Sample records for arthritis ankylosing spondylitis

  1. Ankylosing Spondylitis and Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Diagnosis >>> Treatment >>> Medication >>> Doctor Q&A From Spondylitis Plus >>> PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS Overview Psoriasis is a scaly rash ... PsA Our May / June 2003 issue of Spondylitis Plus contains a detailed article on psoriatic arthritis. Click ...

  2. Effectiveness of adalimumab in treating patients with ankylosing spondylitis associated with enthesitis and peripheral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of adalimumab in enthesitis and peripheral arthritis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods Adults with active AS (Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index [BASDAI] ? 4) received adalimumab 40 mg every other week with standard antirheumatic therapies in a 12-week, open-label study. Effectiveness in enthesitis was assessed using the Maastricht ankylosing spondylitis enthesitis score (MASES, 0-13) and by examining the plantar fascia in patients with enthesitis (? 1 inflamed enthesis) at baseline; effectiveness in peripheral arthritis was evaluated using tender and swollen joint counts (TJC, 0-46; SJC, 0-44) in patients with peripheral arthritis (? 1 swollen joint) at baseline. Overall effectiveness measures included Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society 20% response (ASAS20). Results Of 1,250 patients enrolled, 686 had enthesitis and 281 had peripheral arthritis. In 667 patients with MASES ? 1 at baseline, the median MASES was reduced from 5 at baseline to 1 at week 12. At week 12, inflammation of the plantar fascia ceased in 122 of 173 patients with inflammation at baseline. The median TJC in 281 patients with SJC ? 1 at baseline was reduced from 5 at baseline to 1 at week 12; the median SJC improved from 2 to 0. ASAS20 responses were achieved by 70.5% of 457 patients with no enthesitis and no arthritis; 71.0% of 512 patients with only enthesitis; 68.0% of 107 patients with only arthritis; and 66.7% of 174 patients with both. Conclusions Treatment with adalimumab improved enthesitis and peripheral arthritis in patients with active AS. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00478660. PMID:20230622

  3. Absence of radiographic progression of hip arthritis during infliximab treatment for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Konsta, M; Sfikakis, P P; Bournia, V K; Karras, D; Iliopoulos, A

    2013-08-01

    This study aims to examine the impact of long-term treatment with the anti-TNF antibody infliximab on radiographic progression of hip arthritis in ankylosing spondylitis. Anteroposterior X-rays of the pelvis obtained at baseline from consecutive patients with ankylosing spondylitis and bilateral hip arthritis were compared with X-rays obtained after 6?±?2.5 years (mean?±?SD) of continuous infliximab treatment. Analysis was performed by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiology Hip Index (BASRI-h) scoring system (min 0, max 4). Hip joint space width was also assessed by the average of measurements at three distinct sites between the acetabulum and femoral head. In 23 patients with active disease (21 men, mean age and disease duration of 45 and 16 years, respectively), the BASRI-h score at baseline was 1 in 7, 2 in 16, 3 in 16, and 4 in 7 hips (including two arthroplasties). Individual BASRI-h scores at baseline (2.50?±?0.86, mean?±?SD) remained unchanged in all patients at end of follow-up. At baseline, the average width of the whole joint space (3.56?±?0.70 mm, n?=?44) was not associated with disease activity measurements but negatively correlated with BAS functional index (Spearman r?=?-0.5, P?=?0.007). After 2-10 years of infliximab treatment, the average width of the whole joint space in these patients (3.59?±?0.79 mm) was not reduced. These results suggest that radiographic progression of hip arthritis in ankylosing spondylitis may be arrested during infliximab treatment. PMID:23604596

  4. Recommendations of the French Society for Rheumatology regarding TNF? antagonist therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis or psoriatic arthritis: 2007 update

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thao Pham; Bruno Fautrel; Emmanuelle Dernis; Philippe Goupille; Francis Guillemin; Xavier Le Loët; Philippe Ravaud; Pascal Claudepierre; Corinne Miceli-Richard; Michel de Bandt; Maxime Breban; Jean-Francis Maillefert; Charles Masson; Alain Saraux; Thierry Schaeverbeke; Daniel Wendling; Xavier Mariette; Bernard Combe

    2007-01-01

    ObjectiveTo update French Society for Rheumatology guidelines regarding the use of tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF?) antagonists for treating patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) or psoriatic arthritis (PsA).

  5. A prospective study of pregnant patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis using validated clinical instruments

    PubMed Central

    Ostensen, M; Fuhrer, L; Mathieu, R; Seitz, M; Villiger, P

    2004-01-01

    Objective: : To analyse the disease course of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) during and after pregnancy by validated clinical instruments for measurement of disease activity, and assess their usefulness in pregnant patients. Methods: Included were 10 patients with RA and 9 with AS (10 pregnancies). Clinical examination and blood/urine sampling was performed before conception, at each trimester, and weeks 6, 12, and 24 post partum. Assessment of RA was by the RA Disease Activity Index (RADAI), the 44 joint count, and the Health Assessment Questionnaire; assessment of AS by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Activity Index (BASDAI), the Dougados Functional and Articular Index, and a night pain index. Common for all patients were the patient's and physician's global assessment. Results: : Most patients with RA showed sustained or increased improvement of disease activity during pregnancy. Higher disease activity scores were found in the patients with AS with a frequent increase of disease activity in the second trimester and mitigation of symptoms in the third trimester. Analysis specifically for the patient's assessment of pain showed continuously higher pain scores in the patients with AS than in those with RA. Rank correlation showed good to moderate correlation between most clinical measurements and RADAI or BASDAI, respectively. Functional indices were confounded by physiological changes of late pregnancy. Conclusion: RA can be monitored during and after pregnancy by the swollen joint count and RADAI without interference from pregnancy related symptoms, whereas usual measures of disease activity are not always applicable in pregnant patients with AS. PMID:15361373

  6. Structural damage in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis: traditional views, novel insights gained from TNF blockade, and concepts for the future

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Georg Schett; Laura C Coates; Zoe R Ash; Stefanie Finzel; Phillip G Conaghan

    2011-01-01

    Structural changes of bone and cartilage are a hallmark of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA),\\u000a psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Despite certain similarities – in particular, inflammation as\\u000a the driving force for structural changes – the three major inflammatory joint diseases show considerably different pathologies.\\u000a Whereas RA primarily results in bone and cartilage resorption, PsA

  7. Do the radiological changes of classic ankylosing spondylitis differ from the changes found in the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease, psoriasis, and reactive arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, P; Hickling, P; Wright, V

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—In 1971 McEwen and colleagues suggested that the radiological changes of classic ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and the changes of the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease differ in several respects from the radiological features of psoriatic and reactive spondylitis. The findings of this study have never been confirmed. The aim of this study was to replicate the McEwen study comparing films blinded to diagnostic group.?METHODS—The study population comprised 91 patients with classic AS, 15 patients with regional enteritis, 16 patients with ulcerative colitis, five patients with sexually acquired reactive arthritis, two with post-dysenteric arthritis, and 34 with psoriatic arthritis. Blinded reading of spinal radiographs was undertaken, scoring for severity, symmetry, paravertebral ossification, size of syndesmophytes, ligamentous calcification, squaring, discitis, pseudo-fractures, zygoapophyseal joint involvement, and complete ankylosis.?RESULTS—Comparison of the four groups—classic, enteropathic, psoriatic, and reactive AS— showed differences with respect to symmetry of sacroiliitis, symmetry of lumbar spinal involvement, and frequency and size of syndesmophytes. Zygoapophyseal joint involvement was more frequent in the lumbar spine in classic and enteropathic spondylitis but no between group differences were found with respect to symphisitis, squaring, apophyseal joint involvement and ligamentous calcification in the lumbar spine, and other areas.?CONCLUSIONS—Some of the radiological differences described by McEwen et al, notably the asymmetry, the less severe changes, and the distinctive syndesmophytes in psoriasis, have been confirmed. A number of hypotheses are proposed to explain these differences including biomechanical, biochemical, and genetic factors.?? Keywords: psoriatic arthritis; ankylosing spondylitis; reactive arthritis; inflammatory bowel disease PMID:9640127

  8. Quality of life and work in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis of working age

    PubMed Central

    Chorus, A; Miedema, H; Boonen, A; van der Linden, S.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between work and quality of life (QOL) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) aged 16–59. Methods: 1056 patients with RA and 658 with AS were included in the study. Data were obtained by postal questionnaire, which included several generic and disease related QOL instruments. Separate dimensions and physical and mental summary scores from the SF-36 were compared. Stepwise multiple regression was performed to study the relationship between work and physical and mental health related QOL, including disease related factors, coping, and fatigue. Results: Physical health related QOL was reported to be worse, and mental health related QOL better, in RA than in AS in people of working age. No differences between RA and AS were found in somatic pain, physical role functioning, social functioning, emotional role functioning, vitality, or general health perception; nor were there any significant differences in fatigue and behavioural coping styles. Work was positively associated with physical health related QOL in both groups and, after disease characteristics, was the most important determinant. No association was found with mental health related QOL. Conclusions: Although physical health related QOL was worse in patients with RA, the impact on several dimensions of health related QOL in patients with RA and AS of working age under rheumatological care was comparable. Patients with RA and AS experienced similar limitations in physical role functioning, including work. Work is an important independent external determinant of physical health related QOL, but not of mental health related QOL. PMID:14644855

  9. Drug survival rates of tumor necrosis factor inhibitors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji-Hyoun; Park, Dong-Jin; Lee, Jeong-Won; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Wen, Lihui; Kim, Tae-Jong; Park, Yong-Wook; Lee, Shin-Seok

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the compliance of Korean patients using tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and identified potential predictors associated with treatment discontinuation. The study population comprised 114 RA and 310 AS patients treated with TNF inhibitors at a single tertiary center for at least 1 yr from December 2002 to November 2011. Of the 114 RA patients, 64 (56.1%) discontinued their first TNF inhibitors with a mean duration of 18.1 months. By contrast, 65 of 310 patients (21.0%) with AS discontinued their first TNF inhibitors, with a mean duration of 84 months. Although the survival rate did not differ among the three TNF inhibitors in the AS patients, the etanercept group had a lower discontinuation rate than the infliximab group in the RA patients. In addition, RA patients who received corticosteroids in combination with TNF inhibitors were more likely to discontinue their TNF inhibitors. The independent predictors of drug discontinuation in AS patients were male gender and complete ankylosis on radiographs of the sacroiliac joint. Our results provide further evidence that real-life treatment outcomes of RA and AS patients may be different from those observed in randomized clinical trials. PMID:25246737

  10. Ankylosing spondylitis: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Sieper, J; Braun, J; Rudwaleit, M; Boonen, A; Zink, A

    2002-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a complex, potentially debilitating disease that is insidious in onset, progressing to radiological sacroiliitis over several years. Patients with symptomatic AS lose productivity owing to work disability and unemployment, have a substantial use of healthcare resources, and reduced quality of life. The pathogenesis of AS is poorly understood. However, immune mediated mechanisms involving human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B27, inflammatory cellular infiltrates, cytokines (for example, tumour necrosis factor ? and interleukin 10), and genetic and environmental factors are thought to have key roles. The detection of sacroiliitis by radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, or computed tomography in the presence of clinical manifestations is diagnostic for AS, although the presence of inflammatory back pain plus at least two other typical features of spondyloarthropathy (for example, enthesitis and uveitis) is highly predictive of early AS. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) effectively relieve inflammatory symptoms and are presently first line drug treatment. However, NSAID treatment has only a symptomatic effect and probably does not alter the disease course. For symptoms refractory to NSAIDs, second line treatments, including corticosteroids and various disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, are employed but are of limited benefit. Emerging biological therapies target the inflammatory processes underlying AS, and thus, may favourably alter the disease process, in addition to providing symptom relief. PMID:12381506

  11. Ankylosing spondylitis and monoclonal gammopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Renier, G; Renier, J C; Gardembas-Pain, M; Chevailler, A; Boasson, M; Hurez, D

    1992-01-01

    From 1960 to 1990, 557 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (428 men, 129 women) were diagnosed and indexed in the department of rheumatology. Monoclonal gammopathies were found in seven (five men, two women) patients (1.3%). With one exception, ankylosing spondylitis preceded monoclonal gammopathies by many years. The distribution of the isotypes of the mIg found in these seven patients was striking when compared either with previous reports of an association between ankylosing spondylitis and monoclonal gammopathies or with local data on the epidemiology of monoclonal gammopathies: five patients with IgG, four of them of the lambda (lambda) type, and two IgM, both of the kappa (kappa) type were found; no patients with mIgA were recorded. Two patients were HLA-B27 positive and had slight and transient monoclonal gammopathies, whereas three subjects were HLA-B27 negative and had important spikes, corresponding in two subjects to malignant diseases. This observation raises the question of whether the coexistence of HLA-B27 and ankylosing spondylitis might provide a protective action. Epidemiological studies are required to clarify such points. PMID:1417119

