve. Thus, microvascular decompression was performed. The superior cerebellar artery was the responsible artery, and it was transposed to decompress the trigeminal nerve. After this manoeuvre, an artery was identified running parallel to the trigeminal nerve toward Meckel's cave. The artery, which turned out to be a PPTA, communicated with the basilar artery. The PPTA was carefully observed, and it was found not to be the artery causing the neuralgia because it did not compress the nerve at surgical observation. No additional procedure between the PPTA and the trigeminal nerve was performed. The patient's symptom improved dramatically following surgery, and her postoperative course was uneventful. Postoperative three-dimensional computed tomography showed the PPTA. The findings in the present case suggest that transposition of the responsible artery effectively decompresses the root entry zone and assists in determining whether the PPTA is affecting the trigeminal nerve. PMID:22059208

  20. Advances of Peripheral Nerve Repair Techniques to Improve Hand Function: A Systematic Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    P, Mafi; S, Hindocha; M, Dhital; M, Saleh

    2012-01-01

    Concepts of neuronal damage and repair date back to ancient times. The research in this topic has been growing ever since and numerous nerve repair techniques have evolved throughout the years. Due to our greater understanding of nerve injuries and repair we now distinguish between central and peripheral nervous system. In this review, we have chosen to concentrate on peripheral nerve injuries and in particular those involving the hand. There are no reviews bringing together and summarizing the latest research evidence concerning the most up-to-date techniques used to improve hand function. Therefore, by identifying and evaluating all the published literature in this field, we have summarized all the available information about the advances in peripheral nerve techniques used to improve hand function. The most important ones are the use of resorbable poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB), epineural end-to-end suturing, graft repair, nerve transfer, side to side neurorrhaphy and end to side neurorrhaphy between median, radial and ulnar nerves, nerve transplant, nerve repair, external neurolysis and epineural sutures, adjacent neurotization without nerve suturing, Agee endoscopic operation, tourniquet induced anesthesia, toe transfer and meticulous intrinsic repair, free auto nerve grafting, use of distal based neurocutaneous flaps and tubulization. At the same time we found that the patient’s age, tension of repair, time of repair, level of injury and scar formation following surgery affect the prognosis. Despite the thorough findings of this systematic review we suggest that further research in this field is needed. PMID:22431951

  1. Electrophysiologic studies of cutaneous nerves of the thoracic limb of the dog.

    PubMed

    Kitchell, R L; Whalen, L R; Bailey, C S; Lohse, C L

    1980-01-01

    The cutaneous innervation of the thoracic limb was investigated in 36 barbiturate-anesthetized dogs, using electrophysiologic techniques. The cutaneous area (CA) innervated by each cutaneous nerve was delineated in at least five dogs by stroking the hair in the area with a small watercolor brush while recording from the nerve. Mapping of adjacent CA revealed areas of considerable overlapping. The part of the CA of a given nerve supplied by only that nerve is referred to as its autonomous zone. Of all nerves arising from the brachial plexus, only the suprascapular, subscapular, lateral thoracic, thoracodorsal, and cranial and caudal pectoral nerves lacked cutaneous afferents. The dorsal cutaneous branch of C6 had a CA, but no grossly demonstrable dorsal cutaneous branches for C7 C8, or T1 were found. The cervical nerves had ventral cutaneous branches, but no lateral cutaneous branches. Thoracic nerves T2-T4 had dorsal, ventral, and lateral cutaneous branches. The cutaneous branches of the brachiocephalic, axillary, musculocutaneous, radial, median, and ulnar nerves all had CA which were overlapped by adjacent CA, thus their autonomous zones were much smaller than the cutaneous areas usually depicted for these nerves in anatomy and neurology textbooks. PMID:7362125

  2. Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by an Intraneural Spiral Trigeminocerebellar Artery: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wakuta, Naoki; Abe, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Masani; Higashi, Toshio; Ueba, Tetsuya; Inoue, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminocerebellar artery (TCA) is a branch of the basilar artery that may have an intraneural course and may cause trigeminal neuralgia. We report a case of trigeminal neuralgia with right vertebral artery aneurysm caused by an intraneural TCA that compressed the trigeminal nerve in multiple places. We performed proximal trapping for the fusiform aneurysm with extra-intracranial bypass to preserve flow of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, followed by microvascular decompression that successfully changed the course of the TCA. This procedure provided relief from the neuralgia without direct bisection of the trigeminal nerve that may cause severe nerve injury. Reshaping of the course of the artery can achieve good pain relief. PMID:26251812

  3. Evaluation of Nerve Conduction Studies in Obese Children With Insulin Resistance or Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ince, Hülya; Taşdemir, Haydar Ali; Aydin, Murat; Ozyürek, Hamit; Tilki, Hacer Erdem

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate nerve conduction studies in terms of neuropathic characteristics in obese patients who were in prediabetes stage and also to determine the abnormal findings. The study included 69 obese adolescent patients between April 2009 and December 2010. All patients and control group underwent motor (median, ulnar, tibial, and peroneal) and sensory (median, ulnar, sural, and medial plantar) nerve conduction studies and sympathetic skin response test. Sensory response amplitude of the medial plantar nerve was significantly lower in the patients with impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. To our knowledge, the present study is the first study demonstrating the development of sensory and autonomic neuropathy due to metabolic complications of obesity in adolescent children even in the period without development of diabetes mellitus. We recommend that routine electrophysiological examinations be performed, using medial plantar nerve conduction studies and sympathetic skin response test. PMID:25342307

  4. Persistent trigeminal artery causing "double" neurovascular conflict.

    PubMed

    Clerici, Angelo Maurizio; Merlo, Paola; Rognone, Felice; Noce, Monica; Rognone, Elisa; Bono, Giorgio

    2009-03-01

    We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who presented with right VI nerve palsy and homolateral atypical trigeminal neuralgia; standard neuroradiological investigation of orbital/retroorbital regions and intracranial arteries excluded the most commonly demonstrable underlying causes while brain magnetic resonance (T1-weighted fat suppression; T2-weighted thin-section) and magnetic resonance angiography disclosed the evidence of "double" neurovascular conflict because of persistent trigeminal artery with aneurysmal dilation. A role of this almost rare vascular condition in causing painful ophthalmoplegia is discussed. PMID:19267790

  5. Landscaping of highway medians and roadway safety at unsignalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyun; Fabregas, Aldo; Lin, Pei-Sung

    2016-05-01

    Well-planted and maintained landscaping can help reduce driving stress, provide better visual quality, and decrease over speeding, thus improving roadway safety. Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Standard Index (SI-546) is one of the more demanding standards in the U.S. for landscaping design criteria at highway medians near intersections. The purposes of this study were to (1) empirically evaluate the safety results of SI-546 at unsignalized intersections and (2) quantify the impacts of geometrics, traffic, and landscaping design features on total crashes and injury plus fatal crashes. The studied unsignalized intersections were divided into (1) those without median trees near intersections, (2) those with median trees near intersections that were compliant with SI-546, and (3) those with median trees near intersections that were non-compliant with SI-546. A total of 72 intersections were selected, for which five-year crash data from 2006-2010 were collected. The sites that were compliant with SI-546 showed the best safety performance in terms of the lowest crash counts and crash rates. Four crash predictive models-two for total crashes and two for injury crashes-were developed. The results indicated that improperly planted and maintained median trees near highway intersections can increase the total number of crashes and injury plus fatal crashes at a 90% confidence level; no significant difference could be found in crash rates between sites that were compliant with SI-546 and sites without trees. All other conditions remaining the same, an intersection with trees that was not compliant with SI-546 had 63% more crashes and almost doubled injury plus fatal crashes than those at intersections without trees. The study indicates that appropriate landscaping in highway medians near intersections can be an engineering technology that not only improves roadway environmental quality but also maintains intersection safety. PMID:26922287

  6. Quantitative MRI of the wrist and nerve conduction studies in patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, S; Itsubo, T; Yasutomi, T; Nakagawa, H; Kamimura, M; Kato, H

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To correlate morphological findings of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) with the function of the median nerve. Methods: In this study, 105 wrists of 105 women patients with idiopathic CTS, and 36 wrists of 36 female volunteers were subjected to nerve conduction studies and MRI. Cross sectional area, signal intensity ratio, and the flattening ratio of the median nerve, carpal tunnel area, flexor tendon area, synovial area, and intersynovial space, and the palmar bowing of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) were quantified by MRI and correlated with the severity of the disease determined by nerve conduction studies. Results: Cross sectional areas of the median nerve, flexor tendons, and carpal tunnel, and the palmar bowing of the TCL of the CTS groups were greater than in the control group, but differences were not detected among the CTS groups for the area of the flexor tendons and the carpal tunnel. Enlargement, flattening, and high signal intensity of the median nerve at the distal radioulnar joint level were more significant in the advanced than in the earlier stages of the disease. Increase in palmar bowing of the TCL was less prominent in the most advanced group. Linear correlation between the area of the carpal tunnel and palmar bowing of the TCL was noted. Conclusion: Severity of the disease could be judged by evaluating not only longitudinal changes of signal intensity and configuration of the median nerve, but also palmar bowing of the TCL. Increased palmar bowing of the TCL was found to be associated with an increase in the area of the carpal tunnel. PMID:16024888

  7. Physical activity: its influence on nerve conduction velocity.

    PubMed

    Halar, E M; Hammond, M C; Dirks, S

    1985-09-01

    In a group of 40 healthy subjects, distal and proximal latencies of the median, tibial, and peroneal motor, and sural sensory nerves and their respective skin surface temperatures (Tsk) were measured before and after walking or bicycling. The baseline tests were performed 30 minutes after resting in a constant room temperature of 24C. The ambulation or bicycling task was continued for 30 minutes at a constant rate. Postactivity tests were performed within 30 minutes and between 45 to 60 minutes after termination of activity. Another test was done 75 to 90 minutes after bicycle exercise. After walking, there was a significant increase in Tsk in all lower extremity nerves tested (p less than 0.01). The increases were accompanied by faster distal and proximal latencies in both testing periods (p less than 0.01). Median nerve Tsk, distal and proximal latencies did not differ significantly from baseline values initially, but 45 minutes after walking Tsk was elevated and proximal latency had become faster (p less than 0.01). Following bicycling, lower extremity Tsk was significantly reduced over tibial, peroneal, and sural nerves by the third testing period (p less than 0.01) but only sural latencies were significantly prolonged (p less than 0.05) by this time. In the upper extremities median Tsk was significantly elevated and distal latency had become significantly faster 45 minutes after bicycling. Our data suggest that activity significantly influences nerve conduction latency results due to tissue temperature alteration. In addition, 30 minutes of rest after activity may not be sufficient time for the lower extremity temperatures to become stable. PMID:4038026

  8. What Are Nerve Blocks for Headache?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nerve blocks for headache? Print Email What are nerve blocks for headache? ACHE Newsletter Sign up for ... entering your e-mail address below. What are nerve blocks for headache? A nerve block is the ...

  9. Marked lateral deviation of the phrenic nerve due to variant origin and course of the thyrocervical trunk: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Ogami, Keiko; Saiki, K; Okamoto, K; Wakebe, T; Manabe, Y; Imamura, T; Tsurumoto, T

    2016-05-01

    Phrenic nerve impairment can often lead to serious respiratory disorders under various pathological conditions. During routine dissection of an 88-year-old Japanese male cadaver, a victim of heart failure, we recognized an extremely rare variation of the right thyrocervical trunk arising from the subclavian artery laterally to the anterior scalene muscle. In addition to that, the ipsilateral phrenic nerve was drawn and displaced remarkably laterad by this vessel. We examined all of the branches arising from subclavian arteries, phrenic nerves and diaphragm muscles. The embryological background of this arterial variation is considered. The marked displacement with prolonged strain had a potential to cause phrenic nerve impairment with an atrophic change of the diaphragm muscle. Recently many image diagnostic technologies have been developed and are often used. However, it is still possible that rare variations like this case may be overlooked and can only be recognized by intimate regional examination while keeping these rare variations in mind. PMID:26438272

  10. Nonrecurrent inferior laryngeal nerves and anatomical findings during thyroid surgery: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kumiko; Toriumi, Yasuo; Kamio, Makiko; Nogi, Hiroko; Shioya, Hisashi; Takeyama, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    A nonrecurrent inferior laryngeal nerve (NRILN) is found more frequently on the right side than on the left, and it is closely associated with an aberrant right subclavian artery. The presence of the aberrant right subclavian artery on preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan suggests NRILN; however, different types of branching locations and pathways exist. Here, we report three NRILN cases with different pathways where the vagus nerve arises more medial than usual and a review of the literature. Case 1: A 30-year-old Japanese female presented with papillary thyroid carcinoma. Preoperative CT scan revealed an aberrant right subclavian artery, and an operation was performed under suspicion of NRILN. During the operation, the vagus nerve was found to arise more medially than usual and two NRILNs originated from it at the level of the cricoid cartilage and at a more caudal position; the two NRILNs were preserved. Case 2: A 33-year-old Japanese female with a thyroid nodule of increased size underwent surgery. Preoperative CT scan revealed an aberrant right subclavian artery, which suggested NRILN. During the operation, the vagus nerve was identified to run more medially than usual and NRILN was found to originate at the level of the cricoid cartilage; NRILN was preserved. Case 3: A 78-year-old Japanese female underwent an operation with a diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma. Preoperative CT scan showed an aberrant right subclavian artery. During the operation, NRILN was found to originate from the vagus nerve at the level of the lower pole of the thyroid gland, and the vagus nerve ran medial to the common carotid artery at the caudal level. PMID:27188389

  11. Optic nerve hypoplasia in children.

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, S. M.; Dutton, G. N.

