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  1. Regulation of vascular tone and arterial blood pressure: role of chloride transport in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Christian A; Schroeder, Björn C; Ehmke, Heimo

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that primary changes in vascular resistance can cause sustained changes in arterial blood pressure. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about Cl(-) homeostasis in vascular smooth muscle cells. Within vascular smooth muscle cells, Cl(-) is accumulated above the electrochemical equilibrium, causing Cl(-) efflux, membrane depolarization, and increased contractile force when Cl(-) channels are opened. At least two different transport mechanisms contribute to raise [Cl(-)] i in vascular smooth muscle cells, anion exchange, and cation-chloride cotransport. Recent work suggests that TMEM16A-associated Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents mediate Cl(-) efflux in vascular smooth muscle cells leading to vasoconstriction. Additional proteins associated with Cl(-) flux in vascular smooth muscle are bestrophins, which modulate vasomotion, the volume-activated LRRC8, and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Cl(-) transporters and Cl(-) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) significantly contribute to the physiological regulation of vascular tone and arterial blood pressure. PMID:25588975

  2. 3D Reconstruction of Coronary Artery Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tong; Chen, Huan; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The 3D geometry of individual vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which are essential for understanding the mechanical function of blood vessels, are currently not available. This paper introduces a new 3D segmentation algorithm to determine VSMC morphology and orientation. Methods and Results A total of 112 VSMCs from six porcine coronary arteries were used in the analysis. A 3D semi-automatic segmentation method was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs from cell clumps as well as to extract the 3D geometry of VSMCs. A new edge blocking model was introduced to recognize cell boundary while an edge growing was developed for optimal interpolation and edge verification. The proposed methods were designed based on Region of Interest (ROI) selected by user and interactive responses of limited key edges. Enhanced cell boundary features were used to construct the cell’s initial boundary for further edge growing. A unified framework of morphological parameters (dimensions and orientations) was proposed for the 3D volume data. Virtual phantom was designed to validate the tilt angle measurements, while other parameters extracted from 3D segmentations were compared with manual measurements to assess the accuracy of the algorithm. The length, width and thickness of VSMCs were 62.9±14.9μm, 4.6±0.6μm and 6.2±1.8μm (mean±SD). In longitudinal-circumferential plane of blood vessel, VSMCs align off the circumferential direction with two mean angles of -19.4±9.3° and 10.9±4.7°, while an out-of-plane angle (i.e., radial tilt angle) was found to be 8±7.6° with median as 5.7°. Conclusions A 3D segmentation algorithm was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs of blood vessel walls based on optical image stacks. The results were validated by a virtual phantom and manual measurement. The obtained 3D geometries can be utilized in mathematical models and leads a better understanding of vascular mechanical properties and function. PMID:26882342

  3. Vascular smooth cell proliferation in perfusion culture of porcine carotid arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Dan; Lin, Peter H.; Yao Qizhi; Chen Changyi

    2008-08-08

    Objective of this study was to develop a novel in vitro artery culture system to study vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation of porcine carotid arteries in response to injury, basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), and FGF2 conjugated with cytotoxin saporin (SAP). Perfusion-cultured porcine carotid arteries remained contractile in response to norepinephrine and relaxant to acetylcholine for up to 96 h. SMC proliferation of cultured arteries was detected by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in both non-injured and balloon-injured arteries. In the inner layer of the vessel wall near the lumen, SMC proliferation were less than 10% in uninjured vessels, 66% in injured vessels, 80% in injured vessels with FGF2 treatment, and 5% in injured vessels with treatment of FGF2-SAP. Thus, the cultured porcine carotid arteries were viable; and the injury stimulated SMC proliferation, which was significantly enhanced by FGF2 and inhibited by FGF2-SAP.

  4. Vascular smooth muscle desensitization in rabbit epigastric and mesenteric arteries during hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Ratz, P H; Miner, A S; Huang, Y; Smith, C A; Barbee, R W

    2016-07-01

    The decompensatory phase of hemorrhage (shock) is caused by a poorly defined phenomenon termed vascular hyporeactivity (VHR). VHR may reflect an acute in vivo imbalance in levels of contractile and relaxant stimuli favoring net vascular smooth muscle (VSM) relaxation. Alternatively, VHR may be caused by intrinsic VSM desensitization of contraction resulting from prior exposure to high levels of stimuli that temporarily adjusts cell signaling systems. Net relaxation, but not desensitization, would be expected to resolve rapidly in an artery segment removed from the in vivo shock environment and examined in vitro in a fresh solution. Our aim was to 1) induce shock in rabbits and apply an in vitro mechanical analysis on muscular arteries isolated pre- and postshock to determine whether VHR involves intrinsic VSM desensitization, and 2) identify whether net VSM relaxation induced by nitric oxide and cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase activation in vitro can be sustained for some time after relaxant stimulus washout. The potencies of phenylephrine- and histamine-induced contractions in in vitro epigastric artery removed from rabbits posthemorrhage were decreased by ∼0.3 log units compared with the control contralateral epigastric artery removed prehemorrhage. Moreover, a decrease in KCl-induced tonic, relative to phasic, tension of in vitro mesenteric artery correlated with the degree of shock severity as assessed by rates of lactate and K(+) accumulation. VSM desensitization was also caused by tyramine in vivo and PE in vitro, but not by relaxant agents in vitro. Together, these results support the hypothesis that VHR during hemorrhagic decompensation involves contractile stimulus-induced long-lasting, intrinsic VSM desensitization. PMID:27199133

  5. Arterial Wall Stress Controls NFAT5 Activity in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Clemens; Pfisterer, Larissa; Wagner, Andreas H.; Hödebeck, Maren; Cattaruzza, Marco; Hecker, Markus; Korff, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background Nuclear factor of activated T‐cells 5 (NFAT5) has recently been described to control the phenotype of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Although an increase in wall stress or stretch (eg, elicited by hypertension) is a prototypic determinant of VSMC activation, the impact of this biomechanical force on the activity of NFAT5 is unknown. This study intended to reveal the function of NFAT5 and to explore potential signal transduction pathways leading to its activation in stretch‐stimulated VSMCs. Methods and Results Human arterial VSMCs were exposed to biomechanical stretch and subjected to immunofluorescence and protein‐biochemical analyses. Stretch promoted the translocation of NFAT5 to the nucleus within 24 hours. While the protein abundance of NFAT5 was regulated through activation of c‐Jun N‐terminal kinase under these conditions, its translocation required prior activation of palmitoyltransferases. DNA microarray and ChiP analyses identified the matrix molecule tenascin‐C as a prominent transcriptional target of NFAT5 under these conditions that stimulates migration of VSMCs. Analyses of isolated mouse femoral arteries exposed to hypertensive perfusion conditions verified that NFAT5 translocation to the nucleus is followed by an increase in tenascin‐C abundance in the vessel wall. Conclusions Collectively, our data suggest that biomechanical stretch is sufficient to activate NFAT5 both in native and cultured VSMCs where it regulates the expression of tenascin‐C. This may contribute to an improved migratory activity of VSMCs and thus promote maladaptive vascular remodeling processes such as hypertension‐induced arterial stiffening. PMID:24614757

  6. Thyroid hormone affects both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells in rat arteries.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yin; Manio, Michael M; Leung, George P H; Xu, Aimin; Tang, Eva H C; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2015-01-15

    Hypothyroidism impairs endothelium-dependent dilatations, while hyperthyroidism augments the production of endothelial nitric oxide. Thus, experiments were designed to determine if thyroid hormone causes endothelium-dependent responses, or alleviates diabetic endothelial dysfunction. Isometric tension was measured in rings with or without endothelium of arteries from normal and diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats. Release of 6-keto prostaglandin F1α and thromboxane B2 were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and protein levels [endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), cyclooxygenases (COX)] by immunoblotting. Triiodothyronine (T3) caused concentration-dependent (3×10(-6)-3×10(-5)M) relaxations in mesenteric (pEC50, 4.96±0.19) and femoral (pEC50, 4.57±0.35) arteries without endothelium. In femoral arteries of rats with diabetes, 5-methylamino-2-[[(2S,3R,5R,8S,9S)-3,5,9-trimethyl-2-(1-oxo-(1H-pyrrol-2- -yl)propan-2-yl)-1,7-dioxaspiro-(5,5)undecan-8-yl]methyl]benzooxazole-4-carboxylic acid (A23187, 3×10(-7) to 10(-6)M) caused partly endothelium-dependent contractions. After chronic T3-treatment with (10μg/kg/day; four weeks), the contractions to A23187 of preparations with and without endothelium were comparable, the thromboxane B2-release was reduced (by 38.1±9.2%). The pEC50 of 9, 11-dideoxy-11α, 9α-epoxymethanoprostaglandin F2α (U46619, TP-receptor agonist) was increased in T3-treated diabetic rats compared with controls (8.53±0.06 vs 7.94±0.09). The protein expression of eNOS increased (by 228%) but that of COX-1 decreased (by 35%) after chronic T3 treatment. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells incubated for one week with T3 (10(-10)-10(-7)M) in the presence but not in the absence of interleukin-1β (1ng/ml), the expression of eNOS was increased compared to control. In conclusion, thyroid hormone acutely relaxes mesenteric and femoral vascular smooth muscle, but given chronically reduces the release of endothelium-derived vasoconstrictor

  7. Sympathetic neuroeffector transmission to pulmonary vascular smooth muscle in porcine superior mesenteric arterial occlusion (SMAO) shock.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, S; Glenn, T M; Eddy, L J; Rebert, R R

    1980-01-01

    Splanchnic arterial occlusion shock results in pulmonary endothelial damage and depression of porcine intralobar pulmonary artery and vein contractility. This study evaluates the functional integrity of the adrenergic nerves innervating intralobar pulmonary arteries and veins and the changes in neurotransmission following 1) superior mesenteric artery occlusion (SMAO) shock in swine; 2) sequential inhibition of prostacyclin, thromboxane, and prostaglandin synthesis; and 3) mechanical stripping of the endothelium. Rings of porcine intralobar pulmonary arteries and veins were obtained from sham and SMAO shocked swine. They were suspended in muscle baths and stimulated transmurally at 1-32 Hz, 2 msec duration, 2 msec delay at 7.5-10V. Some experiments were performed on rings of intralobular pulmonary arteries and veins in which the endothelium was stripped with a razor blade. Appropriate inverted-reverted controls were used to account for any deleterious effects of the preparatory techniques involved in stripping. Intralobar pulmonary arteries and veins from sham swine contracted in response to 1 Hz, with maximum responses at 32 Hz. The responses to nerve stimulation were enhanced by cocaine and inhibited by phentolamine, an alpha-receptor antagonist. Inhibition of endothelial prostacyclin synthesis, as well as endothelial stripping, diminished by 30-40% the responses to nerve stimulation. The responses to nerve stimulation were depressed in both intralobar pulmonary arteries and veins in SMAO shocked swine. The data demonstrate physiologic regulation of neural control in porcine pulmonary blood vessels. Furthermore, the data suggest that prostaglandin, the vascular endothelium, and shock, may modify this process. PMID:7315616

  8. Assays for in vitro monitoring of proliferation of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Elena A; Lim, Poay; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Eszterhas, Andrew; Panettieri, Reynold A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Vascular and airway remodeling, which are characterized by airway smooth muscle (ASM) and pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) proliferation, contribute to the pathology of asthma, pulmonary hypertension, restenosis and atherosclerosis. To evaluate the proliferation of VSM and ASM cells in response to mitogens, we perform a [3H]thymidine incorporation assay. The proliferation protocol takes approximately 48 h and includes stimulating cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle with agonists, labeling cells with [3H]thymidine and examining levels of [3H]thymidine incorporation by scintillation counting. Although using radiolabeled [3H]thymidine incorporation is a limitation, the greatest benefit of the assay is providing reliable and statistically significant data. PMID:17406550

  9. Pathophysiological role of vascular smooth muscle alkaline phosphatase in medial artery calcification.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Campbell R; Kuss, Pia; Narisawa, Sonoko; Yadav, Manisha C; Nigro, Jessica; Wang, Wei; Chhea, T Nicole; Sergienko, Eduard A; Kapoor, Kapil; Jackson, Michael R; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Pinkerton, Anthony B; O'Neill, W Charles; Millán, José Luis

    2015-05-01

    Medial vascular calcification (MVC) is a pathological phenomenon that causes vascular stiffening and can lead to heart failure; it is common to a variety of conditions, including aging, chronic kidney disease, diabetes, obesity, and a variety of rare genetic diseases. These conditions share the common feature of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) upregulation in the vasculature. To evaluate the role of TNAP in MVC, we developed a mouse model that overexpresses human TNAP in vascular smooth muscle cells in an X-linked manner. Hemizygous overexpressor male mice (Tagln-Cre(+/-) ; Hprt(ALPL) (/Y) or TNAP-OE) show extensive vascular calcification, high blood pressure, and cardiac hypertrophy, and have a median age of death of 44 days, whereas the cardiovascular phenotype is much less pronounced and life expectancy is longer in heterozygous (Tagln-Cre(+/-) ; Hprt(ALPL) (/-) ) female TNAP-OE mice. Gene expression analysis showed upregulation of osteoblast and chondrocyte markers and decreased expression of vascular smooth muscle markers in the aortas of TNAP-OE mice. Through medicinal chemistry efforts, we developed inhibitors of TNAP with drug-like pharmacokinetic characteristics. TNAP-OE mice were treated with the prototypical TNAP inhibitor SBI-425 or vehicle to evaluate the feasibility of TNAP inhibition in vivo. Treatment with this inhibitor significantly reduced aortic calcification and cardiac hypertrophy, and extended lifespan over vehicle-treated controls, in the absence of secondary effects on the skeleton. This study shows that TNAP in the vasculature contributes to the pathology of MVC and that it is a druggable target. PMID:25428889

  10. Pathophysiological role of vascular smooth muscle alkaline phosphatase in medial artery calcification†

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Campbell R.; Kuss, Pia; Narisawa, Sonoko; Yadav, Manisha C.; Nigro, Jessica; Wang, Wei; Chhea, T. Nicole; Sergienko, Eduard A.; Kapoor, Kapil; Jackson, Michael R.; Hoylaerts, Marc. F.; Pinkerton, Anthony B.; O'Neill, W. Charles; Millán, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Medial vascular calcification (MVC) is a pathological phenomenon common to a variety of conditions, including aging, chronic kidney disease, diabetes, obesity, and a variety of rare genetic diseases, that causes vascular stiffening and can lead to heart failure. These conditions share the common feature of tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) upregulation in the vasculature. To evaluate the role of TNAP in MVC, we developed a mouse model that overexpresses human TNAP in vascular smooth muscle cells in an X-linked manner. Hemizygous overexpressor male mice (Tagln-Cre+/-; HprtALPL/Y, or TNAP-OE) show extensive vascular calcification, high blood pressure, cardiac hypertrophy and have a median age of death of 44 days, whereas the cardiovascular phenotype is much less pronounced and life expectancy is longer in heterozygous (Tagln-Cre+/-; HprtALPL/-) female TNAP-OE mice. Gene expression analysis showed upregulation of osteoblast and chondrocyte markers and decreased expression of vascular smooth muscle markers in the aortas of TNAP-OE mice. Through medicinal chemistry efforts, we developed inhibitors of TNAP with drug-like pharmacokinetic characteristics. TNAP-OE mice were treated with the prototypical TNAP inhibitor SBI-425 or vehicle to evaluate the feasibility of TNAP inhibition in vivo. Treatment with this inhibitor significantly reduced aortic calcification and cardiac hypertrophy, and extended lifespan over vehicle-treated controls, in the absence of secondary effects on the skeleton. This study shows that TNAP in the vasculature contributes to the pathology of MVC and that it is a druggable target. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved PMID:25428889

  11. Glucose-induced alterations of cytosolic free calcium in cultured rat tail artery vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Barbagallo, M; Shan, J; Pang, P K; Resnick, L M

    1995-01-01

    We have previously suggested that hyperglycemia per se may contribute to diabetic hypertensive and vascular disease by altering cellular ion content. To more directly investigate the potential role of glucose in this process, we measured cytosolic free calcium in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells isolated from Sprague-Dawley rat tail artery before and after incubation with 5 (basal), 10, 15, and 20 mM glucose. Glucose significantly elevated cytosolic free calcium in a dose- and time-dependent manner, from 110.0 +/- 5.4 to 124.5 +/- 9.0, 192.7 +/- 20.4, and 228.4 +/- 21.9 nM at 5, 10, 15, and 20 mM glucose concentrations, respectively. This glucose-induced cytosolic free calcium elevation was also specific, no change being observed after incubation with equivalent concentrations of L-glucose or mannitol. This glucose effect was also dependent on extracellular calcium and pH, since these calcium changes were inhibited in an acidotic or a calcium-free medium, or by the competitive calcium antagonist lanthanum. We conclude that ambient glucose concentrations within clinically observed limits may alter cellular calcium ion homeostasis in vascular smooth muscle cells. We suggest that these cellular ionic effects of hyperglycemia may underlie the predisposition to hypertension and vascular diseases among diabetic subjects and/or those with impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:7860758

  12. Vascular smooth muscle in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Winquist, R J; Webb, R C; Bohr, D F

    1982-06-01

    The cause of the elevated arterial pressure in most forms of hypertension is an increase in total peripheral resistance. This brief review is directed toward an assessment of recent investigations contributing information about the factors responsible for this increased vascular resistance. Structural abnormalities in the vasculature that characterize the hypertensive process are 1) changes in the vascular media, 2) rarefication of the resistance vessels, and 3) lesions of the intimal vascular surface. These abnormalities are mainly the result of an adaptive process and are secondary to the increase in wall stress and/or to pathological damage to cellular components in the vessel wall. Functional alterations in the vascular smooth muscle are described as changes in agonist-smooth muscle interaction or plasma membrane permeability. These types of changes appear to play a primary, initiating role in the elevation of vascular resistance of hypertension. These alterations are not the result of an increase in wall stress and they often precede the development of high blood pressure. The functional changes are initiated by abnormal function of neurogenic, humoral, and/or myogenic changes that alter vascular smooth muscle activity. PMID:6282652

  13. A method for three-dimensional quantification of vascular smooth muscle orientation: application in viable murine carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Spronck, Bart; Megens, Remco T A; Reesink, Koen D; Delhaas, Tammo

    2016-04-01

    When studying in vivo arterial mechanical behaviour using constitutive models, smooth muscle cells (SMCs) should be considered, while they play an important role in regulating arterial vessel tone. Current constitutive models assume a strictly circumferential SMC orientation, without any dispersion. We hypothesised that SMC orientation would show considerable dispersion in three dimensions and that helical dispersion would be greater than transversal dispersion. To test these hypotheses, we developed a method to quantify the 3D orientation of arterial SMCs. Fluorescently labelled SMC nuclei of left and right carotid arteries of ten mice were imaged using two-photon laser scanning microscopy. Arteries were imaged at a range of luminal pressures. 3D image processing was used to identify individual nuclei and their orientations. SMCs showed to be arranged in two distinct layers. Orientations were quantified by fitting a Bingham distribution to the observed orientations. As hypothesised, orientation dispersion was much larger helically than transversally. With increasing luminal pressure, transversal dispersion decreased significantly, whereas helical dispersion remained unaltered. Additionally, SMC orientations showed a statistically significant ([Formula: see text]) mean right-handed helix angle in both left and right arteries and in both layers, which is a relevant finding from a developmental biology perspective. In conclusion, vascular SMC orientation (1) can be quantified in 3D; (2) shows considerable dispersion, predominantly in the helical direction; and (3) has a distinct right-handed helical component in both left and right carotid arteries. The obtained quantitative distribution data are instrumental for constitutive modelling of the artery wall and illustrate the merit of our method. PMID:26174758

  14. Trophoblast- and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell-Derived MMP-12 Mediates Elastolysis during Uterine Spiral Artery Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Lynda K.; Smith, Samantha D.; Keogh, Rosemary J.; Jones, Rebecca L.; Baker, Philip N.; Knöfler, Martin; Cartwright, Judith E.; Whitley, Guy St. J.; Aplin, John D.

    2010-01-01

    During the first trimester of pregnancy, the uterine spiral arteries are remodeled, creating heavily dilated conduits that lack maternal vasomotor control but allow the placenta to meet an increasing requirement for nutrients and oxygen. To effect permanent vasodilatation, the internal elastic lamina and medial elastin fibers must be degraded. In this study, we sought to identify the elastolytic proteases involved in this process. Primary first-trimester cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) derived from the placenta exhibited intracellular and membrane-associated elastase activity; membrane-associated activity was primarily attributable to matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). Indeed, Affymetrix microarray analysis and immunocytochemistry implicated MMP-12 (macrophage metalloelastase) as a key mediator of elastolysis. Cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) exhibited constitutive membrane-associated elastase activity and inducible intracellular elastase activity; these cells also expressed MMP-12 protein. Moreover, a specific inhibitor of MMP-12 significantly reduced CTB- and HASMC-mediated elastolysis in vitro, to 31.7 ± 10.9% and 23.3 ± 8.7% of control levels, respectively. MMP-12 is expressed by both interstitial and endovascular trophoblasts in the first-trimester placental bed and by vascular SMCs (VSMCs) in remodeling spiral arteries. Perfusion of isolated spiral artery segments with CTB-conditioned medium stimulated MMP-12 expression in medial VSMCs. Our data support a model in which trophoblasts and VSMCs use MMP-12 cooperatively to degrade elastin during vascular remodeling in pregnancy, with the localized release of elastin peptides and CTB-derived factors amplifying elastin catabolism. PMID:20802175

  15. Overexpression of human endothelial nitric oxide synthase in rat vascular smooth muscle cells and in balloon-injured carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Daum, G; Forough, R; Clowes, M; Walter, U; Clowes, A W

    1998-05-01

    Endothelial cells in normal blood vessels might prevent the unscheduled proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) by the expression of cell migration and growth inhibitors. NO, a potent vasodilator, generated by endothelium-specific constitutive NO synthase (ecNOS) might be such an inhibitor. To test this hypothesis, we overexpressed human ecNOS in syngeneic rat arterial SMCs using retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. Compared with SMCs transduced with vector alone (LXSN SMCs), DNA synthesis and cell proliferation were inhibited in the ecNOS-expressing SMCs (LCNSN SMCs). Basal and stimulated (by the calcium ionophore A23187) secretion of NO and intracellular cGMP were increased in LCNSN SMCs. Nomega-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NA), an inhibitor of NO synthesis, enhanced the proliferation of LCNSN SMCs but had no effect on LXSN SMCs. LCNSN SMCs seeded onto the luminal surface of balloon-injured rat carotid arteries inhibited neointimal formation by 37% and induced marked dilatation (3-fold increase in vessel diameter) at 2 weeks compared with LXSN SMC-seeded arteries. Orally administered L-NA blocked these changes. Phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, which is regulated in part by NO, was elevated in LCNSN SMCs and in LCNSN SMC-seeded arteries. This study demonstrates that NO generation by ecNOS inhibits SMC proliferation in vitro and modulates vascular tone locally in vivo. PMID:9576106

  16. Composition of connective tissues and morphometry of vascular smooth muscle in arterial wall of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats - In relation with arterial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kozaburo; Shimizu, Emiko

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension (HT) was induced in Wistar rats aged 16 and 48 weeks by a deoxycortico-sterone acetate (DOCA)-salt procedure. Common carotid arteries were resected 16 weeks after, and their histological specimens were selectively stained for observations of collagen, elastin, and vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. Then, the fractions of collagen and elastin and their radial distributions, and the size and number of VSM cells were determined with an image analyzer. These results were compared with the results from age-matched, non-treated, normotensive (NT) animals and also with those from our previous biomechanical studies. In both age groups, there were no significant differences in the fractions of collagen and elastin, and the ratio of collagen to elastin content between HT and NT arteries. These results correspond well with our previous biomechanical results, which showed no significant difference in wall elasticity between HT and NT vessels. Moreover, in the innermost layer out of 4 layers bordered with thick elastic lamellae, the fraction of collagen was significantly greater in HT arteries than in NT ones, which is attributable to HT-related stress concentration in the layer. VSM cells were significantly hypertrophied and their content was increased by HT, although their total number in the media remained unchanged. The increased size and content of cells correspond to the enhancement of vascular tone and contractility in HT arteries. PMID:26987272

  17. A novel inhibitory effect of oxazol-5-one compounds on ROCKII signaling in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghabkari, Abdulhameed; Deng, Jing-Ti; McDonald, Paul C; Dedhar, Shoukat; Alshehri, Mana; Walsh, Michael P; MacDonald, Justin A

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity of (4Z)-2-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl)-4-(pyridin-3-ylmethylidene)-1,3-oxazol-5-one (DI) for zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) was previously described by in silico computational modeling, screening a large panel of kinases, and determining the inhibition efficacy. Our assessment of DI revealed another target, the Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 2 (ROCKII). In vitro studies showed DI to be a competitive inhibitor of ROCKII (Ki, 132 nM with respect to ATP). This finding was supported by in silico molecular surface docking of DI with the ROCKII ATP-binding pocket. Time course analysis of myosin regulatory light chain (LC20) phosphorylation catalyzed by ROCKII in vitro revealed a significant decrease upon treatment with DI. ROCKII signaling was investigated in situ in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). ROCKII down-regulation using siRNA revealed several potential substrates involved in smooth muscle contraction (e.g., LC20, Par-4, MYPT1) and actin cytoskeletal dynamics (cofilin). The application of DI to CASMCs attenuated LC20, Par-4, LIMK, and cofilin phosphorylations. Notably, cofilin phosphorylation was not significantly decreased with a novel ZIPK selective inhibitor (HS-38). In addition, CASMCs treated with DI underwent cytoskeletal changes that were associated with diminution of cofilin phosphorylation. We conclude that DI is not selective for ZIPK and is a potent inhibitor of ROCKII. PMID:27573465

  18. A novel inhibitory effect of oxazol-5-one compounds on ROCKII signaling in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghabkari, Abdulhameed; Deng, Jing-Ti; McDonald, Paul C.; Dedhar, Shoukat; Alshehri, Mana; Walsh, Michael P.; MacDonald, Justin A.

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity of (4Z)-2-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl)-4-(pyridin-3-ylmethylidene)-1,3-oxazol-5-one (DI) for zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) was previously described by in silico computational modeling, screening a large panel of kinases, and determining the inhibition efficacy. Our assessment of DI revealed another target, the Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 2 (ROCKII). In vitro studies showed DI to be a competitive inhibitor of ROCKII (Ki, 132 nM with respect to ATP). This finding was supported by in silico molecular surface docking of DI with the ROCKII ATP-binding pocket. Time course analysis of myosin regulatory light chain (LC20) phosphorylation catalyzed by ROCKII in vitro revealed a significant decrease upon treatment with DI. ROCKII signaling was investigated in situ in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). ROCKII down-regulation using siRNA revealed several potential substrates involved in smooth muscle contraction (e.g., LC20, Par-4, MYPT1) and actin cytoskeletal dynamics (cofilin). The application of DI to CASMCs attenuated LC20, Par-4, LIMK, and cofilin phosphorylations. Notably, cofilin phosphorylation was not significantly decreased with a novel ZIPK selective inhibitor (HS-38). In addition, CASMCs treated with DI underwent cytoskeletal changes that were associated with diminution of cofilin phosphorylation. We conclude that DI is not selective for ZIPK and is a potent inhibitor of ROCKII. PMID:27573465

  19. Profiling the role of mammalian target of rapamycin in the vascular smooth muscle metabolome in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kudryashova, Tatiana V.; Goncharov, Dmitry A.; Pena, Andressa; Ihida-Stansbury, Kaori; DeLisser, Horace; Kawut, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Increased proliferation and resistance to apoptosis of pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle cells (PAVSMCs), coupled with metabolic reprogramming, are key components of pulmonary vascular remodeling, a major and currently irreversible pathophysiological feature of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We recently reported that activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a key role in increased energy generation and maintenance of the proliferative, apoptosis-resistant PAVSMC phenotype in human PAH, but the downstream effects of mTOR activation on PAH PAVSMC metabolism are not clear. Using liquid and gas chromatography–based mass spectrometry, we performed pilot metabolomic profiling of human microvascular PAVSMCs from idiopathic-PAH subjects before and after treatment with the selective adenosine triphosphate–competitive mTOR inhibitor PP242 and from nondiseased lungs. We have shown that PAH PAVSMCs have a distinct metabolomic signature of altered metabolites—components of fatty acid synthesis, deficiency of sugars, amino sugars, and nucleotide sugars—intermediates of protein and lipid glycosylation, and downregulation of key biochemicals involved in glutathione and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) metabolism. We also report that mTOR inhibition attenuated or reversed the majority of the PAH-specific abnormalities in lipogenesis, glycosylation, glutathione, and NAD metabolism without affecting altered polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism. Collectively, our data demonstrate a critical role of mTOR in major PAH PAVSMC metabolic abnormalities and suggest the existence of de novo lipid synthesis in PAVSMCs in human PAH that may represent a new, important component of disease pathogenesis worthy of future investigation. PMID:26697174

  20. 12S-lipoxygenase protein associates with {alpha}-actin fibers in human umbilical artery vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weisinger, Gary . E-mail: gary_w@tasmc.health.gov.il; Limor, Rona; Marcus-Perlman, Yonit; Knoll, Esther; Kohen, Fortune; Schinder, Vera; Firer, Michael; Stern, Naftali

    2007-05-11

    The current study sets out to characterize the intracellular localization of the platelet-type 12S-lipoxygenase (12-LO), an enzyme involved in angiotensin-II induced signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Immunohistochemical analysis of VSMC in vitro or human umbilical arteries in vivo showed a clear cytoplasmic localization. On immunogold electron microscopy, 12-LO was found primarily associated with cytoplasmic VSMC muscle fibrils. Upon angiotensin-II treatment of cultured VSMC, immunoprecipitated 12-LO was found bound to {alpha}-actin, a component of the cytoplasmic myofilaments. 12-LO/{alpha}-actin binding was blocked by VSMC pretreatment with the 12-LO inhibitors, baicalien or esculetine and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. Moreover, the binding of 12-LO to {alpha}-actin was not associated with 12-LO serine or tyrosine phosphorylation. These observations suggest a previously unrecognized angiotensin-II dependent protein interaction in VSMC through which 12-LO protein may be trafficked, for yet undiscovered purposes towards the much more abundantly expressed cytoskeletal protein {alpha}-actin.

  1. Oxygen-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Vascular Smooth Muscle and Their Possible Role in Hypoxic Arterial Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Obregon, A.; Urena, J.; Lopez-Barneo, J.

    1995-05-01

    We have investigated the modifications of cytosolic [Ca2+] and the activity of Ca2+ channels in freshly dispersed arterial myocytes to test whether lowering O_2 tension (PO_2) directly influences Ca2+ homeostasis in these cells. Unclamped cells loaded with fura-2 AM exhibit oscillations of cytosolic Ca2+ whose frequency depends on extracellular Ca2+ influx. Switching from a PO_2 of 150 to 20 mmHg leads to a reversible attenuation of the Ca2+ oscillations. In voltage-clamped cells, hypoxia reversibly reduces the influx of Ca2+ through voltage-dependent channels, which can account for the inhibition of the Ca2+ oscillations. Low PO_2 selectively inhibits L-type Ca2+ channel activity, whereas the current mediated by T-type channels is unaltered by hypoxia. The effect of low PO_2 on the L-type channels is markedly voltage dependent, being more apparent with moderate depolarizations. These findings demonstrate the existence of O_2-sensitive, voltage-dependent, Ca2+ channels in vascular smooth muscle that may critically contribute to the local regulation of circulation.

  2. Artery Tertiary Lymphoid Organs Control Aorta Immunity and Protect against Atherosclerosis via Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Lymphotoxin β Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Desheng; Mohanta, Sarajo K.; Yin, Changjun; Peng, Li; Ma, Zhe; Srikakulapu, Prasad; Grassia, Gianluca; MacRitchie, Neil; Dever, Gary; Gordon, Peter; Burton, Francis L.; Ialenti, Armando; Sabir, Suleman R.; McInnes, Iain B.; Brewer, James M.; Garside, Paul; Weber, Christian; Lehmann, Thomas; Teupser, Daniel; Habenicht, Livia; Beer, Michael; Grabner, Rolf; Maffia, Pasquale; Weih, Falk; Habenicht, Andreas J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) emerge during nonresolving peripheral inflammation, but their impact on disease progression remains unknown. We have found in aged Apoe−/− mice that artery TLOs (ATLOs) controlled highly territorialized aorta T cell responses. ATLOs promoted T cell recruitment, primed CD4+ T cells, generated CD4+, CD8+, T regulatory (Treg) effector and central memory cells, converted naive CD4+ T cells into induced Treg cells, and presented antigen by an unusual set of dendritic cells and B cells. Meanwhile, vascular smooth muscle cell lymphotoxin β receptors (VSMC-LTβRs) protected against atherosclerosis by maintaining structure, cellularity, and size of ATLOs though VSMC-LTβRs did not affect secondary lymphoid organs: Atherosclerosis was markedly exacerbated in Apoe−/−Ltbr−/− and to a similar extent in aged Apoe−/−Ltbrfl/flTagln-cre mice. These data support the conclusion that the immune system employs ATLOs to organize aorta T cell homeostasis during aging and that VSMC-LTβRs participate in atherosclerosis protection via ATLOs. PMID:26084025

  3. A novel combination of promoter and enhancers increases transgene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro and coronary arteries in vivo after adenovirus-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Appleby, CE; Kingston, PA; David, A; Gerdes, CA; Umaña, P; Castro, MG; Lowenstein, PR; Heagerty, AM

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses are employed widely for vascular gene transfer. Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are a relatively poor target for transgene expression after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery, however, even when expression is regulated by powerful, constitutive viral promoters. The major immediate-early murine cytomegalovirus enhancer/promoter (MIEmCMV) elicits substantially greater transgene expression than the human cytomegalovirus promoter (MIEhCMV) in all cell types in which they have been compared. The Woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE) increases transgene expression in numerous cell lines, and fragments of the smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SMMHC) promoter increase expression within SMC from heterologous promoters. We therefore, compared the expression of β-galactosidase after adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of lacZ under the transcriptional regulation of a variety of combinations of the promoters and enhancers described, in vitro and in porcine coronary arteries. We demonstrate that inclusion of WPRE and a fragment of the rabbit SMMHC promoter along with MIEmCMV increases β-galactosidase expression 90-fold in SMC in vitro and ≈40-fold in coronary arteries, compared with vectors in which expression is regulated by MIEhCMV alone. Expression cassette modification represents a simple method of improving adenovirus-mediated vascular gene transfer efficiency and has important implications for the development of efficient cardiovascular gene therapy strategies. PMID:12907954

  4. Mebendazole Reduces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Neointimal Formation Following Vascular Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jintao; Wang, Hui; Guo, Chiao; Luo, Wei; Lawler, Alyssa; Reddy, Aswin; Wang, Julia; Sun, Eddy B.; Eitzman, Daniel T.

    2014-01-01

    Mebendazole is an antihelminthic drug that exerts its effects via interference with microtubule function in parasites. To determine the utility of mebendazole as a potential treatment for vascular diseases involving proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, the effects of mebendazole on vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation were tested in vitro and in a mouse model of arterial injury. In vitro, mebendazole inhibited proliferation and migration of murine vascular smooth muscle cells and this was associated with altered intracellular microtubule organization. To determine in vivo effects of mebendazole following vascular injury, femoral arterial wire injury was induced in wild-type mice treated with either mebendazole or placebo control. Compared with placebo-treated mice, mebendazole-treated mice formed less neointima at the site of injury. Mebendazole is effective at inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, and neointimal formation following arterial injury in mice. PMID:24587248

  5. MicroRNA-223 Attenuates Hypoxia-induced Vascular Remodeling by Targeting RhoB/MLC2 in Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Kang, Kang; Chen, Jidong; Wu, Zhiqin; Huang, Jinyong; Lu, Wenju; Chen, Yuqin; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhai, Yujia; Qu, Junle; Ramchandran, Ramaswamy; Raj, J. Usha; Wang, Jian; Gou, Deming

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that microRNAs are implicated in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we identified that miR-223 was significantly downregulated in chronically hypoxic mouse and rat lungs, as well as in pulmonary artery and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) exposed to hypoxia. Knockdown of miR-223 increased PASMC proliferation. In contrast, miR-223 overexpression abrogated cell proliferation, migration and stress fiber formation. Administering miR-223 agomir in vivo antagonized hypoxia-induced increase in pulmonary artery pressure and distal arteriole muscularization. RhoB, which was increased by hypoxia, was identified as one of the targets of miR-223. Overexpressed miR-223 suppressed RhoB and inhibited the consequent phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) and the expression of myosin light chain of myosin II (MLC2), which was identified as another target of miR-223. Furthermore, serum miR-223 levels were decreased in female patients with PAH associated with congenital heart disease. Our study provides the first evidence that miR-223 can regulate PASMC proliferation, migration, and actomyosin reorganization through its novel targets, RhoB and MLC2, resulting in vascular remodeling and the development of PAH. It also highlights miR-223 as a potential circulating biomarker and a small molecule drug for diagnosis and treatment of PAH. PMID:27121304

  6. Vascular Protective Effect of an Ethanol Extract of Camellia japonica Fruit: Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation of Coronary Artery and Reduction of Smooth Muscle Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sin-Hee; Shim, Bong-Sup; Yoon, Jun-Seong; Lee, Hyun-Ho; Lee, Hye-Won; Yoo, Seok-Bong; Wi, An-Jin; Park, Whoa-Shig; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Dong-Wok; Oak, Min-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Camellia japonica is a popular garden plant in Asia and widely used as cosmetic sources and traditional medicine. However, the possibility that C. japonica affects cardiovascular system remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate vascular effects of an extract of C. japonica. Vascular reactivity was assessed in organ baths using porcine coronary arteries and inhibition of proliferation and migration were assessed using human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). All four different parts, leaf, stem, flower, and fruits, caused concentration-dependent relaxations and C. japonica fruit (CJF) extract showed the strongest vasorelaxation and its effect was endothelium dependent. Relaxations to CJF were markedly reduced by inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inhibitor of PI3-kinase, but not affected by inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated response. CJF induced activated a time- and concentration-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS in endothelial cells. Altogether, these studies have demonstrated that CJF is a potent endothelium-dependent vasodilator and this effect was involved in, at least in part, PI3K-eNOS-NO pathway. Moreover, CJF attenuated TNF-α induced proliferation and PDGF-BB induced migration of VSMCs. The present findings indicate that CJF could be a valuable candidate of herbal medicine for cardiovascular diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. PMID:26697138

  7. Vascular Protective Effect of an Ethanol Extract of Camellia japonica Fruit: Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation of Coronary Artery and Reduction of Smooth Muscle Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin-Hee; Shim, Bong-Sup; Yoon, Jun-Seong; Lee, Hyun-Ho; Lee, Hye-Won; Yoo, Seok-Bong; Wi, An-Jin; Park, Whoa-Shig; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Dong-Wok; Oak, Min-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Camellia japonica is a popular garden plant in Asia and widely used as cosmetic sources and traditional medicine. However, the possibility that C. japonica affects cardiovascular system remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate vascular effects of an extract of C. japonica. Vascular reactivity was assessed in organ baths using porcine coronary arteries and inhibition of proliferation and migration were assessed using human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). All four different parts, leaf, stem, flower, and fruits, caused concentration-dependent relaxations and C. japonica fruit (CJF) extract showed the strongest vasorelaxation and its effect was endothelium dependent. Relaxations to CJF were markedly reduced by inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inhibitor of PI3-kinase, but not affected by inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated response. CJF induced activated a time- and concentration-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS in endothelial cells. Altogether, these studies have demonstrated that CJF is a potent endothelium-dependent vasodilator and this effect was involved in, at least in part, PI3K-eNOS-NO pathway. Moreover, CJF attenuated TNF-α induced proliferation and PDGF-BB induced migration of VSMCs. The present findings indicate that CJF could be a valuable candidate of herbal medicine for cardiovascular diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. PMID:26697138

  8. Pharmacological characterization of the dopamine receptor coupled to cyclic AMP formation expressed by rat mesenteric artery vascular smooth muscle cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, A. S.; Bryson, S. E.; Vaughan, P. F.; Ball, S. G.; Balmforth, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    1. Mesenteric artery vascular smooth muscle cells derived from male Wistar rats and grown in culture were prelabelled with [3H]-adenine and exposed to a range of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists. Resultant [3H]-cyclic AMP formation was determined and concentration-effect curves constructed, in the presence of propranolol (10-6) M) and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX (5 x 10(-4) M). 2. Ka apparent values for D1/DA1 dopamine receptor agonists SKF 38393, fenoldopam, 6,7-ADTN, and dopamine were 0.06, 0.59, 4.06 and 5.77 x 10(-6) M respectively. Although fenoldopam and SKF 38393 were more potent than dopamine, they were partial agonists with efficacies, relative to dopamine of approximately 48% and 24% respectively. 6,7-ADTN, in contrast, behaved as a full agonist. 3. Dopamine-stimulated cyclic AMP formation was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by the D1/DA1 dopamine receptor selective antagonists, SCH 23390 and cis-flupenthixol (Ki values 0.53 and 36.1 x 10(-1) M respectively). In contrast, the D2/DA2 dopamine receptor selective antagonists, domperidone and (-)-sulpiride, were less potent (Ki values 2.06 and 5.82 x 10(-6) M respectively). Furthermore, the stereoisomers of SCH 23390 and cis-flupenthixol, SCH 23388 and trans-flupenthixol, were at least two orders of magnitude less potent (Ki values 0.14 and 13.2 x 10(-6) M respectively) indicating the stereoselective nature of this receptor. 4. Our results indicate that rat mesenteric artery vascular smooth muscle cells in culture express a dopamine receptor coupled to cyclic AMP formation, which has the pharmacological profile, characteristic of the D1 dopamine receptor subfamily. PMID:7902178

  9. Heparan sulfate side chains have a critical role in the inhibitory effects of perlecan on vascular smooth muscle cell response to arterial injury.

    PubMed

    Gotha, Lara; Lim, Sang Yup; Osherov, Azriel B; Wolff, Rafael; Qiang, Beiping; Erlich, Ilana; Nili, Nafiseh; Pillarisetti, Sivaram; Chang, Ya-Ting; Tran, Phan-Kiet; Tryggvason, Karl; Hedin, Ulf; Tran-Lundmark, Karin; Advani, Suzanne L; Gilbert, Richard E; Strauss, Bradley H

    2014-08-01

    Perlecan is a proteoglycan composed of a 470-kDa core protein linked to three heparan sulfate (HS) glycosaminoglycan chains. The intact proteoglycan inhibits the smooth muscle cell (SMC) response to vascular injury. Hspg2(Δ3/Δ3) (MΔ3/Δ3) mice produce a mutant perlecan lacking the HS side chains. The objective of this study was to determine differences between these two types of perlecan in modifying SMC activities to the arterial injury response, in order to define the specific role of the HS side chains. In vitro proliferative and migratory activities were compared in SMC isolated from MΔ3/Δ3 and wild-type mice. Proliferation of MΔ3/Δ3 SMC was 1.5× greater than in wild type (P < 0.001), increased by addition of growth factors, and showed a 42% greater migratory response than wild-type cells to PDGF-BB (P < 0.001). In MΔ3/Δ3 SMC adhesion to fibronectin, and collagen types I and IV was significantly greater than wild type. Addition of DRL-12582, an inducer of perlecan expression, decreased proliferation and migratory response to PDGF-BB stimulation in wild-type SMC compared with MΔ3/Δ3. In an in vivo carotid artery wire injury model, the medial thickness, medial area/lumen ratio, and macrophage infiltration were significantly increased in the MΔ3/Δ3 mice, indicating a prominent role of the HS side chain in limiting vascular injury response. Mutant perlecan that lacks HS side chains had a marked reduction in the inhibition of in vitro SMC function and the in vivo arterial response to injury, indicating the critical role of HS side chains in perlecan function in the vessel wall. PMID:24858854

  10. Mechanics of Vascular Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Ratz, Paul H

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle (VSM; see Table 1 for a list of abbreviations) is a heterogeneous biomaterial comprised of cells and extracellular matrix. By surrounding tubes of endothelial cells, VSM forms a regulated network, the vasculature, through which oxygenated blood supplies specialized organs, permitting the development of large multicellular organisms. VSM cells, the engine of the vasculature, house a set of regulated nanomotors that permit rapid stress-development, sustained stress-maintenance and vessel constriction. Viscoelastic materials within, surrounding and attached to VSM cells, comprised largely of polymeric proteins with complex mechanical characteristics, assist the engine with countering loads imposed by the heart pump, and with control of relengthening after constriction. The complexity of this smart material can be reduced by classical mechanical studies combined with circuit modeling using spring and dashpot elements. Evaluation of the mechanical characteristics of VSM requires a more complete understanding of the mechanics and regulation of its biochemical parts, and ultimately, an understanding of how these parts work together to form the machinery of the vascular tree. Current molecular studies provide detailed mechanical data about single polymeric molecules, revealing viscoelasticity and plasticity at the protein domain level, the unique biological slip-catch bond, and a regulated two-step actomyosin power stroke. At the tissue level, new insight into acutely dynamic stress-strain behavior reveals smooth muscle to exhibit adaptive plasticity. At its core, physiology aims to describe the complex interactions of molecular systems, clarifying structure-function relationships and regulation of biological machines. The intent of this review is to provide a comprehensive presentation of one biomachine, VSM. PMID:26756629

  11. Selective biological response of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells on cold-plasma-modified polyester vascular prostheses.

    PubMed

    Blanchemain, N; Aguilar, M R; Chai, F; Jimenez, M; Jean-Baptiste, E; El-Achari, A; Martel, B; Hildebrand, H F; Roman, J San

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this work was to improve the hemocompatibility and the selectivity according to cells of non-woven poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) membranes. Non-woven PET membranes were modified by a combined plasma-chemical process. The surface of these materials was pre-activated by cold-plasma treatment and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was grafted by the in situ free radical polymerization of acrylic acid (AA). The extent of this reaction and the number of carboxylic groups incorporated were evaluated by colorimetric titration using toluidine blue O. All samples were characterized by SEM, AFM and thermogravimetric analysis, and the mechanical properties of the PAA grafted sample were determined. A selective cell response was observed when human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMC) or human pulmonary micro vascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) were seeded on the modified surfaces. HPASMC proliferation decreased about 60%, while HPMEC proliferation was just reduced about 10%. PAA grafted samples did not present hemolytic activity and the platelet adhesion decreased about 28% on PAA grafted surfaces. PMID:22002636

  12. Vascular Leiomyoma of the Pulmonary Artery.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Laura V; Morresi-Hauf, Alicia; Hatz, Rudolf A; Lindner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyoma of the pulmonary artery represents a curiosity in the literature. We describe a case of a 54-year-old female patient who presented with recurrent cough of a few weeks' duration. Computed tomography of the thorax located a smooth, limited tumor in the left thorax near the interlobar space. Thoracoscopic exploration showed a tumor mass, fused with the pulmonary artery. After anterolateral thoracotomy, a complete resection of the tumor was performed. The histopathologic examination showed the presence of a vascular leiomyoma of the tunica media of the pulmonary artery. PMID:26694272

  13. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease. PMID:27402344

  14. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area. PMID:25926569

  15. Vascular Extracellular Matrix and Arterial Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    WAGENSEIL, JESSICA E.; MECHAM, ROBERT P.

    2009-01-01

    An important factor in the transition from an open to a closed circulatory system was a change in vessel wall structure and composition that enabled the large arteries to store and release energy during the cardiac cycle. The component of the arterial wall in vertebrates that accounts for these properties is the elastic fiber network organized by medial smooth muscle. Beginning with the onset of pulsatile blood flow in the developing aorta, smooth muscle cells in the vessel wall produce a complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that will ultimately define the mechanical properties that are critical for proper function of the adult vascular system. This review discusses the structural ECM proteins in the vertebrate aortic wall and will explore how the choice of ECM components has changed through evolution as the cardiovascular system became more advanced and pulse pressure increased. By correlating vessel mechanics with physiological blood pressure across animal species and in mice with altered vessel compliance, we show that cardiac and vascular development are physiologically coupled, and we provide evidence for a universal elastic modulus that controls the parameters of ECM deposition in vessel wall development. We also discuss mechanical models that can be used to design better tissue-engineered vessels and to test the efficacy of clinical treatments. PMID:19584318

  16. Origin and differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Jacquet, Laureen; Karamariti, Eirini; Xu, Qingbo

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), a major structural component of the vessel wall, not only play a key role in maintaining vascular structure but also perform various functions. During embryogenesis, SMC recruitment from their progenitors is an important step in the formation of the embryonic vascular system. SMCs in the arterial wall are mostly quiescent but can display a contractile phenotype in adults. Under pathophysiological conditions, i.e. vascular remodelling after endothelial dysfunction or damage, contractile SMCs found in the media switch to a secretory type, which will facilitate their ability to migrate to the intima and proliferate to contribute to neointimal lesions. However, recent evidence suggests that the mobilization and recruitment of abundant stem/progenitor cells present in the vessel wall are largely responsible for SMC accumulation in the intima during vascular remodelling such as neointimal hyperplasia and arteriosclerosis. Therefore, understanding the regulatory mechanisms that control SMC differentiation from vascular progenitors is essential for exploring therapeutic targets for potential clinical applications. In this article, we review the origin and differentiation of SMCs from stem/progenitor cells during cardiovascular development and in the adult, highlighting the environmental cues and signalling pathways that control phenotypic modulation within the vasculature. PMID:25952975

  17. Arteriolar vascular smooth muscle cells: mechanotransducers in a complex environment.

    PubMed

    Hill, Michael A; Meininger, Gerald A

    2012-09-01

    Contraction of small artery (diameters typically less than 250 μm) vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a critical role in local control of blood flow and arterial pressure through its affect on vascular caliber. Specifically, contraction of small arteries in response to increased intraluminal pressure is referred to as the myogenic response and represents an important role for mechanotransduction. Critical questions remain as to how changes in pressure are sensed by VSMCs and transduced across the cell membrane to tune the contractile state of the cell. Recent studies suggest a pivotal role for interactions between VSMCs and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Thus, pressure-induced deformation of ECM proteins and their cell surface receptors (for example, integrins) may initiate contraction and cytoskeletal remodeling through modulation of ion channels, membrane depolarization, increased intracellular Ca(2+) and actomyosin crossbridge cycling. Importantly, it is argued that the contractile properties of small artery VSMCs reflect an intimate and integrated interaction with their extracellular environment and the three-dimensional structure of the vessel wall. PMID:22677491

  18. Involvement of Receptor Activity-Modifying Protein 3 (RAMP3) in the Vascular Actions of Adrenomedullin in Rat Mesenteric Artery Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Madhu; Yallampalli, Uma; Banadakappa, Manu; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar

    2015-11-01

    CALCB, ADM, and ADM2 are potent vasodilators that share a seven-transmembrane GPCR, calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CALCRL), whose ligand specificity is dictated by the presence of one of the three receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). We assessed the relative pharmacologic potency of these peptides in mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the specific RAMP that mediates the effect of ADM in VSMCs. VSMCs, with or without RAMP knockdown, were treated with CALCB, ADM, or ADM2 in the presence or absence of their antagonists, CALCB8-37, ADM22-52, and ADM217-47, respectively, to assess the relative effect of peptides on cAMP production and their pharmacologic potency. Proximity ligation assay was used to assess the specific RAMP that associates with CALCRL to mediate the actions of ADM in VSMCs. All three peptides induced cAMP generation in VSMCs and the order of their potency is CALCB > ADM > ADM2. Effects of CALCB were blocked by CALCB8-37, ADM effects were blocked by CALCB8-37 and ADM217-47 but not ADM22-52, and ADM2 effects were blocked by all three antagonists. Knockdown of RAMP2 was ineffective, whereas knockdown of RAMP3 inhibited ADM-induced cAMP production in VSMCs, suggesting involvement of RAMP3 with CALCRL to mediate ADM effects. Absence of both RAMP2 and RAMP3 further increased CALCB-induced cAMP synthesis compared to control (P < 0.05). ADM increased CALCRL and RAMP3 association and RAMP3 knockdown inhibited the interaction of ADM with CALCRL. PMID:26423127

  19. Megadolicho vascular malformation of the intracranial arteries.

    PubMed

    Lodder, J; Janevski, B; van der Lugt, P J

    1981-01-01

    A patient is presented suffering a hemiparesis. Megadolicho-vascular malformation of the intracranial part of the internal carotid arteries and some of its branches and of the basilar artery was suggested by CT and confirmed by angiography. The value of CT compared with angiography in relation to intracranial megadolicho vascular malformations is discussed. PMID:6273040

  20. Vascular leiomyoma of the lung arising from pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Leiomyoma of the lung is extremely rare. The entity is not described in WHO blue book. Less than 100 cases of leiomyoma of the lung have been reported in the literature. However, vascular leiomyoma has not been reported in the literature, to the author's best knowledge. Herein reported is the first case of vascular leiomyoma of the lung arising from smooth muscles of the pulmonary artery. A 62-year-old woman (non-smoker) was found to have a small tumor in the upper lobe in the right lung in routine check. Imaging modalities including CT demonstrated no metastatic lesions. Although clinical cytology and biopsy revealed no malignant cell, right upper lobectomy was performed under the clinical diagnosis of lung carcinoma. Grossly, a white tumor of 1 x 0.8 cm was recognized in the lung. Microscopically, the tumor was connected to the pulmonary arteries. The tumor was composed of mature smooth muscles. Small pulmonary arteries are embedded in the tumor. No lymphatics were seen. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were poisitive for alpha-smooth muscle actin, vimentin and Ki-67 (labeling 2%). However, they were negative for cytokeratin (CK) AE1/3, CK CAM5.2, desmin, S100 protein, p53, CD34, KIT, HMB45, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and myoglobin. A pathological diagnosis of primary vascular leiomyoma arising from the smooth muscle of pulmonary artery was made. The patient is now free from tumor, and is now alive 10 year after the operation. PMID:23236548

  1. Molecular mechanisms of increased vascular smooth muscle contraction in SHR

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.V.; Aqel, M.B.; Butters, C.; McEldoon, J.; Bhalla, R.C.

    1986-03-01

    The isometric tension development and /sup 45/Ca influx in response to NE and methoxamine stimulation were significantly (P < .05) increased in SHR caudal arteries as compared to WKY. Estimation of /sup 3/H-prazosin binding to the membranes isolated from caudal artery of WKY and SHR showed a single class of high affinity binding sites with Kd values: SHR, 128 +/- 14 pM; WKY, 141 +/- 19 pM and the Bmax values; SHR, 108 +/- 14 fmoles/mg protein; WKY, 113 +/- 21 fmoles/mg protein. Nifedipine inhibition of caudal artery contractions in response to NE stimulation was significantly greater (P < .05) in SHR as compared to WKY. On the other hand, there were no differences between WKY and SHR caudal artery rings either in the isometric tension development, /sup 45/Ca influx or nifedipine inhibition in response to K/sup +/-depolarization. Their results indicate that the increased vascular smooth muscle contraction in SHR in response to NE-stimulation may be due to increased Ca/sup 2 +/ influx through the receptor operated Ca/sup 2 +/ channels.

  2. Adult Vascular Wall Resident Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells, Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Arterial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Bruno; Compagna, Rita; Amato, Maurizio; Grande, Raffaele; Butrico, Lucia; Rossi, Alessio; Naso, Agostino; Ruggiero, Michele; de Franciscis, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Evidences have shown the presence of multipotent stem cells (SCs) at sites of arterial aneurysms: they can differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and are activated after residing in a quiescent state in the vascular wall. Recent studies have implicated the role of matrix metalloproteinases in the pathogenesis of arterial aneurysms: in fact the increased synthesis of MMPs by arterial SMCs is thought to be a pivotal mechanism in aneurysm formation. The factors and signaling pathways involved in regulating wall resident SC recruitment, survival, proliferation, growth factor production, and differentiation may be also related to selective expression of different MMPs. This review explores the relationship between adult vascular wall resident multipotent vascular SCs, MMPs, and arterial aneurysms. PMID:25866513

  3. Calcium oscillations in human mesenteric vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Garcia-Alonso, Mauricio; van Breemen, Cornelis; Tejerina, Teresa; Fameli, Nicola

    2014-02-28

    Phenylephrine (PE)-induced oscillatory fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) of vascular smooth muscle have been observed in many blood vessels isolated from a wide variety of mammals. Paradoxically, until recently similar observations in humans have proven elusive. In this study, we report for the first time observations of adrenergically-stimulated [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in human mesenteric artery smooth muscle. In arterial segments preloaded with Fluo-4 AM and mounted on a myograph on the stage of a confocal microscope, we observed PE-induced oscillations in [Ca(2+)]i, which initiated and maintained vasoconstriction. These oscillations present some variability, possibly due to compromised health of the tissue. This view is corroborated by our ultrastructural analysis of the cells, in which we found only (5 ± 2)% plasma membrane-sarcoplasmic reticulum apposition, markedly less than measured in healthy tissue from laboratory animals. We also partially characterized the oscillations by using the inhibitory drugs 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and nifedipine. After PE contraction, all drugs provoked relaxation of the vessel segments, sometimes only partial, and reduced or inhibited oscillations, except CPA, which rarely caused relaxation. These preliminary results point to a potential involvement of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) in the maintenance of the Ca(2+) oscillations observed in human blood vessels. PMID:24508261

  4. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Martin R; Sinha, Sanjay; Owens, Gary K

    2016-02-19

    The historical view of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in atherosclerosis is that aberrant proliferation of VSMCs promotes plaque formation, but that VSMCs in advanced plaques are entirely beneficial, for example preventing rupture of the fibrous cap. However, this view has been based on ideas that there is a homogenous population of VSMCs within the plaque, that can be identified separate from other plaque cells (particularly macrophages) using standard VSMC and macrophage immunohistochemical markers. More recent genetic lineage tracing studies have shown that VSMC phenotypic switching results in less-differentiated forms that lack VSMC markers including macrophage-like cells, and this switching directly promotes atherosclerosis. In addition, VSMC proliferation may be beneficial throughout atherogenesis, and not just in advanced lesions, whereas VSMC apoptosis, cell senescence, and VSMC-derived macrophage-like cells may promote inflammation. We review the effect of embryological origin on VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis, the role, regulation and consequences of phenotypic switching, the evidence for different origins of VSMCs, and the role of individual processes that VSMCs undergo in atherosclerosis in regard to plaque formation and the structure of advanced lesions. We think there is now compelling evidence that a full understanding of VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis is critical to identify therapeutic targets to both prevent and treat atherosclerosis. PMID:26892967

  5. A novel transgenic marker for migrating limb muscle precursors and for vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tidhar, A; Reichenstein, M; Cohen, D; Faerman, A; Copeland, N G; Gilbert, D J; Jenkins, N A; Shani, M

    2001-01-01

    A unique pattern of LacZ expression was found in a transgenic mouse line, likely due to regulatory elements at the site of integration. Two new genes flanking the transgene were identified. At early stages of development, the transgene is transiently expressed in ventro-lateral demomyotomal cells migrating from the somites into the limb buds. At late developmental stages and in the adult, lacZ staining marks vascular smooth muscle cells throughout the vascular bed, with the exception of the major elastic arteries, and in pericytes. No expression was detected in skeletal and smooth muscles. Different patterns of expression in vascular smooth muscles was observed at distinct levels of the vascular tree, in arteries as well as in veins. Vessel injury, resulting in stimulation of smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration, is associated with transgene down-regulation. After the formation of neointima thickening, it is reactivated. This transgenic insertion may therefore be used as a useful marker to identify novel physiological cues or genetic elements involved in the regulation of the vascular smooth muscle phenotype(s). It may also provide an experimental tool for studying vasculature and the involvement of pericytes in regulating microvascular homeostasis. PMID:11146508

  6. Vinpocetine Attenuates the Osteoblastic Differentiation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun-Yun; Sun, Lin; Chen, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Na; Yi, Peng-Fei; Song, Min; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Liang, Qiu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active process of osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, its definite mechanism remains unknown. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has been demonstrated to inhibit the high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, it remains unknown whether vinpocetine can affect the osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. We hereby investigated the effect of vinpocetine on vascular calcification using a beta-glycerophosphate-induced cell model. Our results showed that vinpocetine significantly reduced the osteoblast-like phenotypes of vascular smooth muscle cells including ALP activity, osteocalcin, collagen type I, Runx2 and BMP-2 expression as well as the formation of mineralized nodule. Vinpocetine, binding to translocation protein, induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase and Akt and thus inhibited the translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B into the nucleus. Silencing of translocator protein significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of vinpocetine on osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Taken together, vinpocetine may be a promising candidate for the clinical therapy of vascular calcification. PMID:27589055

  7. Vascular balloon injury and intraluminal administration in rat carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Trebak, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The carotid artery balloon injury model in rats has been well established for over two decades. It remains an important method to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in vascular smooth muscle dedifferentiation, neointima formation and vascular remodeling. Male Sprague-Dawley rats are the most frequently employed animals for this model. Female rats are not preferred as female hormones are protective against vascular diseases and thus introduce a variation into this procedure. The left carotid is typically injured with the right carotid serving as a negative control. Left carotid injury is caused by the inflated balloon that denudes the endothelium and distends the vessel wall. Following injury, potential therapeutic strategies such as the use of pharmacological compounds and either gene or shRNA transfer can be evaluated. Typically for gene or shRNA transfer, the injured section of the vessel lumen is locally transduced for 30 min with viral particles encoding either a protein or shRNA for delivery and expression in the injured vessel wall. Neointimal thickening representing proliferative vascular smooth muscle cells usually peaks at 2 weeks after injury. Vessels are mostly harvested at this time point for cellular and molecular analysis of cell signaling pathways as well as gene and protein expression. Vessels can also be harvested at earlier time points to determine the onset of expression and/or activation of a specific protein or pathway, depending on the experimental aims intended. Vessels can be characterized and evaluated using histological staining, immunohistochemistry, protein/mRNA assays, and activity assays. The intact right carotid artery from the same animal is an ideal internal control. Injury-induced changes in molecular and cellular parameters can be evaluated by comparing the injured artery to the internal right control artery. Likewise, therapeutic modalities can be evaluated by comparing the injured and treated artery to the

  8. Arterial Myogenic Activation through Smooth Muscle Filamin A.

    PubMed

    Retailleau, Kevin; Arhatte, Malika; Demolombe, Sophie; Peyronnet, Rémi; Baudrie, Véronique; Jodar, Martine; Bourreau, Jennifer; Henrion, Daniel; Offermanns, Stefan; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Feng, Yuanyi; Patel, Amanda; Duprat, Fabrice; Honoré, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in the filamin A (FlnA) gene are frequently associated with severe arterial abnormalities, although the physiological role for this cytoskeletal element remains poorly understood in vascular cells. We used a conditional mouse model to selectively delete FlnA in smooth muscle (sm) cells at the adult stage, thus avoiding the developmental effects of the knockout. Basal blood pressure was significantly reduced in conscious smFlnA knockout mice. Remarkably, pressure-dependent tone of the resistance caudal artery was lost, whereas reactivity to vasoconstrictors was preserved. Impairment of the myogenic behavior was correlated with a lack of calcium influx in arterial myocytes upon an increase in intraluminal pressure. Notably, the stretch activation of CaV1.2 was blunted in the absence of smFlnA. In conclusion, FlnA is a critical upstream element of the signaling cascade underlying the myogenic tone. These findings allow a better understanding of the molecular basis of arterial autoregulation and associated disease states. PMID:26923587

  9. Long-Term Expression of Human Adenosine Deaminase in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells of Rats: A Model for Gene Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Carmel M.; Clowes, Monika M.; Osborne, William R. A.; Clowes, Alexander W.; Dusty Miller, A.

    1992-02-01

    Gene transfer into vascular smooth muscle cells in animals was examined by using recombinant retroviral vectors containing an Escherichia coli β-galactosidase gene or a human adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) gene. Direct gene transfer by infusion of virus into rat carotid arteries was not observed. However, gene transfer by infection of smooth muscle cells in culture and seeding of the transduced cells onto arteries that had been denuded of endothelial cells was successful. Potentially therapeutic levels of human adenosine deaminase activity were detected over 6 months of observation, indicating the utility of vascular smooth muscle cells for gene therapy in humans.

  10. Functional preservation of vascular smooth muscle tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, W. C.; Hutchins, P. M.; Kimzey, S. L.

    1973-01-01

    The ionic and cellular feedback relationships operating to effect the vascular decompensatory modifications were examined to reveal procedures for implementing protective measures guarding against vascular collapse when returning from a weightless environment to that of the earth's gravity. The surgical procedures for preparing the rat cremaster, and the fixation methods are described. Abstracts of publications resulting from this research are included.

  11. Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness Syndrome”—Revisiting the Structural Basis of Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Sehgel, Nancy L.; Vatner, Stephen F.; Meininger, Gerald A.

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, the pervasiveness of increased arterial stiffness in patients with cardiovascular disease has become increasingly apparent. Though, this phenomenon has been well documented in humans and animal models of disease for well over a century, there has been surprisingly limited development in a deeper mechanistic understanding of arterial stiffness. Much of the historical literature has focused on changes in extracellular matrix proteins—collagen and elastin. However, extracellular matrix changes alone appear insufficient to consistently account for observed changes in vascular stiffness, which we observed in our studies of aortic stiffness in aging monkeys. This led us to examine novel mechanisms operating at the level of the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)—that include increased cell stiffness and adhesion to extracellular matrix—which that may be interrelated with other mechanisms contributing to arterial stiffness. We introduce these observations as a new concept—the Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness Syndrome (SMCSS)—within the field of arterial stiffness and posit that stiffening of vascular cells impairs vascular function and may contribute stiffening to the vasculature with aging and cardiovascular disease. Importantly, this review article revisits the structural basis of arterial stiffness in light of these novel findings. Such classification of SMCSS and its contextualization into our current understanding of vascular mechanics may be useful in the development of strategic therapeutics to directly target arterial stiffness. PMID:26635621

  12. Caveolin-3 Promotes a Vascular Smooth Muscle Contractile Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Pajares, Jorge L.; Iturrieta, Jeannette; Dulam, Vipin; Wang, Yu; Pavlides, Stephanos; Malacari, Gabriella; Lisanti, Michael P.; Frank, Philippe G.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the importance of cardiovascular diseases in Western countries. Among the cell types associated with a dysfunctional vasculature, smooth muscle (SM) cells are believed to play an essential role in the development of these illnesses. Vascular SM cells are key regulators of the vascular tone and also have an important function in the development of atherosclerosis and restenosis. While in the normal vasculature, contractile SM cells are predominant, in atherosclerotic vascular lesions, synthetic cells migrate toward the neointima, proliferate, and synthetize extracellular matrix proteins. In the present study, we have examined the role of caveolin-3 in the regulation of SM cell phenotype. Caveolin-3 is expressed in vivo in normal arterial SM cells, but its expression appears to be lost in cultured SM cells. Our data show that caveolin-3 expression in the A7r5 SM cell line is associated with increased expression of contractility markers such as SM α-actin, SM myosin heavy chain but decreased expression of the synthetic phenotype markers such as p-Elk and Klf4. Moreover, we also show that caveolin-3 expression can reduce proliferation upon treatment with LDL or PDGF. Finally, we show that caveolin-3-expressing SM cells are less sensitive to apoptosis than control cells upon treatment with oxidized LDL. Taken together, our data suggest that caveolin-3 can regulate the phenotypic switch between contractile and synthetic SM cells. A better understanding of the factors regulating caveolin-3 expression and function in this cell type will permit the development of a better comprehension of the factors regulating SM function in atherosclerosis and restenosis. PMID:26664898

  13. Hypertrophy and hyperplasia of smooth muscle cells of small intramyocardial arteries in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Amann, K; Gharehbaghi, H; Stephen, S; Mall, G

    1995-01-01

    Hearts of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were investigated by means of stereology and were compared with those of normotensive. Wistar-Kyoto controls. At the age of 9 months, hypertensive rats showed cardiac hypertrophy, marked myocardial fibrosis, activation of nonvascular interstitium, focal myocytial degeneration, reduction of capillarization, and microarteriopathy of small intramyocardial arteries. Stereologically, a significant increase in the total left ventricular arterial wall volume (+180% versus controls) was found in SHR hearts. By using new stereological techniques, the orientator and the nucleator, we investigated whether this significant increase in total left ventricular arterial wall volume was due to hyperplasia of smooth muscle cells in addition to the process of vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy that is common in SHR. Additionally, the nuclear size and ratio of cell volume to nuclear volume were determined using another new stereological technique, the selector. The stereological data indicate a significant increase in mean cell and nuclear volumes as well as in the total number of left ventricular arterial smooth muscle cells of SHR. Additionally, the total length of intramyocardial arteries was also significantly increased in hypertensive rats. The volume and number of arterial smooth muscle cells per arterial length were significantly (P < .001 and P < .05, respectively) higher in SHR than in normotensive controls. Thus, we conclude that hypertrophy and hyperplasia of smooth muscle cells are involved in intramyocardial arterial growth processes in hypertensive heart remodeling.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7843743

  14. Piperine Congeners as Inhibitors of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mair, Christina E; Liu, Rongxia; Atanasov, Atanas G; Wimmer, Laurin; Nemetz-Fiedler, Daniel; Sider, Nadine; Heiss, Elke H; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Dirsch, Verena M; Rollinger, Judith M

    2015-08-01

    Successful vascular healing after percutaneous coronary interventions is related to the inhibition of abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and efficient re-endothelialization. In the search for vascular smooth muscle cell anti-proliferative agents from natural sources we identified piperine (1), the main pungent constituent of the fruits from Piper nigrum (black pepper). Piperine inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation with an IC50 of 21.6 µM, as quantified by a resazurin conversion assay. Investigations of ten piperamides isolated from black pepper fruits and 15 synthesized piperine derivatives resulted in the identification of three potent vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation inhibitors: the natural alkaloid pipertipine (4), and the two synthetic derivatives (2E,4E)-N,N-dibutyl-5-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)penta-2,4-dienamide (14) and (E)-N,N-dibutyl-3-(naphtho[2,3-d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl)acrylamide (20). They showed IC50 values of 3.38, 6.00, and 7.85 µM, respectively. Furthermore, the synthetic compound (2E,4E)-5-(4-fluorophenyl)-1-(piperidin-1-yl)penta-2,4-dien-1-one (12) was found to be cell type selective, by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation with an IC50 of 11.8 µM without influencing the growth of human endothelial cells. PMID:26132851

  15. Neurotrophin and Neurotrophin Receptors in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Michael J.; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Kraemer, Rosemary; McCaffrey, Timothy A.; Tessarollo, Lino; Mahadeo, Debbie; Sharif, Setareh; Kaplan, David R.; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Parada, Luis; Toran-Allerand, C. Dominique; Hajjar, David P.; Hempstead, Barbara L.

    1995-01-01

    The neurotrophins, a family of related polypeptide growth factors including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin (NT)-3 and NT-4/5 promote the survival and differentiation of distinctive sets of embryonic neurons. Here we define a new functional role for neurotrophins, as autocrine or local paracrine mediators of vascular smooth muscle cell migration. We have identified neurotrophins, and their cognate receptors, the trk tyrosine kinases, in human and rat vascular smooth muscle cells in vivo. In vitro, cultured human smooth muscle cells express BDNF; NT-3; and trk A, B, and C Similarly, rat smooth muscle cells expressed all three trk receptors as well as all four neurotrophins. Moreover, NGF induces cultured human smooth muscle cell migration at subnanomolar concentrations. In the rat aortic balloon deendothelialization model of vascular injury, the expression of NGF, BDNF, and their receptors trk A and trk B increased dramatically in the area of injury within 3 days and persisted during the formation of the neointima. In human coronary atherosclerotic lesions, BDNF, NT-3, and NT-4/5, and the trk B and trk C receptors could be demonstrated in smooth muscle cells. These findings suggest that neurotrophins play an important role in regulating the response of vascular smooth muscle cells to injury. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:7639328

  16. Vinpocetine suppresses pathological vascular remodeling by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yujun; Knight, Walter E; Guo, Shujie; Li, Jian-Dong; Knight, Peter A; Yan, Chen

    2012-11-01

    Abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) activation is associated with various vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis, in-stent restenosis, vein graft disease, and transplantation-associated vasculopathy. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. However, its role in pathological vascular remodeling remains unexplored. Herein, we show that systemic administration of vinpocetine significantly reduced neointimal formation in carotid arteries after ligation injury. Vinpocetine also markedly decreased spontaneous remodeling of human saphenous vein explants in ex vivo culture. In cultured SMCs, vinpocetine dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and caused G1-phase cell cycle arrest, which is associated with a decrease in cyclin D1 and an increase in p27Kip1 levels. In addition, vinpocetine dose-dependently inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated SMC migration as determined by the two-dimensional migration assays and three-dimensional aortic medial explant invasive assay. Moreover, vinpocetine significantly reduced PDGF-induced type I collagen and fibronectin expression. It is noteworthy that PDGF-stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), but not protein kinase B, was specifically inhibited by vinpocetine. Vinpocetine powerfully attenuated intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) production, which largely mediates the inhibitory effects of vinpocetine on ERK1/2 activation and SMC growth. Taken together, our results reveal a novel function of vinpocetine in attenuating neointimal hyperplasia and pathological vascular remodeling, at least partially through suppressing ROS production and ERK1/2 activation in SMCs. Given the safety profile of vinpocetine, this study provides insight into the therapeutic potential of vinpocetine in proliferative vascular disorders. PMID:22915768

  17. Vinpocetine Suppresses Pathological Vascular Remodeling by Inhibiting Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yujun; Knight, Walter E.; Guo, Shujie; Li, Jian-Dong; Knight, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) activation is associated with various vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis, in-stent restenosis, vein graft disease, and transplantation-associated vasculopathy. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. However, its role in pathological vascular remodeling remains unexplored. Herein, we show that systemic administration of vinpocetine significantly reduced neointimal formation in carotid arteries after ligation injury. Vinpocetine also markedly decreased spontaneous remodeling of human saphenous vein explants in ex vivo culture. In cultured SMCs, vinpocetine dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and caused G1-phase cell cycle arrest, which is associated with a decrease in cyclin D1 and an increase in p27Kip1 levels. In addition, vinpocetine dose-dependently inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated SMC migration as determined by the two-dimensional migration assays and three-dimensional aortic medial explant invasive assay. Moreover, vinpocetine significantly reduced PDGF-induced type I collagen and fibronectin expression. It is noteworthy that PDGF-stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), but not protein kinase B, was specifically inhibited by vinpocetine. Vinpocetine powerfully attenuated intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) production, which largely mediates the inhibitory effects of vinpocetine on ERK1/2 activation and SMC growth. Taken together, our results reveal a novel function of vinpocetine in attenuating neointimal hyperplasia and pathological vascular remodeling, at least partially through suppressing ROS production and ERK1/2 activation in SMCs. Given the safety profile of vinpocetine, this study provides insight into the therapeutic potential of vinpocetine in proliferative vascular disorders. PMID:22915768

  18. Disruption of TGF-β signaling in smooth muscle cell prevents flow-induced vascular remodeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fu; Chambon, Pierre; Tellides, George; Kong, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Wei

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • TGF-β signaling in SMC contributes to the flow-induced vascular remodeling. • Disruption of TGF-β signaling in SMC can prevent this process. • Targeting SM-specific Tgfbr2 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for vascular remodeling. - Abstract: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling has been prominently implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling, especially the initiation and progression of flow-induced vascular remodeling. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the principal resident cells in arterial wall and are critical for arterial remodeling. However, the role of TGF-β signaling in SMC for flow-induced vascular remodeling remains unknown. Therefore, the goal of our study was to determine the effect of TGF-β pathway in SMC for vascular remodeling, by using a genetical smooth muscle-specific (SM-specific) TGF-β type II receptor (Tgfbr2) deletion mice model. Mice deficient in the expression of Tgfbr2 (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup f/f}) and their corresponding wild-type background mice (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup WT/WT}) underwent partial ligation of left common carotid artery for 1, 2, or 4 weeks. Then the carotid arteries were harvested and indicated that the disruption of Tgfbr2 in SMC provided prominent inhibition of vascular remodeling. And the thickening of carotid media, proliferation of SMC, infiltration of macrophage, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) were all significantly attenuated in Tgfbr2 disruption mice. Our study demonstrated, for the first time, that the TGF-β signaling in SMC plays an essential role in flow-induced vascular remodeling and disruption can prevent this process.