  12. Pulmonary manifestations of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Kanathur, Naveen; Lee-Chiong, Teofilo

    2010-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis, a chronic multisystem inflammatory disorder, can present with articular and extra-articular features. It can affect the tracheobronchial tree and the lung parenchyma, and respiratory complications include chest wall restriction, apical fibrobullous disease with or without secondary pulmonary superinfection, spontaneous pneumothorax, and obstructive sleep apnea. Ankylosing spondylitis is a common cause of pulmonary apical fibrocystic disease; early involvement may be unilateral or asymmetrical, but most cases eventually consist of bilateral apical fibrobullous lesions, many of which are progressive with coalescence of the nodules, formation of cysts and cavities, fibrosis, and bronchiectasis. Mycobacterial or fungal superinfection of the upper lobe cysts and cavities occurs commonly. Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common pathogen isolated, followed by various species of mycobacteria. Prognosis of patients with fibrobullous apical lesions is mainly determined by the presence, extent, and severity of superinfection. Pulmonary function test results are nonspecific and generally parallel the severity of parenchymal involvement. A restrictive ventilatory impairment can develop in patients with ankylosing spondylitis because of either fusion of the costovertebral joints and ankylosis of the thoracic spine or anterior chest wall involvement. Chest radiographic findings may mirror the severity of clinical involvement. Pulmonary parenchymal disease is typically progressive, and cyst formation, cavitation, and fibrosis are seen in advanced cases. No treatment has been shown to alter the clinical course of apical fibrobullous disease. Although several antiinflammatory agents, such as infliximab, etanercept, and adalimumab, are being used to treat ankylosing spondylitis, their effects on pulmonary manifestations are unclear. PMID:20692546

  13. Celecoxib: a review of its use for symptomatic relief in the treatment of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Paul L

    2011-12-24

    Celecoxib (Celebrex®) was the first cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitor (coxib) to be introduced into clinical practice. Coxibs were developed to provide anti-inflammatory/analgesic activity similar to that of nonselective NSAIDs, but without their upper gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity, which is thought to result largely from COX-1 inhibition. Celecoxib is indicated in the EU for the symptomatic treatment of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis in adults. This article reviews the clinical efficacy and tolerability of celecoxib in these EU-approved indications, as well as overviewing its pharmacological properties. In randomized controlled trials, celecoxib, at the recommended dosages of 200 or 400?mg/day, was significantly more effective than placebo, at least as effective as or more effective than paracetamol (acetaminophen) and as effective as nonselective NSAIDs and the coxibs etoricoxib and lumiracoxib for the symptomatic treatment of patients with active osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis. Celecoxib was generally well tolerated, with mild to moderate upper GI complaints being the most common body system adverse events. In meta-analyses and large safety studies, the incidence of upper GI ulcer complications with recommended dosages of celecoxib was significantly lower than that with nonselective NSAIDs and similar to that with paracetamol and other coxibs. However, concomitant administration of celecoxib with low-dose cardioprotective aspirin often appeared to negate the GI-sparing advantages of celecoxib over NSAIDs. Although one polyp prevention trial noted a dose-related increase in cardiovascular risk with celecoxib 400 and 800?mg/day, other trials have not found any significant difference in cardiovascular risk between celecoxib and placebo or nonselective NSAIDs. Meta-analyses and database-derived analyses are inconsistent regarding cardiovascular risk. At recommended dosages, the risks of increased thrombotic cardiovascular events, or renovascular, hepatic or hypersensitivity reactions with celecoxib would appear to be small and similar to those with NSAIDs. Celecoxib would appear to be a useful option for therapy in patients at high risk for NSAID-induced GI toxicity, or in those responding suboptimally to or intolerant of NSAIDs. To minimize any risk, particularly the cardiovascular risk, celecoxib, like all coxibs and NSAIDs, should be used at the lowest effective dosage for the shortest possible duration after a careful evaluation of the GI, cardiovascular and renal risks of the individual patient. PMID:22141388

  14. Ankylosing spondylitis in a military aviator: air medical considerations.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Reza; Momenzadeh, Mahmud; Ebadi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatologic diseases are a challenging diagnosis when it comes to air medical disposition decision making because many of these diseases overlap and their initial presentation is insidious and relapsing remitting in future scope. Many rheumatologic diseases have musculoskeletal and other organ complications. One of these diagnoses is spondyloarthritides. These disorders include ankylosing spondylitis (AS), reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and spondylitis, enteropathic arthritis and spondylitis, juvenile-onset spondyloarthritis, and undifferentiated spondyloarthritis. The prevalence of spondyloarthropathy is estimated to be between 0.1% and 2.5%,(1) although figures vary from 1 study to another. In this article, we report the case of a military pilot diagnosed with AS who had a favorable response to treatment with etanercept therapy. PMID:24787516

  15. Sexual functions in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Bal, Serpil; Bal, Kaan; Turan, Yasemin; Deniz, Gonca; Gürgan, Alev; Berkit, I??l Karata?; Sendur, Omer Faruk

    2011-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the axial skeleton. In recent years, several authors reported an increased prevalence of sexual dysfunction among AS patients. We aimed to find out, whether the prevalence of erectile dysfunction among AS patients is different from age-matched healthy controls. Thirty-seven male patients with AS who were diagnosed according to the modified New York criteria and 67 normal healthy controls (NHC) were included in this study. Clinical characteristics of patients including age, disease duration and morning stiffness were noted. Disease activity was evaluated by using Bath AS disease activity index (BASDAI), functional statement was evaluated by using Bath AS functional index, and scores of spinal measurements were done by using Bath AS metrology index. Erectile function is evaluated using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) scoring system. Health-related quality of life was assessed by short form 36. The mean age of the patients and controls were 42.8 + 10.8 and 43.6 + 5.9 years (P = 0.666). The prevalence of erectile dysfunction in AS patients and NHC were 35.1 and 26.9%, respectively (P = 0.335). There was no statistically significant difference between IIEF domain scores of AS patients and NHC except for the sexual desire domain (P = 0.014). Duration of morning stiffness and BASDAI was negatively correlated with sexual desire and overall satisfaction; however, they have no negative impact on erectile function, orgasmic function and intercourse satisfaction domains of IIEF. In this report, we showed that only the sexual desire domain of IIEF was significantly lower in AS patients. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction among AS patients is similar to NHC, which is a finding contrary to previous reports. AS patients do not suffer from erectile dysfunction, they rather have problems of satisfaction from the intercourse. PMID:20238218

  16. Treat Ankylosing Spondylitis with Methazolamide

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiaotian; Yan, Xinfeng; Zhang, Yunzhong

    2011-01-01

    Background: Increased bone resorption and new bone information are two characteristics of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Much evidence has shown that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors can restrain bone resorption. We had detected increased expression of carbonic anhydrase I (CA1) in synovium of patients with AS. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of methazolamide, an anti-carbonic anhydrase drug, for treating patients with AS. Methods: Two patients, called as S and L, were diagnosed with active AS based on BASDAI and BASFI assessments, radiographic data and other clinical indices. They took methazolamide tablets at a dose of 25 mg twice every day. Results: Patient S's BASDAI score fell from 5.4 to 4.4, while patient L's BASDAI fell from 2.4 to 2. Patient S's BASFI score change from 2.7 to 2.9, while patient L's BASFI score fell from 1.2 to 0.2. The ESR values of patient S were considerably reduced, while the ESR value of patient L remained unchanged and in the normal range. The calcium concentration of patient S decreased from 3.05 mmol/L to 2.39 mmol/L. The CT evidence indicates that the articular surfaces of the erosive sacroiliac joints became clearer and the area of the calcium deposits began decreased. No significant systemic side effects were observed in either patient. Conclusions: The above results indicate that methazolamide was effective for active AS. Methazolamide may improve AS symptoms by inhibiting carbonic anhydrase activity during the processes of bone reporption and new bone formation. PMID:21750646

  17. Ankylosing Spondylitis: Diet and Nutrition

    MedlinePLUS

    Diet & Nutrition: Quick Links Overview of Diet & Spondylitis >>> Medication & Diet >>> Dietary Supplements >>> Changing Your Diet >>> The London AS / Low Starch Diet >>> Back To The About Spondylitis Main Page >>> DIET & ...

  18. Efficacy of cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibition by etoricoxib and naproxen on the axial manifestations of ankylosing spondylitis in the presence of peripheral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gossec, L; van der Heijde, D; Melian, A; Krupa, D; James, M; Cavanaugh, P; Reicin, A; Dougados, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The combined efficacy of selective and non-selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition on the axial manifestations of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in the presence or absence of chronic peripheral arthritis was evaluated. Methods: In a post hoc subgroup analysis of a 6 week, randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial, 387 patients with active axial AS were randomised to receive etoricoxib 90 mg or 120 mg once a day, naproxen 500 mg twice daily, or placebo. Randomisation was stratified by the presence or absence of chronic peripheral arthritis. The primary outcome measure was the time weighted average change from baseline of spine pain intensity. Efficacy data from the three groups receiving active treatment (the NSAID/COX-2 inhibitor group) were combined to improve precision. An analysis of covariance model was used to evaluate the effect of peripheral disease on treatment response. Results: 93 patients were allocated to receive placebo and 294 to active treatment (naproxen or etoricoxib). The combined NSAID/COX-2 inhibitor group had a significant treatment response compared with the placebo group for all efficacy measures, both in patients with and without peripheral arthritis. A significantly greater difference in mean patient assessment of spine pain was found between active and placebo treatments in patients without compared with those with peripheral arthritis (p = 0.005; –32.5 mm v –17.0 mm, respectively). Similar differences, although not statistically significant, were seen for other end points. Conclusion: NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors have a clinically relevant symptomatic effect on axial AS irrespective of the presence of peripheral arthritis. In this exploratory analysis spinal improvement appeared to be greater in patients without peripheral disease. PMID:15731291

  19. Patient-reported adherence to coprescribed proton pump inhibitor gastroprotection in osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis patients using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Kenneth; From, Jesper; Stratelis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are commonly treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), sometimes with a concomitant gastroprotective proton pump inhibitor (PPI). The present study examines real-life patient adherence to PPIs when coprescribed with NSAIDs. Methods This retrospective medical record survey identified patients diagnosed with OA, RA, or AS who had PPIs coprescribed with NSAIDs for prevention of NSAID-associated gastrointestinal ulcers. Actual NSAID and PPI intake was retrospectively recorded using a self-reported questionnaire. Adherence to PPI treatment was assessed using descriptive statistics. Results In total, 96 patients (69% female, mean age 67 years, 72% OA, 16% RA, 12% AS) were included. The mean patient-reported adherence to coprescribed PPIs was 73%–81%. The percentage of patients with a self-reported adherence of ?80% was 26%. No predictive factors for low adherence could be identified. Conclusion Despite doctors’ instructions to use PPIs concomitantly with NSAIDs, the mean patient-reported adherence to coprescribed PPIs in this population indicates a risk of a “gastroprotective treatment gap”. The patients’ adherence to gastroprotective PPIs for the prevention of NSAID-associated upper gastrointestinal ulcers can be improved. PMID:25429206

  20. [Diagnosis and approach in suspected ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Rentsch, H U; van der Linden, S; Gerber, N

    1991-05-21

    The time interval from first clinical symptoms to definite diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis (Morbus Bechterew) is still too long. Thus, many years for essential therapeutic interventions are unequivocally lost. Therefore, it is most important to improve early diagnosis. To this aim the diagnostic criteria recently suggested by van der Linden are useful in relatively early stages of disease (table 1). Diagnosis is based on patient history, clinical examination and radiological signs of sacroiliitis. Blood examinations for ESR, rheumatoid factors and antinuclear antibodies are important with regard to differential diagnosis. The determination of the HLA-B27 haplotype as a diagnostic tool is irrelevant on terms of single cases, because at least 8% of ankylosing spondylitis patients are HLA-B27-negative and in middle europe at least 7% of normal controls exhibit this genetic marker. PMID:2052824

  1. Complete heart block in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Juan Pablo; Molina, María Del Pilar

    2012-10-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic rheumatic disease of young men that affects mainly the axial skeleton and is associated with HLA-B27 in 90% of the cases. Incidence of cardiovascular involvement in AS ranges between 10%-30%; conduction disturbances have been described in 1%-9% of the patients with AS. The majority of the series show a relationship with longstanding disease. To our knowledge, this is the first report of complete heart block in early AS. PMID:23090380