    1990-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is characterised by a diminished number of optic nerve fibres in the optic nerve(s) and until recently was thought to be rare. It may be associated with a wide range of other congenital abnormalities. Its pathology, clinical features, and the conditions associated with it are reviewed. Neuroendocrine disorders should be actively sought in any infant or child with bilateral ONH. Early recognition of the disorder may in some cases be life saving. Images PMID:2191713

  12. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  13. Optic Nerve Drusen

    MedlinePlus

    ... the drusen enlarge and the overlying tissue (nerve fiber layer) thins with age, the disc drusen become more apparent. How are optic disc drusen treated? There is no treatment for drusen. In the rare cases (with choroidal neovascularization) laser treatment may be indicated. Revised March 2016 Eye ...

  14. Optic Nerve Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the occipital lobe (the part of the brain that interprets vision) like a cable wire. What is optic nerve ... nystagmus. In older patients, peripheral vision and color vision assessment ... around the brain and spinal cord (hydrocephalus) may prevent further optic ...

  15. Mechanisms of insulin action on sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntzel, Martin S.; Anderson, Erling A.; Johnson, Alan Kim; Mark, Allyn L.

    1996-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia may contribute to the development of arterial hypertension. Although insulin may elevate arterial pressure, in part, through activation of the sympathetic nervous system, the sites and mechanisms of insulin-induced sympathetic excitation remain uncertain. While sympathoexcitation during insulin may be mediated by the baroreflex, or by modulation of norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve endings, it has been shown repeatedly that insulin increases sympathetic outflow by actions on the central nervous system. Previous studies employing norepinephrine turnover have suggested that insulin causes sympathoexcitation by acting in the hypothalamus. Recent experiments from our laboratory involving direct measurements of regional sympathetic nerve activity have provided further evidence that insulin acts in the central nervous system. For example, administration of insulin into the third cerebralventricle increased lumbar but not renal or adrenal sympathetic nerve activity in normotensive rats. Interestingly, this pattern of regional sympathetic nerve responses to central neural administration of insulin is similar to that seen with systemic administration of insulin. Further, lesions of the anteroventral third ventricle hypothalamic (AV3V) region abolished increases in sympathetic activity to systemic administration of insulin with euglycemic clamp, suggesting that AV3V-related structures are critical for insulin-induced elevations in sympathetic outflow.

  16. Elementary School Teachers' Understanding of the Mean and Median

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobbe, Tim

    2012-01-01

    This study provides a snapshot of elementary school teachers' understanding of the mean and median. The research is presented in light of recent work regarding preservice teachers' understanding of the mean. Common misconceptions are identified which lead to potential implications for teacher preparation programs. One of the primary concerns…

  17. Improving reversal median computation using commuting reversals and cycle information.

    PubMed

    Arndt, William; Tang, Jijun

    2008-10-01

    In the past decade, genome rearrangements have attracted increasing attention from both biologists and computer scientists as a new type of data for phylogenetic analysis. Methods for reconstructing phylogeny from genome rearrangements include distance-based methods, MCMC methods, and direct optimization methods. The latter, pioneered by Sankoff and extended with the software suites GRAPPA and MGR, is the most accurate approach, but is very limited due to the difficulty of its scoring procedure--it must solve multiple instances of the reversal median problem to compute the score of a given tree. The reversal median problem is known to be NP-hard and all existing solvers are extremely slow when the genomes are distant. In this paper, we present a new reversal median heuristic for unichromosomal genomes. The new method works by applying sets of reversals in a batch where all such reversals both commute and do not break the cycle of any other. Our testing using simulated datasets shows that this method is much faster than the leading solver for difficult datasets with only a slight accuracy penalty, yet retains better accuracy than other heuristics with comparable speed, and provides the additional option of searching for multiple medians. This method dramatically increases the speed of current direct optimization methods and enables us to extend the range of their applicability to organellar and small nuclear genomes with more than 50 reversals along each edge. PMID:18774904

  18. Revision of the Solanum medians complex (Solanum section Petota)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solanum medians is a widely distributed wild potato species growing along the coast and along the western slopes of the Andes from central Peru and northern Chile, from along the coastal lomas near sea level to 3800 m. Fertile diploid and triploid cytotypes are common, are believed to associated wit...

  19. Endocrine cells in median raphe cysts of the penis.

    PubMed

    Fetissof, F; Lorette, G; Dubois, M P; Philippe, A; Tharanne, M J; Jobard, P

    1985-12-01

    Serotonin-storing cells are distributed in all tissues derived from cloaca. They were observed in the cavernous portion of penile urethra whereas they were absent from the glans portion. Serotonin cells were detected in several morphologic varieties of median raphe cysts. It is suggested that these cysts arise from the endodermal part of urethra. PMID:3831998

  20. A novel fast median filter algorithm without sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weiping; Zhang, Zhilong; Lu, Xinping; Li, Jicheng; Chen, Dong; Yang, Guopeng

    2016-04-01

    As one of widely applied nonlinear smoothing filtering methods, median filter is quite effective for removing salt-andpepper noise and impulsive noise while maintaining image edge information without blurring its boundaries, but its computation load is the maximal drawback while applied in real-time processing systems. In order to solve the issue, researchers have proposed many effective fast algorithms and published many papers. However most of the algorithms are based on sorting operations so as to make real-time implementation difficult. In this paper considering the large scale Boolean calculation function and convenient shift operation which are two of the advantages of FPGA(Field Programmable Gate Array), we proposed a novel median value finding algorithm without sorting, which can find the median value effectively and its performing time almost keeps changeless despite how large the filter radius is. Based on the algorithm, a real-time median filter has been realized. A lot of tests demonstrate the validity and correctness of proposed algorithm.

  1. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AND MEDIAN. REPLICATING WERNER HEGEMANN PHOTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AND MEDIAN. REPLICATING WERNER HEGEMANN PHOTO TAKEN CIRCA 1909 SEEN FROM TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT CHANNING WAY LOOKING NW. Photograph by Fredrica Drotos and Michael Kelly, July 9, 2006 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Multichromosomal median and halving problems under different genomic distances

    PubMed Central

    Tannier, Eric; Zheng, Chunfang; Sankoff, David

    2009-01-01

    Background Genome median and genome halving are combinatorial optimization problems that aim at reconstructing ancestral genomes as well as the evolutionary events leading from the ancestor to extant species. Exploring complexity issues is a first step towards devising efficient algorithms. The complexity of the median problem for unichromosomal genomes (permutations) has been settled for both the breakpoint distance and the reversal distance. Although the multichromosomal case has often been assumed to be a simple generalization of the unichromosomal case, it is also a relaxation so that complexity in this context does not follow from existing results, and is open for all distances. Results We settle here the complexity of several genome median and halving problems, including a surprising polynomial result for the breakpoint median and guided halving problems in genomes with circular and linear chromosomes, showing that the multichromosomal problem is actually easier than the unichromosomal problem. Still other variants of these problems are NP-complete, including the DCJ double distance problem, previously mentioned as an open question. We list the remaining open problems. Conclusion This theoretical study clears up a wide swathe of the algorithmical study of genome rearrangements with multiple multichromosomal genomes. PMID:19386099

  3. Glucagon Release Induced by Pancreatic Nerve Stimulation in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Marliss, Errol B.; Girardier, Lucien; Seydoux, Josiane; Wollheim, Claes B.; Kanazawa, Yasunori; Orci, Lelio; Renold, Albert E.; Porte, Daniel

    1973-01-01

    A direct neural role in the regulation of immunoreactive glucagon (IRG) secretion has been investigated during stimulation of mixed autonomic nerves to the pancreas in anesthetized dogs. The responses were evaluated by measurement of blood flow and hormone concentration in the venous effluent from the stimulated region of pancreas. Electrical stimulation of the distal end of the discrete bundles of nerve fibers isolated along the superior pancreaticoduodenal artery was invariably followed by an increase in IRG output. With 10-min periods of nerve stimulation, the integrated response showed that the higher the control glucagon output, the greater was the increment. Atropinization did not influence the response to stimulation. That the preparation behaved in physiologic fashion was confirmed by a fall in IRG output, and a rise in immunoreactive insulin (IRI) output, during hyperglycemia induced by intravenous glucose (0.1 g/kg). The kinetics of this glucose effect on IRG showed characteristics opposite to those of nerve stimulation: the lower the control output, the less the decrement. Furthermore, during the control steady state, blood glucose concentration was tightly correlated with the IRI/IRG molar output ratio, the function relating the two parameters being markedly nonlinear. Injection or primed infusion of glucose diminished the IRG response to simultaneous nerve stimulation. Measurement of IRG was inferred to reflect response of pancreatic glucagon secretion on the basis of the site of sample collection (the superior pancreaticoduodenal vein), the absence of changes in arterial IRG, and similar responses being obtained using an antibody specific for pancreatic glucagon. These studies support a role for the autonomic nervous system in the control of glucagon secretion: direct nerve stimulation induces glucagon release. Such sympathetic activation may be interpreted as capable of shifting the sensitivity of the A cell to glucose in the direction of higher

  4. Does retraction of the sternum during median sternotomy result in brachial plexus injuries?

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Scott; O'Neill, Bridie; Bilal, Haris; Waterworth, Paul

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was ‘does retraction of the sternum during median sternotomy result in brachial plexus injuries or peripheral neuropathies?’ Altogether 58 papers were found using the reported search, of which 12 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The authors, date, journal and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers were tabulated. Caudal placement of the retractor or relieving the pressure superiorly by removing the upper blades of a retractor (P = 0.02) and use of a caudally placed symmetrical retractor has been shown to reduce neuropathy. Positioning of the patient with ‘hands up’ positioning showed significant reduction in the incidence of brachial plexus injuries. Furthermore, how wide the retractor is opened and use of an asymmetrical retractor for internal mammary artery (IMA) harvesting are also important factors in quantifying risk of postoperative neuropathy. Wider sternal retraction and longer bypass time did increase the risk of developing postoperative neuropathy. Three asymmetrical retractors were looked at that demonstrates the Delacroix–Chevalier to be the safest (P < 0.05). We conclude that median sternotomy risks brachial plexus injury and where possible the sternum should be opened as small a distance as possible with symmetrical retractor and using a caudally placed retractor. PMID:23513004

  5. Consistent Estimation in Mendelian Randomization with Some Invalid Instruments Using a Weighted Median Estimator

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Jack; Davey Smith, George; Haycock, Philip C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Developments in genome‐wide association studies and the increasing availability of summary genetic association data have made application of Mendelian randomization relatively straightforward. However, obtaining reliable results from a Mendelian randomization investigation remains problematic, as the conventional inverse‐variance weighted method only gives consistent estimates if all of the genetic variants in the analysis are valid instrumental variables. We present a novel weighted median estimator for combining data on multiple genetic variants into a single causal estimate. This estimator is consistent even when up to 50% of the information comes from invalid instrumental variables. In a simulation analysis, it is shown to have better finite‐sample Type 1 error rates than the inverse‐variance weighted method, and is complementary to the recently proposed MR‐Egger (Mendelian randomization‐Egger) regression method. In analyses of the causal effects of low‐density lipoprotein cholesterol and high‐density lipoprotein cholesterol on coronary artery disease risk, the inverse‐variance weighted method suggests a causal effect of both lipid fractions, whereas the weighted median and MR‐Egger regression methods suggest a null effect of high‐density lipoprotein cholesterol that corresponds with the experimental evidence. Both median‐based and MR‐Egger regression methods should be considered as sensitivity analyses for Mendelian randomization investigations with multiple genetic variants. PMID:27061298

  6. Effects of Hemodiafiltration and High Flux Hemodialysis on Nerve Excitability in End-Stage Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Ria; Pussell, Bruce A.; Pianta, Timothy J.; Grinius, Virginija; Lin, Cindy S-Y.; Kiernan, Matthew C.; Howells, James; Jardine, Meg J.; Krishnan, Arun V.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Peripheral neuropathy is the most common neurological complication in end-stage kidney disease. While high flux hemodialysis (HFHD) and hemodiafiltration (HDF) have become the preferred options for extracorporeal dialysis therapy, the effects of these treatments on nerve excitability have not yet been examined. Methods An observational proof-of-concept study of nerve excitability and neuropathy was undertaken in an incident dialysis population (n = 17) receiving either HFHD or HDF. Nerve excitability techniques were utilised to assess nerve ion channel function and membrane potential, in conjunction with clinical assessment and standard nerve conduction studies. A mathematical model of axonal excitability was used to investigate the underlying basis of the observed changes. Nerve excitability was recorded from the median nerve, before, during and after a single dialysis session and correlated with corresponding biochemical markers. Differences in nerve excitability were compared to normal controls with longitudinal follow-up over an 18 month period. Results Nerve excitability was performed in patient cohorts treated with either HFHD (n = 9) or online HDF (n = 8), with similar neuropathy status. Nerve excitability measures in HDF-treated patients were significantly closer to normal values compared to HFHD patients obtained over the course of a dialysis session (p<0.05). Longitudinal studies revealed stability of nerve excitability findings, and thus maintenance of improved nerve function in the HDF group. Conclusions This study has provided evidence that nerve excitability in HDF-treated patients is significantly closer to normal values prior to dialysis, across a single dialysis session and at longitudinal follow-up. These findings offer promise for the management of neuropathy in ESKD and should be confirmed in randomised trials. PMID:23536855

  7. [Carpal tunnel syndrome revealed by digital ulcerations caused by arterial vasospasm].