  19. [Vascular aging, arterial hypertension and physical activity].

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Trucksäss, A; Weisser, B

    2011-11-01

    The present review delineates the significance of intima-media-thickness, arterial stiffness and endothelial function for vascular aging. There is profound evidence for an increase in intima-media-thickness and vascular stiffness not only during healthy aging but induced also by cardiovascular risk factors. There is a central role of arterial hypertension for this progression in both structural factors. In addition, both parameters are strongly associated with cardiovascular risk. Endothelial function measured as postischemic flow-mediated vasodilatation is a functional parameter which is decreased both in healthy aging and by cardiovascular risk factors. Physical activity modifies the influence of aging and risk factors on endothelial function. A positive influence of endurance exercise on vascular stiffness and endothelial function has been demonstrated in numerous studies. In long-term studies, regular physical activity has been shown to reduce the progression of intima-media-thickness. Thus, arterial hypertension accelerates vascular aging, while physical activity has a positive influence on a variety of vascular parameters associated with vascular aging. PMID:22068448

  20. Mechanisms of Vascular Smooth Muscle Contraction and the Basis for Pharmacologic Treatment of Smooth Muscle Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brozovich, F.V.; Nicholson, C.J.; Degen, C.V.; Gao, Yuan Z.; Aggarwal, M.

    2016-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell directly drives the contraction of the vascular wall and hence regulates the size of the blood vessel lumen. We review here the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which agonists, therapeutics, and diseases regulate contractility of the vascular smooth muscle cell and we place this within the context of whole body function. We also discuss the implications for personalized medicine and highlight specific potential target molecules that may provide opportunities for the future development of new therapeutics to regulate vascular function. PMID:27037223

  1. Cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor inhibition decreases vascular smooth muscle migration and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, Mohanraj; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Hasko, Gyoergy; Pacher, Pal

    2008-12-26

    Vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration triggered by inflammatory stimuli and chemoattractants such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are key events in the development and progression of atherosclerosis and restenosis. Cannabinoids may modulate cell proliferation and migration in various cell types through cannabinoid receptors. Here we investigated the effects of CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716A), which has recently been shown to have anti-atherosclerotic effects both in mice and humans, on PDGF-induced proliferation, migration, and signal transduction of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs). PDGF induced Ras and ERK 1/2 activation, while increasing proliferation and migration of HCASMCs, which were dose dependently attenuated by CB{sub 1} antagonist, rimonabant. These findings suggest that in addition to improving plasma lipid alterations and decreasing inflammatory cell migration and inflammatory response, CB{sub 1} antagonists may exert beneficial effects in atherosclerosis and restenosis by decreasing vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration.

  2. Hydraulic Conductivity of Smooth Muscle Cell-Initiated Arterial Cocultures.

    PubMed

    Mathura, Rishi A; Russell-Puleri, Sparkle; Cancel, Limary M; Tarbell, John M

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of arterial coculture conditions on the transport properties of several in vitro endothelial cell (EC)-smooth muscle cell (SMC)-porous filter constructs in which SMC were grown to confluence first and then EC were inoculated. This order of culturing simulates the environment of a blood vessel wall after endothelial layer damage due to stenting, vascular grafting or other vascular wall insult. For all coculture configurations examined, we observed that hydraulic conductivity (L p) values were significantly higher than predicted by a resistances-in-series (RIS) model accounting for the L p of EC and SMC measured separately. The greatest increases were observed when EC were plated directly on top of a confluent SMC layer without an intervening filter, presumably mediated by direct EC-SMC contacts that were observed under confocal microscopy. The results are the opposite of a previous study that showed L p was significantly reduced compared to an RIS model when EC were grown to confluency first. The physiological, pathophysiological and tissue engineering implications of these results are discussed. PMID:26265460

  3. Niacin Suppresses Progression of Atherosclerosis by Inhibiting Vascular Inflammation and Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Gang; Sun, Guangli; Liu, Hai; Shu, Liliang; Zhang, Jingchao; Guo, Longhui; Huang, Chen; Xu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Background Niacin is a broad-spectrum lipid-regulating drug used for the clinical therapy of atherosclerosis; however, the mechanisms by which niacin ameliorates atherosclerosis are not clear. Material/Methods The effect of niacin on atherosclerosis was assessed by detection of atherosclerotic lesion area. Adhesion molecules in arterial endothelial cells were determined by using qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The levels of serum inflammatory cytokines in ApoE−/− mice were detected by using ELISA. We detected the expression levels of phosphorylated nuclear factors-κB (NF-κB) p65 in aortic endothelial cells of mice using Western blot analysis. Furthermore, we investigated the anti-inflammation effect and endothelium-protecting function of niacin and their regulatory mechanisms in vitro. Results Niacin inhibited the progress of atherosclerosis and decreased the levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules in ApoE−/− mice. Niacin suppressed the activity of NF-κB and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Furthermore, niacin induced phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and FAK inhibitor PF-573228 reduced the level of Bcl-2 and elevated the level of cleaved caspase-3 in VSMCs. Conclusions Niacin inhibits vascular inflammation and apoptosis of VSMCs via inhibiting the NF-κB signaling and the FAK signaling pathway, respectively, thus protecting ApoE−/− mice against atherosclerosis. PMID:26712802

  4. [Mechanism of losartan suppressing vascular calcification in rat aortic artery].

    PubMed

    Shao, Juan; Wu, Panfeng; Wu, Jiliang; Li, Mincai

    2016-08-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of the angiotensin II receptor 1 (AT1R) blocker losartan on vascular calcification in rat aortic artery and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods SD rats were divided randomly into control group, vascular calcification model group and treatment group. Vascular calcification models were made by subcutaneous injection of warfarin plus vitamin K1 for two weeks. Rats in the treatment group were subcutaneously injected with losartan (10 mg/kg) at the end of the first week and consecutively for one week. We observed the morphological changes by HE staining and the calcium deposition by Alizarin red staining in the artery vascular wall. The mRNA expressions of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) were analyzed by reverse transcription PCR. The BMP2 and RUNX2 protein expressions were determined by Western blotting. The apoptosis of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were detected by TUNEL. The AT1R expression was tested by fluorescent immunohistochemistry. Results The aortic vascular calcification was induced by warfarin and vitamin K1. Compared with the vascular calcification model group, the mRNA and protein expressions of BMP2 and RUNX2 were significantly downregulated in the aorta in the losartan treatment group. Furthermore, the apoptosis of SMCs and the AT1R expression obviously decreased. Conclusion AT1R blocker losartan inhibits the apoptosis of SMCs and reduces AT1R expression; it downregulates the BMP2 and RUNX2 expressions in the vascular calcification process. PMID:27412937

  5. Perfusion of veins at arterial pressure increases the expression of KLF5 and cell cycle genes in smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Amirak, Emre; Zakkar, Mustafa; Evans, Paul C.; Kemp, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation remains a major cause of veno-arterial graft failure. We hypothesised that exposure of venous SMCs to arterial pressure would increase KLF5 expression and that of cell cycle genes. Porcine jugular veins were perfused at arterial or venous pressure in the absence of growth factors. The KLF5, c-myc, cyclin-D and cyclin-E expression were elevated within 24 h of perfusion at arterial pressure but not at venous pressure. Arterial pressure also reduced the decline in SM-myosin heavy chain expression. These data suggest a role for KLF5 in initiating venous SMCs proliferation in response to arterial pressure.

  6. Blocking interferon {beta} stimulates vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and arteriogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Stephan H; Bot, Pieter T; Fledderus, Joost O; van der Laan, A M; Volger, Oscar L; Laufs, Ulrich; Böhm, Michael; de Vries, Carlie J M; Horrevoets, Anton J G; Piek, Jan J; Hoefer, Imo E; van Royen, Niels

    2010-11-01

    Increased interferon (IFN)-β signaling in patients with insufficient coronary collateralization and an inhibitory effect of IFNβ on collateral artery growth in mice have been reported. The mechanisms of IFNβ-induced inhibition of arteriogenesis are unknown. In stimulated monocytes from patients with chronic total coronary artery occlusion and decreased arteriogenic response, whole genome expression analysis showed increased expression of IFNβ-regulated genes. Immunohistochemically, the IFNβ receptor was localized in the vascular media of murine collateral arteries. Treatment of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) with IFNβ resulted in an attenuated proliferation, cell-cycle arrest, and increased expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor-1A (p21). The growth inhibitory effect of IFNβ was attenuated by inhibition of p21 by RNA interference. IFNβ-treated THP1 monocytes showed enhanced apoptosis. Subsequently, we tested if collateral artery growth can be stimulated by inhibition of IFNβ-signaling. RNA interference of the IFNβ receptor-1 (IFNAR1) increased VSMC proliferation, cell cycle progression, and reduced p21 gene expression. IFNβ signaling and FAS and TRAIL expression were attenuated in monocytes from IFNAR1(-/-) mice, indicating reduced monocyte apoptosis. Hindlimb perfusion restoration 1 week after femoral artery ligation was improved in IFNAR1(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice as assessed by infusion of fluorescent microspheres. These results demonstrate that IFNβ inhibits collateral artery growth and VSMC proliferation through p21-dependent cell cycle arrest and induction of monocyte apoptosis. Inhibition of IFNβ stimulates VSMC proliferation and collateral artery growth. PMID:20736166

  7. Notch signal reception is required in vascular smooth muscle cells for ductus arteriosus closure.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Luke T; Norton, Christine R; Gridley, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The ductus arteriosus is an arterial vessel that shunts blood flow away from the lungs during fetal life, but normally occludes after birth to establish the adult circulation pattern. Failure of the ductus arteriosus to close after birth is termed patent ductus arteriosus, and is one of the most common congenital heart defects. Our previous work demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cell expression of the Jag1 gene, which encodes a ligand for Notch family receptors, is essential for postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice. However, it was not known what cell population was responsible for receiving the Jag1-mediated signal. Here we show, using smooth muscle cell-specific deletion of the Rbpj gene, which encodes a transcription factor that mediates all canonical Notch signaling, that Notch signal reception in the vascular smooth muscle cell compartment is required for ductus arteriosus closure. These data indicate that homotypic vascular smooth muscle cell interactions are required for proper contractile smooth muscle cell differentiation and postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice. PMID:26742650

  8. BMP-2 gene expression and effects on human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Willette, R N; Gu, J L; Lysko, P G; Anderson, K M; Minehart, H; Yue, T

    1999-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and their serine/threonine kinase receptors have been identified in atherosclerotic arteries and vascular smooth muscle cells, respectively. Thus, BMPs (the largest subfamily of the TGF-beta superfamily) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. However, the origins of BMP biosynthesis and the functional roles of BMP in blood vessels are unclear. The present study explored BMP-2 gene expression in various human blood vessels and vascular cell types. Functional in vitro studies were also performed to determine the effects of recombinant human BMP-2 on migration (transwell assay) and proliferation ([3H]-thymidine incorporation) of human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HASMC). RT-PCR experiments revealed BMP-2 gene expression in normal and atherosclerotic human arteries as well as cultured human aortic and coronary vascular smooth muscle cells, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human macrophages. In cellular migration studies, incubation with BMP-2 produced efficacious (smooth muscle cell response to vascular injury. PMID:10213907

  9. The induction of YAP expression following arterial injury is crucial for smooth muscle phenotypic modulation and neointima formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaobo; Hu, Guoqing; Gao, Xiangwei; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Wei; Harmon, Erin Yund; Zhi, Xu; Xu, Zhengping; Lennartz, Michelle R.; Barroso, Margarida; Trebak, Mohamed; Chen, Ceshi; Zhou, Jiliang

    2012-01-01

    Objective Abnormal proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the key events in the progression of neointima formation in response to vascular injury. The goal of this study is to investigate the functional role of a potent oncogene YAP in smooth muscle phenotypic modulation in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results In vitro in cell culture and in vivo in both mouse and rat arterial injury models YAP expression is significantly induced and correlated with the vascular SMC synthetic phenotype. Over-expression of YAP promotes SMC migration and proliferation while attenuating smooth muscle contractile gene expression. Conversely, knocking-down endogenous YAP in SMCs up-regulates smooth muscle gene expression but attenuates SMC proliferation and migration. Consistent with this, knocking-down YAP expression in a rat carotid balloon injury model and genetic deletion of YAP specifically in vascular SMCs in mouse after carotid artery ligation injury attenuates injury-induced smooth muscle phenotypic switch and neointima formation. Conclusions YAP plays a novel integrative role in smooth muscle phenotypic modulation by inhibiting smooth muscle-specific gene expression while promoting smooth muscle proliferation and migration in vitro and in vivo. Blocking the induction of YAP would be a potential therapeutic approach for ameliorating vascular occlusive diseases. PMID:22922963

  10. Vascular mechanics of the coronary artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veress, A. I.; Vince, D. G.; Anderson, P. M.; Cornhill, J. F.; Herderick, E. E.; Klingensmith, J. D.; Kuban, B. D.; Greenberg, N. L.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes our research into the vascular mechanics of the coronary artery and plaque. The three sections describe the determination of arterial mechanical properties using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), a constitutive relation for the arterial wall, and finite element method (FEM) models of the arterial wall and atheroma. METHODS: Inflation testing of porcine left anterior descending coronary arteries was conducted. The changes in the vessel geometry were monitored using IVUS, and intracoronary pressure was recorded using a pressure transducer. The creep and quasistatic stress/strain responses were determined. A Standard Linear Solid (SLS) was modified to reproduce the non-linear elastic behavior of the arterial wall. This Standard Non-linear Solid (SNS) was implemented into an axisymetric thick-walled cylinder numerical model. Finite element analysis models were created for five age groups and four levels of stenosis using the Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis Youth (PDAY) database. RESULTS: The arteries exhibited non-linear elastic behavior. The total tissue creep strain was epsilon creep = 0.082 +/- 0.018 mm/mm. The numerical model could reproduce both the non-linearity of the porcine data and time dependent behavior of the arterial wall found in the literature with a correlation coefficient of 0.985. Increasing age had a strong positive correlation with the shoulder stress level, (r = 0.95). The 30% stenosis had the highest shoulder stress due to the combination of a fully formed lipid pool and a thin cap. CONCLUSIONS: Studying the solid mechanics of the arterial wall and the atheroma provide important insights into the mechanisms involved in plaque rupture.

  11. Tobacco constituents are mitogenic for arterial smooth-muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, C.G.; Hajjar, D.P.; Hefton, J.M.

    1985-07-01

    Tobacco glycoprotein (TGP) purified from flue-cured tobacco leaves, tar-derived material (TAR), the water soluble, nondialyzable, delipidized extract of cigarette smoke condensate, rutin-bovine serum albumin conjugates, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid are mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, but not adventitial fibroblasts. The mitogenicity appears to depend on polyphenol epitopes on carrier molecules. Ellagic acid, another plant polyphenol, inhibited arterial smooth-muscle proliferation. These results suggest that a number of ubiquitous, plant-derived substances may influence smooth-muscle cell proliferation in the arterial wall.

  12. Increased Vascular Smooth Muscle Contractility in TRPC6−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Alexander; Mederos y Schnitzler, Michael; Gollasch, Maik; Gross, Volkmar; Storch, Ursula; Dubrovska, Galyna; Obst, Michael; Yildirim, Eda; Salanova, Birgit; Kalwa, Hermann; Essin, Kirill; Pinkenburg, Olaf; Luft, Friedrich C.; Gudermann, Thomas; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2005-01-01

    Among the TRPC subfamily of TRP (classical transient receptor potential) channels, TRPC3, -6, and -7 are gated by signal transduction pathways that activate C-type phospholipases as well as by direct exposure to diacylglycerols. Since TRPC6 is highly expressed in pulmonary and vascular smooth muscle cells, it represents a likely molecular candidate for receptor-operated cation entry. To define the physiological role of TRPC6, we have developed a TRPC6-deficient mouse model. These mice showed an elevated blood pressure and enhanced agonist-induced contractility of isolated aortic rings as well as cerebral arteries. Smooth muscle cells of TRPC6-deficient mice have higher basal cation entry, increased TRPC-carried cation currents, and more depolarized membrane potentials. This higher basal cation entry, however, was completely abolished by the expression of a TRPC3-specific small interference RNA in primary TRPC6−/− smooth muscle cells. Along these lines, the expression of TRPC3 in wild-type cells resulted in increased basal activity, while TRPC6 expression in TRPC6−/− smooth muscle cells reduced basal cation influx. These findings imply that constitutively active TRPC3-type channels, which are up-regulated in TRPC6-deficient smooth muscle cells, are not able to functionally replace TRPC6. Thus, TRPC6 has distinct nonredundant roles in the control of vascular smooth muscle tone. PMID:16055711

  13. Smooth muscle BK channel activity influences blood pressure independent of vascular tone in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sachse, Gregor; Faulhaber, Jörg; Seniuk, Anika; Ehmke, Heimo; Pongs, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel is an important determinant of vascular tone and contributes to blood pressure regulation. Both activities depend on the ancillary BKβ1 subunit. To determine the significance of smooth muscle BK channel activity for blood pressure regulation, we investigated the potential link between changes in arterial tone and altered blood pressure in BKβ1 knockout (BKβ1−/−) mice from three different genetically defined strains. While vascular tone was consistently increased in all BKβ1−/− mice independent of genetic background, BKβ1−/− strains exhibited increased (strain A), unaltered (strain B) or decreased (strain C) mean arterial blood pressures compared to their corresponding BKβ1+/+ controls. In agreement with previous data on aldosterone regulation by renal/adrenal BK channel function, BKβ1−/− strain A mice have increased plasma aldosterone and increased blood pressure. Consistently, blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors by spironolactone treatment reversibly restored the elevated blood pressure to the BKβ1+/+ strain A level. In contrast, loss of BKβ1 did not affect plasma aldosterone in strain C mice. Smooth muscle-restricted restoration of BKβ1 expression increased blood pressure in BKβ1−/− strain C mice, implying that impaired smooth muscle BK channel activity lowers blood pressure in these animals. We conclude that BK channel activity directly affects vascular tone but influences blood pressure independent of this effect via different pathways. PMID:24687584

  14. SGLT inhibitors attenuate NO-dependent vascular relaxation in the pulmonary artery but not in the coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Han, Ying; Cho, Young-Eun; Ayon, Ramon; Guo, Rui; Youssef, Katia D; Pan, Minglin; Dai, Anzhi; Yuan, Jason X-J; Makino, Ayako

    2015-11-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT)2 are a new class of oral drugs for type 2 diabetic patients that reduce plasma glucose levels by inhibiting renal glucose reabsorption. There is increasing evidence showing the beneficial effect of SGLT2 inhibitors on glucose control; however, less information is available regarding the impact of SGLT2 inhibitors on cardiovascular outcomes. The present study was designed to determine whether SGLT inhibitors regulate vascular relaxation in mouse pulmonary and coronary arteries. Phlorizin (a nonspecific SGLT inhibitor) and canagliflozin (a SGLT2-specific inhibitor) relaxed pulmonary arteries in a dose-dependent manner, but they had little or no effect on coronary arteries. Pretreatment with phlorizin or canagliflozin significantly inhibited sodium nitroprusside (SNP; a nitric oxide donor)-induced vascular relaxation in pulmonary arteries but not in coronary arteries. Phlorizin had no effect on cGMP-dependent relaxation in pulmonary arteries. SNP induced membrane hyperpolarization in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, and pretreatment of cells with phlorizin and canagliflozin attenuated SNP-induced membrane hyperpolarization by decreasing K(+) activities induced by SNP. Contrary to the result observed in ex vivo experiments with SGLT inhibitors, SNP-dependent relaxation in pulmonary arteries was not altered by chronic administration of canagliflozin. On the other hand, canagliflozin administration significantly enhanced SNP-dependent relaxation in coronary arteries in diabetic mice. These data suggest that SGLT inhibitors differentially regulate vascular relaxation depending on the type of arteries, duration of the treatment, and health condition, such as diabetes. PMID:26361875

  15. Collagen formation by transformed smooth muscle cells after arterial injury.

    PubMed

    Chidi, C C; DePalma, R G

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-five normocholesterolemic rabbits were sacrificed at intervals up to 60 days after the thoracic aortas were de-endothelialized. Ultrastructural studies of both the re-endothelialized and nonendothelialized intima were done. The smooth muscle cells in the re-endothelialized intima showed segmental structural changes typically associated with transformation to a secretory cell type; abundant accumulations of collagen were in juxtaposition with these cells. The nonendothelialized intima did not demonstrate similar smooth muscle cell changes and collagen accumulation. These observations suggest that regenerating endothelial cells and intimal smooth muscle cells interact to cause smooth muscle cell transformation and collagen accumulation during arterial repair. PMID:7455897

  16. AMPK Dilates Resistance Arteries via Activation of SERCA and BKCa Channels in Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Holger; Schubert, Kai Michael; Blodow, Stephanie; Kreutz, Claus-Peter; Erdogmus, Serap; Wiedenmann, Margarethe; Qiu, Jiehua; Fey, Theres; Ruth, Peter; Lubomirov, Lubomir T; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Mederos Y Schnitzler, Michael; Hardie, D Grahame; Gudermann, Thomas; Pohl, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    The protective effects of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) on the metabolic syndrome may include direct effects on resistance artery vasomotor function. However, the precise actions of AMPK on microvessels and their potential interaction are largely unknown. Thus, we set to determine the effects of AMPK activation on vascular smooth muscle tone and the underlying mechanisms. Resistance arteries isolated from hamster and mouse exhibited a pronounced endothelium-independent dilation on direct pharmacological AMPK activation by 2 structurally unrelated compounds (PT1 and A769662). The dilation was associated with a decrease of intracellular-free calcium [Ca(2+)]i in vascular smooth muscle cell. AMPK stimulation induced activation of BKCa channels as assessed by patch clamp studies in freshly isolated hamster vascular smooth muscle cell and confirmed by direct proof of membrane hyperpolarization in intact arteries. The BKCa channel blocker iberiotoxin abolished the hyperpolarization but only partially reduced the dilation and did not affect the decrease of [Ca(2+)]i. By contrast, the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) inhibitor thapsigargin largely reduced these effects, whereas combined inhibition of SERCA and BKCa channels virtually abolished them. AMPK stimulation significantly increased the phosphorylation of the SERCA modulator phospholamban at the regulatory T17 site. Stimulation of smooth muscle AMPK represents a new, potent vasodilator mechanism in resistance vessels. AMPK directly relaxes vascular smooth muscle cell by a decrease of [Ca(2+)]i. This is achieved by calcium sequestration via SERCA activation, as well as activation of BKCa channels. There is in part a mutual compensation of both calcium-lowering mechanisms. However, SERCA activation which involves an AMPK-dependent phosphorylation of phospholamban is the predominant mechanism in resistance vessels. PMID:26034200

  17. Smooth Muscle-Targeted Overexpression of Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor-γ Disrupts Vascular Wall Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kleinhenz, Jennifer M.; Murphy, Tamara C.; Pokutta-Paskaleva, Anastassia P.; Gleason, Rudolph L.; Lyle, Alicia N.; Taylor, W. Robert; Blount, Mitsi A.; Cheng, Juan; Yang, Qinglin; Sutliff, Roy L.; Hart, C. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the nuclear hormone receptor, PPARγ, with pharmacological agonists promotes a contractile vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype and reduces oxidative stress and cell proliferation, particularly under pathological conditions including vascular injury, restenosis, and atherosclerosis. However, pharmacological agonists activate both PPARγ-dependent and -independent mechanisms in multiple cell types confounding efforts to clarify the precise role of PPARγ in smooth muscle cell structure and function in vivo. We, therefore, designed and characterized a mouse model with smooth muscle cell-targeted PPARγ overexpression (smPPARγOE). Our results demonstrate that smPPARγOE attenuated contractile responses in aortic rings, increased aortic compliance, caused aortic dilatation, and reduced mean arterial pressure. Molecular characterization revealed that compared to littermate control mice, aortas from smPPARγOE mice expressed lower levels of contractile proteins and increased levels of adipocyte-specific transcripts. Morphological analysis demonstrated increased lipid deposition in the vascular media and in smooth muscle of extravascular tissues. In vitro adenoviral-mediated PPARγ overexpression in human aortic smooth muscle cells similarly increased adipocyte markers and lipid uptake. The findings demonstrate that smooth muscle PPARγ overexpression disrupts vascular wall structure and function, emphasizing that balanced PPARγ activity is essential for vascular smooth muscle homeostasis. PMID:26451838

  18. Smoking and Female Sex: Independent Predictors of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Stiffening

    PubMed Central

    Dinardo, Carla Luana; Santos, Hadassa Campos; Vaquero, André Ramos; Martelini, André Ricardo; Dallan, Luis Alberto Oliveira; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Krieger, José Eduardo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa

    2015-01-01

    Aims Recent evidence shows the rigidity of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) contributes to vascular mechanics. Arterial rigidity is an independent cardiovascular risk factor whose associated modifications in VSMC viscoelasticity have never been investigated. This study’s objective was to evaluate if the arterial rigidity risk factors aging, African ancestry, female sex, smoking and diabetes mellitus are associated with VMSC stiffening in an experimental model using a human derived vascular smooth muscle primary cell line repository. Methods Eighty patients subjected to coronary artery bypass surgery were enrolled. VSMCs were extracted from internal thoracic artery fragments and mechanically evaluated using Optical Magnetic Twisting Cytometry assay. The obtained mechanical variables were correlated with the clinical variables: age, gender, African ancestry, smoking and diabetes mellitus. Results The mechanical variables Gr, G’r and G”r had a normal distribution, demonstrating an inter-individual variability of VSMC viscoelasticity, which has never been reported before. Female sex and smoking were independently associated with VSMC stiffening: Gr (apparent cell stiffness) p = 0.022 and p = 0.018, R2 0.164; G’r (elastic modulus) p = 0.019 and p = 0.009, R2 0.184 and G”r (dissipative modulus) p = 0.011 and p = 0.66, R2 0.141. Conclusion Female sex and smoking are independent predictors of VSMC stiffening. This pro-rigidity effect represents an important element for understanding the vascular rigidity observed in post-menopausal females and smokers, as well as a potential therapeutic target to be explored in the future. There is a significant inter-individual variation of VSMC viscoelasticity, which is slightly modulated by clinical variables and probably relies on molecular factors. PMID:26661469

  19. Ion channel remodeling in vascular smooth muscle during hypertension: Implications for novel therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Biny K.; Thakali, Keshari M.; Moore, Christopher L.; Rhee, Sung W.

    2013-01-01

    Ion channels are multimeric, transmembrane proteins that selectively mediate ion flux across the plasma membrane in a variety of cells including vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The dynamic interplay of Ca2+ and K+ channels on the plasma membrane of VSMCs plays a pivotal role in modulating the vascular tone of small arteries and arterioles. The abnormally-elevated arterial tone observed in hypertension thus points to an aberrant expression and function of Ca2+ and K+ channels in the VSMCs. In this short review, we focus on the three well-studied ion channels in VSMCs, namely the L-type Ca2+ (CaV1.2) channels, the voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels, and the large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels. First, we provide a brief overview on the physiological role of vascular CaV1.2, KV and BK channels in regulating arterial tone. Second, we discuss the current understanding of the expression changes and regulation of CaV1.2, KV and BK channels in the vasculature during hypertension. Third, based on available proof-of-concept studies, we describe the potential therapeutic approaches targeting these vascular ion channels in order to restore blood pressure to normotensive levels. PMID:23376354

  20. Human vascular smooth muscle cells express a urate transporter.

    PubMed

    Price, Karen L; Sautin, Yuri Y; Long, David A; Zhang, Li; Miyazaki, Hiroki; Mu, Wei; Endou, Hitoshi; Johnson, Richard J

    2006-07-01

    An elevated serum uric acid is associated with the development of hypertension and renal disease. Renal regulation of urate excretion is largely controlled by URAT1 (SLC22A12), a member of the organic anion transporter superfamily. This study reports the specific expression of URAT1 on human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, as assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis. Expression of URAT1 was localized to the cell membrane. Evidence that the URAT1 transporter was functional was provided by the finding that uptake of 14C-urate was significantly inhibited in the presence of probenecid, an organic anion transporter inhibitor. It is proposed that URAT1 may provide a mechanism by which uric acid enters the human vascular smooth muscle cell, a finding that may be relevant to the role of uric acid in cardiovascular disease. PMID:16775029

  1. Ablation of SM22alpha decreases contractility and actin contents of mouse vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, Asad; Swärd, Karl; Nordström, Ina; Ekblad, Eva; Zhang, Janet C L; Parmacek, Michael S; Hellstrand, Per

    2004-03-26

    The actin-binding protein SM22alpha marks contractile differentiation in smooth muscle, but its function is unknown. We tested its role in arterial contractility and stretch-sensitive vascular protein synthesis. Active stress in depolarised mesenteric resistance arteries and portal veins was reduced by 40% in SM22alpha(-/-) mice. Passive and active arterial circumference-force relationships were shifted leftwards, whereas alpha(1)-adrenergic responses were increased. Actin contents were 10-25% lower in vessels from SM22alpha(-/-) mice, but protein composition was otherwise similar. Synthesis of SM22alpha, calponin and alpha-actin, but not beta-actin, was sensitive to stretch. Ablation of SM22alpha did not affect stretch sensitivity of any of these proteins. Thus, SM22alpha plays a role in contractility, possibly by affecting actin filament organisation. PMID:15044015

  2. Nrf2/Keap1 system regulates vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis for vascular homeostasis: role in neointimal formation after vascular injury

    PubMed Central

    Ashino, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Numazawa, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal increases in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the intimal region after a vascular injury is a key event in developing neointimal hyperplasia. To maintain vascular function, proliferation and apoptosis of VSMCs is tightly controlled during vascular remodeling. NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) system, a key component of the oxidative stress response that acts in maintaining homeostasis, plays an important role in neointimal hyperplasia after a vascular injury; however, the role of Nrf2/Keap1 in VSMC apoptosis has not been clarified. Here we report that 14 days after arterial injury in mice, TUNEL-positive VSMCs are detected in both the neointimal and medial layers. These layers contain cells expressing high levels of Nrf2 but low Keap1 expression. In VSMCs, Keap1 depletion induces features of apoptosis, such as positive TUNEL staining and annexin V binding. These changes are associated with an increased expression of nuclear Nrf2. Simultaneous Nrf2 depletion inhibits Keap1 depletion-induced apoptosis. At 14 days after the vascular injury, Nrf2-deficient mice demonstrated fewer TUNEL-positive cells and increased neointimal formation in the neointimal and medial areas. The results suggest that the Nrf2/Keap1 system regulates VSMC apoptosis during neointimal formation, thereby inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia after a vascular injury. PMID:27198574

  3. Statistical modeling of the arterial vascular tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Thomas; Godenschwager, Christian; Bauer, Miriam; Bernhardt, Dominik; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2011-03-01

    Automatic examination of medical images becomes increasingly important due to the rising amount of data. Therefore automated methods are required which combine anatomical knowledge and robust segmentation to examine the structure of interest. We propose a statistical model of the vascular tree based on vascular landmarks and unbranched vessel sections. An undirected graph provides anatomical topology, semantics, existing landmarks and attached vessel sections. The atlas was built using semi-automatically generated geometric models of various body regions ranging from carotid arteries to the lower legs. Geometric models contain vessel centerlines as well as orthogonal cross-sections in equidistant intervals with the vessel contour having the form of a polygon path. The geometric vascular model is supplemented by anatomical landmarks which are not necessarily related to the vascular system. These anatomical landmarks define point correspondences which are used for registration with a Thin-Plate-Spline interpolation. After the registration process, the models were merged to form the statistical model which can be mapped to unseen images based on a subset of anatomical landmarks. This approach provides probability distributions for the location of landmarks, vessel-specific geometric properties including shape, expected radii and branching points and vascular topology. The applications of this statistical model include model-based extraction of the vascular tree which greatly benefits from vessel-specific geometry description and variation ranges. Furthermore, the statistical model can be applied as a basis for computer aided diagnosis systems as indicator for pathologically deformed vessels and the interaction with the geometric model is significantly more user friendly for physicians through anatomical names.

  4. Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery: An Unusual Cause of Vascular Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Arundeep; Jana, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus is generally of vascular origin and can be due to arterial, venous, or systemic causes. While certain congenital anatomical variants and arterial vascular loops have been commonly found in symptomatic patients undergoing imaging, persistent primitive trigeminal artery in association with isolated tinnitus is unusual. Thus we report a patient with unilateral isolated pulsatile tinnitus who was evaluated with magnetic resonance angiography and was found to have a persistent primitive trigeminal artery. We also briefly discuss vascular tinnitus as well as the embryology, imaging, and classification of persistent primitive trigeminal artery with the clinical implications. PMID:24459596

  5. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery: an unusual cause of vascular tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Panda, Ananya; Arora, Arundeep; Jana, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus is generally of vascular origin and can be due to arterial, venous, or systemic causes. While certain congenital anatomical variants and arterial vascular loops have been commonly found in symptomatic patients undergoing imaging, persistent primitive trigeminal artery in association with isolated tinnitus is unusual. Thus we report a patient with unilateral isolated pulsatile tinnitus who was evaluated with magnetic resonance angiography and was found to have a persistent primitive trigeminal artery. We also briefly discuss vascular tinnitus as well as the embryology, imaging, and classification of persistent primitive trigeminal artery with the clinical implications. PMID:24459596

  6. Slug Is Increased in Vascular Remodeling and Induces a Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferative Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Coll-Bonfill, Núria; Peinado, Victor I.; Pisano, María V.; Párrizas, Marcelina; Blanco, Isabel; Evers, Maurits; Engelmann, Julia C.; García-Lucio, Jessica; Tura-Ceide, Olga; Meister, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have confirmed Slug as a key player in regulating phenotypic changes in several cell models, however, its role in smooth muscle cells (SMC) has never been assessed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of Slug during the phenotypic switch of SMC in vitro and throughout the development of vascular remodeling. Methods and Results Slug expression was decreased during both cell-to-cell contact and TGFβ1 induced SMC differentiation. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), a known inductor of a proliferative/dedifferentiated SMC phenotype, induces the expression of Slug in SMC. Slug knockdown blocked TNFα-induced SMC phenotypic change and significantly reduced both SMC proliferation and migration, while its overexpression blocked the TGFβ1-induced SMC differentiation and induced proliferation and migration. Genome-wide transcriptomic analysis showed that in SMC, Slug knockdown induced changes mainly in genes related to proliferation and migration, indicating that Slug controls these processes in SMC. Notably, Slug expression was significantly up-regulated in lungs of mice using a model of pulmonary hypertension-related vascular remodeling. Highly remodeled human pulmonary arteries also showed an increase of Slug expression compared to less remodeled arteries. Conclusions Slug emerges as a key transcription factor driving SMC towards a proliferative phenotype. The increased Slug expression observed in vivo in highly remodeled arteries of mice and human suggests a role of Slug in the pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular diseases. PMID:27441378

  7. Vascular Smooth Muscle Sirtuin-1 Protects Against Diet-Induced Aortic Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Fry, Jessica L; Al Sayah, Leona; Weisbrod, Robert M; Van Roy, Isabelle; Weng, Xiang; Cohen, Richard A; Bachschmid, Markus M; Seta, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Arterial stiffness, a major cardiovascular risk factor, develops within 2 months in mice fed a high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS) diet, serving as a model of human metabolic syndrome, and it is associated with activation of proinflammatory and oxidant pathways in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. Sirtuin-1 (SirT1) is an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase regulated by the cellular metabolic status. Our goal was to study the effects of VSM SirT1 on arterial stiffness in the context of diet-induced metabolic syndrome. Overnight fasting acutely decreased arterial stiffness, measured in vivo by pulse wave velocity, in mice fed HFHS for 2 or 8 months, but not in mice lacking SirT1 in VSM (SMKO). Similarly, VSM-specific genetic SirT1 overexpression (SMTG) prevented pulse wave velocity increases induced by HFHS feeding, during 8 months. Administration of resveratrol or S17834, 2 polyphenolic compounds known to activate SirT1, prevented HFHS-induced arterial stiffness and were mimicked by global SirT1 overexpression (SirT1 bacterial artificial chromosome overexpressor), without evident metabolic improvements. In addition, HFHS-induced pulse wave velocity increases were reversed by 1-week treatment with a specific, small molecule SirT1 activator (SRT1720). These beneficial effects of pharmacological or genetic SirT1 activation, against HFHS-induced arterial stiffness, were associated with a decrease in nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) activation and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) and p47phox protein expressions, in aorta and VSM cells. In conclusion, VSM SirT1 activation decreases arterial stiffness in the setting of obesity by stimulating anti-inflammatory and antioxidant pathways in the aorta. SirT1 activators may represent a novel therapeutic approach to prevent arterial stiffness and associated cardiovascular complications in overweight/obese individuals with metabolic syndrome. PMID:27432859

  8. Endogenous cannabinoid receptor CB1 activation promotes vascular smooth-muscle cell proliferation and neointima formation

    PubMed Central

    Molica, Filippo; Burger, Fabienne; Thomas, Aurélien; Staub, Christian; Tailleux, Anne; Staels, Bart; Pelli, Graziano; Zimmer, Andreas; Cravatt, Benjamin; Matter, Christian M.; Pacher, Pal; Steffens, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty is frequently used in patients with severe arterial narrowing due to atherosclerosis. However, it induces severe arterial injury and an inflammatory response leading to restenosis. Here, we studied a potential activation of the endocannabinoid system and the effect of FA amide hydrolase (FAAH) deficiency, the major enzyme responsible for endocannabinoid anandamide degradation, in arterial injury. We performed carotid balloon injury in atherosclerosis-prone apoE knockout (apoE−/−) and apoE−/−FAAH−/− mice. Anandamide levels were systemically elevated in apoE−/− mice after balloon injury. ApoE−/−FAAH−/− mice had significantly higher baseline anandamide levels and enhanced neointima formation compared with apoE−/− controls. The latter effect was inhibited by treatment with CB1 antagonist AM281. Similarly, apoE−/− mice treated with AM281 had reduced neointimal areas, reduced lesional vascular smooth-muscle cell (SMC) content, and proliferating cell counts. The lesional macrophage content was unchanged. In vitro proliferation rates were significantly reduced in CB1−/− SMCs or when treating apoE−/− or apoE−/−FAAH−/− SMCs with AM281. Macrophage in vitro adhesion and migration were marginally affected by CB1 deficiency. Reendothelialization was not inhibited by treatment with AM281. In conclusion, endogenous CB1 activation contributes to vascular SMC proliferation and neointima formation in response to arterial injury. PMID:23479425

  9. Interaction of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Under Low Shear Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    The blood vessel wall consists of three cellular layers, an outer adventitial, a middle medial and an inner intimal layer. When the blood vessel forms in the embryo it begins as a tube composed of a single cell type called endothelial cells. Over time, other cells are recruited from the surrounding tissue to form additional layers on the outer surface of the endothelial tube. The cells that are recruited are called mesenchymal cells. Mesenchymal cells are responsible for the production of connective tissue that holds the blood vessel together and for developing into vascular smooth muscle cells that are responsible for regulating the diameter of the vessel (1) and therefore, blood flow. In a fully developed blood vessel, the endothelial cells make- up the majority of cells in the intimal layer while the mesenchymal cells make-up the majority of cells in the medial and adventitial layers. Within the medial layer of a mature vessel, cells are organized into multiple circular layers of alternating bands of connective tissue and cells. The cell layer is composed of a mixture of mesenchymal cells that have not developed into smooth muscle cells and fully developed smooth muscle cells (2). The assembly and organization of complex tissues is directed in part by a signaling system composed of proteins on the cell surface called adhesion molecules. Adhesion molecules enable cells to recognize each other as well as the composition of the connective tissue in which they reside (3). It was hypothesized that the different cell types that compose the vascular wall possess different adhesion molecules that enable them to recognize each other and through this recognition system, form the complex layered organization of the vascular wall. In other words, the layered organization is an intrinsic property of the cells. If this hypothesis is correct then the different cells that make up the vessel wall, when mixed together, should organize themselves into a layered structure

  10. Gax regulates human vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation and vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Hu, Zhenlei; Zhai, Xinming; Wang, Yongyi; Liu, Jidong; Wang, Weijun; Xue, Song

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a hallmark of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, hypertension and restenosis after angioplasty. Transcription factors have emerged as critical regulators for VSMCs function, and recently we verified inhibiting transcription factor Gax was important for controlling VSMCs proliferation and migration. This study aimed to determine its role in phenotypic modulation of VSMCs. Western blot revealed that overexpression of Gax increased expression of VSMCs differentiation marker genes such as calponin and SM-MHC 11. Then, Gax overexpression potently suppressed proliferation and migration of VSMCs with or without platelet-derived growth factor-induced-BB (PDGF-BB) stimuli whereas Gax silencing inhibited these processes. Furthermore, cDNA array analysis indicated that Rap1A gene was the downstream target of Gax in human VSMCs. And overexpression of Gax significantly inhibited expression of Rap1A in VSMCs with or without PDGF-BB stimuli. Moreover, overexpression of Rap1A decreased expression of VSMCs differentiation marker genes and increased proliferation and migration of VSMCs with or without PDGF-BB stimuli. Finally, Gax overexpression significantly inhibited the neointimal formation in carotid artery injury of mouse models, specifically through maintaining VSMCs contractile phenotype by decreasing Rap1A expression. In conclusion, these results indicated that Gax was a regulator of human VSMCs phenotypic modulation by targeting Rap1A gene, which suggested that targeting Gax or its downstream targets in human VSMCs may provide an attractive approach for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27508012

  11. In vitro differentiation of porcine aortic vascular precursor cells to endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zaniboni, Andrea; Bernardini, Chiara; Bertocchi, Martina; Zannoni, Augusta; Bianchi, Francesca; Avallone, Giancarlo; Mangano, Chiara; Sarli, Giuseppe; Calzà, Laura; Bacci, Maria Laura; Forni, Monica

    2015-09-01

    Recent findings suggest that progenitor and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are associated with vascular niches. Cells displaying mesenchymal properties and differentiating to whole components of a functional blood vessel, including endothelial and smooth muscle cells, can be defined as vascular stem cells (VSCs). Recently, we isolated a population of porcine aortic vascular precursor cells (pAVPCs), which have MSC- and pericyte-like properties. The aim of the present work was to investigate whether pAVPCs possess VSC-like properties and assess their differentiation potential toward endothelial and smooth muscle lineages. pAVPCs, maintained in a specific pericyte growth medium, were cultured in high-glucose DMEM + 10% FBS (long-term medium, LTM) or in human endothelial serum-free medium + 5% FBS and 50 ng/ml of hVEGF (endothelial differentiation medium, EDM). After 21 days of culture in LTM, pAVPCs showed an elongated fibroblast-like morphology, and they seem to organize in cord-like structures. qPCR analysis of smooth muscle markers [α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), calponin, and smooth muscle myosin (SMM) heavy chain] showed a significant increment of the transcripts, and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the presence of α-SMA and SMM proteins. After 21 days of culture in EDM, pAVPCs displayed an endothelial cell-like morphology and revealed the upregulation of the expression of endothelial markers (CD31, vascular endothelial-cadherin, von Willebrand factor, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase) showing the CD31-typical pattern. In conclusion, pAVPCs could be defined as a VSC-like population considering that, if they are maintained in a specific pericyte medium, they express MSC markers, and they have, in addition to the classical mesenchymal trilineage differentiation potential, the capacity to differentiate in vitro toward the smooth muscle and the endothelial cell phenotypes. PMID:26135800

  12. Expression of TRPC homologs in endothelial cells and smooth muscle layers of human arteries.

    PubMed

    Yip, Ham; Chan, Wing-Yee; Leung, Pan-Cheung; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Liu, Cuiling; Huang, Yu; Michel, Villaz; Yew, David Tai-Wai; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2004-12-01

    TRPC channels are a group of Ca(2+)-permeable nonselective cation channels that mediate store-operated and/or agonist-stimulated Ca(2+) influx in a variety of cell types. In this study, we extensively examined the expression patterns of TRPC homologs in human vascular tissues. RT-PCR amplified cDNA fragments of TRPC1 (505 bp), TRPC3 (372 bp), TRPC4 (499 bp), TRPC5 (325 bp), TRPC6 (509 bp), and TRPC7 (187 bp) from RNA isolated from cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells. In situ hybridization yielded strong labeling of TRPC1,3-6 in the endothelial and smooth muscle cells of human coronary and cerebral arteries. TRPC7 labeling was exclusively found in endothelial cells but not in smooth muscle cells. Results from immunohistochemical staining were consistent with those from in situ hybridization. Similar expression patterns of TRPC homologs were also observed in arterioles and vaso vasora. In conclusion, our study indicates that TRPC homologs are widely expressed in human vessels of all calibers, including medium-sized coronary arteries and cerebral arteries, smaller-sized resistance arteries, and vaso vasora. These results suggest a ubiquitous role of TRPC homologs in regulating blood supply to different regions and in controlling arterial blood pressure. PMID:15538613

  13. Ablation of the androgen receptor from vascular smooth muscle cells demonstrates a role for testosterone in vascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dongxing; Hadoke, Patrick W. F.; Wu, Junxi; Vesey, Alex T.; Lerman, Daniel. A.; Dweck, Marc R.; Newby, David E.; Smith, Lee B.; MacRae, Vicky E.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification powerfully predicts mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease. Men have a greater risk of cardiovascular disease, compared to women of a similar age. These gender disparities suggest an influence of sex hormones. Testosterone is the primary and most well-recognised androgen in men. Therefore, we addressed the hypothesis that exogenous androgen treatment induces vascular calcification. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed expression of androgen receptor (AR) in the calcified media of human femoral artery tissue and calcified human valves. Furthermore, in vitro studies revealed increased phosphate (Pi)-induced mouse vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification following either testosterone or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment for 9 days. Testosterone and DHT treatment increased tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (Alpl) mRNA expression. Testosterone-induced calcification was blunted in VSMC-specific AR-ablated (SM-ARKO) VSMCs compared to WT. Consistent with these data, SM-ARKO VSMCs showed a reduction in Osterix mRNA expression. However, intriguingly, a counter-intuitive increase in Alpl was observed. These novel data demonstrate that androgens play a role in inducing vascular calcification through the AR. Androgen signalling may represent a novel potential therapeutic target for clinical intervention. PMID:27095121

  14. Ablation of the androgen receptor from vascular smooth muscle cells demonstrates a role for testosterone in vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongxing; Hadoke, Patrick W F; Wu, Junxi; Vesey, Alex T; Lerman, Daniel A; Dweck, Marc R; Newby, David E; Smith, Lee B; MacRae, Vicky E

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification powerfully predicts mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease. Men have a greater risk of cardiovascular disease, compared to women of a similar age. These gender disparities suggest an influence of sex hormones. Testosterone is the primary and most well-recognised androgen in men. Therefore, we addressed the hypothesis that exogenous androgen treatment induces vascular calcification. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed expression of androgen receptor (AR) in the calcified media of human femoral artery tissue and calcified human valves. Furthermore, in vitro studies revealed increased phosphate (Pi)-induced mouse vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification following either testosterone or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment for 9 days. Testosterone and DHT treatment increased tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (Alpl) mRNA expression. Testosterone-induced calcification was blunted in VSMC-specific AR-ablated (SM-ARKO) VSMCs compared to WT. Consistent with these data, SM-ARKO VSMCs showed a reduction in Osterix mRNA expression. However, intriguingly, a counter-intuitive increase in Alpl was observed. These novel data demonstrate that androgens play a role in inducing vascular calcification through the AR. Androgen signalling may represent a novel potential therapeutic target for clinical intervention. PMID:27095121

  15. Vascular smooth muscle-specific deletion of the leptin receptor attenuates leptin-induced alterations in vascular relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael J; Coleman, T Taylor; Sasser, Jennifer M; Pittman, Katarina M; Hankins, Michael W; Stec, David E

    2016-05-15

    Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is associated with increased plasma levels of the adipose-derived hormone leptin. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) express leptin receptors (LepR); however, their physiological role is unclear. We hypothesized that leptin, at levels to mimic morbid obesity, impairs vascular relaxation. To test this, we used control and VSM-LepR knockout mice (VSM-LepR KO) created with a tamoxifen-inducible specific Cre recombinase to delete the LepR gene in VSMC. Control (10-12 wk old) and VSM-LepR KO (10-12 wk old) mice were fed a diet containing tamoxifen (50 mg/kg) for 6 wk, after which vascular reactivity was studied in isolated carotid arteries using an organ chamber bath. Vessels were incubated with leptin (100 ng/ml) or vehicle (0.1 mM Tris·HCl) for 30 min. Leptin treatment resulted in significant impairment of vessel relaxation to the endothelial-specific agonist acetylcholine (ACh). When these experiments were repeated in the presence of the superoxide scavenger tempol, relaxation responses to ACh were restored. VSM-LepR deletion resulted in a significant attenuation of leptin-mediated impaired ACh-induced relaxation. These data show that leptin directly impairs vascular relaxation via a VSM-LepR-mediated mechanism, suggesting a potential pathogenic role for leptin to increase cardiovascular risk during obesity. PMID:26936780

  16. Upregulation of decorin by FXR in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    He Fengtian; Zhang Qiuhong; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Gao Xiang; Li Jiang; Li Yong; Gong Wei; Jiang, Yu; Xie Wen; Li Song

    2008-08-08

    Decorin is a member of the family of small leucine-rich proteoglycans that are present in blood vessels and synthesized by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Decorin plays complex roles in both normal vascular physiology and the pathogenesis of various types of vascular disorders. However, the mechanisms of regulation of decorin expression in vasculature are not clearly understood. Particularly little information is available about a role of nuclear receptors in the regulation of decorin expression. In the present study, we report that activation of vascular FXR by a specific ligand resulted in upregulation of decorin at the levels of both mRNA and protein. FXR appears to induce decorin expression at a transcriptional level because (1) upregulation of decorin mRNA expression was abolished by the treatment of a transcription inhibitor, actinomycin D; and (2) decorin promoter activity was significantly increased by activation of FXR. Functional analysis of human decorin promoter identified an imperfect inverted repeat DNA motif, IR8 (-2313TGGTCAtagtgtcaTGACCT-2294), as a likely FXR-responsive element that is involved in decorin regulation.

  17. Proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in the development of ascites syndrome in broilers induced by low ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Qiao, J; Zhao, L H; Li, K; Wang, H; Xu, T; Tian, Y; Gao, M; Wang, X

    2007-12-01

    Pulmonary vascular remodelling, mainly characterized by arterial medial thickening, is an important pathological feature of broiler ascites syndrome (AS). Since vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) form the major cellular component of arterial medial layer, we speculate that VSMC proliferation is one of the causes of pulmonary arterial medial thickening in ascitic broilers. Hence, the present study was designed to investigate the role of VSMC proliferation in pulmonary vascular remodelling in development of AS induced by low ambient temperature. Broilers in control group (22 +/- 1.5 degrees C) and low temperature group (11 +/- 2 degrees C) were sampled every week at 15-50 days of age. Proliferative indexes of VSMC in pulmonary arteries were assessed with proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and the relative medial thickness (RMT) and relative wall area (RWA), as indexes of pulmonary vascular remodelling, were examined by computer-image analysing system. The results showed that the high incidence (18.75%) of AS was induced by low temperature, and a significantly increased VSMC proliferation was observed in pulmonary arteries in the low temperature group at 22-50 days of age (P < 0.05). In addition, RMT and RWA in pulmonary arteries were significantly elevated in the low temperature group from 36 days of age (P < 0.05), indicating that pulmonary vascular remodelling occurred following VSMC proliferation in AS. Our data suggest that proliferation of VSMC may facilitate pulmonary vascular remodelling and have a pivotal role in AS induced by low ambient temperature. PMID:18045340

  18. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein prevents vascular aging and vascular smooth muscle cells senescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meili; Fu, Yi; Gao, Cheng; Jia, Yiting; Huang, Yaqian; Liu, Limei; Wang, Xian; Wang, Wengong; Kong, Wei

    2016-09-16

    Aging-related vascular dysfunction contributes to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a vascular extracellular matrix protein, has been described as a negative regulatory factor for the vascular aging-related processes including atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. However, whether COMP is implicated in the process of vascular aging remains unclear. Here, we identified a novel function of COMP in preventing vascular aging and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) senescence. Firstly, vascular COMP expression was decreased in three different senescence-accelerated mouse models and was also declining with age. COMP(-/-) mice displayed elevated senescence-associated markers expression, including p53, p21 and p16, in the aortas compared with their wild type (WT) littermates. In accordance, COMP deficiency induced aging-related vascular dysfunction as evidenced by the significantly reduced phenylephrine-induced contraction and increased vascular stiffness as evaluated by pulse wave velocity. The aortic wall of COMP(-/-) mice was susceptible to senescence by displaying senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal) activity induced by periadventitial application of CaCl2 to the abdominal aorta. In vitro, COMP knockdown by small interfering (si) RNA led to the elevation of p53, p21 and p16 as well as SA β-gal activity in VSMCs after H2O2 stimulation. VSMCs isolated from COMP(-/-) mice showed elevated senescence-associated markers expression and supplement of COMP adenovirus to COMP-deficient VSMCs greatly rescued cellular senescence. Taken together, these findings revealed the essential role of COMP in retarding the development of vascular aging and VSMC senescence. PMID:27498005

  19. Targeting smooth muscle microRNAs for therapeutic benefit in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Albinsson, Sebastian; Swärd, Karl

    2013-09-01

    In view of the bioinformatic projection that a third of all protein coding genes and essentially all biological pathways are under control of microRNAs (miRNAs), it is not surprising that this class of small RNAs plays roles in vascular disease progression. MiRNAs have been shown to be involved in cholesterol turnover, thrombosis, glucose homeostasis and vascular function. Some miRNAs appear to be specific for certain cells, and the role that such cell-specific miRNAs play in vascular disease is only beginning to be appreciated. A notable example is the miR-143/145 cluster which is enriched in mature and highly differentiated smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Here we outline and discuss the recent literature on SMC-expressed miRNAs in major vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, neointima formation, aortic aneurysm formation, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Forced expression of miR-145 emerges as a promising strategy for reduction and stabilization of atherosclerotic plaques as well as for reducing neointimal hyperplasia. It is concluded that if obstacles in the form of delivery and untoward effects of antimirs and mimics can be overcome, the outlook for targeting of SMC-specific miRNAs for therapeutic benefit in vascular disease is bright. PMID:23611811

  20. Diffuse and uncontrolled vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in rapidly progressing pediatric moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, Amy J; Bhattacharjee, Meenakshi B; Regalado, Ellen S; Milewicz, Allen L; El-Hakam, Lisa M; Dauser, Robert C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2010-09-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare stroke syndrome of unknown etiology resulting from stenosis or occlusion of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) in association with an abnormal vascular network in the basal ganglia. Although the highest incidence of moyamoya disease is in pediatric patients, pathology reports have been primarily limited to adult samples and describe occlusive fibrocellular lesions in the intimae of affected arteries. We describe the case of a young girl with primary moyamoya disease who presented at 18 months of age with right hemiparesis following an ischemic stroke. Angiography showed stenosis of the distal left ICA, left middle cerebral artery, and right ICA. An emergent left-sided dural inversion was performed. Recurrent strokes and alternating hemiplegia necessitated a right dural inversion 6 months later. Nonetheless, her aggressive disease proved uniquely refractory to surgical revascularization, and she succumbed to recurrent strokes and neurological deterioration at 2.5 years of age. Pathological specimens revealed a striking bilateral occlusion of the anterior carotid circulation resulting from intimal proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Most strikingly, the ascending aorta and the superior mesenteric artery demonstrated similar intimal proliferation, along with SMC proliferation in the media. The systemic pathology involving multiple arteries in this extremely young child, the first case of its kind available for autopsy, suggests that globally uncontrolled SMC proliferation, in the absence of environmental risk factors and likely resulting from an underlying genetic alteration, may be a primary etiologic event leading to moyamoya disease. PMID:20809708

  1. Role of smooth muscle cell mineralocorticoid receptor in vascular tone.

    PubMed

    Tarjus, Antoine; Belozertseva, Ekaterina; Louis, Huguette; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Labat, Carlos; Lacolley, Patrick; Jaisser, Frédéric; Galmiche, Guillaume

    2015-08-01

    Identification of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the vasculature (i.e., endothelial and smooth muscle cells) raised the question of its role in vascular function and blood pressure control. Using a mouse model with conditional inactivation of MR in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) (MR(SMKO)), we have recently shown that the VSMC MR is crucial for aldosterone-salt-induced carotid stiffening. In the present study, we have investigated the specific contribution of the VSMC MR in the regulation of vascular tone in large vessels. In MR(SMKO) mice, contractions induced by potassium chloride and calcium (Ca(2+)) are decreased in the aorta, whereas contraction is normal in response to phenylephrine and caffeine. The difference in response to Ca(2+) suggests that the VSMC-specific deficiency of the MR modifies VSM Ca(2+) signaling but without altering the intracellular Ca(2+) store handling. The relaxation induced by acetylcholine is not affected by the absence of MR. However, the relaxation induced by Ach in the presence of indomethacin and the relaxation induced by sodium nitroprussiate are significantly reduced in MR(SMKO) mice compared to controls. Since endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity is increased in mutant mice, their altered relaxation reflects impairment of the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway. In addition to altered NO and Ca(2+) signaling, the activity of myosin light chain and its regulators, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin phosphatase (MLCP), is reduced. In conclusion, MR expressed in VSMC is required for NO and Ca(2+) signaling pathways and contractile protein activity leading to an altered contraction/relaxation coupling. PMID:25262754

  2. Brain Arterial Diameters as a Risk Factor for Vascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Jose; Cheung, Ken; Bagci, Ahmet; Rundek, Tatjana; Alperin, Noam; Sacco, Ralph L; Wright, Clinton B; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2015-01-01

    Background Arterial luminal diameters are routinely used to assess for vascular disease. Although small diameters are typically considered pathological, arterial dilatation has also been associated with disease. We hypothesize that extreme arterial diameters are biomarkers of the risk of vascular events. Methods and Results Participants in the Northern Manhattan Study who had a time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography were included in this analysis (N=1034). A global arterial Z-score, called the brain arterial remodeling (BAR) score, was obtained by averaging the measured diameters within each individual. Individuals with a BAR score <−2 SDs were considered to have the smallest diameters, individuals with a BAR score >−2 and <2 SDs had average diameters, and individuals with a BAR score >2 SDs had the largest diameters. All vascular events were recorded prospectively after the brain magnetic resonance imaging. Spline curves and incidence rates were used to test our hypothesis. The association of the BAR score with death (P=0.001), vascular death (P=0.02), any vascular event (P=0.05), and myocardial infarction (P=0.10) was U-shaped except for ischemic stroke (P=0.74). Consequently, incidence rates for death, vascular death, myocardial infarction, and any vascular event were higher in individuals with the largest diameters, whereas individuals with the smallest diameters had a higher incidence of death, vascular death, any vascular event, and ischemic stroke compared with individuals with average diameters. Conclusions The risk of death, vascular death, and any vascular event increased at both extremes of brain arterial diameters. The pathophysiology linking brain arterial remodeling to systemic vascular events needs further research. PMID:26251284

  3. Statin-exposed vascular smooth muscle cells secrete proteoglycans with decreased binding affinity for LDL.

    PubMed

    Meyers, C Daniel; Tannock, Lisa R; Wight, Thomas N; Chait, Alan

    2003-11-01

    Retention of LDL in the artery intima is mediated by extracellular matrix proteoglycans and plays an important role in the initiation of atherosclerosis. Compared with quiescent cells, proliferating smooth muscle cells secrete proteoglycans with elongated glycosaminoglycan side chains, which have an increased binding affinity to LDL. Because 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) decrease smooth muscle cell proliferation, we hypothesized that statin exposure would decrease both the size and LDL binding affinity of vascular proteoglycans. Monkey aortic smooth muscle cells grown in culture were exposed to simvastatin (10 and 100 microM) and cerivastatin (0.1 and 1 microM), and newly secreted proteoglycans were quantified and characterized. Both simvastatin and cerivastatin caused a concentration-dependent reduction in cell growth and reduced 35SO4 incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, on both an absolute and a per cell basis. Interestingly, statin exposure increased the apparent molecular weight and hydrodynamic size of secreted proteoglycans. However, proteoglycans secreted from statin-exposed cells demonstrated a reduction in binding affinity to LDL. Thus, statins may induce atheroprotective changes in vascular proteoglycans and lower LDL retention in the vessel wall. These findings suggest a mechanism whereby statins may benefit atherosclerosis in a manner unrelated to serum LDL lowering. PMID:12923222

  4. Hypercholesterolemic diet induces vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in sympathectomized rats via intrinsic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hachani, Rafik; Dab, Houcine; Feriani, Anouar; Saber, Sami; Sakly, Mohsen; Vicaut, Eric; Callebert, Jacques; Sercombe, Richard; Kacem, Kamel

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we intend to investigate the role of hypercholesterolemic diet, a high risk factor for atherosclerosis, on vascular cell apoptosis in rats that have been previously sympathectomized. Thus, newborn male Wistar rats received injections of guanethidine for sympathectomy. Sham received injections of vehicle. The two groups were fed 1% cholesterol diet for 3months. Sympathectomy alone group was also exploited. Apoptosis in abdominal aortic tissue was identified by TUNEL method and conventional agarose gel electrophoresis to detect specific DNA fragmentation. Caspases 3 and 9, Bcl-2, Bax and cytochrome c were examined by immunoblotting. Oil Red O staining was used to reveal lipid in the arterial wall. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and macrophages were identified by immunostaining for α-smooth muscle actin and rat macrophage marker (ED1), respectively. The efficacy of sympathectomy was evaluated by analysis of perivascular sympathetic fibers. Our study showed that hypercholesterolemic diet, when performed in rats with neonatal sympathectomy, 1) increased aortic TUNEL-positive cells compared to sham and sympathectomy alone groups, 2) illustrated a typical apoptotic DNA ladder on agarose gel electrophoresis, 3) induced Bax translocation from cytosol to mitochondria, 4) enhanced cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol, 5) increased expression of active caspases 3 and 9, and 6) decreased Bcl-2 expression. VSMCs are identified as the major cell type exhibiting apoptosis in this model. Taken together, it can be concluded that hypercholesterolemic diet, when performed in rats with neonatal sympathectomy, induces vascular cell apoptosis in an intrinsic pathway. PMID:24708922

  5. Loss of Notch3 Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Promotes Severe Heart Failure Upon Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ragot, Hélène; Monfort, Astrid; Baudet, Mathilde; Azibani, Fériel; Fazal, Loubina; Merval, Régine; Polidano, Evelyne; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Delcayre, Claude; Vodovar, Nicolas; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Samuel, Jane-Lise

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension, which is a risk factor of heart failure, provokes adaptive changes at the vasculature and cardiac levels. Notch3 signaling plays an important role in resistance arteries by controlling the maturation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Notch3 deletion is protective in pulmonary hypertension while deleterious in arterial hypertension. Although this latter phenotype was attributed to renal and cardiac alterations, the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. To investigate the role of Notch3 signaling in the cardiac adaptation to hypertension, we used mice with either constitutive Notch3 or smooth muscle cell-specific conditional RBPJκ knockout. At baseline, both genotypes exhibited a cardiac arteriolar rarefaction associated with oxidative stress. In response to angiotensin II-induced hypertension, the heart of Notch3 knockout and SM-RBPJκ knockout mice did not adapt to pressure overload and developed heart failure, which could lead to an early and fatal acute decompensation of heart failure. This cardiac maladaptation was characterized by an absence of media hypertrophy of the media arteries, the transition of smooth muscle cells toward a synthetic phenotype, and an alteration of angiogenic pathways. A subset of mice exhibited an early fatal acute decompensated heart failure, in which the same alterations were observed, although in a more rapid timeframe. Altogether, these observations indicate that Notch3 plays a major role in coronary adaptation to pressure overload. These data also show that the hypertrophy of coronary arterial media on pressure overload is mandatory to initially maintain a normal cardiac function and is regulated by the Notch3/RBPJκ pathway. PMID:27296994

  6. Role of blood and vascular smooth muscle in the vasoactivity of nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J.; Barcelo, Lisa; Bragg, Shannon L.; Terry, Michael H.; Wilson, Sean M.; Power, Gordon G.

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence from humans and rats indicates that nitrite is a vasodilator under hypoxic conditions by reacting with metal-containing proteins to produce nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that near-physiological concentrations of nitrite would produce vasodilation in a hypoxia- and concentration-dependent manner in the hind limb of sheep. Anesthetized sheep were instrumented to measure arterial blood pressure and femoral blood flows continuously in both hind limbs. Nitrite was infused into one femoral artery to raise the nitrite concentration in the femoral vein by 10 to 15-fold while the sheep breathed 50%, 14% or 12% oxygen in inspired air. In contrast to reports in humans and rats, the nitrite infusion had no measurable effect on mean femoral blood flows or vascular conductances, regardless of inspired O2 levels. In vitro experiments showed no significant difference in the release of NO from nitrite in sheep and human red blood cells. Further experiments demonstrated nitrite is converted to NO in rat artery homogenates faster than sheep arteries, and that this source of NO production is attenuated in the presence of a heme oxidizer. Finally, western blots indicate that concentrations of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin, but not myoglobin, are markedly lower in sheep arteries compared with rats. Overall, the results demonstrate that nitrite is not a physiological vasodilator in sheep. This is likely due to a lack of conversion of nitrite to NO within the vascular smooth muscle, perhaps due to deficient amounts of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin. PMID:25108012

  7. Simulated Hypergravity Alters Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Shameka; Bettis, Barika; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The cellular effects of gravity are poorly understood due to its constancy and nonavailability of altered gravitational models. Such an understanding is crucial for prolonged space flights. In these studies, we assessed the influence of centrifugation at 6G (HGrav) on vascular smooth muscle (SMC) mobility and proliferation. Cells were: (a) plated at low density and subjected to HGrav for 24-72 hr for proliferation studies, or (b) grown to confluency, subjected to HGrav, mechanically denuded and monitored for cell movement into the denuded area. Controls were maintained under normogravity. SMC showed a 50% inhibition of growth under HGrav and 10% serum; HGrav and low serum resulted in greater growth inhibition. The rate of movement of SMC into the denuded area was 2-3-fold higher under HGrav in low serum compared to controls, but similar in 10% serum. These studies show that HGrav has significant effects on SMC growth and mobility, which are dependent on serum levels.

  8. Pericytes are progenitors for coronary artery smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Volz, Katharina S; Jacobs, Andrew H; Chen, Heidi I; Poduri, Aruna; McKay, Andrew S; Riordan, Daniel P; Kofler, Natalie; Kitajewski, Jan; Weissman, Irving; Red-Horse, Kristy

    2015-01-01

    Epicardial cells on the heart's surface give rise to coronary artery smooth muscle cells (caSMCs) located deep in the myocardium. However, the differentiation steps between epicardial cells and caSMCs are unknown as are the final maturation signals at coronary arteries. Here, we use clonal analysis and lineage tracing to show that caSMCs derive from pericytes, mural cells associated with microvessels, and that these cells are present in adults. During development following the onset of blood flow, pericytes at arterial remodeling sites upregulate Notch3 while endothelial cells express Jagged-1. Deletion of Notch3 disrupts caSMC differentiation. Our data support a model wherein epicardial-derived pericytes populate the entire coronary microvasculature, but differentiate into caSMCs at arterial remodeling zones in response to Notch signaling. Our data are the first demonstration that pericytes are progenitors for smooth muscle, and their presence in adult hearts reveals a new potential cell type for targeting during cardiovascular disease. PMID:26479710

  9. Activity of sap from Croton lechleri on rat vascular and gastric smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Froldi, G; Zagotto, G; Filippini, R; Montopoli, M; Dorigo, P; Caparrotta, L

    2009-08-01

    The effects of red sap from Croton lechleri (SdD), Euphorbiaceae, on vascular and gastric smooth muscles were investigated. SdD, from 10 to 1000 microg/ml, induced concentration-dependent vasoconstriction in rat caudal arteries, which was endothelium-independent. In arterial preparations pre-constricted by phenylephrine (0.1 microM) or KCl (30 mM), SdD also produced concentration-dependent vasoconstriction. To study the mechanisms implicated in this effect we used selective inhibitors such as prazosin (0.1 microM), an antagonist of alpha(1)-adrenoceptors, atropine (0.1 microM), an antagonist of muscarinic receptors, and ritanserin (50 nM), a 5-HT(2A) antagonist; none of these influenced vasoconstriction caused by SdD. Likewise, nifedipine (50 nM), an inhibitor of L-type calcium channels, did not modify the action of SdD. Capsaicin (100 nM), an agonist of vanilloid receptors, also did not affect vasoconstriction by SdD. We also investigated the action of SdD (10-1000 microg/ml) on rat gastric fundus; per se the sap slightly increased contractile tension. When the gastric fundus was pre-treated with SdD (100 microg/ml) the contraction induced by carbachol (1 microM) was increased, whereas that by KCl (60mM) or capsaicin (100 nM) were unchanged. The data shows that SdD increased contractile tension in a concentration-dependent way, both on vascular and gastric smooth muscles. The vasoconstriction is unrelated to alpha(1), M, 5-HT(2A) and vanilloid receptors as well as L-type calcium channels. SdD increased also contraction by carbachol on rat gastric fundus. Thus for the first time, experimental data provides evidence that sap from C. lechleri owns constricting activity on smooth muscles. PMID:19406630

  10. Carvacrol induces the apoptosis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianlong; Fan, Kai; Wang, Peng; Yu, Juan; Liu, Ruxia; Qi, Hanping; Sun, Hongli; Cao, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    The abnormal apoptosis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) is an important pathophysiological process in pulmonary vascular remodeling and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Carvacrol, an essential oil compound from oregano and thyme, has displayed antimicrobial, antitumor, and antioxidant properties. Although carvacrol has pro-apoptosis properties in tumor cells, the underlying mechanisms of carvacrol in PASMC apoptosis remain unclear. Thus, in this study, we aim to investigate the role of carvacrol in pulmonary vascular remodeling and PASMC apoptosis in hypoxia. Right Ventricular Hypertrophy Measurements and pulmonary pathomorphology data show that the ratio of the heart weight/tibia length (HW/TL), the right ventricle/left ventricle plus septum (RV/LV+S) and the medial width of the pulmonary artery increased in chronic hypoxia and were reversed by carvacrol treatment under hypoxia. Additionally, carvacrol inhibited PASMC viability, attenuated oxidative stress, induced mitochondria membrane depolarization, increased the percentage of apoptotic cells, suppressed Bcl-2 expression, decreased procaspase-3 expression, promoted caspase-3 activation, and inhibited the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathway. Taken together, these findings suggest that carvacrol attenuates the pulmonary vascular remodeling and promotes PASMC apoptosis by acting on, at least in part, the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. This process might provide us new insight into the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26607464

  11. Calcifying nanoparticles promote mineralization in vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Larry W; Charlesworth, Jon E; Yu, Sam; Lieske, John C; Miller, Virginia M

    2014-01-01

    Background Nano-sized complexes of calcium phosphate mineral and proteins (calcifying nanoparticles [CNPs]) serve as mineral chaperones. Thus, CNPs may be both a result and cause of soft tissue calcification processes. This study determined if CNPs could augment calcification of arterial vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro. Methods CNPs 210 nm in diameter were propagated in vitro from human serum. Porcine aortic smooth muscle cells were cultured for up to 28 days in medium in the absence (control) or presence of 2 mM phosphate ([P] positive calcification control) or after a single 3-day exposure to CNPs. Transmission electron-microscopy was used to characterize CNPs and to examine their cellular uptake. Calcium deposits were visualized by light microscopy and von Kossa staining and were quantified by colorimetry. Cell viability was quantified by confocal microscopy of live-/dead-stained cells and apoptosis was examined concurrently by fluorescent labeling of exposed phosphatidylserine. Results CNPs, as well as smaller calcium crystals, were observed by transmission electron-microscopy on day 3 in CNP-treated but not P-treated cells. By day 28, calcium deposits were visible in similar amounts within multicellular nodules of both CNP- and P-treated cells. Apoptosis increased with cell density under all treatments. CNP treatment augmented the density of apoptotic bodies and cellular debris in association with mineralized multicellular nodules. Conclusion Exogenous CNPs are taken up by aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro and potentiate accumulation of smooth-muscle-derived apoptotic bodies at sites of mineralization. Thus, CNPs may accelerate vascular calcification. PMID:24920905

  12. Gastrodin inhibits cell proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells and attenuates neointima formation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, LIHUA; GUAN, HONGJING; CUI, CHANGPING; TIAN, SONG; YANG, DA; WANG, XINAN; ZHANG, SHUMING; WANG, LANG; JIANG, HONG

    2012-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation plays a critical role in the development of vascular diseases. In the present study, we tested the efficacy and the mechanisms of action of gastrodin, a bioactive component of the Chinese herb Gastrodia elata Bl, in relation to platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-dependent cell proliferation and neointima formation after acute vascular injury. Cell experiments were performed with VSMCs isolated from rat aortas. WST and BrdU incorporation assays were used to evaluate VSMC proliferation. Eight-week-old C57BL/6 mice were used for the animal experiments. Gastrodin (150 mg/kg/day) was administered in the animal chow for 14 days, and the mice were subjected to wire injury of the left carotid artery. Our data demonstrated that gastrodin attenuated the VSMC proliferation induced by PDGF-BB, as assessed by WST assay and BrdU incorporation. Gastrodin influenced the S-phase entry of VSMCs and stabilised p27Kip1 expression. In addition, pre-incubation with sinomenine prior to PDGF-BB stimulation led to increased smooth muscle-specific gene expression, thereby inhibiting VSMC dedifferentiation. Gastrodin treatment also reduced the intimal area and the number of PCNA-positive cells. Furthermore, PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, Akt and GSK3β was suppressed by gastrodin. Our results suggest that gastrodin can inhibit VSMC proliferation and attenuate neointimal hyperplasia in response to vascular injury. Furthermore, the ERK1/2, p38 MAPK and Akt/GSK3β signalling pathways were found to be involved in the effects of gastrodin. PMID:22922870

  13. Actions of 4-aminopyridine on vascular smooth muscle tissues of the guinea-pig

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Yusuke; Kitamura, Kenji; Kuriyama, Hirosi

    1980-01-01

    1 Effects of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and procaine on the membrane and contractile properties of smooth muscle cells of the guinea-pig pulmonary artery and portal vein were observed. 2 The membrane potential and length constant of smooth muscle cells of the guinea-pig pulmonary artery were -53.2 mV and 1.2 mm, respectively, and those of the portal vein were -52.6 mV and 0.71 mm, respectively. The membrane was electrically quiescent in the pulmonary artery and it was electrically active in the portal vein. 3 Both 4-AP and procaine depolarized the membrane, increased the membrane resistance and suppressed the rectifying properties in both tissues. Both agents evoked a graded response from the muscle membranes of the pulmonary artery by outward current pulse. Procaine had a greater effect than 4-AP on the above membrane properties. 4 4-AP (10-5 M) produced contraction without depolarization of the membrane. The contraction evoked by 10-5 M 4-AP was completely suppressed but that evoked by 5 × 10-4 M 4-AP was only partly suppressed by phentolamine (10-7 M). However, the contraction evoked by procaine was not suppressed by phentolamine. 5 4-AP enhanced but procaine suppressed the amplitude of 118 mM [K]0-induced contraction. 6 The results suggest that 4-AP and procaine suppress K-conductance of the muscle membrane, and 4-AP but not procaine increases noradrenaline release from the nerve terminal. Presumably intracellular free Ca concentrations are also modified by these agents. The effects of 4-AP and procaine on the vascular muscle were compared with those on other excitable tissues. PMID:7357204

  14. Establishment of an Animal Model of Vascular Restenosis with Bilateral Carotid Artery Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruixiong; Lan, Bin; Zhu, Tianxiang; Yang, Yanlong; Wang, Muting; Ma, Chensheng; Chen, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Background Vascular restenosis occurring after CABG is a major clinical problem that needs to be addressed. Vein grafts are associated with a higher degree of stenosis than artery grafts. However, the mechanism responsible for this effect has not been elucidated. We aimed to establish a rabbit model of vascular restenosis after bilateral carotid artery grafting, and to investigate the associated spatiotemporal changes of intimal hyperplasia in carotid artery and jugular vein grafts after surgery. Material/Methods Twenty adult New Zealand white rabbits (10 males; 10 females), weighing 2.0–2.5 kg, were obtained from the Experimental Animal Center of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China (License No.: scxk-Guangdong-2006-0015). We quantitatively analyzed intimal thickness, area, and degree of stenosis in carotid artery and jugular vein bridges. Results After 8 weeks of a high-fat diet, rabbit carotid arteries showed early atherosclerotic lesions. With increasing time after surgery, carotid artery and jugular vein grafts showed histopathological and morphological changes, including smooth muscle cell migration, lipid deposition, intimal hyperplasia, and vascular stenosis. The degree of vascular stenosis was significantly higher in vein grafts than in artery grafts at all time points – 35.1±6.7% vs. 16.1±2.6% at Week 12, 56.2±8.5% vs. 23.4±3.4% at Week 16, and 71.2±1.3% vs. 25.2±5.3% at Week 20. Conclusions Rabbit bilateral carotid arteries were grafted with carotid artery and jugular vein bridges to simulate pathophysiological processes that occur in people after CABG surgery. PMID:25549796

  15. Hepatoma-derived growth factor stimulates smooth muscle cell growth and is expressed in vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Allen D.; Lobe, David R.; Matsumura, Martin E.; Nakamura, Hideji; McNamara, Coleen A.