  2. Treatment of ankylosing spondylitis: focus on etanercept

    PubMed Central

    Frech, Tracy

    2007-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory condition which preferentially affects the axial skeleton, often beginning in the sacroiliac joints. The etiology of the pathologic lesions of this condition including enthesitis, erosive articular changes, osteitis, and fibrous ankylosis, as well as changes which occur in the eye, gastrointestinal tract, cardiovascular system, and lungs is unknown; however, there is a strong association with HLA-B27, which indicates altered immunity. One of the major mediators of the immune response is TNF-?, which functions as a pleiotrophic soluble messenger primarily from macrophages. TNF-? is principally involved with activation of both normal and transformed cells, including endothelium, synoviocytes, osteoclasts, chondrocytes, and fibroblasts. The cornerstone of medical management of ankylosing spondylitis includes intensive physical therapy and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories for symptomatic relief. However, it is becoming increasingly recognized that TNF-? blockade has an important role in the reduction of spine and joint inflammation. This review discusses the data that supports use of etanercept in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:19707347

  3. Agreement of Turkish Physiatrists with the Assessment in Spondyloarthritis International Society and the European League Against Rheumatism Recommendations for the Management of Ankylosing Spondylitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ozgocmen, Salih; Akgul, Ozgur; Ak?nc?, Aysen; Ataman, Sebnem; Birtane, Murat; Bodur, Hatice; Günayd?n, Rezan; Kuru, Ömer; Rezvani, Aylin; ?endur, Omer Faruk; ?enel, Kaz?m; Tuncer, Tiraje

    2012-01-01

    Background: New developments in the field of targeted therapies or biologic agents led more effective management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recommendations for the management of rheumatic diseases propose to reduce inappropriate use of medications, minimize variations among countries, and enable cost-effective use of health care resources. Objective: The aim this study was to evaluate conceptual agreement of ASsessment in SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS) and the EUropean League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of AS and EULAR recommendations for RA and to assess the rate of application among Turkish physiatrists in daily clinical practice. Methods: An online survey link has been sent to 1756 Turkish physiatrists with e-mails asking to rate agreement on 11-item ASAS/EULAR AS recommendations and 15-item EULAR RA recommendations with synthetic and biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Also barriers and difficulties for using biologic agents were assessed. Results: Three hundred nine physiatrists (17.5%) completed the survey. The conceptual agreement with both recommendations was very high (Level of agreement; mean 8.35±0.82 and 8.90± 0.67 for RA and AS recommendations, respectively), and the self-declared application of overall recommendations in the clinical practice was also high for both RA and AS (72.42% and 75.71%, respectively). Conclusion: Turkish physiatrists are in good conceptual agreement with the evidence-based recommendations for the management of AS and RA. These efforts may serve to disseminate the knowledge and increase the current awareness among physicians who serve to these patients and also implementation of these recommendations is expected to increase as well. PMID:22481985

  4. Anti-TNF-? Therapy for Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Sang-Won

    2010-01-01

    Background This review evaluated the safety and efficacy of etanercept in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods Of 59 patients with AS, this study reviewed 11 patients who were refractory to conventional therapy and treated with etanercept from September 2005 to January 2008. The mean follow-up duration was 13.6 months. The general improvement was evaluated by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), and adverse effects, complications and inflammatory markers were also assessed. Results The mean BASDAI decreased from 7.1 ± 1.6 before treatment to 4.2 ± 1.8 at 3 months after the etanercept treatment (p = 0.001). The mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were decreased significantly by the etanercept treatment. The greatest improvement in symptoms was enthesitis, followed by skin involvement and morning stiffness. There was a significant difference in the improvement in BASDAI along with the follow up duration (p = 0.04). A serious infection was observed as a complication in 1 case. Conclusions These results suggest that etanercept can induce significant improvement in most patients with less damage. A trial of tumor necrosis factor inhibition is indicated in all AS patients who do not achieve adequate disease control with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, such as methotrexate, leflunomide etc. The patients treated with etanercept should be educated about the possibility of infection and monitored closely. PMID:20190998

  5. Crohn's disease unmasked following etanercept treatment for ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Jethwa, H; Mann, S

    2013-01-01

    We describe the case of a 45-year-old man with ankylosing spondylitis being treated with etanercept who presented with a 1?month history of abdominal pain. CT abdomen revealed an ileocaecal mass associated with an abscess, resulting in a laparotomy and right hemi-colectomy. Histology of the resected specimen showed the classical features of Crohn's disease. Etanercept was stopped and he was started on adalimumab. He is currently in clinical remission from both ankylosing spondylitis and Crohn's disease. PMID:23813506

  6. Dermatoglyphic analysis of patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Wisniewska, H

    1985-01-01

    Dermatoglyphic features on fingers and palms were assayed in 50 male patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and in 36 families (184 family members, 1st degree male relatives). In patients significantly higher occurrence of whorls and arches on finger tips was found. Loops were significantly less frequent when compared to standard population patterns. Decreasing number of palmar patterns was found in AS patients. Distal position of triradius, as well as more frequent occurrence of t', t" make the difference between AS patients and Polish population. Main lines D, C, B, A in AS patients tend to end in areas of lower numbers (9,7,5,4). That makes a significant difference with results obtained from population studies (p less than 0.01). The main line D in the area 9 occurs more frequently in AS patients expressing HLA-B27 antigen than in patients not showing it (p less than 0.01). PMID:3879949

  7. Temporomandibular joint involvement in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pallak; Amarnath, Janardhan; Ravindra, Setru Veerabhadrappa; Rallan, Mandeep

    2013-01-01

    Frequency of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has varied from 4% to 35%. It is more common in men and produces generalised stiffness in involved joints. Clinician should be suspicious of AS when a patient reports with painful restricted movements of joint, neck or back and with no trauma history. Conventional radiographic methods have allowed the demonstration of TMJ abnormalities in patients with AS, but CT is necessary to establish joint space relations and bony morphology. We describe a case of severe AS with TMJ involvement in a 40-year-old female patient and demonstrated TMJ changes on CT. A CT was able to demonstrate articular cartilage changes, disc- and joint abnormalities. Thus, if conventional radiographs in a symptomatic patient with rheumatic diseases are unable to demonstrate changes, CT can provide valuable additional information of the changes in the TMJ. PMID:23645650

  8. Serum copper and caeruloplasmin in ankylosing spondylitis, systemic sclerosis, and morphea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. I. V. Jayson; P. Davis; J. T. Whicher; G. Walters

    1976-01-01

    Jayson, M. I. V., Davis, P., Whicher, J. T., and Walters, G. (1976).Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 35, 443-445. Serum copper and caeruloplasmin in ankylosing spondylitis, systemic sclerosis, and morphea. Studies of serum copper and caeruloplasmin were performed in patients with ankylosing spondylitis, systemic sclerosis, and morphea. Mean levels of both were raised significantly in ankylosing spondylitis, with the greatest

  9. Predictive factors of radiographic progression in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyungjin; Lee, Jaejoon; Ahn, Joong Kyong; Hwang, Jiwon; Park, Eun-Jung; Jeong, Hyemin; Cha, Hoon-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The course of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is rather variable, and the factors that predict radiographic progression remain largely obscure. In this study, we tried to determine the clinical factors and laboratory measures that are useful in predicting the radiographic progression of patients with AS. Methods In 64 consecutive patients with AS, we collected radiographic and laboratory data over 3 years. Radiographic data included images of the sacroiliac (SI) and hip joints and laboratory data included areas under the curve (AUC) of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and hemoglobin (Hb). We investigated associations among changes in radiographic scores, initial clinical manifestations and laboratory measurements. Results Changes in scores for the SI joint and lumbar spine did not correlate with AUC for ESR, CRP, or ALP. AUC for Hb did not significantly correlate with radiographic progression in any joint. Patients with hip arthritis at the initial visit showed significantly higher radiographic score changes after 3 years in the SI and hip joint compared to those without hip arthritis. Patients who had shoulder arthritis as the initial manifestation had significantly increased AUCs for ESR and CRP compared to those without shoulder arthritis. However, at 3 years, the change of the lumbar spine score was significantly higher in patients without shoulder arthritis. Conclusions These results indicate that hip arthritis at presentation is a useful clinical marker for predicting the structural damage to the SI and hip joint, and suggest that initial shoulder arthritis correlates with slower radiographic progression of the lumbar spine. PMID:25995670

  10. Association of the programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1) gene polymorphism with ankylosing spondylitis in the Korean population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sang-Hoon Lee; Yeon-Ah Lee; Doo-Hyun Woo; Ran Song; Eun-Kyung Park; Mi-Hyun Ryu; Young-Hoon Kim; Kyoung-Soo Kim; Seung-Jae Hong; Myung Chul Yoo; Hyung-In Yang

    2006-01-01

    The PD-1 (programmed death 1) molecule is a negative regulator of T cells. PDCD1 (programmed cell death 1) has been reported to have a genetic association in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis in Caucasians. However, there are no reports on the association between this gene and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The present study investigated the association of the PD-1 polymorphisms

  11. New light on uveitis in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, L; Elswood, J; Calin, A

    1991-01-01

    Inflammatory eye disease is well recognized in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) but the relationship between the uveitis and the spondyloarthropathy is poorly defined. The following conclusions may be drawn from a study of 1331 consecutive patients with AS: the prevalence of uveitis was 40% (535 subjects), almost half of whom had greater than 5 attacks. Family studies of sib pairs, concordant for AS, showed that uveitis occurred randomly with a concordance for uveitis/no uveitis of only 43%. A comparison of patients with (n = 535) and without (n = 796) uveitis showed no important differences. Analysis of potential trigger factors among 72 patients with recurrent disease revealed no seasonal, infective or other correlation. The removal of an intrauterine device from a woman with severe intractable bilateral uveitis was associated with remission of the eye disease. In summary, although genetic background determines susceptibility to uveitis the pattern of the disease suggests the possibility of random environmental triggers unrelated to the course of the underlying rheumatological disorder. PMID:2023199

  12. Rosuvastatin improves endothelial dysfunction in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Garg, Nidhi; Krishan, Pawan; Syngle, Ashit

    2015-06-01

    Enhanced cardiovascular risk in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) provides a strong rationale for early therapeutical intervention. In view of the proven benefit of statins in atherosclerotic vascular disease, we aimed to investigate the effect of rosuvastatin on endothelial dysfunction (ED) and inflammatory disease activity in AS. In a single-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel study, 32 AS patients were randomized to receive 24 weeks of treatment with rosuvastatin (10 mg/day, n?=?17) and placebo (n?=?15) as an adjunct to existing stable antirheumatic drugs. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) was assessed by AngioDefender™ (Everest Genomic Ann Arbor, USA). Inflammatory measures (BASDAI, BASFI, CRP and ESR) and pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-?], interleukin-6 [IL-6] and interleukin-1 [IL-1]) were measured at baseline and after treatment. Lipids and adhesion molecules (intracellular adhesion molecule [ICAM-1] and vascular cell adhesion molecule [VCAM-1]) were estimated at baseline and after treatment. At baseline, inflammatory measures, pro inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules were elevated among both groups. After treatment with rosuvastatin, FMD improved significantly (p?