    PubMed

    Léger, O; Lavallé, F

    2005-02-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome presenting as a trophic disorder in the hand is unusual. We report the case of a 66 year old man in whom nerve conduction tests confirmed compression of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel, and vasospasm in the corresponding area was demonstrated by arteriography for, we believe, the first time. Simple decompression of the carpal tunnel brought about total recovery. The mechanism of the autonomic disorders found in carpal tunnel syndrome remains controversial. The clinical case that we report objectively demonstrates the vasospasm caused by the compression of the autonomic fibres of the median nerve. PMID:15754710

  8. Sympathetic neuroeffector transmission to pulmonary vascular smooth muscle in porcine superior mesenteric arterial occlusion (SMAO) shock.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, S; Glenn, T M; Eddy, L J; Rebert, R R

    1980-01-01

    Splanchnic arterial occlusion shock results in pulmonary endothelial damage and depression of porcine intralobar pulmonary artery and vein contractility. This study evaluates the functional integrity of the adrenergic nerves innervating intralobar pulmonary arteries and veins and the changes in neurotransmission following 1) superior mesenteric artery occlusion (SMAO) shock in swine; 2) sequential inhibition of prostacyclin, thromboxane, and prostaglandin synthesis; and 3) mechanical stripping of the endothelium. Rings of porcine intralobar pulmonary arteries and veins were obtained from sham and SMAO shocked swine. They were suspended in muscle baths and stimulated transmurally at 1-32 Hz, 2 msec duration, 2 msec delay at 7.5-10V. Some experiments were performed on rings of intralobular pulmonary arteries and veins in which the endothelium was stripped with a razor blade. Appropriate inverted-reverted controls were used to account for any deleterious effects of the preparatory techniques involved in stripping. Intralobar pulmonary arteries and veins from sham swine contracted in response to 1 Hz, with maximum responses at 32 Hz. The responses to nerve stimulation were enhanced by cocaine and inhibited by phentolamine, an alpha-receptor antagonist. Inhibition of endothelial prostacyclin synthesis, as well as endothelial stripping, diminished by 30-40% the responses to nerve stimulation. The responses to nerve stimulation were depressed in both intralobar pulmonary arteries and veins in SMAO shocked swine. The data demonstrate physiologic regulation of neural control in porcine pulmonary blood vessels. Furthermore, the data suggest that prostaglandin, the vascular endothelium, and shock, may modify this process. PMID:7315616

  9. Pseudoaneurysm of the Posterior Tibial Artery After Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Elabdi, Monsef; Roukhsi, Redouane; Tijani, Youssef; Chtata, Hassan; Jaafar, Abdeloihab

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery is an uncommon condition that, left untreated, can lead to hemorrhage, thrombosis, or emboli. We present the case of a 54-year-old male who developed pseudoaneurysm of the posterior tibial artery 4 months after undergoing tibialis posterior tendon transfer for management of peroneal nerve palsy, which had developed as a complication of hip arthroplasty. PMID:26972754

  10. August median streamflow on ungaged streams in Eastern Coastal Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2004-01-01

    Methods for estimating August median streamflow were developed for ungaged, unregulated streams in eastern coastal Maine. The methods apply to streams with drainage areas ranging in size from 0.04 to 73.2 square miles and fraction of basin underlain by a sand and gravel aquifer ranging from 0 to 71 percent. The equations were developed with data from three long-term (greater than or equal to 10 years of record) continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations, 23 partial-record streamflow- gaging stations, and 5 short-term (less than 10 years of record) continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations. A mathematical technique for estimating a standard low-flow statistic, August median streamflow, at partial-record streamflow-gaging stations and short-term continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations was applied by relating base-flow measurements at these stations to concurrent daily streamflows at nearby long-term continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations (index stations). Generalized least-squares regression analysis (GLS) was used to relate estimates of August median streamflow at streamflow-gaging stations to basin characteristics at these same stations to develop equations that can be applied to estimate August median streamflow on ungaged streams. GLS accounts for different periods of record at the gaging stations and the cross correlation of concurrent streamflows among gaging stations. Thirty-one stations were used for the final regression equations. Two basin characteristics?drainage area and fraction of basin underlain by a sand and gravel aquifer?are used in the calculated regression equation to estimate August median streamflow for ungaged streams. The equation has an average standard error of prediction from -27 to 38 percent. A one-variable equation uses only drainage area to estimate August median streamflow when less accuracy is acceptable. This equation has an average standard error of prediction from -30 to 43 percent. Model error is larger than

  11. Optic Nerve Vascular Compression in a Patient with a Tuberculum Sellae Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Mizrahi, Cezar José; Moscovici, Samuel; Dotan, Shlomo; Spektor, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Background. Optic nerve vascular compression in patients with suprasellar tumor is a known entity but is rarely described in the literature. Case Description. We present a unique, well-documented case of optic nerve strangulation by the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery in a patient with a tuberculum sellae meningioma. The patient presented with pronounced progressive visual deterioration. Following surgery, there was immediate resolution of her visual deficit. Conclusion. Vascular strangulation of the optic nerve should be considered when facing progressive and/or severe visual field deterioration in patients with tumors proximal to the optic apparatus. PMID:25705535

  12. Optic nerve vascular compression in a patient with a tuberculum sellae meningioma.

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Cezar José; Moscovici, Samuel; Dotan, Shlomo; Spektor, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Background. Optic nerve vascular compression in patients with suprasellar tumor is a known entity but is rarely described in the literature. Case Description. We present a unique, well-documented case of optic nerve strangulation by the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery in a patient with a tuberculum sellae meningioma. The patient presented with pronounced progressive visual deterioration. Following surgery, there was immediate resolution of her visual deficit. Conclusion. Vascular strangulation of the optic nerve should be considered when facing progressive and/or severe visual field deterioration in patients with tumors proximal to the optic apparatus. PMID:25705535

  13. Glycemic control and nerve conduction abnormalities in non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Graf, R J; Halter, J B; Pfeifer, M A; Halar, E; Brozovich, F; Porte, D

    1981-03-01

    The influence of therapy of hyperglycemia on the progression of diabetic neuropathy is unclear. We studied variables of glycemia and motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity in a group of 18 non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects before and after institution of diabetes therapy. Diabetes therapy significantly reduced variables of glycemia after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Conduction velocity of the median motor nerve was improved from baseline at each time tested during treatment. In addition, peroneal and tibial motor nerve conduction velocities improved in patients whose levels of hyperglycemia were lowered. Moreover, extent of improvement of conduction velocity of some motor nerves was related to the degree of reduction of hyperglycemia. Sensory nerve conduction velocity was not altered by diabetes therapy. These findings support the hypothesis of a metabolic component to diabetic neuropathy and suggest that optimal glycemic control may be beneficial to patients with this disorder. PMID:7013592

  14. Interventional therapeutic strategy for hemoptysis originating from infectious pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysms.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Jitsuro; Hasegawa, Ichiro; Torikai, Hideyuki; Sayama, Koichi; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Narimatsu, Yoshiaki

    2015-07-01

    This study reports 6 cases of hemoptysis originating from infectious pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysms (PAPs). Selective pulmonary angiography revealed PAPs in 5 cases, and segmental pulmonary artery embolization was performed using coils and gelatin sponge particles. Systemic arterial embolization also was performed in 5 cases because of inadequate initial control or for shunts from systemic to pulmonary arteries. At a median follow-up time of 9 months (range, 25 d to 25 mo), no recurrence occurred, although 2 patients died of respiratory failure. Segmental artery embolization combined with systemic artery embolization may be useful in patients with hemoptysis secondary to PAPs. PMID:26095272

  15. Responsiveness of the somatosensory system after nerve injury and amputation in the human hand.

    PubMed

    Schady, W; Braune, S; Watson, S; Torebjörk, H E; Schmidt, R

    1994-07-01

    We studied the responsiveness of the somatosensory system in humans after prolonged deprivation of peripheral input. Eight patients with traumatic transection of the median or ulnar nerve and 6 patients with amputation of a finger or hand underwent microneurography and intraneural stimulation. Bundles of nerve fibers were electrically stimulated through a microelectrode placed in the affected nerve proximally to the site of damage or in the case of amputees, in a nerve fascicle supplying the stump. During intraneural stimulation the subjects with nerve injuries reported distinct percepts in the hypoesthetic skin. Their projections were usually confined to the territory of a single or two adjacent palmar digital nerves, similar to the fascicular territories of healthy nerves in control subjects, but there was much less microneurographically recordable afferent activity than in normal subjects. In amputees intraneural stimulation evoked sensations in a phantom digit or digits in over three fourths of the fascicles studied. We conclude that (1) the somatosensory system remains able to process information from a nerve fascicle that has lost its cutaneous territory, and (2) somatosensory localization remains accurate despite the presumed central reorganization that takes place after nerve division or amputation. This lack of functional adaptation has important implications with regard to our understanding of human central nervous system plasticity. PMID:8024265

  16. Atypic geniculate neuralgia: atypic anatomic correlation of cranial nerve roots and AICA.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Füsun Demirçivi; Duransoy, Yusuf Kurtuluş; Camlar, Mahmut

    2009-08-01

    Geniculate neuralgia is a rare cause of craniofacial pains. The anterior inferior cerebellar artery is the offending vessel which compress nervus intermedius in the patients with typical geniculate neuralgia. We report a patient whose pain was atypical for either geniculate neuralgia and trigeminal neuralgia. At operation the anterior inferior cerebellar artery was coursing with the nerves and was separated. After the decompression the pain resolved immediately. PMID:19404569

  17. New sonographic measures of peripheral nerves: a tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve involvement in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Lugão, Helena Barbosa; Furini, Renata Bazan; Marques Júnior, Wilson; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate ultrasonographic (US) cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of peripheral nerves, indexes of the differences between CSAs at the same point (∆CSAs) and between tunnel (T) and pre-tunnel (PT) ulnar CSAs (∆TPTs) in leprosy patients (LPs) and healthy volunteers (HVs). Seventy-seven LPs and 49 HVs underwent bilateral US at PT and T ulnar points, as well as along the median (M) and common fibular (CF) nerves, to calculate the CSAs, ∆CSAs and ∆TPTs. The CSA values in HVs were lower than those in LPs (p < 0.0001) at the PT (5.67/9.78 mm2) and T (6.50/10.94 mm2) points, as well as at the M (5.85/8.48 mm2) and CF (8.17/14.14 mm2) nerves. The optimum CSA- receiver operating characteristic (ROC) points and sensitivities/specificities were, respectively, 6.85 mm2 and 68-85% for the PT point, 7.35 mm2 and 71-78% for the T point, 6.75 mm2 and 62-75% for the M nerve and 9.55 mm2 and 81-72% for the CF nerve. The ∆CSAs of the LPs were greater than those of the HVs at the PT point (4.02/0.85; p = 0.007), T point (3.71/0.98; p = 0.0005) and CF nerve (2.93/1.14; p = 0.015), with no difference found for the M nerve (1.41/0.95; p = 0.17). The optimum ∆CSA-ROC points, sensitivities, specificities and p-values were, respectively, 1.35, 49%, 80% and 0.003 at the PT point, 1.55, 55-85% and 0.0006 at the T point, 0.70, 58-50% and 0.73 for the M nerve and 1.25, 54-67% and 0.022 for the CF nerve. The ∆TPT in the LPs was greater than that in the HVs (4.43/1.44; p <0.0001). The optimum ∆TPT-ROC point was 2.65 (90% sensitivity/41% specificity, p < 0.0001). The ROC analysis of CSAs showed the highest specificity and sensitivity at the PT point and CF nerve, respectively. The PT and T ∆CSAs had high specificities (> 80%) and ∆TPT had the highest specificity (> 90%). New sonographic peripheral nerve measurements (∆CSAs and ∆TPT) provide an important methodological improvement in the detection of leprosy neuropathy. PMID:23778664

  18. Geometry of Covariance Matrices and Computation of Median

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Le; Arnaudon, Marc; Barbaresco, Frédéric

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we consider the manifold of covariance matrices of order n parametrized by reflection coefficients which are derived from Levinson's recursion of autoregressive model. The explicit expression of the reparametrization and its inverse are obtained. With the Riemannian metric given by the Hessian of a Kähler potential, we show that the manifold is in fact a Cartan-Hadamard manifold with lower sectional curvature bound -4. The explicit expressions of geodesics are also obtained. After that we introduce the notion of Riemannian median of points lying on a Riemannian manifold and give a simple algorithm to compute it. Finally, some simulation examples are given to illustrate the applications of the median method to radar signal processing.