    2000-01-01

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is the first member identified of a new family of secreted heparin-binding growth factors highly expressed in the fetal aorta. The biologic role of HDGF in vascular growth is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that HDGF mRNA is expressed in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), most prominently in proliferating SMCs, 8–24 hours after serum stimulation. Exogenous HDGF and endogenous overexpression of HDGF stimulated a significant increase in SMC number and DNA synthesis. Rat aortic SMCs transfected with a hemagglutinin-epitope–tagged rat HDGF cDNA contain HA-HDGF in their nuclei during S-phase. We also detected native HDGF in nuclei of cultured SMCs, of SMCs and endothelial cells from 19-day fetal (but not in the adult) rat aorta, of SMCs proximal to abdominal aortic constriction in adult rats, and of SMCs in the neointima formed after endothelial denudation of the rat common carotid artery. Moreover, HDGF colocalizes with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in SMCs in human atherosclerotic carotid arteries, suggesting that HDGF helps regulate SMC growth during development and in response to vascular injury. PMID:10712428

  16. Single Nisoldipine-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Smooth Muscle Cells Isolated from Rabbit Mesenteric Artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Jennings F.; Deitmer, Joachim W.; Nelson, Mark T.

    1986-08-01

    Single smooth muscle cells were enzymatically isolated from the rabbit mesenteric artery. At physiological levels of external Ca, these cells were relaxed and contracted on exposure to norepinephrine, caffeine, or high levels of potassium. The patch-clamp technique was used to measure unitary currents through single channels in the isolated cells. Single channels were selective for divalent cations and exhibited two conductance levels, 8 pS and 15 pS. Both types of channels were voltage-dependent, and channel activity occurred at potentials positive to -40 mV. The activity of both channel types was almost completely inhibited by 50 nM nisoldipine. These channels appear to be the pathways for voltage-dependent Ca influx in vascular smooth muscle and may be the targets of the clinically used dihydropyridines.

  17. Qingxuan Jiangya Decoction Reverses Vascular Remodeling by Inducing Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Apoptosis in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fei; He, Fei; Chen, Hongwei; Lin, Shan; Shen, Aling; Chen, Youqin; Chu, Jianfeng; Peng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Qingxuan Jiangya Decoction (QXJYD), a traditional Chinese medicine formula prescribed by academician Ke-ji Chen, has been used in China to clinically treat hypertension for decades of years. However, the molecular mechanisms of its action remain largely unknown. In this study, we examined the therapeutic efficacy of QXJYD against elevated systolic blood pressure in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model, and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that oral administration of QXJYD significantly reduced the elevation of systolic blood pressure in SHR but had no effect on body weight change. Additionally, QXJYD treatment significantly decreased the media thickness and ratio of media thickness/lumen diameter in the carotid arteries of SHR. Moreover, QXJYD remarkably promoted apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells and reduced the expression of anti-apoptotic B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2. Furthermore, QXJYD significantly decreased the plasma Angiotensin II level in SHR. Collectively, our findings suggest that reversing vascular remodeling via inducing VSMC apoptosis could be one of the mechanisms whereby QXJYD treats hypertension. PMID:27455221

  18. Physiological functions of transient receptor potential channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Ru; Lin, Mo-Jun; Sham, James S K

    2010-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) gene superfamily, which consists of 7 subfamilies with at least 28 mammalian homologues, is known to encode a wide variety of cation channels with diverse biophysical properties, activation mechanisms, and physiological functions. Recent studies have identified multiple TRP channel subtypes, belonging to the canonical (TRPC), melastatin-related (TRPM), and vanilloid-related (TRPV) subfamilies, in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). They operate as specific Ca(2+) pathways responsive to stimuli, including Ca(2+) store depletion, receptor activation, reactive oxygen species, growth factors, and mechanical stress. Increasing evidence suggests that these channels play crucial roles in agonist-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction, hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell proliferation, vascular remodeling, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. This chapter highlighted and discussed these putative physiological functions of TRP channels in pulmonary vasculatures. Since Ca(2+) ions regulate many cellular processes via specific Ca(2+) signals, future investigations of these novel channels will likely uncover more important regulatory mechanisms of pulmonary vascular functions in health and in disease states. PMID:20204726

  19. Adaptive response of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle to length change.

    PubMed

    Syyong, Harley; Cheung, Christine; Solomon, Dennis; Seow, Chun Y; Kuo, Kuo H

    2008-04-01

    Hypervasoconstriction is associated with pulmonary hypertension and dysfunction of the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle (PASM) is implicated. However, relatively little is known about the mechanical properties of PASM. Recent advances in our understanding of plastic adaptation in smooth muscle may shed light on the disease mechanism. In this study, we determined whether PASM is capable of adapting to length changes (especially shortening) and regain its contractile force. We examined the time course of length adaptation in PASM in response to step changes in length and to length oscillations mimicking the periodic stretches due to pulsatile arterial pressure. Rings from sheep pulmonary artery were mounted on myograph and stimulated using electrical field stimulation (12-16 s, 20 V, 60 Hz). The length-force relationship was determined at L(ref) to 0.6 L(ref), where L(ref) was a reference length close to the in situ length of PASM. The response to length oscillations was determined at L(ref), after the muscle was subjected to length oscillation of various amplitudes for 200 s at 1.5 Hz. Release (or stretch) of resting PASM from L(ref) to 0.6 (and vice versa) was followed by a significant force recovery (73 and 63%, respectively), characteristic of length adaptation. All recoveries of force followed a monoexponential time course. Length oscillations with amplitudes ranging from 5 to 20% L(ref) caused no significant change in force generation in subsequent contractions. It is concluded that, like many smooth muscles, PASM possesses substantial capability to adapt to changes in length. Under pathological conditions, this could contribute to hypervasoconstriction in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:18218913

  20. Luteolin Ameliorates Hypertensive Vascular Remodeling through Inhibiting the Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jie; Xu, Han-Ting; Yu, Jing-Jing; Gao, Jian-Li; Lei, Jing; Yin, Qiao-Shan; Li, Bo; Pang, Min-Xia; Su, Min-Xia; Mi, Wen-Jia; Chen, Su-Hong; Lv, Gui-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Preliminary researches showed that luteolin was used to treat hypertension. However, it is still unclear whether luteolin has effect on the hypertensive complication such as vascular remodeling. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of luteolin on the hypertensive vascular remodeling and its molecular mechanism. Method and Results. We evaluated the effect of luteolin on aorta thickening of hypertension in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) and found that luteolin could significantly decrease the blood pressure and media thickness of aorta in vivo. Luteolin could inhibit angiotensin II- (Ang II-) induced proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) staining result showed that luteolin reduced Ang II-stimulated ROS production in VSMCs. Furthermore, western blot and gelatin zymography results showed that luteolin treatment leaded to a decrease in ERK1/2, p-ERK1/2, p-p38, MMP2, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein level. Conclusion. These data support that luteolin can ameliorate hypertensive vascular remodeling by inhibiting the proliferation and migration of Ang II-induced VSMCs. Its mechanism is mediated by the regulation of MAPK signaling pathway and the production of ROS. PMID:26495010

  1. Uteroplacental insufficiency programs regional vascular dysfunction and alters arterial stiffness in female offspring.

    PubMed

    Mazzuca, Marc Q; Wlodek, Mary E; Dragomir, Nicoleta M; Parkington, Helena C; Tare, Marianne

    2010-06-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction caused by uteroplacental insufficiency increases the risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Vascular mechanisms in female offspring are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of uteroplacental insufficiency on blood pressure, vascular reactivity and arterial stiffness in four vascular beds in female offspring born growth restricted. Uteroplacental insufficiency was induced on day 18 of gestation in Wistar Kyoto rats by bilateral uterine vessel ligation (Restricted) or sham surgery (Controls). Wire and pressure myography were used to test endothelial and smooth muscle function, and passive mechanical wall properties, respectively, in uterine, mesenteric, renal and femoral arteries of 18-month-old female offspring. Collagen and elastin fibres were quantified using circular crossed-polarized light microscopy and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. Restricted female offspring were born 10-15% smaller. Restricted females were normotensive, had plasma triglycerides 2-fold elevated and had uterine endothelial dysfunction, attributed to a 23% reduction in the maximal relaxation produced by endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor. Uterine artery stiffness was increased, with an augmented proportion of thick and decreased proportion of thin collagen fibres. Vascular reactivity and mechanical wall properties were preserved in mesenteric, renal and femoral arteries in growth restricted females. Female offspring born growth restricted have selective uterine artery endothelial dysfunction and increased wall stiffness. The preserved vascular function in other arteries may explain the lack of hypertension in these females. The uterine artery specific dysfunction has potential implications for impaired pregnancy adaptations and a compromised intrauterine environment of the next generation. PMID:20403978

  2. CCN1 suppresses pulmonary vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon-jin; Zhang, Meng; Hu, Kebin; Lin, Ling; Zhang, Duo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary vasoconstriction and increased vascular resistance are common features in pulmonary hypertension (PH). One of the contributing factors in the development of pulmonary vasoconstriction is increased pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) contraction. Here we report that CCN1, an extracellular matrix molecule, suppressed PASMC contraction in response to hypoxia. CCN1 (Cyr61), discovered in past decade, belongs to the Cyr61-CTGF-Nov (CCN) family. It carries a variety of cellular functions, including angiogenesis and cell adhesion, death, and proliferation. Hypoxia robustly upregulated the expression of CCN1 in the pulmonary vessels and lung parenchyma. Given that CCN1 is a secreted protein and functions in a paracine manner, we examined the potential effects of CCN1 on the adjacent smooth muscle cells. Interestingly, bioactive recombinant CCN1 significantly suppressed hypoxia-induced contraction in human PASMCs in vitro. Consistently, in the in vivo functional studies, administration of bioactive CCN1 protein significantly decreased right ventricular pressure in three different PH animal models. Mechanistically, protein kinase A–pathway inhibitors abolished the effects of CCN1 in suppressing PASMC contraction. Furthermore, CCN1-inhibited smooth muscle contraction was independent of the known vasodilators, such as nitric oxide. Taken together, our studies indicated a novel cellular function of CCN1, potentially regulating the pathogenesis of PH. PMID:26697179

  3. Morelloflavone blocks injury-induced neointimal formation by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Pinkaew, Decha; Cho, Sung Gook; Hui, David Y.; Wiktorowicz, John E.; Hutadilok-Towatana, Nongporn; Mahabusarakam, Wilawan; Tonganunt, Moltira; Stafford, Lewis J.; Phongdara, Amornrat; Liu, Mingyao; Fujise, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Background In-stent restenosis, or renarrowing within a coronary stent, is the most ominous complication of percutaneous coronary intervention, caused by vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration into and proliferation in the intima. Although drug-eluting stents reduce restenosis, they delay the tissue healing of the injured arteries. No promising alternative anti-restenosis treatments are currently on the horizon. Methods & Results In endothelium-denudated mouse carotid arteries, oral morelloflavone—an active ingredient of the Thai medicinal plant Garcinia dulcis—significantly decreased the degree of neointimal hyperplasia, without affecting neointimal cell cycle progression or apoptosis as evaluated by Ki-67 and TUNEL staining, respectively. At the cellular level, morelloflavone robustly inhibited VSMC migration as shown by both scratch wound and invasion assays. In addition, morelloflavone prevented VSMCs from forming lamellipodia, a VSMC migration apparatus. Mechanistically, the inhibition by morelloflavone of VSMC migration was through its negative regulatory effects on several migration-related kinases, including FAK, Src, ERK, and RhoA. Consistently with the animal data, morelloflavone did not affect VSMC cell cycle progression or induce apoptosis. Conclusion These data suggest that morelloflavone blocks injury-induced neointimal hyperplasia via the inhibition of VSMC migration, without inducing apoptosis or cell cycle arrest. General Significance We propose morelloflavone to be a viable oral agent for the prevention of restenosis, without compromising effects on the integrity and healing of the injured arteries. PMID:18930785

  4. PDMS Elastic Micropost Arrays for Studying Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qi; Sun, Zhe; Meininger, Gerald; Almasri, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the design, modeling, fabrication and characterization of a micromachined array of high-density 3-dimensional microposts (100×100) made of flexible material (silicone elastomers) for use to measure quantitatively the cellular traction force and contractile events in isolated vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The micropost array was fabricated with diameters ranged from 3 to 10 μm, with edge to edge spacing of 5, 7 and 10 μm, and with a height to diameter aspect ratio up to 10. VSMCs exerted larger basal traction forces when they were grown on stiffer micropost arrays. These basal traction forces were 80% larger in control VSMCs than in VSMCs in which integrin linked kinase (ILK) was knocked down using shRNA. The addition of Angiotensin II (ANGII) led to VSMC contraction as evidenced by an increased traction force exerted on the microposts under the cell. This ANGII induced contractile response and change in traction force on the microposts was not observed in VSMCs lacking ILK. Following treatment of VSMCs with Cytochalasin D to depolymerize the actin cytoskeleton, the VSMCs exhibited relaxation that was apparent as a significant reduction in the measured traction force exerted on microposts under the cell. Overall, this study demonstrates the usefulness of micropost arrays for study of the contractile responsiveness of VSMC and the results indicate that ILK plays a critical role in the signaling pathways leading to the generation of substrate traction force in VSMC. PMID:26451074

  5. Tensile Properties of Contractile and Synthetic Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Kozaburo

    Tensile properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of synthetic and contractile phenotypes were determined using a newly developed tensile test system. Synthetic and contractile VSMCs were isolated from the rabbit thoracic aorta with an explant and an enzymatic digestion method, respectively. Each cell floated in Hanks' balanced salt solution of 37°C was attached to the fine tips of a pair of micropipettes with a cell adhesive and, then, stretched at the rate of 6µm/sec by moving one of the micropipettes with a linear actuator. Load applied to the cell was measured with a cantilever-type load cell; its elongation was determined from the distance between the micropipette tips using a video dimension analyzer. The synthetic and contractile VSMCs were not broken even at the tensile force of 2.4µN and 3.4µN, respectively. Their stiffness was significantly higher in contractile phenotype (0.17N/m) than in synthetic one (0.09N/m). The different tensile properties between synthetic and contractile cells are attributable to the differences in cytoskeletal structures and contractile apparatus.

  6. Extracellular calcium sensing in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Christoffersen, Tue E.H.

    2006-10-06

    Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) can act as a first messenger in many cell types through a G protein-coupled receptor, calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). It is still debated whether the CaR is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we report the expression of CaR mRNA and protein in rat aortic VSMCs and show that Ca2+o stimulates proliferation of the cells. The effects of Ca2+o were attenuated by pre-treatment with MAPK kinase 1 (MEK1) inhibitor, as well as an allosteric modulator, NPS 2390. Furthermore, stimulation of the VSMCs with Ca2+o-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but surprisingly did not cause inositol phosphate accumulation. We were not able to conclusively state that the CaR mediates Ca2+o-induced cell proliferation. Rather, an additional calcium-sensing mechanism may exist. Our findings may be of importance with regard to atherosclerosis, an inflammatory disease characterized by abnormal proliferation of VSMCs and high local levels of calcium.

  7. Identification of possible adenosine receptors in vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Doctrow, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Adenosine is a vasodilator and has been implicated in increased blood flow in tissues that undergo energy deficiency. During conditions such as hypoxia and ischemia, adenosine is produced and is said to increase blood flow by relaxing the vascular smooth muscle (VSM) lining the resistance vessels. The goal of this research was to identify receptors that might be responsible for adenosine-mediated VSM relaxation. When an insoluble fraction from calf aortic VSM was incubated with /sup 32/P-ATP, two components were phosphorylated. One was identified as myosin light chain by MW, pl, and immunoprecipitation. The other product was identified as phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (DPI) by tic. Both phosphorylations were inhibited by adenosine and by 5'-chloro-5'-deoxyadenosine (Cl-Ado). DPI production was much more sensitive to the nucleosides than was myosin phosphorylation. Neither inhibition involved change in cAMP production. Phosphatidylinositol (Pl) kinase in the VSM membranes required magnesium, was activated and solubilized by Triton X-100, and phosphorylated both endogenous and exogenous Pl. Cl-Ado inhibited Pl kinase in a manner competitive with respect to ATP and noncompetitive with respect to Pl. Adenosine and adenosine analogs modified in the ribose ring were inhibitors with potencies comparable to that of Cl-Ado. Adenine nucleotides and purine-modified adenosine analogs were weaker inhibitors than Cl-Ado.

  8. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Viitanen, Matti; Sundström, Erik; Baumann, Marc; Tikka, Saara

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology. -- Highlights: ► CADASIL is an inherited disease of cerebral vascular cells. ► Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CADASIL. ► Lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC. ► Increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria and lower mitochondrial membrane potential in CADASIL VSMCs. ► Reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs.

  9. Factors influencing acute thrombus formation on carotid artery vascular grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Torem, S.; Schneider, P.A.; Paxton, L.D.; Yasuda, H.; Hanson, S.R.

    1988-10-01

    Scintillation camera imaging of 111Indium-labeled platelets has been used to measure acute thrombus formation on modified expanded Teflon (ePTFE) vascular grafts placed in the carotid arteries of normal baboons. Platelet deposition plateaued over 2 hr postoperatively and occurred primarily at the graft-vessel anastomoses. A positive correlation was found between the circulating platelet count in individual animals and the extent of early platelet thrombus deposition. Unmodified ePTFE grafts accumulated 4.6 +/- 1.2 x 10(9) platelets per graft, or 2.3 +/- 0.71 x 10(9) platelets per anastomosis. Acutely, platelet accumulation was reduced versus control graft results by coating the graft lumenal surfaces with a smooth layer of silicone rubber polymer (0.60 +/- 0.19 x 10(9) platelets per anastomosis; P less than 0.02) but not by coating the grafts using a plasma polymer based on methane, which did not modify graft texture (8.2 +/- 1.7 x 10(9) platelets per graft; P greater than 0.10). The benefit of the silicone rubber coating persisted for at least 48 hr. However, longer term patency was not preserved because 10 of 12 grafts placed had failed within 1 to 2 months.

  10. Expression of extra domain A fibronectin sequence in vascular smooth muscle cells is phenotype dependent.

    PubMed

    Glukhova, M A; Frid, M G; Shekhonin, B V; Vasilevskaya, T D; Grunwald, J; Saginati, M; Koteliansky, V E

    1989-07-01

    Different fibronectin (FN) variants arise from the single gene transcript alternatively spliced in a tissue-specific manner (Hynes, R. O. 1985. Annu. Rev. Cell Biol. 1:67-90; Owens, R. J., A. R. Kornblihtt, and F. E. Baralle. 1986. Oxf. Surv. Eurcaryotic Genes. 3:141-160). We used mAb IST-9, specific for extra domain A (ED-A) FN sequence, and cDNA probe to ED-A exon to determine whether ED-A is present in FN synthesized by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and, if so, whether expression of ED-A is SMC phenotype dependent. ED-A-containing FN (A-FN) was not revealed in tunica media of human arteries and normal rat aorta by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting techniques. A cDNA probe to ED-A exon did not hybridize with RNA isolated from human aortic media. A positive reaction with IST-9 was observed in (a) diffuse intimal thickening and atherosclerotic plaque from human arteries; (b) experimentally induced intimal thickening in rat aorta; and (c) cultured vascular SMCs. A-FN mRNA was present in the RNA preparation from human aortic intima as judged by hybridization with cDNA probe to ED-A. On the other hand, an mAb interacting with an epitope common for all FN variants revealed FN in both intima and media of human arteries and in the normal rat aorta. A cDNA probe to a sequence shared by all FN variants hybridized with RNA from both intima and media of human aorta, though the level of expression was higher in intima. The data suggest that ED-A exon is omitted during splicing of the FN mRNA precursor in medial SMCs while the expression of A-FN is characteristic of "modulated" SMCs--those of intimal thickenings, of atherosclerotic lesions, and growing in culture. PMID:2663879

  11. Suppressed smooth muscle proliferation and inflammatory cell invasion after arterial injury in elafin-overexpressing mice

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Syed H.E.; You, Xiao-Mang; Ciura, Sorana; O’Blenes, Stacey; Husain, Mansoor; Rabinovitch, Marlene

    2000-01-01

    Elastases degrade the extracellular matrix, releasing growth factors and chemotactic peptides, inducing glycoproteins such as tenascin, and thereby promoting vascular cell proliferation and migration. Administration of serine elastase inhibitors reduces experimentally induced vascular disease. The ability to mount an intrinsic anti-elastase response may, therefore, protect against intimal/medial thickening after vascular injury. To investigate this, we showed that wire-induced endothelial denudation of the carotid artery is associated with transient elevation in elastase activity and confirmed that this is abolished in transgenic mice overexpressing the serine elastase inhibitor, elafin, targeted to the cardiovascular system. Ten days after injury, nontransgenic littermates show vessel enlargement, intimal thickening, increased medial area and cellularity, and 2-fold increase in tenascin. Injured vessels in transgenic mice become enlarged but are otherwise similar to sham-operated controls. Injury-induced vessel wall thickening, which is observed only in nontransgenic mice, is related to foci of neutrophils and macrophages, in addition to smooth muscle cells that fail to stain for α-actin and are likely dedifferentiated. Our study therefore suggests that a major determinant of the vascular response to injury is the early transient induction of serine elastase activity, which leads to cellular proliferation and inflammatory cell migration. PMID:10862784

  12. Response Gene to Complement 32 Promotes Vascular Lesion Formation through Stimulation of Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Ning; Shi, Ning; Xie, Wei-bing; Guo, Xia; Chen, Shi-You

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study are to determine the role of response gene to complement 32 (RGC-32) in vascular lesion formation after experimental angioplasty and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods and Results Using a rat carotid artery balloon-injury model, we documented for the first time that neointima formation was closely associated with a significantly increased expression of RGC-32 protein. shRNA Knockdown of RGC-32 via adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene delivery dramatically inhibited the lesion formation by 62% as compared to control groups 14 days after injury. Conversely, RGC-32 overexpression significantly promoted the neointima formation by 33%. Gain and loss of function studies in primary culture of rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs) indicated that RGC-32 is essential for both the proliferation and migration of RASMCs. RGC-32 induced RASMC proliferation by enhancing p34CDC2 activity. RGC-32 stimulated the migration of RASMC via inducing focal adhesion contact and stress fiber formation. These effects were caused by the enhanced ROKα activity due to RGC-32-induced downregulation of Rad GTPase. Conclusions RGC-32 plays an important role in vascular lesion formation following vascular injury. Increased RGC-32 expression in vascular injury appears to be a novel mechanism underlying the migration and proliferation of vascular SMCs. Therefore, targeting RGC-32 is a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention of vascular remodeling in proliferative vascular diseases. PMID:21636805

  13. Quantification of Adventitial Vasa Vasorum Vascularization in Double-injury Restenotic Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Meng; Zhang, Bai-Gen; Zhang, Lan; Xie, Hui; Zhang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accumulating evidence indicates a potential role of adventitial vasa vasorum (VV) dysfunction in the pathophysiology of restenosis. However, characterization of VV vascularization in restenotic arteries with primary lesions is still missing. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the response of adventitial VV to vascular injury resulting from balloon angioplasty in diseased arteries. Methods: Primary atherosclerotic-like lesions were induced by the placement of an absorbable thread surrounding the carotid artery of New Zealand rabbits. Four weeks following double-injury induced that was induced by secondary balloon dilation, three-dimensional patterns of adventitial VV were reconstructed; the number, density, and endothelial surface of VV were quantified using micro-computed tomography. Histology and immunohistochemistry were performed in order to examine the development of intimal hyperplasia. Results: Results from our study suggest that double injured arteries have a greater number of VV, increased luminal surface, and an elevation in the intima/media ratio (I/M), along with an accumulation of macrophages and smooth muscle cells in the intima, as compared to sham or single injury arteries. I/M and the number of VV were positively correlated (R2 = 0.82, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Extensive adventitial VV neovascularization occurs in injured arteries after balloon angioplasty, which is associated with intimal hyperplasia. Quantitative assessment of adventitial VV response may provide insight into the basic biological process of postangioplasty restenosis. PMID:26228224

  14. [Local vascular complications after iatrogenic femoral artery puncture].

    PubMed

    Fruhwirth, J; Pascher, O; Hauser, H; Amann, W

    1996-01-01

    Over a period of 5 years 81 vascular complications after 15,460 catheterizations of the femoral artery for diagnostic (n = 11,883) or therapeutic (n = 3577) procedures were registered. The following complications were observed in declining frequency: 1. False aneurysm (n = 65), 2. arterial occlusion (dissection, embolia, thrombosis) (n = 8), 3. vascular lesion causing profuse bleeding (n = 7), 4. AV-fistula (n = 1). The total complication rate was 0.52%. The complication rate was significantly higher in therapeutical procedures (1,03%) than in diagnostic investigations (0.37%). Pseudoaneurysms were complicated by thrombosis of the femoral vein (n = 3), lymphatic fistula (n = 3) and deep wound infection (n = 9); secondary complication rate 18.5%. Risk factors for local vascular complications are old age, female gender, high grade arteriosclerosis at the puncture site, overweight, manifest arterial hypertension and medication with cumarin, acetylsalicylic acid or heparin. Further complicating factors are connected with technical risks such as duration of the procedure. French size of the catheter, the catheter sheath and multiple punctures. Vascular repair was performed by simple angiography in most cases, but in 14.8% more extensive surgical procedures were required. In patients with signs of occlusive vascular disease the external iliac artery was replaced by a PTFE-vascular access graft in 4 cases and an arterioplasty of the deep femoral artery was performed in 2 patients. 36% of the operations were undertaken as emergencies. Reintervention was necessary for a postoperative bleeding complication in 1 case (surgical complication rate 1.2%). A female patient suffering from aortic valve stenosis died during emergency operation due to massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage after cardiac catheterization (mortality rate 1.2%). Over a median follow-up period of 37 months no late complications of the intervention were recorded, nor recurrences of peripheral arterial occlusive

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.; Maron, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that is precipitated by hypertrophic pulmonary vascular remodeling of distal arterioles to increase pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance in the absence of left heart, lung parenchymal, or thromboembolic disease. Despite available medical therapy, pulmonary artery remodeling and its attendant hemodynamic consequences result in right ventricular dysfunction, failure, and early death. To limit morbidity and mortality, attention has focused on identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant pulmonary artery remodeling to identify pathways for intervention. While there is a well-recognized heritable genetic component to PAH, there is also evidence of other genetic perturbations, including pulmonary vascular cell DNA damage, activation of the DNA damage response, and variations in microRNA expression. These findings likely contribute, in part, to dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis signaling pathways akin to what is observed in cancer; changes in cellular metabolism, metabolic flux, and mitochondrial function; and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as key signaling pathways that promote pulmonary vascular remodeling. This review will highlight recent advances in the field with an emphasis on the aforementioned molecular mechanisms as contributors to the pulmonary vascular disease pathophenotype. PMID:27213345

  16. Vascular smooth muscle cell-derived adiponectin: a paracrine regulator of contractile phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ding, Min; Carrão, Ana Catarina; Wagner, Robert J; Xie, Yi; Jin, Yu; Rzucidlo, Eva M; Yu, Jun; Li, Wei; Tellides, George; Hwa, John; Aprahamian, Tamar R; Martin, Kathleen A

    2012-02-01

    Adiponectin is a cardioprotective adipokine derived predominantly from visceral fat. We recently demonstrated that exogenous adiponectin induces vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) differentiation via repression of mTORC1 and FoxO4. Here we report for the first time that VSMC express and secrete adiponectin, which acts in an autocrine and paracrine manner to regulate VSMC contractile phenotype. Adiponectin was found to be expressed in human coronary artery and mouse aortic VSMC. Importantly, siRNA knock-down of endogenous adiponectin in VSMC significantly reduced the expression of VSMC contractile proteins. Contractile protein deficiency was also observed in primary VSMC isolated from Adiponectin(-/-) mice. This deficiency could be rescued by culturing Adiponectin(-/-) VSMC in conditioned media from wild type (WT) VSMC. Moreover, the paracrine effect of VSMC-derived adiponectin was confirmed as adiponectin neutralizing antibody blocked the rescue. Overexpressed adiponectin also exerted paracrine effects on neighboring untransfected VSMC, which was also blocked by adiponectin neutralizing antibody. Interestingly, adiponectin expression was inducible by the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone. Our data support an important role for VSMC-derived adiponectin in maintaining VSMC contractile phenotype, contributing to critical cardioprotective functions in the vascular wall. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Local Signaling in Myocytes". PMID:21952104

  17. The flavonoid quercetin induces apoptosis and inhibits JNK activation in intimal vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco . E-mail: fperez@med.ucm.es; Bishop-Bailley, David; Lodi, Federica; Duarte, Juan; Cogolludo, Angel; Moreno, Laura; Bosca, Lisardo; Mitchell, Jane A.; Warner, Timothy D.

    2006-08-04

    Quercetin, the most abundant dietary flavonol, exerts vasodilator, anti-hypertensive, and anti-atherogenic effects and reduces the vascular remodelling associated with elevated blood pressure. Here, we have compared the effects of quercetin in intimal- and medial-type rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in culture. After 48 h, quercetin reduced the viability of a polyclonal intimal-type cell line derived from neonatal aorta but not of a medial-type cell line derived from adult aorta. These differential effects were similar in both proliferating and quiescent VSMC. Quercetin also preferentially reduced the viability of intimal-type over medial-type VSMC in primary cultures derived from balloon-injured carotid arteries. The effects of quercetin on cell viability were mainly dependent upon induction of apoptosis, as demonstrated by nuclear condensation and fragmentation, and were unrelated to PPAR{gamma}, pro-oxidant effects or nitric oxide. The expression of MAPKs (ERK, p38, and JNK) and ERK phosphorylation were not different between intimal- and medial-type VSMC. p38 phosphorylation was negligible in both cell types. Medial-type showed a weak JNK phosphorylation while this was markedly increased in intimal-type cells. Quercetin reduced JNK phosphorylation but had no consistent effect on ERK phosphorylation. In conclusion, quercetin preferentially produced apoptosis in intimal-type compared to medial-type VSMC. This might play a role in the anti-atherogenic and anti-hypertensive effects of quercetin.

  18. Phorbol esters modulate the shape of cultured canine vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Di Salvo, J.; Kolquist, K.; Semenchuk, L.; Rengstorf, J. )

    1991-03-11

    Marked changes in the shape of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) occur during early development, repair of the vascular wall, and formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Yet, surprisingly little is known about mechanisms which regulate the shape of VSMC. Since protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in regulation of multiple cellular functions including interactions between contractile and cytoskeletal proteins, the authors suspected it might also regulate VSMC shape. Accordingly, the authors studied the influence of a known activator of PKC, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), on the shape of cultured canine carotid arterial BSMC. PMA produced time and concentration dependent changes from normal elongated shape to pronounced circular forms. Cells recovered normal shape within 24 hrs even though exposure to PMA was continued. Analogs of PMA which do not activate PKC did not alter shape, whereas phorbol 13, 14 diacetate, an analog which activates PKC, did produce changes in shape similar to those produced by PMA. Cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, or actinomycin D, an inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, did not alter PMA-induced changes in morphology. In contrast, however, recovery of normal shape after prolonged exposure to PMA was blocked by either cycloheximide or actinomycin D. These results suggest activation of PKC produces changes in VSMC shape that are independent of transcription or translation, whereas recovery is dependent on both transcription and translation. The results also suggest PKC may modulate in vivo changes in VSMC shape occurring during different pathophysiological states.

  19. Activation of Calpain-2 by Mediators in Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Laszlo; Han, Weihong; Rafikov, Ruslan; Bagi, Zsolt; Offermanns, Stefan; Saido, Takaomi C; Black, Stephen M; Su, Yunchao

    2016-03-01

    Calpain mediates collagen synthesis and cell proliferation and plays an important role in pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In the present study, we investigated whether and how calpain is activated by PAH mediators in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). These data show that smooth muscle-specific knockout of calpain attenuated and knockout of calpastatin potentiated pulmonary vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension. Treatment of PASMCs with the PAH mediators platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), serotonin, H2O2, endothelin-1, and IL-6 caused significant increases in calpain activity, cell proliferation, and collagen-I protein level without changes in protein levels of calpain-1 and -2. The calcium chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis (acetoxymethyl ester) (BAPTA/AM) did not affect calpain activation, but the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 inhibitor PD98059 and knocking down of calpain-2 prevented calpain activation in PAH mediator-treated PASMCs. Mass spectrometry data showed that the phosphorylation of calpain-2 at serine (Ser) 50 was increased and the phosphorylation of calpain-2 at Ser369 was decreased in PDGF-treated PASMCs. The PDGF-induced increase in Ser50 phosphorylation of calpain-2 was prevented by PD98059, whereas dephosphorylation of calpain-2 at Ser369 was blocked by the protein phosphatase 2A inhibitor fostriecin. Furthermore, smooth muscle of pulmonary arteries in PAH animal models and patients with PAH showed higher levels of phospho-Ser50-calpain-2 (P-Ser50) and lower levels of phospho-Ser369-calpain-2 (P-Ser369). These data support that calpain modulates pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH. PAH mediator-induced activation of calpain is caused by ERK1/2-dependent phosphorylation of calpain-2 at Ser50 and protein phosphatase 2A-dependent dephosphorylation of calpain-2 at Ser369 in pulmonary vascular remodeling of PAH. PMID:26248159

  20. mTORC2 coordinates pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell metabolism, proliferation and survival in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Goncharov, Dmitry A.; Kudryashova, Tatiana V.; Ziai, Houman; Ihida-Stansbury, Kaori; DeLisser, Horace; Krymskaya, Vera P.; Tuder, Rubin M.; Kawut, Steven M.; Goncharova, Elena A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Enhanced proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and metabolic shift to glycolysis of pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle cells (PAVSMC) are key pathophysiological components of pulmonary vascular remodeling in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). The role of distinct mTOR complexes mTORC1 (mTOR-raptor) and mTORC2 (mTOR-rictor) in PAVSMC proliferation and survival in PAH and their therapeutic relevance is unknown. Methods and Results Immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses revealed that mTORC1 and mTORC2 pathways are markedly up-regulated in small remodeled PAs and isolated distal PAVSMC from IPAH subjects that have increased ATP levels, proliferation and survival that depend on glycolytic metabolism. siRNA- and pharmacological-based analysis showed that while both mTORC1 and mTORC2 contributing to proliferation, only mTORC2 is required for ATP generation and survival of IPAH PAVSMC. mTORC2 down-regulated energy sensor AMPK allowing activation of mTORC1-S6 and increased proliferation, and deficiency of pro-apoptotic protein Bim and IPAH PAVSMC survival. Nox4 protein levels were increased in IPAH PAVSMC that was necessary for mTORC2 activation, proliferation and survival. Nox4 levels and mTORC2 signaling were significantly up-regulated in small PAs from hypoxia-exposed rats at days 2-28 of hypoxia. Treatment with the mTOR kinase inhibitor PP242 at days 15-28 suppressed mTORC2, but not Nox4, induced SM-specific apoptosis in small PAs and reversed hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling in rats. Conclusions These data provide a novel mechanistic link of Nox4-dependent activation of mTORC2 via energy sensor AMPK to increased proliferation and survival of PAVSMC in PAH suggesting a new potential pathway for the therapeutic interventions. PMID:24270265

  1. Transdifferentiation of endothelial cells to smooth muscle cells play an important role in vascular remodelling.

    PubMed

    Coll-Bonfill, Núria; Musri, Melina Mara; Ivo, Victor; Barberà, Joan Albert; Tura-Ceide, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary artery remodelling it is a major feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). It is characterised by cellular and structural changes of the pulmonary arteries causing higher pulmonar vascular resistance and right ventricular failure. Abnormal deposition of smooth muscle-like (SM-like) cells in normally non-muscular, small diameter vessels and a deregulated control of endothelial cells are considered pathological features of PH. The origin of the SM-like cells and the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of this remodelling process are not understood. Endothelial cells within the intima may migrate from their organised layer of cells and transition to mesenchymal or SM-like phenotype in a process called endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EnMT). Traditionally, Waddington's epigenetic landscape illustrates that fates of somatic cells are progressively determined to compulsorily follow a downhill differentiation pathway. EnMT induces the transformation of cells with stem cell traits, therefore contrasting Waddington's theory and confirming that cell fate seems to be far more flexible than previously thought. The prospect of therapeutic inhibition of EnMT to delay or prevent PH may represent a promising new treatment modality. PMID:25973327

  2. Globular adiponectin reduces vascular calcification via inhibition of ER-stress-mediated smooth muscle cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yan; Bian, Yunfei; Wang, Yueru; Bai, Rui; Wang, Jiapu; Xiao, Chuanshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the mechanism of globular adiponectin inhibiting vascular calcification. Methods: We established drug-induced rat vascular calcification model, globular adiponectin was given to observe the effect of globular Adiponectin on the degree of calcification. The markers of vascular calcification and apoptosis were also investigated. Meanwhile, the in vitro effect of globular Adiponectin on vascular calcification was also evaluated using primary cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Results: We found that globular adiponectin could inhibit drug-induced rat vascular calcification significantly in vivo. The apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells was also reduced. The possible mechanism could be the down-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress by globular adiponectin. Experiments in primary cultured vascular smooth muscle cells also confirmed that globular adiponectin could reduce cell apoptosis to suppress vascular calcification via inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Conclusions: This study confirmed that globular adiponectin could suppress vascular calcification; one of the mechanisms could be inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress to reduce cell apoptosis. It could provide an effective method in the therapy of vascular calcification-associated diseases. PMID:26045760

  3. Functional comparison of endothelin receptors in human and rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Bialecki, R A; Fisher, C S; Murdoch, W W; Barthlow, H G; Bertelsen, D L

    1997-02-01

    The receptors mediating arterial smooth muscle contraction to endothelins (ET) differ among species and origin of vascular bed. We characterized ET receptors mediating contraction of endothelium-denuded human intralobar pulmonary artery (hIPA) and rat intralobar (rIPA) and extralobar left branch (rLPA) pulmonary artery with ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, sarafotoxin S6c, sarafotoxin S6b, and ET receptor antagonists in vitro. Rat aorta was studied for comparison. Each vascular segment showed concentration-dependent contraction with a rank order sensitivity (pD2) profile of ET-1 > or = ET-2 = sarafotoxin S6b > ET-3. Maximum contraction to ET-1 was greater than to sarafotoxin S6c in all preparations. Responses of rIPA and rLPA to sarafotoxin S6c were conspicuous when compared with hIPA or aorta. The ET(A) receptor blockers BQ-123 and BMS-182874 competitively antagonized ET-1 responses of hIPA and aorta, but not rLPA. The ET(B) receptor antagonist BQ-788 attenuated contractions of rIPA and rLPA to ET-3 and sarafotoxin S6c, respectively. In conclusion, ET(B)-mediated contraction of endothelium-denuded conduit pulmonary arteries varies among species and may contribute more to contraction of rIPA and rLPA than of hIPA and aorta, although maximum ET(B)-mediated contraction is smaller than that mediated by the ET(A) receptor. PMID:9124371

  4. PDT-induced apoptosis in arterial smooth muscles cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamekye, Isaac; Renick, R.; Gilbert, C.; McEwan, Jean R.; Evan, G.; Bishop, Christopher C. R.; Bown, Stephen G.

    1995-03-01

    PDT kills smooth muscle cells (SMC) in vivo and thus prevents intimal hyperplasia after angioplasty. It causes little inflammation and structural integrity of the artery is not compromised. We have studied the process of the SMC death in vitro. Cultured rat SMC (cell line sv40 ATCC) were sensitized with aluminum disulphonated phthalocyanine (AlS2Pc), and then irradiated with 675 nm laser light (2.5 J/cm2). Controls were studied using only sensitizer or laser for treatment. The cells were incubated and the dying process observed with a time lapse video and microscope system. PDT caused a characteristic pattern of death. Cells lost contact with neighbors, shrank, and showed hyperactivity and membrane ruffling. The cells imploded into active and condensed membrane bound vesicles which were terminally reduced to residual bodies. These are the morphological changes of apoptosis. The control cells which were given AlS2Pc alone or laser alone showed no death. PDT induced cultured arterial SMC death by apoptosis rather than necrosis. An apoptotic mechanism of cell death in vivo would explain the relative lack of inflammation and local tissue destruction in the face of massive death.

  5. Cyclic GMP alters Ca exchange in vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Magliola, L.; Bailey, B.; Jones, A.W.

    1986-03-05

    Contraction and /sup 42/K efflux from vascular smooth muscle stimulated either by norepinephrine (NE) or by K-depolarization is dependent on an increase in cytosolic Ca concentration. The purpose of this study was to determine if cyclic GMP (cGMP) inhibited these processes and if inhibition was secondary to the action of cGMP on Ca movements. Basal cGMP content of rat aorta was 1.2 fmol/mg wet wt. Sodium nitroprusside (NP) increased cGMP approx.2-fold at 1 nM and approx.750-fold at 1 ..mu..M with no effect on cAMP levels. A 5 min pretreatment with NP (1 ..mu..M) completely prevented tension development induced by 3 ..mu..M NE. The same concentration of NP also inhibited NE-stimulated /sup 42/K and /sup 45/Ca efflux > 90 and > 80%, respectively. Removal of NP in the continued presence of NE (3 ..mu..M) caused recovery of the /sup 42/K efflux response to approx.75% of control with a half-time of approx.2.5 min. NP (1 ..mu..M) also caused a rapid relaxation of aorta contracted with 3 ..mu..M NE and a loss of the /sup 42/K efflux response with half-times of 2-3 min. In contrast, 100 ..mu..M NP produced only a 50% inhibition of contraction induced by high K (55 mM). Also, NP (1 ..mu..M) inhibited K-stimulated /sup 42/K efflux only approx.25%. These results demonstrate both a concentration- and a time-dependent relationship between increases in cGMP induced by NP and decreases in NE-stimulated contraction, /sup 42/K and /sup 45/Ca effluxes. They also indicate that the sensitivity of NE-induced contraction and /sup 42/K efflux to NP is greater than that induced by high K. These studies suggest that cGMP modulates the control sites for Ca exchange in the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  6. Magnolol inhibits migration of vascular smooth muscle cells via cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation

    SciTech Connect

    Karki, Rajendra; Kim, Seong-Bin; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2013-12-10

    Background: Increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contribute importantly to the formation of both atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of magnolol on VSMC migration. Methods: The proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) stimulated VSMCs was performed by gelatin zymography. VSMC migration was assessed by wound healing and Boyden chamber methods. Collagen induced VSMC adhesion was determined by spectrofluorimeter and stress fibers formation was evaluated by fluorescence microscope. The expression of signaling molecules involved in stress fibers formation was determined by western blot. The phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC20) was determined by urea-glycerol polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression of β1-integrin and collagen type I in the injured carotid arteries of rats on day 35 after vascular injury. Results: VSMC migration was strongly inhibited by magnolol without affecting MMPs expression. Also, magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, FAK phosphorylation and RhoA and Cdc42 activation to inhibit the collagen induced stress fibers formation. Moreover, magnolol inhibited the phosphorylation of MLC20. Our in vivo results showed that magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, collagen type I deposition and FAK phosphorylation in injured carotid arteries without affecting MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: Magnolol inhibited VSMC migration via inhibition of cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation. General significance: This study provides a rationale for further evaluation of magnolol for the management of atherosclerosis and restenosis. - Highlights: • Magnolol strongly inhibited migration of VSMCs. • Magnolol inhibited stress fibers formation. • MLC20 phosphorylation was also inhibited by magnolol. • Anti

  7. Nuclear envelope proteins modulate proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells during cyclic stretch application

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ying-Xin; Yao, Qing-Ping; Huang, Kai; Shi, Qian; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Guo-Liang; Han, Yue; Bao, Han; Wang, Lu; Li, Hai-Peng; Shen, Bao-Rong; Wang, Yingxiao; Chien, Shu; Jiang, Zong-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic stretch is an important inducer of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which is crucial in vascular remodeling during hypertension. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. We studied the effects of emerin and lamin A/C, two important nuclear envelope proteins, on VSMC proliferation in hypertension and the underlying mechano-mechanisms. In common carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo and in cultured cells subjected to high (15%) cyclic stretch in vitro, VSMC proliferation was increased significantly, and the expression of emerin and lamin A/C was repressed compared with normotensive or normal (5%) cyclic stretch controls. Using targeted siRNA to mimic the repressed expression of emerin or lamin A/C induced by 15% stretch, we found that VSMC proliferation was enhanced under static and 5%-stretch conditions. Overexpression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed VSMC proliferation induced by 15% stretch. Hence, emerin and lamin A/C play critical roles in suppressing VSMC hyperproliferation induced by hyperstretch. ChIP-on-chip and MOTIF analyses showed that the DNAs binding with emerin contain three transcription factor motifs: CCNGGA, CCMGCC, and ABTTCCG; DNAs binding with lamin A/C contain the motifs CVGGAA, GCCGCYGC, and DAAGAAA. Protein/DNA array proved that altered emerin or lamin A/C expression modulated the activation of various transcription factors. Furthermore, accelerating local expression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed cell proliferation in the carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo. Our findings establish the pathogenetic role of emerin and lamin A/C repression in stretch-induced VSMC proliferation and suggest mechanobiological mechanism underlying this process that involves the sequence-specific binding of emerin and lamin A/C to specific transcription factor motifs. PMID:27114541

  8. Development affects in vitro vascular tone and calcium sensitivity in ovine cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Greg G; Osol, George J; Longo, Lawrence D

    2004-01-01

    We have shown recently that development from neonatal to adult life affects cerebrovascular tone of mouse cerebral arteries through endothelium-derived vasodilatory mechanisms. The current study tested the hypothesis that development from fetal to adult life affects cerebral artery vascular smooth muscle (VSM) [Ca2+]i sensitivity and tone through a mechanism partially dependent upon endothelium-dependent signalling. In pressurized resistance sized cerebral arteries (∼150 μm) from preterm (95 ± 2 days gestation (95 d)) and near-term (140 ± 2 days gestation (140 d)) fetuses, and non-pregnant adults, we measured vascular diameter (μm) and [Ca2+]i (nm) as a function of intravascular pressure. We repeated these studies in the presence of inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS; with l-NAME), cyclo-oxygenase (COX; with indomethacin) and endothelium removal (E–). Cerebrovasculature tone (E+) was greater in arteries from 95 d fetuses and adults compared to 140 d sheep. Ca2+ sensitivity was similar in 95 d fetuses and adults, but much lower in 140 d fetuses. Removal of endothelium resulted in a reduction in lumen diameter as a function of pressure (greater tone) in all treatment groups. [Ca2+]i sensitivity differences among groups were magnified after E–. NOS inhibition decreased diameter as a function of pressure in each age group, with a significant increase in [Ca2+]i to pressure ratio only in the 140 d fetuses. Indomethacin increased tone and increased [Ca2+]i in the 140 d fetuses, but not the other age groups. Development from near-term to adulthood uncovered an interaction between NOS- and COX-sensitive substances that functioned to modulate artery diameter but not [Ca2+]i. This study suggests that development is associated with significant alterations in cerebral vascular smooth muscle (VSM), endothelium, NOS and COX responses to intravascular pressure. We speculate that these changes have important implications in the regulation of cerebral blood flow in

  9. ECM-mimetic heparin glycosamioglycan-functionalized surface favors constructing functional vascular smooth muscle tissue in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jimin; Wang, Jianing; Wei, Yongzhen; Gao, Cheng; Chen, Xuejiao; Kong, Wei; Kong, Deling; Zhao, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    Contractile vascular smooth muscle accounts for the normal physiological function of artery. Heparin, as a native glycosaminoglycan, has been well known for its important function in promoting or maintaining the contractile phenotype of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In this study, heparin-functionalized non-woven poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) mat was fabricated by a facile and efficient surface modification protocol, which enables the control of surface heparin density within a broad range. Surface heparization remarkably increased the hydrophilicity of PCL, and reduced platelet adhesion. MTT assay showed that VSMC proliferation was evidently inhibited on the heparin-functionalized PCL surface in a dose-dependent manner. Gene analysis confirmed that surface heparization also promoted the transition of VSMCs from synthetic phenotype to contractile one. Furthermore, with a proper surface density of heparin, it allowed VSMCs to grow in a certain rate, while exhibiting contractile phenotype. Culture of VSMCs on a modified PCL mat with moderate heparin density (PCL-Hep-20) for 2 days resulted in a confluent layer of contractile smooth muscle cells. These data suggest that the heparin-modified PCL scaffolds may be a promising candidate to generate functional vascular tissues in vitro. PMID:27351139

  10. A pro-inflammatory role of deubiquitinating enzyme cylindromatosis (CYLD) in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shuai; Lv, Jiaju; Han, Liping; Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Wang, Wenjuan; Li, Siying; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Cui, Taixing

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyld deficiency suppresses pro-inflammatory phenotypic switch of VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyld deficiency inhibits MAPK rather than NF-kB activity in inflamed VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYLD is up-regulated in the coronary artery with neointimal hyperplasia. -- Abstract: CYLD, a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB), is a critical regulator of diverse cellular processes, ranging from proliferation and differentiation to inflammatory responses, via regulating multiple key signaling cascades such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. CYLD has been shown to inhibit vascular lesion formation presumably through suppressing NF-{kappa}B activity in vascular cells. However, herein we report a novel role of CYLD in mediating pro-inflammatory responses in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via a mechanism independent of NF-{kappa}B activity. Adenoviral knockdown of Cyld inhibited basal and the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha})-induced mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (Mcp-1), intercellular adhesion molecule (Icam-1) and interleukin-6 (Il-6) in rat adult aortic SMCs (RASMCs). The CYLD deficiency led to increases in the basal NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity in RASMCs; however, did not affect the TNF{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activity. Intriguingly, the TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B phosphorylation was enhanced in the CYLD deficient RASMCs. While knocking down of Cyld decreased slightly the basal expression levels of I{kappa}B{alpha} and I{kappa}B{beta} proteins, it did not alter the kinetics of TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B protein degradation in RASMCs. These results indicate that CYLD suppresses the basal NF-{kappa}B activity and TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B kinase activation without affecting TNF{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activity in VSMCs. In addition, knocking down of Cyld suppressed TNF{alpha}-induced activation of mitogen activated protein

  11. Three-Layered PCL Grafts Promoted Vascular Regeneration in a Rabbit Carotid Artery Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Zheng, Wenting; Pan, Yiwa; Ma, Shaoyang; Guan, Yong; Liu, Ruming; Zhu, Meifeng; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Qiang; Zhu, Yan; Wang, Lianyong; Kong, Deling

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a three layered poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) graft (tPCL) was fabricated by electrospinning PCL and electrospraying poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO), which has a thin dense inner layer, a loose middle layer, and a dense outer layer. Regular PCL grafts (rPCL) with only a dense layer were used as control. In vivo evaluation was performed in rabbit carotid artery. Enhanced cell infiltration, rapid regeneration of endothelium and smooth muscle layers, and increased elastin deposition were observed within the tPCL graft wall. After 3 months, tPCL grafts showed faster PCL degradation than the rPCL grafts. Infiltrated macrophages in the tPCL grafts secreted higher level of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) which enhanced vascular regeneration. In conclusion, the tPCL graft may be a useful vascular prosthesis and worth for further investigation. PMID:26756321

  12. Vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation to an osteogenic phenotype involves matrix metalloproteinase-2 modulation by homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingjiao; Lin, Jinghan; Ju, Ting; Chu, Lei; Zhang, Liming

    2015-08-01

    Arterial calcification is common in vascular diseases and involves conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to an osteoblast phenotype. Clinical studies suggest that the development of atherosclerosis can be promoted by homocysteine (HCY), but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we determined whether increases in HCY levels lead to an increase in VSMC calcification and differentiation, and examined the role of an extracellular matrix remodeler, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Rat VSMCs were exposed to calcification medium in the absence or presence of HCY (10, 100 or 200 μmol/L) or an MMP-2 inhibitor (10(-6) or 10(-5) mol/L). MTT assays were performed to determine the cytotoxicity of the MMP-2 inhibitor in calcification medium containing 200 μmol/L HCY. Calcification was assessed by measurements of calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as well as von Kossa staining. Expression of osteocalcin, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, and osteopontin, and MMP-2 was determined by immunoblotting. Calcification medium induced osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs. HCY promoted calcification, increased osteocalcin and BMP-2 expression, and decreased expression of osteopontin. MMP-2 expression was increased by HCY in a dose-dependent manner in VSMCs exposed to both control and calcification medium. The MMP-2 inhibitor decreased the calcium content and ALP activity, and attenuated the osteoblastic phenotype of VSMCs. Vascular calcification and osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs were positively regulated by HCY through increased/restored MMP-2 expression, increased expression of calcification proteins, and decreased anti-calcification protein levels. In summary, MMP-2 inhibition may be a protective strategy against VSMC calcification. PMID:25987498

  13. Activation of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor induces endothelium-independent relaxation of coronary artery smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuan; Ma, Handong; Barman, Scott A; Liu, Alexander T; Sellers, Minga; Stallone, John N; Prossnitz, Eric R; White, Richard E; Han, Guichun

    2011-11-01

    Estrogens can either relax or contract arteries via rapid, nongenomic mechanisms involving classic estrogen receptors (ER). In addition to ERα and ERβ, estrogen may also stimulate G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER) in nonvascular tissue; however, a potential role for GPER in coronary arteries is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine how GPER activity influenced coronary artery reactivity. In vitro isometric force recordings were performed on endothelium-denuded porcine arteries. These studies were augmented by RT-PCR and single-cell patch-clamp experiments. RT-PCR and immunoblot studies confirmed expression of GPER mRNA and protein, respectively, in smooth muscle from either porcine or human coronary arteries. G-1, a selective GPER agonist, produced a concentration-dependent relaxation of endothelium-denuded porcine coronary arteries in vitro. This response was attenuated by G15, a GPER-selective antagonist, or by inhibiting large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK(Ca)) channels with iberiotoxin, but not by inhibiting NO signaling. Last, single-channel patch-clamp studies demonstrated that G-1 stimulates BK(Ca) channel activity in intact smooth muscle cells from either porcine or human coronary arteries but had no effect on channels isolated in excised membrane patches. In summary, GPER activation relaxes coronary artery smooth muscle by increasing potassium efflux via BK(Ca) channels and requires an intact cellular signaling mechanism. This novel action of estrogen-like compounds may help clarify some of the controversy surrounding the vascular effects of estrogens. PMID:21791623

  14. MicroRNA-34a Induces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Senescence by SIRT1 Downregulation and Promotes the Expression of Age-Associated Pro-inflammatory Secretory Factors.

    PubMed

    Badi, Ileana; Burba, Ilaria; Ruggeri, Clarissa; Zeni, Filippo; Bertolotti, Matteo; Scopece, Alessandro; Pompilio, Giulio; Raucci, Angela

    2015-11-01

    Arterial aging is a major risk factor for the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. The aged artery is characterized by endothelial dysfunction and vascular smooth muscle cells altered physiology together with low-grade chronic inflammation. MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) has been recently implicated in cardiac, endothelial, and endothelial progenitor cell senescence; however, its contribution to aging-associated vascular smooth muscle cells phenotype has not been explored so far. We found that miR-34a was highly expressed in aortas isolated from old mice. Moreover, its well-known target, the longevity-associated protein SIRT1, was significantly downregulated during aging in both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells. Increased miR-34a as well as decreased SIRT1 expression was also observed in replicative-senescent human aortic smooth muscle cells. miR-34a overexpression in proliferative human aortic smooth muscle cells caused cell cycle arrest along with enhanced p21 protein levels and evidence of cell senescence. Furthermore, miR-34a ectopic expression induced pro-inflammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype molecules. Finally, SIRT1 protein significantly decreased upon miR-34a overexpression and restoration of its levels rescued miR-34a-dependent human aortic smooth muscle cells senescence, but not senescence-associated secretory phenotype factors upregulation. Taken together, our findings suggest that aging-associated increase of miR-34a expression levels, by promoting vascular smooth muscle cells senescence and inflammation through SIRT1 downregulation and senescence-associated secretory phenotype factors induction, respectively, may lead to arterial dysfunctions. PMID:25352462

  15. Induction of antioxidant stress proteins in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells: protective action of vitamin C against atherogenic lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Siow, R C; Sato, H; Leake, D S; Ishii, T; Bannai, S; Mann, G E

    1999-10-01

    Elevated levels of lipid peroxidation and increased formation of reactive oxygen species within the vascular wall in atherosclerosis can overwhelm cellular antioxidant defence mechanisms. Accumulating evidence implicates oxidatively modified low density lipoproteins (LDL) in vascular dysfunction in atherosclerosis and oxidized LDL have been localized with in atherosclerotic lesions. We here report that human oxidatively modified LDL induce expression of 'antioxidant-like' stress proteins in vascular cells, involving increases in the activity of L-cystine transport, glutathione synthesis, heme oxygenase-1 and the murine stress protein MSP23. Moreover, treatment of human arterial smooth muscle cells with the dietary antioxidant vitamin C markedly attenuates adaptive increases in endogenous antioxidant gene expression and affords protection against smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by moderately oxidized LDL. As vascular cell death is a key feature of atherosclerotic lesions and may contribute to the plaque 'necrotic' core, cap rupture and thrombosis, our findings suggest that the cytoprotective actions of vitamin C could limit plaque instability in advanced atherosclerosis. PMID:10517535

  16. Vascular Smooth Muscle Mineralocorticoid Receptor Contributes to Coronary and Left Ventricular Dysfunction After Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Gueret, Alexandre; Harouki, Najah; Favre, Julie; Galmiche, Guillaume; Nicol, Lionel; Henry, Jean-Paul; Besnier, Marie; Thuillez, Christian; Richard, Vincent; Kolkhof, Peter; Mulder, Paul; Jaisser, Frédéric; Ouvrard-Pascaud, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists slow down the progression of heart failure after myocardial infarction (MI), but the cell-specific role of MR in these benefits is unclear. In this study, the role of MR expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was investigated. Two months after coronary artery ligation causing MI, mice with VSMC-specific MR deletion (MI-MR(SMKO)) and mice treated with the MR antagonist finerenone (MI-fine) had improved left ventricular compliance and elastance when compared with infarcted control mice (MI-CTL), as well as reduced interstitial fibrosis. Importantly, the coronary reserve assessed by magnetic resonance imaging was preserved (difference in myocardial perfusion before and after induction of vasodilatation, mL mg (-1) min(-1): MI-CTL: 1.1±0.5, nonsignificant; MI-MR(SMKO): 4.6±1.6 [P<0.05]; MI-fine: 3.6±0.7 [P<0.01]). The endothelial function, tested on isolated septal coronary arteries by analyzing the acetylcholine-induced nitric oxide-dependent relaxation, was also improved by MR deletion in VSMCs or by finerenone treatment (relaxation %: MI-CTL: 36±5, MI-MR(SMKO): 54±3, and MI-fine: 76±4; P<0.05). Such impairment of the coronary endothelial function on MI involved an oxidative stress that was reduced when MR was deleted in VSMCs or by finerenone treatment. Moreover, short-term incubation of coronary arteries isolated from noninfarcted animals with low-dose angiotensin-II (10(-9) mol/L) induced oxidative stress and impaired acetylcholine-induced relaxation in CTL but neither in MR(SMKO) nor in mice pretreated with finerenone. In conclusion, deletion of MR in VSMCs improved left ventricular dysfunction after MI, likely through maintenance of the coronary reserve and improvement of coronary endothelial function. MR blockage by finerenone had similar effects. PMID:26902493

  17. TonEBP/NFAT5 regulates ACTBL2 expression in biomechanically activated vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Hödebeck, Maren; Scherer, Clemens; Wagner, Andreas H.; Hecker, Markus; Korff, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Cytoskeletal reorganization and migration are critical responses which enable vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) cells to evade, compensate, or adapt to alterations in biomechanical stress. An increase in wall stress or biomechanical stretch as it is elicited by arterial hypertension promotes their reorganization in the vessel wall which may lead to arterial stiffening and contractile dysfunction. This adaptive remodeling process is dependent on and driven by subtle phenotype changes including those controlling the cytoskeletal architecture and motility of VSMCs. Recently, it has been reported that the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 (TonEBP/NFAT5) controls critical aspects of the VSMC phenotype and is activated by biomechanical stretch. We therefore hypothesized that NFAT5 controls the expression of gene products orchestrating cytoskeletal reorganization in stretch-stimulated VSMCs. Automated immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses revealed that biomechanical stretch enhances the expression and nuclear translocation of NFAT5 in VSMCs. Subsequent in silico analyses suggested that this transcription factor binds to the promotor region of ACTBL2 encoding kappa-actin which was shown to be abundantly expressed in VSMCs upon exposure to biomechanical stretch. Furthermore, ACTBL2 expression was inhibited in these cells upon siRNA-mediated knockdown of NFAT5. Kappa-actin appeared to be aligned with stress fibers under static culture conditions, dispersed in lamellipodia and supported VSMC migration as its knockdown diminishes lateral migration of these cells. In summary, our findings delineated biomechanical stretch as a determinant of NFAT5 expression and nuclear translocation controlling the expression of the cytoskeletal protein ACTBL2. This response may orchestrate the migratory activity of VSMCs and thus promote maladaptive rearrangement of the arterial vessel wall during hypertension. PMID:25520667

  18. Endothelial-dependent relaxant actions of carbachol and substance P in arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Bolton, T B; Clapp, L H

    1986-04-01

    In helical strips cut from the small mesenteric artery of guinea-pig (GPSMA) (0.3-0.6 mm o.d.) relaxations induced by substance P were more susceptible to damage of the endothelium by rubbing than were relaxations evoked by carbachol. Relaxations induced by 2-nicotin-amidoethyl nitrate (SG75) were unaffected by this procedure. Relaxations evoked by the calcium ionophore A23187 persisted when those to substance P had been abolished by rubbing the endothelium in GPSMA, rabbit mesenteric and rabbit ear arteries. In guinea-pig pulmonary artery and aorta relaxations to A23187 were lost after this treatment. Carbachol and SG75 were more effective in inhibiting phasic than tonic tension induced by noradrenaline in GPSMA, but substance P was more effective against tonic tension. In the GPSMA, carbachol and substance P inhibited tension produced by noradrenaline to similar extents. However, carbachol was less, and substance P much less effective in inhibiting tension evoked by high-potassium solution than by noradrenaline. Susceptibility of relaxations to blockade by haemoglobin in GPSMA was: substance P greater than carbachol greater than ATP greater than SG75. The membrane potential of smooth muscle cells in the media of the GPSMA was recorded by microelectrode. Carbachol, but not substance P, hyperpolarized the cells both in the presence and absence of noradrenaline at concentrations which relaxed the muscle. These results suggest a heterogeneity in the mechanisms of endothelial-dependent relaxations induced by various vascular relaxants. PMID:2423170

  19. PPARα-Independent Arterial Smooth Muscle Relaxant Effects of PPARα Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Silswal, Neerupma; Parelkar, Nikhil K.; Wacker, Michael J.; Badr, Mostafa; Andresen, Jon

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine direct vascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) agonists using isolated mouse aortas and middle cerebral arteries (MCAs). The PPARα agonists GW7647, WY14643, and gemfibrozil acutely relaxed aortas held under isometric tension and dilated pressurized MCAs with the following order of potency: GW7647≫WY14643>gemfibrozil. Responses were endothelium-independent, and the use of PPARα deficient mice demonstrated that responses were also PPARα-independent. Pretreating arteries with high extracellular K+ attenuated PPARα agonist-mediated relaxations in the aorta, but not in the MCA. In the aorta, the ATP sensitive potassium (KATP) channel blocker glibenclamide also impaired relaxations whereas the other K+ channel inhibitors, 4-aminopyridine and Iberiotoxin, had no effect. In aortas, GW7647 and WY14643 elevated cGMP levels by stimulating soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), and inhibition of sGC with ODQ blunted relaxations to PPARα agonists. In the MCA, dilations were inhibited by the protein kinase C (PKC) activator, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, and also by ODQ. Our results demonstrated acute, nonreceptor-mediated relaxant effects of PPARα agonists on smooth muscle of mouse arteries. Responses to PPARα agonists in the aorta involved KATP channels and sGC, whereas in the MCA the PKC and sGC pathways also appeared to contribute to the response. PMID:23008696

  20. NF-κB-mediated transactivation of telomerase prevents intimal smooth muscle cell from replicative senescence during vascular repair

    PubMed Central

    Bu, De-xiu; Johansson, Maria E; Ren, Jingyi; Xu, Da-wei; Johnson, F Brad; Edfeldt, Kristina; Yan, Zhong-qun

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Functional telomerase is essential to the replicative longevity of vascular cells. To gain insights into mechanisms by which intimal hyperplasia interferes with the repair process, expression and function of the telomerase catalytic subunit (TERT) were investigated following vascular injury. METHODS AND RESULTS We found that TERT was de novo activated in intima of the injured arteries, involving activation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway. Stimulation of the isolated intimal smooth muscle cell (SMC) by basic fibroblast growth factor or tumor necrosis factor α resulted in increased TERT activity. This depends on the activation of c-Myc signaling since mutation of the E-box in the promoter or over-expression of MAD1, a c-Myc competitor, abrogated the transcriptional activity. Inhibition of NF-κB in both intimal SMC and in the injured artery attenuated TERT transcriptional activity through reduction of c-Myc expression. Pharmacological blockade of TERT led to SMC senescence. Finally, depletion of telomerase function in mice resulted in severe intimal SMC senescence following vascular injury. CONCLUSIONS These results support a model whereby vascular injury induces de novo expression of TERT in intimal SMC via activation of NF-κB and up-regulation of c-Myc. The resumed TERT activity is critical for intimal hyperplasia. PMID:20864668

  1. Vascular histopathologic reaction to pulmonary artery banding in an in vivo growing porcine model.

    PubMed

    Nedorost, Lukáš; Uemura, Hideki; Furck, Anke; Saeed, Imran; Slavik, Zdenek; Kobr, Jiří; Tonar, Zbyněk

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary artery banding (PAB) is used as a surgical palliation to reduce excessive pulmonary blood flow caused by congenital heart defects. Due to the lack of microscopic studies dealing with the tissue remodeling caused by contemporary PAB materials, this study aimed to assess histologic changes associated with PAB surgery by analyzing local tissue reaction to the presence of Gore-Tex strips fixed around the pulmonary artery. Gore-Tex strips were used for PAB in a growing porcine model. After 5 weeks, histologic samples with PAB (n = 5) were compared with healthy pulmonary arterial segments distal to the PAB or from a sham-treated animal (n = 1). Stereology was used to quantify the density of the vasa vasorum and the area fraction of elastin, smooth muscle actin, macrophages, and nervi vasorum within the pulmonary arterial wall. The null hypothesis stated that samples did not differ histopathologically from adjacent vascular segments or sham-treated samples. The PAB samples had a greater area fraction of macrophages, a lower amount of nervi vasorum, and a tendency toward decreased smooth muscle content compared with samples that had no PAB strips. There was no destruction of elastic membranes, no medionecrosis, no pronounced inflammatory infiltration or foreign body reaction, and no vasa vasorum deficiency after the PAB. All the histopathologic changes were limited to the banded vascular segment and did not affect distal parts of the pulmonary artery. The study results show the tissue reaction of palliative PAB and suggest that Gore-Tex strips used contemporarily for PAB do not cause severe local histologic damage to the banded segment of the pulmonary arterial wall after 5 weeks in a porcine PAB model. PMID:23591800

  2. Antagonism of Nav channels and α1-adrenergic receptors contributes to vascular smooth muscle effects of ranolazine.

    PubMed

    Virsolvy, Anne; Farah, Charlotte; Pertuit, Nolwenn; Kong, Lingyan; Lacampagne, Alain; Reboul, Cyril; Aimond, Franck; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Ranolazine is a recently developed drug used for the treatment of patients with chronic stable angina. It is a selective inhibitor of the persistent cardiac Na(+) current (INa), and is known to reduce the Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) overload that occurs in cardiomyocytes during ischemia. Vascular effects of ranolazine, such as vasorelaxation,have been reported and may involve multiple pathways. As voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Nav) present in arteries play a role in contraction, we hypothesized that ranolazine could target these channels. We studied the effects of ranolazine in vitro on cultured aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) and ex vivo on rat aortas in conditions known to specifically activate or promote INa. We observed that in the presence of the Nav channel agonist veratridine, ranolazine inhibited INa and intracellular Ca(2+) calcium increase in SMC, and arterial vasoconstriction. In arterial SMC, ranolazine inhibited the activity of tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Nav channels and thus antagonized contraction promoted by low KCl depolarization. Furthermore, the vasorelaxant effects of ranolazine, also observed in human arteries and independent of the endothelium, involved antagonization of the α1-adrenergic receptor. Combined α1-adrenergic antagonization and inhibition of SMCs Nav channels could be involved in the vascular effects of ranolazine. PMID:26655634

  3. Antagonism of Nav channels and α1-adrenergic receptors contributes to vascular smooth muscle effects of ranolazine

    PubMed Central

    Virsolvy, Anne; Farah, Charlotte; Pertuit, Nolwenn; Kong, Lingyan; Lacampagne, Alain; Reboul, Cyril; Aimond, Franck; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Ranolazine is a recently developed drug used for the treatment of patients with chronic stable angina. It is a selective inhibitor of the persistent cardiac Na+ current (INa), and is known to reduce the Na+-dependent Ca2+ overload that occurs in cardiomyocytes during ischemia. Vascular effects of ranolazine, such as vasorelaxation,have been reported and may involve multiple pathways. As voltage-gated Na+ channels (Nav) present in arteries play a role in contraction, we hypothesized that ranolazine could target these channels. We studied the effects of ranolazine in vitro on cultured aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) and ex vivo on rat aortas in conditions known to specifically activate or promote INa. We observed that in the presence of the Nav channel agonist veratridine, ranolazine inhibited INa and intracellular Ca2+ calcium increase in SMC, and arterial vasoconstriction. In arterial SMC, ranolazine inhibited the activity of tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Nav channels and thus antagonized contraction promoted by low KCl depolarization. Furthermore, the vasorelaxant effects of ranolazine, also observed in human arteries and independent of the endothelium, involved antagonization of the α1-adrenergic receptor. Combined α1-adrenergic antagonization and inhibition of SMCs Nav channels could be involved in the vascular effects of ranolazine. PMID:26655634

  4. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells: Methods and Application

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Biraja C.; Jiang, Zhengxin; Suh, Carol; Qyang, Yibing

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play a major role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology and their capability to differentiation into virtually every cell type in the human body make this field a ray of hope for vascular regenerative therapy and for understanding disease mechanism. In this review, we first discuss the recent iPSC technology and vascular smooth muscle development from embryo and then examine different methodology to derive VSMCs from iPSCs and their applications in regenerative therapy and disease modeling. PMID:25559088

  5. Tetrahydrocurcumin Protects against Cadmium-Induced Hypertension, Raised Arterial Stiffness and Vascular Remodeling in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sangartit, Weerapon; Kukongviriyapan, Upa; Donpunha, Wanida; Pakdeechote, Poungrat; Kukongviriyapan, Veerapol; Surawattanawan, Praphassorn; Greenwald, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cadmium (Cd) is a nonessential heavy metal, causing oxidative damage to various tissues and associated with hypertension. Tetrahydrocurcumin (THU), a major metabolite of curcumin, has been demonstrated to be an antioxidant, anti-diabetic, anti-hypertensive and anti-inflammatory agent. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of THU against Cd-induced hypertension, raised arterial stiffness and vascular remodeling in mice. Methods Male ICR mice received CdCl2 (100 mg/l) via drinking water for 8 weeks. THU was administered intragastrically at dose of 50 or 100 mg/kg/day concurrently with Cd treatment. Results Administration of CdCl2 significantly increased arterial blood pressure, blunted vascular responses to vasoactive agents, increased aortic stiffness, and induced hypertrophic aortic wall remodeling by increasing number of smooth muscle cells and collagen deposition, decreasing elastin, and increasing matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 levels in the aortic medial wall. Supplementation with THU significantly decreased blood pressure, improved vascular responsiveness, and reversed the structural and mechanical alterations of the aortas, including collagen and elastin deposition. The reduction on the adverse response of Cd treatment was associated with upregulated eNOS and downregulated iNOS protein expressions, increased nitrate/nitrite level, alleviated oxidative stress and enhanced antioxidant glutathione. Moreover, THU also reduced the accumulation of Cd in the blood and tissues. Conclusions Our results suggest that THU ameliorates cadmium-induced hypertension, vascular dysfunction, and arterial stiffness in mice through enhancing NO bioavailability, attenuating oxidative stress, improving vascular remodeling and decreasing Cd accumulation in other tissues. THU has a beneficial effect in moderating the vascular alterations associated with Cd exposure. PMID:25502771

  6. Caliber-persistent labial artery. A common vascular anomaly.

    PubMed

    Lovas, J G; Rodu, B; Hammond, H L; Allen, C M; Wysocki, G P

    1998-09-01

    Sixteen cases of caliber-persistent labial artery of the lips have been reported to date in the English literature. Six of these were clinically misdiagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma and treated with wedge resection. To date, we have seen 187 cases clinically and an additional 23 cases through our surgical oral pathology services. Careful clinical observation usually reveals a soft linear or papular bluish elevation above the labial mucosal surface. The unique feature is pulsation--not simply pulsation toward and away from the observer, which can be caused by an underlying artery, but lateral pulsation, which only an artery can exhibit. All but 2 of our 187 clinical cases were asymptomatic. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of caliber-persistent labial artery of the upper lip. The upper:lower lip ratio for the clinical cases was almost 2:1. Three times as many lower lip as upper lip lesions were biopsied. Males and females were almost equally affected (clinical cases, 76:86; histopathologic cases, 9:13). Although a vascular term (artery, hemangioma, phlebolith, varix, vascular malformation) was used on the biopsy form in one half of the clinical differential diagnoses, none of the clinical histories mentioned pulsation. In contrast to the cases of Miko et al. in 1980 and 1983, none of our cases manifested itself as an ulcer, nor was carcinoma ever mentioned in the clinical differential diagnosis. The purpose of this article is to familiarize clinicians and pathologists with the clinical and histopathologic features of this seldom reported but common vascular anomaly. Clinicians should carefully look for lateral pulsation in lip mucosal papules so as to avoid unnecessary surgery and intraoperative arterial bleeding. Pathologists should recognize that a relatively large-caliber superficial artery in a lip biopsy may not be an incidental finding but rather the clinical lesion that was biopsied. PMID:9768420

  7. Augmented Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness and Adhesion when Hypertension is Superimposed on Aging

    PubMed Central

    Sehgel, Nancy L.; Sun, Zhe; Hong, Zhongkui; Hunter, William C.; Hill, Michael A.; Vatner, Dorothy E.; Vatner, Stephen F.; Meininger, Gerald A.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension and aging are both recognized to increase aortic stiffness, but their interactions are not completely understood. Most prior studies have attributed increased aortic stiffness to changes in extracellular matrix proteins that alter mechanical properties of the vascular wall. Alternatively, we hypothesized that a significant component of increased vascular stiffness in hypertension is due to changes in the mechanical and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells, and that aging would augment the contribution from vascular smooth muscle cells compared to the extracellular matrix. Accordingly, we studied aortic stiffness in young (16 wks) and old (64 wks) spontaneously hypertensive rats and Wistar-Kyoto wild-type controls. Systolic and pulse pressures were significantly increased in young spontaneously hypertensive rats, compared to young Wistar-Kyoto rats, and these continued to rise in old spontaneously hypertensive rats, compared to age-matched controls. Excised aortic ring segments exhibited significantly greater elastic moduli in both young and old spontaneously hypertensive rats vs. Wistar-Kyoto rats. Vascular smooth muscle cells were isolated from the thoracic aorta, and stiffness and adhesion to fibronectin were measured by atomic force microscopy. Hypertension increased both vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion, and these increases were both augmented with aging. By contrast, hypertension did not affect histological measures of aortic collagen and elastin, which were predominantly changed by aging. This supports the concept that stiffness and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells are novel mechanisms contributing to the increased aortic stiffness occurring with hypertension superimposed on aging. PMID:25452471

  8. On arterial physiology, pathophysiology of vascular compliance, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Glasser, S P

    2000-01-01

    Traditionally, the main emphasis in hypertension treatment has been on lowering diastolic blood pressure. Recently, this emphasis has been shifting toward systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, the latter of which might be a better indicator of future clinical events than either blood pressure reading alone or in combination. Increased pulse pressure indicates increased arterial stiffness and hence is commonly seen in older subjects. As patients age and vessels stiffen, there is a resulting loss of arterial compliance, the ability of the vessel to store blood volume temporarily as it is ejected with each systole. The arterial system acts like a Windkessel, or pump, as it converts intermittent flow from the heart into continuous flow to the organs. The process of stiffening occurs via vascular remodeling, a redistribution of the heterogeneous elements of the vascular wall. Endothelial dysfunction can trigger this remodeling process, increasing stiffness, raising blood pressure and pulse pressure, and ultimately leading to atherosclerosis, plaque formation, and attendant clinical events. Because angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and calcium antagonists can restore arterial compliance, they are suitable choices for hypertension treatment when it is complicated by vascular stiffness. PMID:11728285

  9. Cocaine mediated apoptosis of vascular cells as a mechanism for carotid artery dissection leading to ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Dabbouseh, Noura M; Ardelt, Agnieszka

    2011-08-01

    In arterial dissection, blood may enter the arterial wall through an intimal tear, splitting the arterial wall and activating the coagulation cascade at the site of endothelial damage. Dissection of extracranial and intracranial vessels may lead to ischemic stroke through thromboembolic or hemodynamic mechanisms. Major blunt trauma or rapid acceleration-deceleration may cause dissection, but in patients with inherent arterial wall weakness, dissection can occur spontaneously or as a result of minor neck movement. Cocaine use has been associated with dissection of the aortic arch and coronary and renal arteries through cocaine-mediated hypertension. Recent preclinical studies have suggested, however, that cocaine may cause apoptosis of cells in the vascular wall. In this article, we postulate that cocaine may cause apoptosis of vascular endothelial and/or smooth muscle cells, thus weakening the vascular wall and resulting in a dissection-prone state. We review the literature and propose a biological basis for vasculopathy, vascular dissection, and ischemic stroke in the setting of cocaine use. Further research studies on vascular cells, as well as focused analysis of human pathological material, will be important in providing evidence for or against our hypotheses. PMID:21546166

  10. Arterial structure and function in vascular ageing: are you as old as your arteries?

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Carter, Sophie E; Green, Daniel J

    2016-04-15

    Advancing age may be the most potent independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, a relationship that is not fully explained by time-related changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Since some arteries exhibit differential susceptibility to atherosclerosis, generalisations regarding the impact of ageing in humans may be overly simplistic, whereas in vivo assessment of arterial function and health provide direct insight. Coronary and peripheral (conduit, resistance and skin) arteries demonstrate a gradual, age-related impairment in vascular function that is likely to be related to a reduction in endothelium-derived nitric oxide bioavailability and/or increased production of vasoconstrictors (e.g. endothelin-1). Increased exposure and impaired ability for defence mechanisms to resist oxidative stress and inflammation, but also cellular senescence processes, may contribute to age-related changes in vascular function and health. Arteries also undergo structural changes as they age. Gradual thickening of the arterial wall, changes in wall content (i.e. less elastin, advanced glycation end-products) and increase in conduit artery diameter are observed with older age and occur similarly in central and peripheral arteries. These changes in structure have important interactive effects on artery function, with increases in small and large arterial stiffness representing a characteristic change with older age. Importantly, direct measures of arterial function and structure predict future cardiovascular events, independent of age or other cardiovascular risk factors. Taken together, and given the differential susceptibility of arteries to atherosclerosis in humans, direct measurement of arterial function and health may help to distinguish between biological and chronological age-related change in arterial health in humans. PMID:26140618

  11. Smooth muscle filamin A is a major determinant of conduit artery structure and function at the adult stage.

    PubMed

    Retailleau, Kevin; Arhatte, Malika; Demolombe, Sophie; Jodar, Martine; Baudrie, Véronique; Offermanns, Stefan; Feng, Yuanyi; Patel, Amanda; Honoré, Eric; Duprat, Fabrice

    2016-07-01

    Human mutations in the X-linked FLNA gene are associated with a remarkably diverse phenotype, including severe arterial morphological anomalies. However, the role for filamin A (FlnA) in vascular cells remains partially understood. We used a smooth muscle (sm)-specific conditional mouse model to delete FlnA at the adult stage, thus avoiding the developmental effects of the knock-out. Inactivation of smFlnA in adult mice significantly lowered blood pressure, together with a decrease in pulse pressure. However, both the aorta and carotid arteries showed a major outward hypertrophic remodeling, resistant to losartan, and normally occurring in hypertensive conditions. Notably, arterial compliance was significantly enhanced in the absence of smFlnA. Moreover, reactivity of thoracic aorta rings to a variety of vasoconstrictors was elevated, while basal contractility in response to KCl depolarization was reduced. Enhanced reactivity to the thromboxane A2 receptor agonist U46619 was fully reversed by the ROCK inhibitor Y27632. We discuss the possibility that a reduction in arterial stiffness upon smFlnA inactivation might cause a compensatory increase in conduit artery diameter for normalization of parietal tension, independently of the ROCK pathway. In conclusion, deletion of smFlnA in adult mice recapitulates the vascular phenotype of human bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopia, culminating in aortic dilatation. PMID:27023351

  12. Endothelial dysfunction impairs vascular neurotransmission in tail arteries.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Joana B; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The present study intends to clarify if endothelium dysfunction impairs vascular sympathetic neurotransmission. Electrically-evoked tritium overflow (100 pulses/5 Hz) was evaluated in arteries (intact and denuded) or exhibiting some degree of endothelium dysfunction (spontaneously hypertensive arteries), pre-incubated with [(3)H]-noradrenaline in the presence of enzymes (nitric oxide synthase (NOS); nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase; xanthine oxidase; cyclooxygenase; adenosine kinase) inhibitors and a nucleoside transporter inhibitor. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase with L-NIO dihydrochloride reduced tritium overflow in intact arteries whereas inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase with Nω-Propyl-L-arginine hydrochloride was devoid of effect showing that only endothelial nitric oxide synthase is involved in vascular sympathetic neuromodulation. Inhibition of enzymes involved in reactive oxygen species or prostaglandins production with apocynin and allopurinol or indomethacin, respectively, failed to alter tritium overflow. A facilitation or reduction of tritium overflow was observed in the presence of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) or of 5-iodotubericidin, respectively, but only in intact arteries. These effects can be ascribed to a tonic inhibitory effect mediated by A1 receptors. In denuded and hypertensive arteries, 7-(2-phenylethyl)-5-amino-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c] pyrimidine (SCH 58261) reduced tritium overflow, suggesting the occurrence of a tonic activation of A2A receptors. When endogenous adenosine bioavailability was increased by the nucleoside transporter inhibitor, S-(4-Nitrobenzyl)-6-thioinosine, tritium overflow increased in intact, denuded and hypertensive arteries. Among the endothelium-derived substances studied that could alter vascular sympathetic transmission only adenosine/adenosine receptor mediated mechanisms were clearly impaired by endothelium injury

  13. Cigarette Smoke Modulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Phenotype: Implications for Carotid and Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Pascal M.; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I.; Gonzalez, Fernando; Hasan, David M.; Rosenwasser, Robert H.; Owens, Gary K.; Koch, Walter J.; Dumont, Aaron S.