  13. Testicular Sertoli cell function in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Breno Pires; Saad, Carla Gonçalves Schahin; Souza, Fernando Henrique Carlos; Moraes, Julio Cesar Bertacini; Nukumizu, Lucia Akemi; Viana, Vilma Santos Trindade; Bonfá, Eloísa; Silva, Clovis Artur

    2013-07-01

    To assess the testicular Sertoli cell function according to inhibin B levels in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients and the possible effect of anti-TNF therapy on this hormone production, 20 consecutive AS patients and 24 healthy controls were evaluated. At study entry, AS patients were not receiving sulfasalazine/methotrexate and never have used biological/cytotoxic agents. They were assessed by serum inhibin B levels, hormone profile, urological examination, testicular ultrasound, seminal parameters, and clinical features. Ten of these patients received anti-TNF treatment and they were reevaluated for Sertoli function and disease parameters at 6 months. Four of them agreed to repeat sperm analysis. At study entry, the median of inhibin B (68 vs. 112.9 pg/mL, p = 0.111), follicle-stimulating hormone levels (3.45 vs. 3.65 IU/L, p = 0.795), and the other hormones was comparable in AS patients and controls (p > 0.05). Sperm analysis was similar in AS patients and controls (p > 0.05) with one AS patient presenting borderline low inhibin B levels. Further analysis at 6 months of the 10 patients referred for anti-TNF therapy, including one with borderline inhibin B, revealed that median inhibin B levels remained stable (116.5 vs. 126.5 pg/mL, p = 0.431) with a significant improvement in C-reactive protein (27.8 vs. 2.27 mg/L, p = 0.039). Sperm motility and concentration were preserved in the four patients who repeated this analysis after TNF blockage. In conclusion, this was the first study to report, using a specific marker, a normal testicular Sertoli cell function in AS patients with mild to moderate disease activity. PMID:23417428

  14. Epidemiology of ankylosing spondylitis in Northwest Greece, 1983-2002

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Alamanos; N. G. Papadopoulos; P. V. Voulgari; A. Karakatsanis; C. Siozos; A. A. Drosos

    2004-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the incidence and the prevalence of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in a defined area of northwest Greece with a total population of about 500 000 inhabitants. Methods. AS cases were recorded from (i) in- and out-patients referred to the rheumatology clinics of the Ioannina university hospital and the Ioannina general hospital, and (ii) patients referred to private rheumatologists

  15. Safe Re-administration of Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF?) Inhibitors in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis or Ankylosing Spondylitis Who Developed Active Tuberculosis on Previous Anti-TNF? Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Young Sun; Kwok, Seung-ki; Ju, Ji Hyeon; Park, Kyung-Su; Park, Sung-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus on whether it is safe to re-administer tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF?) inhibitors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or ankylosing spondylitis (AS) flared after withdrawal of TNF? inhibitors due to active tuberculosis (TB). We evaluated the safety of restarting anti-TNF? therapy in patients with TNF?-associated TB. We used data of 1,012 patients with RA or AS treated with TNF? inhibitors at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital between January 2003 and July 2013 to identify patients who developed active TB. Demographic and clinical data including the results of tuberculin skin tests (TST) and interferon-? releasing assays (IGRA) were collected. Fifteen patients developed active TB. Five cases were occurred in RA and 10 cases in AS. Nine of 15 patients had a negative TST or IGRA and 6 TST-positive patients had received prophylaxis prior to initiating anti-TNF? therapy. All patients discontinued TNF? inhibitors with starting the treatment of TB. Eight patients were re-administered TNF? inhibitors due to disease flares and promptly improved without recurrence of TB. TNF? inhibitors could be safely resumed after starting anti-TB regimen in patients with RA or AS. PMID:24431903

  16. Low grade radiographic sacroiliitis as prognostic factor in patients with undifferentiated spondyloarthritis fulfilling diagnostic criteria for ankylosing spondylitis throughout follow up

    PubMed Central

    Huerta?Sil, G; Casasola?Vargas, J C; Londoño, J D; Rivas?Ruíz, R; Chávez, J; Pacheco?Tena, C; Cardiel, M H; Vargas?Alarcón, G; Burgos?Vargas, R

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine the rate and factors associated with ankylosing spondylitis in a cohort of patients with undifferentiated spondyloarthritides (SpA). Methods 62 consecutive patients with undifferentiated SpA seen between 1998 and 1999 underwent clinical and imaging evaluations throughout follow up. The main outcome measure was a diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis. Results 50 patients with peripheral arthritis (n?=?35) and inflammatory back pain (n?=?24) (26 male; mean (SD) age at onset, 20.4 (8.8) years; disease duration 5.4 (5.7) years) were followed up for 3–5 years. At baseline, >90% of patients had axial and peripheral disease, while 38% had radiographic sacroiliitis below the cut off level for a diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis (BASDAI 3.9, BASFI 2.9). At the most recent evaluation, 21 patients (42%) had ankylosing spondylitis. Two factors were associated with a diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis in multivariate analysis: radiographic sacroiliitis grade <2 bilateral, or grade <3 unilateral (odds ratio (OR)?=?11.18 (95% confidence interval, 2.59 to 48.16), p?=?0.001), particularly grade 1 bilateral (OR?=?12.58 (1.33 to 119.09), p?=?0.027), and previous uveitis (OR?=?19.25 (1.72 to 214.39), p?=?0.001). Acute phase reactant levels, juvenile onset, and HLA?B27 showed a trend to linkage with ankylosing spondylitis (NS). Conclusions Low grade radiographic sacroiliitis is a prognostic factor for ankylosing spondylitis in patients originally classified as having undifferentiated SpA. Low grade radiographic sacroiliitis should be regarded as indicative of early ankylosing spondylitis in patients with undifferentiated SpA. PMID:16219705

  17. Serum hyaluronic acid levels in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mehmet Tuncay Duruöz; Yasemin Turan; Lale Cerrahoglu; Banu Isbilen

    2008-01-01

    Our aim in this study was to investigate serum hyaluronic acid (HA) levels and the relationship between clinical parameters\\u000a in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Approximately 30 patients with AS and 30 healthy individuals were recruited in this study\\u000a consecutively. Cross-sectional study was planned, and demographic, clinical, functional, radiological, and laboratory data\\u000a of patients were evaluated. Disease activity, functional status, and quality

  18. Nursing and safety of silver needle diathermy treating ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ning, Huaxiu; Wang, Yun; Yuan, Yiwen; Ning, Huaying

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims to discuss the nursing and safety of silver needle diathermy in the treatment for ankylosing spondylitis. We nursed 46 patients with ankylosing spondylitis treated with silver needle diathermy. Specific nursing was focused on physical condition evaluation and mental nursing before treatment, observation during and after treatment, diet nursing, needle eye nursing, functional training and propaganda and education when discharged. The result suggested that all the patients received mental nursing, diet guide, skin care, health education, functional training and follow-up visit from the nurse and all of them could endure silver needle diathermy as discomfort or drug allergy was barely found, so were slight scald and skin infection nearby the needle eye caused by fainting during acupuncture, accidental puncture or overheat. Follow-up visit showed that no patient suffered obvious untoward effect and the pain, joint range of motion and living condition were distinctly improved a week after discharging. In conclusion, during the treatment for ankylosing spondylitis applying silver needle diathermy, the nursing before, during and after the treatment can obviously reduce the complication, accelerate the recovery, which is highly safe. PMID:25796147

  19. Continuous posterior lumbar plexus and continuous parasacral and intubation with lighted stylet for ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Imbelloni, Luiz Eduardo; Lucena, Neli

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is characterized by progressive ossification of the spinal column with resultant stiffness. Ankylosing spondylitis can present significant challenges to the anaesthetist as a consequence of the potential difficult airway and performing neuraxial blockade. We describe a case of intubation with lighted stylet, and use of the continuous lumbosacral plexus for THA and postoperative analgesia with an elastomeric pump. Key words: Airways difficult anticipated, anesthesia, ankoylosing spondylitis, arthroplasty, conduction, continuous lumbosacral plexus, hip, infusion pumps, intubation awake, replacement PMID:25886430

  20. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and ankylosing spondylitis. Modifiable risk factors ... forms of arthritis (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis and lupus) may have weakened immune systems, due either to ...

  1. Polymorphonuclear leucocyte motility in men with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed Central

    Pease, C T; Fennell, M; Brewerton, D A

    1989-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) response to a chemotactic or chemokinetic stimulus is enhanced in men with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This effect does not parallel the severity of disease activity or the size of the acute phase response, and it is independent of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment. Polymorph function is normal in HLA-B27 positive brothers of probands with AS and in other HLA-B27 positive individuals in the absence of disease. Polymorph motility is also normal in patients with psoriasis vulgaris or Crohn's disease, indicating that enhanced PMN motility is not a non-specific consequence of all inflammatory disorders. PMID:2784306

  2. Surgical outcome after spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Sapkas, George; Kateros, Konstantinos; Papadakis, Stamatios A; Galanakos, Spyros; Brilakis, Emmanuel; Machairas, George; Katonis, Pavlos

    2009-01-01

    Background Ankylosing spondylitis is a rheumatic disease in which spinal and sacroiliac joints are mainly affected. There is a gradual bone formation in the spinal ligaments and ankylosis of the spinal diarthroses which lead to stiffness of the spine. The diffuse paraspinal ossification and inflammatory osteitis of advanced Ankylosing spondylitis creates a fused, brittle spine that is susceptible to fracture. The aim of this study is to present the surgical experience of spinal fractures occurring in patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis and to highlight the difficulties that exist as far as both diagnosis and surgical management are concerned. Methods Twenty patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis were operated due to a spinal fracture. The fracture was located at the cervical spine in 7 cases, at the thoracic spine in 9, at the thoracolumbar junction in 3 and at the lumbar spine in one case. Neurological defects were revealed in 10 patients. In four of them, neurological signs were progressively developed after a time period of 4 to 15 days. The initial radiological study was negative for a spinal fracture in twelve patients. Every patient was assessed at the time of admission and daily until the day of surgery, then postoperatively upon discharge. Results Combined anterior and posterior approaches were performed in three patients with only posterior approaches performed on the rest. Spinal fusion was seen in 100% of the cases. No intra-operative complications occurred. There was one case in which superficial wound inflammation occurred. Loosening of posterior screws without loss of stability appeared in two patients with cervical injuries. Frankel neurological classification was used in order to evaluate the neurological status of the patients. There was statistically significant improvement of Frankel neurological classification between the preoperative and postoperative evaluation. 35% of patients showed improvement due to the operation performed. Conclusion The operative treatment of these injuries is useful and effective. It usually succeeds the improvement of the patients' neurological status. Taking into consideration the cardiovascular problems that these patients have, anterior and posterior stabilization aren't always possible. In these cases, posterior approach can be performed and give excellent results, while total operation time, blood loss and other possible complications are decreased. PMID:19646282

  3. Evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis: results from the Australian 3E initiative in rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Kain, Tracey; Zochling, Jane; Taylor, Andrew; Manolios, Nicholas; Smith, Malcolm D; Reed, Mark D; Brown, Matthew A; Schachna, Lionel

    2008-02-18

    As part of the 3E program, we conducted a systematic literature review and gathered consensus from 23 practising Australian rheumatologists to develop guidelines for early identification of ankylosing spondylitis and specialist referral. In three rounds of break-out sessions followed by discussion and voting, the specialist panel addressed three questions related to diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis: In individuals with back pain, what are the early clinical features that suggest ankylosing spondylitis? How useful is imaging in identifying early ankylosing spondylitis? Based on which clinical features should a general practitioner refer a patient to a rheumatologist for further evaluation? The panel agreed on six recommendations related to the three questions: 1a. Early clinical features to suggest ankylosing spondylitis include inflammatory back pain and age at symptom onset < 45 years. 1b. The absence of symptomatic response to an appropriate course of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs makes the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis less likely. 1c. Raised inflammatory markers are supportive, but their absence does not rule out the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis. 2a. Despite low sensitivity to detect changes of early ankylosing spondylitis, plain radiographs of the pelvis and spine are appropriate initial imaging techniques. 2b. Magnetic resonance imaging is a useful imaging modality for detecting early changes of ankylosing spondylitis. 3. Individuals with inflammatory back pain should be referred to a rheumatologist for further evaluation. Effective dissemination and implementation of these recommendations are important to standardise the approach to early diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:18279132

  4. Ankylosing Spondylitis and Posture Control: The Role of Visual Input

    PubMed Central

    De Nunzio, Alessandro Marco; Iervolino, Salvatore; Zincarelli, Carmela; Di Gioia, Luisa; Rengo, Giuseppe; Multari, Vincenzo; Peluso, Rosario; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Pappone, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the motor control during quiet stance in patients with established ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to evaluate the effect of visual input on the maintenance of a quiet posture. Methods. 12 male AS patients (mean age 50.1?±?13.2 years) and 12 matched healthy subjects performed 2 sessions of 3 trials in quiet stance, with eyes open (EO) and with eyes closed (EC) on a baropodometric platform. The oscillation of the centre of feet pressure (CoP) was acquired. Indices of stability and balance control were assessed by the sway path (SP) of the CoP, the frequency bandwidth (FB1) that includes the 80% of the area under the amplitude spectrum, the mean amplitude of the peaks (MP) of the sway density curve (SDC), and the mean distance (MD) between 2 peaks of the SDC. Results. In severe AS patients, the MD between two peaks of the SDC and the SP of the center of feet pressure were significantly higher than controls during both EO and EC conditions. The MP was significantly reduced just on EC. Conclusions. Ankylosing spondylitis exerts negative effect on postural stability, not compensable by visual inputs. Our findings may be useful in the rehabilitative management of the increased risk of falling in AS. PMID:25821831

  5. Relapsing polychondritis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis using etanercept.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Valderilio Feijó; Galli, Natalia Bassalobre; Kleinfelder, Alais Daiane Fadini; D'Ippolito, Julia Farabolini; Gulin Tolentino, Andressa; Paiva, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by recurrent episodes of inflammation and progressive destruction of cartilaginous tissues, especially of the ears, nose, joints, and tracheobronchial tree. Its etiology is not well understood, but some studies have linked its pathophysiology with autoimmune disease and autoantibody production. We described a case of a 46-year-old male patient with ankylosing spondylitis who developed RP after the use of etanercept. Few similar cases have been described in the literature. However, they show a possible association between the use of biological inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF?), which potentially produces autoantibodies, and the development of RP. The treatment was based on data in the literature and included the cessation of biological therapy and the addition of corticosteroids with substantial improvement. PMID:25276463