  19. On detection of median filtering in digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, Matthias; Fridrich, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    In digital image forensics, it is generally accepted that intentional manipulations of the image content are most critical and hence numerous forensic methods focus on the detection of such 'malicious' post-processing. However, it is also beneficial to know as much as possible about the general processing history of an image, including content-preserving operations, since they can affect the reliability of forensic methods in various ways. In this paper, we present a simple yet effective technique to detect median filtering in digital images-a widely used denoising and smoothing operator. As a great variety of forensic methods relies on some kind of a linearity assumption, a detection of non-linear median filtering is of particular interest. The effectiveness of our method is backed with experimental evidence on a large image database.

  20. Solitary median maxillary central incisor: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Uçar, Faruk Izzet; Gümüş, Hüsniye; Aydınbelge, Mustafa; Sisman, Yildiray

    2012-01-01

    A single median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) is a rare dental anomaly that may occur alone or be associated with growth deficiency or other systemic abnormalities. The best known association is with holoprosencephaly (HPE). HPE is a complex brain malformation that affects both the forebrain and the face. Early diagnosis of SMMCI is important, since it may be a sign of other severe congenital or developmental abnormalities. Therefore, systematic follow-up and close monitoring of the growth and development of SMMCI patients is crucial. The purpose of this paper was to report the cases of 2 children, each with a single median maxillary central incisor, and describe important symptoms of this syndrome that have not yet been reported. PMID:22583889

  1. Median raphe cyst of the penis with ciliated cells.

    PubMed

    Romaní, J; Barnadas, M A; Miralles, J; Curell, R; de Moragas, J M

    1995-08-01

    Cystic lesions occurring on the ventral surface of the penis have been classified as median raphe cysts of the penis. They are lined by pseudostratified, columnar or stratified squamous cell epithelium, mimicking the epithelial lining of the male urethra. Ciliated cysts of the human skin are unusual. Cystic lesions containing ciliated cells have been noted to occur in the chest, neck, or head, and bronchogenic origin has been the most accepted explanation for its origin. Other reports show the presence of ciliated cysts on the lower extremities, and the mechanism of formation is still a debated question. A case of median raphe cyst of the penis containing ciliated epithelium is presented. The existing literature about these cutaneous lesions is reviewed, including the possible mechanisms believed to be involved in its origin. PMID:7499581

  2. Split median raphe: case series and brief literature review.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Enrico; Cutrone, Mario

    2014-01-01

    We describe three cases of split median raphe of the penis (SMR) from our hospital newborn records from 2004 to 2013. One case was associated with median raphe cyst, one with skin hypochromia, and one with a scar-like aspect of the region of interest. SMR is thought to be the result of defective fusion of ectodermal tissue in the urethra and scrotum area or of defective growth of the perineal mesoderm around the urethra during gestation. Although SMR associated with other major penile congenital defects (epispadias, hypospadias, penile torsion, bifid scrotum, chordee) is common, isolated SMR is probably an underdiagnosed (although not rare) malformative condition. Recognizing SMR in a newborn may be of educational value to neonatologists because it leads to the search for and exclusion of the above-mentioned pathologic conditions. PMID:25236772

  3. Bayesian median regression for temporal gene expression data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Keming; Vinciotti, Veronica; Liu, Xiaohui; 't Hoen, Peter A. C.

    2007-09-01

    Most of the existing methods for the identification of biologically interesting genes in a temporal expression profiling dataset do not fully exploit the temporal ordering in the dataset and are based on normality assumptions for the gene expression. In this paper, we introduce a Bayesian median regression model to detect genes whose temporal profile is significantly different across a number of biological conditions. The regression model is defined by a polynomial function where both time and condition effects as well as interactions between the two are included. MCMC-based inference returns the posterior distribution of the polynomial coefficients. From this a simple Bayes factor test is proposed to test for significance. The estimation of the median rather than the mean, and within a Bayesian framework, increases the robustness of the method compared to a Hotelling T2-test previously suggested. This is shown on simulated data and on muscular dystrophy gene expression data.

  4. Surgical repair of the isolated incomplete median cleft lip.

    PubMed

    Topkara, A; Özkan, A; Özcan, R H; Öksüz, M

    2016-02-01

    Median cleft lip refers to a vertical cleft on the midline of the upper lip. It is a rare congenital craniofacial anomaly brought about by a fusion failure in the medial nasal prominence. A novel surgical approach to median cleft lips and their repair is reported herein, with reference to a clinical case. The patient had a cleft in the lower half of the upper lip. There were no other craniofacial anomalies in this patient other than the cleft. Within the framework of the patient's surgical treatment, a functional and cosmetically satisfactory result was achieved by performing a V-Y advancement flap on the columella base, Z-plasty in the vermillion zone, and Z pattern muscular tissue repair, without having to resort to any tissue excisions. PMID:26364580

  5. Conductive PPY/PDLLA conduit for peripheral nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haixing; Holzwarth, Jeremy M.; Yan, Yuhua; Xu, Peihu; Zheng, Hua; Yin, Yixia; Li, Shipu; Ma, Peter X.

    2013-01-01

    The significant drawbacks and lack of success associated with current methods to treat critically sized nerve defects have led to increased interest in neural tissue engineering. Conducting polymers show great promise due to their electrical properties, and in the case of polypyrrole (PPY), its cell compatibility as well. Thus, the goal of this study is to synthesize a conducting composite nerve conduit with PPY and poly(D, L-lactic acid) (PDLLA), assess its ability to support the differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells in vitro, and determine its ability to promote nerve regeneration in vivo. Different amounts of PPY (5%, 10%, and 15%) are used to synthesize the conduits resulting in different conductivities (5.65, 10.40, and 15.56 ms/cm, respectively). When PC12 cells are seeded on these conduits and stimulated with 100 mV for 2 h, there is a marked increase in both the percentage of neurite-bearing cells and the median neurite length as the content of PPY increased. More importantly, when the PPY/PDLLA nerve conduit was used to repair a rat sciatic nerve defect it performed similarly to the gold standard autologous graft. These promising results illustrate the potential that this PPY/PDLLA conducting composite conduit has for neural tissue engineering. PMID:24138830

  6. Robust optic nerve segmentation on clinically acquired CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Swetasudha; Asman, Andrew J.; DeLisi, Michael P.; Mawn, Louise A.; Galloway, Robert L.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-03-01

    The optic nerve is a sensitive central nervous system structure, which plays a critical role in many devastating pathological conditions. Several methods have been proposed in recent years to segment the optic nerve automatically, but progress toward full automation has been limited. Multi-atlas methods have been successful for brain segmentation, but their application to smaller anatomies remains relatively unexplored. Herein we evaluate a framework for robust and fully automated segmentation of the optic nerves, eye globes and muscles. We employ a robust registration procedure for accurate registrations, variable voxel resolution and image fieldof- view. We demonstrate the efficacy of an optimal combination of SyN registration and a recently proposed label fusion algorithm (Non-local Spatial STAPLE) that accounts for small-scale errors in registration correspondence. On a dataset containing 30 highly varying computed tomography (CT) images of the human brain, the optimal registration and label fusion pipeline resulted in a median Dice similarity coefficient of 0.77, symmetric mean surface distance error of 0.55 mm, symmetric Hausdorff distance error of 3.33 mm for the optic nerves. Simultaneously, we demonstrate the robustness of the optimal algorithm by segmenting the optic nerve structure in 316 CT scans obtained from 182 subjects from a thyroid eye disease (TED) patient population.

  7. Relapse of a maxillary median diastema: closure and permanent retention.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Claudia Trindade; da Silva, Dayanne Lopes; Ruellas, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the closure of a maxillary median diastema of a 26-year-old woman that had been corrected before during orthodontic treatment but reopened after dental trauma in a car accident. A clear esthetic device made from a tray like those used for home bleaching was used, providing a comfortable, nearly undetectable, and efficient solution. A permanent fixed retainer was bonded again to the maxillary central incisors to prevent relapse. PMID:22196198

  8. Positron emission tomographic map reconstruction using fuzzy-median filter

    SciTech Connect

    Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2006-10-09

    Positron emission tomography is widely used in medical physics for the reconstruction of the distribution of radionuclei molecules for analyzing regional physiological functions. The existing maximum a posteriori reconstruction methodologies produce artifacts such as oversmoothing and streaking. In this letter, the author proposes a potential function based on fuzzy-median filter for noise-free image reconstruction. The reconstruction methodology is therefore very useful for obtaining artifact-free reconstruction of biomedical specimens.

  9. Patterning of sympathetic nerve activity in response to vestibular stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; McAllen, R. M.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for the vestibular system in regulation of autonomic outflow during postural adjustments. In the present paper we review evidence for the patterning of sympathetic nerve activity elicited by vestibular stimulation. In response to electrical activation of vestibular afferents, firing of sympathetic nerves located throughout the body is altered. However, activity of the renal nerve is most sensitive to vestibular inputs. In contrast, high-intensity simultaneous activation of cutaneous and muscle inputs elicits equivalent changes in firing of the renal, superior mesenteric and lumbar colonic nerves. Responses of muscle vasoconstrictor (MVC) efferents to vestibular stimulation are either inhibitory (Type I) or are comprised of a combination of excitation and inhibition (Type II). Interestingly, single MVC units located in the hindlimb exhibited predominantly Type I responses while those located in the forelimb and face exhibited Type II responses. Furthermore, brachial and femoral arterial blood flows were dissociated in response to vestibular stimulation, such that brachial vascular resistance increased while femoral resistance decreased. These studies demonstrate that vestibulosympathetic reflexes are patterned according to both the anatomical location and innervation target of a particular sympathetic nerve, and can lead to distinct changes in local blood flow.

  10. Ultrasound of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Im; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, neuromuscular ultrasound has emerged as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews sonographic findings of normal nerves including key quantitative ultrasound measurements that are helpful in the evaluation of focal and possibly generalized peripheral neuropathies. It also discusses several recent papers outlining the evidence base for the use of this technology, as well as new findings in compressive, traumatic, and generalized neuropathies. Ultrasound is well suited for use in electrodiagnostic laboratories where physicians, experienced in both the clinical evaluation of patients and the application of hands-on technology, can integrate findings from the patient’s history, physical examination, electrophysiological studies, and imaging for diagnosis and management. PMID:23314937

  11. Median recoil direction as a WIMP directional detection signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Anne M.; Morgan, Ben

    2010-03-01

    Direct detection experiments have reached the sensitivity to detect dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Demonstrating that a putative signal is due to WIMPs, and not backgrounds, is a major challenge, however. The direction dependence of the WIMP scattering rate provides a potential WIMP “smoking gun.” If the WIMP distribution is predominantly smooth, the Galactic recoil distribution is peaked in the direction opposite to the direction of Solar motion. Previous studies have found that, for an ideal detector, of order 10 WIMP events would be sufficient to reject isotropy, and rule out an isotropic background. We examine how the median recoil direction could be used to confirm the WIMP origin of an anisotropic recoil signal. Specifically, we determine the number of events required to confirm the direction of solar motion as the median inverse recoil direction at 95% confidence. We find that for zero background 31 events are required, a factor of ˜2 more than are required to simply reject isotropy. We also investigate the effect of a nonzero isotropic background. As the background rate is increased the number of events required increases, initially fairly gradually and then more rapidly, once the signal becomes subdominant. We also discuss the effect of features in the speed distribution at large speeds, as found in recent high resolution simulations, on the median recoil direction.