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypic modulation in the cerebral circulation and pathogenesis of stroke has not been determined. Cigarette smoke is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, but potential mechanisms are unclear, and its role in SMC phenotypic modulation has not been established. Methods and Results In cultured cerebral vascular SMCs, exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) resulted in decreased promoter activity and mRNA expression of key SMC contractile genes (SM-α-actin, SM-22α, SM-MHC) and the transcription factor myocardin in a dose-dependent manner. CSE also induced pro-inflammatory/matrix remodeling genes (MCP-1, MMPs, TNF-α, IL-1β, NF-κB). CSE increased expression of KLF4, a known regulator of SMC differentiation, and siKLF4 inhibited CSE induced suppression of SMC contractile genes and myocardin and activation of inflammatory genes. These mechanisms were confirmed in vivo following exposure of rat carotid arteries to CSE. Chromatin immune-precipitation assays in vivo and in vitro demonstrated that CSE promotes epigenetic changes with binding of KLF4 to the promoter regions of myocardin and SMC marker genes and alterations in promoter acetylation and methylation. Conclusion CSE exposure results in phenotypic modulation of cerebral SMC through myocardin and KLF4 dependent mechanisms. These results provides a mechanism by which cigarette smoke induces a pro-inflammatory/matrix remodeling phenotype in SMC and an important pathway for cigarette smoke to contribute to atherosclerosis and stroke. PMID:23967268

  14. An ethanolic extract of Angelica gigas improves atherosclerosis by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Ja Young; Kim, Jihyun; Cai, Jingmei; Kim, Youngeun; Shin, Kyungha; Kim, Tae-Su; Lee, Sung-Pyo; Park, Sung Kyeong

    2014-01-01

    The effects of an ethanolic extract of Angelica gigas (EAG) on the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and high-cholesterol diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis were investigated. Rat aortic VSMCs were stimulated with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (25 ng/mL) for the induction of DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. EAG (1-10 µg/mL) significantly inhibited both the thymidine incorporation and cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Hypercholesterolemia was induced by feeding male New Zealand white rabbits with 0.5% cholesterol in diet for 10 weeks, during which EAG (1% in diet) was given for the final 8 weeks after 2-week induction of hypercholesterolemia. Hypercholesterolemic rabbits exhibited great increases in serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins (LDL) levels, and finally severe atheromatous plaque formation covering 28.4% of the arterial walls. EAG significantly increased high-density lipoproteins (HDL), slightly decreased LDL, and potentially reduced the atheroma area to 16.6%. The results indicate that EAG attenuates atherosclerosis not only by inhibiting VASC proliferation, but also by increasing blood HDL levels. Therefore, it is suggested that EAG could be an alternative or an adjunct therapy for the improvement of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:24999363

  15. Mechanical strain induces specific changes in the synthesis and organization of proteoglycans by vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, R T; Yamamoto, C; Feng, Y; Potter-Perigo, S; Briggs, W H; Landschulz, K T; Turi, T G; Thompson, J F; Libby, P; Wight, T N

    2001-04-27

    In the mechanically active environment of the artery, cells sense mechanical stimuli and regulate extracellular matrix structure. In this study, we explored the changes in synthesis of proteoglycans by vascular smooth muscle cells in response to precisely controlled mechanical strains. Strain increased mRNA for versican (3.2-fold), biglycan (2.0-fold), and perlecan (2.0-fold), whereas decorin mRNA levels decreased to a third of control levels. Strain also increased versican, biglycan, and perlecan core proteins, with a concomitant decrease in decorin core protein. Deformation did not alter the hydrodynamic size of proteoglycans as evidenced by molecular sieve chromatography but increased sulfate incorporation in both chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycans and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (p < 0.05 for both). Using DNA microarrays, we also identified the gene for the hyaluronan-linking protein TSG6 as mechanically induced in smooth muscle cells. Northern analysis confirmed a 4.0-fold increase in steady state mRNA for TSG6 following deformation. Size exclusion chromatography under associative conditions showed that versican-hyaluronan aggregation was enhanced following deformation. These data demonstrate that mechanical deformation increases specific vascular smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis and aggregation, indicating a highly coordinated extracellular matrix response to biomechanical stimulation. PMID:11278699

  16. Low Levels of the Reverse Transactivator Fail to Induce Target Transgene Expression in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Viceconte, Nikenza; McKenna, Tomás; Eriksson, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a genetic disease with multiple features that are suggestive of premature aging. Most patients with HGPS carry a mutation on one of their copies of the LMNA gene. The LMNA gene encodes the lamin A and lamin C proteins, which are the major proteins of the nuclear lamina. The organs of the cardiovascular system are amongst those that are most severely affected in HGPS, undergoing a progressive depletion of vascular smooth muscle cells, and most children with HGPS die in their early teens from cardio-vascular disease and other complications from atherosclerosis. In this study, we developed a transgenic mouse model based on the tet-ON system to increase the understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to the most lethal aspect of HGPS. To induce the expression of the most common HGPS mutation, LMNA c.1824C>T; p.G608G, in the vascular smooth muscle cells of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta, we used the previously described reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator, sm22α-rtTA. However, the expression of the reverse sm22α-transactivator was barely detectable in the arteries, and this low level of expression was not sufficient to induce the expression of the target human lamin A minigene. The results from this study are important because they suggest caution during the use of previously functional transgenic animal models and emphasize the importance of assessing transgene expression over time. PMID:25090270

  17. Defective autophagy in vascular smooth muscle cells accelerates senescence and promotes neointima formation and atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grootaert, Mandy OJ; da Costa Martins, Paula A; Bitsch, Nicole; Pintelon, Isabel; De Meyer, Guido RY; Martinet, Wim; Schrijvers, Dorien M

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is triggered in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of diseased arterial vessels. However, the role of VSMC autophagy in cardiovascular disease is poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the effect of defective autophagy on VSMC survival and phenotype and its significance in the development of postinjury neointima formation and atherosclerosis. Tissue-specific deletion of the essential autophagy gene Atg7 in murine VSMCs (atg7−/− VSMCs) caused accumulation of SQSTM1/p62 and accelerated the development of stress-induced premature senescence as shown by cellular and nuclear hypertrophy, CDKN2A-RB-mediated G1 proliferative arrest and senescence-associated GLB1 activity. Transfection of SQSTM1-encoding plasmid DNA in Atg7+/+ VSMCs induced similar features, suggesting that accumulation of SQSTM1 promotes VSMC senescence. Interestingly, atg7−/− VSMCs were resistant to oxidative stress-induced cell death as compared to controls. This effect was attributed to nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFE2L2 resulting in upregulation of several antioxidative enzymes. In vivo, defective VSMC autophagy led to upregulation of MMP9, TGFB and CXCL12 and promoted postinjury neointima formation and diet-induced atherogenesis. Lesions of VSMC-specific atg7 knockout mice were characterized by increased total collagen deposition, nuclear hypertrophy, CDKN2A upregulation, RB hypophosphorylation, and GLB1 activity, all features typical of cellular senescence. To conclude, autophagy is crucial for VSMC function, phenotype, and survival. Defective autophagy in VSMCs accelerates senescence and promotes ligation-induced neointima formation and diet-induced atherogenesis, implying that autophagy inhibition as therapeutic strategy in the treatment of neointimal stenosis and atherosclerosis would be unfavorable. Conversely, stimulation of autophagy could be a valuable new strategy in the treatment of arterial disease. PMID:26391655

  18. /sup 45/Ca distribution and transport in saponin skinned vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.A.; Diecke, F.P.

    1983-04-01

    /sup 45/Ca distribution and transport were studied in chemically skinned strips of caudal artery from Kyoto Wistar rats. Sarcolemmal membranes were made hyperpermeable by exposure for 60 min to solutions containing 0.1 mg/ml of saponin. Skinned helical strips responded with graded contractions to changes in ethylene glycol bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid buffered free Ca solutions (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) and were sensitive to the Mg-ATP concentration. Tissues loaded in the presence of 10(-7) M Ca contracted in response to 10 mM caffeine. These experiments indicate the strips are skinned and possess a functional regulatory and contractile system and an intact Ca sequestering system. /sup 45/Ca distributes in three compartments in skinned caudal artery strips. The Ca contents of two components are linear functions of the Ca-ethylene glycol bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid concentration and desaturate at rapid rates. They correspond to the extracellular and cytoplasmic spaces. A significantly smaller component releases Ca at comparatively slower rates. /sup 45/Ca uptake by the slow component consists of an ATP-dependent and an ATP-independent fraction. The /sup 45/Ca content of the ATP-dependent fraction is a function of the free Ca concentration and is independent of the Ca-ethylene glycol bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid concentration. Its content was enhanced by oxalate and was abolished by Triton X-100 skinning solutions. The ATP-independent component was not affected by Triton X-100 skinning and may represent Ca binding to cytoplasmic molecules and structures. The sequestered Ca was released with caffeine or Ca but not by epinephrine. The observations indicate that the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria of vascular smooth muscle strips skinned with saponin retain their functional integrity after saponin skinning.

  19. Puerarin Induces Mitochondria-Dependent Apoptosis in Hypoxic Human Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chan; Chen, Chun; Wang, Zhiyi; Wang, Liangxing; Yang, Lehe; Ding, Minjiao; Ding, Cheng; Sun, Yu; Lin, Quan; Huang, Xiaoying; Du, Xiaohong; Zhao, Xiaowei; Wang, Chuangyi

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary vascular medial hypertrophy in hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is caused in part by decreased apoptosis in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Puerarin, an isoflavone purified from the Chinese medicinal herb kudzu, ameliorates chronic hypoxic PAH in animal models. Here we investigated the effects of puerarin on apoptosis of hypoxic human PASMCs (HPASMCs), and to determine the possible underlying mechanisms. Methodology/Principal Findings HPASMCs were cultured for 24 h in normoxia or hypoxia (5% O2) conditions with and without puerarin. Cell number and viability were determined with a hemacytometer or a cell counting kit. Apoptosis was detected with a TUNEL test, rhodamine-123 (R-123) fluorescence, a colorimetric assay, western blots, immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR. Hypoxia inhibited mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and promoted HPASMC growth. In contrast, after puerarin (50 µM or more) intervention, cell growth was inhibited and apoptosis was observed. Puerarin-induced apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs was accompanied by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, caspase-9 activation, and Bcl-2 down-regulation with concurrent Bax up-regulation. Conclusions/Significance Puerarin promoted apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs by acting on the mitochondria-dependent pathway. These results suggest a new mechanism of puerarin relevant to the management of clinical hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22457823

  20. Local and cellular Ca2+ transients in smooth muscle of pressurized rat resistance arteries during myogenic and agonist stimulation.

    PubMed

    Miriel, V A; Mauban, J R; Blaustein, M P; Wier, W G

    1999-08-01

    1. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to visualize Ca2+ transients in the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) of intact, pressurized rat mesenteric resistance arteries loaded with fluorescent calcium indicators. Vasoconstriction was assessed by measuring inner arterial diameter. All arteries were studied at 70 mmHg intralumenal pressure and 37 C. 2. In the control condition of myogenic tone the arteries were constricted to 62 % (n = 10) of their passive diameter (p.d.). The [Ca2+]i in most VSMC of these arteries was constant over time. In a small percentage (< 10 %) of cells in each artery, [Ca2+]i oscillated regularly. Local calcium transients (Ca2+ sparks) were observed in five arteries studied with confocal linescan imaging. 3. Activation of alpha-adrenoceptors by phenylephrine (PE, 1.0 microM) induced further vasoconstriction of pressurized arteries (to 27 % of p.d.). In this condition, [Ca2+]i oscillations were prominent in a large percentage (83 %) of the VSMC. The Ca2+ oscillations ranged in frequency from 4 to 22 min-1, and were usually asynchronous between cells. 4. High [KCl]o (65 mM) induced nearly comparable vasoconstriction to PE (37 % of p.d.) but [Ca2+]i oscillated in only about 13 % of cells in each artery. 5. Block of L-type Ca2+ channels (with nifedipine) in arteries activated by PE caused nearly full vasodilatation, but did not abolish the Ca2+ oscillations. Subsequent block of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump (with cyclopiazonic acid) abolished Ca2+ oscillations in all cells. 6. We conclude that Ca2+ entering VSMC via L-type Ca2+ channels has an obligatory role in force development, both in myogenic tone and during alpha1-adrenoceptor activation. The oscillatory pattern of [Ca2+]i that persists in the absence of Ca2+ entry via L-type Ca2+ channels is ineffective in activating contraction. PMID:10420017

  1. Assessing intracranial vascular compliance using dynamic arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lirong; Liu, Collin Y; Smith, Robert X; Jog, Mayank; Langham, Michael; Krasileva, Kate; Chen, Yufen; Ringman, John M; Wang, Danny J J

    2016-01-01

    Vascular compliance (VC) is an important marker for a number of cardiovascular diseases and dementia, which is typically assessed in the central and peripheral arteries indirectly by quantifying pulse wave velocity (PWV), and/or pulse pressure waveform. To date, very few methods are available for the quantification of intracranial VC. In the present study, a novel MRI technique for in-vivo assessment of intracranial VC was introduced, where dynamic arterial spin labeling (ASL) scans were synchronized with the systolic and diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle. VC is defined as the ratio of change in arterial cerebral blood volume (ΔCBV) and change in arterial pressure (ΔBP). Intracranial VC was assessed in different vascular components using the proposed dynamic ASL method. Our results show that VC mainly occurs in large arteries, and gradually decreases in small arteries and arterioles. The comparison of intracranial VC between young and elderly subjects shows that aging is accompanied by a reduction of intracranial VC, in good agreement with the literature. Furthermore, a positive association between intracranial VC and cerebral perfusion measured using pseudo-continuous ASL with 3D GRASE MRI was observed independent of aging effects, suggesting loss of VC is associated with a decline in perfusion. Finally, a significant positive correlation between intracranial and central (aortic arch) VC was observed using an ungated phase-contrast 1D projection PWV technique. The proposed dynamic ASL method offers a promising approach for assessing intracranial VC in a range of cardiovascular diseases and dementia. PMID:26364865

  2. Vascular nanomedicine: Site specific delivery of elastin stabilizing therapeutics to damaged arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Aditi

    Elastin, a structural protein in the extra-cellular matrix, plays a critical role in the normal functioning of blood vessels. Apart from performing its primary function of providing resilience to arteries, it also plays major role in regulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, response to injury, and morphogenesis. Medial arterial calcification (MAC) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are two diseases where the structural and functional integrity of elastin is severely compromised. Although the clinical presentation of MAC and AAA differ, they have one common underlying causative mechanism---pathological degradation of elastin. Hence prevention of elastin degradation in the early stages of MAC and AAA can mitigate, partially if not wholly, the fatal consequences of both the diseases. The work presented here is motivated by the overwhelming statistics of people afflicted by elastin associated cardiovascular diseases and the unavailability of cure for the same. Overall goal of our research is to understand role of elastin degradation in cardiovascular diseases and to develop a targeted vascular drug delivery system that is minimally invasive, biodegradable, and non-toxic, that prevents elastin from degradation. Our hope is that such treatment will also help regenerate elastin, thereby providing a multi-fold treatment option for elasto-degenerative vascular diseases. For this purpose, we have first confirmed the combined role of degraded elastin and hyperglycemia in the pathogenesis of MAC. We have shown that in the absence of degraded elastin and TGF-beta1 (abundantly present in diabetic arteries) vascular smooth muscle cells maintain their homeostatic state, regardless of environmental glucose concentrations. However simultaneous exposure to glucose, elastin peptides and TGF-beta1 causes the pathological transgenesis of vascular cells to osteoblast-like cells. We show that plant derived polyphenols bind to vascular elastin with great affinity resulting in

  3. Thrombospondin-1 limits ischemic tissue survival by inhibiting nitric oxide–mediated vascular smooth muscle relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Isenberg, Jeff S.; Hyodo, Fuminori; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Romeo, Martin J.; Abu-Asab, Mones; Tsokos, Maria; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Wink, David A.; Krishna, Murali C.

    2007-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP pathway, by relaxing vascular smooth muscle cells, is a major physiologic regulator of tissue perfusion. We now identify thrombospondin-1 as a potent antagonist of NO for regulating F-actin assembly and myosin light chain phosphorylation in vascular smooth muscle cells. Thrombospondin-1 prevents NO-mediated relaxation of precontracted vascular smooth muscle cells in a collagen matrix. Functional magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that an NO-mediated increase in skeletal muscle perfusion was enhanced in thrombospondin-1–null relative to wild-type mice, implicating endogenous thrombospondin-1 as a physiologic antagonist of NO-mediated vasodilation. Using a random myocutaneous flap model for ischemic injury, tissue survival was significantly enhanced in thrombospondin-1–null mice. Improved flap survival correlated with increased recovery of oxygen levels in the ischemic tissue of thrombospondin-1–null mice as measured by electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry. These findings demonstrate an important antag-onistic relation between NO/cGMP signaling and thrombospondin-1 in vascular smooth muscle cells to regulate vascular tone and tissue perfusion. PMID:17082319

  4. Characterization of human vascular smooth muscle cells transformed by the early genetic region of SV40 virus.

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, A.; Greenspan, P.; Nagpal, M. L.; Nachtigal, S. A.; Nachtigal, M.

    1991-01-01

    Human arterial smooth muscle cells transfected with the plasmid pSV3-neo, which contains the SV40 virus early region and the neor gene, developed colonies of morphologically transformed cells. Five cell strains were initiated from these colonies and could be subcultivated for up to 9 months before entering a stage of crisis that ended their life span. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules containing viral sequences were found free and integrated in the transformed cells. The intranuclear SV40 large T antigen and the p53 cellular protein were expressed in the transformed cells. Most of the transformed cells were spindle shaped but some were large and multinucleated. The modal chromosome numbers were in the triploid range, and aberrations, particularly dicentrics, were common. The transcripts for smooth muscle actins were significantly reduced and there were less alpha-actin filaments detected by immunofluorescence. Cytochemical staining disclosed a large accumulation of lipid droplets in the transformed cells incubated with rabbit hypercholesterolemic beta-very-low-density lipoprotein. Chemical analysis showed that cholesteryl esters were significantly elevated in these cells. Phenotypic changes induced in human vascular smooth muscle cells by SV40 early genes are similar to those found in smooth muscle cells from atherosclerotic lesions and may indicate common pathogenetic mechanisms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1653520

  5. Lipid Loading of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Induces Changes in Tropoelastin Protein Levels and Physical Structure

    PubMed Central

    Samouillan, Valerie; Dandurand, Jany; Nasarre, Laura; Badimon, Lina; Lacabanne, Colette; Llorente-Cortés, Vicenta

    2012-01-01

    Aggregated low-density lipoprotein (agLDL), one of the main LDL modifications in the arterial intima, contributes to massive intracellular cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation in human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), which are major producers of elastin in the vascular wall. Our aim was to analyze the levels, physical structure, and molecular mobility of tropoelastin produced by agLDL-loaded human VSMC (agLDL-VSMC) versus that produced by control VSMC. Western blot analysis demonstrated that agLDL reduced VSMC-tropoelastin protein levels by increasing its degradation rate. Moreover, our results demonstrated increased levels of precursor and mature forms of cathepsin S in agLDL-VSMC. Fourier transform infrared analysis revealed modifications in the secondary structures of tropoelastin produced by lipid-loaded VSMCs. Thermal and dielectric analyses showed that agLDL-VSMC tropoelastin has decreased glass transition temperatures and distinct chain dynamics that, in addition to a loss of thermal stability, lead to strong changes in its mechanical properties. In conclusion, agLDL lipid loading of human vascular cells leads to an increase in cathepsin S production concomitantly with a decrease in cellular tropoelastin protein levels and dramatic changes in secreted tropoelastin physical structure. Therefore, VSMC-lipid loading likely determines alterations in the mechanical properties of the vascular wall and plays a crucial role in elastin loss during atherosclerosis. PMID:22947869

  6. Vascular wall hypoxia promotes arterial thrombus formation via augmentation of vascular thrombogenicity.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yunosuke; Yamashita, Atsushi; Iwakiri, Takashi; Sugita, Chihiro; Okuyama, Nozomi; Kitamura, Kazuo; Asada, Yujiro

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions represent a hypoxic milieu. However, the significance of this milieu in atherothrombosis has not been established. We aimed to assess the hypothesis that vascular wall hypoxia promotes arterial thrombus formation. We examined the relation between vascular wall hypoxia and arterial thrombus formation using a rabbit model in which arterial thrombosis was induced by 0.5 %-cholesterol diet and repeated balloon injury of femoral arteries. Vascular wall hypoxia was immunohistochemically detected by pimonidazole hydrochloride, a hypoxia marker. Rabbit neointima and THP-1 macrophages were cultured to analyse prothrombotic factor expression under hypoxic conditions (1 % O2). Prothrombotic factor expression and nuclear localisation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 were immunohistochemically assessed using human coronary atherectomy plaques. Hypoxic areas were localised in the macrophage-rich deep portion of rabbit neointima and positively correlated with the number of nuclei immunopositive for HIF-1α and NF-κB p65, and tissue factor (TF) expression. Immunopositive areas for glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and fibrin in thrombi were significantly correlated with hypoxic areas in arteries. TF and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression was increased in neointimal tissues and/or macrophages cultured under hypoxia, and both were suppressed by inhibitors of either HIF-1 or NF-κB. In human coronary plaques, the number of HIF-1α-immunopositive nuclei was positively correlated with that of NF-κB-immunopositive nuclei and TF-immunopositive and PAI-1-immunopositive area, and it was significantly higher in thrombotic plaques. Vascular wall hypoxia augments the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaque and thrombus formation on plaques via prothrombotic factor upregulation. PMID:25833755

  7. Curcumin Exerts its Anti-hypertensive Effect by Down-regulating the AT1 Receptor in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yonggang; Wang, Wei; Li, Meixiang; Ren, Hongmei; Chen, Caiyu; Wang, Jialiang; Wang, Wei Eric; Yang, Jian; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin exerts beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. However, its mechanisms are unknown. We propose that curcumin prevents the development of hypertension by regulating AT1 receptor (AT1R) expression in arteries. The present study examined how curcumin regulates AT1R expression in vascular smooth muscle cells and investigated the physiological significance of this regulation in angiotensin (Ang) II-induced hypertension. The results showed that curcumin decreased AT1R expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in vascular smooth muscle cells. Using luciferase reporters with an entire AT1 or a mutant AT1R in A10 cells, the AT1R promoter activity was inhibited by 10(-6 )M curcumin, and the proximal element (from -61 to +25 bp) of the AT1R promoter was crucial for curcumin-induced AT1R down-regulation. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that curcumin decreased specificity protein 1 (SP1) binding with the AT1R promoter in A10 cells. Curcumin treatment reduced Ang II-induced hypertension in C57Bl/6J mice, which was accompanied by lower AT1R expression in the arteries and decreased Ang II-mediated vasoconstriction in the mesenteric artery. These findings indicate that curcumin down-regulates AT1R expression in A10 cells by affecting SP1/AT1R DNA binding, thus reducing AT1R-mediated vasoconstriction and subsequently prevents the development of hypertension in an Ang II-induced hypertensive model. PMID:27146402

  8. Curcumin Exerts its Anti-hypertensive Effect by Down-regulating the AT1 Receptor in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yonggang; Wang, Wei; Li, Meixiang; Ren, Hongmei; Chen, Caiyu; Wang, Jialiang; Wang, Wei Eric; Yang, Jian; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin exerts beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. However, its mechanisms are unknown. We propose that curcumin prevents the development of hypertension by regulating AT1 receptor (AT1R) expression in arteries. The present study examined how curcumin regulates AT1R expression in vascular smooth muscle cells and investigated the physiological significance of this regulation in angiotensin (Ang) II-induced hypertension. The results showed that curcumin decreased AT1R expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in vascular smooth muscle cells. Using luciferase reporters with an entire AT1 or a mutant AT1R in A10 cells, the AT1R promoter activity was inhibited by 10−6 M curcumin, and the proximal element (from −61 to +25 bp) of the AT1R promoter was crucial for curcumin-induced AT1R down-regulation. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that curcumin decreased specificity protein 1 (SP1) binding with the AT1R promoter in A10 cells. Curcumin treatment reduced Ang II-induced hypertension in C57Bl/6J mice, which was accompanied by lower AT1R expression in the arteries and decreased Ang II-mediated vasoconstriction in the mesenteric artery. These findings indicate that curcumin down-regulates AT1R expression in A10 cells by affecting SP1/AT1R DNA binding, thus reducing AT1R-mediated vasoconstriction and subsequently prevents the development of hypertension in an Ang II-induced hypertensive model. PMID:27146402

  9. Induction of hyaluronic acid synthase 2 (HAS2) in human vascular smooth muscle cells by vasodilatory prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Sussmann, M; Sarbia, M; Meyer-Kirchrath, J; Nüsing, R M; Schrör, K; Fischer, J W

    2004-03-19

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a prominent constituent of the extracellular matrix of atherosclerotic vascular lesions in humans known to modulate vascular smooth muscle phenotype. The regulation of HA synthesis by vasodilatory prostaglandins was analyzed in human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs). The prostacyclin analogue, iloprost (100 nmol/L), markedly increased pericellular formation of HA coats and HA secretion into the cell culture medium in human arterial SMCs (8.7+/-1.6-fold). Expression of HA synthase 2 (HAS2) was determined by semiquantitative RT-PCR and found to be strongly upregulated at concentrations of iloprost between 1 and 100 nmol/L after 3 hours. Furthermore, endogenous cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) activity was required for basal expression of HAS2 mRNA in SMCs in vitro. Total HA secretion in response to iloprost was markedly decreased by RNA interference (RNAi), specific for HAS2. In addition, siRNA targeting HAS2 strongly increased the spreading of human SMCs compared with mock-transfected cells. HAS2 mRNA levels were also stimulated by a selective prostacyclin receptor (IP) agonist, cicaprost (10 nmol/L), prostaglandin E(2) (10 nmol/L), and the EP(2) receptor agonist, butaprost (1 micromol/L). Induction of HAS2 mRNA and HA synthesis by prostaglandins was mimicked by stable cAMP analogues and forskolin. In human atherectomy specimens from the internal carotid artery, HA deposits and COX2 expression colocalized frequently. In addition, strong EP(2) receptor expression was detected in SMCs in HA-rich areas. Therefore, upregulation of HAS2 expression via EP(2) and IP receptors might contribute to the accumulation of HA during human atherosclerosis, thereby mediating proatherosclerotic functions of COX2. PMID:14752026

  10. Regulation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Tone by Adipose-Derived Contracting Factor

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Matthias R.; Fredette, Natalie C.; Barton, Matthias; Prossnitz, Eric R.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and arterial hypertension, important risk factors for atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, are characterized by an increase in vascular tone. While obesity is known to augment vasoconstrictor prostanoid activity in endothelial cells, less is known about factors released from fat tissue surrounding arteries (perivascular adipose). Using lean controls and mice with either monogenic or diet-induced obesity, we set out to determine whether and through which pathways perivascular adipose affects vascular tone. We unexpectedly found that in the aorta of obese mice, perivascular adipose potentiates vascular contractility to serotonin and phenylephrine, indicating activity of a factor generated by perivascular adipose, which we designated “adipose-derived contracting factor” (ADCF). Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) fully prevented ADCF-mediated contractions, whereas COX-1 or COX-2-selective inhibition was only partially effective. By contrast, inhibition of superoxide anions, NO synthase, or endothelin receptors had no effect on ADCF activity. Perivascular adipose as a source of COX-derived ADCF was further confirmed by detecting increased thromboxane A2 formation from perivascular adipose-replete aortae from obese mice. Taken together, this study identifies perivascular adipose as a novel regulator of arterial vasoconstriction through the release of COX-derived ADCF. Excessive ADCF activity in perivascular fat under obese conditions likely contributes to increased vascular tone by antagonizing vasodilation. ADCF may thus propagate obesity-dependent hypertension and the associated increased risk in coronary artery disease, potentially representing a novel therapeutic target. PMID:24244459

  11. Stretch-activated channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells from normoxic and chronically hypoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Ducret, Thomas; El Arrouchi, Jalila; Courtois, Arnaud; Quignard, Jean-François; Marthan, Roger; Savineau, Jean-Pierre

    2010-11-01

    Stretch-activated channels (SACs) act as membrane mechanotransducers since they convert physical forces into biological signals and hence into a cell response. Pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) are continuously exposed to mechanical stimulations e.g., compression and stretch, that are enhanced under conditions of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Using the patch-clamp technique (cell-attached configuration) in PASMCs, we showed that applying graded negative pressures (from 0 to -60 mmHg) to the back end of the patch pipette increases occurrence and activity of SACs. The current-voltage relationship (from -80 to +40 mV) was almost linear with a reversal potential of 1 mV and a slope conductance of 34 pS. SACs were inhibited in the presence of GsMTx-4, a specific SACs blocker. Using microspectrofluorimetry (indo-1), we found that hypotonic-induced cell swelling increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). This [Ca(2+)](i) increase was markedly inhibited in the absence of external Ca(2+) or in the presence of the following blockers of SACs: gadolinium, streptomycin, and GsMTx-4. Interestingly, in chronically hypoxic rats, an animal model of PAH, SACs were more active and hypotonic-induced calcium response in PASMCs was significantly higher (nearly a two-fold increase). Moreover, unlike in normoxic rats, intrapulmonary artery rings from hypoxic rats mounted in a Mulvany myograph, exhibited a myogenic tone sensitive to SAC blockers. In conclusion, this work demonstrates that SACs in rat PASMCs can be activated by membrane stretch as well as hypotonic stimulation and are responsible for [Ca(2+)](i) increase. The link between SACs activation-induced calcium response and myogenic tone in chronically hypoxic rats suggests that SACs are an important element for the increased pulmonary vascular tone in PAH and that they may represent a molecular target for PAH treatment. PMID:21035852

  12. Id proteins are critical downstream effectors of BMP signaling in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Li, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Southwood, Mark; Ye, Lingying; Long, Lu; Al-Lamki, Rafia S; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2013-08-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPR-II) mutations are responsible for over 70% of cases of heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Loss of BMP signaling promotes pulmonary vascular remodeling via modulation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation. Id proteins (Id1-4) are major downstream transcriptional targets of BMP signaling. However, the impact of BMPR-II mutation on the expression of the range of Id proteins and the contribution of individual Id proteins to abnormal PASMC function remain unclear. Human PASMCs were used to determine the expression of Id proteins (Id1-4) by real-time PCR and immunoblotting. The BMP responses in control cells were compared with PASMCs harboring BMPR-II mutations and cells in which BMPR-II was knocked down by siRNA transfection. Id3 expression in pulmonary vessels was also investigated in BMPR-II mutant mice and in patients with heritable PAH. BMP4 and BMP6, but not BMP9, induced mRNA expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3. The BMP-stimulated induction of Id1 and Id3 was markedly reduced in BMPR-II mutant PASMCs and in control PASMCs following siRNA silencing of BMPR-II. Pulmonary arteries in BMPR-II mutant mice and patients with heritable PAH demonstrated reduced levels of Id3 compared with control subjects. Lentiviral overexpression of Id3 reduced cell cycle progression and inhibited proliferation of PASMCs. Lipopolysaccharide further reduced Id3 expression in mutant PASMCs. In conclusion, Id proteins, and particularly Id1 and Id3, are critical downstream effectors of BMP signaling in PASMCs. Loss of BMPR-II function reduces the induction of Id genes in PASMCs, Id1, and Id3 regulate the proliferation of PASMCs via cell cycle inhibition, an effect that may be exacerbated by inflammatory stimuli. PMID:23771884

  13. Id proteins are critical downstream effectors of BMP signaling in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Li, Xiaohui; Li, Ying; Southwood, Mark; Ye, Lingying; Long, Lu; Al-Lamki, Rafia S.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPR-II) mutations are responsible for over 70% of cases of heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Loss of BMP signaling promotes pulmonary vascular remodeling via modulation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation. Id proteins (Id1–4) are major downstream transcriptional targets of BMP signaling. However, the impact of BMPR-II mutation on the expression of the range of Id proteins and the contribution of individual Id proteins to abnormal PASMC function remain unclear. Human PASMCs were used to determine the expression of Id proteins (Id1–4) by real-time PCR and immunoblotting. The BMP responses in control cells were compared with PASMCs harboring BMPR-II mutations and cells in which BMPR-II was knocked down by siRNA transfection. Id3 expression in pulmonary vessels was also investigated in BMPR-II mutant mice and in patients with heritable PAH. BMP4 and BMP6, but not BMP9, induced mRNA expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3. The BMP-stimulated induction of Id1 and Id3 was markedly reduced in BMPR-II mutant PASMCs and in control PASMCs following siRNA silencing of BMPR-II. Pulmonary arteries in BMPR-II mutant mice and patients with heritable PAH demonstrated reduced levels of Id3 compared with control subjects. Lentiviral overexpression of Id3 reduced cell cycle progression and inhibited proliferation of PASMCs. Lipopolysaccharide further reduced Id3 expression in mutant PASMCs. In conclusion, Id proteins, and particularly Id1 and Id3, are critical downstream effectors of BMP signaling in PASMCs. Loss of BMPR-II function reduces the induction of Id genes in PASMCs, Id1, and Id3 regulate the proliferation of PASMCs via cell cycle inhibition, an effect that may be exacerbated by inflammatory stimuli. PMID:23771884

  14. Thrombospondin-1, -2 and -5 have differential effects on vascular smooth muscle cell physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Helkin, Alex; Maier, Kristopher G.; Gahtan, Vivian

    2015-09-04

    Introduction: The thrombospondins (TSPs) are matricellular proteins that exert multifunctional effects by binding cytokines, cell-surface receptors and other proteins. TSPs play important roles in vascular pathobiology and are all expressed in arterial lesions. The differential effects of TSP-1, -2, and -5 represent a gap in knowledge in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) physiology. Our objective is to determine if structural differences of the TSPs imparted different effects on VSMC functions critical to the formation of neointimal hyperplasia. We hypothesize that TSP-1 and -2 induce similar patterns of migration, proliferation and gene expression, while the effects of TSP-5 are different. Methods: Human aortic VSMC chemotaxis was tested for TSP-2 and TSP-5 (1–40 μg/mL), and compared to TSP-1 and serum-free media (SFM) using a modified Boyden chamber. Next, VSMCs were exposed to TSP-1, TSP-2 or TSP-5 (0.2–40 μg/mL). Proliferation was assessed by MTS assay. Finally, VSMCs were exposed to TSP-1, TSP-2, TSP-5 or SFM for 3, 6 or 24 h. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed on 96 genes using a microfluidic card. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA or t-test, with p < 0.05 being significant. Results: TSP-1, TSP-2 and TSP-5 at 20 μg/mL all induce chemotaxis 3.1 fold compared to serum-free media. TSP-1 and TSP-2 induced proliferation 53% and 54% respectively, whereas TSP-5 did not. In the gene analysis, overall, cardiovascular system development and function is the canonical pathway most influenced by TSP treatment, and includes multiple growth factors, cytokines and proteases implicated in cellular migration, proliferation, vasculogenesis, apoptosis and inflammation pathways. Conclusions and relevance: The results of this study indicate TSP-1, -2, and -5 play active roles in VSMC physiology and gene expression. Similarly to TSP-1, VSMC chemotaxis to TSP-2 and -5 is dose-dependent. TSP-1 and -2 induces VSMC proliferation, but TSP-5 does not, likely

  15. Effects of an artery/vascular graft compliance mismatch on protein transport: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Sandy F C; Lyman, Donald J

    2004-07-01

    Small-diameter vascular graft failure by intimal hyperplasia and thrombosis may result from flow disturbances and disruption of chemical transport in the fluid at the distal anastomosis, because of compliance mismatch between the graft and host artery. In previous studies. lower-than-normal wall shear stress (WSS), particle trapping, and high particle residence times were observed at the distal anastomosis due to a pulsatile tubular expansion effect caused by nonuniform radial deformations. This study was undertaken to examine effects of compliance and radius mismatch on the distribution of a model protein released at the graft-fluid interface. Finite element simulations of end-to-end vascular grafting were performed under pulsatile flow, using fluid-structure coupling to give physiologic wall displacements. Results showed that protein is convected smoothly downstream in a uniform compliant tube. A compliance mismatch disturbed the transport, causing positive and negative gradients in the concentration profile at the distal anastomosis. This was seen when the graft and artery radii were matched at zero pressure and at mean arterial pressure; low WSSs were only observed in the former case. Thus the distal intimal hypertrophy seen in noncompliant grafts may be caused partly by decreased WSS, and partly by concentration gradients of dissolved chemicals affecting chemotaxis of cells. PMID:15298437

  16. Oxygen mediates vascular smooth muscle relaxation in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Dada, Jessica; Pinder, Andrew G; Lang, Derek; James, Philip E

    2013-01-01

    The activation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) by nitric oxide (NO) and other ligands has been extensively investigated for many years. In the present study we considered the effect of molecular oxygen (O2) on sGC both as a direct ligand and its affect on other ligands by measuring cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production, as an index of activity, as well as investigating smooth muscle relaxation under hypoxic conditions. Our isolated enzyme studies confirm the function of sGC is impaired under hypoxic conditions and produces cGMP in the presence of O2, importantly in the absence of NO. We also show that while O2 could partially affect the magnitude of sGC stimulation by NO when the latter was present in excess, activation by the NO independent, haem-dependent sGC stimulator 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzylindazole (YC-1) was unaffected. Our in vitro investigation of smooth muscle relaxation confirmed that O2 alone in the form of a buffer bolus (equilibrated at 95% O2/5% CO2) had the ability to dilate vessels under hypoxic conditions and that this was dependent upon sGC and independent of eNOS. Our studies confirm that O2 can be a direct and important mediator of vasodilation through an increase in cGMP production. In the wider context, these observations are key to understanding the relative roles of O2 versus NO-induced sGC activation. PMID:23451175

  17. Oxygen Mediates Vascular Smooth Muscle Relaxation in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Derek; James, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    The activation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) by nitric oxide (NO) and other ligands has been extensively investigated for many years. In the present study we considered the effect of molecular oxygen (O2) on sGC both as a direct ligand and its affect on other ligands by measuring cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production, as an index of activity, as well as investigating smooth muscle relaxation under hypoxic conditions. Our isolated enzyme studies confirm the function of sGC is impaired under hypoxic conditions and produces cGMP in the presence of O2, importantly in the absence of NO. We also show that while O2 could partially affect the magnitude of sGC stimulation by NO when the latter was present in excess, activation by the NO independent, haem-dependent sGC stimulator 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzylindazole (YC-1) was unaffected. Our in vitro investigation of smooth muscle relaxation confirmed that O2 alone in the form of a buffer bolus (equilibrated at 95% O2/5% CO2) had the ability to dilate vessels under hypoxic conditions and that this was dependent upon sGC and independent of eNOS. Our studies confirm that O2 can be a direct and important mediator of vasodilation through an increase in cGMP production. In the wider context, these observations are key to understanding the relative roles of O2 versus NO-induced sGC activation. PMID:23451175

  18. Effects of the dual TP receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor EV-077 on human endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, Marcelo H.; Tellier, Céline; Michiels, Carine; Ellertsen, Ingvill; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Bäck, Magnus

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •EV-077 reduced TNF-α induced inflammation in endothelial cells. •The thromboxane mimetic U69915 enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. •EV-077 inhibited smooth muscle cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The prothrombotic mediator thromboxane A{sub 2} is derived from arachidonic acid metabolism through the cyclooxygenase and thromboxane synthase pathways, and transduces its effect through the thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptor. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the TP receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor EV-077 on inflammatory markers in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and on human coronary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation. To this end, mRNA levels of different proinflammatory mediators were studied by real time quantitative PCR, supernatants were analyzed by enzyme immune assay, and cell proliferation was assessed using WST-1. EV-077 significantly decreased mRNA levels of ICAM-1 and PTX3 after TNFα incubation, whereas concentrations of 6-keto PGF1α in supernatants of endothelial cells incubated with TNFα were significantly increased after EV-077 treatment. Although U46619 did not alter coronary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation, this thromboxane mimetic enhanced the proliferation induced by serum, insulin and growth factors, which was significantly inhibited by EV-077. In conclusion, EV-077 inhibited TNFα-induced endothelial inflammation and reduced the enhancement of smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by a thromboxane mimetic, supporting that the thromboxane pathway may be associated with early atherosclerosis in terms of endothelial dysfunction and vascular hypertrophy.

  19. Interference with PPARγ Function in Smooth Muscle Causes Vascular Dysfunction and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Halabi, Carmen M.; Beyer, Andreas M.; de Lange, Willem J.; Keen, Henry L.; Baumbach, Gary L.; Faraci, Frank M.; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is a ligand activated transcription factor playing a critical role in metabolism. Thiazolidinediones, high affinity PPARγ ligands used clinically to treat type-II diabetes, have been reported to lower blood pressure and provide other cardiovascular benefits. Some mutations in PPARγ cause type-II diabetes and severe hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that PPARγ in vascular muscle plays a role in the regulation of vascular tone and blood pressure. Transgenic mice expressing dominant negative mutations in PPARγ under the control of a smooth muscle-specific promoter exhibit a loss of responsiveness to nitric oxide and striking alterations in contractility in the aorta, hypertrophy and inward remodeling in the cerebral microcirculation, and systolic hypertension. These results identify PPARγ as pivotal in vascular muscle as a regulator of vascular structure, vascular function and blood pressure, potentially explaining some of the cardioprotective effects of thiazolidinediones. PMID:18316027

  20. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; P<0.05) at all examined time points (2 to 24 hours). mRNA half-life studies showed that this response was not due to increased mRNA instability. tPA mRNA expression was decreased (to 10% of stationary control; P<0.05) by low shear stress after 12 hours of exposure and was increased (to 250% of stationary control; P<0.05) after 24 hours at high shear stress. The same trends in PAR-1 mRNA levels were observed in rat smooth muscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  1. Real-time vascular mechanosensation through ex vivo artery perfusion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell-based perfusion studies have provided great insight into fluid-sensing mechanisms, such as primary cilia in the renal and vascular systems. However, the intrinsic limitations of in vitro cell culture, such as the inability to reflect cellular organization within tissues, has distanced observed paradigms from possible clinical developments. Here we describe a protocol that applies ex vivo artery perfusion and calcium imaging to observe real-time cellular responses to fluid-shear stress. Results Through our ex vivo artery perfusion method, we were able to simulate physiological flow and initiate distinct fluid shear stress mechanosensory responses, as well as induced acetylcholine responses in mouse aortic tissue. The observed calcium profiles confirm results found through previous in vitro cell culture experiments. The overall procedure, including dissection, sample preparation and perfusion, takes around 3 hours to complete. Conclusion Through our unique method, we are able to induce laminar flow within intact mouse aortic tissue and illicit subsequent cellular responses. This method of ex vivo artery perfusion provides the opportunity to bridge the novel findings of in vitro studies with subsequent physiological models of fluid-shear stress mechanosensation in vascular tissues. PMID:24685068

  2. Marker profile for the evaluation of human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell quality obtained by different isolation and culture methods.

    PubMed

    Mazza, G; Roßmanith, E; Lang-Olip, I; Pfeiffer, D

    2016-08-01

    Even though umbilical cord arteries are a common source of vascular smooth muscle cells, the lack of reliable marker profiles have not facilitated the isolation of human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMC). For accurate characterization of HUASMC and cells in their environment, the expression of smooth muscle and mesenchymal markers was analyzed in umbilical cord tissue sections. The resulting marker profile was then used to evaluate the quality of HUASMC isolation and culture methods. HUASMC and perivascular-Wharton's jelly stromal cells (pv-WJSC) showed positive staining for α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC), desmin, vimentin and CD90. Anti-CD10 stained only pv-WJSC. Consequently, HUASMC could be characterized as α-SMA+ , SM-MHC+ , CD10- cells, which are additionally negative for endothelial markers (CD31 and CD34). Enzymatic isolation provided primary HUASMC batches with 90-99 % purity, yet, under standard culture conditions, contaminant CD10+ cells rapidly constituted more than 80 % of the total cell population. Contamination was mainly due to the poor adhesion of HUASMC to cell culture plates, regardless of the different protein coatings (fibronectin, collagen I or gelatin). HUASMC showed strong attachment and long-term viability only in 3D matrices. The explant isolation method achieved cultures with only 13-40 % purity with considerable contamination by CD10+ cells. CD10+ cells showed spindle-like morphology and up-regulated expression of α-SMA and SM-MHC upon culture in smooth muscle differentiation medium. Considering the high contamination risk of HUASMC cultures by CD10+ neighboring cells and their phenotypic similarities, precise characterization is mandatory to avoid misleading results. PMID:25535117

  3. Mechanisms of vascular preservation by a novel NO donor following rat carotid artery intimal injury.

    PubMed

    Guo, J P; Panday, M M; Consigny, P M; Lefer, A M

    1995-09-01

    We studied the effects of a novel organic nitric oxide (NO) donor, 4-hydroxymethyl-furazan-3-carboxylic acid-2-oxide (CAS-1609), in a rat carotid artery intimal injury model. The NO donor, CAS-1609, or its non-NO-donating control compound, 4-hydroxymethyl-furazan-3-carboxylic acid (C-93-4845), was infused intravenously at 30 micrograms/day. Seven days after injury, carotid artery rings contracted only 56 +/- 6 mg to NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester in C-93-4845-treated rats, compared with 120 +/- 17 mg in CAS-1609-treated rats (P < 0.02), indicating a preservation of endogenous NO release. Improved responses to the endothelium-dependent dilator, acetylcholine, also occurred in injured arteries treated with CAS-1609. Morphometric analysis of injured carotid arteries given the inactive compound showed marked intimal thickening with an intimal-to-medial ratio (I/M) of 0.76 +/- 0.02, compared with a significantly lower I/M of 0.32 +/- 0.04 (P < 0.01) in injured carotid arteries given CAS-1609. Additionally, CAS-1609 was found to have a concentration-dependent stimulatory effect on cultured rat aortic endothelial cell proliferation (P < 0.01) but and inhibitory effect on platelet-derived growth factor-BB (10 ng/ml)-stimulated rat aortic smooth muscle cell proliferation (P < 0.01). This is the first study to demonstrate that NO plays a dual role in vascular cell proliferation, stimulating endothelial cells but inhibiting smooth muscle cell proliferation. This dual effect of NO on cell proliferation is associated with an in vivo reduction in neointimal thickening and an acceleration of endothelial recovery determined by both anatomic and functional methods. PMID:7573510

  4. Inhibition of the Ca sup 2+ -ATPase of vascular smooth muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum by superoxide radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yuichiro; Ford, G.D. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of oxygen free radicals generated by hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase on the Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum from bovine aortic smooth muscle were studied. Exogenous hypoxanthine plus xanthine oxidase produced an hypoxanthine concentration dependent inhibition of the Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase. The inhibition could be completely blocked by superoxide dismutase but not by either mannitol or deferoxamine. Direct addition of reagent hydrogen peroxide in the {mu}M range did not cause significant inhibition. These results suggest that superoxide is the primary damaging species. Additionally, 1.16 {plus minus} 0.17 mU/g wet wt of xanthine oxidase activity were detected in the post-nuclear supernatant of bovine aortic smooth muscle, suggesting the existence of a possible intracellular source of superoxide. This value was calculated to be approximately 5 mU/ml by using a usual value of vascular smooth muscle cellular volume. Thus the level of endogenous xanthine oxidase resident in vascular smooth muscle is comparable with the level of exogenous xanthine oxidase used in the present study. These findings suggest a potential role of xanthine oxidase-generated superoxide in free radical injury to vascular smooth muscle.

  5. Coronary Artery Disease Associated Transcription Factor TCF21 Regulates Smooth Muscle Precursor Cells That Contribute to the Fibrous Cap

    PubMed Central

    Raiesdana, Azad; Kundu, Ramendra; Miller, Clint L.; Kim, Juyong B.; Arora, Komal; Carcamo-Oribe, Ivan; Xiong, Yiqin; Tellakula, Nikhil; Nanda, Vivek; Murthy, Nikitha; Boisvert, William A.; Hedin, Ulf; Perisic, Ljubica; Aldi, Silvia; Maegdefessel, Lars; Pjanic, Milos; Owens, Gary K.; Tallquist, Michelle D.; Quertermous, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome wide association studies have identified a number of genes that contribute to the risk for coronary heart disease. One such gene, TCF21, encodes a basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor believed to serve a critical role in the development of epicardial progenitor cells that give rise to coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMC) and cardiac fibroblasts. Using reporter gene and immunolocalization studies with mouse and human tissues we have found that vascular TCF21 expression in the adult is restricted primarily to adventitial cells associated with coronary arteries and also medial SMC in the proximal aorta of mouse. Genome wide RNA-Seq studies in human coronary artery SMC (HCASMC) with siRNA knockdown found a number of putative TCF21 downstream pathways identified by enrichment of terms related to CAD, including “vascular disease,” “disorder of artery,” and “occlusion of artery,” as well as disease-related cellular functions including “cellular movement” and “cellular growth and proliferation.” In vitro studies in HCASMC demonstrated that TCF21 expression promotes proliferation and migration and inhibits SMC lineage marker expression. Detailed in situ expression studies with reporter gene and lineage tracing revealed that vascular wall cells expressing Tcf21 before disease initiation migrate into vascular lesions of ApoE-/- and Ldlr-/- mice. While Tcf21 lineage traced cells are distributed throughout the early lesions, in mature lesions they contribute to the formation of a subcapsular layer of cells, and others become associated with the fibrous cap. The lineage traced fibrous cap cells activate expression of SMC markers and growth factor receptor genes. Taken together, these data suggest that TCF21 may have a role regulating the differentiation state of SMC precursor cells that migrate into vascular lesions and contribute to the fibrous cap and more broadly, in view of the association of this gene with human CAD, provide

  6. The role of mechanotransduction on vascular smooth muscle myocytes cytoskeleton and contractile function

    PubMed Central

    Ye, George J.C.; Nesmith, Alexander P.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle exhibits a highly organized structural hierarchy that extends over multiple spatial scales to perform a wide range of functions at the cellular, tissue, and organ levels. Early efforts primarily focused on understanding vascular smooth muscle function through biochemical signaling. However, accumulating evidence suggests that mechanotransduction, the process through which cells convert mechanical stimuli into biochemical cues, is requisite for regulating contractility. Cytoskeletal proteins that comprise the extracellular, intercellular, and intracellular domains are mechanosensitive and can remodel their structure and function in response to external mechanical cues. Pathological stimuli such as malignant hypertension can act through the same mechanotransductive pathways to induce maladaptive remodeling, leading to changes in cellular shape and loss of contractile function. In both health and disease, the cytoskeletal architecture integrates the mechanical stimuli and mediates structural and functional remodeling in the vascular smooth muscle. PMID:25125187

  7. Endothelial cells are progenitors of cardiac pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Adams, Susanne; Eilken, Hanna; Stehling, Martin; Corada, Monica; Dejana, Elisabetta; Zhou, Bin; Adams, Ralf H.

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells of the vessel wall, namely pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, are essential for vascular integrity. The developmental sources of these cells and molecular mechanisms controlling their progenitors in the heart are only partially understood. Here we show that endocardial endothelial cells are progenitors of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in the murine embryonic heart. Endocardial cells undergo endothelial–mesenchymal transition and convert into primitive mesenchymal progenitors expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. These progenitors migrate into the myocardium, differentiate and assemble the wall of coronary vessels, which requires canonical Wnt signalling involving Frizzled4, β-catenin and endothelial cell-derived Wnt ligands. Our findings identify a novel and unexpected population of progenitors for coronary mural cells with potential relevance for heart function and disease conditions. PMID:27516371

  8. Endothelial cells are progenitors of cardiac pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Adams, Susanne; Eilken, Hanna; Stehling, Martin; Corada, Monica; Dejana, Elisabetta; Zhou, Bin; Adams, Ralf H

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells of the vessel wall, namely pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, are essential for vascular integrity. The developmental sources of these cells and molecular mechanisms controlling their progenitors in the heart are only partially understood. Here we show that endocardial endothelial cells are progenitors of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in the murine embryonic heart. Endocardial cells undergo endothelial-mesenchymal transition and convert into primitive mesenchymal progenitors expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. These progenitors migrate into the myocardium, differentiate and assemble the wall of coronary vessels, which requires canonical Wnt signalling involving Frizzled4, β-catenin and endothelial cell-derived Wnt ligands. Our findings identify a novel and unexpected population of progenitors for coronary mural cells with potential relevance for heart function and disease conditions. PMID:27516371

  9. Distribution of a lanthanide (147 Pm) in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Weiss, G B; Goodman, F R

    1976-08-01

    In order to ascertain whether trivalent rare earth ions such as lanthanum (La+++) penetrate the cell membrane under physiological conditions, the extracellular and cellular distribution of promethium (147 Pm), a carrier-free rare earth radioisotope, was examined in rabbit aortic smooth muscle. As the duration of incubation was lengthened, uptake of 147Pm continued to increase; it was inhibited by La+++ and other rare earth ions (Nd+++, Lu+++) only when the 147 Pm/rare earth concentration ratio exceeded 1:10(6). However, equally high concentrations of Ca++ had no effect on 147Pm uptake. Efflux of 147Pm was only transiently increased by 1.5 mM La+++, and exposure to 0.05 mM EDTA elicited an increased 147Pm efflux with both transient and maintained components. The magnitude of the EDTA-induced increase in 147 Pm efflux was similar over a 30-fold range of EDTA concentration (0.05-1.5 mM); the limiting factor for 147Pm efflux is the rate of 147Pm desorption from the tissue rather than the extracellular concentration of EDTA. Loss of 147Pm in the presence of 0.05 mM EDTA could be described in terms of two specific washout components (the more rapid of which included 147Pm within the extracellular space and the slower of which had half-times of washout of approximately 7-10 minutes). Uptake of 147Pm was inhibited by lowering the incubation solution temperature to 0 degrees C or by procaine. However, concentrations of metabolic inhibitors (iodoacetate and dinitrophenol) which diminish loss of Ca++ from the cell did not decrease either the uptake or efflux of 147Pm. Thus, significant quantities of 147Pm do not appear to be accumulated within the cell or transported out of the cell; distribution of 147Pm can be most simply described in terms of a binding at and desorption from surface acessible fiber sites. PMID:820850

  10. TLR4-Activated MAPK-IL-6 Axis Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guan-Lin; Wu, Jing-Yiing; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Fu; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Kuo, Cheng-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into the intima is considered to be a vital event in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Despite substantial evidence supporting the pathogenic role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the progression of atherogenesis, its function in the regulation of VSMC migration remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism by which TLR4 regulates VSMC migration. Inhibitor experiments revealed that TLR4-induced IL-6 secretion and VSMC migration were mediated via the concerted actions of MyD88 and TRIF on the activation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling. Neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibodies abrogated TLR4-driven VSMC migration and F-actin polymerization. Blockade of p38 MAPK or ERK1/2 signaling cascade inhibited TLR4 agonist-mediated activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of CREB production repressed TLR4-induced IL-6 production and VSMC migration. Rac-1 inhibitor suppressed TLR4-driven VSMC migration but not IL-6 production. Importantly, the serum level of IL-6 and TLR4 endogenous ligand HMGB1 was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) than in healthy subjects. Serum HMGB1 level was positively correlated with serum IL-6 level in CAD patients. The expression of both HMGB1 and IL-6 was clearly detected in the atherosclerotic tissue of the CAD patients. Additionally, there was a positive association between p-CREB and HMGB1 in mouse atherosclerotic tissue. Based on our findings, we concluded that, upon ligand binding, TLR4 activates p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling through MyD88 and TRIF in VSMCs. These signaling pathways subsequently coordinate an additive augmentation of CREB-driven IL-6 production, which in turn triggers Rac-1-mediated actin cytoskeleton to promote VSMC migration. PMID:27563891

  11. Endothelin-1, superoxide and adeninediphosphate ribose cyclase in shark vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Susan K; Parker, Laurel

    2005-03-01

    In vascular smooth muscle (VSM) of Squalus acanthias, endothelin-1 (ET-1) signals via the ET(B) receptor. In both shark and mammalian VSM, ET-1 induces a rise in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) via activation of the inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor (IP(3)R) and subsequent release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). IP(3)R-mediated release of SR Ca(2+) causes calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) via the ryanodine receptor (RyR), which can be sensitized by cyclic adeninediphosphate ribose (cADPR). cADPR is synthesized from NAD(+) by a membrane-bound bifunctional enzyme, ADPR cyclase. We have previously shown that the antagonists of the RyR, Ruthenium Red, high concentrations of ryanodine and 8-Br cADPR, diminish the [Ca(2+)](i) response to ET-1 in shark VSM. To investigate how ET-1 might influence the activity of the ADPR cyclase, we employed inhibitors of the cyclase. To explore the possibility that ET-1-induced production of superoxide (O(2)*-) might activate the cyclase, we used an inhibitor of NAD(P)H oxidase (NOX), DPI and a scavenger of O(2)*-, TEMPOL. Anterior mesenteric artery VSM was loaded with fura-2AM to measure [Ca(2+)](i). In Ca(2+)-free shark Ringers, ET-1 increased [Ca(2+)](i) by 104+/-8 nmol l(-1). The VSM ADPR cyclase inhibitors, nicotinamide and Zn(2+), diminished the response by 62% and 72%, respectively. Both DPI and TEMPOL reduced the response by 63%. The combination of the IP(3)R antagonists, 2-APB or TMB-8, with DPI or TEMPOL further reduced the response by 83%. We show for the first time that in shark VSM, inhibition of the ADPR cyclase reduces the [Ca(2+)](i) response to ET-1 and that superoxide may be involved in the activation of the cyclase. PMID:15767306

  12. Unique remodeling processes after vascular injury in intracranial arteries: analysis using a novel mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Munehisa; Nakagami, Hironori; Sata, Masataka; Takaoka, Minoru; Azuma, Junya; Kiomy Osako, Mariana; Koriyama, Hiroshi; Kurinami, Hitomi; Wakayama, Kouji; Miyake, Takashi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-08-01

    The effectiveness of angioplasty and stenting in intracranial atherosclerotic diseases is controversial due to high rates of delayed restenosis and hemorrhage compared with extracranial arteries. However, the mechanisms underlying these differences are still unclear, because their pathophysiology is yet to be examined. To address this issue, we established a novel vascular injury model in the intracranial internal carotid arteries (IICAs) in mice, and analyzed the remodeling process in comparison to that of the femoral arteries (FAs). In IICAs, neointimal hyperplasia was observed from day 14 and grew until day 56. Although smooth muscle cells (SMCs) emerged in the neointima from day 28, SMCs in the injured media were continuously lost with eventual extinction of the media. Re-endothelialization was started from day 7 and completed on day 28. Accumulation of macrophages was continued in the adventitia until day 56. Compared with FAs, the following points are unique in IICAs: (1) delayed continuous formation of neointima; (2) accumulation of macrophages in the media on day 14; (3) continuous loss of SMCs in the media followed by extinction of the media itself; and (4) continuously growing adventitia. These pathophysiologic differences might be associated with unfavorable outcomes in percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting in intracranial arteries. PMID:23571280

  13. Vanilloid and Melastatin Transient Receptor Potential Channels in Vascular Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Earley, Scott

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily consists of six subfamilies that are defined by structural homology: TRPC (conventional or canonical), TRPV (vanilloid), TRPM (melastatin), TRPA (ankyrin), TRPP (polycystin), and TRPML (mucoliptin). This review focuses on channels belonging to the vanilloid (V) and melastatin (M) TRP subfamilies. The TRPV subfamily consists of six members (TRPV1–6) and the TRPM subfamily has eight (TRPM1–8). The basic biophysical properties of these channels are briefly described. All of these channels except TRPV5, TRPV6, and TRPM1 are reportedly present in arterial smooth muscle from various segments of the vasculature. Studies demonstrating involvement of TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPM4, TRPM7 and TRPM8 in regulation of arterial smooth muscle function are reviewed. The functions of TRPV3, TRPM2, TRPM3, and TRPM6 channels in arterial myocytes have not been reported. PMID:20536737

  14. CO2 vascular anastomosis of atherosclerotic and calcified arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John V.; Leefmans, Eric; Stewart, Gwendolyn J.; Katz, Mira L.; Comerota, Anthony J.

    1990-06-01

    The technique for CO2 laser fusion vascular anastomosis in normal vessels has been well established. Normal arterial wall has a predictable thermal response to the incident laser energy, with rapid heating and cooling of collagen within the arterial wall. Since atherosclerosis involves subendothelial cellular proliferation, lipid and calcium deposition, it may modify the thermal responsiveness of the arterial wall. To this study, CO2 laser fusion anastomoses were attempted in rabbits with non-calcific atherosclerosis and humans with calcific atherosclerosis. All anastomoses were successfully completed without alteration in technique despite the presence of plaque at the site of laser fusion. Histology of rabbit vessels revealed the classic laser fusion cap within the adventitia and persistent atherosclerotic plaque at the flow surface. Duplex imaging of patients post-operatively demonstrated long term anastomotic patency in 2 of 3 fistulae. These results suggest that neither non-calcified or calcified atherosclerosis significantly alters the arterial wall thermal responsiveness to CO2 laser energy or inhibits creation of laser fusion anastomoses. Therefore, this technique may be applicable to the treatment of patients with atherosclerotic occlusive disease.

  15. Current Trends in Heparin Use During Arterial Vascular Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Durran, Alexandra C.; Watts, Christopher

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess the current use of heparinized saline and bolus doses of heparin in non-neurological interventional radiology and to determine whether consensus could be reached to produce guidance for heparin use during arterial vascular intervention. Methods: An interactive electronic questionnaire was distributed to members of the British Society of Interventional Radiology regarding their current practice in the use, dosage, and timing of heparin boluses and heparinized flushing solutions.ResultsA total of 108 completed questionnaires were received. More than 80% of respondents used heparinized saline with varying concentrations; the most prevalent was 1,000 IU/l (international units of heparin per liter) and 5,000 IU/l. Fifty-one percent of interventionalists use 3,000 IU as their standard bolus dose; however, the respondents were split regarding the timing of bolus dose with {approx}60% administering it after arterial access is obtained and 40% after crossing the lesion. There was no consensus on altering dose according to body weight, and only 4% monitored clotting parameters. Conclusions: There seems to be some coherence among practicing interventionalists regarding heparin administration. We hypothesize that heparinized saline should be used at a recognized standard concentration of 1,000 IU/l as a flushing concentration in all arterial vascular interventions and that 3,000 IU bolus is considered the standard dose for straightforward therapeutic procedures and 5000 IU for complex, crural, and endovascular aneurysm repair work. The bolus should be given after arterial access is obtained to allow time for optimal anticoagulation to be achieved by the time of active intervention and stenting. Further research into clotting abnormalities following such interventional procedures would be an interesting quantifiable follow-up to this initial survey of opinions and practice.