  6. Relapsing Polychondritis in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis Using Etanercept

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Valderilio Feijó; Galli, Natalia Bassalobre; Kleinfelder, Alais Daiane Fadini; D'Ippolito, Julia Farabolini; Gulin Tolentino, Andressa; Paiva, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by recurrent episodes of inflammation and progressive destruction of cartilaginous tissues, especially of the ears, nose, joints, and tracheobronchial tree. Its etiology is not well understood, but some studies have linked its pathophysiology with autoimmune disease and autoantibody production. We described a case of a 46-year-old male patient with ankylosing spondylitis who developed RP after the use of etanercept. Few similar cases have been described in the literature. However, they show a possible association between the use of biological inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF?), which potentially produces autoantibodies, and the development of RP. The treatment was based on data in the literature and included the cessation of biological therapy and the addition of corticosteroids with substantial improvement. PMID:25276463

  7. [Correct and incorrect paths in the history of ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Fellmann, J

    1991-05-21

    This article retraces the history of ankylosing spondylitis. While the first part takes into consideration the paleopathological aspects of illness, the second part retains the main stages of the research on the subject from the 16th to the 19th century. This part refers to B.O. Connor, who in 1694 was the first to give a complete description of a characteristic skeleton. This part also mentions Benjamin Brodie who in 1850 wrote the first complete clinical description and Charles Fagge who in his work was the first to combine clinical and anatomical elements. The scientific discussion at the end of the 19th century between Adolf Strümpell. Wladimir von Bechterew and Pierre Marie is also part of this paragraph. The last part shows the important discoveries of the 20th century, specially useful for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:2052821

  8. Normal anti-Klebsiella lymphocytotoxicity in ankylosing spondylitis

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.D.; Fritzler, M.J.; Lewkonia, R.M.

    1986-03-01

    We compared in vitro lymphocytotoxicity (LCT) of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), obtained from patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and normal controls (NC). Assays were performed with antibacterial antisera prepared from AS- and NC-derived Klebsiella and coliforms Escherichia coli. LCT assessed by eosin staining was not significantly different in PBL of 12 AS patients and 28 controls when reacted with 3 Klebsiella and 1 E coli antisera. LCT assessed by /sup 51/Cr release was not significantly different for PBL of 20 age- and sex-matched pairs of AS patients and NC when reacted with 3 Klebsiella and 1 E coli antisera. Similarly, LCT-/sup 51/Cr of PBL of 15 matched AS and NC pairs was not significantly different for anti-K21, a serotype putatively implicated in Klebsiella-HLA-B27 antigenic cross-reactivity. Our results do not support the notion of molecular mimicry between Klebsiella and B27 in the pathogenesis of primary AS.

  9. Elevated serum level of IL-27 and VEGF in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and associate with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tian-Tian; Lu, Jing; Qi, Chen-Yue; Yuan, Lin; Li, Xiao-Lin; Xia, Li-Ping; Shen, Hui

    2015-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-27 is an IL-12 family cytokine and exerts a critical role in immune regulation in the context of infection, autoimmunity, and angiogenesis. In this study, we aimed to investigate the possible pathophysiological role of IL-27 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). One hundred and forty AS patients and 90 healthy controls were included in the current study. The levels of IL-27 and VEGF in serum and synovial fluid (SF) samples were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 were measured by standard laboratory techniques. Disease activity in AS was scored with Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Hip involvement, peripheral arthritis, and eye involvement were also recorded. The serum levels of IL-27 were remarkably higher in AS patients than healthy groups and significantly correlated with serum levels of VEGF. Furthermore, the serum levels of IL-27 were correlated with BASDAI independent of other markers of inflammation. Elevated serum levels of IL-27 and VEGF were detected in AS patients with peripheral arthritis and HLA-B27 positive. The SF levels of IL-27 and VEGF were significantly higher than serum levels in AS patients with peripheral arthritis. By contrast, levels of IL-27 and VEGF were not increased in AS patients with hip involvement and eye involvement. IL-27 may regulate the immunological or inflammatory process of AS. PMID:24710630

  10. High-dose thalidomide increases the risk of peripheral neuropathy in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hong-xia; Fu, Wen-yi; Cui, Hua-dong; Yang, Li-li; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Li-juan

    2015-01-01

    Thalidomide is an effective drug for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis but might induce peripheral neuropathy. This major adverse reaction has attracted much concern. The current study aimed to observe the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy among ankylosing spondylitis patients for 1 year after treatment. In this study, 207 ankylosing spondylitis cases received thalidomide treatment, while 116 ankylosing spondylitis cases received other treatments. Results showed that the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy in the thalidomide group was higher than that in the non-thalidomide group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of neuropathy between the < 6 months medication and ? 6 months medication groups. There were no differences in the mean age, gender, or daily dose between the two groups. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy among patients receiving 25, 50, 75, or 100 mg thalidomide per day was 4.6%, 8.5%, 17.1%, 21.7%, respectively. The incidence was significantly different between the groups receiving 25 mg and 100 mg thalidomide. In conclusion, thalidomide can induce peripheral neuropathy within 1 year after treatment of ankylosing spondylitis; however, age and gender have no obvious impact on the incidence of peripheral neuropathy. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy is associated with increasing daily doses of thalidomide.

  11. [Magnetic resonance imaging in ankylosing spondylitis (Marie-Struempell-Bechterew disease)].

    PubMed

    Bollow, M

    2002-12-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is the prototypical form of the spondyloarthropathies, which at a prevalence of 2 % is among the most frequent rheumatic diseases. Spondyloarthropathy comprises the following five disorders: AS, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, enteropathic arthritis in Crohn's disease, and ulcerosing colitis as well as undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy. In 99 % of the patients with AS initial abnormal findings affect the sacroiliac joints. The radiographic changes required for diagnosing AS occur as late as 5 - 9 years after the onset of clinical symptoms. MRI of the sacroiliac joints reliably demonstrates both chronic inflammatory changes (erosions, sclerotic changes, bone bridges) and acute inflammatory changes (synovitis, capsulitis, osteitis) and allows for grading the chronicity and acuity of such changes. Enthesitis of the interosseous ligaments of the retroarticular space is a manifestation of AS. Spondylodiscitis (Andersson 1937) may occur as an inflammatory or non-inflammatory process (transdiscal fatigue fracture). Inflammations of the facet and costospinal joints developing into ankylosis are typical of AS. Changes of the vertebral bodies occur as anterior (Romanus 1952), posterior, and marginal spondylitis. All forms of spondyloarthropathies are furthermore characterized by asymmetrical synovitis of the large joints, particularly of the legs (gonarthritis, coxitis, tarsitis, peripheral oligoarthritis), rheumatic fibroosteitis (pelvic enthesitis, rheumatic calcaneopathy), and peri- and synchondritis of the pubic symphisis and sternal synchondrosis. Since early inflammatory changes of the spinal column and of the extravertebral localizations in AS are demonstrated by MRI before they become apparent on radiographs, and thereby the diagnostic gap could be closed, the early use of MRI for diagnostic and follow-up is commendable, when new therapeutical options like the so-called "biologicals" are employed. PMID:12471519

  12. [Vitamin D levels in ankylosing spondylitis: does deficiency correspond to disease activity?].

    PubMed

    Pokhai, Gabriel G; Bandagi, Sabiha; Abrudescu, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an inflammatory disorder that presents with arthritis of the axial skeleton, including sacroiliac joints. Vitamin D is a secosteroid hormone with a long-established role in calcium and phosphate homeostasis, and in the regulation of bone formation and resorption. It is now known that vitamin D plays an immunosuppressive role in the body, and there is interest of late in the role of vitamin D in autoimmune diseases. Inflammation may be responsible for some of the loss of bone mineral density seen in AS. We reviewed the literature for studies assessing vitamin D level as a marker of AS disease activity and those examining vitamin D levels in AS in comparison to healthy controls. Four of 7 studies found a significant negative correlation between vitamin D levels and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Index (BASDAI), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP). In a review of 8 case-control studies, the mean level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was 22.8 ± 14.1 ng/mL in 555 AS patients versus 26.6 ± 12.5 ng/mL in 557 healthy controls. When compared with a 2-sample t test, vitamin D levels were significantly higher in healthy controls (p < 0.01). We conclude that patients with AS appear to have lower vitamin D levels versus healthy controls; however, the cause is unclear. Existing studies do not demonstrate a consistent link between vitamin D levels and disease activity in AS. Further studies are in need to determine if a causative link exists between vitamin D deficiency and AS. PMID:25627231

  13. Fatal Isolated Cervical Spine Injury in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gelalis, Ioannis D.; Lykissas, Marios G.; Dimou, Apostolos A.; Giannoulis, Dionysios K.; Beris, Alexandros E.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design?Case report. Objective?The purpose of the present case report was to present a patient with a history of ankylosing spondylitis who sustained a dislocation of C6 on C7 and died soon after his presentation in the emergency room (ER). Methods?An 88-year-old man was brought to the ER due to a neck injury secondary to a fall. Imaging of the cervical spine revealed anterior dislocation of C6 on C7 and the characteristic “bamboo” spine of ankylosing spondylitis. Results?The patient died within 30 minutes due to respiratory insufficiency. Conclusion?Isolated cervical spine injuries in patients with ankylosing spondylitis can be fatal. A high degree of clinical suspicion, thorough imaging with computed tomography, and meticulous handling are required in this patient population.

  14. Effects of Glossopharyngeal Insufflation in Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, Nina; Lindholm, Peter; Lennartsson, Claudia; Nygren-Bonnier, Malin

    2014-01-01

    In Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS), thoracic range of motion is often greatly limited. The objective of the study was to describe the effects of 12 weeks of Glossopharyngeal Insufflation (GI) training in patients with AS. Dynamic spirometry included vital capacity, forced expiratory volume, and peak expiratory flow. Thoracic and lumbar range of motion was assessed by tragus-to-wall distance, modified Schober test, and tape measure. Disease activity, activity limitation, and health perception were assessed using the BAS-Indices, and tension in the thoracic region during GI was assessed using the Borg CR-10 scale. Adherence to training was recorded in an activity log, along with any remarks on the training. Ten patients were recruited and six male patients fulfilled the study protocol. Three patients were able to learn GI by exceeding their maximal vital capacity with 5% using GI. A significant increase in thoracic range of motion both on costae IV (P = 0.04) and at the level of the xiphoid process (P = 0.04) was seen. Thus, patients with AS can practice GI, it is safe if maximal exertion is avoided, and patients with some mobility in the chest can increase their lung function substantially by performing GI during 12 weeks. PMID:25506364

  15. Economic Considerations of the Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Reveille, John D.; Ximenes, Antonio; Ward, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS)is associated with both significant direct and indirect costs,which vary by country, and have generally increased dramatically since the introduction of anti-TNF therapy. The cost-effectiveness of biologic agents is controversial, although cost-effectiveness studies need to consider the potential impact of anti-TNF treatments on work ability. Alternatives to reduce costs associated with biologics have been examined, including on-demand dosing and lower dose alternatives. Other treatment measures, such as total hip arthroplasty and physical therapy, are also effective in reducing pain and improving function in patients with AS, although the optimal type or combination of physical therapy treatment modalities, the optimal frequency and duration of treatment, and whether therapy is equally effective in stable disease and uncontrolled AS needs to be determined. No studies have examined differences in patient outcomes based on subspecialty care. Establishing an evidence base for these questions would help inform policy decisions to design the most cost-effective measures to treat AS. PMID:22543541

  16. Dysphagia and airway obstruction due to large cervical osteophyte in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Varsak, Yasin Kür?ad; Eryilmaz, Mehmet Akif; Arba?, Hamdi

    2014-07-01

    Anterior cervical osteophytes are excessive bony formation of cervical vertebra bodies. They are common but rarely symptomatic lesions mostly seen in geriatric population. Large anterior cervical osteophytes may cause symptoms such as dysphagia, dyspnea, dysphonia, and odynophagia. They have been attributed to multiple etiologies including diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, following trauma, cervical spondylitis, and infectious spondylitis. However, symptomatic large anterior cervical osteophyte with ankylosing spondylitis is extremely rare. Surgical excision is the main treatment for symptomatic cases. We report a case of a 53-year-old man with airway obstruction and dysphagia due to large cervical osteophyte who has a history of ankylosing spondylitis, and we also addressed the etiological factors and management of large symptomatic cervical osteophytes. PMID:24905946