  12. Male median raphe cysts: serial retrospective analysis and histopathological classification

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To review the clinical and pathological characteristics of median raphe cysts and to classify the lesions according to pathogenesis and histopathological findings. Methods The medical records of patients who were diagnosed with median raphe cysts between 2001 and 2010 were reviewed to document the clinical presentation and pathological findings of the cysts. Results Most patients were asymptomatic; however, 9 patients had inflammatory or infectious cysts that were tender or painful. Four patients who had cysts on the parameatus and distal prepuce had difficulty voiding. Hematuria and hematospermia were noted in 2 cases. Thirty-one cysts were lined with an urothelium-like epithelium, and a squamous epithelium lining was found in 3 cases. In 2 cases, a well-formed mucinous glandular structure was observed. The other 20 cysts consisted of mixed epithelia. After excision of the cysts under local or general anesthesia, an urethral fistula developed as a complication in only 1 case. Conclusions Median raphe cysts are benign lesions formed due to tissue trapping during the development of urethral folds. The cysts can be defined into 4 types based on pathological findings: urethral, epidermoid, glandular, and mixed. The associated symptoms and signs should be taken into consideration when determining the treatment for the cysts. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http//http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/7727074877500751 PMID:22978603

  13. Median Robust Extended Local Binary Pattern for Texture Classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Lao, Songyang; Fieguth, Paul W; Guo, Yulan; Wang, Xiaogang; Pietikäinen, Matti

    2016-03-01

    Local binary patterns (LBP) are considered among the most computationally efficient high-performance texture features. However, the LBP method is very sensitive to image noise and is unable to capture macrostructure information. To best address these disadvantages, in this paper, we introduce a novel descriptor for texture classification, the median robust extended LBP (MRELBP). Different from the traditional LBP and many LBP variants, MRELBP compares regional image medians rather than raw image intensities. A multiscale LBP type descriptor is computed by efficiently comparing image medians over a novel sampling scheme, which can capture both microstructure and macrostructure texture information. A comprehensive evaluation on benchmark data sets reveals MRELBP's high performance-robust to gray scale variations, rotation changes and noise-but at a low computational cost. MRELBP produces the best classification scores of 99.82%, 99.38%, and 99.77% on three popular Outex test suites. More importantly, MRELBP is shown to be highly robust to image noise, including Gaussian noise, Gaussian blur, salt-and-pepper noise, and random pixel corruption. PMID:26829791

  14. Median recoil direction as a WIMP directional detection signal

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Anne M.; Morgan, Ben

    2010-03-15

    Direct detection experiments have reached the sensitivity to detect dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Demonstrating that a putative signal is due to WIMPs, and not backgrounds, is a major challenge, however. The direction dependence of the WIMP scattering rate provides a potential WIMP 'smoking gun'. If the WIMP distribution is predominantly smooth, the Galactic recoil distribution is peaked in the direction opposite to the direction of Solar motion. Previous studies have found that, for an ideal detector, of order 10 WIMP events would be sufficient to reject isotropy, and rule out an isotropic background. We examine how the median recoil direction could be used to confirm the WIMP origin of an anisotropic recoil signal. Specifically, we determine the number of events required to confirm the direction of solar motion as the median inverse recoil direction at 95% confidence. We find that for zero background 31 events are required, a factor of {approx}2 more than are required to simply reject isotropy. We also investigate the effect of a nonzero isotropic background. As the background rate is increased the number of events required increases, initially fairly gradually and then more rapidly, once the signal becomes subdominant. We also discuss the effect of features in the speed distribution at large speeds, as found in recent high resolution simulations, on the median recoil direction.

  15. Cranial Nerve II: Vision.

    PubMed

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D

    2009-09-01

    This article contains a brief review of the anatomy of the visual system, a survey of diseases of the retina, optic nerve and lesions of the optic chiasm, and other visual field defects of special interest to the psychiatrist. It also includes a presentation of the corticothalamic mechanisms, differential diagnosis, and various manifestations of visual illusions, and simple and complex visual hallucinations, as well as the differential diagnoses of these various visual phenomena. PMID:19855858

  16. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M. ); Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1993-09-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  17. Optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Savleen; Jain, Sparshi; Sodhi, Harsimrat B S; Rastogi, Anju; Kamlesh

    2013-05-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65%) than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED). PMID:24082663

  18. Compression of adjacent anatomical structures by pulmonary artery dilation.

    PubMed

    Dakkak, Wael; Tonelli, Adriano R

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is the commonest condition leading to dilated pulmonary artery. We describe three different types of compression of adjacent anatomical structures by dilated pulmonary arteries. We included involvement of the left main coronary artery, left recurrent laryngeal nerve and tracheobronchial tree. Compression of these structures can cause major complications such as myocardial ischemia, hoarseness and major airway stenosis. We present a case for each scenario and review the literature for each of these complications, focusing on patients' characteristics and contemporary management. PMID:26898826

  19. Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chang Kyu; Lee, Sung Ho; Rhee, Bong Arm

    2014-01-01

    A 66-year-old man presented with typical trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed a primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) that came into contact with the trigeminal nerve. Based on MRA, we performed microvascular decompression (MVD). In the operational field, we confirmed the PTA location and performed MVD successfully. Postoperatively, the patient's pain subsided without any complications. PMID:25368776

  20. Trigeminal neuralgia caused by persistent primitive trigeminal artery.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang Kyu; Choi, Hyuk Jai; Lee, Sung Ho; Rhee, Bong Arm

    2014-09-01

    A 66-year-old man presented with typical trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) revealed a primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) that came into contact with the trigeminal nerve. Based on MRA, we performed microvascular decompression (MVD). In the operational field, we confirmed the PTA location and performed MVD successfully. Postoperatively, the patient's pain subsided without any complications. PMID:25368776

  1. Internal Carotid Artery Aneurysm Mimicking Peritonsillar Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Brzost, Jacek; Waniewska, Martyna; Szczepanski, Miroslaw J.

    2015-01-01

    The extracranial internal carotid artery aneurysm (EICAA) is an uncommon arterial lesion. Patients typically present with neurologic symptoms resulting from impaired cerebral perfusion and compression symptoms of cranial nerves. Often EICAA presents as a pulsatile neck mass, which is otherwise asymptomatic. We present a case of an 84-year-old female, who was initially referred to the Emergency Department for Otolaryngology with suspected peritonsillar abscess. The patient had a history of recent upper airway infection and cardiovascular comorbidities, including hypertension and ischaemic stroke complicated by extensive neurologic deficits. Physical examination revealed a compact, nonpulsatile mass in the lateral parapharyngeal space and local erythema of the mucosa. Duplex Doppler Ultrasonography and Computed Tomography revealed an atherosclerotic aneurysm of the right internal carotid artery, measuring 63 × 55 × 88 mm, stretching from the skull base to the angle of the mandible. PMID:26124973

  2. Primary repair of crush nerve injuries by means of biological tubulization with muscle-vein-combined grafts.

    PubMed

    Tos, Pierluigi; Battiston, Bruno; Ciclamini, Davide; Geuna, Stefano; Artiaco, Stefano

    2012-07-01

    Despite extensive research and surgical innovation, the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries remains a complex issue, particularly in nonsharp lesions. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical outcome in a group of 16 patients who underwent, in emergency, a primary repair for crush injury of sensory and mixed nerves of the upper limb with biological tubulization, namely, the muscle-vein-combined graft. The segments involved were sensory digital nerves in eight cases and mixed nerves in another eight cases (four median nerves and four ulnar nerves). The length of nerve defect ranged from 0.5 to 4 cm (mean 1.9 cm). Fifteen of 16 patients showed some degree of functional recovery. Six patients showed diminished light touch (3.61), six had protective sensation (4.31), and three showed loss of protective sensation (4.56) using Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test. All the patients who underwent digital nerve repair had favorable results graded as S4 in one case, S3+ in six cases, and S3 in one case. With respect to mixed nerve repair, we observed two S4, two S3+, two S3, one S2, and one S0 sensory recovery. Less favorable results were observed for motor function with three M4, one M3, two M2, and two M0 recoveries. Altogether, the results of this retrospective study demonstrates that tubulization nerve repair in emergency, in case of short nerve gaps, may restore the continuity of the nerve avoiding secondary nerve grafting. This technique preserves donor nerve and, in case of failure, does not preclude a delayed repair with a nerve graft. PMID:22422438

  3. The adductor part of the adductor magnus is innervated by both obturator and sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Megumi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Ito, Hajime; Fujimiya, Mineko; Uchiyama, Eiichi

    2014-07-01

    The hip adductor group, innervated predominantly by the obturator nerve, occupies a large volume of the lower limb. However, case reports of patients with obturator nerve palsy or denervation have described no more than minimal gait disturbance. Those facts are surprising, given the architectural characteristics of the hip adductors. Our aim was to investigate which regions of the adductor magnus are innervated by the obturator nerve and by which sciatic nerve and to consider the clinical implications. Twenty-one lower limbs were examined from 21 formalin-fixed cadavers, 18 males and 3 females. The adductor magnus was dissected and was divided into four parts (AM1-AM4) based on the locations of the perforating arteries and the adductor hiatus. AM1 was supplied solely by the obturator nerve. AM2, AM3, and AM4 received innervation from both the posterior branch of the obturator nerve and the tibial nerve portion of the sciatic nerve in 2 (9.5%), 20 (95.2%), and 6 (28.6%) of the cadavers, respectively. The double innervation in more than 90% of the AM3s is especially noteworthy. Generally, AM1-AM3 corresponds to the adductor part, traditionally characterized as innervated by the obturator nerve, and AM4 corresponds to the hamstrings part, innervated by the sciatic nerve. Here, we showed that the sciatic nerve supplies not only the hamstrings part but also the adductor part. These two nerves spread more widely than has generally been believed, which could have practical implications for the assessment and treatment of motor disability. PMID:23813615

  4. Social Security: a financial appraisal for the median voter.

    PubMed

    Galasso, V

    Several explanations have been proposed for why voters continue to support unfunded social security systems. Browning (1975) suggests that the extremely large unfunded pension systems of most democracies depend on the existence of a voting majority composed of middle-aged and older people who fail to fully internalize the cost of financing the system. In fact, when voting, economically rational workers consider only their current and future contributions to the system and their expected pension benefits--not their past contributions, which they regard as sunk costs. If, for a majority of voters, the expected continuation return from social security exceeds the return from alternative assets, an unfunded social security system is politically sustainable. This article explores the validity of Browning's proposition by quantifying the returns that U.S. voters in presidential elections from 1964 to 1996 have obtained, or expect to obtain, from Social Security. Did "investments" in Social Security outperform alternative forms of investment, such as mutual funds or pension funds, for a majority of the voters? What can be expected for the future? The U.S. Social Security system redistributes income within age cohorts on the basis of sex, income, and marital status. To account for some of these features, the median voter is represented by a family unit whose members--a husband who accounts for 70 percent of household earnings and a wife who accounts for 30 percent--make joint economic and voting decisions. Thus, retirement and survival benefits paid out to the spouse of an insured worker can be included in the calculation of Social Security returns. Interval estimates of voters' family incomes from the U.S. Census Bureau were used to obtain the median voter's household earnings. The median voter's age is derived from the ages of those who voted in presidential elections, not from the ages of the entire electorate. The median voter's contributions to Social Security are the

  5. Diving and exercise: the interaction of trigeminal receptors and muscle metaboreceptors on muscle sympathetic nerve activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James P; Fernandes, Igor A; Barbosa, Thales C; Prodel, Eliza; Coote, John H; Nóbrega, Antonio Claudio L; Vianna, Lauro C