  16. Calcium ion-regulated thin filaments from vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Marston, S B; Trevett, R M; Walters, M

    1980-01-01

    Myosin and actin competition tests indicated the presence of both thin-filament and myosin-linked Ca2+-regulatory systems in pig aorta and turkey gizzard smooth-muscle actomyosin. A thin-filament preparation was obtained from pig aortas. The thin filaments had no significant ATPase activity [1.1 +/- 2.6 nmol/mg per min (mean +/- S.D.)], but they activated skeletal-muscle myosin ATPase up to 25-fold [500 nmol/mg of myosin per min (mean +/- S.D.)] in the presence of 10(-4) M free Ca2+. At 10(-8) M-Ca2+ the thin filaments activated myosin ATPase activity only one-third as much. Thin-filament activation of myosin ATPase activity increased markedly in the range 10(-6)-10(-5) M-Ca2+ and was half maximal at 2.7 x 10(-6) M (pCa2+ 5.6). The skeletal myosin-aorta-thin-filament mixture gave a biphasic ATPase-rate-versus-ATP-concentration curve at 10(-8) M-Ca2+ similar to the curve obtained with skeletal-muscle thin filaments. Thin filaments bound up to 9.5 mumol of Ca2+/g in the presence of MgATP2-. In the range 0.06-27 microM-Ca2+ binding was hyperbolic with an estimated binding constant of (0.56 +/- 0.07) x 10(6) M-1 (mean +/- S.D.) and maximum binding of 8.0 +/- 0.8 mumol/g (mean +/- S.D.). Significantly less Ca2+ bound in the absence of ATP. The thin filaments contained actin, tropomyosin and several other unidentified proteins. 6 M-Urea/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis at pH 8.3 showed proteins that behaved like troponin I and troponin C. This was confirmed by forming interspecific complexes between radioactive skeletal-muscle troponin I and troponin C and the aorta thin-filament proteins. The thin filaments contained at least 1.4 mumol of a troponin C-like protein/g and at least 1.1 mumol of a troponin I-like protein/g. PMID:6446898

  17. Hypoxia differentially regulates arterial and venous smooth muscle cell proliferation via PDGFR-β and VEGFR-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Chanakira, Alice; Dutta, Raini; Charboneau, Richard; Barke, Roderick; Santilli, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite intensive research studies, theories have yet to focus on the contribution of hypoxia to patency differences observed clinically between arterial vs. venous grafts. This study investigates the differential hypoxic response of smooth muscle cells (SMC) to hypoxia-derived endothelial cell (EC) growth factors. Initiation of SMC proliferation under hypoxia (<5% O2) occurred only after incubation with hypoxic endothelial cell-conditioned media (H-ECM). After the investigation of several possible growth factors in the H-ECM that may be responsible for SMC proliferation, the greatest difference was observed in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) and platelet-derived growth factor homodimer B (PDGF-BB) expression. VEGF-A increased (2-fold) significantly (P < 0.05) in arterial-derived smooth muscle cells (ASMC) under hypoxia compared with venous-derived smooth muscle cells (VSMC), which showed no significant change. VSMC showed significant (P < 0.05) increase in VEGFR-2 expression under hypoxia compared with ASMC. Incubation with VEGFR-2-neutralizing antibody/PDGFR antagonist in VSMC before addition of H-ECM resulted in decreased proliferation. ASMC proliferation under hypoxia did not decrease during incubation with VEGFR-2-neutralizing antibody but did decrease upon PDGFR antagonist incubation. Current therapies focusing on treating intimal hyperplasia have negated the fact that combinational therapy might be required to combat induction of SMC proliferation. Clinically, therapy with PDGFR antagonists plus anti-VEGFR-2 may prove to be efficacious in managing SMC proliferation in venous-derived grafts. PMID:22159994

  18. G-Protein-Coupled Receptor 35 Mediates Human Saphenous Vein Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration and Endothelial Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    McCallum, Jennifer E.; Mackenzie, Amanda E.; Divorty, Nina; Clarke, Carolyn; Delles, Christian; Milligan, Graeme; Nicklin, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation is central to neointima formation in vein graft failure following coronary artery bypass. However, there are currently no pharmacological interventions that prevent vein graft failure through intimal occlusion. It is hence a therapeutic target. Here, we investigated the contribution of GPR35 to human VSMC and endothelial cell (EC) migration, using a scratch-wound assay, and also the contribution to proliferation, using MTS and BrdU assays, in in vitro models using recently characterized human GPR35 ortholog-selective small-molecule agonists and antagonists. Real-time PCR studies showed GPR35 to be robustly expressed in human VSMCs and ECs. Stimulation of GPR35, with either the human-selective agonist pamoic acid or the reference agonist zaprinast, promoted VSMC migration in the scratch-wound assay. These effects were blocked by coincubation with either of the human GPR35-specific antagonists, CID-2745687 or ML-145. These GPR35-mediated effects were produced by inducing alterations in the actin cytoskeleton via the Rho A/Rho kinase signaling axis. Additionally, the agonist ligands stimulated a proliferative response in ECs. These studies highlight the potential that small molecules that stimulate or block GPR35 activity can modulate vascular proliferation and migration. These data propose GPR35 as a translational therapeutic target in vascular remodeling. PMID:27064272

  19. Silencing of osterix expression by siRNA inhibits aldosterone‑induced calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yan-Chun; He, Yue; Wang, Hao; Niu, Wen-Quan; Ji, Kai-Da; Li, Hua

    2016-09-01

    The process of vascular calcification shares numerous similarities with that of skeletal mineralization and involves the deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in arteries and cardiac valves. However, the underlying cellular mechanism remains to be fully elucidated. Microarray analysis in the present study demonstrated that greater than 2,000 genes were upregulated during the calcification of murine vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), of which osterix (OSX) and integrin‑binding sialoprotein (IBSP) were the most significantly differentially expressed genes. Following the validation of increased OSX and IBSP expression by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction in calcifying murine VSMCs induced by aldosterone. Subsequent to transfection with siRNA‑OSX, results indicated that OSX may inhibit calcification of VSMCs via IBSP. It was suggested that the increased OSX expression in calcifying VSMCs may reflect the well‑established prenatal role of OSX. A full understanding of the importance of OSX in this pathological process would improve understanding of the pathogenesis of vascular calcification. PMID:27431734

  20. Decreased vascular smooth muscle cell density in medial degeneration of human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    López-Candales, A.; Holmes, D. R.; Liao, S.; Scott, M. J.; Wickline, S. A.; Thompson, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are characterized by structural deterioration of the aortic wall leading to progressive aortic dilatation and eventual rupture. The histopathological changes in AAAs are particularly evident within the elastic media, which is normally dominated by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). To determine whether a decrease in vascular SMCs contributes to medial degeneration, we measured SMC density in 21 normal and pathological human abdominal aortic tissue specimens using immunohistochemistry for alpha-SMC actin and direct cell counts (medial SMCs per high-power field (HPF)). Medial SMC density was not significantly different between normal aorta (n = 5; 199.5 +/- 14.9 SMCs/HPF) and atherosclerotic occlusive disease (n = 6; 176.4 +/- 13.9 SMCs/HPF), but it was reduced by 74% in AAA (n = 10; 50.9 +/- 6.1 SMCs/HPF; P < 0.01 versus normal aorta). Light and electron microscopy revealed no evidence of overt cellular necrosis, but SMCs in AAAs exhibited ultrastructural changes consistent with apoptosis. Using in situ end-labeling (ISEL) of fragmented DNA to detect apoptotic cells, up to 30% of aortic wall cells were ISEL positive in AAAs. By double-labeling techniques, many of these cells were alpha-actin-positive SMCs distributed throughout the degenerative media. In contrast, ISEL-positive cells were observed only within the intimal plaque in atherosclerotic occlusive disease. The amount of p53 protein detected by immunoblotting was increased nearly fourfold in AAA compared with normal aorta and atherosclerotic occlusive disease (P < 0.01), and immunoreactive p53 was localized to lymphocytes and residual SMCs in the aneurysm wall. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays a substantial amount of p53 mRNA expression was observed in AAAs. These results demonstrate that medial SMC density is significantly decreased in human AAA tissues associated with evidence of SMC apoptosis and increased production of p53, a potential

  1. Effect of Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein on the Expression of Runx2 and SPARC Genes in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Effat; Ghatreh Samani, Keihan; Hashemzadeh, Morteza; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vascular calcification is an important stage in atherosclerosis. During this stage, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) synthesize many osteogenic factors such as osteonectin (encoded by SPARC). Oxidative stress plays a critical role in atherosclerosis progression, and its accumulation in the vascular wall stimulates the development of atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. The osteonectin overexpression has been observed in the arterial wall during the course of atherosclerosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-mediated vascular calcification remains to be clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of oxLDL on the osteonectin gene expression through the Runx2 transcription factor. Methods: In this experimental study, VSMC were cultured in F-12K media and then treated with oxLDL. The expression of Runx2 and osteonectin genes was determined by real-time PCR method. Protein levels were investigated by the western blotting technique. The Runx2 gene was knocked down using siRNA in order to determine whether Runx2 regulates the osteonectin expression in VSMC induced by oxLDL. Then transfected cells were treated with oxLDL, and the expression levels of Runx2 and osteonectin were determined again. Results: oxLDL was found to increase Runx2 and osteonectin gene expression (4.8 ± 0.47- and 9.2 ± 1.96-fold, respectively) after 48 h. Western blotting analysis confirmed the induced levels of Runx2 and osteonectin proteins. However, oxLDL-induced osteonectin expression was not observed to be blocked by Runx2 knockdown. Conclusion: The up-regulation of osteonectin by oxLDL is independent of Runx2, and it may be mediated by other transcription factors. PMID:26025968

  2. Diversity of Potassium Channels in Human Umbilical Artery Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Pedro; Rebolledo, Alejandro; Palomo, Ana Rocio Roldán; Moncada, Melisa; Piccinini, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Through their control of cell membrane potential, potassium (K+) channels are among the best known regulators of vascular tone. This article discusses the expression and function of K+ channels in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs). We review the bibliographic reports and also present single-channel data recorded in freshly isolated cells. Electrophysiological properties of big conductance, voltage- and Ca2+-sensitive K+ channel and voltage-dependent K+ channels are clearly established in this vessel, where they are involved in contractile state regulation. Their role in the maintenance of membrane potential is an important control mechanism in the determination of the vessel diameter. Additionally, small conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels, 2-pore domains K+ channels and inward rectifier K+ channels also appear to be present in HUASMCs, while intermediate conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels and ATP-sensitive K+ channels could not be identified. In both cases, additional investigation is necessary to reach conclusive evidence of their expression and/or functional role in HUASMCs. Finally, we discuss the role of K+ channels in pregnancy-related pathologies like gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. PMID:24084522

  3. Increased rhythmicity in hypertensive arterial smooth muscle is linked to transient receptor potential canonical channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoping; Yang, Dachun; Ma, Shuangtao; He, Hongbo; Luo, Zhidan; Feng, Xiaoli; Cao, Tingbing; Ma, Liqun; Yan, Zhencheng; Liu, Daoyan; Tepel, Martin; Zhu, Zhiming

    2010-10-01

    Vasomotion describes oscillations of arterial vascular tone due to synchronized changes of intracellular calcium concentrations. Since increased calcium influx into vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) has been associated with variances of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels, in the present study we tested the hypothesis that increased vasomotion in hypertension is directly linked to increased TRPC expression. Using a small vessel myograph we observed significantly increased norepinephrine-induced vasomotion in mesenteric arterioles from SHR compared to normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Using immunoblottings we obtained significantly increased expression of TRPC1, TRPC3 and TRPC5 in mesenteric arterioles from SHR compared to WKY, whereas TRPC4 and TRPC6 showed no differences. Norepinephrine-induced vasomotion from SHR was significantly reduced in the presence of verapamil, SKF96365, 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane (2-APB) or gadolinium. Pre-incubation of mesenteric arterioles with anti-TRPC1 and anti-TRPC3 antibodies significantly reduced norepinephrine-induced vasomotion and calcium influx. Control experiments with pre-incubation of TRPC antibodies plus their respective antigenic peptide or in the presence of anti-β-actin antibodies or random immunoglobulins not related to TRPC channels showed no inhibitory effects of norepinephrine-induced vasomotion and calcium influx. Administration of candesartan or telmisartan, but not amlodipine to SHR for 16 weeks significantly reduced either the expression of TRPC1, TRPC3 and TRPC5 as well as norepinephrine-induced vasomotion in mesenteric arterioles. In conclusion we gave experimental evidence that the increased TRPC1, TRPC3 and TRPC5 expression in mesenteric arterioles from SHR causes increased vasomotion in hypertension. PMID:19725917

  4. miR-155-dependent regulation of mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 2 (MST2) coordinates inflammation, oxidative stress and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhan; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Yu; He, Ming; Zhang, Xin-hua; Ma, Dong; Zhang, Ruo-nan; Wu, Xiao-li; Wen, Jin-kun

    2015-07-01

    In response to vascular injury, inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell proliferation often occur simultaneously in vascular tissues. We previously observed that microRNA-155 (miR-155), which is implicated in proliferation and inflammation is involved in neointimal hyperplasia; however, the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates these processes remain largely unknown. In this study, we observed that vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and neointimal formation in wire-injured femoral arteries were reduced by the loss of miR-155 and increased by the gain of miR-155. The proliferative effect of miR-155 was also observed in cultured VSMCs. Notably, expression of the miR-155-target protein mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 2 (MST2) was increased in the injured arteries of miR-155-/- mice. miR-155 directly repressed MST2 and thus activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway by promoting an interaction between RAF proto-oncogene serine/threonine-protein kinase (Raf-1) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) and stimulating inflammatory and oxidative stress responses; together, these effects lead to VSMC proliferation and vascular remodeling. Our data reveal that MST2 mediates miR-155-promoted inflammatory and oxidative stress responses by altering the interaction of MEK with Raf-1 and MST2 in response to vascular injury. Therefore, suppression of endogenous miR-155 might be a novel therapeutic strategy for vascular injury and remodeling. PMID:25892184

  5. Tissue-Engineered Vascular Rings from Human iPSC-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Dash, Biraja C; Levi, Karen; Schwan, Jonas; Luo, Jiesi; Bartulos, Oscar; Wu, Hongwei; Qiu, Caihong; Yi, Ting; Ren, Yongming; Campbell, Stuart; Rolle, Marsha W; Qyang, Yibing

    2016-07-12

    There is an urgent need for an efficient approach to obtain a large-scale and renewable source of functional human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to establish robust, patient-specific tissue model systems for studying the pathogenesis of vascular disease, and for developing novel therapeutic interventions. Here, we have derived a large quantity of highly enriched functional VSMCs from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-VSMCs). Furthermore, we have engineered 3D tissue rings from hiPSC-VSMCs using a facile one-step cellular self-assembly approach. The tissue rings are mechanically robust and can be used for vascular tissue engineering and disease modeling of supravalvular aortic stenosis syndrome. Our method may serve as a model system, extendable to study other vascular proliferative diseases for drug screening. Thus, this report describes an exciting platform technology with broad utility for manufacturing cell-based tissues and materials for various biomedical applications. PMID:27411102

  6. Biomechanical regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell functions: from in vitro to in vivo understanding

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Juhui; Zheng, Yiming; Hu, Jianjun; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans; Deng, Xiaoyan; Fan, Yubo; Wang, Guixue

    2014-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) have critical functions in vascular diseases. Haemodynamic factors are important regulators of VSMC functions in vascular pathophysiology. VSMCs are physiologically active in the three-dimensional matrix and interact with the shear stress sensor of endothelial cells (ECs). The purpose of this review is to illustrate how haemodynamic factors regulate VSMC functions under two-dimensional conditions in vitro or three-dimensional co-culture conditions in vivo. Recent advances show that high shear stress induces VSMC apoptosis through endothelial-released nitric oxide and low shear stress upregulates VSMC proliferation and migration through platelet-derived growth factor released by ECs. This differential regulation emphasizes the need to construct more actual environments for future research on vascular diseases (such as atherosclerosis and hypertension) and cardiovascular tissue engineering. PMID:24152813

  7. Orai channel-mediated Ca2+ signals in vascular and airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Spinelli, Amy M; Trebak, Mohamed

    2016-03-15

    Orai (Orai1, Orai2, and Orai3) proteins form a family of highly Ca(2+)-selective plasma membrane channels that are regulated by stromal-interacting molecules (STIM1 and STIM2); STIM proteins are Ca(2+) sensors located in the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum. STIM and Orai proteins are expressed in vascular and airway smooth muscle and constitute the molecular components of the ubiquitous store-operated Ca(2+) entry pathway that mediate the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) current. STIM/Orai proteins also encode store-independent Ca(2+) entry pathways in smooth muscle. Altered expression and function of STIM/Orai proteins have been linked to vascular and airway pathologies, including restenosis, hypertension, and atopic asthma. In this review we discuss our current understanding of Orai proteins and the store-dependent and -independent signaling pathways mediated by these proteins in vascular and airway smooth muscle. We also discuss the current studies linking altered expression and function of Orai proteins with smooth muscle-related pathologies. PMID:26718630

  8. Phospholipase D signaling in serotonin-induced mitogenesis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Fanburg, B L

    2008-09-01

    We have previously reported the participation of mitogen-activated protein, Rho, and phosphoinositide-3 (PI3) kinases in separate pathways in serotonin (5-HT)-induced proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In this study, we investigated the possible participation of phospholipase D (PLD) and phosphatidic acid (PA) in this growth process. 5-HT stimulated a time-dependent increase in [(3)H]phosphatidylbutanol and PA generation. Exposure of SMCs to 1-butanol or overexpression of an inactive mutant of human PLD1R898R blocked 5-HT-induced proliferation. Furthermore, 1-butanol inhibited 5-HT activation of S6K1 and S6 protein, downstream effectors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), by 80 and 72%, respectively, and partially blocked activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by 30% but had no effect on other associated signaling pathways. Exogenous PA caused cellular proliferation and revitalized cyclin D1 expression by 5-HT of the 1-butanol-treated cells. PA also reproduced activations by 5-HT of mTOR, S6K1, and ERK. Transfection with inactive human PLD1 reduced 5-HT-induced activation of S6K1 by approximately 50%. Inhibition of 5-HT receptor 2A (R 2A) with ketaserin blocked PLD activation by 5-HT. Inhibition with PI3-kinase inhibitor failed to block either activation of PLD by 5-HT or PA-dependent S6K1 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that ligation of the 5-HTR 2A by 5-HT initiates PLD activation in SMCs, and that its product, PA, is an early signaling molecule in 5-HT-induced pulmonary artery SMC proliferation. Signaling by PA produces its downstream effects primarily through the mTOR/S6K1 pathway and to a lesser extent through the ERK pathway. Hydrolysis of cell membrane lipid may be important in vascular effects of 5-HT. PMID:18621911

  9. Maturation of intracellular calcium homeostasis in sheep pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ravi; Creel, Kara D; Chavis, Erica; Smith, Gregory D; Longo, Lawrence D; Wilson, Sean M

    2008-11-01

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling dynamics are important to pulmonary arterial reactivity, and alterations are implicated in pulmonary vascular disorders. Yet, adaptations in cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signaling with maturation from fetal to adult life in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) are not known. The present study tested the hypothesis that cytosolic Ca(2+) homeostasis and receptor-generated Ca(2+) signaling adapt with maturation in sheep PASMCs. Digitalized fluorescence microscopy was performed using isolated PASMCs from fetal and adult sheep that were loaded with the Ca(2+) indicator fura 2. The results show that basal cytosolic and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) levels are attained before birth. Similarly, Ca(2+) efflux pathways from the cytosol and basal as well as capacitative Ca(2+) entry (CCE) are also developed before birth. However, receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signaling adapts with maturation. Prominently, serotonin stimulation elicited Ca(2+) elevations in very few fetal compared with adult PASMCs; in contrast, phenylephrine elevated Ca(2+) in a similar percentage of fetal and adult PASMCs. Serotonin and phenylephrine elicited Ca(2+) increases of a similar magnitude in reactive cells of fetus and adult, supporting the assertion that inositol trisphosphate signaling is intact. Caffeine and ATP elevated Ca(2+) in equivalent numbers of fetal and adult PASMCs. However, the caffeine-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) increase was significantly greater in fetal PASMCs, whereas the ATP-elicited increase was greater in adult cells. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate selective adaptations in receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signaling, but not in cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. PMID:18776056

  10. Electrospun elastin-like polypeptide enriched polyurethanes and their interactions with vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Blit, Patrick H; Battiston, Kyle G; Yang, Meilin; Paul Santerre, J; Woodhouse, Kimberly A

    2012-07-01

    In vascular tissue, elastin is an essential extracellular matrix protein that plays an important biomechanical and biological signalling role. Native elastin is insoluble and is difficult to extract from tissues, which results in its relatively rare use for the fabrication of vascular tissue engineering scaffolds. Recombinant elastin-like polypeptide-4 (ELP4), which mimics the structure and function of native tropoelastin, represents a practical alternative to the native elastic fibre for vascular applications. In this study, electrospinning was utilized to fabricate fibrous scaffolds which were subsequently surface modified with ELP4 and used as substrates for smooth muscle cell culture. ELP4 surface modified materials demonstrated enhanced smooth muscle cell (SMC) adhesion and maintenance of cell numbers over a 1-week period relative to controls. SMCs seeded on the ELP4 surface modified materials were also shown to exhibit the cell morphology and biological markers of a contractile phenotype including a spindle-like morphology, actin filament organization and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain expression. Competitive inhibition experiments demonstrated that the elastin-laminin cell surface receptor and its affinity for the VGVAPG peptide sequence on ELP4 molecules are likely involved in the initial SMC contact with the ELP4 modified materials. Elastin-like polypeptides show promise as surface modifiers for candidate scaffolds for engineering contractile vascular tissues. PMID:22459513

  11. Pharmacological neutropenia prevents endothelial dysfunction but not smooth muscle functions impairment induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Pétrault, Olivier; Ouk, Thavarak; Gautier, Sophie; Laprais, Maud; Gelé, Patrick; Bastide, Michèle; Bordet, Régis

    2005-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) activation and mobilization observed in acute cerebral infarction contribute to the brain tissue damage, but PMN could also be involved in postischemic functional injury of ischemied blood vessel. This study was undertaken to investigate whether pharmacological neutropenia could modify the postischemic endothelial dysfunction in comparison to smooth muscle whose impairment is likely more related to reperfusion and oxidative stress. A cerebral ischemia–reperfusion by endoluminal occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (MCA) was performed 4 days after intravenous administration of vinblastine or 12 h after RP-3 anti-rat neutrophils monoclonal antibody (mAb RP-3) injection into the peritoneal cavity, on male Wistar rats with 1-h ischemia then followed by 24-h reperfusion period. Brain infarct volume was measured by histomorphometric analysis and vascular endothelial and smooth muscle reactivity of MCA was analysed using Halpern myograph. Neutropenia induced a neuroprotective effect as demonstrated by a significant decrease of brain infarct size. In parallel to neuroprotection, neutropenia prevented postischemic impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxing response to acetylcholine. In contrast, smooth muscle functional alterations were not prevented by neutropenia. Ischemia–reperfusion-induced myogenic tone impairment remained unchanged in vinblastine and mAb RP-3-treated rats. Postischemic Kir2.x-dependent relaxation impairment was not prevented in neutropenic conditions. The fully relaxation of smooth muscle response to sodium nitroprusside was similar in all groups. Our results evidenced the dissociate prevention of pharmacologically induced neutropenia on postischemic vascular endothelial and smooth muscle impairment. The selective endothelial protection by neutropenia is parallel to a neuroprotective effect suggesting a possible relationship between the two phenomena. PMID:15700030

  12. Adult human arterial smooth muscle cells in primary culture. Modulation from contractile to synthetic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Thyberg, J; Nilsson, J; Palmberg, L; Sjölund, M

    1985-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells were isolated enzymatically from adult human arteries, grown in primary culture in medium containing 10% whole blood serum, and studied by transmission electron microscopy and [3H]thymidine autoradiography. In the intact arterial wall and directly after isolation, each smooth muscle cell had a nucleus with a wide peripheral zone of condensed chromatin and a cytoplasm dominated by myofilament bundles with associated dense bodies. After 1-2 days of culture, the cells had attached to the substrate and started to spread out. At the same time, a characteristic fine-structural modification took place. It included nuclear enlargement, dispersion of the chromatin and formation of large nucleoli. Moreover, myofilament bundles disappeared and an extensive rough endoplasmic reticulum and a large Golgi complex were organized in the cytoplasm. This morphological transformation of the cells was completed in 3-4 days. It was accompanied by initiation of DNA replication and mitosis. The observations demonstrate that adult human arterial smooth muscle cells, when cultivated in vitro, pass through a phenotypic modulation of the same type as arterial smooth muscle cells from experimental animals. This modulation gives the cells morphological and functional properties resembling those of the modified smooth muscle cells found in fibroproliferative lesions of atherosclerosis. Further studies of the regulation of smooth muscle phenotype and growth may provide important clues for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:3967287

  13. Regulation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Phenotype in Three-Dimensional Coculture System by Jagged1-Selective Notch3 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Aparna; Lin, Shigang; Sandig, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The modulation of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotype is an essential element to fabricate engineered conduits of clinical relevance. In vivo, owing to their close proximity, endothelial cells (ECs) play a role in VSMC phenotype switching. Although considerable progress has been made in vascular tissue engineering, significant knowledge gaps exist on how the contractile VSMC phenotype is induced at the conclusion of the tissue fabrication process. The objectives of this study were as follows: (1) to establish ligand presentation modes on transcriptional activation of VSMC-specific genes, (2) to develop a three-dimensional (3D) coculture model using human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) and human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) on porous synthetic scaffolds and, (3) to investigate EC-mediated Notch signaling in 3D cultures and the induction of the HCASMC contractile phenotype. Whereas transcriptional activation of VSMC-specific genes was not induced by presenting soluble Jagged1 and Jagged1 bound to protein G beads, a direct link between HCAEC-bound Jagged1 and HCASMC differentiation genes was observed. Our 3D culture results showed that HCASMCs seeded to scaffolds and cultured for up to 16 days readily attached, infiltrated the scaffold, proliferated, and formed dense confluent layers. HCAECs, seeded on top of an HCASMC layer, formed a distinct, separate monolayer with cell-type partitioning, suggesting that HCAEC growth was contact inhibited. While we observed EC monolayer formation with 200,000 HCAECs/scaffold, seeding 400,000 HCAECs/scaffold revealed the formation of cord-like structures akin to angiogenesis. Western blot analyses showed that 3D coculture induced an upregulation of Notch3 receptor in HCASMCs and its ligand Jagged1 in HCAECs. This was accompanied by a corresponding induction of the contractile HCASMC phenotype as demonstrated by increased expression of smooth muscle-α-actin (SM-α-actin) and calponin. Knockdown

  14. UAP56 is an important mediator of Angiotensin II/platelet derived growth factor induced vascular smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Sahni, Abha; Wang, Nadan; Alexis, Jeffrey

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Knockdown of UAP56 inhibits Angiotensin II/PDGF induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. ► UAP56 is a positive regulator of E2F transcriptional activation. ► UAP56 is present in the vessel wall of low flow carotid arteries. -- Abstract: Angiotensin (Ang) II and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are important mediators of pathologic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. Identifying downstream mediators of Ang II and PDGF signaling may provide insights for therapies to improve vascular proliferative diseases. We have previously demonstrated that breakpoint cluster region (Bcr) is an important mediator of Ang II/PDGF signaling in VSMC. We have recently reported that the DExD/H box protein UAP56 is an interacting partner of Bcr in regulating VSMC DNA synthesis. We hypothesized that UAP56 itself is an important regulator of VSMC proliferation. In this report we demonstrate that knockdown of UAP56 inhibits Ang II/PDGF induced VSMC DNA synthesis and proliferation, and inhibits E2F transcriptional activity. In addition, we demonstrate that UAP56 is present in the vessel wall of low-flow carotid arteries. These findings suggest that UAP56 is a regulator of VSMC proliferation and identify UAP56 as a target for preventing vascular proliferative disease.

  15. Effect of urea and osmotic cell shrinkage on Ca2+ entry and contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, C A; Huber, S M; Wärntges, S; Zempel, G; Kaba, N K; Fux, R; Orth, N; Busch, G L; Waldegger, S; Lambert, I; Nilius, B; Heinle, H; Lang, F

    2000-06-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the effects of urea on vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). Addition of urea (20, 50, 100 mM) to physiological salt solution blunted the vasoconstrictory effect of phenylephrine (by 17, 25 and 30%, respectively) and of an increased extracellular K+ concentration (by 7, 14 and 19%, respectively) without affecting the basal tone of rabbit arterial rings. According to Fura-2 fluorescence in cultured SMC (A7r5), urea had no effect on basal intracellular calcium activity ([Ca2+]i), but significantly blunted the increase of [Ca2+]i following an increase of extracellular K+. Whole-cell patch-clamp studies revealed that the Ca2+ current through voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels is significantly inhibited in the presence of urea. As evident from calcein fluorescence, addition of urea leads to sustained cell shrinkage. The effects of urea on vascular tone, [Ca2+]i activity, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and cell volume are mimicked by addition of raffinose or NaCl. However, the cell shrinkage induced by urea is sustained, whereas the addition of equiosmolar NaCl is only transient and followed by a regulatory cell volume increase. Moreover, hypertonic NaCl increases, whereas urea decreases, the transcription of cell-volume-regulated kinase hsgk. In conclusion, urea leads to sustained shrinkage of vascular smooth muscle cells, which is followed by inhibition of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, a decrease of [Ca2+]i and thus blunts the vasoconstrictory action of phenylephrine and increased extracellular K+ concentration. PMID:10898530

  16. Overexpression of Mitofusin 2 inhibited oxidized low-density lipoprotein induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and reduced atherosclerotic lesion formation in rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Yanhong; Chen Kuanghueih; Gao Wei; Li Qian; Chen Li; Wang Guisong Tang Jian

    2007-11-16

    Our previous studies have implies that Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), which was progressively reduced in arteries from ApoE{sup -/-} mice during the development of atherosclerosis, may take part in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, we found that overexpression of Mfn2 inhibited oxidized low-density lipoprotein or serum induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by down-regulation of Akt and ERK phosphorylation. Then we investigated the in vivo role of Mfn2 on the development of atherosclerosis in rabbits using adenovirus expressing Mitofusin 2 gene (AdMfn2). By morphometric analysis we found overexpression of Mfn2 inhibited atherosclerotic lesion formation and intima/media ratio by 66.7% and 74.6%, respectively, compared with control group. These results suggest that local Mfn2 treatment suppresses the development of atherosclerosis in vivo in part by attenuating the smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by lipid deposition and vascular injury.

  17. Transmembrane Protein 184A Is a Receptor Required for Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Responses to Heparin.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Raymond J; Slee, Joshua B; Farwell, Sara Lynn N; Li, Yaqiu; Barthol, Trista; Patton, Walter A; Lowe-Krentz, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Vascular cell responses to exogenous heparin have been documented to include decreased vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation following decreased ERK pathway signaling. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which heparin interacts with cells to induce those responses has remained unclear. Previously characterized monoclonal antibodies that block heparin binding to vascular cells have been found to mimic heparin effects. In this study, those antibodies were employed to isolate a heparin binding protein. MALDI mass spectrometry data provide evidence that the protein isolated is transmembrane protein 184A (TMEM184A). Commercial antibodies against three separate regions of the TMEM184A human protein were used to identify the TMEM184A protein in vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. A GFP-TMEM184A construct was employed to determine colocalization with heparin after endocytosis. Knockdown of TMEM184A eliminated the physiological responses to heparin, including effects on ERK pathway activity and BrdU incorporation. Isolated GFP-TMEM184A binds heparin, and overexpression results in additional heparin uptake. Together, these data support the identification of TMEM184A as a heparin receptor in vascular cells. PMID:26769966

  18. Characterization of Evolving Biomechanical Properties of Tissue Engineered Vascular Grafts in the Arterial Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Udelsman, Brooks V.; Khosravi, Ramak; Miller, Kristin S.; Dean, Ethan W.; Bersi, Matthew R.; Rocco, Kevin; Yi, Tai; Humphrey, Jay D.; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    We used a murine model to assess the evolving biomechanical properties of tissue engineered vascular grafts (TEVGs) implanted in the arterial circulation. The initial polymeric tubular scaffold was fabricated from (poly)lactic acid (PLA) and coated with a 50:50 copolymer of (poly)caprolactone and (poly)lactic acid (P[PC/LA]). Following seeding with syngeneic bone marrow derived mononuclear cells, the TEVGs (n=50) were implanted as aortic interposition grafts in wild-type mice and monitored serially using ultrasound. A custom biaxial mechanical testing device was used to quantify in vitro the circumferential and axial mechanical properties of grafts explanted at 3 or 7 months. At both times, the TEVGs were much stiffer than native tissue in both directions. Repeat mechanical testing of some TEVGs treated with elastase or collagenase suggested that elastin did not contribute significantly to the overall stiffness whereas collagen did contribute. Traditional histology and immunostaining revealed smooth muscle cell layers, significant collagen deposition, and increasing elastin production in addition to considerable scaffold at both 3 and 7 months, which likely dominated the high stiffness seen in mechanical testing. These results suggest that PLA has inadequate in vivo degradation, which impairs cell-mediated development of vascular neotissue having properties closer to native arteries. Assessing contributions of individual components, such as elastin and collagen, to the developing neovessel is needed to guide computational modeling that may help to optimize the design of the TEVG. PMID:24702863

  19. Emerging roles for vascular smooth muscle cell exosomes in calcification and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, A N; Shanahan, C M

    2016-06-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotypic conversion from a contractile to 'synthetic' state contributes to vascular pathologies including restenosis, atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. We have recently found that the secretion of exosomes is a feature of 'synthetic' VSMCs and that exosomes are novel players in vascular repair processes as well as pathological vascular thrombosis and calcification. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors as well as mineral imbalance stimulate exosome secretion by VSMCs, most likely by the activation of sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (SMPD3) and cytoskeletal remodelling. Calcium stress induces dramatic changes in VSMC exosome composition and accumulation of phosphatidylserine (PS), annexin A6 and matrix metalloproteinase-2, which converts exosomes into a nidus for calcification. In addition, by presenting PS, VSMC exosomes can also provide the catalytic surface for the activation of coagulation factors. Recent data showing that VSMC exosomes are loaded with proteins and miRNA regulating cell adhesion and migration highlight VSMC exosomes as potentially important communication messengers in vascular repair. Thus, the identification of signalling pathways regulating VSMC exosome secretion, including activation of SMPD3 and cytoskeletal rearrangements, opens up novel avenues for a deeper understanding of vascular remodelling processes. PMID:26864864

  20. Influences on vascular wall smooth muscle cells with novel short-duration thermal angioplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunio, M.; Shimazaki, N.; Arai, T.; Sakurada, M.

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the influences on smooth muscle cells after our novel short-duration thermal angioplasty, Photo-thermo Dynamic Balloon Angioplasty (PTDBA), to reveal the mechanism that can suppress neo-intimal hyperplasia after PTDBA. We obtained the sufficient arterial dilatations by short-duration heating (<=15 s, <70°C) and low dilatation pressure (<0.4 MPa) without arterial injuries in our previous in vivo studies. Smooth muscle cells, which play most important role in chronic treatment effects, were heated during PTDBA and stretch-fixed after PTDBA. The dead cell rate by heating, estimated by Arrhenius equation with A=2.5x1016 s-1 and Ea=1.17×105 J mol-1, was 15.7+/-2.2% after PTDBA. The measured deformation rate of smooth muscle cells' nuclei was 1.6+/-0.1 after PTDBA in vivo. We found that the expression of smooth muscle cells' growth factor after PTDBA was inhibited 0.52 fold compared to that after the conventional balloon angioplasty in vivo. The measured neo-intimal hyperplasia occupancy rate was less than 20% after PTDBA in vivo. We prospect that the inhibition of the growth factor's expression by stretch-fixing may result to suppress the neo-intimal hyperplasia. In addition, the decrease of smooth muscle cells' density in the vessel media by heating might be another reason for the neo-intimal hyperplasia suppression.

  1. The role of vascular capacitance in the coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Chambers, D E; Akizuki, S; Downey, J M

    1984-12-01

    When the left coronary artery was perfused with nonpulsatile pressure, the onset of diastole was accompanied by a capacitance overshoot in flow with an exponential decay back to a steady state. Time constant for that decay ranged from 55 msec when tone was present to 105 msec with maximal dilation. Since the transient resulted from a fall in tissue pressure, this represents an estimation of intramural arterial capacitance only. Transients in perfusion pressure, which would also affect epicardial arteries, yielded similar time constants. We concluded that most of the coronary capacitance resides in the small intramural vessels. Analysis of transients yielded a value for capacitance of between 0.01 and 0.05 ml/mm Hg per 100 g. We then used the data from the transients to construct coronary pressure flow curves which were free of any back flow from capacitance. When coronary tone was present, the curves indicated that flow ceased at 30 mm Hg. With maximal dilation, flow ceased at only 18 mm Hg. Long diastoles in those same hearts indicated that flow ceased at about 10 mm Hg higher pressure. Although capacitance causes critical closing pressure as determined by a long diastole to be artifactually high, critical closing pressure is still appreciable in the heart, and tone dependent. Finally, three computer models were built, one of which included only small vessel capacitances, the second, only vascular waterfalls, and the third, both of the above. Only model 3 was capable of reproducing the flow patterns which were actually seen. PMID:6499131

  2. Major and minor arterial malformations in patients with cutaneous vascular abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Castroviejo, Ignacio; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel I; Viaño, Juan; López-Gutierrez, Juan C; Palencia, Rafael

    2010-05-01

    The association of persistent embryonic arteries and the absence of 1 carotid or vertebral arteries with facial or neck hemangioma or vascular malformation have been frequently described. The abnormalities can involve major or minor vessels. Of 22 patients of our series with this neurocutaneous syndrome, 20 had the origin of both anterior cerebral arteries from the same internal carotid artery. Thirteen patients showed absence or hypoplasia of 1 carotid artery and 10 of 1 vertebral artery; 10 showed persistence of the trigeminal artery; 3 had persistent proatlantal artery; 6 showed the absence of the posterior communicating artery; and 4 had hypoplastic posterior cerebral artery. Other less frequent abnormalities were found in 7 patients. Intellectual level of most patients was either borderline or below normal. Abnormalities in the vascularization and perfusion of the frontal lobes may contribute to the borderline or lower mental level of these patients. PMID:19808986

  3. Arterial grafts exhibiting unprecedented cellular infiltration and remodeling in vivo: the role of cells in the vascular wall

    PubMed Central

    Row, Sindhu; Peng, Haofan; Schlaich, Evan M.; Koenigsknecht, Carmon; Andreadis, Stelios T.; Swartz, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To engineer and implant vascular grafts in the arterial circulation of a pre-clinical animal model and assess the role of donor medial cells in graft remodeling and function. Approach and results Vascular grafts were engineered using Small Intestinal Submucosa (SIS)-fibrin hybrid scaffold and implanted interpositionally into the arterial circulation of an ovine model. We sought to demonstrate implantability of SIS-Fibrin based grafts; examine the remodeling; and determine whether the presence of vascular cells in the medial wall was necessary for cellular infiltration from the host and successful remodeling of the implants. We observed no occlusions or anastomotic complications in 18 animals that received these grafts. Notably, the grafts exhibited unprecedented levels of host cell infiltration that was not limited to the anastomotic sites but occurred through the lumen as well as the extramural side, leading to uniform cell distribution. Incoming cells remodeled the extracellular matrix and matured into functional smooth muscle cells as evidenced by expression of myogenic markers and development of vascular reactivity. Interestingly, tracking the donor cells revealed that their presence was beneficial but not necessary for successful grafting. Indeed, the proliferation rate and number of donor cells decreased over time as the vascular wall was dominated by host cells leading to significant remodeling and development of contractile function. Conclusions These results demonstrate that SIS-Fibrin grafts can be successfully implanted into the arterial circulation of a clinically relevant animal model, improve our understanding of vascular graft remodeling and raise the possibility of engineering mural cell-free arterial grafts. PMID:25736502

  4. Gelatinases promote calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells by up-regulating bone morphogenetic protein-2.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong-Gang; Meng, Fan-Xing; Li, Bing-Wei; Sheng, You-Ming; Liu, Ming-Ming; Wang, Bing; Li, Hong-Wei; Xiu, Rui-Juan

    2016-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), also known as gelatinase A, is involved in vascular calcification. Another member of gelatinases is MMP-9 (gelatinase B). However, the role of gelatinases in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification is not well understood. The current study aims to clarify the relationship between gelatinases and vascular calcification and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Beta-glycerophosphate (β-GP) was used to induce calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) with or without 2-[[(4-Phenoxyphenyl)sulfonyl]methyl]-thiirane (SB-3CT), a specific gelatinases inhibitor. Levels of calcification were determined by assessing calcium content and calcification area of VSMCs. Phenotype transition of VSMCs was observed by assessing expressions of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), smooth muscle α-actin (SM-α-actin) and desmin. Gelatin zymography was applied to determine the activities of gelatinases, and western blot was applied to determine expressions of gelatinases, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and msh homeobox homolog 2 (Msx-2). Gelatinases inhibition by SB-3CT alleviated calcification and phenotype transition of VSMCs induced by β-GP. Increased gelatinases expression and active MMP-2 were observed in calcifying VSMCs. Gelatinases inhibition reduced expression of RUNX2, Msx-2 and BMP-2. BMP-2 treatment increased expressions of RUNX2 and Msx-2, while noggin, an antagonist of BMP-2, decreased expressions of RUNX2 and Msx-2. Gelatinases promote vascular calcification by upregulating BMP-2 which induces expression of RUNX2 and Msx-2, two proteins associated with phenotype transition of VSMCs in vascular calcification. Interventions targeting gelatinases inhibition might be a proper candidate for ameliorating vascular calcification. PMID:26797522

  5. Generation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Patsch, Christoph; Challet-Meylan, Ludivine; Thoma, Eva C.; Urich, Eduard; Heckel, Tobias; O’Sullivan, John F; Grainger, Stephanie J; Kapp, Friedrich G.; Sun, Lin; Christensen, Klaus; Xia, Yulei; Florido, Mary H. C.; He, Wei; Pan, Wei; Prummer, Michael; Warren, Curtis R.; Jakob-Roetne, Roland; Certa, Ulrich; Jagasia, Ravi; Freskgård, Per-Ola; Adatto, Isaac; Kling, Dorothee; Huang, Paul; Zon, Leonard I; Chaikof, Elliot L.; Gerszten, Robert E.; Graf, Martin; Iacone, Roberto; Cowan, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells for in vitro disease modeling and clinical applications requires protocols that convert these cells into relevant adult cell types. Here, we report the rapid and efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. We found that GSK3 inhibition and BMP4 treatment rapidly committed pluripotent cells to a mesodermal fate and subsequent exposure to VEGF or PDGF-BB resulted in the differentiation of either endothelial or vascular smooth muscle cells, respectively. Both protocols produced mature cells with efficiencies over 80% within six days. Upon purification to 99% via surface markers, endothelial cells maintained their identity, as assessed by marker gene expression, and showed relevant in vitro and in vivo functionality. Global transcriptional and metabolomic analyses confirmed that the cells closely resembled their in vivo counterparts. Our results suggest that these cells could be used to faithfully model human disease. PMID:26214132

  6. Generation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Patsch, Christoph; Challet-Meylan, Ludivine; Thoma, Eva C; Urich, Eduard; Heckel, Tobias; O'Sullivan, John F; Grainger, Stephanie J; Kapp, Friedrich G; Sun, Lin; Christensen, Klaus; Xia, Yulei; Florido, Mary H C; He, Wei; Pan, Wei; Prummer, Michael; Warren, Curtis R; Jakob-Roetne, Roland; Certa, Ulrich; Jagasia, Ravi; Freskgård, Per-Ola; Adatto, Isaac; Kling, Dorothee; Huang, Paul; Zon, Leonard I; Chaikof, Elliot L; Gerszten, Robert E; Graf, Martin; Iacone, Roberto; Cowan, Chad A

    2015-08-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells for in vitro disease modelling and clinical applications requires protocols that convert these cells into relevant adult cell types. Here, we report the rapid and efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. We found that GSK3 inhibition and BMP4 treatment rapidly committed pluripotent cells to a mesodermal fate and subsequent exposure to VEGF-A or PDGF-BB resulted in the differentiation of either endothelial or vascular smooth muscle cells, respectively. Both protocols produced mature cells with efficiencies exceeding 80% within six days. On purification to 99% via surface markers, endothelial cells maintained their identity, as assessed by marker gene expression, and showed relevant in vitro and in vivo functionality. Global transcriptional and metabolomic analyses confirmed that the cells closely resembled their in vivo counterparts. Our results suggest that these cells could be used to faithfully model human disease. PMID:26214132

  7. Development of advanced pulmonary vascular disease in D-transposition of the great arteries after the neonatal arterial switch operation.

    PubMed Central

    Rivenes, S M; Grifka, R G; Feltes, T F

    1998-01-01

    We report the case of a neonate with D-transposition of the great arteries who, after undergoing an uneventful arterial switch operation at the age of 4 days, was found at the age of 42 months to have developed advanced pulmonary vascular disease. Because the arterial switch operation was performed when our patient was only 4 days old, this case challenges the hypothesis that postnatal hemodynamics alone dictate the development of advanced pulmonary vascular disease in infants and children with transposition of the great arteries. Images PMID:9782561

  8. Hypertonic upregulation of amino acid transport system A in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, J G; Klus, L R; Steenbergen, D K; Kempson, S A

    1994-08-01

    The A10 line of vascular smooth muscle cells has Na+ dependent transport systems for alanine, proline, and Pi, whereas uptake of leucine, myo-inositol and D-glucose is Na+ independent. When A10 cells were incubated for 4 h in medium made hypertonic by addition of sucrose, there was a marked increase in Na(+)-dependent transport of alanine and proline but no change in Na(+)-dependent Pi uptake or Na(+)-independent uptake of leucine and inositol. Intracellular alanine content was increased 61% by the hypertonic treatment. Other nonpenetrating solutes, such as cellobiose and mannitol, reproduced the effect of sucrose, but urea, a penetrating solute, did not. Studies with 2-(methylamino)-isobutyric acid revealed that the upregulation by hypertonicity involved only system A. Increases in alanine and proline uptake also occurred after incubating the cells in isotonic medium containing 0.1 mM ouabain, suggesting that an increase in intracellular Na+ may be part of the intracellular signal for upregulation of system A. Hypertonic upregulation of Na(+)-dependent alanine transport occurred also in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells. The response was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, indicating that gene transcription and protein synthesis play important roles in the mechanism leading to increased alanine uptake. We conclude that vascular smooth muscle cells, during prolonged hypertonic stress, activate system A and accumulate specific neutral amino acids which may act as organic osmolytes to help maintain normal cell volume. PMID:8074188

  9. Pharmacological evidence for a novel cysteinyl-leukotriene receptor subtype in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Walch, Laurence; Norel, Xavier; Bäck, Magnus; Gascard, Jean-Pierre; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Brink, Charles

    2002-01-01

    To characterize the cysteinyl-leukotriene receptors (CysLT receptors) in isolated human pulmonary arteries, ring preparations were contracted with leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and leukotriene D4 (LTD4) in either the absence or presence of the selective CysLT1 receptor antagonists, ICI 198615, MK 571 or the dual CysLT1/CysLT2 receptor antagonist, BAY u9773. Since the contractions induced by the cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cysLTs) in intact preparations failed to attain a plateau response over the concentration range studied, the endothelium was removed and the tissue treated continuously with indomethacin (Rubbed+INDO). In these latter preparations, the pEC50 for LTC4 and LTD4 were not significantly different (7.61±0.07, n=20 and 7.96±0.09, n=22, respectively). However, the LTC4 and LTD4 contractions were markedly potentiated when compared with data from intact tissues. Leukotriene E4 (LTE4) did not contract human isolated pulmonary arterial preparations. In addition, treatment of preparations with LTE4 (1 μM; 30 min) did not modify either the LTC4 or LTD4 contractions. Treatment of preparations with the S-conjugated glutathione (S-hexyl-GSH; 100 μM, 30 min), an inhibitor of the metabolism of LTC4 to LTD4, did not modify LTC4 contractions. The pEC50 values for LTC4 were significantly reduced by treatment of the preparations with either ICI 198615, MK 571 or BAY u9773 and the pKB values were: 7.20, 7.02 and 6.26, respectively. In contrast, these antagonists did not modify the LTD4 pEC50 values. These findings suggest the presence of two CysLT receptors on human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle. A CysLT1 receptor with a low affinity for CysLT1 antagonists and a novel CysLT receptor subtype, both responsible for vasoconstriction. Activation of this latter receptor by LTC4 and LTD4 induced a contractile response which was resistant to the selective CysLT1 antagonists (ICI 198615 and MK 571) as well as the non-selective (CysLT1/CysLT2) antagonist, BAY u9773. PMID

  10. Smooth Muscle-Alpha Actin Inhibits Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration by Inhibiting Rac1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lihua; DeWispelaere, Allison; Dastvan, Frank; Osborne, William R. A.; Blechner, Christine; Windhorst, Sabine; Daum, Guenter

    2016-01-01

    Smooth muscle alpha-actin (SMA) is a marker for the contractile, non-proliferative phenotype of adult smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Upon arterial injury, expression of SMA and other structural proteins decreases and SMCs acquire a pro-migratory and proliferative phenotype. To what extent SMA regulates migration and proliferation of SMCs is unclear and putative signaling pathways involved remain to be elucidated. Here, we used lentiviral-mediated gene transfer and siRNA technology to manipulate expression of SMA in carotid mouse SMCs and studied effects of SMA. Overexpression of SMA results in decreased proliferation and migration and blunts serum-induced activation of the small GTPase Rac, but not RhoA. All inhibitory effects of SMA are rescued by expression of a constitutively active Rac1 mutant (V12rac1). Moreover, reduction of SMA expression by siRNA technology results in an increased activation of Rac. Taken together, this study identifies Rac1 as a downstream target for SMA to inhibit SMC proliferation and migration. PMID:27176050

  11. Vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation from human stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Sarah K; Husain, Mansoor

    2016-05-15

    Transplantation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a promising cellular therapy to promote angiogenesis and wound healing. However, VSMCs are derived from diverse embryonic sources which may influence their role in the development of vascular disease and in its therapeutic modulation. Despite progress in understanding the mechanisms of VSMC differentiation, there remains a shortage of robust methods for generating lineage-specific VSMCs from pluripotent and adult stem/progenitor cells in serum-free conditions. Here we describe a method for differentiating pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as skin-derived precursors, into lateral plate-derived VSMCs including 'coronary-like' VSMCs and neural crest-derived VSMC, respectively. We believe this approach will have broad applications in modeling origin-specific disease vulnerability and in developing personalized cell-based vascular grafts for regenerative medicine. PMID:26678794

  12. Photodynamic therapy of contractile arterial smooth muscle cells in vivo using aluminium disulphonated phthalocyanine: implications for angioplasty-induced intimal hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamekye, Isaac; McEwan, Jean R.; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Bishop, Christopher C. R.; Bown, Stephen G.

    1994-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of proliferative vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) reduces intimal hyperplasia. We asses the effects of PDT on contractile SMC In normal arteries using aluminum disulphonated phthalocyanine (AlS2Pc) sensitization. Rats sensitized with intravenous AlS2Pc underwent carotid artery fluorescence measurement. More rats had carotid artery irradiation with different laser energies 30 minutes after sensitization with AlS2Pc 5.0 mg/kg and sacrificed at 3 days. Additional rats were irradiated with 50 J/cm2 after sensitization with different AlS2Pc doses and sacrificed at 3 and 14 days. Histological analysis was by light microscopy. Rats treated with PDT and sacrificed at 3 and 6 months were also analyzed. The results show AlS2Pc induced high and dose dependent fluorescence within the arterial media. All PDT light doses (50 - 250 J/cm2) produced arterial SMC depletion. In contrast, PDT sensitizer doses produced complete cell depletion only at high doses of AlS2Pc. These treated arteries were acellular after 3 days. At 14 days the media remained acellular but the endothelial lining regenerated. The arterial media remained acellular even at 6 months -- however, no hemorrhage, thrombosis or aneurysm formation was seen. Arterial PDT causes media contractile SMC depletion in vivo and the artery retains its structural and functional integrity.

  13. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome presenting as rapidly progressive multiple arterial aneurysms and dissections.

    PubMed

    Mortani Barbosa, Eduardo J; Pyeritz, Reed E; Litt, Harold; Desjardins, Benoit

    2011-12-01

    Life expectancy in vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is shortened due to spontaneous rupture of arteries, the colon and the gravid uterus. Two adolescent males with vascular EDS illustrate rapid progression of arterial aneurysms, dissections, and rupture. Radiologic imaging played an important role in initially diagnosing and monitoring the evolution of arterial involvement. Both prophylactic and emergency management remain largely ineffective in this connective tissue disorder; however, noninvasive imaging may provide important prognostic information. PMID:22065459

  14. Effects of Gingko biloba extract (EGb 761) on vascular smooth muscle cell calcification induced by β-glycerophosphate.

    PubMed

    Li, En-Gang; Tian, Jun; Xu, Zhong-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of Gingko biloba extract (EGb 761) on calcification induced by β-glycerophosphate in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. Methods Rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells were cultured with various concentrations of EGb 761 and β-glycerophosphate for 7 days. Calcium content in the cells, alkaline phosphatase activity, cell protein content, NF-κB activation, and reactive oxygen species production were assayed, respectively. Results The calcium depositions of vascular smooth muscle cells of the β-glycerophosphate group were significantly higher than those of the control group (p < 0.01), and were inhibited by EGb 761 in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Data showed β-glycerophosphate induced the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase, up-regulated the NF-κB activity and increased reactive oxygen species production of vascular smooth muscle cells while these decreased when administrated with EGb 761(p < 0.05). Conclusions EGb 761 significantly reduced deposition of calcium induced by β-glycerophosphate in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. It not only reduced the deposition of calcium, but also inhibited osteogenic transdifferentiation, which may be associated with decreasing expression of alkaline phosphatase, down-regulating the NF-κB activity, and reducing reactive oxygen species production of vascular smooth muscle cells, and may have the potential to serve as a role for vascular calcification in clinical situations. PMID:26908182

  15. Metformin inhibits inflammatory response via AMPK-PTEN pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Ae; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN was induced by metformin and inhibited by compound C and AMPK siRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin suppressed TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 and iNOS mRNA expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound C and bpv (pic) increased iNOS and COX-2 protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B activation was restored by inhibiting AMPK and PTEN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AMPK and PTEN regulated TNF-{alpha}-induced ROS production in VSMCs. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammation of the coronary arteries. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated by cytokines and chemokines accelerate the inflammatory response and migrate to the injured endothelium during the progression of atherosclerosis. Activation of AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor maintaining metabolic homeostasis, suppresses the inflammatory response. However, how AMPK regulates the inflammatory response is poorly understood. To identify the mechanism of this response, we focused on phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which is a negative regulator of inflammation. We investigated that activation of AMPK-induced PTEN expression and suppression of the inflammatory response through the AMPK-PTEN pathway in VSMCs. We treated with the well-known AMPK activator metformin to induce PTEN expression. PTEN was induced by metformin (2 mM) and inhibited by compound C (10 {mu}M) and AMPK siRNA. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) was used to induce inflammation. The inflammatory response was confirmed by cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B. Metformin suppressed COX-2 and iNOS mRNA and protein expression dose dependently. Treatment with compound C and bpv (pic) in the presence of metformin, iNOS and COX-2 protein expression increased. NF-{kappa}B activation decreased in response to metformin and was restored by inhibiting AMPK

  16. Extravillous trophoblast cells-derived exosomes promote vascular smooth muscle cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Carlos; Yee, Sarah; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Kobayashi, Miharu; Vaswani, Kanchan; Kvaskoff, David; Illanes, Sebastian E.; Mitchell, Murray D.; Rice, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) migration is a critical process during human uterine spiral artery (SpA) remodeling and a successful pregnancy. Extravillous trophoblast cells (EVT) interact with VSMC and enhance their migration, however, the mechanisms by which EVT remodel SpA remain to be fully elucidated. We hypothesize that exosomes released from EVT promote VSMC migration. Methods: JEG-3 and HTR-8/SVneo cell lines were used as models for EVT. Cells were cultured at 37°C and humidified under an atmosphere of 5% CO2-balanced N2 to obtain 8% O2. Cell-conditioned media were collected, and exosomes (exo-JEG-3 and exo- HTR-8/SVneo) isolated by differential and buoyant density centrifugation. The effects of exo-EVT on VSMC migration were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™). Exosomal proteins where identified by mass spectrometry and submitted to bioinformatic pathway analysis (Ingenuity software). Results: HTR-8/SVneo cells were significantly more (~30%) invasive than JEG-3 cells. HTR-8/SVneo cells released 2.6-fold more exosomes (6.39 × 108 ± 2.5 × 108 particles/106 cells) compared to JEG-3 (2.86 × 108 ± 0.78 × 108 particles/106 cells). VSMC migration was significantly increased in the presence of exo-JEG-3 and exo-HTR-8/SVneo compared to control (−exosomes) (21.83 ± 0.49 h and 15.57 ± 0.32, respectively, vs. control 25.09 ± 0.58 h, p < 0.05). Sonication completely abolished the effect of exosomes on VSMC migration. Finally, mass spectrometry analysis identified unique exosomal proteins for each EVT cell line-derived exosomes. Conclusion: The data obtained in this study are consistent with the hypothesis that the release, content, and bioactivity of exosomes derived from EVT-like cell lines is cell origin-dependent and differentially regulates VSMC migration. Thus, an EVT exosomal signaling pathway may contribute to SpA remodeling by promoting the migration of VSMC out of the vessel walls. PMID:25157233

  17. Fibroblast growth factor-2 induces osteogenic differentiation through a Runx2 activation in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahara, Takehiro; Sato, Hiroko; Shimizu, Takehisa; Tanaka, Toru; Matsui, Hiroki; Kawai-Kowase, Keiko; Sato, Mahito; Iso, Tatsuya; Arai, Masashi; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2010-04-02

    Expression of bone-associated proteins and osteoblastic transcription factor Runx2 in arterial cells has been implicated in the development of vascular calcification. However, the signaling upstream of the Runx2-mediated activation of osteoblastic program in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is poorly understood. We examined the effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), an important regulator of bone formation, on osteoblastic differentiation of VSMC. Stimulation of cultured rat aortic SMC (RASMC) with FGF-2 induced the expression of the osteoblastic markers osteopontin (OPN) and osteocalcin. Luciferase assays showed that FGF-2 induced osteocyte-specific element (OSE)-dependent transcription. Downregulation of Runx2 by siRNA repressed the basal and FGF-2-stimulated expression of the OPN gene in RASMC. FGF-2 produced hydrogen peroxide in RASMC, as evaluated by fluorescent probe. Induction of OPN expression by FGF-2 was inhibited not only by PD98059 (MEK1 inhibitor) and PP1 (c-Src inhibitor), but also by an antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine. Nuclear extracts from FGF-2-treated RASMC exhibited increased DNA-binding of Runx2 to its target sequence. Immunohistochemistry of human coronary atherectomy specimens and calcified aortic tissues showed that expression of FGF receptor-1 and Runx2 was colocalized. In conclusion, these results suggest that FGF-2 plays a role in inducing osteoblastic differentiation of VSMC by activating Runx2 through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent- and oxidative stress-sensitive-signaling pathways.

  18. Modulation of Ca2+ channels by opioid receptor antagonists in mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells of rats in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Kai, Li; Wang, Zhong-Feng; Hu, De-Yao; Shi, Yu-Liang; Liu, Liang-Ming

    2002-10-01

    The effects of hemorrhagic shock on Ba currents ( ) via Ca channels and the regulation of the channels in the vascular hyporesponse stage of hemorrhagic shock by opioid receptor antagonists were examined by using the whole-cell recording of patch-clamp technique in mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells of rats. The results showed that hemorrhagic shock induced an inhibition of Ca channels in the cells; 10 micro M of naloxone and 100 n of naltrindole, nor-binaltorphimine, and beta-funaltrexamine increased the in the cells of rats in shock. After inhibition of protein kinase C by using 1-(5-isoquindinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine via electrodes, the enhancement of by the antagonists was not observed. These results suggested that the inhibition of Ca channel induced by hemorrhagic shock was mediated by delta-, kappa-, and mu -opioid receptors in the cells and may be partly responsible for vascular hyporesponse. The enhancement of was mediated by activation of protein kinase C and may be responsible for the antagonist-caused improvement in the response of resistance arteries to vasoactive stimulants at the decompensatory stage of hemorrhagic shock. PMID:12352325

  19. Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 4 modulates prostaglandin E2 release from human arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Golej, Deidre L.; Askari, Bardia; Kramer, Farah; Barnhart, Shelley; Vivekanandan-Giri, Anuradha; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2011-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (ACSLs) catalyze the thioesterification of long-chain FAs into their acyl-CoA derivatives. Purified ACSL4 is an arachidonic acid (20:4)-preferring ACSL isoform, and ACSL4 is therefore a probable regulator of lipid mediator production in intact cells. Eicosanoids play important roles in vascular homeostasis and disease, yet the role of ACSL4 in vascular cells is largely unknown. In the present study, the ACSL4 splice variant expressed in human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) was identified as variant 1. To investigate the function of ACSL4 in SMCs, ACSL4 variant 1 was overexpressed, knocked-down by small interfering RNA, or its enzymatic activity acutely inhibited in these cells. Overexpression of ACSL4 resulted in a markedly increased synthesis of arachidonoyl-CoA, increased 20:4 incorporation into phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, and triacylglycerol, and reduced cellular levels of unesterified 20:4. Accordingly, secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was blunted in ACSL4-overexpressing SMCs compared with controls. Conversely, acute pharmacological inhibition of ACSL4 activity resulted in increased release of PGE2. However, long-term downregulation of ACSL4 resulted in markedly reduced PGE2 secretion. Thus, ACSL4 modulates PGE2 release from human SMCs. ACSL4 may regulate a number of processes dependent on the release of arachidonic acid-derived lipid mediators in the arterial wall. PMID:21242590

  20. Subclavian artery aneurysm in a patient with vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Shota; Imoto, Kiyotaka; Uchida, Keiji; Uranaka, Yasuko; Kurosawa, Kenji; Masuda, Munetaka

    2016-02-01

    We describe our experience of surgical treatment in a 28-year-old woman with vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. A right subclavian artery aneurysm was detected. The right vertebral artery arose from the aneurysm. Digital subtraction angiography showed interruption of the left vertebral artery. The aneurysm was excised and the right vertebral artery was anastomosed end-to-side to the right common carotid artery under deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest. The patient remained very well 4 years after surgery, with no late vascular complication. PMID:25293415

  1. Traumatic brain injury in vivo and in vitro contributes to cerebral vascular dysfunction through impaired gap junction communication between vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang-Xiang; Mueller, Martin; Hawkins, Bridget E; Mathew, Babu P; Parsley, Margaret A; Vergara, Leoncio A; Hellmich, Helen L; Prough, Donald S; Dewitt, Douglas S

    2014-04-15

    Gap junctions (GJs) contribute to cerebral vasodilation, vasoconstriction, and, perhaps, to vascular compensatory mechanisms, such as autoregulation. To explore the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on vascular GJ communication, we assessed GJ coupling in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells subjected to rapid stretch injury (RSI) in vitro and VSM in middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) harvested from rats subjected to fluid percussion TBI in vivo. Intercellular communication was evaluated by measuring fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). In VSM cells in vitro, FRAP increased significantly (p<0.05 vs. sham RSI) after mild RSI, but decreased significantly (p<0.05 vs. sham RSI) after moderate or severe RSI. FRAP decreased significantly (p<0.05 vs. sham RSI) 30 min and 2 h, but increased significantly (p<0.05 vs. sham RSI) 24 h after RSI. In MCAs harvested from rats 30 min after moderate TBI in vivo, FRAP was reduced significantly (p<0.05), compared to MCAs from rats after sham TBI. In VSM cells in vitro, pretreatment with the peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) scavenger, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)prophyrinato iron[III], prevented RSI-induced reductions in FRAP. In isolated MCAs from rats treated with the ONOO(-) scavenger, penicillamine, GJ coupling was not impaired by fluid percussion TBI. In addition, penicillamine treatment improved vasodilatory responses to reduced intravascular pressure in MCAs harvested from rats subjected to moderate fluid percussion TBI. These results indicate that TBI reduced GJ coupling in VSM cells in vitro and in vivo through mechanisms related to generation of the potent oxidant, ONOO(-). PMID:24341563

  2. Effects of low-intensity laser irradiation on the apoptosis of rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells in culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. D.; Chen, P.; Zhang, C. P.; Wen, J. X.; Liang, J.; Kang, H. X.; Gao, R. L.; Fu, X. B.

    2011-11-01

    Restenosis is a major complication after coronary intervention therapy. Excessive proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and a decline in their apoptosis, which eventually leads to excessive neointimal thickening in coronary arteries, are the main causes of restenosis. Induction of the apoptosis of VSMCs and inhibition of excessive proliferation of VSMCs are therefore crucial for the prevention of restenosis, and low-intensity laser irradiation of coronary arteries may play a promising role in keeping this in balance. In this study, we used in vitro cultured rabbit VSMCs to investigate the effects of low-intensity laser irradiation at a wavelength of 532 nm on the apoptosis of VSMCs via morphological observation and molecular biology. The results showed that apoptotic bodies and obvious intranuclear apoptosis-positive particles formed within VSMCs 24 h after laser irradiation, suggesting that low-intensity laser irradiation at certain doses can inhibit the proliferation of VSMCs by promoting their apoptosis. This experiment provides evidences for further animal experiments and clinical trials on prevention and treatment of restenosis by intracoronary low-intensity laser irradiation at a wavelength of 532 nm.

  3. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Ephb6 Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Contractility and Modulates Blood Pressure in Concert with Sex Hormones*

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hongyu; Wu, Zenghui; Tremblay, Johanne; Thorin, Eric; Peng, Junzheng; Lavoie, Julie L.; Hu, Bing; Stoyanova, Ekatherina; Cloutier, Guy; Qi, Shijie; Wu, Tao; Cameron, Mark; Wu, Jiangping

    2012-01-01

    Eph kinases constitute the largest receptor tyrosine kinase family, and their ligands, ephrins (Efns), are also cell surface molecules. Our study is the first to assess the role of Ephb6 in blood pressure (BP) regulation. We observed that EphB6 and all three of its Efnb ligands were expressed on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in mice. We discovered that small arteries from castrated Ephb6 gene KO males showed increased contractility, RhoA activation, and constitutive myosin light chain phosphorylation ex vivo compared with their WT counterparts. Consistent with this finding, castrated Ephb6 KO mice presented heightened BP compared with castrated WT controls. In vitro experiments in VSMC revealed that cross-linking Efnbs but not Ephb6 resulted in reduced VSMC contractions, suggesting that reverse signaling through Efnbs was responsible for the observed BP phenotype. The reverse signaling was mediated by an adaptor protein Grip1. Additional experiments demonstrated decreased 24-h urine catecholamines in male Ephb6 KO mice, probably as a compensatory feedback mechanism to keep their BP in the normal range. After castration, however, such compensation was abolished in Ephb6 KO mice and was likely the reason why BP increased overtly in these animals. It suggests that Ephb6 has a target in the nervous/endocrine system in addition to VSMC, regulating a testosterone-dependent catecholamine compensatory mechanism. Our study discloses that Ephs and Efns, in concert with testosterone, play a critical role in regulating small artery contractility and BP. PMID:22223652

  4. Cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells are resistant to methylamine toxicity: no correlation to semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langford, S. D.; Trent, M. B.; Boor, P. J.

    2001-01-01

    Methylamine (MA), a component of serum and a metabolite of nicotine and certain insecticides and herbicides, is metabolized by semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO). MA is toxic to cultured human umbilical vein and calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells. Endothelial cells, which do not exhibit endogenous SSAO activity, are exposed to SSAO circulating in serum. In contrast, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) do exhibit innate SSAO activity both in vivo and in vitro. This property, together with the critical localization of VSMC within the arterial wall, led us to investigate the potential toxicity of MA to VSMC. Cultured rat VSMC were treated with MA (10-5 to 1 M). In some cultures, SSAO was selectively inhibited with semicarbazide or MDL-72145 [(E)-2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-fluoroallylamine]. Cytotoxicity was measured via MTT, vital dye exclusion, and clonogenic assays. MA proved to be toxic to VSMC only at relatively high concentrations (LC(50) of 0.1 M). The inhibition of SSAO with semicarbazide or MDL-72145 did not increase MA toxicity, suggesting that the production of formaldehyde via tissue-bound, SSAO-mediated MA metabolism does not play a role in the minimal toxicity observed in isolated rat VSMC. The omission of fetal calf serum (FCS), which contains high SSAO activity, from media similarly showed little effect on cytotoxicity. We conclude that VSMC--in contrast to previous results in endothelial cells--are relatively resistant to MA toxicity, and SSAO does not play a role in VSMC injury by MA.

  5. Stretch activates myosin light chain kinase in arterial smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Barany, K.; Rokolya, A.; Barany, M. )

    1990-11-30

    Stretching of porcine carotid arterial muscle increased the phosphorylation of the 20 kDa myosin light chain from 0.23 to 0.68 mol (32P)phosphate/mol light chain, whereas stretching of phorbol dibutyrate treated muscle increased the phosphorylation from 0.30 to 0.91 mol/mol. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping was used to identify the enzyme involved in the stretch-induced phosphorylation. Quantitation of the (32P)phosphate content of the peptides revealed considerable light chain phosphorylation by protein kinase C only in the phorbol dibutyrate treated arterial muscle, whereas most of the light chain phosphorylation was attributable to myosin light chain kinase. Upon stretch of either the untreated or treated muscle, the total increment in (32P)phosphate incorporation into the light chain could be accounted for by peptides characteristic for myosin light chain kinase catalyzed phosphorylation, demonstrating that the stretch-induced phosphorylation is caused by this enzyme exclusively.

  6. ACTIVATION OF GATA-4 BY SEROTONIN IN PULMONARY ARTERY SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a mitogen of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) and plays an important role in the development of pulmonary hypertension. Signal transduction initiated by 5-HT involves serotonin transporter (SERT)-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of...

  7. TNF-α induces phenotypic modulation in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for cerebral aneurysm pathology.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad S; Starke, Robert M; Jabbour, Pascal M; Tjoumakaris, Stavropoula I; Gonzalez, L Fernando; Rosenwasser, Robert H; Owens, Gary K; Koch, Walter J; Greig, Nigel H; Dumont, Aaron S

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypic modulation in the cerebral circulation or pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysms. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) has been associated with aneurysms, but potential mechanisms are unclear. Cultured rat cerebral SMCs overexpressing myocardin induced expression of key SMC contractile genes (SM-α-actin, SM-22α, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain), while dominant-negative cells suppressed expression. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha treatment inhibited this contractile phenotype and induced pro-inflammatory/matrix-remodeling genes (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, matrix metalloproteinase-3, matrix metalloproteinase-9, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, interleukin-1 beta). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha increased expression of KLF4, a known regulator of SMC differentiation. Kruppel-like transcription factor 4 (KLF4) small interfering RNA abrogated TNF-α activation of inflammatory genes and suppression of contractile genes. These mechanisms were confirmed in vivo after exposure of rat carotid arteries to TNF-α and early on in a model of cerebral aneurysm formation. Treatment with the synthesized TNF-α inhibitor 3,6-dithiothalidomide reversed pathologic vessel wall alterations after induced hypertension and hemodynamic stress. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in vivo and in vitro demonstrated that TNF-α promotes epigenetic changes through KLF4-dependent alterations in promoter regions of myocardin, SMCs, and inflammatory genes. In conclusion, TNF-α induces phenotypic modulation of cerebral SMCs through myocardin and KLF4-regulated pathways. These results demonstrate a novel role for TNF-α in promoting a pro-inflammatory/matrix-remodeling phenotype, which has important implications for the mechanisms behind intracranial aneurysm formation. PMID:23860374

  8. Protein kinases in vascular smooth muscle tone--role in the pulmonary vasculature and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jeremy P T; Knock, Greg A; Snetkov, Vladimir A; Aaronson, Philip I

    2004-12-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an adaptive mechanism that in the normal animal diverts blood away from poorly ventilated areas of the lung, thereby maintaining optimal ventilation-perfusion matching. In global hypoxia however, such as in respiratory disease or at altitude, it causes detrimental increases in pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary artery (PA) pressure. The precise intracellular pathways and mechanisms underlying HPV remain unclear, although it is now recognised that both an elevation in smooth muscle intracellular [Ca2+] and a concomitant increase in Ca2+ sensitivity are involved. Several key intracellular protein kinases have been proposed as components of the signal transduction pathways leading to development of HPV, specifically Rho kinase, non-receptor tyrosine kinases (NRTK), p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase, and protein kinase C (PKC). All of these have been implicated to a greater or lesser extent in pathways leading to Ca2+ sensitisation, and in some cases regulation of intracellular [Ca2+] as well. In this article, we review the role of these key protein kinases in the regulation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) constriction, applying what is known in the systemic circulation to the pulmonary circulation and HPV. We conclude that the strongest evidence for direct involvement of protein kinases in the mechanisms of HPV concerns a central role for Rho kinase in Ca2+ sensitisation, and a potential role for Src-family kinases in both modulation of Ca2+ entry via capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE) and activation of Rho kinase, though others are likely to have indirect or modulatory influences. In addition, we speculate that Src family kinases may provide a central interface between the proposed hypoxia-induced generation of reactive oxygen species by mitochondria and both the elevation in intracellular [Ca2+] and Rho kinase mediated Ca2+ sensitisation. PMID:15556675

  9. Vasoactive peptides upregulate mRNA expression and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Alagappan, Vijay K T; Willems-Widyastuti, Anna; Seynhaeve, Ann L B; Garrelds, Ingrid M; ten Hagen, Timo L M; Saxena, Pramod R; Sharma, Hari S

    2007-01-01

    Airway remodeling and associated angiogenesis are documented features of asthma, of which the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Angiotensin (ANG)II and endothelin (ET)-1 are potent vasoconstricting circulatory hormones implicated in asthma. We investigated the effects of ANG II and ET-1 on human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells proliferation and growth and examined the mRNA expression and release of the angiogenic peptide, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Serum deprived (48 h) human ASM cells were incubated with ANG II (100 nM) or ET-1 (10 nM) for 30 min, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 24 h and the endogenous synthesis of VEGF was examined in relation to control cells receiving serum free culture medium. ET-1 induced time dependent DNA biosynthesis as determined by [3H]-thymidine incorporation assay. Using northern blot hybridization, we detected two mRNA species of 3.9 and 1.7 kb encoding VEGF in the cultured smooth muscle cells. Both ANG II and ET-1 induced the mRNA expression (two- to threefold) and secretion (1.8- to 2.8-fold) of VEGF reaching maximal levels between 4-8 h of incubation. Induced expression and release of VEGF declined after 8 h of ANG II incubation while levels remained elevated in the case of ET-1. The conditioned medium derived from ET-1-treated ASM cells induced [3H]-thymidine incorporation and cell number in porcine pulmonary artery endothelial as well as human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Moreover, the VEGF tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor blocked the conditioned medium induced mitogenesis in endothelial cells. Our results suggest a potential role for ANG II and ET-1 in ASM cell growth and upregulation of VEGF that may participate in endothelial cell proliferation via paracrine mechanisms and thus causing pathological angiogenesis and vascular remodelling seen during asthma. PMID:17406064

  10. Estradiol attenuates directed migration of vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodgie, F. D.; Jacob, A.; Wilson, P. S.; Carlson, G. C.; Farb, A.; Verma, A.; Virmani, R.

    1996-01-01

    Although the cardiovascular benefits of the hormone estrogen are at least, in part, mediated by its antiproliferative effect on vascular smooth muscle, its action on the migration of these cells is unknown. To explore this relationship, female rat aortic smooth muscle cells were grown in hormone-free medium, and the effect of various concentrations of beta-estradiol on directed cellular migration was measured in vitro using a microwell Boyden chamber apparatus. Migration of smooth muscle cells to the known chemoattractants platelet-derived growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, and fibronectin (all at peak doses for migratory activity) was attenuated by beta-estradiol (0.5 to 10 ng/ml) in a concentration-dependent manner relative to control cells treated with vehicle (0.01% ethanol). This response was insensitive to pretreatment with indomethacin and was stereospecific (17 alpha-estradiol lacked response). Like beta-estradiol, the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol attenuated directed smooth muscle cell migration whereas the male hormone testosterone was ineffective. Additional studies showed that beta-estradiol-mediated suppression of migration was inhibited by the anti-estrogen ICI 164,384 and the gene transcription inhibitor actinomycin D. These are the first results demonstrating a reduction in directed smooth muscle cell migration by beta-estradiol. The mechanism of this estrogen-mediated response appears to involve conventional estrogen receptors. PMID:8774151

  11. Suppression of Akt1 phosphorylation by adenoviral transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits hypoxia-induced proliferation of rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Chunxia; Yi, Bin; Bai, Li; Xia, Yongzhi; Wang, Guansong; Qian, Guisheng; Feng, Hua

    2010-07-02

    Recent findings identify the role of proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase (Akt) proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been identified as a negative regulator of cytokine signaling that inhibits the PI3K-Akt pathway. However, little is known about the role of PTEN/Akt signaling in hypoxia-associated vascular remodeling. In this study, we found that hypoxia-induced the expression of Akt1 mRNA and phosphorylated protein by at least twofold in rat PASMCs. Phospho-PTEN significantly decreased in the nuclei of PASMCs after hypoxic stimulation. After forcing over-expression of PTEN by adenovirus-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) transfection, the expression of phospho-Akt1 was significantly suppressed in PASMCs at all time-points measured. Additionally, we showed here that hypoxia increased proliferation of PASMCs by nearly twofold and over-expression of PTEN significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced PASMCs proliferation. These findings suggest that phospho-PTEN loss in the nuclei of PASMCs under hypoxic conditions may be the major cause of aberrant activation of Akt1 and may, therefore, play an important role in hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling. Finally, the fact that transfection with Ad-PTEN inhibits the phosphorylation of Akt1 in PASMCs suggests a potential therapeutic effect on hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling.