  17. Pitfalls and complications in the treatment of cervical spine fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Heyde, Christoph-E; Fakler, Johannes K; Hasenboehler, Erik; Stahel, Philip F; John, Thilo; Robinson, Yohan; Tschoeke, Sven K; Kayser, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Patients with ankylosing spondylitis are at significant risk for sustaining cervical spine injuries following trauma predisposed by kyphosis, stiffness and osteoporotic bone quality of the spine. The risk of sustaining neurological deficits in this patient population is higher than average. The present review article provides an outline on the specific injury patterns in the cervical spine, diagnostic algorithms and specific treatment modalities dictated by the underlying disease in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. An emphasis is placed on the risks and complication patterns in the treatment of these rare, but challenging injuries. PMID:18538019

  18. An Epidemiological Study on Ankylosing Spondylitis in Southern Albania

    PubMed Central

    Koko, Vjollca; Ndrepepa, Ana; Skënderaj, Skënder; Ploumis, Avraam; Backa, Teuta; Tafaj, Argjend

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the incidence and prevalence of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in southern Albania and to assess the association of various demographic risk factors with the severity of disease. Material and methods: This is an observational study with cross-sectional analyses, conducted in the region of Gjirokaster, between 1995 until 2011. The diagnosis of AS was based on the modified New York criteria. Data on population are obtained from the reports of the National Institute of Statistics. Results: Between 1995 and 2011, there were 54 patients diagnosed with AS. Of them, 48 subjects were males (88.9%) and 6 subjects females (11.1%). The AS prevalence in adult population (?14 years of age), in December 2010, was 0.061%. The 5-year incidence (2006–2010) in adult population was 0.006 %. The mean age at the onset of disease was 29.7±8.4 years. The mean age in 2011 (n=50 subjects) was 51.6±12.7 years. The duration of the disease was 22.7±11.2 years. More than two thirds of the patients (70.3%) were in the advanced radiological stages of the disease. A younger age at the onset of the disease, longer delay in diagnosis, lower educational level and smoking were significant independent factors associated with the advanced forms of the disease. Conclusion: In southern Albania, the AS prevalence in 2010 was 0.061% and the 5-year incidence (2006-2010) was 6 new cases per 105 adults. The incidence and prevalence of AS in Southern Albania are close to the respective regional epidemiological data. PMID:24757397

  19. Involvement of Notch1/Hes signaling pathway in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Liang, Chao-Ge; Li, Yi-Fan; Ji, Yun-Han; Qiu, Wen-Jun; Tang, Xian-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of Notch1/Hes signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of abnormal ossification of hip ligament in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). 22 AS patients scheduled for artificial hip arthroplasty were randomly chosen as AS group. As controls, we used 4 patients diagnosed with transcervical fracture who underwent hip replacement surgery. Notch1 and Hes mRNA expressions were detected by real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RFQ-PCR). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to detect Notch1 and Hes protein expression. Correlation analyses of Notch-l and Hes with AS-related clinical factors were conducted with spearman’s correlation analysis and partial correlation analysis. RFQ-PCR results showed significant differences in Notch1 and Hes mRNA expressions between AS group and the control group (all P < 0.05). IHC analysis further indicated positive nuclear signals of Notch1 and Hes protein, indicating functional activation of the Notch1 and Hes pathways. Semi-quantitative IHC showed a higher Notch1 and Hes expression levels in AS group compared to the control group (all P < 0.05). Correlation analysis suggested that Hes protein expression was positively associated with the clinical course of the disease in AS patients. In conclusion, Notch1 and Hes overexpression was clearly detected in hip joint ligaments of AS patients, Hes protein expression was associated with the clinical course of AS. Taken together, we suggest that signaling pathways mediated by Notch1-Hes may contribute to ligament ossification of hip joints in AS patients.

  20. Surgical Outcomes after Traumatic Vertebral Fractures in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    An, Seong-Bae; Kim, Keung-Nyun; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Cho, Yong-Eun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Ankylosing spondylitis is an inflammatory rheumatic disease mainly affecting the axial skeleton. The rigid spine may secondarily develop osteoporosis, further increasing the risk of spinal fracture. In this study, we reviewed fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis that had been clinically diagnosed to better define the mechanism of injury, associated neurological deficit, predisposing factors, and management strategies. Methods Between January 2003 and December 2013, 12 patients with 13 fractures with neurological complications were treated. Neuroimaging evaluation was obtained in all patients by using plain radiography, CT scan, and MR imaging. The ASIA Impairment Scale was used in order to evaluate the neurologic status of the patients. Management was based on the presence or absence of spinal instability. Results A total of 9 cervical and 4 thoracolumbar fractures were identified in a review of patients in whom ankylosing spondylitis had been diagnosed. Of these, 7 fractures were associated with a hyperextension mechanism. 10 cases resulted in a fracture by minor trauma. Posttraumatic neurological deficits were demonstrated in 11 cases and neurological improvement after surgery was observed in 5 of these cases. Conclusions Patients with ankylosing spondylitis are highly susceptible to spinal fracture and spinal cord injury even after only mild trauma. Initial CT or MR imaging of the whole spine is recommended even if the patient's symptoms are mild. The patient should also have early surgical stabilization to correct spinal deformity and avoid worsening of the patient's neurological status. PMID:25328647

  1. Therapeutic effects of individual physical therapy in ankylosing spondylitis related to duration of disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Hidding; S. Linden; L. Witte

    1993-01-01

    Physical therapy in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is considered important for maintaining or improving mobility, fitness, functioning, and global health. We studied the influence of disease duration on the short term effects of supervised individual therapy. One hundred forty-four AS outpatients (modified New York Criteria; mean age: 43 years; median duration of disease: 4 years; range: 0–33) received 12 supervised individual

  2. A case report on nephrotic syndrome associated with ankylosing spondylitis effectively treated with infliximab

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xin; Li, Yao; Gao, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Renal abnormalities have been reported to occur in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This study examined a patient who suffered from AS for two years. The 24-hour urine protein of the patient was 4.80 g/day. The result of renal biopsy showed minimal change. The patient was treated with infliximab. After two months, nephrotic syndrome was treated successfully. PMID:25356164

  3. 2010 update of the ASAS\\/EULAR recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. von Braun; R van den Berg; X. Baraliakos; H. Boehm; R. Burgos-Vargas; E. Collantes-Estevez; H. Dagfinrud; B. A. C. Dijkmans; M. Dougados; P Emery; P. Geher; M. Hammoudeh; R. D. Inman; M. Jongkees; M. A. Khan; U. Kiltz; TK Kvien; M Leirisalo-Repo; W. P. Maksymowych; I. Olivieri; K. Pavelka; J. Sieper; E. Stanislawska-Biernat; D. Wendling; S Özgocmen; C van Drogen; BJ van Royen; Heijde van der H. D

    2011-01-01

    This first update of the ASAS\\/EULAR recommendations on the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is based on the original paper, a systematic review of existing recommendations and the literature since 2005 and the discussion and agreement among 21 international experts, 2 patients and 2 physiotherapists in a meeting in February 2010. Each original bullet point was discussed in detail and

  4. Pitfalls and complications in the treatment of cervical spine fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christoph-E Heyde; Johannes K Fakler; Erik Hasenboehler; Philip F Stahel; Thilo John; Yohan Robinson; Sven K Tschoeke; Ralph Kayser

    2008-01-01

    Patients with ankylosing spondylitis are at significant risk for sustaining cervical spine injuries following trauma predisposed by kyphosis, stiffness and osteoporotic bone quality of the spine. The risk of sustaining neurological deficits in this patient population is higher than average. The present review article provides an outline on the specific injury patterns in the cervical spine, diagnostic algorithms and specific

  5. Chest Wall Motion during Speech Production in Patients with Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalliakosta, Georgia; Mandros, Charalampos; Tzelepis, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production. Method: The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45 plus or minus 8 years, Schober test 1.45 plus or…

  6. Integrated Genomics Identifies Convergence of Ankylosing Spondylitis with Global Immune Mediated Disease Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammed; Codner, Dianne; Mahmud Hasan, S M; Scherer, Stephen W; O’Rielly, Darren D; Rahman, Proton

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis(AS), a highly heritable complex inflammatory arthritis. Although, a handful of non-HLA risk loci have been identified, capturing the unexplained genetic contribution to AS pathogenesis remains a challenge attributed to additive, pleiotropic and epistatic-interactions at the molecular level. Here, we developed multiple integrated genomic approaches to quantify molecular convergence of non-HLA loci with global immune mediated diseases. We show that non-HLA genes are significantly sensitive to deleterious mutation accumulation in the general population compared with tolerant genes. Human developmental proteomics (prenatal to adult) analysis revealed that proteins encoded by non-HLA AS risk loci are 2-fold more expressed in adult hematopoietic cells.Enrichment analysis revealed AS risk genes overlap with a significant number of immune related pathways (p?

  7. Major histocompatibility complex associations of ankylosing spondylitis are complex and involve further epistasis with ERAP1.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Adrian; Pulit, Sara L; Leo, Paul J; Pointon, Jenny J; Robinson, Philip C; Weisman, Michael H; Ward, Michael; Gensler, Lianne S; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Haroon, Nigil; Mulero, Juan; Blanco, Francisco J; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Lopez-Larrea, C; Bowness, Paul; Gaffney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; de Bakker, Paul I W; Brown, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common, highly heritable, inflammatory arthritis for which HLA-B*27 is the major genetic risk factor, although its role in the aetiology of AS remains elusive. To better understand the genetic basis of the MHC susceptibility loci, we genotyped 7,264 MHC SNPs in 22,647 AS cases and controls of European descent. We impute SNPs, classical HLA alleles and amino-acid residues within HLA proteins, and tested these for association to AS status. Here we show that in addition to effects due to HLA-B*27 alleles, several other HLA-B alleles also affect susceptibility. After controlling for the associated haplotypes in HLA-B, we observe independent associations with variants in the HLA-A, HLA-DPB1 and HLA-DRB1 loci. We also demonstrate that the ERAP1 SNP rs30187 association is not restricted only to carriers of HLA-B*27 but also found in HLA-B*40:01 carriers independently of HLA-B*27 genotype. PMID:25994336

  8. Integrated genomics identifies convergence of ankylosing spondylitis with global immune mediated disease pathways.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammed; Codner, Dianne; Mahmud Hasan, S M; Scherer, Stephen W; O'Rielly, Darren D; Rahman, Proton

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis(AS), a highly heritable complex inflammatory arthritis. Although, a handful of non-HLA risk loci have been identified, capturing the unexplained genetic contribution to AS pathogenesis remains a challenge attributed to additive, pleiotropic and epistatic-interactions at the molecular level. Here, we developed multiple integrated genomic approaches to quantify molecular convergence of non-HLA loci with global immune mediated diseases. We show that non-HLA genes are significantly sensitive to deleterious mutation accumulation in the general population compared with tolerant genes. Human developmental proteomics (prenatal to adult) analysis revealed that proteins encoded by non-HLA AS risk loci are 2-fold more expressed in adult hematopoietic cells.Enrichment analysis revealed AS risk genes overlap with a significant number of immune related pathways (p?

  9. Major histocompatibility complex associations of ankylosing spondylitis are complex and involve further epistasis with ERAP1

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Adrian; Pulit, Sara L.; Leo, Paul J.; Pointon, Jenny J.; Robinson, Philip C.; Weisman, Michael H.; Ward, Michael; Gensler, Lianne S.; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A.; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Bradbury, Linda A.; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Haroon, Nigil; Mulero, Juan; Blanco, Francisco J.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Lopez-Larrea, C; Bowness, Paul; Gaffney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D.; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P.; Crusius, J. Bart A.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M.; Inman, Robert D.; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Reveille, John D.; Evans, David M.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Brown, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common, highly heritable, inflammatory arthritis for which HLA-B*27 is the major genetic risk factor, although its role in the aetiology of AS remains elusive. To better understand the genetic basis of the MHC susceptibility loci, we genotyped 7,264 MHC SNPs in 22,647 AS cases and controls of European descent. We impute SNPs, classical HLA alleles and amino-acid residues within HLA proteins, and tested these for association to AS status. Here we show that in addition to effects due to HLA-B*27 alleles, several other HLA-B alleles also affect susceptibility. After controlling for the associated haplotypes in HLA-B, we observe independent associations with variants in the HLA-A, HLA-DPB1 and HLA-DRB1 loci. We also demonstrate that the ERAP1 SNP rs30187 association is not restricted only to carriers of HLA-B*27 but also found in HLA-B*40:01 carriers independently of HLA-B*27 genotype. PMID:25994336

  10. [Spinal claudication and malum perforans pedis. Late sequela of ankylosing spondylitis (Bechterew disease) with cystic lumbosacral arachnopathy].