    2015-03-01

    Swimming involves muscular activity and submersion, creating a conflict of autonomic reflexes elicited by the trigeminal receptors and skeletal muscle afferents. We sought to determine the autonomic cardiovascular responses to separate and concurrent stimulation of the trigeminal cutaneous receptors and metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreflex). In eight healthy men (30 ± 2 yr) muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; microneurography), mean arterial pressure (MAP; Finometer), femoral artery blood flow (duplex Doppler ultrasonography), and femoral vascular conductance (femoral artery blood flow/MAP) were assessed during the following three experimental conditions: 1) facial cooling (trigeminal nerve stimulation), 2) postexercise ischemia (PEI; muscle metaboreflex activation) following isometric handgrip, and 3) trigeminal nerve stimulation with concurrent PEI. Trigeminal nerve stimulation produced significant increases in MSNA total activity (Δ347 ± 167%) and MAP (Δ21 ± 5%) and a reduction in femoral artery vascular conductance (Δ-17 ± 9%). PEI also evoked significant increases in MSNA total activity (Δ234 ± 83%) and MAP (Δ36 ± 4%) and a slight nonsignificant reduction in femoral artery vascular conductance (Δ-9 ± 12%). Trigeminal nerve stimulation with concurrent PEI evoked changes in MSNA total activity (Δ341 ± 96%), MAP (Δ39 ± 4%), and femoral artery vascular conductance (Δ-20 ± 9%) that were similar to those evoked by either separate trigeminal nerve stimulation or separate PEI. Thus, excitatory inputs from the trigeminal nerve and metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents do not summate algebraically in eliciting a MSNA and cardiovascular response but rather exhibit synaptic occlusion, suggesting a high degree of convergent inputs on output neurons. PMID:25527781

  6. Diabetic neuropathy increases stimulation threshold during popliteal sciatic nerve block†

    PubMed Central

    Heschl, S.; Hallmann, B.; Zilke, T.; Gemes, G.; Schoerghuber, M.; Auer-Grumbach, M.; Quehenberger, F.; Lirk, P.; Hogan, Q.; Rigaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Peripheral nerve stimulation is commonly used for nerve localization in regional anaesthesia, but recommended stimulation currents of 0.3–0.5 mA do not reliably produce motor activity in the absence of intraneural needle placement. As this may be particularly true in patients with diabetic neuropathy, we examined the stimulation threshold in patients with and without diabetes. Methods Preoperative evaluation included a neurological exam and electroneurography. During ultrasound-guided popliteal sciatic nerve block, we measured the current required to produce motor activity for the tibial and common peroneal nerve in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Proximity to the nerve was evaluated post-hoc using ultrasound imaging. Results Average stimulation currents did not differ between diabetic (n=55) and non-diabetic patients (n=52). Although the planned number of patients was not reached, the power goal for the mean stimulation current was met. Subjects with diminished pressure perception showed increased thresholds for the common peroneal nerve (median 1.30 vs. 0.57 mA in subjects with normal perception, P=0.042), as did subjects with decreased pain sensation (1.60 vs. 0.50 mA in subjects with normal sensation, P=0.038). Slowed ulnar nerve conduction velocity predicted elevated mean stimulation current (r=−0.35, P=0.002). Finally, 15 diabetic patients required more than 0.5 mA to evoke a motor response, despite intraneural needle placement (n=4), or required currents ≥2 mA despite needle-nerve contact, vs three such patients (1 intraneural, 2 with ≥2 mA) among non-diabetic patients (P=0.003). Conclusions These findings suggest that stimulation thresholds of 0.3–0.5 mA may not reliably determine close needle-nerve contact during popliteal sciatic nerve block, particularly in patients with diabetic neuropathy. Clinical trial registration NCT01488474 PMID:26994231

  7. Hardening of the arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis; Arteriosclerosis; Plaque buildup - arteries; Hyperlipidemia - atherosclerosis; Cholesterol - atherosclerosis ... Hardening of the arteries often occurs with aging. As you grow older, ... narrows your arteries and makes them stiffer. These changes ...

  8. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... ischemia is often seen in people who have hardening of the arteries in other parts of the ... long-term (chronic) mesenteric artery ischemia caused by hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ): Abdominal pain after eating ...

  9. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  10. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a ...

  11. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Carotid Artery Disease? Carotid artery disease is a disease in ... blood to your face, scalp, and neck. Carotid Arteries Figure A shows the location of the right ...

  12. A systematic review of variations of the recurrent laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xing Yao; Smoll, Nicolas Roydon

    2016-01-01

    With thyroid cancer fast becoming one of the most common endocrine cancers, the frequency of thyroid surgery has increased. A common and debilitating concern with thyroid surgery is recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) paralysis leading to glottal obstruction and airway compromise. A systematic review regarding the anatomical variation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve was performed to determine the position of anatomical variants of the RLN in relation to the inferior thyroid artery (ITA) as well as the prevalence of nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve (NRLN). MEDLINE, Web of Science, MEDITEXT, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane, ProQuest, Pubmed, and ScienceDirect. Databases were searched using the search terms "inferior thyroid artery," "recurrent laryngeal nerve," "nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve," and "anatomical variation." The reference sections of the articles found were searched for additional reports. The references of all articles were searched to find articles missed in the database search. A total of 8,655 RLN sides were included in this study. One thousand eight hundred and thirteen (20.95%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 20.09, 2,182) showed a Type A configuration of RLN in relation to the ITA, 2,432 (28.10%; 95% CI 27.15, 29.06) showed a Type B configuration and 4,410 (50.95%; 95% CI 49.89, 52.01) showed a Type C configuration between the RLN and the ITA. The second search returned with 38,568 recurrent laryngeal sides and only 221 (0.57%; 95%CI 0.5, 0.65) NRLN documented. The RLN is most commonly found in the posterior position, relative to the ITA. The incidence of the NRLN is low, only occurring in 0.57% of people. PMID:26297484

  13. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed. PMID:25851889

  14. A novel GABA-mediated corticotropin-releasing hormone secretory mechanism in the median eminence

    PubMed Central

    Kakizawa, Keisuke; Watanabe, Miho; Mutoh, Hiroki; Okawa, Yuta; Yamashita, Miho; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Itoi, Keiichi; Suda, Takafumi; Oki, Yutaka; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2016-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is synthesized in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, plays an important role in the endocrine stress response. The excitability of CRH neurons is regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)–containing neurons projecting to the PVN. We investigated the role of GABA in the regulation of CRH release. The release of CRH was impaired, accumulating in the cell bodies of CRH neurons in heterozygous GAD67-GFP (green fluorescent protein) knock-in mice (GAD67+/GFP), which exhibited decreased GABA content. The GABAA receptor (GABAAR) and the Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC1), but not the K+-Cl− cotransporter (KCC2), were expressed in the terminals of the CRH neurons at the median eminence (ME). In contrast, CRH neuronal somata were enriched with KCC2 but not with NKCC1. Thus, intracellular Cl− concentrations ([Cl−]i) may be increased at the terminals of CRH neurons compared with concentrations in the cell body. Moreover, GABAergic terminals projecting from the arcuate nucleus were present in close proximity to CRH-positive nerve terminals. Furthermore, a GABAAR agonist increased the intracellular calcium (Ca2+) levels in the CRH neuron terminals but decreased the Ca2+ levels in their somata. In addition, the increases in Ca2+ concentrations were prevented by an NKCC1 inhibitor. We propose a novel mechanism by which the excitatory action of GABA maintains a steady-state CRH release from axon terminals in the ME. PMID:27540587

  15. A novel GABA-mediated corticotropin-releasing hormone secretory mechanism in the median eminence.

    PubMed

    Kakizawa, Keisuke; Watanabe, Miho; Mutoh, Hiroki; Okawa, Yuta; Yamashita, Miho; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Itoi, Keiichi; Suda, Takafumi; Oki, Yutaka; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2016-08-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is synthesized in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, plays an important role in the endocrine stress response. The excitability of CRH neurons is regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing neurons projecting to the PVN. We investigated the role of GABA in the regulation of CRH release. The release of CRH was impaired, accumulating in the cell bodies of CRH neurons in heterozygous GAD67-GFP (green fluorescent protein) knock-in mice (GAD67(+/GFP)), which exhibited decreased GABA content. The GABAA receptor (GABAAR) and the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC1), but not the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (KCC2), were expressed in the terminals of the CRH neurons at the median eminence (ME). In contrast, CRH neuronal somata were enriched with KCC2 but not with NKCC1. Thus, intracellular Cl(-) concentrations ([Cl(-)]i) may be increased at the terminals of CRH neurons compared with concentrations in the cell body. Moreover, GABAergic terminals projecting from the arcuate nucleus were present in close proximity to CRH-positive nerve terminals. Furthermore, a GABAAR agonist increased the intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) levels in the CRH neuron terminals but decreased the Ca(2+) levels in their somata. In addition, the increases in Ca(2+) concentrations were prevented by an NKCC1 inhibitor. We propose a novel mechanism by which the excitatory action of GABA maintains a steady-state CRH release from axon terminals in the ME. PMID:27540587

  16. Ultrasound guidance of uncommon nerve blocks

    PubMed Central

    Thallaj, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    In the past nerve stimulation was considered the standard tool for anesthesiologists to locate the peripheral nerve for nerve blocks. However, with the recent introduction of ultrasound (US) technology for regional anesthesia, the use of nerve stimulation has become a rarity nowadays. There is a growing interest by most anesthesiologists in using US for nerve blocks because of its simplicity and accuracy. US is now available in most hospitals practicing regional anesthesia and is a popular tool for performance of nerve blocks. Although nerve stimulation became a rarity, however the use of it is now limited to identify small nerve structures, such as greater auricular nerve and medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve of the forearm. However, in this review article we discuss the role of ultrasonography for greater auricular and antebrachial cutaneous nerve blocks, which could replace nerve stimulation technique. We look at the available literature on the role of US for the performance of uncommon nerve blocks and its benefits. PMID:22144927

  17. Median raphe cysts of the perineum in children.

    PubMed

    Krauel, Lucas; Tarrado, Xavier; Garcia-Aparicio, Luis; Lerena, Javier; Suñol, Mariona; Rodó, Joan; Ribó, Josep Maria

    2008-05-01

    Median raphe cysts of the perineum are uncommon congenital lesions of the male genitalia. They can be found all the way from the distal penis and scrotum toward the perineum in a midline position. They are considered as congenital alterations in embryologic development. A case of a 6 year-old boy is presented. Review of the literature relevant to children was made regarding the embryologic, diagnostic, and treatment aspects. We believe it is important that adult and pediatric urologists recognize these lesions and their management to provide the appropriate information to the parents. PMID:18313117

  18. [Immunohistochemical characterization of a median raphe cyst of the penis].

    PubMed

    Richard-Lallemand, M A; Choux, R; Szekeres, G; Bacquie, N; Chamlian, A; Bonerandi, J J

    1994-01-01

    Cysts and canals found on the ventral surface of the penis have been ascribed to minor dysembryoplasia of the male genitalia. These lesions occur almost exclusively on the ventral surface of the penis along the median raphe and can extend from the urethral meatus to the anus. They are lined by stratified urothelium or squamous epithelium and they do not communicate with the urethra. Most cases are noted in early adulthood, they are usually asymptomatic but may become infected. Surgical removal is the adapted treatment. In this report we describe a case in which the urothelial origin of the cyst was documented by immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin 13. PMID:8037806

  19. Trichomonas vaginalis infection of the median raphe of the penis.

    PubMed

    Soendjojo, A; Pindha, S

    1981-01-01

    A case of trichomonas vaginalis infection involving the median raphe of the penis is presented. The infection was contracted after sexual exposure. The patient had no urethral discharge but had a penile swelling tht discharged pus. Microscopic examination and culture of the discharge showed the presence of T. vaginalis. Treatment with metronidazole (250 mg thrice daly for seven days) eradicated the infection, but the swelling remained and a cyst was excised. One month after the surgical procedure, the patient was clinically normal and cured of the infection. PMID:6977195

  20. [Labial recurrent swelling revealing median congenital upper-lip fistula].