  12. Mechanism of hydralazine-induced relaxation of arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Ebeigbe, A B; Aloamaka, C P

    1985-07-01

    The effect of hydralazine on contractile responses by various agents has been studied in isolated rat tail artery strips. Hydralazine caused dose-dependent relaxation of contractions produced by 10(-7) mol.litre-1 noradrenaline (N); 10(-7) mol.litre-1 5-HT or 100 mmol.litre-1 KCl, suggesting that the relaxation response is non-specific. CaCl2 dose-response (in the presence of 10(-5) mol.litre-1 N; 10(-5) mol.litre-1 5-HT or 100 mmol.litre-1 KC1) was significantly inhibited by 5 X 10(-4) mol.litre-1 hydralazine in the order: KCl greater than 5-HT greater than N. Hydralazine also inhibited BaCl2 dose-response curve (in K+-depolarised strips); maximal contraction to BaCl2 was depressed by 87%. In other experiments, hydralazine significantly depressed (by 20%) the phasic contractile response to N due to mobilisation of calcium from a membrane-bound pool. D 600, a calcium entry blocker, also caused dose-dependent relaxation of contractile responses to all three agents studied; and inhibited CaCl2 and BaCl2 dose-response curves in K+-depolarised media, as well as depressed the phasic contractile response to N in Ca-free media by 17%. These results suggest that in the rat tail artery, hydralazine interferes with Ca2+ influx, as well as release from a membrane-bound pool. PMID:4016816

  13. Collagen degradation and platelet-derived growth factor stimulate the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Stringa, E; Knäuper, V; Murphy, G; Gavrilovic, J

    2000-06-01

    Cell migration is a key event in many biological processes and depends on signals from both extracellular matrix and soluble motogenic factors. During atherosclerotic plaque development, vascular smooth muscle cells migrate from the tunica media to the intima through a basement membrane and interstitial collagenous matrix and proliferate to form a neointima. Matrix metalloproteinases have previously been implicated in neointimal formation and in this study smooth muscle cell adhesion and migration on degraded collagen have been evaluated. Vascular smooth muscle cells adhered to native intact collagen type I and to its first degradation by-product, 3/4 fragment (generated by collagenase-3 cleavage), unwound at 35 degrees C to mimic physiological conditions. PDGF-BB pre-treatment induced a fourfold stimulation of smooth muscle cell motility on the collagen 3/4 fragment whereas no increase in smooth muscle cell motility on collagen type I was observed. Cell migration on collagen type I was mediated by alpha2 integrin, whereas PDGF-BB-stimulated migration on the 3/4 collagen fragment was dependent on alphavbeta3 integrin. alphavbeta3 integrin was organised in clusters concentrated at the leading and trailing edges of the cells and was only expressed when cells were exposed to the 3/4 collagen fragment. Tyrphostin A9, an inhibitor of PDGF receptor-beta tyrosine kinase activity, resulted in complete abolition of migration of PDGF-BB treated cells on collagen type I and 3/4 fragment. These results strongly support the hypothesis that the cellular migratory response to soluble motogens can be regulated by proteolytic modification of the extracellular matrix. PMID:10806116

  14. Mercury induces proliferation and reduces cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells through MAPK, oxidative stress and cyclooxygenase-2 pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Aguado, Andrea; Galán, María; Zhenyukh, Olha; Wiggers, Giulia A.; Roque, Fernanda R.; Redondo, Santiago; Peçanha, Franck; Martín, Angela; Fortuño, Ana; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Tejerina, Teresa; Salaices, Mercedes; and others

    2013-04-15

    Mercury exposure is known to increase cardiovascular risk but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain undetermined. We analyzed whether chronic exposure to HgCl{sub 2} affects vascular structure and the functional properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2 dependent pathways. Mesenteric resistance arteries and aortas from Wistar rats treated with HgCl{sub 2} (first dose 4.6 mg kg{sup −1}, subsequent doses 0.07 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}, 30 days) and cultured aortic VSMC stimulated with HgCl{sub 2} (0.05–5 μg/ml) were used. Treatment of rats with HgCl{sub 2} decreased wall thickness of the resistance and conductance vasculature, increased the number of SMC within the media and decreased SMC nucleus size. In VSMCs, exposure to HgCl{sub 2}: 1) induced a proliferative response and a reduction in cell size; 2) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity, gene and/or protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunit NOX-1, the EC- and Mn-superoxide dismutases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2); 3) induced activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized the proliferative response and the altered cell size induced by HgCl{sub 2}. Blockade of ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished the HgCl{sub 2}-induced Nox1 and COX-2 expression and normalized the alterations induced by mercury in cell proliferation and size. In conclusion, long exposure of VSMC to low doses of mercury activates MAPK signaling pathways that result in activation of inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2 that in turn induce proliferation of VSMC and changes in cell size. These findings offer further evidence that mercury might be considered an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: ► Chronic HgCl{sub 2} exposure induces vascular remodeling. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces proliferation and decreased cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces

  15. Role played by Prx1-dependent extracellular matrix properties in vascular smooth muscle development in embryonic lungs

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Juliana; Chokshi, Mithil; Aiad, Norman; Sanyal, Sonali; Kawabata, Kimihito C.; Levental, Ilya; Sundararaghavan, Harini G.; Burdick, Jason A.; Janmey, Paul; Miyazono, Kohei; Wells, Rebecca G.; Jones, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although there are many studies focusing on the molecular pathways underlying lung vascular morphogenesis, the extracellular matrix (ECM)–dependent regulation of mesenchymal cell differentiation in vascular smooth muscle development needs better understanding. In this study, we demonstrate that the paired related homeobox gene transcription factor Prx1 maintains the elastic ECM properties, which are essential for vascular smooth muscle precursor cell differentiation. We have found that Prx1null mouse lungs exhibit defective vascular smooth muscle development, downregulated elastic ECM expression, and compromised transforming growth factor (TGF)–β localization and signaling. Further characterization of ECM properties using decellularized lung ECM scaffolds derived from Prx1 mice demonstrated that Prx1 is required to maintain lung ECM stiffness. The results of cell culture using stiffness-controlled 2-D and 3-D synthetic substrates confirmed that Prx1-dependent ECM stiffness is essential for promotion of smooth muscle precursor differentiation for effective TGF-β stimulation. Supporting these results, both decellularized Prx1null lung ECM and Prx1WT (wild type) ECM scaffolds with blocked TGF-β failed to support mesenchymal cell to 3-D smooth muscle cell differentiation. These results suggest a novel ECM-dependent regulatory pathway of lung vascular development wherein Prx1 regulates lung vascular smooth muscle precursor development by coordinating the ECM biophysical and biochemical properties. PMID:26064466

  16. The role of vascular peroxidase 1 in ox-LDL-induced vascular smooth muscle cell calcification.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yixin; Xu, Qian; Peng, Haiyang; Liu, Zhaoya; Yang, Tianlun; Yu, Zaixin; Cheng, Guangjie; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Guogang; Shi, Ruizheng

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is associated with the pathogenesis of vascular calcification. Vascular peroxidase 1 (VPO1), a peroxidase in the cardiovascular system, utilizes the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by co-expressed NADPH oxidases to produce hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and catalyze peroxidative reactions. The aim of this study was to determine whether VPO1 plays a role in the osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs in the setting of the vascular calcification induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). In cultured primary rat VSMCs, we observed that the expression of VPO1 was significantly increased in combination with increases in calcification, as demonstrated via increased mineralization, as well as increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and up-regulated runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) expression in ox-LDL-treated cells. Ox-LDL-induced VSMC calcification and Runx2 expression were both inhibited by knockdown of VPO1 using a small interfering RNA or by an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Moreover, the knockdown of VPO1 in VSMCs suppressed the production of HOCl and the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK and P38 MAPK. Furthermore, HOCl treatment facilitated the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and P38 MAPK and the expression of Runx2, whereas LY294002 (a specific inhibitor of PI3K), U0126 (a specific inhibitor of ERK1/2) and SB203580 (a specific inhibitor of P38 MAPK) significantly attenuated the HOCl-induced up-regulation of Runx2. Collectively, these results demonstrated that VPO1 promotes ox-LDL-induced VSMC calcification via the VPO1/HOCl/PI3K/AKT, ERK1/2, and P38 MAPK/Runx2 signaling pathways. PMID:26520887

  17. Heparin fragments inhibit human vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, S.C.; Johnson, W.V.; Maciag, T.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have examined the effect of heparin on human abdominal aortic smooth muscle cell growth. Cell proliferation was inhibited by more than 90% at a concentration of 20 ..mu..g/ml in a 12 day growth assay using heparin from Sigma, Upjohn or Calbiochem. Additionally, 200 ..mu..g/ml Upjohn heparin inhibits /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation by 50% in short term assays using serum or purified platelet-derived growth factor (25-100ng/ml) to initiate the cell cycle. Homogeneous size classes of heparin fragments were prepared by nitrous acid cleavage and BioGel P-10 filtration chromatography. Deca-, octa-, hexa-, tetra-, and di-saccharides inhibited proliferation by 90% at concentrations of 280, 320, 260, 180 and 100 ..mu..g/ml, respectively, in a 12 day growth assay. These data confirm the work of Castellot et.al. and extend the range of inhibitory fragments down to the tetra- and di-saccharide size. These data suggest, therefore, that di-saccharide subunit of heparin is sufficient to inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. The authors are now examining the role of the anhydromannose moiety on the reducing end of the nitrous acid generated fragments as a possible mediator of heparin-induced inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

  18. The early- and late stages in phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells: differential roles for lysophosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huazhang; Makarova, Natalia; Cheng, Yunhui; E, Shuyu; Ji, Rui-Rui; Zhang, Chunxiang; Farrar, Patricia; Tigyi, Gabor

    2008-09-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has been implicated as causative in phenotypic modulation (PM) of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in their transition to the dedifferentiated phenotype. We evaluated the contribution of the three major LPA receptors, LPA1 and LPA2 GPCR and PPARgamma, on PM of VSMC. Expression of differentiated VSMC-specific marker genes, including smooth muscle alpha-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, calponin, SM-22alpha, and h-caldesmon, was measured by quantitative real-time PCR in VSMC cultures and aortic rings kept in serum-free chemically defined medium or serum- or LPA-containing medium using wild-type C57BL/6, LPA1, LPA2, and LPA1&2 receptor knockout mice. Within hours after cells were deprived of physiological cues, the expression of VSMC marker genes, regardless of genotype, rapidly decreased. This early PM was neither prevented by IGF-I, inhibitors of p38, ERK1/2, or PPARgamma nor significantly accelerated by LPA or serum. To elucidate the mechanism of PM in vivo, carotid artery ligation with/without replacement of blood with Krebs solution was used to evaluate contributions of blood flow and pressure. Early PM in the common carotid was induced by depressurization regardless of the presence/absence of blood, but eliminating blood flow while maintaining blood pressure or after sham surgery elicited no early PM. The present results indicate that LPA, serum, dissociation of VSMC, IGF-I, p38, ERK1/2, LPA1, and LPA2 are not causative factors of early PM of VSMC. Tensile stress generated by blood pressure may be the fundamental signal maintaining the fully differentiated phenotype of VSMC. PMID:18602022

  19. BMP-9 regulates the osteoblastic differentiation and calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells through an ALK1 mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dongxing; Mackenzie, Neil Charles Wallace; Shanahan, Catherine M; Shroff, Rukshana C; Farquharson, Colin; MacRae, Vicky Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The process of vascular calcification shares many similarities with that of physiological skeletal mineralization, and involves the deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in arteries. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible have yet to be fully explained. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-9) has been shown to exert direct effects on both bone development and vascular function. In the present study, we have investigated the role of BMP-9 in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification. Vessel calcification in chronic kidney disease (CKD) begins pre-dialysis, with factors specific to the dialysis milieu triggering accelerated calcification. Intriguingly, BMP-9 was markedly elevated in serum from CKD children on dialysis. Furthermore, in vitro studies revealed that BMP-9 treatment causes a significant increase in VSMC calcium content, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mRNA expression of osteogenic markers. BMP-9-induced calcium deposition was significantly reduced following treatment with the ALP inhibitor 2,5-Dimethoxy-N-(quinolin-3-yl) benzenesulfonamide confirming the mediatory role of ALP in this process. The inhibition of ALK1 signalling using a soluble chimeric protein significantly reduced calcium deposition and ALP activity, confirming that BMP-9 is a physiological ALK1 ligand. Signal transduction studies revealed that BMP-9 induced Smad2, Smad3 and Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. As these Smad proteins directly bind to Smad4 to activate target genes, siRNA studies were subsequently undertaken to examine the functional role of Smad4 in VSMC calcification. Smad4-siRNA transfection induced a significant reduction in ALP activity and calcium deposition. These novel data demonstrate that BMP-9 induces VSMC osteogenic differentiation and calcification via ALK1, Smad and ALP dependent mechanisms. This may identify new potential therapeutic strategies for clinical intervention. PMID:25297851

  20. Functional characterization of voltage-gated K+ channels in mouse pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eun A; Burg, Elyssa D; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Msefya, Joseph; Firth, Amy L; Yuan, Jason X-J

    2007-09-01

    Mice are useful animal models to study pathogenic mechanisms involved in pulmonary vascular disease. Altered expression and function of voltage-gated K(+) (K(V)) channels in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) have been implicated in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. K(V) currents (I(K(V))) in mouse PASMCs have not been comprehensively characterized. The main focus of this study was to determine the biophysical and pharmacological properties of I(K(V)) in freshly dissociated mouse PASMCs with the patch-clamp technique. Three distinct whole cell I(K(V)) were identified based on the kinetics of activation and inactivation: rapidly activating and noninactivating currents (in 58% of the cells tested), rapidly activating and slowly inactivating currents (23%), and slowly activating and noninactivating currents (17%). Of the cells that demonstrated the rapidly activating noninactivating current, 69% showed I(K(V)) inhibition with 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), while 31% were unaffected. Whole cell I(K(V)) were very sensitive to tetraethylammonium (TEA), as 1 mM TEA decreased the current amplitude by 32% while it took 10 mM 4-AP to decrease I(K(V)) by a similar amount (37%). Contribution of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (K(Ca)) channels to whole cell I(K(V)) was minimal, as neither pharmacological inhibition with charybdotoxin or iberiotoxin nor perfusion with Ca(2+)-free solution had an effect on the whole cell I(K(V)). Steady-state activation and inactivation curves revealed a window K(+) current between -40 and -10 mV with a peak at -31.5 mV. Single-channel recordings revealed large-, intermediate-, and small-amplitude currents, with an averaged slope conductance of 119.4 +/- 2.7, 79.8 +/- 2.8, 46.0 +/- 2.2, and 23.6 +/- 0.6 pS, respectively. These studies provide detailed electrophysiological and pharmacological profiles of the native K(V) currents in mouse PASMCs. PMID:17581857

  1. miR-143 Activation Regulates Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Cell Crosstalk in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Hannah; Lu, Ruifang; Caudrillier, Axelle; McBride, Martin; McClure, John D; Grant, Jenny; Thomas, Matthew; Frid, Maria; Stenmark, Kurt; White, Kevin; Seto, Anita G.; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Bradshaw, Angela C; MacLean, Margaret R.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale The pathogenesis of PAH remains unclear. The four microRNAs representing the miR-143 and miR-145 stem loops are genomically clustered. Objective To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of the miR-143/145 cluster, and the role of miR-143 in PAH. Methods and Results We identified the promoter region that regulates miR-143/145 miRNA expression in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). We mapped PAH-related signalling pathways, including estrogens receptor (ER), liver X factor/retinoic X receptor (LXR/RXR), TGF-β (Smads), and hypoxia (HRE) that regulated levels of all pri-miR stem loop transcription and resulting miRNA expression. We observed that miR-143-3p is selectively upregulated compared to miR-143-5p during PASMC migration. Modulation of miR-143 in PASMCs significantly altered cell migration and apoptosis. In addition, we found high abundance of miR-143-3p in PASMCs-derived exosomes. Using assays with pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs) we demonstrated a paracrine pro-migratory and pro-angiogenic effect of miR-143-3p enriched exosomes from PASMC. Quantitative PCR and in situ hybridisation showed elevated expression of miR-143 in calf models of PAH as well as in samples from PAH patients. Moreover, in contrast to our previous findings that had not supported a therapeutic role in vivo, we now demonstrate a protective role for miR-143 in experimental PH in vivo in miR-143−/− and antimiR143-3p-treated mice exposed to chronic hypoxia in both preventative and reversal settings. Conclusions miR-143-3p modulated both cellular and exosome-mediated responses in pulmonary vascular cells, while inhibition of miR-143-3p blocked experimental PH. Taken together these findings confirm an important role for the miR-143/145 cluster in PAH pathobiology. PMID:26311719

  2. Suitability of Exoseal Vascular Closure Device for Antegrade Femoral Artery Puncture Site Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelter, Christopher Liebl, Andrea; Poullos, Nektarios; Ruppert, Volker; Vorwerk, Dierk

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To assess the efficacy and safety of the Exoseal vascular closure device for antegrade puncture of the femoral artery. Methods. In a prospective study from February 2011 to January 2012, a total of 93 consecutive patients received a total of 100 interventional procedures via an antegrade puncture of the femoral artery. An Exoseal vascular closure device (6F) was used for closure in all cases. Puncture technique, duration of manual compression, and use of compression bandages were documented. All patients were monitored by vascular ultrasound and color-coded duplex sonography of their respective femoral artery puncture site within 12 to 36 h after angiography to check for vascular complications. Results. In 100 antegrade interventional procedures, the Exoseal vascular closure device was applied successfully for closure of the femoral artery puncture site in 96 cases (96 of 100, 96.0 %). The vascular closure device could not be deployed in one case as a result of kinking of the vascular sheath introducer and in three cases because the bioabsorbable plug was not properly delivered to the extravascular space adjacent to the arterial puncture site, but instead fully removed with the delivery system (4.0 %). Twelve to 36 h after the procedure, vascular ultrasound revealed no complications at the femoral artery puncture site in 93 cases (93.0 %). Minor vascular complications were found in seven cases (7.0 %), with four cases (4.0 %) of pseudoaneurysm and three cases (3.0 %) of significant late bleeding, none of which required surgery. Conclusion. The Exoseal vascular closure device was safely used for antegrade puncture of the femoral artery, with a high rate of procedural success (96.0 %), a low rate of minor vascular complications (7.0 %), and no major adverse events.

  3. Benefits of Synchrotron Microangiography for Dynamic Studies of Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Roles in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, James T.; Schwenke, Daryl O.; Jenkins, Mathew J.; Edgley, Amanda J.; Sonobe, Takashi; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Umetani, Keiji; Eppel, Gabriela A.; Evans, Roger G.; Okura, Yasuhiko; Shirai, Mikiyasu

    2010-07-01

    Changes in endothelial and smooth muscle function compromise organ perfusion in the chronic disease states of diabetes, atherosclerosis and hypertension. Moreover, vascular dysfunction increases the likelihood of lethal acute events such as myocardial infarction and stroke, which are now leading causes of adult mortality. Many circulating and local tissue factors in these disease states contribute to impaired vasomotor regulation of the arterial vessels, leading to spasm, chronic constriction and eventually vessel remodelling. X-ray contrast absorption imaging allows assessment of vessel lumen diameter and the factors contributing to steady-state vessel calibre, however, conventional clinical devices (>200 μm resolution) are not adequate to detect microvessels or accurately assess function in real time. Using synchrotron imaging we are now able to detect small vessel calibres (˜30 μm) and quantify regional differences in calibre even under conditions of high heart rate (>500 bpm). Herein we describe recent experiments that were conducted at the Japanese Synchrotron, SPring-8 using anaesthetised Sprague-Dawley rats and C57Bl/6 mice and a synchrotron radiation contrast angiography (single narrow energy bandwidth) approach based on selective arterial injection of iodine contrast agents. Application of this approach to imaging of the heart and other vasculatures are described. Our studies show that within-animal comparisons of 3-4 branching orders of arterial vessels are possible using small bolus contrast injections and appropriate contrast washout times (15-30 min) in many organ systems. Determination of relative calibre changes before and after any treatment allows us to evaluate the contributions of different endogenous factors and ligand-receptor pathways in the maintenance of vasomotor tone. Finally, we will present our findings relating to novel therapies to prevent endothelial dysfunction in heart failure.

  4. Benefits of Synchrotron Microangiography for Dynamic Studies of Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Roles in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, James T.; Schwenke, Daryl O.; Eppel, Gabriela A.; Evans, Roger G.; Jenkins, Mathew J.; Edgley, Amanda J.; Sonobe, Takashi; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Umetani, Keiji; Okura, Yasuhiko

    2010-07-23

    Changes in endothelial and smooth muscle function compromise organ perfusion in the chronic disease states of diabetes, atherosclerosis and hypertension. Moreover, vascular dysfunction increases the likelihood of lethal acute events such as myocardial infarction and stroke, which are now leading causes of adult mortality. Many circulating and local tissue factors in these disease states contribute to impaired vasomotor regulation of the arterial vessels, leading to spasm, chronic constriction and eventually vessel remodelling. X-ray contrast absorption imaging allows assessment of vessel lumen diameter and the factors contributing to steady-state vessel calibre, however, conventional clinical devices (>200 {mu}m resolution) are not adequate to detect microvessels or accurately assess function in real time. Using synchrotron imaging we are now able to detect small vessel calibres ({approx}30 {mu}m) and quantify regional differences in calibre even under conditions of high heart rate (>500 bpm). Herein we describe recent experiments that were conducted at the Japanese Synchrotron, SPring-8 using anaesthetised Sprague-Dawley rats and C57Bl/6 mice and a synchrotron radiation contrast angiography (single narrow energy bandwidth) approach based on selective arterial injection of iodine contrast agents. Application of this approach to imaging of the heart and other vasculatures are described. Our studies show that within-animal comparisons of 3-4 branching orders of arterial vessels are possible using small bolus contrast injections and appropriate contrast washout times (15-30 min) in many organ systems. Determination of relative calibre changes before and after any treatment allows us to evaluate the contributions of different endogenous factors and ligand-receptor pathways in the maintenance of vasomotor tone. Finally, we will present our findings relating to novel therapies to prevent endothelial dysfunction in heart failure.

  5. New Insights into Mechanisms and Functions of Chemokine (C-X-C Motif) Receptor 4 Heteromerization in Vascular Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Ann E.; Tripathi, Abhishek; LaPorte, Heather M.; Brueggemann, Lioubov I.; Singh, Abhay Kumar; Albee, Lauren J.; Byron, Kenneth L.; Tarasova, Nadya I.; Volkman, Brian F.; Cho, Thomas Yoonsang; Gaponenko, Vadim; Majetschak, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) heteromerizes with α1A/B-adrenoceptors (AR) and atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) and that CXCR4:α1A/B-AR heteromers are important for α1-AR function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Structural determinants for CXCR4 heteromerization and functional consequences of CXCR4:α1A/B-AR heteromerization in intact arteries, however, remain unknown. Utilizing proximity ligation assays (PLA) to visualize receptor interactions in VSMC, we show that peptide analogs of transmembrane-domain (TM) 2 and TM4 of CXCR4 selectively reduce PLA signals for CXCR4:α1A-AR and CXCR4:ACKR3 interactions, respectively. While both peptides inhibit CXCL12-induced chemotaxis, only the TM2 peptide inhibits phenylephrine-induced Ca2+-fluxes, contraction of VSMC and reduces efficacy of phenylephrine to constrict isolated arteries. In a Cre-loxP mouse model to delete CXCR4 in VSMC, we observed 60% knockdown of CXCR4. PLA signals for CXCR4:α1A/B-AR and CXCR4:ACKR3 interactions in VSMC, however, remained constant. Our observations point towards TM2/4 of CXCR4 as possible contact sites for heteromerization and suggest that TM-derived peptide analogs permit selective targeting of CXCR4 heteromers. A molecular dynamics simulation of a receptor complex in which the CXCR4 homodimer interacts with α1A-AR via TM2 and with ACKR3 via TM4 is presented. Our findings further imply that CXCR4:α1A-AR heteromers are important for intrinsic α1-AR function in intact arteries and provide initial and unexpected insights into the regulation of CXCR4 heteromerization in VSMC. PMID:27331810

  6. New Insights into Mechanisms and Functions of Chemokine (C-X-C Motif) Receptor 4 Heteromerization in Vascular Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ann E; Tripathi, Abhishek; LaPorte, Heather M; Brueggemann, Lioubov I; Singh, Abhay Kumar; Albee, Lauren J; Byron, Kenneth L; Tarasova, Nadya I; Volkman, Brian F; Cho, Thomas Yoonsang; Gaponenko, Vadim; Majetschak, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) heteromerizes with α1A/B-adrenoceptors (AR) and atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) and that CXCR4:α1A/B-AR heteromers are important for α₁-AR function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Structural determinants for CXCR4 heteromerization and functional consequences of CXCR4:α1A/B-AR heteromerization in intact arteries, however, remain unknown. Utilizing proximity ligation assays (PLA) to visualize receptor interactions in VSMC, we show that peptide analogs of transmembrane-domain (TM) 2 and TM4 of CXCR4 selectively reduce PLA signals for CXCR4:α1A-AR and CXCR4:ACKR3 interactions, respectively. While both peptides inhibit CXCL12-induced chemotaxis, only the TM2 peptide inhibits phenylephrine-induced Ca(2+)-fluxes, contraction of VSMC and reduces efficacy of phenylephrine to constrict isolated arteries. In a Cre-loxP mouse model to delete CXCR4 in VSMC, we observed 60% knockdown of CXCR4. PLA signals for CXCR4:α1A/B-AR and CXCR4:ACKR3 interactions in VSMC, however, remained constant. Our observations point towards TM2/4 of CXCR4 as possible contact sites for heteromerization and suggest that TM-derived peptide analogs permit selective targeting of CXCR4 heteromers. A molecular dynamics simulation of a receptor complex in which the CXCR4 homodimer interacts with α1A-AR via TM2 and with ACKR3 via TM4 is presented. Our findings further imply that CXCR4:α1A-AR heteromers are important for intrinsic α₁-AR function in intact arteries and provide initial and unexpected insights into the regulation of CXCR4 heteromerization in VSMC. PMID:27331810

  7. Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate (IP3) Receptor Up-regulation in Hypertension Is Associated with Sensitization of Ca2+ Release and Vascular Smooth Muscle Contractility*

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Saleh, Haissam; Pathan, Asif R.; Daalis, Arwa; Hubrack, Satanay; Abou-Jassoum, Hamda; Al-Naeimi, Hamda; Rusch, Nancy J.; Machaca, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    Resistance arteries show accentuated responsiveness to vasoconstrictor agonists in hypertension, and this abnormality relies partly on enhanced Ca2+ signaling in vascular smooth muscle (VSM). Although inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) are abundant in VSM, their role in the molecular remodeling of the Ca2+ signaling machinery during hypertension has not been addressed. Therefore, we compared IP3R expression and function between mesenteric arteries of normotensive and hypertensive animals. Levels of IP3R transcript and protein were significantly increased in mesenteric arteries of hypertensive animals, and pharmacological inhibition of the IP3R revealed a higher contribution of IP3-dependent Ca2+ release to vascular contraction in these arteries. Subsequently, we established cultured aortic VSM A7r5 cells as a cellular model that replicates IP3R up-regulation during hypertension by depolarizing the VSM cell membrane. IP3R up-regulation requires Ca2+ influx through L-type Ca2+ channels, followed by activation of the calcineurin-NFAT axis, resulting in IP3R transcription. Functionally, IP3R up-regulation in VSM is associated with enhancement and sensitization of IP3-dependent Ca2+ release, resulting in increased VSM contraction in response to agonist stimulation. PMID:24097979

  8. Effects of chronic exposure to cigarette smoke on canonical transient receptor potential expression in rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Chen, Yuqin; Lin, Chunyi; Jia, Jing; Tian, Lichun; Yang, Kai; Zhao, Lei; Lai, Ning; Jiang, Qian; Sun, Yueqian; Zhong, Nanshan; Ran, Pixin

    2013-01-01

    To clarify the possible mechanism of cigarette smoke (CS)-induced pulmonary hypertension and furthermore provide effective targets for prevention and treatment, the effects of chronic CS on rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle in vivo and nicotine treatment on rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in vitro were investigated. In this study, we demonstrated that chronic CS exposure led to rat weight loss, right ventricular hypertrophy, and pulmonary arterial remodeling. A fluorescence microscope was used to measure intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in rat distal PASMCs. Results showed that basal [Ca2+]i and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) levels in PASMCs from 3- and 6-mo CS-exposed rats were markedly higher than those in cells from the unexposed control animals (the increases in 6-mo CS group were more significant than that in 3-mo group), accompanied with increased canonical transient receptor potential 1 (TRPC1) and TRPC6 expression at both mRNA and protein levels in isolated distal PA. Simultaneously, in vitro study showed that nicotine treatment (10 nM) significantly increased basal [Ca2+]i and SOCE and upregulated TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression in cultured rat distal PASMCs. TRPC siRNA knockdown strategies revealed that the elevations of basal [Ca2+]i and SOCE induced by nicotine in PASMCs were TRPC1 and TRPC6 dependent. These results suggested that chronic CS-induced changes in vascular tone and structure in PA and the development of pulmonary hypertension might be largely due to upregulation of TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression in PASMCs, in which nicotine played an important role. PMID:24336649

  9. Platelet-activating factor biosynthesis in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, P R; Croft, K; Harris, T; Stewart, A G

    1994-01-01

    The ability of platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonists to protect rats from the cardiovascular collapse induced by large doses of endothelin 1 led us to examine the capacity of rat cultured vascular smooth muscle cells to produce PAF and also to evaluate its potential functional roles in this cell type. Adenosine triphosphate and the vasoactive peptides, endothelin 1, angiotensin II, and arginine vasopressin, each elicited an increase in the PAF level in extracts of rat cultured vascular smooth muscle cells as determined by bioassay. PAF was not detectable (above 20 fmol/mg protein) in the supernatants of these cells. The identity of the bioactivity as PAF was confirmed by GC/MS which indicated that more than 80% of the PAF was 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-3-sn-glyceryl-phosphorylcholine. Exogenous PAF (100 nM) elicited increases in intracellular calcium that were inhibited by WEB 2086 (10 microM). Endothelin 1, at a concentration which stimulated PAF synthesis, (1 nM), elicited increases in intracellular calcium levels that were not inhibited by WEB 2086 (10 microM). Thus, endogenous PAF is unlikely to be involved in the endothelin-1-induced calcium increases. Although WEB 2086 (3-100 microM) inhibited concentration dependently fetal calf serum (10% v/v) induced [3H]-thymidine incorporation, reaching a maximum effect at 30 microM of 40-50% reduction, in parallel experiments WEB 2086 had no effect on serum-induced increases in cell numbers. We conclude that PAF is produced and retained by cultured rat vascular smooth muscle and that it is unlikely to contribute to the signaling of increases in intracellular calcium or proliferation. PMID:8148465

  10. Vascular reactivity of rabbit isolated renal and femoral resistance arteries in renal wrap hypertension.

    PubMed

    Khammy, Makhala M; Angus, James A; Wright, Christine E

    2016-02-15

    In rabbits with cellophane renal wrap hypertension, hindquarter and total vascular resistance changes to pressor and depressor agents are amplified compared to those of normotensive rabbits. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro pharmacodynamics of hypertensive and normotensive rabbit small artery segments isolated from the renal and hindquarter vascular beds. Using wire myography, the full range (Emax) and sensitivity (EC50) to a range of agonists of segments of renal interlobar (≈ 600 µm i.d.), renal arcuate (≈ 250 µm i.d.) and deep femoral branch (≈ 250 µm i.d.) arteries were assessed under normalised conditions of passive tension. Interlobar arteries from hypertensive rabbits were more sensitive (EC50) than those from normotensive rabbits to noradrenaline (6-fold), methoxamine (3-fold) and angiotensin II (3-fold). Arcuate artery reactivity was largely unaffected by hypertension. Deep femoral arteries from hypertensive rabbits had enhanced sensitivity only to noradrenaline (2-fold) and methoxamine (4-fold). Sensitivity to relaxation by acetylcholine was unaffected by hypertension in all arteries. Deep femoral arteries from hypertensive rabbits were more sensitive to sodium nitroprusside than normotensive counterparts. Adenosine caused little relaxation in renal arteries, but full relaxation in deep femoral arteries, unaltered by hypertension. This study found substantial heterogeneity in the pharmacodynamic profile of vessels isolated from different vascular beds and between arterial segments within the kidney. These profiles were differentially affected by hypertension suggesting that hypertension per se is not a resultant of general vascular dysfunction. PMID:26806799

  11. Decellularized ovine arteries as small-diameter vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, L; Gualerzi, A; Boschetti, F; Loy, F; Cao, G

    2014-08-01

    Atherosclerosis and its complications still represent the leading cause of death in the developed countries. While autologous blood vessels may be regarded as the best solution for peripheral and coronary bypass, they are unavailable in most patients. Even though tissue engineering techniques are often applied to the development of small-diameter vascular grafts, limiting factors of this approach are represented by the lack of essential extracellular matrix proteins and/or poor biomechanical properties of the scaffolds used. Along these lines, the aim of this study was to develop a decellularization protocol for ovine carotids to be used as suitable small-diameter vascular grafts. Samples were treated either with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) or with Trypsin and Triton X-100; a final nuclease digestion was performed for both protocols. Morphological analyses demonstrate complete removal of nuclei and cellular components in treated vessels, also confirmed by significant reduction in wall thickness and DNA content. Essential extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen, elastin, and fibronectin are well preserved after decellularization. From a mechanical point of view, Trypsin and Triton X-100 treated arteries show elastic modules and compliance comparable to native carotids, whereas the use of SDS makes samples stiffer, with a significant decrease in the compliance mean value and an increase in longitudinal and circumferential Young's modules. It is demonstrated that the treatment where Trypsin and Triton X-100 are combined guarantees complete decellularization of carotids, with no significant alteration of biomechanical and structural properties, thus preserving a suitable environment for adhesion, proliferation, and migration of cells. PMID:25050540

  12. Evaluation of Blood Pressure Control using a New Arterial Stiffness Parameter, Cardio-ankle Vascular Index (CAVI)

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Kohji; Utino, Junji; Saiki, Atsuhito; Endo, Kei; Ohira, Masahiro; Nagayama, Daiji; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Mao; Takahara, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Arterial stiffness has been known to be a surrogate marker of arteriosclerosis, and also of vascular function. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) had been the most popular index and was known to be a predictor of cardiovascular events. But, it depends on blood pressure at measuring time. To overcome this problem, cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is developed. CAVI is derived from stiffness parameter β by Hayashi, and the equation of Bramwell-Hill, and is independent from blood pressure at a measuring time. Then, CAVI might reflect the proper change of arterial wall by antihypertensive agents. CAVI shows high value with aging and in many arteriosclerotic diseases and is also high in persons with main coronary risk factors. Furthermore, CAVI is decreased by an administration of α1 blocker, doxazosin for 2-4 hours, Those results suggested that CAVI reflected the arterial stiffness composed of organic components and of smooth muscle cell contracture. Angiotensin II receptor blocker, olmesartan decreased CAVI much more than that of calcium channel antagonist, amlodipine, even though the rates of decreased blood pressure were almost same. CAVI might differentiate the blood pressure-lowering agents from the point of the effects on proper arterial stiffness. This paper reviewed the principle and rationale of CAVI, and the possibilities of clinical applications, especially in the studies of hypertension. PMID:23807874

  13. Cytotoxicity of some oxysterols on human vascular smooth muscle cells was mediated by apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Y; Shirai, K; Ito, Y; Watanabe, J; Urano, Y; Murano, T; Tomioka, H

    1997-01-01

    A decrease in smooth muscle cells is observed in advanced atherosclerotic lesion. To understand this mechanism, we selected oxysterols as candidates for toxic lipid, and examined their cytotoxicity on human cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, together with the manner of cell death. In the presence of 7-ketocholesterol or 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol (50 mumol/L), the percentage of detached cells increased significantly with dose dependency, and an increase in detached cell number and DNA nick detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling study (TUNEL) preceded an increase in lactate dehydrogenase released into the medium. DNA extracted from smooth muscle cells incubated with 7-ketocholesterol or 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol showed a laddering pattern on agarose electrophoresis. In the presence of 7-ketocholesterol or 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol, fragmented DNA quantified by the quantitative sandwich enzyme immunoassay was significantly increased. From these results, it is proposed that 7-ketocholesterol and 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol are toxic to smooth muscle cells, and that this cytotoxicity is mediated by apoptosis. PMID:9638517

  14. Intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ wave in vascular smooth muscle cells: numerical and experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Quijano, J. C.; Raynaud, F.; Nguyen, D.; Piacentini, N.; Meister, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells exhibit intercellular Ca2+ waves in response to local mechanical or KCl stimulation. Recently, a new type of intercellular Ca2+ wave was observed in vitro in a linear arrangement of smooth muscle cells. The intercellular wave was denominated ultrafast Ca2+ wave and it was suggested to be the result of the interplay between membrane potential and Ca2+ dynamics which depended on influx of extracellular Ca2+, cell membrane depolarization and its intercel- lular propagation. In the present study we measured experimentally the conduction velocity of the membrane depolarization and performed simulations of the ultrafast Ca2+ wave along coupled smooth muscle cells. Numerical results reproduced a wide spectrum of experimental observations, including Ca2+ wave velocity, electrotonic membrane depolarization along the network, effects of inhibitors and independence of the Ca2+ wave speed on the intracellular stores. The numerical data also provided new physiological insights suggesting ranges of crucial model parameters that may be altered experimentally and that could significantly affect wave kinetics allowing the modulation of the wave characteristics experimentally. Numerical and experimental results supported the hypothesis that the propagation of membrane depolarization acts as an intercellular messenger mediating intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ waves in smooth muscle cells. PMID:27507785

  15. Circumferential alignment of vascular smooth muscle cells in a circular microfluidic channel.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Seob; Piao, Yunxian; Seo, Tae Seok

    2014-01-01

    The circumferential alignment of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) in an orthogonally micropatterned circular microfluidic channel is reported to form an in vivo-like smooth muscle cell layer. To construct a biomimetic smooth muscle cell layer which is aligned perpendicular to the axis of blood vessel, a half-circular polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel is first fabricated by soft lithography using a convex PDMS mold. Then, the orthogonally microwrinkle patterns are generated inside the half-circular microchannel by a strain responsive wrinkling method. During the UV treatment on a PDMS substrate with uniaxial 40% stretch and a subsequent strain releasing step, the microwrinkle patterns perpendicular to the axial direction of the circular microchannel are generated, which can guide the circumferential alignment of HASMCs during cultivation. The analysis of orientation angle, shape index, and contractile protein marker expression indicates that the cultured HASMCs reveal the in vivo-like cell phenotype. Finally, a fully circular microchannel is produced by bonding two half-circular microchannels, and the HASMCs are cultured circumferentially inside the channels with high alignment and viability for 5 days. These results demonstrated the creation of an in vivo-like 3D smooth muscle cell layer in the circular microfluidic channel which can provide a bioassay platforms for in-depth study of HASMC biology and vascular function. PMID:24120039

  16. Intercellular ultrafast Ca(2+) wave in vascular smooth muscle cells: numerical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Quijano, J C; Raynaud, F; Nguyen, D; Piacentini, N; Meister, J J

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells exhibit intercellular Ca(2+) waves in response to local mechanical or KCl stimulation. Recently, a new type of intercellular Ca(2+) wave was observed in vitro in a linear arrangement of smooth muscle cells. The intercellular wave was denominated ultrafast Ca(2+) wave and it was suggested to be the result of the interplay between membrane potential and Ca(2+) dynamics which depended on influx of extracellular Ca(2+), cell membrane depolarization and its intercel- lular propagation. In the present study we measured experimentally the conduction velocity of the membrane depolarization and performed simulations of the ultrafast Ca(2+) wave along coupled smooth muscle cells. Numerical results reproduced a wide spectrum of experimental observations, including Ca(2+) wave velocity, electrotonic membrane depolarization along the network, effects of inhibitors and independence of the Ca(2+) wave speed on the intracellular stores. The numerical data also provided new physiological insights suggesting ranges of crucial model parameters that may be altered experimentally and that could significantly affect wave kinetics allowing the modulation of the wave characteristics experimentally. Numerical and experimental results supported the hypothesis that the propagation of membrane depolarization acts as an intercellular messenger mediating intercellular ultrafast Ca(2+) waves in smooth muscle cells. PMID:27507785

  17. Effects of Cyclic Strain and Growth Factors on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kona, Soujanya; Chellamuthu, Prithiviraj; Xu, Hao; Hills, Seth R; Nguyen, Kytai Truong

    2009-01-01

    Under physiological and pathological conditions, vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) are exposed to different biochemical factors and biomechanical forces. Previous studies pertaining to SMC responses have not investigated the effects of both factors on SMCs. Thus, in our research we investigated the combined effects of growth factors like Bfgf (basic fibroblast growth factor), TGF-β (transforming growth factor β) and PDGF (platelet-derived growth factor) along with physiological cyclic strain on SMC responses. Physiological cyclic strain (10% strain) significantly reduced SMC proliferation compared to static controls while addition of growth factors bFGF, TGF-β or PDGF-AB had a positive influence on SMC growth compared to strain alone. Microarray analysis of SMCs exposed to these growth factors and cyclic strain showed that several bioactive genes (vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor receptor, etc.) were altered upon exposure. Further work involving biochemical and pathological cyclic strain stimulation will help us better understand the role of cyclic strain and growth factors in vascular functions and development of vascular disorders. PMID:19812708

  18. Dehydroleucodine inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in G2 phase.

    PubMed

    Cruzado, M; Castro, C; Fernandez, D; Gomez, L; Roque, M; Giordano, O E; Lopez, L A

    2005-11-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis and in the vascular changes seen in hypertension. Dehydroleucodine (DhL) is a sesquiterpene lactone that inhibits cell proliferation in plant cells. In this paper, we study the effect of DhL in the proliferation of VSMCs stimulated with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Very low concentrations of DhL (2-6 microM) inhibited VSMC proliferation and induced cell accumulation in G2. DhL did not affect the dynamics of 3H-thymidine incorporation, and did not modify either the activity of DNA polymerase or the incorporation of deoxyribonucleotides in an in vitro assay. Moreover, DhL did not induce apoptosis in VSMCs. These results indicate that DhL, in very low concentration, induces a transient arrest of VSMCs in G2. Our data show that VSMCs are especially sensitive to DhL effect, suggesting that DhL could be potentially useful to prevent the vascular pathological changes seen in hypertension and other vascular diseases. PMID:16309576

  19. Vascular Access System for Continuous Arterial Infusion of a Protease Inhibitor in Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ganaha, Fumikiyo; Yamada, Tetsuhisa; Yorozu, Naoya; Ujita, Masuo; Irie, Takeo; Fukuda, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kunihiko; Tada, Shimpei

    1999-09-15

    We used a vascular access system (VAS) for continuous arterial infusion (CAI) of a protease inhibitor in two patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The infusion catheter was placed into the dorsal pancreatic artery in the first patient and into the gastroduodenal artery in the second, via a femoral artery approach. An implantable port was then connected to the catheter and was secured in a subcutaneous pocket prepared in the right lower abdomen. No complications related to the VAS were encountered. This system provided safe and uncontaminated vascular access for successful CAI for acute pancreatitis.

  20. Activated mineralocorticoid receptor regulates micro-RNA-29b in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bretschneider, Maria; Busch, Bianca; Mueller, Daniel; Nolze, Alexander; Schreier, Barbara; Gekle, Michael; Grossmann, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Inappropriately activated mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a risk factor for vascular remodeling with unclear molecular mechanism. Recent findings suggest that post-transcriptional regulation by micro-RNAs (miRs) may be involved. Our aim was to search for MR-dependent miRs in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to explore the underlying molecular mechanism and the pathologic relevance. We detected that aldosteroneviathe MR reduces miR-29bin vivoin murine aorta and in human primary and cultured VSMCs (ED50= 0.07 nM) but not in endothelial cells [quantitative PCR (qPCR), luciferase assays]. This effect was mediated by an increased decay of miR-29b in the cytoplasm with unchanged miR-29 family member or primary-miR levels. Decreased miR-29b led to an increase in extracellular matrix measured by ELISA and qPCR and enhanced VSMC migration in single cell-tracking experiments. Additionally, cell proliferation and the apoptosis/necrosis ratio (caspase/lactate dehydrogenase assay) was modulated by miR-29b. Enhanced VSMC migration by aldosterone required miR-29b regulation. Control experiments were performed with scrambled RNA and empty plasmids, by comparing aldosterone-stimulated with vehicle-incubated cells. Overall, our findings provide novel insights into the molecular mechanism of aldosterone-mediated vascular pathogenesis by identifying miR-29b as a pathophysiologic relevant target of activated MR in VSMCs and by highlighting the importance of miR processing for miR regulation.-Bretschneider, M., Busch, B., Mueller, D., Nolze, A., Schreier, B., Gekle, M., Grossmann, C. Activated mineralocorticoid receptor regulates micro-RNA-29b in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:26728178

  1. Regulatory mechanism of human vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic transformation induced by NELIN.

    PubMed

    Pei, Changan; Qin, Shiyong; Wang, Minghai; Zhang, Shuguang

    2015-11-01

    Vascular disorders, including hypertension, atherosclerosis and restenosis, arise from dysregulation of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) differentiation, which can be controlled by regulatory factors. The present study investigated the regulatory mechanism of the phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs by NELIN in order to evaluate its potential as a preventive and therapeutic of vascular disorders. An in vitro model of NELIN‑overexpressing VSMCs was prepared by transfection with a lentiviral (LV) vector (NELIN‑VSMCs) and NELIN was slienced using an a lentiviral vector with small interfering (si)RNA in another group (LV‑NELIN‑siRNA‑VSMCs). The effects of NELIN overexpression or knockdown on the phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs were observed, and its regulatory mechanism was studied. Compared with the control group, cells in the NELIN‑VSMCs group presented a contractile phenotype with a significant increase of NELIN mRNA, NELIN protein, smooth muscle (SM)α‑actin and total Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) protein expression. The intra‑nuclear translocation of SMα‑actin‑serum response factor (SMα‑actin‑SRF) occurred in these cells simultaneously. Following exposure to Rho kinsase inhibitor Y‑27632, SRF and SMα‑actin expression decreased. However, cells in the LV‑NELIN‑siRNA‑VSMCs group presented a synthetic phenotype, and the expression of NELIN mRNA, NELIN protein, SMα‑actin protein and total RhoA protein was decreased. The occurrence of SRF extra‑nuclear translocation was observed. In conclusion, the present study suggested that NELIN was able to activate regulatory factors of SMα‑actin, RhoA and SRF successively in human VSMCs cultured in vitro. Furthermore, NELIN‑induced phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs was regulated via the RhoA/SRF signaling pathway. The results of the present study provide a foundation for the use of NELIN in preventive and therapeutic treatment of vascular remodeling

  2. Phenylephrine Decreases Vascular Tension in Goat Arteries in Specific Circumstances

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Renu R.

    2016-01-01

    Phenylephrine (PE) causes vasoconstriction through alpha adrenergic receptors. PE-induced vasodilatation has also been reported earlier in pre-constricted vessels. Here we demonstrate in spiral strips of goat arteries that addition of PE can decrease tone even from base-line levels (i.e. not pre-constricted) and show that this process requires nitric oxide (NO) and alpha adrenergic stimulation, but is cGMP-independent. Under control conditions, PE caused vasoconstriction, but under conditions where NO levels are higher, as with L-Arginine or sodium nitroprusside, PE decreased vessel tension. L-Arginine/PE combination was not able to decrease tension when alpha adrenoceptors were blocked with Phentolamine or endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was blocked with Nω-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA). Propranolol, a beta blocker, was unable to prevent the reduction in tension by the L-Arginine/PE combination. Adrenaline and noradrenaline (and not isoproterenol) also reduced vessel tension in the presence of L-Arginine. Even when NO levels were not enhanced, relieving NO from having to stimulate the enzyme soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) (either by using sGC blockers, namely ODQ or methylene blue, or by enhancing cGMP levels (with sildenafil) which by negative feedback probably inhibits sGC) led to PE-induced reduction of vascular tension. PMA—phorbol myristate acetate—an agonist which stimulates Protein Kinase C was able to prevent the ability of PE to reduce vascular tension in a high NO environment. Our conclusion is that PE reduces vascular tension through alpha adrenoceptors if there is excess NO availability to activate a putative pathway. Though the reduction of vessel tone by PE is dependent on NO, it is independent of cGMP. Prior treatment with PMA or PE itself can prevent further PE-induced reduction of tension in a high NO environment. The results here suggest, counter-intuitively, that alpha blockers may be of help in the treatment of septic shock where

  3. Enzymatic antioxidant system in vascular inflammation and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Lubrano, Valter; Balzan, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    In biological systems there is a balance between the production and neutralization of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This balance is maintained by the presence of natural antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase. The enhancement of lipid peroxidation or the decrease of antioxidant protection present in metabolic diseases or bad lifestyle can induce endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Clinical studies have shown that oxidative stress can increase ROS reducing the formation of antioxidant defences, especially in subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD). Some observation indicated that in the early stages of the disease there is a homeostatic up-regulation of the antioxidant enzyme system in response to increased free radicals to prevent vascular damage. As soon as free radicals get to chronically elevated levels, this compensation ceases. Therefore, SOD and the other enzymes may represent a good therapeutic target against ROS, but they are not useful markers for the diagnosis of CAD. In conclusion antioxidant enzymes are reduced in presence of metabolic disease and CAD. However the existence of genes that promote their enzymatic activity could contribute to create new drugs for the treatment of damage caused by metabolic diseases or lifestyle that increases the plasma ROS levels. PMID:26618108

  4. Vascular endothelial function of patients with stable coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Yang, Xinchun; Cai, Jun; Shi, Hui; Zhong, Guangzhen; Chi, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate vascular endothelial function and contributing factors in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients. Methods: One hundred twenty six CHD outpatients were randomly recruited. Reactive hyperemia index (RHI) <1.67 indicates endothelial dysfunction. Correlation between RHI and different biochemical parameters was evaluated. Results: RHI in patients receiving statins treatment was significantly higher than patients without statins treatment (P<0.05). RHI in patients with more than 3 risk factors for CHD was also markedly lower than that in patients with ≤2 risk factors (P<0.05). Patients with lesions at several branches of coronary artery had a markedly lower RHI when compared with those with coronary lesions at a single branch (P<0.05). For patients without statins treatment, RHI increased significantly after statins treatment for 1 month (P=0.01). In patients with endothelial dysfunction, FBG, HbA1C, hs-CRP and Hcy were significantly higher than those in patients with normal endothelial function (P<0.05 for all). Smokers with CHD had a remarkably lower RHI when compared with non-smokers (P<0.05). Conclusions: Smoking, FBG, HbA1C, Hcy and hs-CRP are significantly associated with endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction is also related to the numbers of risk factors for CHD, degree of coronary lesions and statins. Statins treatment may significantly improve the endothelial function of CHD patients. PMID:26150839

  5. OUABAIN- AND MARINOBUFAGENIN-INDUCED PROLIFERATION OF HUMAN UMBILICAL VEIN SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS AND A RAT VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL LINE, A7R5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the growth-promoting effects of 2 sodium pump-selective cardiotonic steroids, ouabain and marinobufagenin, on cultured cells from vascular smooth muscle (VSMCs) from human umbilical vein and a rat VSMC line, A7r5. Both ouabain and marinobufagenin activated proliferation of these cells in...

  6. T-cadherin promotes vascular smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation via a GSK3β-inactivation dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Frismantiene, Agne; Dasen, Boris; Pfaff, Dennis; Erne, Paul; Resink, Therese J; Philippova, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Participation of the cadherin superfamily of adhesion molecules in smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype modulation is poorly understood. Immunohistochemical analyses of arterial lesions indirectly suggest upregulated expression of atypical glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored T-cadherin on vascular SMCs as a molecular indicator of the dedifferentiated/proliferative phenotype. This study investigated the role of T-cadherin in SMC phenotypic modulation. Morphological, molecular and functional SMC-signature characteristics of rat, porcine and human arterial SMCs stably transduced with respect to T-cadherin upregulation (Tcad+) or T-cadherin-deficiency (shTcad) were compared with their respective control transductants (E-SMCs or shC-SMCs). Tcad+-SMCs displayed several characteristics of the dedifferentiated phenotype including loss of spindle morphology, reduced/disorganized stress fiber formation, decay of SMC-differentiation markers (smooth muscle α-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, h-caldesmon), gain of SMC-dedifferentiation marker calmodulin, reduced levels of myocardin, nuclear-to-cytoplasmic redistribution of the myocardin related transcription factors MRTFA/B and increased proliferative and migratory capacities. T-cadherin depletion enforced features of the differentiated SMC phenotype. PI3K/Akt is a major signal pathway utilized by T-cadherin in SMCs and we investigated mTORC1/S6K1 and GSK3β axes as mediators of T-cadherin-induced dedifferentiation. Inhibition of mTORC1/S6K1 signalling by rapamycin suppressed proliferation in both E-SMCs and Tcad+-SMCs but failed to restore expression of contractile protein markers in Tcad+-SMCs. Ectopic adenoviral-mediated co-expression of constitutively active GSK3β mutant S9A in Tcad+-SMCs restored the morphological and molecular marker characteristics of differentiated SMCs and normalized rate of proliferation to that in control SMCs. In conclusion our study demonstrates that T-cadherin promotes acquisition of the

  7. Regulatory effects of eicosanoids on thymidine uptake by vascular smooth muscle cells of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Y.; Ishimitsu, T.; Kimura, K.; Ishii, M.; Ikeda, T.; Sugimoto, T.

    1988-12-01

    To define the roles of eicosanoids in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) growth, we examined the effects of exogenous eicosanoids on (/sup 3/H)thymidine uptake by cultured VSMC of Wistar rats. Stable prostacyclin (PGI2) analog, OP-41483, significantly decreased the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of VSMC in a dose dependent manner from 10(-8) to 10(-4) M. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGD2 ranging from 10(-8) to 10(-4) M also dose-dependently decreased the (/sup 3/H)thymidine uptake by VSMC. In contrast, stable thromboxane A2 analog, STA2, significantly increased the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA in a dose dependent manner from 10(-8) to 10(-4) M. The dose response curve of STA2 was shifted toward a lowered response when 10(-5) M PGI2 analog, PGE2 or PGD2 was added in the culture medium. Thus, it is indicated that vasodepressor eicosanoids decrease the proliferation of VSMC, whereas vasoconstrictor TXA2 enhances the VSMC growth. Vascular smooth muscle cells possibly autoregulate the cell proliferation through the eicosanoids generation.

  8. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier; Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine; Morel, Nicole

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  9. Peptides PHI and VIP: comparison between vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle effect in rabbit uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Bardrum, B.; Ottesen, B.; Fahrenkrug, J.

    1986-07-01

    The distribution and effects of the two neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and peptide histidine isoleucine amide (PHI), on vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle in the urogenital tract of nonpregnant rabbit female, were investigated. Immunoreactive VIP and PHI were present in all regions except the ovary with the highest concentration in the uterin cervix. By using in vitro tension recordings of myometrial specimens, it was demonstrated that both peptides displayed a dose-dependent inhibition of the mechanical activity. The dose-response curves of VIP and PHI were superimposable with and ID50 of 3 x 10 Y mol/l, and their combined effect was additive. In addition, the influence of the two peptides on myometrial blood flow (MBF) was investigated by the xenon-133 washout technique. Both peptides were found to increase MBF with the same potency and efficacy. Their combined effect was additive. In conclusion VIP and PHI are present in the rabbit urogenital tract, and the two peptides are equipotent inhibitors of mechanical nonvascular and vascular smooth muscle activity in the uterus.

  10. Metabolomic Profiling of Cellular Responses to Carvedilol Enantiomers in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingxuan; Bai, Jing; Chen, Wei Ning; Ching, Chi Bun

    2010-01-01

    Carvedilol is a non-selective β-blocker indicated in the treatment of hypertension and heart failure. Although the differential pharmacological effects of individual Carvedilol enantiomer is supported by preceding studies, the cellular response to each enantiomer is not well understood. Here we report the use of GC-MS metabolomic profiling to study the effects of Carvedilol enantiomers on vascular smooth muscle cells (A7r5) and to shed new light on molecular events underlying Carvedilol treatment. The metabolic analysis revealed alternations in the levels of 8 intracellular metabolites and 5 secreted metabolites in A7r5 cells incubated separately with S- and R-Carvedilol. Principal component analysis of the metabolite data demonstrated the characteristic metabolic signatures in S- and R-Carvedilol-treated cells. A panel of metabolites, including L-serine, L-threonine, 5-oxoproline, myristic acid, palmitic acid and inositol are closely correlated to the vascular smooth muscle contraction. Our findings reveal the differentiating metabolites for A7r5 cells incubated with individual enantiomer of Carvedilol, which opens new perspectives to employ metabolic profiling platform to study chiral drug-cell interactions and aid their incorporation into future improvement of β-blocker therapy. PMID:21124793

  11. Calcium entry blocking drugs, 'calcium antagonists' and vascular smooth muscle function.

    PubMed

    Bou, J; Llenas, J; Massingham, R

    1983-09-01

    The group of drugs known as "calcium antagonists' is under extensive investigation in experimental animals and man and a re-evaluation of their pharmacological properties is overdue. Recent proposals to adopt the more specific nomenclature of calcium entry blockers for some of these compounds (Vanhoutte & Bohr, 1981) should be supported since there is much confusion in the literature with this class of compound. In this review, which concentrates on vascular smooth muscle, only nifedipine, verapamil, their close chemical analogues and diltiazem are recognised as being relatively selective calcium entry blocking drugs. Whilst definitive evidence for calcium entry blockade must include the demonstration of a selective inhibition of Ca2+-influx into a tissue over a range of concentrations also inhibiting contraction, it is nevertheless possible to define several simple pharmacological criteria which may aid in the identification of such activity. These criteria include the selective antagonism of K+ and Ca2+-induced contractions, relative to those of noradrenaline in suitable vascular smooth muscle preparations and a selective inhibition of alpha 2- as opposed to alpha 1-adrenoreceptor mediated pressor responses in, for example, pithed rat preparations. Recent pharmacological and biochemical studies have identified 3 major subgroups of "calcium antagonist' drugs but the compounds within each subgroup varies with the technique adopted. It is therefore suggested that a combination of both pharmacological and ligand-binding studies be used for purposes of classification. Which mechanism, if any, of inhibiting calcium entry is therapeutically most desirable remains an important question for future research. PMID:6315739

  12. Vasopressin induces release of arachidonic acid from vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grillone, L.R.; Clark, M.A.; Heckman, G.; Schmidt, D.; Stassen, F.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Cultured smooth muscle cells (A-10), derived from rat thoracic aorta, have vascular (V/sub 1/) vasopressin receptors. They have previously shown that these receptors mediate phosphatidylinositol turnover, Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, and inhibition of isoproterenol-induced increases in cAMP. Here they studied the effect of vasopressin on arachidonic acid metabolism of A-10 cells. Cells were incubated for 18-20 hr with (/sup 3/H)-arachidonic acid (80 Ci/mmol). Vasopressin stimulated release of arachidonic acid in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Significant release of arachidonic acid was observed after 4 min with 10/sup -9/ M vasopressin. Maximum release was reached 4 min after addition of 10/sup -7/ M vasopressin (1100 dpm/10/sup 6/ cells). About 800 dmp were released after 1 and 4 min with 10/sup -7/ M and 10/sup -8/ M vasopressin, respectively. The vasopressin-stimulated release of arachidonic acid was blocked by the specific V/sub 1//V/sub 2/ vasopressin antagonist d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)VAVP. These data indicate that vascular smooth muscle cells increase arachidonic acid release in response to vasopressin. This response is likely mediated by V/sub 1/ receptors.

  13. Consequences of postnatal vascular smooth muscle EGFR deletion on acute angiotensin II action.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Barbara; Hünerberg, Mirja; Rabe, Sindy; Mildenberger, Sigrid; Bethmann, Daniel; Heise, Christian; Sibilia, Maria; Offermanns, Stefan; Gekle, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Epi dermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) is activated by its canonical ligands and transactivated by various vasoactive substances, e.g. angiotensin II (Ang II). Vascular EGFR has been proposed to be involved in vascular tissue homoeostasis and remodelling. Thus, most studies have focused on its role during long-term vascular changes whereas the relevance for acute regulation of vascular function in vivo and ex vivo is insufficiently understood. To investigate the postnatal role of VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) EGFR in vivo and ex vivo, we generated a mouse model with cell-specific and inducible deletion of VSMC EGFR and studied the effect on basal blood pressure, acute pressure response to, among others, Ang II in vivo as well as ex vivo, cardiovascular tissue homoeostasis and vessel morphometry in male mice. In knockout (KO) animals, systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressures were reduced compared with wild-type (WT). Furthermore, Ang II-induced pressure load was lower in KO animals, as was Ang II-induced force development and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in aortic rings from KO animals. By contrast, we observed no difference in force development during application of serotonin, KCl, endothelin-1 or endothelin-1-induced pressure load in KO animals. In addition, nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation was not affected. Heart weight (HW) increase and up-regulation of aortic and cardiac expression of Ccl2 (chemoattractant protein-2) and serpinE1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1) during the transition from 4- to 10-months of age were prevented by VSMC EGFR KO. We conclude that VSMC EGFR is involved in basal blood pressure homoeostasis and acute pressure response to Ang II, and thereby contributes to maturation-related remodelling. PMID:26438881

  14. Equol increases cerebral blood flow in rats via activation of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Wang, Yan; Song, Zheng; Zhao, Li-Mei; Li, Gui-Rong; Deng, Xiu-Ling

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of equol on cerebral blood flow and the underlying molecular mechanisms. The regional cerebral blood flow in parietal lobe of rats was measured by using a laser Doppler flowmetry. Isolated cerebral basilar artery and mesenteric artery rings from rats were used for vascular reactivity measurement with a multi wire myography system. Outward K(+) current in smooth muscle cells of cerebral basilar artery, large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel current in BK-HEK 293 cells stably expressing both human α (hSlo)- and β1-subunits, and hSlo channel current in hSlo-HEK 293 cells expressing only the α-subunit of BK channels were recorded with whole cell patch-clamp technique. The results showed that equol significantly increased regional cerebral blood flow in rats, and produced a concentration-dependent but endothelium-independent relaxation in rat cerebral basilar arteries. Both paxilline and iberiotoxin, two selective BK channel blockers, significantly inhibited equol-induced vasodilation in cerebral arteries. Outward K(+) currents in smooth muscle cells of cerebral basilar artery were increased by equol and fully reversed by washout or blockade of BK channels with iberiotoxin. Equol remarkably enhanced human BK current in BK-HEK 293 cells, but not hSlo current in hSlo-HEK 293 cells, and the increase was completely abolished by co-application of paxilline. Our findings provide the first information that equol selectively stimulates BK channel current by acting on its β1 subunit, which may in turn contribute to the equol-mediated vasodilation and cerebral blood flow increase. PMID:26995303

  15. Protein Expression by Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells Containing a BMPR2 Mutation and the Action of ET-1 as Determined by Proteomic Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chunxiang; Yu, Jun; Taylor, Linda; Polgar, Peter; McComb, Mark E.; Costello, Catherine E.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disease characterized by increased pulmonary vascular resistance and remodeling. Increase in the population of vascular smooth muscle cells is among the key events contributing to the remodeling. Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor, is linked to the etiology and progression of PAH. Here we analyze changes in protein expressions in response to ET-1 in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) from a healthy Control (non-PAH) and a PAH subject presenting a bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPR2) mutation with exon 1–8 deletion. Protein expressions were analyzed by proteomic mass spectrometry using label-free quantitation and the correlations were subjected to Ingenuity™ Pathway Analysis. The results point to eIF2/mTOR/p70S6K, RhoA/actin cytoskeleton/integrin and protein unbiquitination as canonical pathways whose protein expressions increase with the development of PAH. These pathways have an intimal function in the PAH-related physiology of smooth muscle proliferation, apoptosis, contraction and cellular stress. Exposure of the cells to ET-1 further increases protein expression within these pathways. Thus our results show changes in signaling pathways as a consequence of PAH and the effect of ET-1 interference on Control and PAH-affected cells. PMID:25866469

  16. Essential role for calcium waves in migration of human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Tanguma, Ricardo; O'Neil, Caroline; Chrones, Tom; Pickering, J Geoffrey; Sims, Stephen M

    2011-08-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration is characterized by extension of the lamellipodia at the leading edge, lamellipodial attachment to substrate, and release of the rear (uropod) of the cell, all of which enable forward movement. However, little is known regarding the role of intracellular cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in coordinating these distinct activities of migrating SMCs. The objective of our study was to determine whether regional changes of Ca(2+) orchestrate the migratory cycle in human vascular SMCs. We carried out Ca(2+) imaging using digital fluorescence microscopy of fura-2 loaded human smooth muscle cells. We found that motile SMCs exhibited Ca(2+) waves that characteristically swept from the rear of polarized cells toward the leading edge. Ca(2+) waves were less evident in nonpolarized, stationary cells, although acute stimulation of these SMCs with the agonists platelet-derived growth factor-BB or histamine could elicit transient rise of [Ca(2+)](i). To investigate a role for Ca(2+) waves in the migratory cycle, we loaded cells with the Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA, which abolished Ca(2+) waves and significantly reduced retraction, supporting a causal role for Ca(2+) in initiation of retraction. However, lamellipod motility was still evident in BAPTA-loaded cells. The incidence of Ca(2+) oscillations was reduced when Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores was disrupted with the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin or by treatment with the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor blocker 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl borate or xestospongin C, implicating Ca(2+) stores in generation of waves. We conclude that Ca(2+) waves are essential for migration of human vascular SMCs and can encode cell polarity. PMID:21572011

  17. Pulsed ultraviolet laser irradiation produces endothelium-independent relaxation of vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Steg, P.G.; Rongione, A.J.; Gal, D.; DeJesus, S.T.; Clarke, R.H.; Isner, J.M.

    1989-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that continuous wave laser irradiation induces contraction of vascular smooth muscle, except at powers far below the threshold for tissue ablation. To determine the corresponding effects of pulsed laser irradiation on vascular smooth muscle tone, vascular rings of rabbit thoracic aorta were mounted isometrically with 1 g tension in Krebs-bicarbonate buffer and irradiated with 308 or 351 nm from an excimer laser through a 400-microns optical fiber. A total of 250 exposures were performed with 1-6.5 mJ/pulse (fluence = 0.8-5.5 J/cm2), 10-50 Hz, and cumulative exposures of 10-120 seconds. Excimer laser irradiation in combinations of pulse energy (PE), repetition rate (RR), and cumulative exposure below, at, or above threshold for tissue ablation consistently produced relaxation unassociated with contraction in each of the 250 exposures. For the total 250 exposures, the magnitude of relaxation (reduction in recorded tension, Rmax) was 55 +/- 4% (mean +/- SEM) of maximum vasomotor reactivity recorded in the specimen in response to administration of serotonin. Rmax varied directly with both PE and RR. When PE was increased from 1 to 5 mJ/pulse (n = 13), Rmax increased from 57 +/- 19% to 80 +/- 19% (p less than 0.0001); when RR was increased from 10 to 50 Hz (n = 10), Rmax increased from 27 +/- 8 to 46 +/- 8 (p less than 0.0001). Rmax varied independently of endothelial integrity (assessed anatomically and pharmacologically) and wavelength (308 vs. 351 nm). Simultaneously recorded tissue-temperature profiles disclosed that during pulsed laser irradiation, tissue temperature rise did not exceed 5/degree/C.

  18. The Role of Monitoring Arterial Stiffness with Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index in the Control of Lifestyle-Related Diseases.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Kohji; Saiki, Atsuhito; Nagayama, Daiji; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Mao

    2015-09-01

    Arteriosclerosis is a major contributor to cardiovascular diseases. One of the difficulties in controlling those diseases is the lack of a suitable indicator of arteriosclerosis or arterial injury in routine clinical practice. Arterial stiffness was supposed to be one of the monitoring indexes of arteriosclerosis. Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is reflecting the stiffness of the arterial tree from the origin of the aorta to the ankle, and one of the features of CAVI is independency from blood pressure at a measuring time. When doxazosin, an α1-adrenergic blocker, was administered, CAVI decreased, indicating that arterial stiffness is composed of both organic stiffness and functional stiffness, which reflects the contraction of arterial smooth muscle. CAVI shows a high value with aging and in many arteriosclerotic diseases, and is also high in persons possessing main coronary risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, hypertension and smoking. Furthermore, when the most of those risk factors were controlled by proper methods, CAVI improved. Furthermore, the co-relationship between CAVI and heart function was demonstrated during treatment of heart failure. This paper reviews the principle and rationale of CAVI, and discusses the meaning of monitoring CAVI in following up so-called lifestyle-related diseases and cardiac dysfunction in routine clinical practice. PMID:26587461

  19. IGF-1 Has Plaque-Stabilizing Effects in Atherosclerosis by Altering Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    von der Thüsen, Jan H.; Borensztajn, Keren S.; Moimas, Silvia; van Heiningen, Sandra; Teeling, Peter; van Berkel, Theo J.C.; Biessen, Erik A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling is important for the maintenance of plaque stability in atherosclerosis due to its effects on vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) phenotype. To investigate this hypothesis, we studied the effects of the highly inflammatory milieu of the atherosclerotic plaque on IGF-1 signaling and stability-related phenotypic parameters of murine vSMCs in vitro, and the effects of IGF-1 supplementation on plaque phenotype in an atherosclerotic mouse model. M1-polarized, macrophage-conditioned medium inhibited IGF-1 signaling by ablating IGF-1 and increasing IGF-binding protein 3, increased vSMC apoptosis, and decreased proliferation. Expression of α-actin and col3a1 genes was strongly attenuated by macrophage-conditioned medium, whereas expression of matrix-degrading enzymes was increased. Importantly, all of these effects could be corrected by supplementation with IGF-1. In vivo, treatment with the stable IGF-1 analog Long R3 IGF-1 in apolipoprotein E knockout mice reduced stenosis and core size, and doubled cap/core ratio in early atherosclerosis. In advanced plaques, Long R3 IGF-1 increased the vSMC content of the plaque by more than twofold and significantly reduced the rate of intraplaque hemorrhage. We believe that IGF-1 in atherosclerotic plaques may have a role in preventing plaque instability, not only by modulating smooth muscle cell turnover, but also by altering smooth muscle cell phenotype. PMID:21281823

  20. IGF-1 has plaque-stabilizing effects in atherosclerosis by altering vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    von der Thüsen, Jan H; Borensztajn, Keren S; Moimas, Silvia; van Heiningen, Sandra; Teeling, Peter; van Berkel, Theo J C; Biessen, Erik A L

    2011-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling is important for the maintenance of plaque stability in atherosclerosis due to its effects on vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) phenotype. To investigate this hypothesis, we studied the effects of the highly inflammatory milieu of the atherosclerotic plaque on IGF-1 signaling and stability-related phenotypic parameters of murine vSMCs in vitro, and the effects of IGF-1 supplementation on plaque phenotype in an atherosclerotic mouse model. M1-polarized, macrophage-conditioned medium inhibited IGF-1 signaling by ablating IGF-1 and increasing IGF-binding protein 3, increased vSMC apoptosis, and decreased proliferation. Expression of α-actin and col3a1 genes was strongly attenuated by macrophage-conditioned medium, whereas expression of matrix-degrading enzymes was increased. Importantly, all of these effects could be corrected by supplementation with IGF-1. In vivo, treatment with the stable IGF-1 analog Long R3 IGF-1 in apolipoprotein E knockout mice reduced stenosis and core size, and doubled cap/core ratio in early atherosclerosis. In advanced plaques, Long R3 IGF-1 increased the vSMC content of the plaque by more than twofold and significantly reduced the rate of intraplaque hemorrhage. We believe that IGF-1 in atherosclerotic plaques may have a role in preventing plaque instability, not only by modulating smooth muscle cell turnover, but also by altering smooth muscle cell phenotype. PMID:21281823

  1. The role of protein breakdown in growth, quiescence, and starvation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Libby, P; O'Brien, K V

    1984-03-01

    Protein accumulation in growing cells may be due in part to a reduction in the rate of protein breakdown. Previous studies of the relation of cell proliferation to protein degradation often produced growth arrest by conditions that may involve nutritional deprivation. However, nutrient lack can itself accelerate proteolysis and produce negative protein balance. We therefore reexamined the relation between growth and protein breakdown using a more selective method for limiting cell growth. We produced quiescent cell cultures using a chemically defined, serum-free medium supplemented with hormones and nutrients. Such media can maintain viability and near neutral protein balance in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, in part because of reduced breakdown of cellular protein. We then compared rates of protein degradation in these quiescent but not starving cells, to those of cultures stimulated to grow by addition of mitogenic substances. Platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, or fetuin added to insulin-containing medium stimulated growth of smooth muscle cells, but further reduced protein breakdown only slightly. Contrary to the implications of certain previous studies, our results show that proliferating cells can accumulate protein without an appreciable reduction in the rates of protein breakdown. Thus, while accelerated proteolysis appears to be an important adaptation to adverse nutritional conditions, growth of smooth muscle cells does not require changes in overall protein breakdown, but occurs primarily through an increase in protein synthesis. PMID:6365933

  2. Calphostin-C induction of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis proceeds through phospholipase D and microtubule inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xi-Long; Gui, Yu; Du, Guangwei; Frohman, Michael A; Peng, Dao-Quan

    2004-02-20

    Calphostin-C, a protein kinase C inhibitor, induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the mechanisms are not completely defined. Because apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells is critical in several proliferating vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty, we decided to investigate the mechanisms underlying the calphostin-C-induced apoptotic pathway. We show here that apoptosis is inhibited by the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid, a metabolite of phospholipase D (PLD), and that calphostin-C inhibits completely the activities of both isoforms of PLD, PLD1 and PLD2. Overexpression of either PLD1 or PLD2 prevented the vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal but not the calphostin-C-elicited apoptosis. These data suggest that PLDs have anti-apoptotic effects and that complete inhibition of PLD activity by calphostin-C induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis. We also report that calphostin-C induced microtubule disruption and that the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid inhibits calphostin-C effects on microtubules, suggesting a role for PLD in stabilizing the microtubule network. Overexpressing PLD2 in Chinese hamster ovary cells phenocopies this result, providing strong support for the hypothesis. Finally, taxol, a microtubule stabilizer, not only inhibited the calphostin-C-induced microtubule disruption but also inhibited apoptosis. We therefore conclude that calphostin-C induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibiting PLD activity and subsequent microtubule polymerization. PMID:14660552

  3. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Stiffness as a Mechanism for Increased Aortic Stiffness with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hongyu; Zhu, Yi; Sun, Zhe; Trzeciakowski, Jerome P.; Gansner, Meredith; Depre, Christophe; Resuello, Ranillo R.G.; Natividad, Filipinas F.; Hunter, William C.; Genin, Guy M.; Elson, Elliot L.; Vatner, Dorothy E.; Meininger, Gerald A.; Vatner, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Increased aortic stiffness, an important feature of many vascular diseases, e.g., aging, hypertension, atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysms, is assumed due to changes in extracellular matrix (ECM). Objective We tested the hypothesis that the mechanisms also involve intrinsic stiffening of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Methods and Results Stiffness was measured in vitro both by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and in a reconstituted tissue model, using VSMCs from aorta of young versus old male monkeys (Macaca fascicularis, n=7/group), where aortic stiffness increases by 200 % in vivo. The apparent elastic modulus was increased (P<0.05) in old VSMCs (41.7±0.5 kPa) versus young (12.8±0.3 kPa), but not after disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D. Stiffness of the VSMCs in the reconstituted tissue model was also higher (P<0.05) in old (23.3±3.0 kPa) than in young (13.7±2.4 kPa). Conclusions These data support the novel concept, not appreciated previously, that increased vascular stiffness with aging is due not only to changes in ECM, but also to intrinsic changes in VSMCs. PMID:20634486

  4. Biphasic responses of human vascular smooth muscle cells to magnesium ion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-02-01

    Magnesium-based alloys are promising in biodegradable cardiovascular stent applications. The degradation products of magnesium stents may have significant impacts on the surrounding vascular cells. However, knowledge on the interactions between magnesium ion and vascular cells at the molecular and cellular levels is still largely missing. Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of restenosis and wound healing after stent implantation. This study evaluated the short-term effects of extracellular magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) on the cellular behaviors of SMCs. Cellular responses to Mg(2+) were biphasic and in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations (10 mM) of Mg(2+) increased cell viability, cell proliferation rate, cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell migration rate, and actin expression. In contrast, higher concentrations (40-60 mM) of Mg(2+) had deleterious effects on cells. Gene expression analysis revealed that Mg(2+) altered the expressions of genes mostly related to cell adhesion, cell injury, angiogenesis, inflammation, coagulation, and cell growth. Finding from this study provides some valuable information on SMC responses toward magnesium ions at the cellular and molecular levels, and guidance for future controlled release of magnesium from the stent material. PMID:26402437

  5. Activation of Transcription Factor GAX and Concomitant Downregulation of IL-1β and ERK1/2 Modulate Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Phenotype in 3D Fibrous Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shigang; Mequanint, Kibret

    2015-09-01

    Since vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) display phenotypic plasticity in response to changing environmental cues, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenotypic modulation mediated by a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold is important to engineer functional vasculature. Following cell seeding into 3D scaffolds, the synthetic phenotype is desired to enable cells to expand rapidly and produce and assemble extracellular matrix components, but must revert to a quiescent contractile phenotype after tissue fabrication to impart the contractile properties found in native blood vessels. This study shows that 3D electrospun fibrous scaffolds regulate human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) toward a more synthetic phenotype characterized by reduced contractile markers, such as smooth muscle alpha-actin and calponin. The reduction in contractile markers expression was mediated by endogenously expressed proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β). 3D topography transiently induces concomitant upregulation of IL-1β and MAPK ERK1/2 through nuclear factor-κB-dependent signaling pathway. An early burst of expression of IL-1β is essential for suppression of the homeobox transcription factor Gax and related cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(Cip1), which are key regulators for cells exiting from cell cycle. Our findings provide new insights for understanding signaling mechanisms of HCASMCs in electrospun 3D fibrous scaffolds, which have considerable value for application in vascular tissue engineering. PMID:26041434

  6. Phosphorylation of GATA-6 is required for vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation after mTORC1 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yi; Jin, Yu; Merenick, Bethany L.; Ding, Min; Fetalvero, Kristina M.; Wagner, Robert J.; Mai, Alice; Gleim, Scott; Tucker, David; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Luciano, Amelia K.; Sessa, William C.; Rzucidlo, Eva M.; Powell, Richard J.; Hou, Lin; Zhao, Hongyu; Hwa, John; Yu, Jun; Martin, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) undergo transcriptionally regulated reversible differentiation in growing and injured blood vessels. This de-differentiation also contributes to VSMC hyperplasia following vascular injury, including that caused by angioplasty and stenting. Stents provide mechanical support and can contain and release rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Rapamycin suppresses VSMC hyperplasia and promotes VSMC differentiation. We report that rapamycin-induced differentiation of VSMCs required the transcription factor GATA-6. Inhibition of mTORC1 stabilized GATA-6 and promoted the nuclear accumulation of GATA-6, its binding to DNA, and its transactivation of promoters encoding contractile proteins and inhibitors of proliferation. These effects were mediated by phosphorylation of GATA-6 at Ser290, potentially by Akt2, a kinase that is activated in VSMCs when mTORC1 is inhibited. Rapamycin induced phosphorylation of GATA-6 in wild-type mice, but not in Akt2−/− mice. Intimal hyperplasia after arterial injury was greater in Akt2−/− mice than in wild-type mice, and the exacerbated response in Akt2−/− mice was rescued to a greater extent by local overexpression of the wild-type or phosphomimetic (S290D) mutant GATA-6 than by that of the phosphorylation-deficient (S290A) mutant. Our data indicated that GATA-6 and Akt2 are involved in the mTORC1-mediated regulation of VSMC proliferation and differentiation. Identifying the downstream transcriptional targets of mTORC1 may provide cell type-specific drug targets to combat cardiovascular diseases associated with excessive proliferation of VSMCs. PMID:25969542

  7. Phosphorylation of GATA-6 is required for vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation after mTORC1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Jin, Yu; Merenick, Bethany L; Ding, Min; Fetalvero, Kristina M; Wagner, Robert J; Mai, Alice; Gleim, Scott; Tucker, David F; Birnbaum, Morris J; Ballif, Bryan A; Luciano, Amelia K; Sessa, William C; Rzucidlo, Eva M; Powell, Richard J; Hou, Lin; Zhao, Hongyu; Hwa, John; Yu, Jun; Martin, Kathleen A

    2015-05-12

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) undergo transcriptionally regulated reversible differentiation in growing and injured blood vessels. This dedifferentiation also contributes to VSMC hyperplasia after vascular injury, including that caused by angioplasty and stenting. Stents provide mechanical support and can contain and release rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Rapamycin suppresses VSMC hyperplasia and promotes VSMC differentiation. We report that rapamycin-induced differentiation of VSMCs required the transcription factor GATA-6. Inhibition of mTORC1 stabilized GATA-6 and promoted the nuclear accumulation of GATA-6, its binding to DNA, its transactivation of promoters encoding contractile proteins, and its inhibition of proliferation. These effects were mediated by phosphorylation of GATA-6 at Ser(290), potentially by Akt2, a kinase that is activated in VSMCs when mTORC1 is inhibited. Rapamycin induced phosphorylation of GATA-6 in wild-type mice, but not in Akt2(-/-) mice. Intimal hyperplasia after arterial injury was greater in Akt2(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice, and the exacerbated response in Akt2(-/-) mice was rescued to a greater extent by local overexpression of the wild-type or phosphomimetic (S290D) mutant GATA-6 than by that of the phosphorylation-deficient (S290A) mutant. Our data indicated that GATA-6 and Akt2 are involved in the mTORC1-mediated regulation of VSMC proliferation and differentiation. Identifying the downstream transcriptional targets of mTORC1 may provide cell type-specific drug targets to combat cardiovascular diseases associated with excessive proliferation of VSMCs. PMID:25969542

  8. Modeling smooth muscle cell proliferation of coronary artery expanded with a drug eluting stent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Suping

    2010-03-01

    The drug eluting coronary stent is for the treatment of narrowed coronary artery. A high strength balloon is used to open the narrowed vessel and leave behind a tiny metal mesh, or stent, to mechanically prevent the vessel from re-narrowing and biologically slow down proliferation of the smooth muscle cells. However, the drug eluting stents that had better performance also more seriously prevented the healing processes of the vessels, which could cause serious thrombotic reactions. In this study, we assume the healing process is controlled by proper proliferation of smooth cells. We also assume that the inflammation reactions and mechanical traction drive the smooth muscle cells to proliferate while the drug loaded in the stents drives the processes at the opposite direction. Numerical calculation was applied to the system. The drug distribution and elution durations, inflammation reactions and mechanical traction were discussed.