    PubMed

    Tesch, M

    1994-12-01

    Enlargement of the caudal sac with bony erosions of the spinal vertebrae may be a late sequel of ankylosing spondylitis. CT scans demonstrate typical changes. We report a case with spinal claudication and a neuropathic ulcer. PMID:7854510

  11. [Symptoms, effects on quality of life, judgement and expectations of treatment in active ankylosing spondylitis: the patient's view].

    PubMed

    Falkenbach, A; Curda, B

    2001-10-01

    Symptoms, Effects on Quality of Life, Judgement and Expectations of Treatment in Active Ankylosing Spondylitis: The Patient's View.In ankylosing spondylitis uncertainty prevails among rheumatologists on how to define and measure activity. In the present study the patient's view of activity was evaluated. What does active ankylosing spondylitis mean for the patient? In a standardized interview the patient was asked to describe, from his own experience, what active ankylosing spondylitis means, what bothers him most, what helps most, and what he expects from therapy. For the patient, active ankylosing spondylitis means pain (99 responses), mobility restriction (19), muscle tension (10), inability to stay supine (6), restriction in chest mobility (5) and dyspnea (5). Fatigue was mentioned by two patients. In active states patients are mainly bothered by pain (77), mobility restriction (55), consequences for social life (20) and work (18), disturbed sleep (17) and difficult breathing (16). Drugs (84) and physical activity (42) were judged the best treatments during active ankylosing spondylitis. It was no surprise that pain and mobility restriction were cited most often by the patients. Breathing difficulties were cited rather often, whereas fatigue seems not to play an important role for most patients. The results suggest that modern rheumatology may have underestimated the relevance of difficult breathing and paid too much attention to fatigue. PMID:11579374

  12. Monitoring ankylosing spondylitis: clinically useful markers and prediction of clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Braun, Juergen; Kiltz, Uta; Sarholz, Michael; Heldmann, Frank; Regel, Andrea; Baraliakos, Xenofon

    2015-08-01

    Patient assessment in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) is multidimensional, and monitoring of disease activity, function and radiographic progression is complex. There is no simple 'gold standard' for measuring disease activity in all individual patients, as disease activity in axSpA is the sum of many different aspects and a complexity that cannot be represented by a single variable. Limited spinal mobility is a cardinal sign of ankylosing spondylitis and loss of spinal mobility has been reported to be a prognostic factor and most often evaluated with the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index. Imaging of the spine and assessment of safety aspects plays an important role in the monitoring of patients with axSpA. The timeframe for collecting information regarding disease activity, function and radiographic progression are recommended on an individual basis. PMID:26048334

  13. Surgical treatment of extensive discovertebral destruction in ankylosing spondylitis: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Kuo, S C; Kao, H C; Liu, C L; Yu, W K; Lo, W H

    1995-02-01

    Extensive discovertebral destruction in ankylosing spondylitis is rare and difficult in diagnosis and management. We present two such cases who were treated with anterior decompression, autogenous strut iliac bone graft and fixed with anterior locking plate system (ALPS) instrumentation. After operation the patients' symptoms improved and the spinal deformities were corrected. Our experiences in these two patients emphasize the importance of early recognition, early detection and aggressive surgical treatment in the lesion. PMID:7750062

  14. Protocol for a population-based Ankylosing Spondylitis (PAS) cohort in Wales

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark D Atkinson; Sinead Brophy; Stefan Siebert; Mike B Gravenor; Ceri J Phillips; David V Ford; Kerina H Jones; Ronan A Lyons

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To develop a population-based cohort of people with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in Wales using (1) secondary care clinical datasets, (2) patient-derived questionnaire data and (3) routinely-collected information in order to examine disease history and the health economic cost of AS. METHODS: This data model will include and link (1) secondary care clinician datasets (i.e. electronic patient notes from the

  15. Body composition, insulin, and leptin levels in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ismail Sari; Tevfik Demir; Leyla Didem Kozaci; Servet Akar; Tulay Kavak; Merih Birlik; Fatos Onen; Nurullah Akkoc

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of chronic inflammation on insulin resistance, serum leptin levels, and body\\u000a composition (BC) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and healthy controls. Twenty-eight AS patients and 17 healthy\\u000a controls were included in this study. Subjects with hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and obesity were excluded. Acute\\u000a phase reactants and serum levels of

  16. Transforming growth factor beta-1 and gene polymorphisms in oriental ankylosing spondylitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. S. Howe; P. L. Cheung; K. O. Kong; H. Badsha; B. Y. H. Thong; K. P. Leong; E. T. Koh; T. Y. Lian; Y. K. Cheng; S. Lam; D. Teo; T. C. Lau; B. P. Leung

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. To study serum levels of transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFb1) and the expression of TGFb 1i nin vitro peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cultures in oriental ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients, and to determine their association with codon 10 and 25 TGFB1 gene polymorphisms. Methods. Serum levels of TGFb1 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The ability of PBMCs

  17. Human lymphocyte response to selected infectious agents in Reiter's syndrome and ankylosing spondylitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Enlow; W. B. Bias; R. Bluestone; F. C. Arnett

    1982-01-01

    Reiter's syndrome (RS) and idiopathic ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have been associated with certain infections and the histocompatibility antigen HLA-B27. The proliferative responses of peripheral mononuclear cell preparations from 18 patients with RS, 6 with AS, and 22 unaffected subjects were studied toward Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, Yersinia enterocolitica, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Chlamydia trachomatis. Although RS, AS, and HLA-B27-positive normal subjects

  18. Exercise and ankylosing spondylitis with New York modified criteria: a systematic review of controlled trials with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Martins, N A; Furtado, Guilherme Eustáquio; Campos, Maria João; Leitão, José Carlos; Filaire, Edith; Ferreira, José Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a systemic rheumatic disease that affects the axial skeleton, causing inflammatory back pain, structural and functional changes which decrease quality of life. Several treatments for ankylosing spondylitis have been proposed and among them the use of exercise. The present study aims to synthesize information from the literature and identify the results of controlled clinical trials on exercise in patients with ankylosing spondylitis with the New York modified diagnostic criteria and to assess whether exercise is more effective than physical activity to reduce functional impairment. The sources of studies used were: LILACS, Pubmed, EBSCOhost, B-on, personal communication, manual research and lists of references. The criteria used for the studies selection was controlled clinical trials, participants with New York modified diagnostic criteria for ankylosing spondylitis, and with interventions through exercise. The variables studied were related to primary outcomes such as BASFI (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index) as a functional index, BASDAI (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index) as an index of intensity of disease activity and BASMI (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index) as a metrological index assessing patient's limitation on movement. From the 603 studies identified after screening only 37 articles were selected for eligibility, from which 18 studies were included. The methodological quality was assessed to select those with an high methodological expressiveness using the PEDro scale. A cumulative meta-analysis was subsequently performed to compare exercise versus usual level of physical activity. Exercise shows significant statistical outcomes for the BASFI, BASDAI and BASMI, higher than those found for usual level of physical activity. PMID:25351868

  19. A prospective study of early diagnostic investigations in the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Eastmond, C J; Robertson, E M

    2003-02-01

    This study was designed to assess the relative values current of locally available investigations in the early diagnosis of inflammatory sacroiliitis. Consecutive patients attending routine rheumatology clinics in Aberdeen clinically considered by consultant rheumatologists to have inflammatory back disease but with insufficient criteria to firmly establish a diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis were included. Patients were assessed using a standard questionnaire, clinical examination of spinal movements, plain radiology of the sacroiliac joints, computerised tomographic scanning of the sacroiliac joints and HLA-B27 typing. Patients were systematically followed up using repeated clinical and radiological examination for five years. Plain film evidence of grade 2 radiological sacroiliitis (bilateral or unilateral) was found to be the most reliable predictor for the development of ankylosing spondylitis satisfying the New York criteria at 5 year follow up. CT scanning and HLA-B27 typing were of no added value in this series and the clinical questionnaire lacked specificity. It is concluded that the combination of clinical history, examination and plain film radiology are currently reliable criteria for diagnosing the subsequent development of ankylosing spondylitis satisfying established criteria. PMID:12669498

  20. Evaluation of paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in Egyptian patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Olama, Shereem Mohamed; Elarman, Mohammed Mohamed

    2013-06-01

    The role of paraoxonase (PON) and arylesterase (ARE) in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis has been investigated, and their serum levels have been evaluated, but clinical study concerning PON1 and ARE and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is little reported in literature. The aim of this study was to investigate PON1 and ARE activities in AS in comparison with healthy persons and their relation with the disease activity parameters. 35 AS patients and 35 healthy controls (matched for age and sex) participated. Disease activity of AS patients was assessed clinically according to the Bath AS disease activity index, and AS functional impairment was assessed using the Bath AS Functional Index. Serum samples were collected from all subjects to evaluate serum PON1, ARE activities, and lipid profile. The mean serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) were significantly higher in the AS patients than in controls, while the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) is significantly lower in the AS patients than controls. Serum PON1 and ARE activities were significantly lower in AS patients than in controls, while malondialdehyde (MDA) was significantly higher. AS patients with active disease had significantly higher serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL and MDA while lower HDL, PON1 and ARE than those with no active AS. Decrease in the PON1/ARE activity leading to generation of oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathogenesis of AS. Moreover, it seems that activity of PON1/ARE in patients with AS is strictly correlated with the activity of the inflammatory process. PMID:23239038

  1. Biomarkers and cytokines of bone turnover: extensive evaluation in a cohort of patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of spine and sacroiliac joints; it is characterized by new bone formation, and the disease processes can be accompanied by osteoporosis. In the present study, we investigated changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and in the levels of various bone turnover-related biomarkers and cytokines in a cohort of AS patients, with regard to clinical parameters, disease activity, and treatment regimen. Methods 55 AS patients and 33 healthy controls included in the study. Spinal mobility was assessed by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), and radiologic changes were scored by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiologic Index (BASRI). Patients were also evaluated with the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI) and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Various biomarkers and cytokines of bone turnover including osteoprotegerin (OPG), serum band 5 tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-5), soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (sRANKL), secreted frizzled-related protein 1 (sFRP-1), Dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK-1), and sclerostin were studied. Results The levels of TRAP-5, NTX, sRANKL, sclerostin, sFRP-1, DKK-1, and IFN?, were similar between the patients and controls (p?>?0.05), while BMD of femoral neck, and OPG levels were significantly lower in AS patients (p?

  2. Identification of Potential Transcriptomic Markers in Developing Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Meta-Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Fang; Pan, Jian; Xu, Lixiao; Li, Gang; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify potential transcriptomic markers in developing ankylosing spondylitis by a meta-analysis of multiple public microarray datasets. Using the INMEX (integrative meta-analysis of expression data) program, we performed the meta-analysis to identify consistently differentially expressed (DE) genes in ankylosing spondylitis and further performed functional interpretation (gene ontology analysis and pathway analysis) of the DE genes identified in the meta-analysis. Three microarray datasets (26 cases and 29 controls in total) were collected for meta-analysis. 905 consistently DE genes were identified in ankylosing spondylitis, among which 482 genes were upregulated and 423 genes were downregulated. The upregulated gene with the smallest combined rank product (RP) was GNG11 (combined RP = 299.64). The downregulated gene with the smallest combined RP was S100P (combined RP = 335.94). In the gene ontology (GO) analysis, the most significantly enriched GO term was “immune system process” (P = 3.46 × 10?26). The most significant pathway identified in the pathway analysis was antigen processing and presentation (P = 8.40 × 10?5). The consistently DE genes in ankylosing spondylitis and biological pathways associated with those DE genes identified provide valuable information for studying the pathophysiology of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:25688367

  3. [Patient evaluation of the German version of the ASAS/EULAR recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Kiltz, U; Feldtkeller, E; Braun, J

    2008-12-01

    On the initiative of the ASAS (Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society) and EULAR (European League against Rheumatism), evidence-based recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) were drawn up, with healthcare professionals as the target group for these recommendations. To facilitate patient participation in the decision-making process with regard to their disease, and to further improve the doctor-patient relationship, the ASAS and EULAR are working on a patient-friendly version of the recommendations.In order to establish to what extent the ASAS/EULAR recommendations, as translated by German experts, can be understood by patients, the recommendations for health care professionals, together with an evaluation form, was distributed to 105 delegates of the German society for ankylosing spondylitis (Deutschen Vereinigung Morbus Bechterew, DVMB). Responders were questioned on text comprehension and their level of agreement (0: not agree at all to 10: fully agree). Space was also provided for additional comments.In total, 59 delegates filled out the questionnaire (rate of return: 56.2%). For recommendation Nos. 1, 2, 5, 6 and 7, text comprehension was moderate. On average, the recommendations were positively assessed with 8.38+/-1.9. Recommendation No. 4 (non-pharmacological therapy) was given the highest agreement (9.54+/-1.02), while recommendation No. 7 (corticosteroids, 6.54+/-2.55) received the lowest agreement. The acceptance of the recommendation was high with 87.9% questions answered.For the first time, the German expert translation of recommendations for the management of AS patients was evaluated by patients. The present translation met with broad approval. To minimize text comprehension problems, patients should be involved in compiling a future patient version. PMID:19011877