    PubMed

    Rohart, J; Nicot, R; Myon, L; Elbaz, J; Raoul, G; Ferri, J

    2015-11-01

    Midline upper-lip fistulas are an extremely rare variant of congenital facial malformations. Less than 30 cases have been reported in the literature since 1970. We report the case of a 2 and a half-year-old girl presenting with a median congenital blind fistula of the upper lip, without any relation with the oral cavity. A recurrent swelling of the upper lip was the main symptom. Complete surgical excision of the cyst or of the fistulous tract must be obtained to avoid recurrence. PMID:26138739

  1. Nerve blocks for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Salim M; Shah, Atit

    2014-10-01

    Nerve blocks are often performed as therapeutic or palliative interventions for pain relief. However, they are often performed for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. When considering nerve blocks for chronic pain, clinicians must always consider the indications, risks, benefits, and proper technique. Nerve blocks encompass a wide variety of interventional procedures. The most common nerve blocks for chronic pain and that may be applicable to the neurosurgical patient population are reviewed in this article. This article is an introduction and brief synopsis of the different available blocks that can be offered to a patient. PMID:25240668

  2. Nerve conduction and electromyography studies.

    PubMed

    Kane, N M; Oware, A

    2012-07-01

    Nerve conduction studies (NCS) and electromyography (EMG), often shortened to 'EMGs', are a useful adjunct to clinical examination of the peripheral nervous system and striated skeletal muscle. NCS provide an efficient and rapid method of quantifying nerve conduction velocity (CV) and the amplitude of both sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) and compound motor action potentials (cMAPs). The CV reflects speed of propagation of action potentials, by saltatory conduction, along large myelinated axons in a peripheral nerve. The amplitude of SNAPs is in part determined by the number of axons in a sensory nerve, whilst amplitude of cMAPs reflects integrated function of the motor axons, neuromuscular junction and striated muscle. Repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) can identify defects of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) transmission, pre- or post-synaptic. Needle EMG examination can detect myopathic changes in muscle and signs of denervation. Combinations of these procedures can establish if motor and/or sensory nerve cell bodies or peripheral nerves are damaged (e.g. motor neuronopathy, sensory ganglionopathy or neuropathy), and also indicate if the primary target is the axon or the myelin sheath (i.e. axonal or demyelinating neuropathies). The distribution of nerve damage can be determined as either generalised, multifocal (mononeuropathy multiplex) or focal. The latter often due to compression at the common entrapment sites (such as the carpal tunnel, Guyon's canal, cubital tunnel, radial groove, fibular head and tarsal tunnel, to name but a few of the reported hundred or so 'entrapment neuropathies'). PMID:22614870

  3. Prediction of mean arterial blood pressure with linear stochastic models.

    PubMed

    Genc, Sahika

    2011-01-01

    A model-based approach that integrates known portion of the cardiovascular system and unknown portion through a parameter estimation to predict evolution of the mean arterial pressure is considered. The unknown portion corresponds to the neural portion that acts like a controller that takes corrective actions to regulate the arterial blood pressure at a constant level. The input to the neural part is the arterial pressure and output is the sympathetic nerve activity. In this model, heart rate is considered a proxy for sympathetic nerve activity. The neural portion is modeled as a linear discrete-time system with random coefficients. The performance of the model is tested on a case study of acute hypotensive episodes (AHEs) on PhysioNet data. TPRs and FPRs improve as more data becomes available during estimation period. PMID:22254409

  4. Factors predicting sensory and motor recovery after the repair of upper limb peripheral nerve injuries

    PubMed Central

    He, Bo; Zhu, Zhaowei; Zhu, Qingtang; Zhou, Xiang; Zheng, Canbin; Li, Pengliang; Zhu, Shuang; Liu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Jiakai

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the factors associated with sensory and motor recovery after the repair of upper limb peripheral nerve injuries. DATA SOURCES: The online PubMed database was searched for English articles describing outcomes after the repair of median, ulnar, radial, and digital nerve injuries in humans with a publication date between 1 January 1990 and 16 February 2011. STUDY SELECTION: The following types of article were selected: (1) clinical trials describing the repair of median, ulnar, radial, and digital nerve injuries published in English; and (2) studies that reported sufficient patient information, including age, mechanism of injury, nerve injured, injury location, defect length, repair time, repair method, and repair materials. SPSS 13.0 software was used to perform univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses and to investigate the patient and intervention factors associated with outcomes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sensory function was assessed using the Mackinnon-Dellon scale and motor function was assessed using the manual muscle test. Satisfactory motor recovery was defined as grade M4 or M5, and satisfactory sensory recovery was defined as grade S3+ or S4. RESULTS: Seventy-one articles were included in this study. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that repair time, repair materials, and nerve injured were independent predictors of outcome after the repair of nerve injuries (P < 0.05), and that the nerve injured was the main factor affecting the rate of good to excellent recovery. CONCLUSION: Predictors of outcome after the repair of peripheral nerve injuries include age, gender, repair time, repair materials, nerve injured, defect length, and duration of follow-up. PMID:25206870

  5. Nerve-pulse interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental and theoretical results on mechanisms through which individual nerve pulses can interact are reviewed. Three modes of interactions are considered: (1) interaction of pulses as they travel along a single fiber which leads to velocity dispersion; (2) propagation of pairs of pulses through a branching region leading to quantum pulse code transformations; and (3) interaction of pulses on parallel fibers through which they may form a pulse assembly. This notion is analogous to Hebb's concept of a cell assembly, but on a lower level of the neural hierarchy.

  6. [Two cases of solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome].

    PubMed

    Catania, P; Conti, C; Poggi, G M; Bardelli, T; Lasagni, D; De Martino, M

    2010-02-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome (SMMCI) syndrome is a unique developmental abnormality arising from an unknown event occurring between the 35th and 38th days in utero, and involving mieline structure of the head including the cranial bones, the maxilla and its container dentition (specifically the central incisor tooth germ), together with other midline structures of the body. The SMMCI tooth may be possibly occur as an isolated trait or in association with many other midline developmental anomalies. It is estimated to occur in 1:50000 live births. There is a wide variability in the phenotypic spectrum. SMMCI is considered one of the most minimal expressions of the holoprosencephaly spectrum. Mutation in the Sonic Hedgehog homolog (SHH) gene may be associated with SSMMCI, but recent studies suggests the existence of several other candidate genes. We described two patients with SMMCI. They presented a solitary median maxillary incisor, short stature, hipotelorism and corpus callosus anomalies found on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). They also present severe hiponatremia. At the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of cases of SMMCI with hiponatremia. We suggest that the sodium disorder may be secondary to syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). PMID:20212404

  7. The mean, the median, and the St. Petersburg paradox.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Benjamin Y; Platt, Michael L

    2009-06-01

    The St. Petersburg Paradox is a famous economic and philosophical puzzle that has generated numerous conflicting explanations. To shed empirical light on this phenomenon, we examined subjects' bids for one St. Petersburg gamble with a real monetary payment. We found that bids were typically lower than twice the smallest payoff, and thus much lower than is generally supposed. We also examined bids offered for several hypothetical variants of the St. Petersburg Paradox. We found that bids were weakly affected by truncating the gamble, were strongly affected by repeats of the gamble, and depended linearly on the initial "seed" value of the gamble. One explanation, which we call the median heuristic, strongly predicts these data. Subjects following this strategy evaluate a gamble as if they were taking the median rather than the mean of the payoff distribution. Finally, we argue that the distribution of outcomes embodied in the St. Petersburg paradox is so divergent from the Gaussian form that the statistical mean is a poor estimator of expected value, so that the expected value of the St. Petersburg gamble is undefined. These results suggest that this classic paradox has a straightforward explanation rooted in the use of a statistical heuristic. PMID:24179560

  8. Electrophysiological Properties of Cells in the Median Ocellus of Limulus

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, John; Brown, Joel E.

    1972-01-01

    Two types of photoreceptors are found in the median ocellus of Limulus. One type is maximally sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light, the other to green light; they are called UV and VIS cells, respectively. Biphasic receptor potentials, consisting of a small initial hyperpolarizing phase and a later slow depolarizing phase, can be recorded from both receptor types. These biphasic responses are elicited in UV cells in response to long-wavelength light, and in VIS cells in response to ultraviolet light. Another type of hyperpolarizing response can be recorded in UV cells: after a bright ultraviolet stimulus, the cell remains depolarized; long-wavelength light rapidly returns the membrane potential to its value preceding ultraviolet illumination (this long-wavelength-induced potential change is called a "repolarizing response"). Also, a long-wavelength stimulus superimposed during a UV stimulus elicits a sustained repolarizing response. A third cell type (arhabdomeric cell) found in the median ocellus generates large action potentials and is maximally sensitive to UV light. Biphasic responses and repolarizing responses also can be recorded from arhabdomeric cells. The retina is divided into groups of cells; both UV cells and VIS cells can occur in the same group. UV cells in the same group are electrically coupled to one another and to an arhabdomeric cell. PMID:5058473

  9. Prostate brachytherapy in patients with median lobe hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wallner, K; Smathers, S; Sutlief, S; Corman, J; Ellis, W

    2000-06-20

    Our aim was to document the technical and clinical course of prostate brachytherapy patients with radiographic evidence of median lobe hyperplasia (MLH). Eight patients with MLH were identified during our routine brachytherapy practice, representing 9% of the 87 brachytherapy patients treated during a 6-month period. No effort was made to avoid brachytherapy in patients noted to have MLH on diagnostic work-up. Cystoscopic evaluation was not routinely performed. Postimplant axial computed tomographic (CT) images of the prostate were obtained at 0.5 cm intervals. Preimplant urinary obstructive symptoms were quantified by the criteria of the American Urologic Association (AUA). Each patient was contacted during the writing of this report to update postimplant morbidity information. There was no apparent association between the degree of MLH and preimplant prostate volume or AUA score. Intraoperatively, we were able to visualize MLH by transrectal ultrasound and did not notice any particular difficulty placing sources in the MLH tissue or migration of sources out of the tissue. The prescription isodose covered from 81% to 99% of the postimplant CT-defined target volume, achieving adequate dose to the median lobe tissue in all patients. Two of the eight patients developed acute, postimplant urinary retention. The first patient required intermittent self-catheterization for 3 months and then resumed spontaneous urination. MLH does not appear to be a strong contraindication to prostate brachytherapy, and prophylactic resection of hypertrophic tissue in such patients is probably not warranted. Int. J. Cancer (Radiat. Oncol. Invest.) 90, 152-156 (2000). PMID:10900427

  10. A novel method of selective ablation of afferent renal nerves by periaxonal application of capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Foss, Jason D.; Wainford, Richard D.; Engeland, William C.; Fink, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Renal denervation has been shown to lower arterial pressure in some hypertensive patients, yet it remains unclear whether this is due to ablation of afferent or efferent renal nerves. To investigate the role of afferent renal nerves in arterial pressure regulation, previous studies have used methods that disrupt both renal and nonrenal afferent signaling. The present study was conducted to develop and validate a technique for selective ablation of afferent renal nerves that does not disrupt other afferent pathways. To do this, we adapted a technique for sensory denervation of the adrenal gland by topical application of capsaicin and tested the hypothesis that exposure of the renal nerves to capsaicin (renal-CAP) causes ablation of afferent but not efferent renal nerves. Renal-CAP had no effect on renal content of the efferent nerve markers tyrosine hydroxylase and norepinephrine; however, the afferent nerve marker, calcitonin gene-related peptide was largely depleted from the kidney 10 days after intervention, but returned to roughly half of control levels by 7 wk postintervention. Moreover, renal-CAP abolished the cardiovascular responses to acute pharmacological stimulation of afferent renal nerves. Renal-CAP rats showed normal weight gain, as well as cardiovascular and fluid balance regulation during dietary sodium loading. To some extent, renal-CAP did blunt the bradycardic response and increase the dipsogenic response to increased salt intake. Lastly, renal-CAP significantly attenuated the development of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension. These results demonstrate that renal-CAP effectively causes selective ablation of afferent renal nerves in rats. PMID:25411365

  11. Articulating external fixation to overcome nerve gaps in lower extremity trauma.

    PubMed

    Ruch, David S; Smith, Adam M

    2003-04-01

    This report describes the use of articulating external fixation in patients with lower extremity trauma with segmental nerve defects. Four patients who would otherwise require nerve grafting underwent application of an articulated external fixator, allowing optimal positioning for end-to-end, tension-free nerve repair followed by gradual lengthening. After three weeks of immobilization, the fixator was gradually advanced through the arc of the hinge. At an average follow-up of 44 months, motor function testing revealed gastroc-soleus function in all cases with a median motor grade of M4. Sensory function testing with Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments demonstrated protective plantar sensation in all cases with a median monofilament size of 3.84 on the injured limb compared with 3.22 on the contralateral side. This series of patients demonstrates that joint positioning through external fixation may be used safely and effectively to facilitate primary neurorrhaphy and subsequent limb salvage. PMID:12679690

  12. Negative-pressure wound therapy and laparoscopic omentoplasty for deep sternal wound infections after median sternotomy.