  9. Myocardin is required for maintenance of vascular and visceral smooth muscle homeostasis during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianhe; Wang, Tao; Wright, Alexander C; Yang, Jifu; Zhou, Su; Li, Li; Yang, Jisheng; Small, Aeron; Parmacek, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Myocardin is a muscle-restricted transcriptional coactivator that activates a serum response factor (SRF)-dependent gene program required for cardiogenesis and embryonic survival. To identify myocardin-dependent functions in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) during postnatal development, mice harboring a SMC-restricted conditional, inducible Myocd null mutation were generated and characterized. Tamoxifen-treated SMMHC-Cre(ERT2)/Myocd(F/F) conditional mutant mice die within 6 mo of Myocd gene deletion, exhibiting profound derangements in the structure of great arteries as well as the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts. Conditional mutant mice develop arterial aneurysms, dissection, and rupture, recapitulating pathology observed in heritable forms of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD). SMCs populating arteries of Myocd conditional mutant mice modulate their phenotype by down-regulation of SMC contractile genes and up-regulation of extracellular matrix proteins. Surprisingly, this is accompanied by SMC autonomous activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy, which over time progress to programmed cell death. Consistent with these observations, Myocd conditional mutant mice develop remarkable dilation of the stomach, small intestine, bladder, and ureters attributable to the loss of visceral SMCs disrupting the muscularis mucosa. Taken together, these data demonstrate that during postnatal development, myocardin plays a unique, and important, role required for maintenance and homeostasis of the vasculature, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts. The loss of myocardin in SMCs triggers ER stress and autophagy, which transitions to apoptosis, revealing evolutionary conservation of myocardin function in SMCs and cardiomyocytes. PMID:25805819

  10. Longitudinal distribution of vascular resistance in the pulmonary arteries, capillaries, and veins

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Jerome S.; Stemmler, Edward J.; DuBois, Arthur B.

    1968-01-01

    A new method has been described for measuring the pressure and resistance to blood flow in the pulmonary arteries, capillaries, and veins. Studies were performed in dog isolated lung lobes perfused at constant flow with blood from a donor dog. Pulmonary artery and vein volume and total lobar blood volume were measured by the ether plethysmograph and dyedilution techniques. The longitudinal distribution of vascular resistance was determined by analyzing the decrease in perfusion pressure caused by a bolus of low viscosity liquid introduced into the vascular inflow of the lobe. The pulmonary arteries were responsible for 46% of total lobar vascular resistance, whereas the pulmonary capillaries and veins accounted for 34 and 20% of total lobar vascular resistance respectively. Vascular resistance was 322 dynes ·sec·cm-5/ml of vessel in the lobar pulmonary arteries, 112 dynes·sec·cm-5/ml in the pulmonary capillaries, and 115 dynes·sec·cm-5/ml in the lobar pulmonary veins. Peak vascular resistivity (resistance per milliliter of volume) was in an area 2 ml proximal to the capillary bed, but resistivity was high throughout the pulmonary arterial tree. The pulmonary arteries accounted for approximately 50% of vascular resistance upstream from the sluice point when alveolar pressure exceeded venous pressure. The method described provides the first measurements of pulmonary capillary pressure. Mid-capillary pressure averaged 13.3 cm H2O, pulmonary artery pressure averaged 20.4 cm H2O, and pulmonary vein pressure averaged 9.2 cm H2O. These techniques also provide a way of analyzing arterial, capillary, and venous responses to various pharmacologic and physiologic stimuli. PMID:4868032

  11. Calpain-2 activates Akt via TGF-β1-mTORC2 pathway in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Abeyrathna, Prasanna; Kovacs, Laszlo; Han, Weihong; Su, Yunchao

    2016-07-01

    Calpain is a family of calcium-dependent nonlysosomal neutral cysteine endopeptidases. Akt is a serine/threonine kinase that belongs to AGC kinases and plays important roles in cell survival, growth, proliferation, angiogenesis, and cell metabolism. Both calpain and Akt are the downstream signaling molecules of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and mediate PDGF-induced collagen synthesis and proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in pulmonary vascular remodeling. We found that inhibitions of calpain-2 by using calpain inhibitor MDL28170 and calpain-2 small interfering RNA attenuated Akt phosphorylations at serine-473 (S473) and threonine-308 (T308), as well as collagen synthesis and cell proliferation of PASMCs induced by PDGF. Overexpression of calpain-2 in PASMCs induced dramatic increases in Akt phosphorylations at S473 and T308. Moreover, knockout of calpain attenuated Akt phosphorylations at S473 and T308 in smooth muscle of pulmonary arterioles of mice with chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. The cell-permeable-specific transforming growth factor (TGF)-β receptor inhibitor SB431542 attenuated Akt phosphorylations at both S473 and T308 induced by PDGF and by overexpressed calpain-2 in PASMCs. Furthermore, SB-431452 and knocking down activin receptor-like kinase-5 significantly reduced PDGF-induced collagen synthesis and cell proliferation of PASMCs. Nevertheless, neutralizing extracellular TGF-β1 using a cell-impermeable TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody did not affect PDGF-induced Akt phosphorylations at S473 and T308. Furthermore, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) by knocking down its component protein Rictor prevented Akt phosphorylations at S473 and T308 induced by PDGF and by overexpressed calpain-2. These data provide first evidence supporting that calpain-2 upregulates PDGF-induced Akt phosphorylation in pulmonary vascular remodeling via an intracrine TGF-β1/mTORC2 mechanism. PMID:27099352

  12. Modulating the dysregulated migration of pulmonary arterial hypertensive smooth muscle cells with motif mimicking cell permeable peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jamie L.; Rupasinghe, Chamila; Usheva, Anny; Warburton, Rod; Kaplan, Chloe; Taylor, Linda; Hill, Nicholas; Mierke, Dale F.; Polgar, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells is a key element in remodeling during pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We are observing key alterations in the migratory characteristics of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMC) isolated from transplanted lungs of subjects with PAH. Using wound migration and barrier removal assays, we demonstrate that the PAH cells migrate under quiescent growth conditions and in the absence of pro-migratory factors such as platelet derived growth factor (PDGF). Under the same conditions, in the absence of PDGF, non-PAH HPASMC show negligible migration. The dysregulated migration initiates, in part, through phosphorylation events signaled through the unstimulated PDGF receptor via focal adhesion kinase (FAK) whose total basal expression and phosphorylation at tyrosine 391 is markedly increased in the PAH cells and is inhibited by a motif mimicking cell-permeable peptide (MMCPP) targeting the Tyr751 region of the PDGF receptor and by imatinib. However, exposure of the PAH cells to PDGF further promotes migration. Inhibition of p21 activated kinases (PAK), LIM kinases (LIMK), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) reduces both the dysregulated and the PDGF-stimulated migration. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirms these observations showing activated JNK and p38 MAPK at the edge of the wound but not in the rest of the culture in the PAH cells. The upstream inhibitors FAK (PF-573228) and imatinib block this activation of JNK and p38 at the edge of the site of injury and correspondingly inhibit migration. MMCPP which inhibit the activation of downstream effectors of migration, cofilin and caldesmon, also limit the dysregulated migration. These results highlight key pathways which point to potential targets for future therapies of pulmonary hypertension with MMCPP.

  13. Inhibitory mechanism of tranilast in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells proliferation, due to blockade of PDGF-BB-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinji; Matsuda, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kazunao; Ikeda, Yasuhiko; Hashimoto, Hisakuni; Umemura, Kazuo

    2000-01-01

    We have previously reported that tranilast, an anti-allergic drug, prevented the experimental intimal thickening in the rat and mouse femoral arteries and its effect may be exerted through the inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. However, its inhibitory mechanism has yet to be understood. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of tranilast on platelet-derived growth factor BB-homodimer (PDGF-BB) mediated signal transduction pathways in cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). Growth responses to PDGF-BB were measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation or cell counting. Activation of DNA synthesis and augmentation of cell proliferation stimulated by PDGF-BB in quiescent cultures of CASMCs were inhibited by tranilast in a concentration-dependent manner. Western blot analysis of lysates from CASMCs with an anti-activated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase antibody revealed that tranilast (10–300 μM) inhibited MAP kinase activation by PDGF-BB in a concentration-dependent manner. Tranilast also reduced PDGF-BB-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of a 180 kDa band, corresponding in mass to the PDGF β-receptor, as shown by immunoblots using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. Receptor-binding study with [125I]-PDGF-BB on CASMCs showed that tranilast (10–1000 μM) inhibited the specific binding of PDGF-BB to cell surface receptors in a concentration-dependent manner. Scatchard analysis revealed that pretreatment with 300 μM tranilast decreased the maximum binding capacity (Bmax) from 27.6 to 18.0 fmol 106 cells−1 without affecting binding affinity (Kd≈0.15 nM), indicating a non-competitive inhibition of the receptor binding. These results suggest that the suppression of human CASMC growth by tranilast might be at least partly due to blockade of PDGF-BB-receptor binding. PMID:10807667

  14. The Activation Function-1 of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Prevents Arterial Neointima Development Through a Direct Effect on Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Natalia F.; Fontaine, Coralie; Buscato, Mélissa; Lupieri, Adrien; Vinel, Alexia; Valera, Marie-Cécile; Guillaume, Maeva; Malet, Nicole; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Lenfant, Francoise; Gourdy, Pierre; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Laffargue, Muriel; Arnal, Jean-Francois

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: 17β-Estradiol (E2) exerts numerous beneficial effects in vascular disease. It regulates gene transcription through nuclear estrogen receptor α (ERα) via 2 activation functions, AF1 and AF2, and can also activate membrane ERα. The role of E2 on the endothelium relies on membrane ERα activation, but the molecular mechanisms of its action on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are not fully understood. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine which cellular target and which ERα subfunction are involved in the preventive action of E2 on neointimal hyperplasia. Methods and Results: To trigger neointimal hyperplasia of VSMC, we used a mouse model of femoral arterial injury. Cre-Lox models were used to distinguish between the endothelial- and the VSMC-specific actions of E2. The molecular mechanisms underlying the role of E2 were further characterized using both selective ERα agonists and transgenic mice in which the ERαAF1 function had been specifically invalidated. We found that (1) the selective inactivation of ERα in VSMC abrogates the neointimal hyperplasia protection induced by E2, whereas inactivation of endothelial and hematopoietic ERα has no effect; (2) the selective activation of membrane ERα does not prevent neointimal hyperplasia; and (3) ERαAF1 is necessary and sufficient to inhibit postinjury VSMC proliferation. Conclusions: Altogether, ERαAF1-mediated nuclear action is both necessary and sufficient to inhibit postinjury arterial VSMC proliferation, whereas membrane ERα largely regulates the endothelial functions of E2. This highlights the exquisite cell/tissue-specific actions of the ERα subfunctions and helps to delineate the spectrum of action of selective ER modulators. PMID:26316608

  15. BMP-2 promotes phosphate uptake, phenotypic modulation, and calcification of human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianwu; Yang, Hsueh-Ying; Giachelli, Cecilia M

    2008-08-01

    Vascular calcification is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events that are the most common cause of death in patients with end-stage renal disease. Clinical and experimental studies indicate that hyperphosphatemia is a risk factor for vascular calcification and cardiovascular mortality in these patients. Our previous studies demonstrated that phosphate transport through the type III sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter, Pit-1, was necessary for phosphate-induced calcification and osteochondrogenic phenotypic change in cultured human smooth muscle cells (SMC). BMP-2 is a potent osteogenic protein required for osteoblast differentiation and bone formation that has been implicated in vascular calcification. In the present study, we have examined the effects of BMP-2 on human SMC calcification in vitro. We found that treatment of SMC with BMP-2 enhanced elevated phosphate-induced calcification, but did not induce calcification under normal phosphate conditions. mRNAs for BMP receptors, including ALK2, ALK3, ALK6, BMPR-II, ActR-IIA and ActR-IIB were all detected in human SMCs. Mechanistically, BMP-2 dose-dependently stimulated phosphate uptake in SMC (200 ng/ml BMP-2 vs. vehicle: 13.94 vs. 7.09 nmol/30 min/mg protein, respectively). Real-time PCR and Western blot revealed the upregulation of Pit-1 mRNA and protein levels, respectively, by BMP-2. More importantly, inhibition of phosphate uptake by a competitive inhibitor of sodium-dependent phosphate cotransport, phosphonoformic acid, abrogated BMP-2-induced calcification. These results indicate that phosphate transport via Pit-1 is crucial in BMP-2-regulated SMC calcification. In addition, BMP-2-induced Runx2 and inhibited SM22 expression, indicating that it promotes osteogenic phenotype transition in these cells. Thus, BMP-2 may promote vascular calcification via increased phosphate uptake and induction of osteogenic phenotype modulation in SMC. PMID:18179800

  16. AMPK induces vascular smooth muscle cell senescence via LKB1 dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Jin Young; Woo, Chang-Hoon; Kang, Young Jin; Lee, Kwang Youn; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} An aging model was established by stimulating VSMC with adriamycin. {yields} Adriamycin increased p-LKB1, p-AMPK, p53 and p21 expressions. {yields} Inhibition of AMPK diminished SA-{beta}-gal staining and restored VSMC proliferation. {yields} p53 and p21 siRNA attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining in VSMC. {yields} p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK induced VSMC senescence. -- Abstract: Vascular cells have a limited lifespan with limited cell proliferation and undergo cellular senescence. The functional changes associated with cellular senescence are thought to contribute to age-related vascular disorders. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been discussed in terms of beneficial or harmful effects for aging-related diseases. However, the detailed functional mechanisms of AMPK are largely unclear. An aging model was established by stimulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) with adriamycin. Adriamycin progressively increased the mRNA and protein expressions of AMPK. The phosphorylation levels of LKB1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the upstream and downstream of AMPK, were dramatically increased by adriamycin stimulation. The expressions of p53 and p21, which contribute to vascular senescence, were also increased. Inhibition of AMPK diminished senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) staining, and restored VSMC proliferation. Cytosolic translocation of LKB1 by adriamycin could be a mechanism for AMPK activation in senescence. Furthermore, p53 siRNA and p21 siRNA transfection attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining. These results suggest that LKB1 dependent AMPK activation elicits VSMC senescence and p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK-induced senescence.

  17. Unexpected role of the copper transporter ATP7A in PDGF-induced vascular smooth

    SciTech Connect

    Ashino, T.; Varadarajan, S.; Urao, N.; Oshikawa, J.; Chen, G. -F.; Wang, H.; Huo, Y.; Finney, L.; Vogt, S.; McKinney, R. D.; Maryon, E. B.; Kaplan, J. H.; Ushio-Fukai, M.; Fukai, T.

    2010-09-09

    Copper, an essential nutrient, has been implicated in vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis with unknown mechanism. Bioavailability of intracellular copper is regulated not only by the copper importer CTR1 (copper transporter 1) but also by the copper exporter ATP7A (Menkes ATPase), whose function is achieved through copper-dependent translocation from trans-Golgi network (TGN). Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) promotes vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, a key component of neointimal formation. To determine the role of copper transporter ATP7A in PDGF-induced VSMC migration. Depletion of ATP7A inhibited VSMC migration in response to PDGF or wound scratch in a CTR1/copper-dependent manner. PDGF stimulation promoted ATP7A translocation from the TGN to lipid rafts, which localized at the leading edge, where it colocalized with PDGF receptor and Rac1, in migrating VSMCs. Mechanistically, ATP7A small interfering RNA or CTR small interfering RNA prevented PDGF-induced Rac1 translocation to the leading edge, thereby inhibiting lamellipodia formation. In addition, ATP7A depletion prevented a PDGF-induced decrease in copper level and secretory copper enzyme precursor prolysyl oxidase (Pro-LOX) in lipid raft fraction, as well as PDGF-induced increase in LOX activity. In vivo, ATP7A expression was markedly increased and copper accumulation was observed by synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy at neointimal VSMCs in wire injury model. These findings suggest that ATP7A plays an important role in copper-dependent PDGF-stimulated VSMC migration via recruiting Rac1 to lipid rafts at the leading edge, as well as regulating LOX activity. This may contribute to neointimal formation after vascular injury. Our findings provide insight into ATP7A as a novel therapeutic target for vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis.

  18. Glucose and glucosamine regulate growth factor gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    McClain, D A; Paterson, A J; Roos, M D; Wei, X; Kudlow, J E

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the expression of two growth factors found in vascular smooth muscle, transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Cells cultured in medium containing 30 mM glucose exhibited a 2-fold increase in TGF alpha mRNA and a 3-fold increase in bFGF mRNA compared with cells grown in normal (5.5 mM) glucose. Glucosamine was more potent than glucose, leading to a 6-fold increase in TGF alpha mRNA. TGF alpha protein levels were also increased by glucosamine treatment, and the predominant species present was the membrane-bound precursor form of TGF alpha. To examine further the regulation of growth factors by sugars, cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells were transfected with a plasmid construct consisting of a 1.2-kilobase-pair fragment of the TGF alpha promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene. Increasing the concentration of glucose in the culture medium from 5.5 mM to 30 mM led to a rapid, 1.7-fold increase in the activity of the TGF alpha promoter. Glucosamine was much more potent than glucose in this stimulation, with 2 mM glucosamine causing a 12-fold increase in TGF alpha promoter activity. Insulin had no effect on luciferase activity in either the presence or the absence of added sugars. The glucose response element of the TGF alpha gene maps to a 130-base-pair segment that includes three potential binding sites for the transcription factor Sp1. We conclude that high glucose concentrations such as are reached in diabetes mellitus can stimulate the transcription of the genes for growth factors in vascular smooth muscle cells. This signaling pathway apparently involves the metabolism of glucose to glucosamine. This effect could be representative of nutritional regulation of a family of genes and could contribute to the toxicity of hyperglycemia and the vascular complications of diabetes. Images PMID:1518840

  19. Expression of fibronectin variants in vascular and visceral smooth muscle cells in development.

    PubMed

    Glukhova, M A; Frid, M G; Shekhonin, B V; Balabanov, Y V; Koteliansky, V E

    1990-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies recognizing extra domain A (ED-A) and extra domain B (ED-B) fibronectin (FN) sequences were used to characterize FN variants expressed in human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) during fetal and postnatal development and to compare spectrum of FN variants produced by vascular and visceral SMC. In 8- to 12-week-old fetuses both ED-A-containing FN (A-FN) and ED-B-containing FN (B-FN) were found in all smooth muscles studied--aorta, esophagus, stomach, and jejunum. By 20-25 weeks of gestation relative amounts of both A-FN and B-FN were reduced significantly in the aortic media (fivefold for A-FN and twofold for B-FN), while in visceral SMC only B-FN content was decreased. All the adult visceral smooth muscles examined contained A-FN rather than B-FN. Therefore, the cells from adult aortic media appear to be the only SMC so far known to produce FN that contains neither ED-A nor ED-B. Moreover, the data obtained show that, unlike other cells, medial SMC are embedded in vivo in the extracellular matrix that contains FN lacking both ED-A and ED-B. SMC from the minor intimal thickenings in the human child aorta as well as those from the atherosclerotic plaques produce A-FN rather than B-FN. We conclude that (1) vascular SMC change the spectrum of produced FN variants at least twice--during prenatal development between 12 and 20 weeks of gestation, and during the postnatal period, when they are recruited into the intimal cell population; (2) the production of FN variants in visceral SMC is also developmentally regulated; (3) all visceral SMC unlike the cells from adult aortic media produce A-FN; (4) the presence of ED-A and ED-B sequences in the FN molecule is not necessary for the extracellular matrix assembly in vivo. PMID:2202605

  20. Rab25 influences functional Cav1.2 channel surface expression in arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bannister, John P; Bulley, Simon; Leo, M Dennis; Kidd, Michael W; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2016-06-01

    Plasma membrane-localized CaV1.2 channels are the primary calcium (Ca(2+)) influx pathway in arterial smooth muscle cells (myocytes). CaV1.2 channels regulate several cellular functions, including contractility and gene expression, but the trafficking pathways that control the surface expression of these proteins are unclear. Similarly, expression and physiological functions of small Rab GTPases, proteins that control vesicular trafficking in arterial myocytes, are poorly understood. Here, we investigated Rab proteins that control functional surface abundance of CaV1.2 channels in cerebral artery myocytes. Western blotting indicated that Rab25, a GTPase previously associated with apical recycling endosomes, is expressed in cerebral artery myocytes. Immunofluorescence Förster resonance energy transfer (immunoFRET) microscopy demonstrated that Rab25 locates in close spatial proximity to CaV1.2 channels in myocytes. Rab25 knockdown using siRNA reduced CaV1.2 surface and intracellular abundance in arteries, as determined using arterial biotinylation. In contrast, CaV1.2 was not located nearby Rab11A or Rab4 and CaV1.2 protein was unaltered by Rab11A or Rab4A knockdown. Rab25 knockdown resulted in CaV1.2 degradation by a mechanism involving both lysosomal and proteasomal pathways and reduced whole cell CaV1.2 current density but did not alter voltage dependence of current activation or inactivation in isolated myocytes. Rab25 knockdown also inhibited depolarization (20-60 mM K(+)) and pressure-induced vasoconstriction (myogenic tone) in cerebral arteries. These data indicate that Rab25 is expressed in arterial myocytes where it promotes surface expression of CaV1.2 channels to control pressure- and depolarization-induced vasoconstriction. PMID:27076616

  1. Medical Textiles as Vascular Implants and Their Success to Mimic Natural Arteries.

    PubMed

    Singh, Charanpreet; Wong, Cynthia S; Wang, Xungai

    2015-01-01

    Vascular implants belong to a specialised class of medical textiles. The basic purpose of a vascular implant (graft and stent) is to act as an artificial conduit or substitute for a diseased artery. However, the long-term healing function depends on its ability to mimic the mechanical and biological behaviour of the artery. This requires a thorough understanding of the structure and function of an artery, which can then be translated into a synthetic structure based on the capabilities of the manufacturing method utilised. Common textile manufacturing techniques, such as weaving, knitting, braiding, and electrospinning, are frequently used to design vascular implants for research and commercial purposes for the past decades. However, the ability to match attributes of a vascular substitute to those of a native artery still remains a challenge. The synthetic implants have been found to cause disturbance in biological, biomechanical, and hemodynamic parameters at the implant site, which has been widely attributed to their structural design. In this work, we reviewed the design aspect of textile vascular implants and compared them to the structure of a natural artery as a basis for assessing the level of success as an implant. The outcome of this work is expected to encourage future design strategies for developing improved long lasting vascular implants. PMID:26133386

  2. Medical Textiles as Vascular Implants and Their Success to Mimic Natural Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Charanpreet; Wong, Cynthia S.; Wang, Xungai

    2015-01-01

    Vascular implants belong to a specialised class of medical textiles. The basic purpose of a vascular implant (graft and stent) is to act as an artificial conduit or substitute for a diseased artery. However, the long-term healing function depends on its ability to mimic the mechanical and biological behaviour of the artery. This requires a thorough understanding of the structure and function of an artery, which can then be translated into a synthetic structure based on the capabilities of the manufacturing method utilised. Common textile manufacturing techniques, such as weaving, knitting, braiding, and electrospinning, are frequently used to design vascular implants for research and commercial purposes for the past decades. However, the ability to match attributes of a vascular substitute to those of a native artery still remains a challenge. The synthetic implants have been found to cause disturbance in biological, biomechanical, and hemodynamic parameters at the implant site, which has been widely attributed to their structural design. In this work, we reviewed the design aspect of textile vascular implants and compared them to the structure of a natural artery as a basis for assessing the level of success as an implant. The outcome of this work is expected to encourage future design strategies for developing improved long lasting vascular implants. PMID:26133386

  3. Clinical Outcomes of Cryopreserved Arterial Allograft Used as a Vascular Conduit for Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Chang, Jai Won; Park, Yangsoon; Han, Youngjin; Kwon, Hyunwook; Kwon, Tae-Won; Han, Duck Jong; Cho, Yong-Pil; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    This single center cohort study aimed to test the hypothesis that use of a cryopreserved arterial allograft could avoid the maturation or healing process of a new vascular access and to evaluate the patency of this technique compared with that of vascular access using a prosthetic graft. Between April 2012 and March 2013, 20 patients underwent an upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft for failed or failing vascular accesses and 53 using a prosthetic graft were included in this study. The mean duration of catheter dependence, calculated as the time interval from upper arm access placement to removal of the tunneled central catheter after successful cannulation of the access, was significantly longer for accesses using a prosthetic graft than a cryopreserved arterial allograft (34.4 ± 11.39 days vs. 4.9 ± 8.5 days, P < 0.001). In the allograft group, use of vascular access started within 7 days in 16 patients (80%), as soon as from the day of surgery in 10 patients. Primary (unassisted; P = 0.314) and cumulative (assisted; P = 0.673) access survivals were similar in the two groups. There were no postoperative complications related to the use of a cryopreserved iliac arterial allograft except for one patient who experienced wound hematoma. In conclusion, upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft may permit immediate hemodialysis without the maturation or healing process, resulting in access survival comparable to that of an access using a prosthetic graft. PMID:27478338

  4. Clinical Outcomes of Cryopreserved Arterial Allograft Used as a Vascular Conduit for Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Chang, Jai Won; Park, Yangsoon; Han, Youngjin; Kwon, Hyunwook; Kwon, Tae-Won; Han, Duck Jong; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    This single center cohort study aimed to test the hypothesis that use of a cryopreserved arterial allograft could avoid the maturation or healing process of a new vascular access and to evaluate the patency of this technique compared with that of vascular access using a prosthetic graft. Between April 2012 and March 2013, 20 patients underwent an upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft for failed or failing vascular accesses and 53 using a prosthetic graft were included in this study. The mean duration of catheter dependence, calculated as the time interval from upper arm access placement to removal of the tunneled central catheter after successful cannulation of the access, was significantly longer for accesses using a prosthetic graft than a cryopreserved arterial allograft (34.4 ± 11.39 days vs. 4.9 ± 8.5 days, P < 0.001). In the allograft group, use of vascular access started within 7 days in 16 patients (80%), as soon as from the day of surgery in 10 patients. Primary (unassisted; P = 0.314) and cumulative (assisted; P = 0.673) access survivals were similar in the two groups. There were no postoperative complications related to the use of a cryopreserved iliac arterial allograft except for one patient who experienced wound hematoma. In conclusion, upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft may permit immediate hemodialysis without the maturation or healing process, resulting in access survival comparable to that of an access using a prosthetic graft. PMID:27478338

  5. Effect of m-calpain in PKCalpha-mediated proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells by low dose of ouabain.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Soni; Sarkar, Jaganmay; Pramanik, Asmita; Karmakar, Kanchan; Chakraborti, Sajal

    2013-10-01

    There is growing evidence that ouabain, a cardiotonic steroid may promote growth of cardiac and vascular myocytes, indicating its novel role in cell growth and proliferation, without appreciable inhibition of the sodium pump. The mechanism(s) by which low dose of ouabain produces pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation, a prerequisite for right ventricular hypertrophy, is currently unknown. Here, we analyzed the effects of low dose of ouabain (10 nM) on increase in [Ca2+]i, m-calpain and protein kinase C (PKC) activities on pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation and determined their sequential involvement in this scenario. We treated bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells with a low dose of ouabain (10 nM) and determined [Ca2+]i in the cells by fluorometric assay using fura2-AM, m-calpain activity by fluorometric assay using SLLVY-AMC as the substrate. PKC activity using an assay kit and assay of Na+/K+ ATPase activity spectrophotometrically. We purified m-calpain and PKCalpha by standard chromatographic procedure by HPLC and then studied cleavage of the purified PKCalpha by m-calpain using Western immunoblot method. Subsequently, we performed cell proliferation assay utilizing the redox dye resazunin. We used selective inhibitors of [Ca2+]i (BAPTA-AM), m-calpain (MDL28170), PKCalpha (Go6976) and determined their involvement in ouabain (10 nM)-mediated smooth muscle cell proliferation. Our results suggested that treatment of bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells with a low dose of ouabain (10 nM) increased [Ca2+]i and subsequently stimulated m-calpain activity and proteolytically activated PKCalpha in caveolae (signaling microdomain also known as signalosomes) of the cells. Upon activation, PKCalpha increased the smooth muscle cell proliferation via Go/G1 to S/G2-M phase transition. Thus, [Ca2]i-mCalpain-PKCalpha signaling axis plays a crucial role during low dose of ouabain-mediated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation

  6. Local electromechanical properties of different phenotype models of vascular smooth muscle cells using force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Gary; Reukov, Vladimir; Nikiforov, Maxim; Guo, Senli; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei; Vertegel, Alexey

    2010-03-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) exist as a spectrum of diverse phenotypes raning between contractile and synthetic, the latter being associated with disease states. Different VSMC phenotypes, modeled using serum-starvation, exhibit characteristic electromechanical responses that can be distinguished using band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy (BEPFM), which maps information at the same rate as the atomic force microscope (AFM) scan performed simultaneously. BEPFM image formation mechanism in the culture medium is determined using excitation steps from 1 mV to 100 V. High voltage improves contrast between cells and collagen-coated substrates. Viscoelasticity from AFM stress relaxation experiments and local elasticity from force maps correlate to BEPFM data providing a map of local mechanical properties on different VSMCs.

  7. MicroRNA-141 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through targeting PAPP-A

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yudong; Chen, Bainan; Ming, Liu; Qin, Hongsong; Zheng, Liu; Yue, Zhang; Cheng, Zhixin; Wang, Yannan; Zhang, Dawei; Liu, Chunmei; Bin, Wang; Hao, Qingzhi; Song, Fuchen; Ji, Bo

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that ox-LDL plays key roles in the development of atherosclerosis, partly by inducing vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) proliferation. Recent findings have revealed that microRNAs, a class of small noncoding RNAs, could regulate cell proliferation in many physiological and pathological conditions. However, the role and function of miRNAs on ox-LDL induced VSMC proliferation are not fully elucidated. In this study, we showed that ox-LDL could suppress miR-141 expression and inhibition of miR-141 could promote VSMCs proliferation. Moreover, we found that PAPPA was the direct target gene of miR-141. Overexpression of PAPPA impaired the miR-141-induced inhibition of proliferation in the VSMCs. Taken together; miR-141 may play important roles in ox-LDL-induced abnormal proliferation of the VSMC. PMID:26823756

  8. Functional role of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yoichiro; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Manabu; Ono, Kyoichi; Munehisa, Yoshiko; Koyama, Takashi; Nobori, Kiyoshi; Iijima, Toshihiko; Ito, Hiroshi

    2007-10-05

    We investigated the functional role of STIM1, a Ca{sup 2+} sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that regulates store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE), in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). STIM1 was mainly localized at the ER and plasma membrane. The knockdown of STIM1 expression by small interfering (si) RNA drastically decreased SOCE. In contrast, an EF-hand mutant of STIM1, STIM1{sup E87A}, produced a marked increase in SOCE, which was abolished by co-transfection with siRNA to transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1). In addition, transfection with siRNA against STIM1 suppressed phosphorylation of cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and cell growth. These results suggest that STIM1 is an essential component of SOCE and that it is involved in VSMC proliferation.

  9. The role of mechanotransduction on vascular smooth muscle myocytes' [corrected] cytoskeleton and contractile function.

    PubMed

    Ye, George J C; Nesmith, Alexander P; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2014-09-01

    Smooth muscle (SM) exhibits a highly organized structural hierarchy that extends over multiple spatial scales to perform a wide range of functions at the cellular, tissue, and organ levels. Early efforts primarily focused on understanding vascular SM (VSM) function through biochemical signaling. However, accumulating evidence suggests that mechanotransduction, the process through which cells convert mechanical stimuli into biochemical cues, is requisite for regulating contractility. Cytoskeletal proteins that comprise the extracellular, intercellular, and intracellular domains are mechanosensitive and can remodel their structure and function in response to external mechanical cues. Pathological stimuli such as malignant hypertension can act through the same mechanotransductive pathways to induce maladaptive remodeling, leading to changes in cellular shape and loss of contractile function. In both health and disease, the cytoskeletal architecture integrates the mechanical stimuli and mediates structural and functional remodeling in the VSM. PMID:25125187

  10. Eugenol dilates rat cerebral arteries by inhibiting smooth muscle cell voltage-dependent calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto-Neves, Dieniffer; Leal-Cardoso, Jose Henrique; Jaggar, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Plants high in eugenol, a phenylpropanoid compound, are used as folk medicines to alleviate diseases including hypertension. Eugenol has been demonstrated to relax conduit and ear arteries and reduce systemic blood pressure, but mechanisms involved are unclear. Here, we studied eugenol regulation of resistance-size cerebral arteries that control regional brain blood pressure and flow and investigated mechanisms involved. We demonstrate that eugenol dilates arteries constricted by either pressure or membrane depolarization (60 mM K+) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experiments performed using patch-clamp electrophysiology demonstrated that eugenol inhibited voltage-dependent calcium (Ca2+) currents, when using Ba2+ as a charge carrier, in isolated cerebral artery smooth muscle cells. Eugenol inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents involved pore block, a hyperpolarizing shift ( ~−10 mV) in voltage-dependent inactivation, an increase in the proportion of steady-state inactivating current, and acceleration of inactivaiton rate. In summary, our data indicate that eugenol dilates cerebral arteries via multi-modal inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. PMID:24921632

  11. Smooth muscle cell expression of extracellular matrix genes after arterial injury.

    PubMed Central

    Nikkari, S. T.; Järveläinen, H. T.; Wight, T. N.; Ferguson, M.; Clowes, A. W.

    1994-01-01

    Accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) after arterial injury is an important event in the development of intimal thickening and is modulated by heparin. To investigate the regulation of matrix protein expression, we have analyzed messenger RNA levels by Northern blotting for various ECM proteins in the rat carotid artery balloon injury model. RNA was extracted from normal arteries and from intima-medial preparations at 2 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks after balloon injury of arteries in animals receiving either saline or heparin infusion. Transcripts for the heparan sulfate proteoglycans perlecan, syndecan, and ryudocan; the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan versican; the dermatan sulfate proteoglycan biglycan; type I procollagen; and tropoelastin all were increased on Northern blots beginning at 1 week after injury. By in situ hybridization, the transcripts for elastin nd biglycan were primarily localized to smooth muscle cells in the intima and were diminished by heparin in proportion to the decrease in intimal mass. Other matrix genes (perlecan, ryudocan) were expressed in the intima and media and were not affected by heparin. The results support the conclusion that ECM gene expression is a relatively late event in the response of the carotid artery, and that some of the genes are expressed only in the intima whereas others are expressed in both the intima and media. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8203472

  12. Piperlongumine inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by suppressing PDGF receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Dong Ju; Kim, Soo Yeon; Han, Seong Su; Kim, Chan Woo; Kumar, Sandeep; Park, Byeoung Soo; Lee, Sung Eun; Yun, Yeo Pyo; Jo, Hanjoong; Park, Young Hyun

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-atherogenic effect of PL was examined using partial carotid ligation model in ApoE KO mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL prevented atherosclerotic plaque development, VSMCs proliferation, and NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Piperlongumine reduced vascular smooth muscle cell activation through PDGF-R{beta} and NF-{kappa}B-signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for atherosclerosis treatment. -- Abstract: Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL) is an alkaloid found in the long pepper (Piper longum L.) and has well-documented anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties; however, the role of PL in prevention of atherosclerosis is unknown. We evaluated the anti-atherosclerotic potential of PL in an in vivo murine model of accelerated atherosclerosis and defined its mechanism of action in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local treatment with PL significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation as well as proliferation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation in an in vivo setting. PL treatment in VSMCs in vitro showed inhibition of migration and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-induced proliferation to the in vivo findings. We further identified that PL inhibited PDGF-BB-induced PDGF receptor beta activation and suppressed downstream signaling molecules such as phospholipase C{gamma}1, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt. Lastly, PL significantly attenuated activation of NF-{kappa}B-a downstream transcriptional regulator in PDGF receptor signaling, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a novel, therapeutic mechanism by which PL suppresses atherosclerosis plaque formation in vivo.

  13. Chemokine production by human vascular smooth muscle cells: modulation by IL-13

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Nicola J; Watson, Malcolm L; Williams, Robert J; Roach, Alan G; Yoshimura, Teizo; Westwick, John

    1997-01-01

    The production of chemokines by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) is implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, although the factors regulating chemokine production by these cells are incompletely characterized. We describe the differential stimulation of interleukin-(IL)-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) synthesis following treatment of human vascular SMC with IL-1α or tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα). Under basal conditions, cultured SMC release very low amounts of IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES as assessed by specific ELISA. Concentration-response studies with IL-1α or TNFα revealed that each stimulus induced a similar amount of MCP-1. In contrast approximately three fold more IL-8 was induced by IL-1α than by TNFα whereas significant RANTES production was induced only by TNFα. These findings point to a divergence in the regulation of synthesis of the different chemokines in response to IL-1α or TNFα stimulation. The T-cell derived cytokines IL-10 and IL-13 were also found to have differential effects on chemokine production by SMC. IL-13, but not IL-10, significantly enhanced IL-8 and MCP-1 release in response to IL-1α or TNFα. This increase in chemokine release appeared to be accounted for by increased mRNA expression. These findings provide support for the concept that smooth muscle cells can have an active role in a local immune response via the production of chemokines which can be selectively modulated by T-cell derived cytokines. PMID:9375973

  14. Interaction of neutrophils with vascular smooth muscle: identification of a neutrophil-derived relaxing factor.

    PubMed

    Rimele, T J; Sturm, R J; Adams, L M; Henry, D E; Heaslip, R J; Weichman, B M; Grimes, D

    1988-04-01

    Experiments were designed to study the interaction of rat peritoneal neutrophils with the vascular smooth muscle of the rat aorta. Rings of aorta, suspended in 10-ml organ chambers containing a physiologic salt solution, were precontracted with phenylephrine. Neutrophils (1 X 10(5) -4 X 10(7) cells/organ chamber) caused a cell number-dependent relaxation of the rat aorta that was augmented by superoxide dismutase (100 U/ml) or changing the oxygen content from 95 to 21%. The neutrophil-induced smooth muscle relaxation occurred in rings with and without endothelium and in rings precontracted with increasing concentrations of phenylephrine, prostaglandin F2 alpha or KCI. Catalase (1000 U/ml) and mannitol (1 X 10(-3) M) did not block the neutrophil-induced relaxation, whereas phenazine methosulfate (1 X 10(-5) M), hydroquinone (3 X 10(-5) M) and methylene blue (1 X 10(-5) M) reversed the neutrophil-induced relaxation. Pre-exposure of endothelium-rubbed rings to neutrophils (2 X 10(7) cells/organ chamber; 15 min) depressed the subsequent concentration-response curve to phenylephrine but augmented the relaxation induced by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor zaprinast (1 X 10(-5) M). The effluent from a column restraining the neutrophils induced a relaxation of endothelium-rubbed aortic rings that was prevented by methylene blue (1 X 10(-5) M). These results demonstrate that rat neutrophils release a factor that has a pharmacologic profile similar to that previously reported for the relaxing factor released from the vascular endothelium. PMID:3129547

  15. Cell biology of Smad2/3 linker region phosphorylation in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Hossein B; Kamato, Danielle; Ansari, Ghazaleh; Osman, Narin; Little, Peter J

    2012-08-01

    The transforming growth factor (TGF)-β superfamily of ligands regulates a diverse set of cellular functions. Transforming growth factor-β induces its biological effects through Type I and Type II transmembrane receptors that have serine/threonine kinase activities and weak tyrosine kinase activity. In vascular smooth muscle, TGF-β binds to the TGF-β Type II receptor (TβRII) at the cell surface, recruiting the Type I receptor (TβRI) to form a heterocomplex. Consequently, after phosphorylation and activation of TβRI, the transcription factors receptor activated (R-) Smad2 and Smad3 are recruited and activated through phosphorylation of C terminal residues. Overall, Smad2/3 and co-Smad4 have similar structures consisting of three regions an N-terminal MH1 domain, a C-terminal MH2 domain and a central linker region. Phosphorylation of the Smad linker region appears to have an important role in the regulation of Smad activity and function. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, CDK2, CDK4 and calcium-calmodulin dependent kinase are the main kinases that phosphorylate sites in the linker region. The role of the linker region includes enabling the formation of Smad homo-oligomers and provision of phosphorylation sites for MAPK and other kinases. In some instances, linker region phosphorylation regulates the inhibition of the nuclear translocation of Smads. In the present review, we describe TGF-β signalling through Smad2/3 and the importance of the linker region in the regulation and expression of genes induced by TGF-β superfamily ligands in the context of vascular smooth muscle. PMID:21883378

  16. NO Hyperpolarizes Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells and Decreases the Intracellular Ca2+ Concentration by Activating Voltage-Gated K+ Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao-Jian; Tod, Mary L.; Rubin, Lewis J.; Blaustein, Mordecai P.

    1996-09-01

    NO causes pulmonary vasodilation in patients with pulmonary hypertension. In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells, the activity of voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels controls resting membrane potential. In turn, membrane potential is an important regulator of the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and pulmonary vascular tone. We used patch clamp methods to determine whether the NO-induced pulmonary vasodilation is mediated by activation of KV channels. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy was employed to test the effect of NO on the depolarization-induced rise in [Ca2+]i. Blockade of KV channels by 4-aminopyridine (5 mM) depolarized pulmonary artery myocytes to threshold for initiation of Ca2+ action potentials, and thereby increased [Ca2+]i. NO (≈ 3 μ M) and the NO-generating compound sodium nitroprusside (5-10 μ M) opened KV channels in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. The enhanced K+ currents then hyperpolarized the cells, and blocked Ca2+-dependent action potentials, thereby preventing the evoked increases in [Ca2+]i. Nitroprusside also increased the probability of KV channel opening in excised, outside-out membrane patches. This raises the possibility that NO may act either directly on the channel protein or on a closely associated molecule rather than via soluble guanylate cyclase. In isolated pulmonary arteries, 4-aminopyridine significantly inhibited NO-induced relaxation. We conclude that NO promotes the opening of KV channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. The resulting membrane hyperpolarization, which lowers [Ca2+]i, is apparently one of the mechanisms by which NO induces pulmonary vasodilation.

  17. Divergent signaling pathways cooperatively regulate TGFβ induction of cysteine-rich protein 2 in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of the arterial wall play a critical role in the development of occlusive vascular diseases. Cysteine-rich protein 2 (CRP2) is a VSMC-expressed LIM-only protein, which functionally limits VSMC migration and protects against pathological vascular remodeling. The multifunctional cytokine TGFβ has been implicated to play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis through numerous downstream signaling pathways. We showed previously that TGFβ upregulates CRP2 expression; however, the detailed signaling mechanisms remain unclear. Results TGFβ treatment of VSMCs activated both Smad2/3 and ATF2 phosphorylation. Individually knocking down Smad2/3 or ATF2 pathways with siRNA impaired the TGFβ induction of CRP2, indicating that both contribute to CRP2 expression. Inhibiting TβRI kinase activity by SB431542 or TβRI knockdown abolished Smad2/3 phosphorylation but did not alter ATF2 phosphorylation, indicating while Smad2/3 phosphorylation was TβRI-dependent ATF2 phosphorylation was independent of TβRI. Inhibiting Src kinase activity by SU6656 suppressed TGFβ-induced RhoA and ATF2 activation but not Smad2 phosphorylation. Blocking ROCK activity, the major downstream target of RhoA, abolished ATF2 phosphorylation and CRP2 induction but not Smad2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, JNK inhibition with SP600125 reduced TGFβ-induced ATF2 (but not Smad2) phosphorylation and CRP2 protein expression while ROCK inhibition blocked JNK activation. These results indicate that downstream of TβRII, Src family kinase-RhoA-ROCK-JNK signaling pathway mediates TβRI-independent ATF2 activation. Promoter analysis revealed that the TGFβ induction of CRP2 was mediated through the CRE and SBE promoter elements that were located in close proximity. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that two signaling pathways downstream of TGFβ converge on the CRE and SBE sites of the Csrp2 promoter to cooperatively control CRP2 induction in VSMCs, which

  18. Cyclooxygenase-2 in Endothelial and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Restrains Atherogenesis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Soon Yew; Monslow, James; Todd, Leslie; Lawson, John; Puré, Ellen; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Placebo controlled trials of nonsteroidal antinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) selective for inhibition of COX-2 reveal an emergent cardiovascular hazard in patients selected for low risk of heart disease. Postnatal global deletion of COX-2 accelerates atherogenesis in hyperlipidemic mice, a process delayed by selective enzyme deletion in macrophages. Methods and Results Here, selective depletion of COX-2 in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) depressed biosynthesis of prostaglandin (PG)I2 and PGE2, elevated blood pressure and accelerated atherogenesis in Ldlr knockout (KO) mice. Deletion of COX-2 in VSMCs and ECs coincided with an increase in COX-2 expression in lesional macrophages and increased biosynthesis of thromboxane. Increased accumulation of less organized intimal collagen, laminin, α-smooth muscle actin and matrix-rich fibrosis was also apparent in lesions of the mutants. Conclusions Although atherogenesis is accelerated in global COX-2 KOs, consistent with evidence of risk transformation during chronic NSAID administration, this masks the contrasting effects of enzyme depletion in macrophages versus VSMCs and ECs. Targeting delivery of COX-2 inhibitors to macrophages may conserve their efficacy while limiting cardiovascular risk. PMID:24519928

  19. Multiple Signaling Pathways Contribute to the Thrombin-induced Secretory Phenotype in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji Young; Son, Younghae; Kim, Bo-Young; Eo, Seong-Kug; Rhim, Byung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    We attempted to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypic change of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) by determining signaling molecules involved in chemokine production. Treatment of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMCs) with thrombin resulted not only in elevated transcription of the (C-C motif) ligand 11 (CCL11) gene but also in enhanced secretion of CCL11 protein. Co-treatment of HAoSMCs with GF109230X, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, or GW5074, an inhibitor of Raf-1 kinase, caused inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and significantly attenuated expression of CCL11 at transcriptional and protein levels induced by thrombin. Both Akt phosphorylation and CCL11 expression induced by thrombin were attenuated in the presence of pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of Gi protein-coupled receptor, or LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor. In addition, thrombin-induced production of CCL11 was significantly attenuated by pharmacological inhibition of Akt or MEK which phosphorylates ERK1/2. These results indicate that thrombin is likely to promote expression of CCL11 via PKC/Raf-1/ERK1/2 and PTX-sensitive protease-activated receptors/PI3K/Akt pathways in HAoSMCs. We propose that multiple signaling pathways are involved in change of VSMCs to a secretory phenotype. PMID:26557022

  20. Multiple Signaling Pathways Contribute to the Thrombin-induced Secretory Phenotype in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji Young; Son, Younghae; Kim, Bo-Young; Eo, Seong-Kug; Rhim, Byung-Yong; Kim, Koanhoi

    2015-11-01

    We attempted to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypic change of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) by determining signaling molecules involved in chemokine production. Treatment of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMCs) with thrombin resulted not only in elevated transcription of the (C-C motif) ligand 11 (CCL11) gene but also in enhanced secretion of CCL11 protein. Co-treatment of HAoSMCs with GF109230X, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, or GW5074, an inhibitor of Raf-1 kinase, caused inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and significantly attenuated expression of CCL11 at transcriptional and protein levels induced by thrombin. Both Akt phosphorylation and CCL11 expression induced by thrombin were attenuated in the presence of pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of Gi protein-coupled receptor, or LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor. In addition, thrombin-induced production of CCL11 was significantly attenuated by pharmacological inhibition of Akt or MEK which phosphorylates ERK1/2. These results indicate that thrombin is likely to promote expression of CCL11 via PKC/Raf-1/ERK1/2 and PTX-sensitive protease-activated receptors/PI3K/Akt pathways in HAoSMCs. We propose that multiple signaling pathways are involved in change of VSMCs to a secretory phenotype. PMID:26557022

  1. Effects of dexamethasone on the synthesis and secretion of galaptin by vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, G.L.; Harris-Hooker, S.A.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of dexamethasone (Dex) on the synthesis and secretion of beta-galactoside specific lectin (galaptin) was examined in cultured primate aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC). SMC cells were treated with 0.15 ..mu..M Dex during their proliferative phase to confluency, and after reaching confluency. Both cultures were labeled with (/sup 3/H)-phenylalanine (phe) for 24 h following exposure to Dex. Incorporation of phe into galaptin increased twofold in the medium from Dex treated confluent cultures, when serum was present. No change was found in incorporation when serum was removed prior to Dex treatment. Phe incorporation into total protein was also increased twofold by Dex treatment of SMC in the presence of serum, but there was a 1.4-fold increase when serum was absent. Dex did not affect the incorporation of phe into either total protein or galaptin in the cell layer of confluent cultures in the presence of serum, but caused a twofold increase in its absence. There was no effect of Dex on the incorporation of phe into galaptin or total protein in either the medium or cell layer of cultures given Dex during their proliferative phase. Dex retarded the growth of SMC, and lowered the total protein content of the cell layer. The results show that vascular smooth muscle cells synthesize and secrete galaptin and that Dex acts directly on confluent SMC to increase galaptin synthesis and secretion. Serum seems to modulate the effect of Dex.

  2. Integration of signal pathways for stretch-dependent growth and differentiation in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Albinsson, Sebastian; Hellstrand, Per

    2007-08-01

    The vascular smooth muscle phenotype is regulated by environmental factors, such as mechanical forces, that exert effects on signaling to differentiation and growth. We used the mouse portal vein in organ culture to investigate stretch-dependent activation of Akt, ERK, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK), which have been suggested to be involved in the regulation of stretch-dependent protein synthesis. The role of actin polymerization in these signaling events was examined using the actin-stabilizing agent jasplakinolide. Stretch caused a biphasic activation of FAK at 5-15 min and 24-72 h, which may reflect first a direct phosphorylation of preexisting focal adhesions followed by a rearrangement of focal adhesions to accommodate for the increased mechanical load. Phosphorylation of ERK was increased by acute stretch but then decreased, and Akt did not have a distinct peak in stretch-induced phosphorylation. Inhibition of ERK, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, or mammalian target of rapamycin reduced global but not contractile protein synthesis with maintained stretch sensitivity. Stabilization of actin filaments with jasplakinolide, in unstretched portal veins, resulted in increased ERK phosphorylation and global protein synthesis as well as the synthesis of contractile proteins. In contrast, stretch during culture with jasplakinolide did not affect FAK phosphorylation or contractility. Therefore, remodeling of smooth muscle cells to adapt to stretch requires a dynamic cytoskeleton. PMID:17507430

  3. Glucagon-like peptide-1 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation through mitochondrial dynamics regulation.

    PubMed

    Torres, Gloria; Morales, Pablo E; García-Miguel, Marina; Norambuena-Soto, Ignacio; Cartes-Saavedra, Benjamín; Vidal-Peña, Gonzalo; Moncada-Ruff, David; Sanhueza-Olivares, Fernanda; San Martín, Alejandra; Chiong, Mario

    2016-03-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a neuroendocrine hormone produced by gastrointestinal tract in response to food ingestion. GLP-1 plays a very important role in the glucose homeostasis by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion, inhibiting glucagon secretion, inhibiting gastric emptying, reducing appetite and food intake. Because of these actions, the GLP-1 peptide-mimetic exenatide is one of the most promising new medicines for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In vivo treatments with GLP-1 or exenatide prevent neo-intima layer formation in response to endothelial damage and atherosclerotic lesion formation in aortic tissue. Whether GLP-1 modulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation by controlling mitochondrial dynamics is unknown. In this report, we showed that GLP-1 increased mitochondrial fusion and activity in a PKA-dependent manner in the VSMC cell line A7r5. GLP-1 induced a Ser-637 phosphorylation in the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, and decreased Drp1 mitochondrial localization. GLP-1 inhibited PDGF-BB-induced VSMC migration and proliferation, actions inhibited by overexpressing wild type Drp1 and mimicked by the Drp1 inhibitor Mdivi-1 and by overexpressing dominant negative Drp1. These results show that GLP-1 stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial activity and decreases PDGF-BB-induced VSMC dedifferentiation by a PKA/Drp1 signaling pathway. Our data suggest that GLP-1 inhibits vascular remodeling through a mitochondrial dynamics-dependent mechanism. PMID:26807480

  4. Rat vascular smooth muscle cells in culture contract upon Ca2+ repletion after depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, S.; Kanaide, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Nakamura, M.

    1985-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Ca2+-repletion following depletion on cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from the rat aorta. With Ca2+-repletion, the cells in primary cultures contracted, as indicated by a decrease in cell area. The process was slow (30 min to maximum effect) and reversible (relaxation completed by 120 min). Contraction during Ca2+-repletion was never observed in subcultured cells. The SMCs in primary culture after treatment maintained the ability to grow and to exclude dye, with a normal plating efficiency. There was no treatment-related additional leakage of intracellular enzymes, LDH and CPK, into the medium. Ca2+-repletion at first accelerated the 45Ca uptake by SMCs (1-5 min after repletion) and then increased Ca2+ efflux after about 10 min of Ca2+-repletion. We conclude that Ca2+-repletion after depletion induces a transient and reversible contraction of vascular SMCs in primary culture, without cell injury and in association with a transient increase in Ca2+ influx and then efflux. This phenomenon may relate to the decrease in perfusion flow in hearts and kidneys during Ca2+-repletion after depletion (Ca2+-paradox). Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:4084451

  5. Bioabsorbable zinc ion induced biphasic cellular responses in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Bioabsorbable metal zinc (Zn) is a promising new generation of implantable scaffold for cardiovascular and orthopedic applications. In cardiovascular stent applications, zinc ion (Zn2+) will be gradually released into the surrounding vascular tissues from such Zn-containing scaffolds after implantation. However, the interactions between vascular cells and Zn2+ are still largely unknown. We explored the short-term effects of extracellular Zn2+ on human smooth muscle cells (SMCs) up to 24 h, and an interesting biphasic effect of Zn2+ was observed. Lower concentrations (<80 μM) of Zn2+ had no adverse effects on cell viability but promoted cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell proliferation, cell migration, and enhanced the expression of F-actin and vinculin. Cells treated with such lower concentrations of Zn2+ displayed an elongated shape compared to controls without any treatment. In contrast, cells treated with higher Zn2+ concentrations (80–120 μM) had opposite cellular responses and behaviors. Gene expression profiles revealed that the most affected functional genes were related to angiogenesis, inflammation, cell adhesion, vessel tone, and platelet aggregation. Results indicated that Zn has interesting concentration-dependent biphasic effects on SMCs with low concentrations being beneficial to cellular functions. PMID:27248371

  6. Tyk2 mediates effects of urokinase on human vascular smooth muscle cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Patecki, Margret; Schaewen, Markus von; Tkachuk, Sergey; Jerke, Uwe; Dietz, Rainer; Dumler, Inna; Kusch, Angelika . E-mail: angelika.kusch@charite.de

    2007-08-03

    The urokinase (uPA)/uPA receptor (uPAR) system plays a role in the response of the vessel wall to injury, presumably by modulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functional behaviour. The Jak/Stat signaling pathway has been implicated to mediate the uPA/uPAR-directed cell migration and proliferation in VSMC. We have therefore investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms, which remained not completely understood. In particular, we aimed at identification of the kinase involved in the signaling cascade leading to Stat1 phosphorylation by uPA and its impact on VSMC growth. We performed expression in VSMC of kinase-deficient mutant forms of the Janus kinases Jak1 and Tyk2 and used different cell culture models imitating the response to vascular injury. We provide evidence that Tyk2, but not Jak1, mediates uPA-induced Stat1 phosphorylation and VSMC growth inhibition and suggest a novel function for Tyk2 as an important modulator of the uPA-directed VSMC functional behaviour at the place of injury.

  7. Bioabsorbable zinc ion induced biphasic cellular responses in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Bioabsorbable metal zinc (Zn) is a promising new generation of implantable scaffold for cardiovascular and orthopedic applications. In cardiovascular stent applications, zinc ion (Zn(2+)) will be gradually released into the surrounding vascular tissues from such Zn-containing scaffolds after implantation. However, the interactions between vascular cells and Zn(2+) are still largely unknown. We explored the short-term effects of extracellular Zn(2+) on human smooth muscle cells (SMCs) up to 24 h, and an interesting biphasic effect of Zn(2+) was observed. Lower concentrations (<80 μM) of Zn(2+) had no adverse effects on cell viability but promoted cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell proliferation, cell migration, and enhanced the expression of F-actin and vinculin. Cells treated with such lower concentrations of Zn(2+) displayed an elongated shape compared to controls without any treatment. In contrast, cells treated with higher Zn(2+) concentrations (80-120 μM) had opposite cellular responses and behaviors. Gene expression profiles revealed that the most affected functional genes were related to angiogenesis, inflammation, cell adhesion, vessel tone, and platelet aggregation. Results indicated that Zn has interesting concentration-dependent biphasic effects on SMCs with low concentrations being beneficial to cellular functions. PMID:27248371

  8. [Effect of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 on vascular smooth muscle cells].

    PubMed

    Saneshige, S; Shigehiro, K

    1997-07-01

    Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, obesity, and essential hypertension are associated with hyperinsulinemia that results from insulin resistance and insulin has been reported to accelerate atherosclerosis. We studied the effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) on the growth of porcine vascular smooth muscle cells and on the synthesis of extracellular matrix. The cells were cultured 3-8 changes of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) with 10% FCS. Subconfulent cells were put in wells 1 x 10(4) or 1 x 10(5) cells/well in DMEM with or without insulin or IGF-1. The number of cells was counted, and protein and DNA synthesis, expression of genes for collagen alpha1(1), and collagen synthesis were measured. Insulin (0, 16, and 160 nM) and IGF-1 (0, 1, 31, and 13.1 nM) increased number of cells by 50% and 40%, in a dose-dependent manner. Protein and DNA synthesis were also increased by insulin (3.8 and 3.0 times) and by IGF-1 (3.9 and 1.8 time). Collaged protein synthesis was increased 2.3-fold by IGF-1 at 13.1 nM, and insulin (16,000 nM) caused a 26.5-fold increase. Levels of collagen alpha1(1) mRNA were also increased by both insulin and IGF-1. These results suggest that insulin and IGF-1 can cause vascular hyperplasia associated with increased collagen synthesis, which indicates that insulin, IGF-1, or both may have an important role in vascular growth. PMID:9388374

  9. MicroRNA-26a is a novel regulator of vascular smooth muscle cell function.

    PubMed

    Leeper, Nicholas J; Raiesdana, Azad; Kojima, Yoko; Chun, Hyung J; Azuma, Junya; Maegdefessel, Lars; Kundu, Ramendra K; Quertermous, Thomas; Tsao, Philip S; Spin, Joshua M

    2011-04-01

    Aberrant smooth muscle cell (SMC) plasticity has been implicated in a variety of vascular disorders including atherosclerosis, restenosis, and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation. While the pathways governing this process remain unclear, epigenetic regulation by specific microRNAs (miRNAs) has been demonstrated in SMCs. We hypothesized that additional miRNAs might play an important role in determining vascular SMC phenotype. Microarray analysis of miRNAs was performed on human aortic SMCs undergoing phenotypic switching in response to serum withdrawal, and identified 31 significantly regulated entities. We chose the highly conserved candidate miRNA-26a for additional studies. Inhibition of miRNA-26a accelerated SMC differentiation, and also promoted apoptosis, while inhibiting proliferation and migration. Overexpression of miRNA-26a blunted differentiation. As a potential mechanism, we investigated whether miRNA-26a influences TGF-β-pathway signaling. Dual-luciferase reporter assays demonstrated enhanced SMAD signaling with miRNA-26a inhibition, and the opposite effect with miRNA-26a overexpression in transfected human cells. Furthermore, inhibition of miRNA-26a increased gene expression of SMAD-1 and SMAD-4, while overexpression inhibited SMAD-1. MicroRNA-26a was also found to be downregulated in two mouse models of AAA formation (2.5- to 3.8-fold decrease, P < 0.02) in which enhanced switching from contractile to synthetic phenotype occurs. In summary, miRNA-26a promotes vascular SMC proliferation while inhibiting cellular differentiation and apoptosis, and alters TGF-β pathway signaling. MicroRNA-26a represents an important new regulator of SMC biology and a potential therapeutic target in AAA disease. PMID:20857419

  10. Protocatechuic aldehyde inhibits migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and intravascular thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Chang Yoon; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Cho, Yoon Hee; Lee, Eun Jig

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protocatechuic aldehyde (PCA) inhibits ROS production in VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA inhibits proliferation and migration in PDGF-induced VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA has anti-platelet effects in ex vivo rat whole blood. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the potential therapeutic role of PCA in atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: The migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and formation of intravascular thrombosis play crucial roles in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. This study examined the effects of protocatechuic aldehyde (PCA), a compound isolated from the aqueous extract of the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza, an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a variety of vascular diseases, on the migration and proliferation of VSMCs and platelets due to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). DNA 5-bromo-2 Prime -deoxy-uridine (BrdU) incorporation and wound-healing assays indicated that PCA significantly attenuated PDGF-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs at a pharmacologically relevant concentration (100 {mu}M). On a molecular level, we observed down-regulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, both of which regulate key enzymes associated with migration and proliferation. We also found that PCA induced S-phase arrest of the VSMC cell cycle and suppressed cyclin D2 expression. In addition, PCA inhibited PDGF-BB-stimulated reactive oxygen species production in VSMCs, indicating that PCA's antioxidant properties may contribute to its suppression of PDGF-induced migration and proliferation in VSMCs. Finally, PCA exhibited an anti-thrombotic effect related to its inhibition of platelet aggregation, confirmed with an aggregometer. Together, these findings suggest a potential therapeutic role of PCA in the treatment of atherosclerosis and angioplasty-induced vascular restenosis.

  11. Substance-specific importance of EGFR for vascular smooth muscle cells motility in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Barbara; Schwerdt, Gerald; Heise, Christian; Bethmann, Daniel; Rabe, Sindy; Mildenberger, Sigrid; Gekle, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Besides their importance for the vascular tone, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) also contribute to pathophysiological vessel alterations. Various G-protein coupled receptor ligands involved in vascular dysfunction and remodeling can transactivate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) of VSMC, yet the importance of EGFR transactivation for the VSMC phenotype is incompletely understood. The aims of this study were (i) to characterize further the importance of the VSMC-EGFR for proliferation, migration and marker gene expression for inflammation, fibrosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis and (ii) to test the hypothesis that vasoactive substances (endothelin-1, phenylephrine, thrombin, vasopressin and ATP) rely differentially on the EGFR with respect to the abovementioned phenotypic alterations. In primary, aortic VSMC from mice without conditional deletion of the EGFR, proliferation, migration, marker gene expression (inflammation, fibrosis and ROS homeostasis) and cell signaling (ERK 1/2, intracellular calcium) were analyzed. VSMC-EGFR loss reduced collective cell migration and single cell migration probability, while no difference between the genotypes in single cell velocity, chemotaxis or marker gene expression could be observed under control conditions. EGF promoted proliferation, collective cell migration, chemokinesis and chemotaxis and leads to a proinflammatory gene expression profile in wildtype but not in knockout VSMC. Comparing the impact of five vasoactive substances (all reported to transactivate EGFR and all leading to an EGFR dependent increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation), we demonstrate that the importance of EGFR for their action is substance-dependent and most apparent for crowd migration but plays a minor role for gene expression regulation. PMID:27012600

  12. Factors Associated with Arterial Vascular Events in PROFILE: A Multiethnic Lupus Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Bertoli, Ana M.; Vilá, Luis M.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; McGwin, Gerald; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Petri, Michelle; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Reveille, John D.; Kimberly, Robert P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The objective of this study was to determine the factors associated with the occurrence of arterial vascular events in a multiethnic systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) cohort. The PROFILE cohort, comprised of SLE patients (n=1,333) of defined ethnicity from five different U.S. institutions, was studied to determine demographic, clinical and biological variables associated with vascular events. An arterial vascular event (first episode) was either a myocardial infarction, angina pectoris and/or a vascular procedure for myocardial infarction, stroke, claudication and/or evidence of gangrene. Patient characteristics were analyzed by univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. One-hundred twenty-three (9.8%) patients had at least one incident arterial event. Age at cohort enrollment (HR= 1.04, 95% CI 1.03-1.06), smoking (HR= 2.20, 95% CI 1.40-3.46), and the CRP2* C alleles (HR= 1.91, 95%CI 1.04-3.49) were associated with a shorter time-to-the occurrence of arterial vascular events. Some clinical manifestations of disease activity were associated with a shorter time-to-occurrence [psychosis (HR= 2.21, 95% CI 1.10-4.44), seizures (HR= 1.85, 95% CI 1.00-3.24) and anemia (HR= 1.83, 95% CI 1.02-3.31)], but others were not [arthritis (HR= 0.32, 95% CI 0.18-0.58)]. In conclusion, older patients, especially in the context of a predisposing environmental factor (smoking) and severe clinical manifestations, are at higher risk of having arterial vascular events. The genetic contribution of the variation at the CRP locus was not obscured by demographic or clinical variables. Awareness of these factors should lead to more effective management strategies of patients at risk for arterial vascular events. PMID:19762396

  13. Time course of increased cellular proliferation in collateral arteries after administration of vascular endothelial growth factor in a rabbit model of lower limb vascular insufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, S.; Rossow, S. T.; Kearney, M.; Zheng, L. P.; Bauters, C.; Bunting, S.; Ferrara, N.; Symes, J. F.; Isner, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Proliferation of vascular cells has been previously shown to contribute to spontaneous development of coronary collaterals. Recent studies from several laboratories have established that collateral artery growth in both the heart and limb can be enhanced by administration of angiogenic growth factors, or therapeutic angiogenesis. In this study, we sought (1) to define the extent and time course of endothelial cell (EC) and smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation accompanying spontaneous collateral development during limb ischemia and (2) to determine the extent to which proliferative activity of ECs and SMCs is augmented during therapeutic angiogenesis with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a heparin-binding EC-specific mitogen. Ten days after induction of limb ischemia by surgically excising the femoral artery of rabbits, either VEGF (500 to 1000 micrograms) or saline was administered as a bolus into the iliac artery of the ischemic limb. Cellular proliferation was evaluated by bromodeoxyuridine labeling for 24 hours at day 0 (immediately before VEGF administration) and at days 3, 5, and 7 after VEGF, EC proliferation in the midzone collaterals of VEGF-treated animals increased 2.8-fold at day 5 (P < 0.05 versus control), and returned to baseline levels by day 7. SMC proliferation in midzone collaterals also increased 2.7-fold in response to VEGF (P < 0.05). No significant increase in EC or SMC proliferation was observed in either the stem or re-entry collaterals of VEGF-treated animals compared with untreated ischemic control animals. Reduction of hemodynamic deficit in the ischemic limb measured by lower limb blood pressure was documented at day 7 after VEGF (P < 0.01 versus untreated, ischemic control). These data thus (1) establish the contribution of cellular proliferation to collateral vessel development in limb ischemia and (2) support the concept that augmented cellular proliferation contributes to the enhanced formation of collateral vessels after

  14. Endovascular treatments for posterior cerebral artery aneurysms and vascular insufficiency of fetal-type circulation after parent artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Hideaki; Kato, Noriyuki; Fujiwara, Yusuke; Hosoo, Hisayuki; Yamazaki, Tomosato; Yasuda, Susumu; Matsumura, Akira

    2016-10-01

    We present a retrospective analysis of endovascular treatments for posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysms and discuss the susceptibility of a fetal-type PCA to vascular insufficiency after parent artery occlusion. Among 1207 aneurysms treated with endovascular therapy between March 1997 and March 2013 in our institution, 10 patients (0.8%) presented PCA aneurysms. The principal strategy was to employ selective coil embolization for the aneurysm. However, in certain cases of fusiform or dissecting aneurysms, we performed parent artery occlusion with coils. Clinical and radiological data were collected from hospital charts and evaluated retrospectively. The mean age was 52.7±15.6years (range, 12-65years). Five patients (50%) were admitted with a subarachnoid hemorrhage, and one patient presented with slowly developing paralysis. The remaining four patients were diagnosed incidentally. Five patients underwent selective coil embolization, and five patients underwent parent artery occlusion. All endovascular therapies were successfully performed. However, two patients in the parent artery occlusion group suffered cerebral infarction, and both patients exhibited a fetal-type PCA. The remaining three patients in the parent artery occlusion group exhibited an adult-type PCA and did not suffer a cerebral infarction. Endovascular treatment with either selective coil embolization or parent artery occlusion is safe and effective as the long as the anatomical type of the PCA is considered. Patients with a fetal-type PCA may develop vascular insufficiency upon parent artery occlusion. Neurosurgeons should attempt to preserve the parent artery using a flow-diverting stent or stent-assisted technique for a fetal-type PCA aneurysm. PMID:27523585

  15. Palmitic acid induces osteoblastic differentiation in vascular smooth muscle cells through ACSL3 and NF-κB, novel targets of eicosapentaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Aiko; Matsui, Hiroki; Ohta, Masahiko; Sambuichi, Keisuke; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Notsu, Tatsuto; Imada, Kazunori; Yokoyama, Tomoyuki; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    Free fatty acids (FFAs), elevated in metabolic syndrome and diabetes, play a crucial role in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) counteracts many aspects of FFA-induced vascular pathology. Although vascular calcification is invariably associated with atherosclerosis, the mechanisms involved are not completely elucidated. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that EPA prevents the osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) induced by palmitic acid (PA), the most abundant long-chain saturated fatty acid in plasma. PA increased and EPA abolished the expression of the genes for bone-related proteins, including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, Msx2 and osteopontin in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC). Among the long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) subfamily, ACSL3 expression was predominant in HASMC, and PA robustly increased and EPA efficiently inhibited ACSL3 expression. Importantly, PA-induced osteoblastic differentiation was mediated, at least in part, by ACSL3 activation because acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) inhibitor or siRNA targeted to ACSL3 completely prevented the PA induction of both BMP-2 and Msx2. Conversely, adenovirus-mediated ACSL3 overexpression enhanced PA-induced BMP-2 and Msx2 expression. In addition, EPA, ACSL3 siRNA and ACS inhibitor attenuated calcium deposition and caspase activation induced by PA. Notably, PA induced activation of NF-κB, and NF-κB inhibitor prevented PA-induction of osteoblastic gene expression and calcium deposition. Immunohistochemistry revealed the prominent expression of ACSL3 in VSMC and macrophages in human non-calcifying and calcifying atherosclerotic plaques from the carotid arteries. These results identify ACSL3 and NF-κB as mediators of PA-induced osteoblastic differentiation and calcium deposition in VSMC and suggest that EPA prevents vascular calcification by inhibiting such a new molecular pathway elicited

  16. Antisense c-myb oligonucleotides inhibit intimal arterial smooth muscle cell accumulation in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Michael; Edelman, Elazer R.; Dekeyser, Jean-Luc; Langer, Robert; Rosenberg, Robert D.

    1992-09-01

    SYNTHETIC antisense oligonucleotides have been used to dissect gene function in vitro. Technical difficulties prevented the use of this approach for investigating the effect of gene products in vivo. Here we report the use of local delivery of antisense c-myb oligonu-cleotide to suppress intimal accumulation of rat carotid arterial smooth muscle cells. Our results suggest that antisense oligonucleotides can be used to define the in vivo biological role of specific macromolecules in the blood vessel wall and could potentially serve as a new class of therapeutic agents for cardiovascular disorders.

  17. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, I. J.; Wagner, W. D.; Owens, R. T.

    1990-01-01

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with [35S]sulfate and [3H]serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in [35S]sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of [3H]serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion. Images Figure 6 PMID:2316626

  18. Real-Time Monitoring the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Intracellular cGMP in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kara F.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.

    2016-01-01

    Real-time and noninvasive imaging of intracellular second messengers in mammalian cells, while preserving their in vivo phenotype, requires biosensors of exquisite constitution. Here we provide the methodology for utilizing the single wavelength cGMP-biosensor δ-FlincG in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:23709030

  19. MECHANISM BY WHICH AVENANTHRAMIDE-C, A POLYPHENOL OF OATS, BLOCKS CELL CYCLE PROGRESSION IN VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avenanthramides (Avn) are unique polyphenols present in oats. We have reported that Avn-c, one of the major forms of Avn with the most antioxidant activity, inhibited the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), an important process in the development of atherosclerosis and restenosis fo...

  20. UAP56 is a novel interacting partner of Bcr in regulating vascular smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sahni, Abha; Wang, Nadan; Alexis, Jeffrey D.

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UAP56 is an important regulator of DNA synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UAP56 binds to Bcr. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction between Bcr and UAP56 is critical for Bcr induced DNA synthesis. -- Abstract: Bcr is a serine/threonine kinase that is a critical regulator of vascular smooth muscle cell inflammation and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that Bcr acts in part via phosphorylation and inhibition of PPAR{gamma}. We have identified the RNA helicase UAP56 as another substrate of Bcr. In this report we demonstrate that knockdown of UAP56 blocks Bcr induced DNA synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). We also found that over expression of Bcr increased the expression of cyclin E and decreased the expression of p27. Knockdown of UAP56 reversed the effect of Bcr on cyclin E and p27 expression. Furthermore, we found that Bcr binds to UAP56 and demonstrate that binding of UAP56 to Bcr is critical for Bcr induced DNA synthesis in VSMC. Our data identify UAP56 as an important binding partner of Bcr and a novel target for inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

  1. Function and expression of ryanodine receptors and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors in smooth muscle cells of murine feed arteries and arterioles.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Erika B; Goodwin, Erica L; Segal, Steven S; Jackson, William F

    2012-04-15

    We tested the hypothesis that vasomotor control is differentially regulated between feed arteries and downstream arterioles from the cremaster muscle of C57BL/6 mice. In isolated pressurized arteries, confocal Ca(2+) imaging of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) revealed Ca(2+) sparks and Ca(2+) waves. Ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonists (ryanodine and tetracaine) inhibited both sparks and waves but increased global Ca(2+) and myogenic tone. In arterioles, SMCs exhibited only Ca(2+) waves that were insensitive to ryanodine or tetracaine. Pharmacological interventions indicated that RyRs are functionally coupled to large-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK(Ca)) in SMCs of arteries, whereas BK(Ca) appear functionally coupled to voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in SMCs of arterioles. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) antagonists (xestospongin D or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate) or a phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122) attenuated Ca(2+) waves, global Ca(2+) and myogenic tone in arteries and arterioles but had no effect on arterial sparks. Real-time PCR of isolated SMCs revealed RyR2 as the most abundant isoform transcript; arteries expressed twice the RyR2 but only 65% the RyR3 of arterioles and neither vessel expressed RyR1. Immunofluorescent localisation of RyR protein indicated bright, clustered staining of arterial SMCs in contrast to diffuse staining in arteriolar SMCs. Expression of IP(3)R transcripts and protein immunofluorescence were similar in SMCs of both vessels with IP(3)R1>IP(3)R2>IP(3)R3. Despite similar expression of IP(3)Rs and dependence of Ca(2+) waves on IP(3)Rs, these data illustrate pronounced regional heterogeneity in function and expression of RyRs between SMCs of the same vascular resistance network. We conclude that vasomotor control is differentially regulated in feed arteries vs. downstream arterioles. PMID:22331418

  2. Effects of heparin on the production of homocysteine-induced extracellular matrix metalloproteinase-2 in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hangyuan; Lee, Jong-Dae; Uzui, Hiroyasu; Yue, Hong; Wang, Ping; Toyoda, Kiyohiro; Geshi, Tooru; Ueda, Takanori

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of heparin on the production of homocysteine-induced extracellular matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells. METHODS: The effects of different homocysteine levels (0 μmol/L to 1000 μmol/L) on MMP-2 production and the effects of different heparin concentrations (0 μg/mL to 100 μg/mL) on homocysteine-induced MMP-2 in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells were examined using gelatin zymography and Western blotting. The changes in MMP-2 were further compared with various treatments for 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. RESULTS: Homocysteine (50 μmol/L to 1000 μmol/L) increased the production of MMP-2 significantly in a dose-dependent manner. Increased production of MMP-2 induced by homocysteine was reduced by the extracellular addition of heparin in a dose-dependent manner. Production of MMP-2 with various treatment regimens for 72 h was greater than for 24 h and 48 h. CONCLUSIONS: Extracellular addition of heparin decreased homocysteine-induced MMP-2 secretion. Data suggest a mechanism by which hyperhomocysteinemia is involved in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease and demonstrate a beneficial effect of heparin on these conditions. PMID:17380220

  3. A Model System for Mapping Vascular Responses to Complex Hemodynamics at Arterial Bifurcations In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hui; Swartz, Daniel D.; Wang, Zhijie; Hoi, Yiemeng; Kolega, John; Metaxa, Eleni M.; Szymanski, Michael P.; Yamamoto, Junichi; Sauvageau, Eric; Levy, Elad I.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Cerebral aneurysms are preferentially located at arterial bifurcation apices with complex hemodynamics. To understand disease mechanisms associated with aneurysm initiation, we attempted to establish a causal relationship between local hemodynamics and vascular responses. Methods Arterial bifurcations were surgically created from native common carotid arteries in two dogs, angiographically imaged 2 weeks and 2 months later, and then excised. We characterized local morphological changes in response to specifically manipulated hemodynamics. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed on the in vivo images and results mapped onto histological images. Results Local flow conditions, such as high wall shear stress and high wall shear stress gradient, were found to be associated with vascular changes, including an intimal pad in the flow impingement region and a “groove” bearing the characteristics of an early aneurysm. Conclusion This novel method of histohemodynamic micromapping reveals a direct correlation between an altered hemodynamic microenvironment and vascular responses consistent with aneurysm development. PMID:17143243

  4. Effect of vasopressin on electrical and contractile responses of vascular smooth muscles in animals of different ages

    SciTech Connect

    Frol'kis, I.V.

    1987-07-01

    The authors analyze the effects of vasopressin on electrical and contractile properties of smooth-muscle cells of the femoral artery of adult and old rats and the possible role of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in its realization. Calculations were done with the aid of standard curves and radioactivity was counted on a liquid scintillator.

  5. Effect of coacervated alpha-elastin on proliferation of vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Ishimaru, S; Wilson, S E

    1998-04-01

    The arterial wall injury associated with arterial graft implantation causes smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media to migrate and proliferate in the intima at the graft-artery junction resulting in anastomotic intimal hyperplasia (AIH). An important step in developing a small-diameter prosthesis may be to stimulate endothelialization and thereby inhibit AIH. In this study, we investigated the effect of coacervated and crosslinked alpha-elastin on proliferation of SMCs and endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro. Coacervation is an important step in the conversion of proelastin to make an elastin fiber in vivo. SMCs and ECs were prepared from porcine aortic media and endothelium, respectively. SMCs and ECs (three to five passages, 4 x 10[4] cells/well) were seeded onto 12 well plates, coated and crosslinked with 0 or 10 mg/mL of coacervated alpha-elastin. After the 1st, 2nd, or 3rd day of cultivation, proliferation was assayed by scintillation counting of [3H]-thymidine incorporation. For the 4th day only, 0, 0.1, 1, 10 mg/mL concentration of coacervated alpha-elastin was coated and crosslinked. SMC proliferation (1st, 2nd day: p<0.005; 3rd, 4th day: p<0.0001) was significantly inhibited over time and dose dependently, eg, 0.1 mg/mL (45.7+/-2.3%: % of control p<0.005), 1 mg/mL (5.9+/-0.7%, p<0.0005), 10 mg/mL (2.8+/-0.4%, p<0.0005). EC proliferation was inhibited over time by 10 mg/mL of coacervated alpha-elastin (2nd, 3rd day: p<0.005; 4th day: p<0.0001), but proliferation (132.8+/-9.9%: % of control p=NS) was stimulated by 0.1 mg/mL of coacervated alpha-elastin. These results suggest that coating and crosslinking a coacervated alpha-elastin into the structure of arterial prosthesis may inhibit AIH and stimulate endothelialization. PMID:9555932

  6. Migration of smooth muscle cells from the arterial anastomosis of arteriovenous fistulas requires Notch activation to form neointima.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ming; Wang, Yun; Liang, Anlin; Mitch, William E; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Han, Guofeng; Cheng, Jizhong

    2015-09-01

    A major factor contributing to failure of arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) is migration of smooth muscle cells into the forming neointima. To identify the source of smooth muscle cells in neointima, we created end-to-end AVFs by anastomosing the common carotid artery to the jugular vein and studied neural crest-derived smooth muscle cells from the carotid artery, which are Wnt1-positive during development. In Wnt1-cre-GFP mice, smooth muscle cells in the carotid artery but not the jugular vein are labeled with GFP. About half of the cells were GFP-positive in the neointima, indicating their migration from the carotid artery to the jugular vein in AVFs created in these mice. As fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) regulates smooth muscle cell migration, we examined FSP-1 in failed AVFs and polytetrafluoroethylene grafts from patients with end-stage kidney disease or from AVFs in mice with chronic kidney disease. In smooth muscle cells of AVFs or polytetrafluoroethylene grafts, FSP-1 and activation of Notch1 are present. In smooth muscle cells, Notch1 increased RBP-Jκ transcription factor activity and RBP-Jκ stimulated FSP-1 expression. Conditional knockout of RBP-Jκ in smooth muscle cells or general knockout of FSP-1 suppressed neointima formation in AVFs in mice. Thus, the artery of AVFs is the major source of smooth muscle cells during neointima formation. Knockout of RBP-Jκ or FSP-1 ameliorates neointima formation and might improve AVF patency during long-term follow-up. PMID:25786100

  7. Kv7.5 Potassium Channel Subunits Are the Primary Targets for PKA-Dependent Enhancement of Vascular Smooth Muscle Kv7 Currents.

    PubMed

    Mani, Bharath K; Robakowski, Christina; Brueggemann, Lyubov I; Cribbs, Leanne L; Tripathi, Abhishek; Majetschak, Matthias; Byron, Kenneth L

    2016-03-01

    Kv7 (KCNQ) channels, formed as homo- or heterotetramers of Kv7.4 and Kv7.5 α-subunits, are important regulators of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) membrane voltage. Recent studies demonstrate that direct pharmacological modulation of VSMC Kv7 channel activity can influence blood vessel contractility and diameter. However, the physiologic regulation of Kv7 channel activity is still poorly understood. Here, we study the effect of cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) activation on whole cell K(+) currents through endogenous Kv7.5 channels in A7r5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells or through Kv7.4/Kv7.5 heteromeric channels natively expressed in rat mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells. The contributions of specific α-subunits are further dissected using exogenously expressed human Kv7.4 and Kv7.5 homo- or heterotetrameric channels in A7r5 cells. Stimulation of Gαs-coupled β-adrenergic receptors with isoproterenol induced PKA-dependent activation of endogenous Kv7.5 currents in A7r5 cells. The receptor-mediated enhancement of Kv7.5 currents was mimicked by pharmacological agents that increase [cAMP] (forskolin, rolipram, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, and papaverine) or mimic cAMP (8-bromo-cAMP); the 2- to 4-fold PKA-dependent enhancement of currents was also observed with exogenously expressed Kv7.5 channels. In contrast, exogenously-expressed heterotetrameric Kv7.4/7.5 channels in A7r5 cells or native mesenteric artery smooth muscle Kv7.4/7.5 channels were only modestly enhanced, and homo-tetrameric Kv7.4 channels were insensitive to this regulatory pathway. Correspondingly, proximity ligation assays indicated that isoproterenol induced PKA-dependent phosphorylation of exogenously expressed Kv7.5 channel subunits, but not of Kv7.4 subunits. These results suggest that signal transduction-mediated responsiveness of vascular smooth muscle Kv7 channel subunits to cAMP/PKA activation follows the order of Kv7.5 > Kv7.4/Kv7.5 > Kv7.4. PMID:26700561

  8. /sup 22/Na+ and /sup 86/Rb+ transport in vascular smooth muscle of SHR, Wistar Kyoto, and Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kuriyama, S.; Denny, T.N.; Aviv, A.

    1988-06-01

    To gain further insight into differences in cellular Na+ and K+ regulation between the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), Wistar Kyoto (WKY), and American Wistar (W) rats, 22Na+ and 86Rb+ washouts were performed under steady-state conditions in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells from the three rat strains. SHR vascular smooth muscle cells showed significantly higher bumetanide sensitive 86Rb+ washout rate constant (x 10(-4)/min; mean +/- SEM) than WKY cells (-38.6 +/- 2.84 and -23.8 +/- 3.58, respectively; p less than 0.005). SHR vascular smooth muscle cells also exhibited significantly higher values than WKY cells in the total 22Na+ washout rate constant (x 10(-2)/min) (-61.0 +/- 1.57 vs. -53.8 +/- 1.24; p less than 0.005). The amiloride sensitive component of the 22Na+ washout rate constant accounted for these differences (-18.6 +/- 1.04 for SHR and -12.1 +/- 2.00 for WKY; p less than 0.05). There were no apparent differences in cellular Na+ concentrations between WKY and SHR cells. In general, the 86Rb+ and 22Na+ washout parameters of W rat cells were quite similar to those of cells from SHR. We conclude that the bumetanide-sensitive 86Rb+ washout (the Na+ K+-cotransport), the overall, and the amiloride-sensitive 22Na+ washout (the latter primarily represents the Na+/H+ antiport) are higher in SHR than WKY rat vascular smooth muscle cells. These findings indicate innate differences in cellular Na+ and K+ transport in vascular smooth muscle cells of the SHR and WKY rat. The mechanisms responsible for these differences are yet to be determined.

  9. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Stimulate Platelets and Facilitate Thrombus Formation through Platelet CLEC-2: Implications in Atherothrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Osamu; Hokamura, Kazuya; Shirai, Toshiaki; Osada, Makoto; Tsukiji, Nagaharu; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Umemura, Kazuo; Asada, Yujiro; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Ozaki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The platelet receptor CLEC-2 is involved in thrombosis/hemostasis, but its ligand, podoplanin, is expressed only in advanced atherosclerotic lesions. We investigated CLEC-2 ligands in vessel walls. Recombinant CLEC-2 bound to early atherosclerotic lesions and normal arterial walls, co-localizing with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry showed that recombinant CLEC-2, but not an anti-podoplanin antibody, bound to VSMCs, suggesting that CLEC-2 ligands other than podoplanin are present in VSMCs. VSMCs stimulated platelet granule release and supported thrombus formation under flow, dependent on CLEC-2. The time to occlusion in a FeCl3-induced animal thrombosis model was significantly prolonged in the absence of CLEC-2. Because the internal elastic lamina was lacerated in our FeCl3-induced model, we assume that the interaction between CLEC-2 and its ligands in VSMCs induces thrombus formation. Protein arrays and Biacore analysis were used to identify S100A13 as a CLEC-2 ligand in VSMCs. However, S100A13 is not responsible for the above-described VSMC-induced platelet activation, because S100A13 is not expressed on the surface of normal VSMCs. S100A13 was released upon oxidative stress and expressed in the luminal area of atherosclerotic lesions. Suspended S100A13 did not activate platelets, but immobilized S100A13 significantly increased thrombus formation on collagen-coated surfaces. Taken together, we proposed that VSMCs stimulate platelets through CLEC-2, possibly leading to thrombus formation after plaque erosion and stent implantation, where VSMCs are exposed to blood flow. Furthermore, we identified S100A13 as one of the ligands on VSMCs. PMID:26418160

  10. Thrombin immobilized to extracellular matrix is a potent mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells: nonenzymatic mode of action.

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Shavit, R; Benezra, M; Eldor, A; Hy-Am, E; Fenton, J W; Wilner, G D; Vlodavsky, I

    1990-01-01

    Esterolytically inactive diisopropyl fluorophosphate-conjugated thrombin (DIP-alpha-thrombin) stimulated 3H-thymidine incorporation and proliferation of growth-arrested vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), similar to native alpha-thrombin. Half-maximal mitogenic response of SMCs was obtained at 1 nM thrombin and was specifically blocked by the leech-derived, high-affinity thrombin inhibitor, hirudin. Native thrombin and a variety of thrombin species that were chemically modified to alter thrombin procoagulant or esterolytic functions were found to induce 3H-thymidine incorporation to a similar extent. Exposure of SMCs to DIP-alpha-thrombin caused a rapid and transient expression of the c-fos protooncogene, determined by Northern blot analysis. These results indicate that thrombin is a potent mitogen for SMCs through a distinct non-enzymatic domain. Binding of 125I-alpha-thrombin to SMC cultures revealed an apparent dissociation constant of 6 nM and an estimated 5.4 x 10(5) binding sites per cell. This binding was inhibited to the same extent by native thrombin and by its nonenzymatic form, DIP-alpha-thrombin. Moreover, the chemotactic fragment of thrombin (CB67-129), which failed to elicit a mitogenic response, competed for 125I-alpha-thrombin binding to SMCs. Cross-linking analysis of 125I-alpha-thrombin to SMCs revealed a specific cell-surface binding site 55 kDa in size. Finally, thrombin immobilized to a naturally produced extracellular matrix retained potent mitogenic activity toward SMCs. These observations lend support to the possibility that in vivo, subendothelial basement membranes sequester thrombin (as well as other bioactive molecules), which may stimulate localized and persistent growth of arterial SMCs. Thrombin may thus be involved directly in progression of atherosclerotic plaque formation. Images PMID:1963793

  11. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Stimulate Platelets and Facilitate Thrombus Formation through Platelet CLEC-2: Implications in Atherothrombosis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Osamu; Hokamura, Kazuya; Shirai, Toshiaki; Osada, Makoto; Tsukiji, Nagaharu; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Umemura, Kazuo; Asada, Yujiro; Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Ozaki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The platelet receptor CLEC-2 is involved in thrombosis/hemostasis, but its ligand, podoplanin, is expressed only in advanced atherosclerotic lesions. We investigated CLEC-2 ligands in vessel walls. Recombinant CLEC-2 bound to early atherosclerotic lesions and normal arterial walls, co-localizing with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry showed that recombinant CLEC-2, but not an anti-podoplanin antibody, bound to VSMCs, suggesting that CLEC-2 ligands other than podoplanin are present in VSMCs. VSMCs stimulated platelet granule release and supported thrombus formation under flow, dependent on CLEC-2. The time to occlusion in a FeCl3-induced animal thrombosis model was significantly prolonged in the absence of CLEC-2. Because the internal elastic lamina was lacerated in our FeCl3-induced model, we assume that the interaction between CLEC-2 and its ligands in VSMCs induces thrombus formation. Protein arrays and Biacore analysis were used to identify S100A13 as a CLEC-2 ligand in VSMCs. However, S100A13 is not responsible for the above-described VSMC-induced platelet activation, because S100A13 is not expressed on the surface of normal VSMCs. S100A13 was released upon oxidative stress and expressed in the luminal area of atherosclerotic lesions. Suspended S100A13 did not activate platelets, but immobilized S100A13 significantly increased thrombus formation on collagen-coated surfaces. Taken together, we proposed that VSMCs stimulate platelets through CLEC-2, possibly leading to thrombus formation after plaque erosion and stent implantation, where VSMCs are exposed to blood flow. Furthermore, we identified S100A13 as one of the ligands on VSMCs. PMID:26418160

  12. Na-Ca exchange in vascular smooth muscle sarcolemmal vesicles is voltage sensitive and inhibitable by quinidine and diltiazem

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, A.M.; Allen, J.C.

    1986-03-05

    These studies were performed to characterize Na-Ca exchange in a sarcolemmal enriched vesicle fraction, obtained by Mg aggregation and differential centrifugation of homogenized bovine superior mesenteric artery (SMA). To avoid the effects of Ca or Na diffusion potentials on the translocation of the counter ion, the transport of /sup 45/Ca or /sup 22/Na was measured in vesicles which were short-circuited by presetting K/sub in/ = k/sub out/ in the presence of the K ionophore, valinomycin. The uptake of 0.1 mM Ca/sub out/ was stimulated 30% by 150 mM Na/sub in/ versus N-methylglucamine/sub in/, in a control cation. The uptake of ImM Na/sub out/ was stimulated 61% by 10 mM Ca/sub in/ versus Mn/sub in/. The efflux of ImM Na/sub in/ was stimulated 57% by 10 mM Ca/sub out/ versus Mn/sub out/. Thus, these vesicles mediate Na/Ca exchange. The one sec Na gradient-dependent uptake of 0.1 mM Ca/sub out/ was .08 nmol/mg under short-circuited conditions. When the membrane potential was rendered inside positive by an inwardly directed K gradient plus valinomycin, Na gradient-dependent Ca uptake increased to 0.17 nmol/mg. The Na gradient-dependent uptake of 0.1 mM Ca/sub out/ was inhibited 12, 6, 82, and 70% by (in mM) 5 choline, 3 amiloride, 5 quinidine, and 5 diltiazem, respectively. It is concluded that Na-Ca exchange in the sarcolemmal of bovine SMA is voltage sensitive, and inhibitable by quinidine and diltiazem. Depolarization stimulated Ca influx in vascular smooth muscle cells may occur, in part, via Na-Ca exchange.

  13. Aneurysm resection and vascular reconstruction for true aneurysm at the initial segment of splenic artery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Xi; Han, Li-Na; Liang, Fa-Qi; Chu, Fu-Tao; Jia, Xin

    2015-06-01

    The aneurysms at the initial segment of splenic artery are rare. This paper aimed to investigate the methods to treat the true aneurysm at the initial segment of splenic artery by aneurysmectomy plus vascular reconstruction. Retrospectively reviewed were 11 cases of true aneurysm at the initial segment of splenic artery who were treated in our hospital from January 2000 to June 2013. All cases were diagnosed by color ultrasonography, computer tomography (CT) and angiography. Upon resection of the aneurysm, the auto-vein transplantation was performed in situ between the hepatic artery and the distal part of the splenic artery in 1 case; the artificial vessel bypass was done between the infra-renal aorta and distal portion of the splenic artery in 7 cases; the splenectomy was done in 2 cases; the splenectomy in combination with ligation of multiple small aneurysms were performed in 1 case. All cases were cured and discharged from the hospital 10-14 days after operation. A 1-14 year follow-up showed that 9 cases survived, and 2 cases died, including 1 case who died of acute myocardial infarction 2 years after aorta-splenic artery bypass operation and 1 case who died of acute cerebral hemorrhage 5 years after aneurysm resection and the splenectomy. Among 6 cases receiving aorta-splenic artery bypass, 1 gradually developed stenosis at anatomosed site, which eventually progressed to complete occlusion 2 years to 6 years after operation, without suffering from splenic infarction because the spleen was supplied by the short gastric vessel and its collaterals. The other 5 cases receiving aorta-splenic artery bypass and 1 case undergoing autologous vascular transplantation did not develop stricture or pseudoaneurysm at the stoma. Our study showed that the aneurysmectomy plus vascular reconstruction is a better treatment for aneurysm at the initial segment of splenic artery. PMID:26072086

  14. Different effect of serotonin on intracellular calcium ion dynamics in the smooth muscle cells between rat posterior ciliary artery and vorticose vein.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Masatoshi; Satoh, Yoh-Ichi; Hirakawa, Masato; Sasaki, Kana; Masu, Kazuki; J McHonde, Gabriel; Ikeda-Kurosawa, Chika; Kurosaka, Daijiro; Saino, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    5-hydroxytriptamine (5-HT: serotonin) is an important transmitter that causes vessel constriction, although few studies have examined the effect of 5-HT on venous smooth muscles. The intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) plays an essential role in stimulus-response coupling in numerous tissue/cells including vascular smooth muscle cells. The present study was performed to examine whether differences between arteries and veins in the response to 5-HT can be detected under confocal microscope with respect to [Ca(2+)]i dynamics. In posterior ciliary arteries of rats, 5-HT induced a [Ca(2+)]i increase. The 5-HT-induced responses were caused by both Ca(2+) influx and mobilization. Agonist and antagonist experiments revealed that arterial smooth muscles possess 5-HT1a, 1b, 2 (Gprotein-coupled type) and 5-HT3 (ion channel type) receptors, and that 5-HT2 in particular plays a major role in these responses. For vorticose veins, the 5-HT-induced responses were also caused by both Ca(2+) influx and mobilization. However, the cAMP dependent pathway (5-HT4-7) was found to be significant in vasocontraction with respect to 5-HT in these vessels. Thus, Ca(2+) mobilization was induced by 5-HT2 and 5-HT4-7 in a vessel-dependent manner, whereas Ca(2+) influx universally was induced by 5-HT3. These results indicate that the posterior ciliary arteries and vorticose veins in the same tissue might differ greatly in their responses to stimulus. PMID:27108880

  15. Association of Autoantibodies to Heat-Shock Protein 60 With Arterial Vascular Events in Patients With Antiphospholipid Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Dieudé, Mélanie; Correa, José A.; Neville, Carolyn; Pineau, Christian; Levine, Jerrold S.; Subang, Rebecca; Landolt-Marticorena, Carolina; Su, Jiandong; Kassis, Jeannine; Solymoss, Susan; Fortin, Paul R.; Rauch, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    Objective Anti–heat shock protein 60 autoantibodies (anti-Hsp60) are associated with cardiovascular disease and are known to affect endothelial cells in vitro, and we have recently shown that anti-Hsp60 promote thrombosis in a murine model of arterial injury. Based on those findings, we undertook the present study to investigate the hypothesis that the presence of anti-Hsp60, alone or in combination with other thrombogenic risk factors, is associated with an elevated risk of vascular events. Methods The study population was derived from 3 ongoing cohort studies: 2 independent systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) registries and 1 cohort comprising SLE patients and non-SLE patients. Data from a total of 402 participants were captured; 199 of these participants had had confirmed vascular events (arterial vascular events in 102, venous vascular events in 76, and both arterial and venous vascular events in 21). Anti-Hsp60 were detected by enzyme-linked immunoassay, and association with vascular events was assessed by regression analysis. Results Multiple regression analysis revealed that arterial vascular events were associated with male sex, age, and hypertension. Analyses of the vascular events according to their origin showed an association of anti-Hsp60 with arterial vascular events (odds ratio 2.26 [95% confidence interval 1.13–4.52]), but not with venous vascular events. Anti-Hsp60 increased the risk of arterial vascular events (odds ratio 5.54 [95% confidence interval 1.89–16.25]) in antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)–positive, but not aPL-negative, individuals. Conclusion We demonstrate that anti-Hsp60 are associated with an increased risk of arterial vascular events, but not venous vascular events, in aPL-positive individuals. These data suggest that anti-Hsp60 may serve as a useful biomarker to distinguish risk of arterial and venous vascular events in patients with aPL. PMID:21506099

  16. Magnesium relaxes arterial smooth muscle by decreasing intracellular Ca2+ without changing intracellular Mg2+.

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, E K; Singer, H A; Rembold, C M

    1992-01-01

    Elevations in extracellular [Mg2+] ([Mg2+]o) relax vascular smooth muscle. We tested the hypothesis that elevated [Mg2+]o induces relaxation through reductions in myoplasmic [Ca2+] and myosin light chain phosphorylation without changing intracellular [Mg2+] ([Mg2+]i). Histamine stimulation of endothelium-free swine carotid medial tissues was associated with increases in both Fura 2- and aequorin-estimated myoplasmic [Ca2+], myosin phosphorylation, and force. Elevated [Mg2+]o decreased myoplasmic [Ca2+] and force to near resting values. However, elevated [Mg2+]o only transiently decreased myosin phosphorylation values: sustained [Mg2+]o-induced decreases in myoplasmic [Ca2+] and force were associated with inappropriately high myosin phosphorylation values. The elevated myosin phosphorylation during [Mg2+]o-induced relaxation was entirely on serine 19, the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase substrate. Myoplasmic [Mg2+] (estimated with Mag-Fura 2) did not significantly increase with elevated [Mg2+]o. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that increased [Mg2+]o induces relaxation by decreasing myoplasmic [Ca2+] without changing [Mg2+]i. These data also demonstrate dissociation of myosin phosphorylation from myoplasmic [Ca2+] and force during Mg(2+)-induced relaxation. This finding suggests the presence of a phosphorylation-independent (yet potentially Ca(2+)-dependent) mechanism for regulation of force in vascular smooth muscle. Images PMID:1602005

  17. Entrapment of the StarClose Vascular Closure System After Attempted Common Femoral Artery Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Durack, Jeremy C. Thor Johnson, D.; Fidelman, Nicholas; Kerlan, Robert K.; LaBerge, Jeanne M.

    2012-08-15

    A complication of the StarClose Vascular Closure System (Abbott, Des Plaines, IL) after a transarterial hepatic chemoembolization is described. After attempted clip deployment, the entire device became lodged in the tissues overlying the common femoral artery and could not be removed percutaneously. Successful removal of the device required surgical cutdown for removal and arterial repair. Entrapment of the StarClose vascular closure deployment system is a potentially serious complication that has been reported in the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database, but has not been recognized in the literature.

  18. Verapamil stereoisomers induce antiproliferative effects in vascular smooth muscle cells via autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Salabei, Joshua K.; Balakumaran, Arun; Frey, Justin C.; Boor, Paul J.; Treinen-Moslen, Mary; Conklin, Daniel J.

    2012-08-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are important in the management of hypertension and limit restenosis. Although CCB efficacy could derive from decreased blood pressure, other mechanisms independent of CCB activity also can contribute to antiproliferative action. To understand mechanisms of CCB-mediated antiproliferation, we studied two structurally dissimilar CCBs, diltiazem and verapamil, in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). To elucidate CCB-independent effects, pure stereoisomers of verapamil (R-verapamil, inactive VR; S-verapamil, active, VS) were used. The effects of CCB exposure on cell viability (MTT reduction), cell proliferation ({sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation), VSMC morphology by light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and autophagy (LC3I/II, ATG5) were measured. In general, verapamil, VR or VS treatment alone (80 μM) appreciably enhanced MTT absorbance although higher concentrations (VR or VS) slightly decreased MTT absorbance. Diltiazem (140 μM) markedly decreased MTT absorbance (40%) at 120 h. VR or VS treatment inhibited {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation (24 h) and induced cytological alterations (i.e., karyokinesis, enhanced perinuclear MTT deposition, accumulated perinuclear “vacuoles”). TEM revealed perinuclear “vacuoles” to be aggregates of highly laminated and electron-dense vesicles resembling autophagosomes and lysosomes, respectively. Increased autophagosome activity was confirmed by a concentration-dependent increase in LC3-II formation by Western blotting and by increased perinuclear LC3-GFP{sup +} puncta in verapamil-treated VSMC. Verapamil stereoisomers appeared to decrease perinuclear mitochondrial density. These observations indicate that antiproliferative effects of verapamil stereoisomers are produced by enhanced mitochondrial damage and upregulated autophagy in VSMC. These effects are independent of CCB activity indicating a distinct mechanism of action that could be targeted for more efficacious anti

  19. Vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation depends on caveolin-1-regulated polyamine uptake

    PubMed Central

    Grossi, Mario; Rippe, Catarina; Sathanoori, Ramasri; Swärd, Karl; Forte, Amalia; Erlinge, David; Persson, Lo; Hellstrand, Per; Nilsson, Bengt-Olof

    2014-01-01

    Much evidence highlights the importance of polyamines for VSMC (vascular smooth muscle cell) proliferation and migration. Cav-1 (caveolin-1) was recently reported to regulate polyamine uptake in intestinal epithelial cells. The aim of the present study was to assess the importance of Cav-1 for VSMC polyamine uptake and its impact on cell proliferation and migration. Cav-1 KO (knockout) mouse aortic cells showed increased polyamine uptake and elevated proliferation and migration compared with WT (wild-type) cells. Both Cav-1 KO and WT cells expressed the smooth muscle differentiation markers SM22 and calponin. Cell-cycle phase distribution analysis revealed a higher proportion of Cav-1 KO than WT cells in the S phase. Cav-1 KO cells were hyper-proliferative in the presence but not in the absence of extracellular polyamines, and, moreover, supplementation with exogenous polyamines promoted proliferation in Cav-1 KO but not in WT cells. Expression of the solute carrier transporters Slc7a1 and Slc43a1 was higher in Cav-1 KO than in WT cells. ODC (ornithine decarboxylase) protein and mRNA expression as well as ODC activity were similar in Cav-1 KO and WT cells showing unaltered synthesis of polyamines in Cav-1 KO cells. Cav-1 was reduced in migrating cells in vitro and in carotid lesions in vivo. Our data show that Cav-1 negatively regulates VSMC polyamine uptake and that the proliferative advantage of Cav-1 KO cells is critically dependent on polyamine uptake. We provide proof-of-principle for targeting Cav-1-regulated polyamine uptake as a strategy to fight unwanted VSMC proliferation as observed in restenosis. PMID:25301005

  20. Essential Role of TGF-β/Smad Pathway on Statin Dependent Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vita, Juan; Sánchez-Galán, Eva; Santamaría, Beatriz; Sánchez-López, Elsa; Rodrigues-Díez, Raquel; Blanco-Colio, Luís Miguel; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2008-01-01

    Background The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (also called statins) exert proven beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases. Recent data suggest a protective role for Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) in atherosclerosis by regulating the balance between inflammation and extracellular matrix accumulation. However, there are no studies about the effect of statins on TGF-β/Smad pathway in atherosclerosis and vascular cells. Methodology In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) statins enhanced Smad pathway activation caused by TGF-β. In addition, statins upregulated TGF-β receptor type II (TRII), and increased TGF-β synthesis and TGF-β/Smad-dependent actions. In this sense, statins, through Smad activation, render VSMCs more susceptible to TGF-β induced apoptosis and increased TGF-β-mediated ECM production. It is well documented that high doses of statins induce apoptosis in cultured VSMC in the presence of serum; however the precise mechanism of this effect remains to be elucidated. We have found that statins-induced apoptosis was mediated by TGF-β/Smad pathway. Finally, we have described that RhoA inhibition is a common intracellular mechanisms involved in statins effects. The in vivo relevance of these findings was assessed in an experimental model of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E deficient mice: Treatment with Atorvastatin increased Smad3 phosphorylation and TRII overexpression, associated to elevated ECM deposition in the VSMCs within atheroma plaques, while apoptosis was not detected. Conclusions Statins enhance TGF-β/Smad pathway, regulating ligand levels, receptor, main signaling pathway and cellular responses of VSMC, including apoptosis and ECM accumulation. Our findings show that TGF-β/Smad pathway is essential for statins-dependent actions in VSMCs. PMID:19088845

  1. Thiamylal sodium increased inflammation and the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoka, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    Background Thiamylal sodium is a common anesthetic barbiturate prepared in alkaline solution for clinical use. There is no previously reported study on the effects of barbiturates on the inflammation and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we examined the effects of clinical-grade thiamylal sodium solution (TSS) on the inflammation and proliferation of rat VSMCs. Methods Expression levels of interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and toll-like receptors in rat VSMCs were detected by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and microarray analyses. The production of IL-6 by cultured VSMCs or ex vivo-cultured rat aortic segments was detected in supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. VSMC proliferation and viability were determined by the water-soluble tetrazolium-1 assay and trypan blue staining, respectively. Results TSS increased expression of IL-1α, IL-6, and TLR4 in VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner, and reduced IL-1β expression. Ex vivo TSS stimulation of rat aorta also increased IL-6. Low concentrations of TSS enhanced VSMC proliferation, while high concentrations reduced both cell proliferation and viability. Expression of IL-1 receptor antagonist, which regulates cell proliferation, was not increased by TSS stimulation. Exposure of cells to the TSS additive, sodium carbonate, resulted in significant upregulation of IL-1α and IL-6 mRNA levels, to a greater extent than TSS. Conclusions TSS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production by VSMCs is caused by sodium carbonate. However, pure thiamylal sodium has an anti-inflammatory effect in VSMCs. TSS exposure to VSMCs may promote vascular inflammation, leading to the progression of atherosclerosis or in-stent restenosis, resulting in vessel bypass graft failure. PMID:27274372

  2. Critical Parameters of the In Vitro Method of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Hortells, Luis; Sosa, Cecilia; Millán, Ángel; Sorribas, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Background Vascular calcification (VC) is primarily studied using cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the use of very different protocols and extreme conditions can provide findings unrelated to VC. In this work we aimed to determine the critical experimental parameters that affect calcification in vitro and to determine the relevance to calcification in vivo. Experimental Procedures and Results Rat VSMC calcification in vitro was studied using different concentrations of fetal calf serum, calcium, and phosphate, in different types of culture media, and using various volumes and rates of change. The bicarbonate content of the media critically affected pH and resulted in supersaturation, depending on the concentration of Ca2+ and Pi. Such supersaturation is a consequence of the high dependence of bicarbonate buffers on CO2 vapor pressure and bicarbonate concentration at pHs above 7.40. Such buffer systems cause considerable pH variations as a result of minor experimental changes. The variations are more critical for DMEM and are negligible when the bicarbonate concentration is reduced to ¼. Particle nucleation and growth were observed by dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy. Using 2mM Pi, particles of ~200nm were observed at 24 hours in MEM and at 1 hour in DMEM. These nuclei grew over time, were deposited in the cells, and caused osteogene expression or cell death, depending on the precipitation rate. TEM observations showed that the initial precipitate was amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), which converts into hydroxyapatite over time. In blood, the scenario is different, because supersaturation is avoided by a tightly controlled pH of 7.4, which prevents the formation of PO43--containing ACP. Conclusions The precipitation of ACP in vitro is unrelated to VC in vivo. The model needs to be refined through controlled pH and the use of additional procalcifying agents other than Pi in order to reproduce calcium phosphate deposition in vivo

  3. Effect of oxysterol-induced apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells on experimental hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Perales, Sonia; Alejandre, M José; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio; Torres, Carolina; Iglesias, Jose; Linares, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) undergo changes related to proliferation and apoptosis in the physiological remodeling of vessels and in diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Recent studies also have demonstrated the vascular cell proliferation and programmed cell death contribute to changes in vascular architecture in normal development and in disease. The present study was designed to investigate the apoptotic pathways induced by 25-hydroxycholesterol in SMCs cultures, using an in vivo/in vitro cell model in which SMCs were isolated and culture from chicken exposed to an atherogenic cholesterol-rich diet (SMC-Ch) and/or an antiatherogenic fish oil-rich diet (SMC-Ch-FO). Cells were exposed in vitro to 25-hydroxycholesterol to study levels of apoptosis and apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L) and Bax and the expression of bcl-2 and bcl-x(L), genes. The quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and the Immunoblotting western blot analysis showed that 25-hydroxycholesterol produces apoptosis in SMCs, mediated by a high increase in Bax protein and Bax gene expression. These changes were more marked in SMC-Ch than in SMC-Ch-FO, indicating that dietary cholesterol produces changes in SMCs that make them more susceptible to 25-hydroxycholesterol-mediated apoptosis. Our results suggest that the replacement of a cholesterol-rich diet with a fish oil-rich diet produces some reversal of cholesterol-induced changes in the apoptotic pathways induced by 25-hydroxycholesterol in SMCs cultures, making SMCs more resistant to apoptosis. PMID:19727411

  4. Loss of the Mechanotransducer Zyxin Promotes a Synthetic Phenotype of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Subhajit; Kollar, Branislav; Nahar, Taslima; Suresh Babu, Sahana; Wojtowicz, Agnieszka; Sticht, Carsten; Gretz, Norbert; Wagner, Andreas H; Korff, Thomas; Hecker, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to excessive cyclic stretch such as in hypertension causes a shift in their phenotype. The focal adhesion protein zyxin can transduce such biomechanical stimuli to the nucleus of both endothelial cells and VSMCs, albeit with different thresholds and kinetics. However, there is no distinct vascular phenotype in young zyxin-deficient mice, possibly due to functional redundancy among other gene products belonging to the zyxin family. Analyzing zyxin function in VSMCs at the cellular level might thus offer a better mechanistic insight. We aimed to characterize zyxin-dependent changes in gene expression in VSMCs exposed to biomechanical stretch and define the functional role of zyxin in controlling the resultant VSMC phenotype. Methods and Results DNA microarray analysis was used to identify genes and pathways that were zyxin regulated in static and stretched human umbilical artery–derived and mouse aortic VSMCs. Zyxin-null VSMCs showed a remarkable shift to a growth-promoting, less apoptotic, promigratory and poorly contractile phenotype with ≈90% of the stretch-responsive genes being zyxin dependent. Interestingly, zyxin-null cells already seemed primed for such a synthetic phenotype, with mechanical stretch further accentuating it. This could be accounted for by higher RhoA activity and myocardin-related transcription factor-A mainly localized to the nucleus of zyxin-null VSMCs, and a condensed and localized accumulation of F-actin upon stretch. Conclusions At the cellular level, zyxin is a key regulator of stretch-induced gene expression. Loss of zyxin drives VSMCs toward a synthetic phenotype, a process further consolidated by exaggerated stretch. PMID:26071033

  5. The non-excitable smooth muscle: Calcium signaling and phenotypic switching during vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    House, Suzanne J.; Potier, Marie; Bisaillon, Jonathan; Singer, Harold A.

    2008-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) is a highly versatile second messenger that controls vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) contraction, proliferation, and migration. By means of Ca2+ permeable channels, Ca2+ pumps and channels conducting other ions such as potassium and chloride, VSMC keep intracellular Ca2+ levels under tight control. In healthy quiescent contractile VSMC, two important components of the Ca2+ signaling pathways that regulate VSMC contraction are the plasma membrane voltage-operated Ca2+ channel of the high voltage-activated type (L-type) and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channel, Ryanodine Receptor (RyR). Injury to the vessel wall is accompanied by VSMC phenotype switch from a contractile quiescent to a proliferative motile phenotype (synthetic phenotype) and by alteration of many components of VSMC Ca2+ signaling pathways. Specifically, this switch that culminates in a VSMC phenotype reminiscent of a non-excitable cell is characterized by loss of L-type channels expression and increased expression of the low voltage-activated (T-type) Ca2+ channels and the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels. The expression levels of intracellular Ca2+ release channels, pumps and Ca2+-activated proteins are also altered: the proliferative VSMC lose the RyR3 and the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase isoform 2a pump and reciprocally regulate isoforms of the ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. This review focuses on the changes in expression of Ca2+ signaling proteins associated with VSMC proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. The physiological implications of the altered expression of these Ca2+ signaling molecules, their contribution to VSMC dysfunction during vascular disease and their potential as targets for drug therapy will be discussed. PMID:18365243

  6. Zoledronate upregulates MMP-9 and -13 in rat vascular smooth muscle cells by inducing oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Mehmet Zuhuri; Reel, Buket; Sala-Newby, Graciela B; Bond, Mark; Tsaousi, Aikaterini; Maskell, Perry; Newby, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonates, including zoledronate, target osteoclasts and are widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and other bone resorption diseases, despite side effects that include damaging the stomach epithelium. Beneficial and adverse effects on other organ systems, including the cardiovascular system, have also been described and could impact on the use of bisphosphonates as therapeutic agents. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are major constituents of the normal vascular wall and have a key role in intimal thickening and atherosclerosis, in part by secreting MMPs that remodel the extracellular matrix and cleave cell surface proteins or secreted mediators. In this study, we investigated the effects of zoledronate on MMP expression. Methods Rat VSMCs were stimulated by PDGF (50 ng/mL) plus TNF-α (10 ng/mL) or left unstimulated for a further 24 hours in serum-free medium. In other series of experiments, cells were pre-treated either with SC-514 (50 μM) or with apocynin (20 nM) for 2 hours, then zoledronate (100 μM) was added into 2% fetal calf serum containing medium for 24 hours. Results and discussion Using isolated rat VSMCs in culture, zoledronate (100 μM) increased MMP-9 and -13 mRNA expressions but inhibited MMP-2 expression. MMP-9 and MMP-13 up-regulation was shown to depend on the NF-κB pathway; and this was activated by zoledronate. Furthermore, zoledronate elevated the levels of reactive oxygen species detected by either dichlorofluorescein in isolated VSMCs or lucigenin enhanced chemiluminescence in rat aortic rings in vitro. Apocynin, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, reversed NF-κB activation and MMP-9 and MMP-13 up-regulation by zoledronate. Conclusion We conclude that zoledronate increases MMP-9 and MMP-13 expressions in rat VSMCs dependent upon stimulation of the NF-κB pathway by reactive oxygen species. Effects on MMP expression may contribute to the pharmacologic profile of bisphosphonates. PMID:27143852

  7. Detection of differentially regulated subsarcolemmal calcium signals activated by vasoactive agonists in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Krishna P.; Paudel, Omkar

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) plays pivotal roles in distinct cellular functions through global and local signaling in various subcellular compartments, and subcellular Ca2+ signal is the key factor for independent regulation of different cellular functions. In vascular smooth muscle cells, subsarcolemmal Ca2+ is an important regulator of excitation-contraction coupling, and nucleoplasmic Ca2+ is crucial for excitation-transcription coupling. However, information on Ca2+ signals in these subcellular compartments is limited. To study the regulation of the subcellular Ca2+ signals, genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators (cameleon), D3cpv, targeting the plasma membrane (PM), cytoplasm, and nucleoplasm were transfected into rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and Ca2+ signals were monitored using laser scanning confocal microscopy. In situ calibration showed that the Kd for Ca2+ of D3cpv was comparable in the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm, but it was slightly higher in the PM. Stimulation of digitonin-permeabilized cells with 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) elicited a transient elevation of Ca2+ concentration with similar amplitude and kinetics in the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. Activation of G protein-coupled receptors by endothelin-1 and angiotensin II preferentially elevated the subsarcolemmal Ca2+ signal with higher amplitude in the PM region than the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. In contrast, the receptor tyrosine kinase activator, platelet-derived growth factor, elicited Ca2+ signals with similar amplitudes in all three regions, except that the rise-time and decay-time were slightly slower in the PM region. These data clearly revealed compartmentalization of Ca2+ signals in the subsarcolemmal regions and provide the basis for further investigations of differential regulation of subcellular Ca2+ signals in PASMCs. PMID:24352334

  8. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Contribute to APOL1-induced Podocyte Injury in HIV milieu

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Xiqian; Wen, Hongxiu; Saleem, Moin A.; Mikulak, Joanna; Malhotra, Ashwani; Skorecki, Karl; Singhal, Pravin C

    2015-01-01

    Clinical reports have demonstrated that higher rates of non-diabetic glomerulosclerosis in African Americans can be attributed to two coding sequence variants (G1 and G2) in the APOL1 gene; however, the underlying mechanism is still unknown. Kidney biopsy data suggest enhanced expression of APOL1/APOL1 variants (Vs) in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of renal vasculature. Since APOL1 is a secretory protein of relatively low molecular weight (41 kDa), SMCs may be a contributory endocrine/paracrine source of APOL1 wild type (WT)/APOL1Vs in the glomerular capillary perfusate percolating podocytes. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that an HIV milieu stimulated secretion of APOL1 and its risk variants by arterial SMCs contributes to podocyte injury. Human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HSMCs)-treated with conditioned media (CM) of HIV-infected peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC/HIV-CM), CM of HIV-infected U939 cells, or recombinant IFN-γ displayed enhanced expression of APOL1. Podocytes co-cultured in trans-wells with HSMCs-over expressing APOL1WT showed induction of injury; however, podocytes co-cultured with HSMC-over expressing either APOL1G1 or APOL1G2 showed several fold greater injury when compared to HSMC- over expressing APOL1WT. Conditioned media collected from HSMC-over-expressing APOL1G1/APOL1G2 (HSMC/APOL1G1-CM or HSMC/APOL1G2-CM) also displayed higher percentages of injured podocytes in the form of swollen cells, leaky lysosomes, loss of viability, and enhanced sensitivity to adverse host factors when compared to HSMC/APOL1WT-CM. Notably, HSMC/APOL1WT-CM promoted podocyte injury only at a significantly higher concentrations compared to HSMC/APOL1G1/G2-CM. We conclude that HSMCs could serve as an endocrine/paracrine source of APOL1Vs, which mediate accelerated podocyte injury in HIV milieu. PMID:25796344

  9. Capacitative calcium entry and TRPC channel proteins are expressed in rat distal pulmonary arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Shimoda, L A; Sylvester, J T

    2004-04-01

    Mammalian homologs of transient receptor potential (TRP) genes in Drosophila encode TRPC proteins, which make up cation channels that play several putative roles, including Ca2+ entry triggered by depletion of Ca2+ stores in endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This capacitative calcium entry (CCE) is thought to replenish Ca2+ stores and contribute to signaling in many tissues, including smooth muscle cells from main pulmonary artery (PASMCs); however, the roles of CCE and TRPC proteins in PASMCs from distal pulmonary arteries, which are thought to be the major site of pulmonary vasoreactivity, remain uncertain. As an initial test of the possibility that TRPC channels contribute to CCE and Ca2+ signaling in distal PASMCs, we measured [Ca2+]i by fura-2 fluorescence in primary cultures of myocytes isolated from rat intrapulmonary arteries (>4th generation). In cells perfused with Ca2+-free media containing cyclopiazonic acid (10 microM) and nifedipine (5 microM) to deplete ER Ca2+ stores and block voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, restoration of extracellular Ca2+ (2.5 mM) caused marked increases in [Ca2+]i whereas MnCl2 (200 microM) quenched fura-2 fluorescence, indicating CCE. SKF-96365, LaCl3, and NiCl2, blocked CCE at concentrations that did not alter Ca2+ responses to 60 mM KCl (IC50 6.3, 40.4, and 191 microM, respectively). RT-PCR and Western blotting performed on RNA and protein isolated from distal intrapulmonary arteries and PASMCs revealed mRNA and protein expression for TRPC1, -4, and -6, but not TRPC2, -3, -5, or -7. Our results suggest that CCE through TRPC-encoded Ca2+ channels could contribute to Ca2+ signaling in myocytes from distal intrapulmonary arteries. PMID:14672922

  10. Phenotypic transformation of smooth muscle cells from porcine coronary arteries is associated with connexin 43

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XUMIN; WANG, XIAODONG; ZHOU, XIAOHUI; MA, XIAOYE; YAO, YIAN; LIU, XUEBO

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the relevance of the gap junction protein connexin Cx43 in coronary artery smooth muscle cell (SMC) heterogeneity and coronary artery restenosis. SMCs were isolated from the coronary artery of 3-month-old pigs using enzymatic digestion. Two distinct SMC populations were isolated: Rhomboid (R) and spindle-shaped (S) cells. S-SMCs exhibited relatively lower rates of proliferation, exhibiting a classic ''hills-and valleys'' growth pattern; R-SMCs displayed increased proliferation rates, growing as mono- or multi-layers. Immunofluorescent staining, polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to assess the expression of Cx40 and Cx43 in SMCs. For further evaluation, cultured SMCs were treated with 10 ng/ml platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB with or without the gap junction blocker 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid. Stent-induced restenosis was assessed in vivo. Different expression patterns were observed for Cx40 and Cx43 in R- and S-SMCs. Cx40 was the most abundant Cx in S-SMCs, whereas CX43 was identified at relatively higher levels than Cx40 in R-SMCs. Notably, PDGF-BB converted S-SMCs to R-SMCs, with increased Cx43 expression, while 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid inhibited the PDGF-BB-induced phenotypic alterations in S-SMCs. Additionally, restenosis was confirmed in pigs 1-month subsequent to stent placement. R-SMCs were the major cell population isolated from stent-induced restenosis artery tissues, and exhibited markedly increased Cx43 expression, in accordance with the in vitro data described above. In conclusion, the phenotypic transformation of coronary artery SMCs is closely associated with Cx43, which is involved in restenosis. These observations provide a basis for the use of Cx43 as a novel target in restenosis prevention. PMID:27175888

  11. A Novel Vascular Homing Peptide Strategy to Selectively Enhance Pulmonary Drug Efficacy in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Toba, Michie; Alzoubi, Abdallah; O’Neill, Kealan; Abe, Kohtaro; Urakami, Takeo; Komatsu, Masanobu; Alvarez, Diego; Järvinen, Tero A.H.; Mann, David; Ruoslahti, Erkki; McMurtry, Ivan F.; Oka, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    A major limitation in the pharmacological treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is the lack of pulmonary vascular selectivity. Recent studies have identified a tissue-penetrating homing peptide, CARSKNKDC (CAR), which specifically homes to hypertensive pulmonary arteries but not to normal pulmonary vessels or other tissues. Some tissue-penetrating vascular homing peptides have a unique ability to facilitate transport of co-administered drugs into the targeted cells/tissues without requiring physical conjugation of the drug to the peptide (bystander effect). We tested the hypothesis that co-administered CAR would selectively enhance the pulmonary vascular effects of i.v. vasodilators in Sugen5416/hypoxia/normoxia-exposed PAH rats. Systemically administered CAR was predominantly detected in cells of remodeled pulmonary arteries. Intravenously co-administered CAR enhanced pulmonary, but not systemic, effects of the vasodilators, fasudil and imatinib, in PAH rats. CAR increased lung tissue imatinib concentration in isolated PAH lungs without increasing pulmonary vascular permeability. Sublingual CAR was also effective in selectively enhancing the pulmonary vasodilation by imatinib and sildenafil. Our results suggest a new paradigm in the treatment of PAH, using an i.v./sublingual tissue-penetrating homing peptide to selectively augment pulmonary vascular effects of nonselective drugs without the potentially problematic conjugation process. CAR may be particularly useful as an add-on therapy to selectively enhance the pulmonary vascular efficacy of any ongoing drug treatment in patients with PAH. PMID:24401613

  12. A novel vascular homing peptide strategy to selectively enhance pulmonary drug efficacy in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Toba, Michie; Alzoubi, Abdallah; O'Neill, Kealan; Abe, Kohtaro; Urakami, Takeo; Komatsu, Masanobu; Alvarez, Diego; Järvinen, Tero A H; Mann, David; Ruoslahti, Erkki; McMurtry, Ivan F; Oka, Masahiko

    2014-02-01

    A major limitation in the pharmacological treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is the lack of pulmonary vascular selectivity. Recent studies have identified a tissue-penetrating homing peptide, CARSKNKDC (CAR), which specifically homes to hypertensive pulmonary arteries but not to normal pulmonary vessels or other tissues. Some tissue-penetrating vascular homing peptides have a unique ability to facilitate transport of co-administered drugs into the targeted cells/tissues without requiring physical conjugation of the drug to the peptide (bystander effect). We tested the hypothesis that co-administered CAR would selectively enhance the pulmonary vascular effects of i.v. vasodilators in Sugen5416/hypoxia/normoxia-exposed PAH rats. Systemically administered CAR was predominantly detected in cells of remodeled pulmonary arteries. Intravenously co-administered CAR enhanced pulmonary, but not systemic, effects of the vasodilators, fasudil and imatinib, in PAH rats. CAR increased lung tissue imatinib concentration in isolated PAH lungs without increasing pulmonary vascular permeability. Sublingual CAR was also effective in selectively enhancing the pulmonary vasodilation by imatinib and sildenafil. Our results suggest a new paradigm in the treatment of PAH, using an i.v./sublingual tissue-penetrating homing peptide to selectively augment pulmonary vascular effects of nonselective drugs without the potentially problematic conjugation process. CAR may be particularly useful as an add-on therapy to selectively enhance the pulmonary vascular efficacy of any ongoing drug treatment in patients with PAH. PMID:24401613

  13. PDGF induces SphK1 expression via Egr-1 to promote pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sysol, Justin R; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Machado, Roberto F

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive, life-threatening disease for which there is currently no curative treatment available. Pathologic changes in this disease involve remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature, including marked proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Recently, the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its activating kinase, sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1), have been shown to be upregulated in PAH and promote PASMC proliferation. The mechanisms regulating the transcriptional upregulation of SphK1 in PASMCs are unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), a PAH-relevant stimuli associated with enhanced PASMC proliferation, on SphK1 expression regulation. In human PASMCs (hPASMCs), PDGF significantly increased SphK1 mRNA and protein expression and induced cell proliferation. Selective inhibition of SphK1 attenuated PDGF-induced hPASMC proliferation. In silico promoter analysis for SphK1 identified several binding sites for early growth response protein 1 (Egr-1), a PDGF-associated transcription factor. Luciferase assays demonstrated that PDGF activates the SphK1 promoter in hPASMCs, and truncation of the 5'-promoter reduced PDGF-induced SphK1 expression. Stimulation of hPASMCs with PDGF induced Egr-1 protein expression, and direct binding of Egr-1 to the SphK1 promoter was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. Inhibition of ERK signaling prevented induction of Egr-1 by PDGF. Silencing of Egr-1 attenuated PDGF-induced SphK1 expression and hPASMC proliferation. These studies demonstrate that SphK1 is regulated by PDGF in hPASMCs via the transcription factor Egr-1, promoting cell proliferation. This novel mechanism of SphK1 regulation may be a therapeutic target in pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH. PMID:27099350

  14. Effects of serotonin on expression of the LDL receptor family member LR11 and 7-ketocholesterol-induced apoptosis in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nagayama, Daiji; Ishihara, Noriko; Bujo, Hideaki; Shirai, Kohji; Tatsuno, Ichiro

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • The dedifferentiation of VSMCs in arterial intima is involved in atherosclerosis. • 5-HT showed proliferative effect on VSMCs which was abolished by sarpogrelate. • 5-HT enhanced expression of LR11 mRNA in VSMCs which was abolished by sarpogrelate. • 5-HT suppressed 7KCHO-induced apoptosis of VSMCs via caspase-3/7-dependent pathway. • The mechanisms explain the 5-HT-induced remodeling of arterial structure. - Abstract: Serotonin (5-HT) is a known mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The dedifferentiation and proliferation/apoptosis of VSMCs in the arterial intima represent one of the atherosclerotic changes. LR11, a member of low-density lipoprotein receptor family, may contribute to the proliferation of VSMCs in neointimal hyperplasia. We conducted an in vitro study to investigate whether 5-HT is involved in LR11 expression in human VSMCs and apoptosis of VSMCs induced by 7-ketocholesterol (7KCHO), an oxysterol that destabilizes plaque. 5-HT enhanced the proliferation of VSMCs, and this effect was abolished by sarpogrelate, a selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist. Sarpogrelate also inhibited the 5-HT-enhanced LR11 mRNA expression in VSMCs. Furthermore, 5-HT suppressed the 7KCHO-induced apoptosis of VSMCs via caspase-3/7-dependent pathway. These findings provide new insights on the changes in the differentiation stage of VSMCs mediated by 5-HT.

  15. Age-associated proinflammatory secretory phenotype in vascular smooth muscle cells from the non-human primate Macaca mulatta: reversal by resveratrol treatment.

    PubMed

    Csiszar, Anna; Sosnowska, Danuta; Wang, Mingyi; Lakatta, Edward G; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2012-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that age-associated chronic low-grade inflammation promotes the development of both large-vessel disease (myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease) and small-vessel pathologies (including vascular cognitive impairment) in older persons. However, the source of age-related chronic vascular inflammation remains unclear. To test the hypothesis that cell-autonomous mechanisms contribute to the proinflammatory changes in vascular phenotype that accompanies advancing age, we analyzed the cytokine secretion profile of primary vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) derived from young (∼13 years old) and aged (∼21 years old) Macaca mulatta. Aged VSMCs cultured in the absence of systemic factors exhibited significantly increased secretion of interleukin-1β, MCP-1, and tumor necrosis factorα compared with young control cells. Secretion of interleukin-6 also tended to increase in aged VSMCs. This age-associated proinflammatory shift in the cellular secretory phenotype was associated with an increased mitochondrial O(2)(-) production and nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells activation. Treatment of aged VSMCs with a physiologically relevant concentration of resveratrol (1 μM) exerted significant anti-inflammatory effects, reversing aging-induced alterations in the cellular cytokine secretion profile and inhibiting nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells. Resveratrol also attenuated mitochondrial O(2)(-) production and upregulated the transcriptional activity of Nrf2 in aged VSMCs. Thus, in non-human primates, cell-autonomous activation of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells and expression of an inflammatory secretome likely contribute to vascular inflammation in aging. Resveratrol treatment prevents the proinflammatory properties of the aged VSMC secretome, an effect that likely contributes to the demonstrated vasoprotective action of resveratrol in animal

  16. Inhibition of Orai1-mediated Ca(2+) entry is a key mechanism of the antiproliferative action of sirolimus in human arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    König, Sarah; Browne, Sara; Doleschal, Bernhard; Schernthaner, Michaela; Poteser, Michael; Mächler, Heinrich; Wittchow, Eric; Braune, Marlen; Muik, Martin; Romanin, Christoph; Groschner, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    Sirolimus (rapamycin) is used in drug-eluting stent strategies and proved clearly superior in this application compared with other immunomodulators such as pimecrolimus. The molecular basis of this action of sirolimus in the vascular system is still incompletely understood. Measurements of cell proliferation in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASM) demonstrated a higher antiproliferative activity of sirolimus compared with pimecrolimus. Although sirolimus lacks inhibitory effects on calcineurin, nuclear factor of activated T-cell activation in hCASM was suppressed to a similar extent by both drugs at 10 μM. Sirolimus, but not pimecrolimus, inhibited agonist-induced and store-operated Ca(2+) entry as well as cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in human arterial smooth muscle, suggesting the existence of an as-yet unrecognized inhibitory effect of sirolimus on Ca(2+) signaling and Ca(2+)-dependent gene transcription. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that only sirolimus but not pimecrolimus significantly blocked the classical stromal interaction molecule/Orai-mediated, store-operated Ca(2+) current reconstituted in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293). A link between Orai function and proliferation was confirmed by dominant-negative knockout of Orai in hCASM. Analysis of the effects of sirolimus on cell proliferation and CREB activation in an in vitro model of arterial intervention using human aorta corroborated the ability of sirolimus to suppress stent implantation-induced CREB activation in human arteries. We suggest inhibition of store-operated Ca(2+) entry based on Orai channels and the resulting suppression of Ca(2+) transcription coupling as a key mechanism underlying the antiproliferative activity of sirolimus in human arteries. This mechanism of action is specific for sirolimus and not a general feature of drugs interacting with FK506-binding proteins. PMID:24056904

  17. Mechanisms of inhibitory effects of cerivastatin on rat vascular smooth muscle cell growth.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Masahiko; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Hirata, Akihiko; Tsuchiya, Hiromi; Ohnuma, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Makoto; Daimon, Makoto; Kato, Takeo

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the mechanism(s) of an inhibitory effect of cerivastatin on cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) growth. After being starved, cultured VSMCs were stimulated by 5% fetal bovine serum with either various concentrations of cerivastatin or 10-4 M of mevalonate. Cerivastatin dose-dependently decreased the values of [3H]-thymidine incorporation and cell numbers and the level of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2. It also suppressed the level of proliferative cell nuclear antigen in a dose-dependent manner. These reductions were abolished by the addition of mevalonate. Similarly, the level of phosphorylated p38 was also decreased by cerivastatin. In contrast, cerivastatin dose-dependently activated the phosphorylation of both c-jun NH2-terminal protein kinase and activating transcription factor-2, and these activations were abolished by the addition of mevalonate. The levels of phosphorylated Akt and p70 S6 kinase as well as those of Bcl-2 were dose-dependently reduced by cerivastatin, and these reductions were abolished by the addition of mevalonate. Cerivastatin could dose-dependently elevate the levels of CPP32/caspase-3 activity and cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragments in VSMCs without causing cytotoxicity. These results indicate that cerivastatin suppresses cell survival and activates the apoptotic cellular signaling in VSMCs, suggesting that it could be effective for preventing the progression of restenosis after angioplasty. PMID:12131557

  18. Differential Mitochondrial Adaptation in Primary Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from a Diabetic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Amy C.; Knaub, Leslie A.; McClatchey, P. Mason; Connon, Chelsea A.; Bouchard, Ron; Miller, Matthew W.; Geary, Kate E.; Walker, Lori A.; Klemm, Dwight J.; Reusch, Jane E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 330 million people worldwide and causes elevated cardiovascular disease risk. Mitochondria are critical for vascular function, generate cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and are perturbed by diabetes, representing a novel target for therapeutics. We hypothesized that adaptive mitochondrial plasticity in response to nutrient stress would be impaired in diabetes cellular physiology via a nitric oxide synthase- (NOS-) mediated decrease in mitochondrial function. Primary smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from aorta of the nonobese, insulin resistant rat diabetes model Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and the Wistar control rat were exposed to high glucose (25 mM). At baseline, significantly greater nitric oxide evolution, ROS production, and respiratory control ratio (RCR) were observed in GK SMCs. Upon exposure to high glucose, expression of phosphorylated eNOS, uncoupled respiration, and expression of mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and V were significantly decreased in GK SMCs (p < 0.05). Mitochondrial superoxide increased with high glucose in Wistar SMCs (p < 0.05) with no change in the GK beyond elevated baseline concentrations. Baseline comparisons show persistent metabolic perturbations in a diabetes phenotype. Overall, nutrient stress in GK SMCs caused a persistent decline in eNOS and mitochondrial function and disrupted mitochondrial plasticity, illustrating eNOS and mitochondria as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27034743

  19. Piperlongumine inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by suppressing PDGF receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Son, Dong Ju; Kim, Soo Yeon; Han, Seong Su; Kim, Chan Woo; Kumar, Sandeep; Park, Byeoung Soo; Lee, Sung Eun; Yun, Yeo Pyo; Jo, Hanjoong; Park, Young Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL) is an alkaloid found in the long pepper (Piper longum L.) and has well-documented anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties; however, the role of PL in prevention of atherosclerosis is unknown. We evaluated the anti-atherosclerotic potential of PL in an in vivo murine model of accelerated atherosclerosis and defined its mechanism of action in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local treatment with PL significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation as well as proliferation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in an in vivo setting. PL treatment in VSMCs in vitro showed inhibition of migration and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-induced proliferation to the in vivo findings. We further identified that PL inhibited PDGF-BB-induced PDGF receptor beta activation and suppressed downstream signaling molecules such as phospholipase C1, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt. Lastly, PL significantly attenuated activation of NF-κB—a downstream transcriptional regulator in PDGF receptor signaling, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a novel, therapeutic mechanism by which PL suppresses atherosclerosis plaque formation in vivo. PMID:22995306

  20. Regulation of ERK5 by insulin and angiotensin-II in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Girish; Goalstone, Marc Lee; E-mail: Marc.Goalstone@uchsc.edu

    2007-03-23

    ERK5 is involved in proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). The proliferative actions of insulin and angiotensin-II (A-II) in VSMC are mediated in part by ERK1/2. We hypothesized that insulin and A-II also regulate ERK5 activity in VSMC. Acute treatment (<60 min) with insulin or A-II increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 at 15 min and ERK5 at 5 min. Chronic treatment ({<=}8 h) with insulin increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation by 4 h and ERK5 by 8 h. A-II-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 by 8 h and ERK5 by 4 h. The EC{sub 50} for insulin treatment effecting ERK1/2 and ERK5 phosphorylation was 1.5 and 0.1 nM, whereas the EC{sub 50} for A-II was 2 nM, each. Insulin plus A-II induced an additive effect only on ERK5 phosphorylation. Inhibition of insulin- and A-II-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK5 and ERK1/2 by PD98059 and Wortmannin exhibited differential and time-dependent effects. Taken together, these data indicate that insulin and A-II regulate the activity of ERK5, but different from that seen for ERK1/2.

  1. Cyclic strain increases protease-activated receptor-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Frye, S. R.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic strain regulates many vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functions through changing gene expression. This study investigated the effects of cyclic strain on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) expression in VSMCs and the possible signaling pathways involved, on the basis of the hypothesis that cyclic strain would enhance PAR-1 expression, reflecting increased thrombin activity. Uniaxial cyclic strain (1 Hz, 20%) of cells cultured on elastic membranes induced a 2-fold increase in both PAR-1 mRNA and protein levels. Functional activity of PAR-1, as assessed by cell proliferation in response to thrombin, was also increased by cyclic strain. In addition, treatment of cells with antioxidants or an NADPH oxidase inhibitor blocked strain-induced PAR-1 expression. Preincubation of cells with protein kinase inhibitors (staurosporine or Ro 31-8220) enhanced strain-increased PAR-1 expression, whereas inhibitors of NO synthase, tyrosine kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases had no effect. Cyclic strain in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor induced PAR-1 mRNA levels beyond the effect of cyclic strain alone, whereas no additive effect was observed between cyclic strain and platelet-derived growth factor-AB. Our findings that cyclic strain upregulates PAR-1 mRNA expression but that shear stress downregulates this gene in VSMCs provide an opportunity to elucidate signaling differences by which VSMCs respond to different mechanical forces.

  2. Localization and function of KLF4 in cytoplasm of vascular smooth muscle cell

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yan; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Xin-hua; Nie, Chan-juan; Li, Yong-hui; Wen, Jin-kun

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •PDGF-BB prompts the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm. •PDGF-BB promotes interaction between KLF4 and actin in the cytoplasm. •Phosphorylation and SUMOylation of KLF4 participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization. •KLF4 regulates cytoskeleton by promoting the expression of contraction-associated genes. -- Abstract: The Krüppel-like factor 4 is a DNA-binding transcriptional regulator that regulates a diverse array of cellular processes, including development, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The previous studies about KLF4 functions mainly focused on its role as a transcription factor, its functions in the cytoplasm are still unknown. In this study, we found that PDGF-BB could prompt the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm through CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and increased the interaction of KLF4 with actin in the cytoplasm. Further study showed that both KLF4 phosphorylation and SUMOylation induced by PDGF-BB participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton in VSMCs. In conclusion, these results identify that KLF4 participates in the cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing cytoskeleton in the cytoplasm of VSMCs.

  3. Statins activate GATA-6 and induce differentiated vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, Hiromichi Abe, Mitsuru; Ono, Koh; Morimoto, Tatsuya; Kawamura, Teruhisa; Takaya, Tomohide; Satoh, Noriko; Fujita, Masatoshi; Kita, Toru; Shimatsu, Akira; Hasegawa, Koji

    2008-10-03

    The beneficial effects of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) beyond cholesterol lowering involve their direct actions on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). However, the effects of statins on phenotypic modulation of VSMCs are unknown. We herein show that simvastatin (Sm) and atorvastatin (At) inhibited DNA synthesis in human aortic VSMCs dose-dependently, while cell toxicity was not observed below the concentration of 1 {mu}M of Sm or 100 nM of At. Stimulating proliferative VSMCs with Sm or At induced the expression of SM-{alpha}-actin and SM-MHC, highly specific markers of differentiated phenotype. Sm up-regulated the binding activity of GATA-6 to SM-MHC GATA site and activated the transfected SM-MHC promoter in proliferative VSMCs, while mutating the GATA-6 binding site abolished this activation. Geranylgeranylpyrophosphate (10 {mu}M), an inhibitor of Rho family proteins, abolished the statin-mediated induction of the differentiated phenotype in VSMCs. These findings suggest that statins activate GATA-6 and induce differentiated VSMCs.

  4. Expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 in smooth muscle cells after vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Hideyuki; Miyata, Masaaki . E-mail: miyatam@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Kume, Noriaki; Minami, Manabu; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Orihara, Koji; Hamasaki, Shuichi; Biro, Sadatoshi; Otsuji, Yutaka; Kita, Toru; Tei, Chuwa

    2006-03-10

    Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an oxidized LDL receptor, and its role in restenosis after angioplasty remains unknown. We used a balloon-injury model of rabbit aorta, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that LOX-1 mRNA expression was modest in the non-injured aorta, reached a peak level 2 days after injury, and remained elevated until 24 weeks after injury. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization showed that LOX-1 was not detected in the media of non-injured aorta but expressed in both medial and neointimal smooth muscle cells (SMC) at 2 and 24 weeks after injury. Low concentrations of ox-LDL (10 {mu}g/mL) stimulated the cultured SMC proliferation, which was inhibited by antisense oligonucleotides of LOX-1 mRNA. Double immunofluorescense staining showed the colocalization of LOX-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in human restenotic lesion. These results suggest that LOX-1 mediates ox-LDL-induced SMC proliferation and plays a role in neointimal formation after vascular injury.

  5. Interaction between resistin and adiponectin in the proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Hiroaki; Kudoh, Akihiro; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the effect between resistin and adiponectin on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). We confirmed that resistin significantly increases the number of rat VSMCs as well as thymidine incorporation with them, whereas adiponectin diminishes resistin-induced cell proliferation. Resistin significantly increased p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation within rat VSMCs, whereas adiponectin inhibited resistin-induced MAPK phosphorylation. Moreover, resistin significantly increased c-fos expression, whereas adiponectin suppressed resistin-induced c-fos expression. Cell cycle progression is a tightly controlled event that is negatively regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors (CDKIs) such as p53, p21, and p27. Resistin significantly decreased the expression of these CDKIs, whereas adiponectin restored the resistin-induced decrease in CDKIs expression. These effects were abolished in the MAPK inhibitors. In conclusion, resistin plays a role in the development of atherosclerosis, whereas adiponectin may be an important in its prevention in insulin-resistant patients. PMID:23267839

  6. Molecular Pathways Regulating Macrovascular Pathology and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Phenotype in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Sara; Bielli, Alessandra; Mauriello, Alessandro; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a disease reaching a pandemic proportion in developed countries and a major risk factor for almost all cardiovascular diseases and their adverse clinical manifestations. T2DM leads to several macrovascular and microvascular alterations that influence the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are fundamental players in macrovascular alterations of T2DM patients. VSMCs display phenotypic and functional alterations that reflect an altered intracellular biomolecular scenario of great vessels of T2DM patients. Hyperglycemia itself and through intraparietal accumulation of advanced glycation-end products (AGEs) activate different pathways, in particular nuclear factor-κB and MAPKs, while insulin and insulin growth-factor receptors (IGFR) are implicated in the activation of Akt and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2. Nuclear factor-κB is also responsible of increased susceptibility of VSMCs to pro-apoptotic stimuli. Down-regulation of insulin growth-factor 1 receptors (IGFR-1R) activity in diabetic vessels also influences negatively miR-133a levels, so increasing apoptotic susceptibility of VSMCs. Alterations of those bimolecular pathways and related genes associate to the prevalence of a synthetic phenotype of VSMCs induces extracellular matrix alterations of great vessels. A better knowledge of those biomolecular pathways and related genes in VSMCs will help to understand the mechanisms leading to macrovascular alterations in T2DM patients and to suggest new targeted therapies. PMID:26473856

  7. Effect of Cymbopogon citratus and Citral on Vascular Smooth Muscle of the Isolated Thoracic Rat Aorta.

    PubMed

    Devi, R Chitra; Sim, S M; Ismail, R

    2012-01-01

    Cymbopogon citratus has been shown to have antioxidant, antimicrobial, antispasmodic and chemo-protective properties. Citral, is the major constituent of C. citratus. This study investigated the effects of methanolic extracts of leaves (LE), stems (SE), and roots (RE) of C. citratus and citral on vascular smooth muscle and explored their possible mechanisms of action. The experiment was conducted using isolated tissue preparations, where citral, LE, SE, and RE were added separately into a tissue bath that contained aortic rings, which were pre-contracted with phenylephrine (PE). Citral, LE, and RE exhibited a dose-dependent relaxant effect on the PE-induced contractions. Citral appeared to partially act via NO as its vasorelaxant effect was attenuated by L-NAME. However, the effect of LE may involve prostacyclin as indomethacin reversed the relaxant effect of LE on the PE-induced contraction. Furthermore, citral, LE, and RE abolished the restoration of PE-induced contraction caused by the addition of increasing doses of calcium in both endothelium intact and denuded rings. These findings suggest that the relaxation effect of citral, LE, and RE is endothelium-independent and may be mainly by affecting the intracellular concentration of calcium. Citral may partially act through the NO pathway while a vasodilator prostaglandin may mediate the effect of LE. PMID:22675383

  8. Differential Mitochondrial Adaptation in Primary Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from a Diabetic Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Keller, Amy C; Knaub, Leslie A; McClatchey, P Mason; Connon, Chelsea A; Bouchard, Ron; Miller, Matthew W; Geary, Kate E; Walker, Lori A; Klemm, Dwight J; Reusch, Jane E B

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 330 million people worldwide and causes elevated cardiovascular disease risk. Mitochondria are critical for vascular function, generate cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and are perturbed by diabetes, representing a novel target for therapeutics. We hypothesized that adaptive mitochondrial plasticity in response to nutrient stress would be impaired in diabetes cellular physiology via a nitric oxide synthase- (NOS-) mediated decrease in mitochondrial function. Primary smooth