    PubMed

    De Brabandere, Kristof; Jacobs-Tulleneers-Thevissen, Daniel; Czapla, Jens; La Meir, Mark; Delvaux, Georges; Wellens, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Deep sternal wound infection remains one of the most serious complications in patients who undergo median sternotomy for coronary artery bypass surgery.We describe our experience in treating 6 consecutive patients with our treatment protocol that combines aggressive débridement, broad-spectrum antibiotics, negative-pressure wound therapy, omentoplasty with laparoscopically harvested omentum, and the use of bilateral pectoral muscle advancement flaps.The number of débridements needed in order to attain clinically clean wounds and negative cultures varied between 1 and 10, with a median of 5. The length of stay after omentoplasty and bilateral pectoral muscle advancement flap placement varied between 11 and 22 days. One of the 6 patients developed a small wound dehiscence that was treated conservatively. No bleeding related to vacuum-assisted closure therapy was identified. Three patients had pneumonia. Two of the 3 patients had an episode of acute renal failure. The 30-day mortality rate was zero, although 1 patient died in the hospital 43 days after the reconstructive surgery, of multiple-organ failure due to pneumonia that was induced by end-stage pulmonary fibrosis. No patient died between hospital discharge and the most recent follow-up date (4-12 mo). Late local follow-up results, both functional and aesthetic, were good.We conclude that negative-pressure wound therapy-in combination with omentoplasty using laparoscopically harvested omentum and with the use of bilateral pectoral advancement flaps-is a valuable technique in the treatment of deep sternal wound infection because it produces good functional and aesthetic results. PMID:22719146

  13. Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy and Laparoscopic Omentoplasty for Deep Sternal Wound Infections after Median Sternotomy

    PubMed Central

    De Brabandere, Kristof; Jacobs-Tulleneers-Thevissen, Daniel; Czapla, Jens; La Meir, Mark; Delvaux, Georges; Wellens, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Deep sternal wound infection remains one of the most serious complications in patients who undergo median sternotomy for coronary artery bypass surgery. We describe our experience in treating 6 consecutive patients with our treatment protocol that combines aggressive débridement, broad-spectrum antibiotics, negative-pressure wound therapy, omentoplasty with laparoscopically harvested omentum, and the use of bilateral pectoral muscle advancement flaps. The number of débridements needed in order to attain clinically clean wounds and negative cultures varied between 1 and 10, with a median of 5. The length of stay after omentoplasty and bilateral pectoral muscle advancement flap placement varied between 11 and 22 days. One of the 6 patients developed a small wound dehiscence that was treated conservatively. No bleeding related to vacuum-assisted closure therapy was identified. Three patients had pneumonia. Two of the 3 patients had an episode of acute renal failure. The 30-day mortality rate was zero, although 1 patient died in the hospital 43 days after the reconstructive surgery, of multiple-organ failure due to pneumonia that was induced by end-stage pulmonary fibrosis. No patient died between hospital discharge and the most recent follow-up date (4–12 mo). Late local follow-up results, both functional and aesthetic, were good. We conclude that negative-pressure wound therapy—in combination with omentoplasty using laparoscopically harvested omentum and with the use of bilateral pectoral advancement flaps—is a valuable technique in the treatment of deep sternal wound infection because it produces good functional and aesthetic results. PMID:22719146

  14. Topohistology of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve fibers in branches of the pelvic plexus: an immunohistochemical study using donated elderly cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Hieda, Keisuke; Sasaki, Hiromasa; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shinichi; Matsubara, Akio; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Although the pelvic autonomic plexus may be considered a mixture of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves, little information on its composite fibers is available. Using 10 donated elderly cadavers, we investigated in detail the topohistology of nerve fibers in the posterior part of the periprostatic region in males and the infero-anterior part of the paracolpium in females. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) were used as parasympathetic nerve markers, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was used as a marker of sympathetic nerves. In the region examined, nNOS-positive nerves (containing nNOS-positive fibers) were consistently predominant numerically. All fibers positive for these markers appeared to be thin, unmyelinated fibers. Accordingly, the pelvic plexus branches were classified into 5 types: triple-positive mixed nerves (nNOS+, VIP+, TH+, thick myelinated fibers + or -); double-positive mixed nerves (nNOS+, VIP-, TH+, thick myelinated fibers + or -); nerves in arterial walls (nNOS-, VIP+, TH+, thick myelinated fibers-); non-parasympathetic nerves (nNOS-, VIP-, TH+, thick myelinated fibers + or -); (although rare) pure sensory nerve candidates (nNOS-, VIP-, TH-, thick myelinated fibers+). Triple-positive nerves were 5-6 times more numerous in the paracolpium than in the periprostatic region. Usually, the parasympathetic nerve fibers did not occupy a specific site in a nerve, and were intermingled with sympathetic fibers. This morphology might be the result of an "incidentally" adopted nerve fiber route, rather than a target-specific pathway. PMID:24693483

  15. Effects of eugenol on nerve and vascular dysfunction in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nangle, Matthew R; Gibson, T Michael; Cotter, Mary A; Cameron, Norman E

    2006-05-01

    Hyperglycaemia in diabetes mellitus results in oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory changes which contribute to vascular complications including endothelial dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy. The aim of this study was to examine whether treatment with the dominant ingredient of clove oil, eugenol, which has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, could improve diabetic vascular and nerve function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Intervention treatment was given for 2 weeks following 6 weeks of untreated diabetes. Dose-ranging studies on diabetic deficits in sciatic nerve motor and saphenous nerve sensory nerve conduction velocities gave ED50 values of 28 mg/kg and 9 mg/kg, respectively, conduction velocity being within the non-diabetic range at a dose of 200 mg/kg. Sciatic nerve endoneurial blood flow was 49% reduced by diabetes and this was completely corrected by 200 mg/kg eugenol treatment. Gastric fundus maximum nitrergic nerve-mediated relaxation was 44% reduced by diabetes; eugenol corrected this deficit by 69%. For renal artery rings, maximum endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine was 51% reduced by diabetes; eugenol corrected this deficit by 60%, with improvements in both nitric oxide and endothelium-derived hyperpolarising factor (EDHF)-mediated vasorelaxation components. Diabetes increased renal artery sensitivity to phenylephrine-mediated contraction, however, this was unaffected by eugenol treatment. Thus, aspects of both vascular and neural complications in experimental diabetes are improved by eugenol, which could have potential therapeutic implications for diabetic neuropathy and vasculopathy. PMID:16773532

  16. Baroreflex control of arterial blood pressure during involuntary diving in ducks (Anas platyrhynchos var.).

    PubMed

    Smith, F M; Jones, D R

    1992-09-01

    The dynamic role of arterial baroreceptors in control of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), hindlimb vascular (HLVR) and total peripheral (TPR) resistance responses to forced dives was investigated in acutely and chronically barodenervated ducks. To activate the baroreflex, the proximal end of one aortic nerve was stimulated electrically with bipolar electrodes that had been implanted under pentobarbital sodium anesthesia. Predive nerve stimulation caused CO to fall (by reducing HR; stroke volume remained constant), producing a decrease in MAP to half the prestimulation level. During diving (for 2.5-min periods) nerve stimulation did not affect HR and MAP after the first minute of submersion. Neither HLVR nor TPR contributed to the fall in MAP during aortic nerve stimulation before or during diving. The effects of nerve stimulation on HR and MAP were maintained to the end of dives in animals given 100% O2 to breathe before diving. In separate experiments, increasing arterial chemoreceptor input by perfusing one vascularly isolated carotid body with venous blood caused a reduction in the effects of aortic nerve stimulation on MAP. Arterial baroreceptors may thus act on HR to alter MAP early in the dive, but as the dive progresses the baroreflex is attenuated by an increase in peripheral chemoreceptor drive. PMID:1415660

  17. Promoting plasticity in the spinal cord with chondroitinase improves functional recovery after peripheral nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Galtrey, Clare M; Asher, Richard A; Nothias, Fatiha; Fawcett, James W

    2007-04-01

    Functional recovery after peripheral nerve repair in humans is often disappointing. A major reason for this is the inaccuracy of re-innervation of muscles and sensory structures. We hypothesized that promoting plasticity in the spinal cord, through digestion of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), might allow the CNS to compensate for inaccurate peripheral re-innervation and improve functional recovery. The median and ulnar nerves were injured and repaired to produce three grades of inaccuracy of peripheral re-innervation by (i) crush of both nerves; (ii) correct repair of median to median and ulnar to ulnar; and (iii) crossover of the median and ulnar nerves. Mapping of the motor neuron pool of the flexor carpi radialis muscle showed precise re-innervation after nerve crush, inaccurate regeneration after correct repair, more inaccurate after crossover repair. Recovery of forelimb function, assessed by skilled paw reaching, grip strength and sensory testing varied with accuracy of re-innervation. This was not due to differences in the number of regenerated axons. Single injections of ChABC into the spinal cord led to long-term changes in the extracellular matrix, with hyaluronan and neurocan being removed and not fully replaced after 8 weeks. ChABC treatment produce increased sprouting visualized by MAP1BP staining and improved functional recovery in skilled paw reaching after correct repair and in grip strength after crossover repair. There was no hyperalgesia. Enhanced plasticity in the spinal cord, therefore, allows the CNS to compensate for inaccurate motor and sensory re-innervation of the periphery, and may be a useful adjunct therapy to peripheral nerve repair. PMID:17255150

  18. Giant early components of somatosensory evoked potentials to tibial nerve stimulation in cortical myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Anzellotti, Francesca; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura; Saracino, Antonio; Franciotti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Enlarged cortical components of somatosensory evoked potentials (giant SEPs) recorded by electroencephalography (EEG) and abnormal somatosensory evoked magnetic fields (SEFs) recorded by magnetoencephalography (MEG) are observed in the majority of patients with cortical myoclonus (CM). Studies on simultaneous recordings of SEPs and SEFs showed that generator mechanism of giant SEPs involves both primary sensory and motor cortices. However the generator sources of giant SEPs have not been fully understood as only one report describes clearly giant SEPs following lower limb stimulation. In our study we performed a combined EEG-MEG recording on responses elicited by electric median and tibial nerve stimulation in a patient who developed consequently to methyl bromide intoxication CM with giant SEPs to median and tibial nerve stimuli. SEPs wave shapes were identified on the basis of polarity-latency components (e.g. P15-N20-P25) as defined by earlier studies and guidelines. At EEG recording, the SEP giant component did not appear in the latency range of the first cortical component for median nerve SEP (N20), but appeared instead in the range of the P37 tibial nerve SEP, which is currently identified as the first cortical component elicited by tibial nerve stimuli. Our MEG and EEG SEPs recordings also showed that components in the latency range of P37 were preceded by other cortical components. These findings suggest that lower limb P37 does not correspond to upper limb N20. MEG results confirmed that giant SEFs are the second component from both tibial (N43m-P43m) and median (N27m-P27m) nerve stimulation. MEG dipolar sources of these giant components were located in the primary sensory and motor area. PMID:27489768

  19. [Interaction of abdominal vagus and greater splanchnic nerve activities in the nucleus tractus solitarius of the rabbit].

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Huang, Z S

    1990-12-01

    Experiments were performed on 67 rabbits. Effects of stimulation of the central ends of abdominal vagus and greater splanchnic nerve on arterial blood pressure before and after destruction of nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and the unit discharges in the NTS before destruction were observed. As a result, we suggest that both the afferents coming from the abdominal vagus and greater splanchnic nerve not only converge on NTS neurons but also interact with each other. Subthreshold stimulation elicited from one of the afferent fibers suppresses the arterial blood pressure responses caused by the other afferent. Similarly, background stimulation elicited from one afferent can suppress the NTS unit discharges caused by the other afferent. It is much easier for abdominal vagal afferent to inhibit the NTS unit discharges and the arterial blood pressure changes elicited by stimulation of the splanchnic nerve. A possible mechanism of such relationship was discussed. PMID:2293366

  20. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Intracranial Nonacoustic Schwannomas Including Facial Nerve Schwannoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, Kentaro; Abo, Daisuke; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Furuta, Yasushi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Onodera, Shunsuke; Sawamura, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Masayori; Fukuda, Satoshi; Shirato, Hiroki

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Although the effectiveness of stereotactic radiosurgery for nonacoustic schwannomas is currently being assessed, there have been few studies on the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for these tumors. We investigated the long-term outcome of SRT for nonacoustic intracranial nerve schwannomas. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were treated between July 1994 and December 2006. Of these patients, 7 had schwannomas located in the jugular foramen, 5 in the trigeminal nerve, 4 in the facial nerve, and 1 in the oculomotor nerve. Radiotherapy was used as an initial treatment without surgery in 10 patients (59%) and after initial subtotal resection in the remaining patients. The tumor volume ranged from 0.3 to 31.3 mL (mean, 8.2 mL). The treatment dose was 40 to 54 Gy in 20 to 26 fractions. The median follow-up period was 59.5 months (range, 7.4-122.6 months). Local control was defined as stable or decreased tumor size on follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Tumor size was decreased in 3 patients, stable in 13, and increased in 1 after SRT. Regarding neurologic symptoms, 8 patients (47%) had improvement and 9 patients were unchanged. One patient had an increase in tumor size and received microsurgical resection at 32 months after irradiation. No patient had worsening of pre-existing neurologic symptoms or development of new cranial nerve deficits at the last follow-up. Conclusions: SRT is an effective alternative to surgical resection for patients with nonacoustic intracranial nerve schwannomas with respect to not only long-term local tumor control but also neuro-functional preservation.