  4. Review of the costs of illness of ankylosing spondylitis and methodologic notes.

    PubMed

    Boonen, Annelies; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2005-04-01

    This article reviews the cost of illness of ankylosing spondylitis in the literature and identifies limitations of comparability of cost of illness studies. The literature was searched semisystematically for studies that aimed to assess the cost of illness of ankylosing spondylitis from the societal perspective. Studies were appraised for methods and results following a self-composed checklist. To compare the aggregated costs between the studies, adjustments for differential timing and purchasing power parities between the countries were applied. In total, 53 titles were retrieved by a MEDLINE search. Five articles reported on the costs of illness in four patient populations, one from the USA and three from Europe. All studies were prevalence studies with a bottom-up approach and reported direct and productivity costs. Patient characteristics differed with respect to sampling source, age, disease duration, presence of spondylitis-related comorbidity and employment status. Categories of resource use and costs were especially difficult to compare with regard to visits to types of healthcare providers and use of formal and informal help in relation to inability to perform unpaid work. In addition, not all studies reported the productivity costs based on human capital as well as the friction cost method. The cost per unit of resource use was only provided explicitly in one publication. Sensitivity analyses were usually not performed. Total 2002 costs based on the human capital approach varied between USD 7243 and 11,840, and productivity costs accounted for 53-73% of the total costs. Total 2002 costs based on the friction costs varied between USD 3353 and 3903, and productivity costs accounted for 15-26% of the total costs. Cost drivers of the direct costs varied among the studies. Physical functioning and/or disease activity were consistent determinants of total costs. In conclusion, between four bottom-up prevalence studies in ankylosing spondylitis from different countries, there were differences in characteristics of patients studied, inclusion of unpaid help and unpaid production loss in the costs and choice of human capital compared with the friction cost method to calculate the productivity costs. The absence of information of the unit-cost per resource hampers comparability. Overall, the ankylosing spondylitis-related costs of illness are substantial and the high costs of formal or informal help and work disability reflect the impact of the disease on physical functioning. PMID:19807572

  5. Airtraq® optical laryngoscope for tracheal intubation in patients with severe ankylosing spondylitis: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Qazi Ehsan; Amir, Syed Hussain; Siddiqui, Obaid Ahmed; Nadeem, Abu; Azhar, Abdulla Zoheb

    2012-01-01

    Airway management in patients of ankylosing spondylitis remains a challenge for anaesthesiologists. Many new airway devices have been used for securing airway in these patients. The Airtraq® optical laryngoscope is one of the new rigid laryngoscopes with a proximal view finder that reflects an image transferred from the distal tip of the blade through a series of lenses, prisms and mirrors. We report two cases of ankylosing spondylitis who were scheduled for total hip replacement and subtotal thyroidectomy and were successfully intubated using the Airtraq® laryngoscope. PMID:22701209

  6. Ultrasound features of shoulder involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) courses, shoulder involvement is common. However, etiologies of shoulder pain in patients with AS remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of ultrasound (US) abnormalities in shoulders of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and to determine predictive factors of ultrasound shoulder enthesitis. Methods 38 patients with AS were included with 38 age and sex-matched healthy controls. All patients fulfilled the modified New York criteria for ankylosing spondylitis. Clinical and demographical data were recorded. US examination of bilateral shoulders was performed by a musculoskeletal sonographer according to a defined protocol that included imaging of the insertions of supraspinatus, subscapularis and infraspinatus tendons, rotator cuff tendons, subacromial-subdeltoid bursa, acromioclavicular joint, and glenohumeral joint. Results The mean age of patients and controls was 36 years, each group of patients and controls comprised 22 men (57.9%) and 16 women (42.1%). Disease duration was 9.6?±?7.2 years. Among 38 patients with AS, 21 had coxitis (55%) and 19 had previous or current shoulder pain (50%). AS shoulders presented significantly more ultrasound enthesitis than controls shoulders (43 shoulders (56.6%) versus 8 shoulders (10.5%) respectively). Involvement of rotator cuff tendons was significantly higher in patients with AS compared with control subjects (16/38 (42.1%) versus 6 (15.2%) respectively). However, involvement of gleno-humeral and acromio-clavicular joints was infrequent in both groups. In patients with AS, we found that the presence of coxitis was the only significant predictive factors of shoulder enthesitis (Odds Ratio (OR)?=?9.4; Confidence interval (CI) 95% (1.10; 81.9), p?=?0.04). Conclusions Ultrasound abnormalities of shoulders are common in patients with AS, and the most frequent abnormalitie was enthesitis, which was associated with the presence of coxitis. PMID:24053556

  7. Cauda equina syndrome associated with multiple lumbar arachnoid cysts in ankylosing spondylitis: improvement following surgical therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, P J; Allcutt, D A; Bates, D; Crawford, P J

    1990-01-01

    A case of cauda equina syndrome with multiple lumbar arachnoid cysts complicating ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is described. The value of computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a non-invasive means of establishing the diagnosis is emphasised. In contrast to previously reported cases the patient showed neurological improvement following surgical therapy. Surgery may be indicated in some patients, particularly when there is nerve root compression by the arachnoid cysts and when the patient is seen early before irreversible damage to the cauda equina has occurred. Images PMID:2292702

  8. Corrective surgery for deformity of the upper cervical spine due to ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bin; Zhang, Bi; Li, Zhu-mei; Li, Qiu-sheng

    2014-01-01

    Rotational and flexion deformity of C1-C2 due to ankylosing spondylitis is rare. We did surgical correction in one such case by lateral release, resection of the posterior arch of C1 and mobilization of the vertebral arteries, wedge osteotomy of the lateral masses of C1 and internal fixation under general anesthesia. There were no vascular and neurological complications during the surgery. After operation the atlantoaxial rotational deformity was corrected and the normal cervical lordosis was restored. At 1 year followup his visual field and feeding became normal and internal fixation was stable. PMID:24741145

  9. Possible protective role of HLA-B*2706 for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ren, E C; Koh, W H; Sim, D; Boey, M L; Wee, G B; Chan, S H

    1997-01-01

    HLA-B27 is strongly associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) but the role of the HLA molecule itself is still unclear. In this study on Singapore Chinese, we have subtyped 50 B27 positive AS patients and 45 B27 positive normals and found that the B*2706 allele has a significant negative association with disease (p = 0.047). Together with recent data indicating the existence of AS "protective" B27 alleles, our data shows that the HLA molecule itself plays a crucial role in disease development. PMID:9027969

  10. Vasculitis and long standing ankylosing spondylitis in a patient with familial Mediterranean fever

    PubMed Central

    Taylan, Ali; Yildiz, Yasar; Sari, Ismail; Ozkok, Guliz

    2014-01-01

    Coexistence of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and other inflammatory disorders has been frequently reported, but no specific underlying factor has been identified. We report a patient with FMF who is presented with long-standing ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and cutaneous leukocytoklastic vasculitis (LV) of the lower limbs. It is the first report on combination of FMF with AS and LV. The Mediterranean Fever (MEFV) gene mutation of heterozygote (R202Q/R726A) and HLA-B27 are detected in this case, and are believed to form genetic susceptibility to LV. PMID:25538787

  11. Trial and error in producing ankylosing-spondylitis-selective antisera according to Andrew Geczy.

    PubMed

    Beukelman, C J; Quarles van Ufford, H C; van Bree, F P; Aerts, P C; Nieuwenhoff, C; Reerink, G; van Leeuwen, A; van Dijk, H

    1990-01-01

    Geczy found that rabbit sera raised against Klebsiella strain K43 cross-reacted with the cells from HLA-B27 positive patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Other laboratories failed to reproduce these results. After a series of unsuccessful attempts, however, we managed to prepare one selective antiserum, using E. coli, isolated from a Dutch Bechterew patient, in offspring of rabbits Geczy sent us. Ever since we obtained irreproducible results only. This paper reports about the many attempts we have made to produce a discriminating antiserum for use in a combined vital stain and dye-exclusion assay. PMID:2259890

  12. Serum melatonin level in ankylosing spondylitis: is it increased in active disease?

    PubMed

    Senna, Mohammad Kamal; Olama, Shereen Mohamed; El-Arman, Mohammad

    2012-11-01

    In the recent years, the role of melatonin (MLT) in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis has been investigated, and the serum levels of MLT have been evaluated, but clinical study concerning MLT and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is little reported in literature. We aimed to investigate the serum levels of MLT and their relation with the disease activity parameters of patients with AS. Forty AS patients and 40 healthy controls (matched for age and sex with the patients) participated in this study. Demographic and clinical data were collected and assessed. Disease activity of AS patients was assessed clinically according to the Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), while AS functional impairment was assessed using the Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI). Serum samples were collected from all subjects to evaluate serum MLT, ESR, and CRP. Serum MLT levels were significantly increased in AS patients as compared to healthy controls (95% CI: 4.63, 8.77, P < 0.001). ESR and CRP are significantly higher in the AS patients compared with the controls (P < 0.001). AS patients with active disease had significantly higher ESR (P = 0.0151), CRP (P = 0.0124), and BASFI (P = 0.0016). Also, the MLT serum level in AS patients with BASDAI ?40 was 39.7 ± 6.2 pg/ml compared with 35.2 ± 3.5 pg/ml in AS patients with BASDAI <40 (95% CI: 1.22, 7.78, P = 0.0106). Also, serum MLT level was significantly higher in the AS patients with enthesopathy than those without enthesopathy. Serum MLT levels were correlated with the duration of morning stiffness, BASDAI, BASFI, and CRP but not with ESR or duration of the disease. Serum levels of MLT were significantly increased in AS patients as compared to healthy controls. MLT levels correlated positively with BASDAI, BASFI, duration of morning stiffness, and CRP levels. Thus, it seems that MLT levels reflect the disease activity in AS patients. PMID:22057142

  13. Increased expression of carbonic anhydrase I in the synovium of patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background One of the most distinctive features of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is new bone formation and bone resorption at sites of chronic inflammation. Previous studies have indicated that the hyperplasia and inflammation of synovial tissues are significantly related to the pathogenic process of AS. The present study used a proteomic approach to identify novel AS-specific proteins by simultaneously comparing the expression profiles of synovial membranes from patients with AS, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Synovial tissues were collected from the hip joints of patients with AS and knee joints of patients with RA or OA (n = 10 for each disease) during joint replacement surgery. Proteins extracted from the synovial tissues were separated by 2-D electrophoresis (2-DE), and the proteins with significantly increased expression in the AS samples were subjected to MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS analysis. The results were verified using western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Levels of the candidate proteins in synovial fluids from knee joints (n = 40 for each disease) were measured using ELISA. Results The proteomic approach revealed significantly increased expression of carbonic anhydrase I (CA1) in the synovial membrane of patients with AS as compared with the RA and OA tissue samples. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting analysis confirmed the findings described above. The ELISA detected a higher level of CA1 in synovial fluids from patients with AS than those with OA. The mean value of the CA1 level was also higher in AS patients as compared with RA patients. This study also detected increased expression of alpha-1-antitrypsin in the synovial tissues from AS patients, which is in agreement with other reports. Conclusion In vitro experiments by other groups indicated that CA1 catalyzes the generation of HCO3- through the hydration of CO2, which then combines with Ca2+ to form a CaCO3 precipitate. Calcification is an essential step of bone formation. Substantial evidence indicates that carbonic anhydrase also stimulates bone resorption. Hence, overexpression of CA1 in the synovial tissues of AS patients may promote improper calcification and bone resorption in AS. PMID:21143847

  14. Improved precision of syndesmophyte measurement for the evaluation of ankylosing spondylitis using CT: a phantom and patient study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sovira Tan; Jianhua Yao; Lawrence Yao; Michael M Ward

    2012-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a disease characterized by abnormal bone formation (syndesmophyte) at the margins of inter-vertebral disc spaces. Syndesmophyte growth is currently typically monitored by the visual inspection of radiographs. The limitations inherent to the modality (2D projection of a 3D object) and rater (qualitative human judgment) may compromise sensitivity. With newly available treatments, more precise measures of syndesmophytes are

  15. Assessment of radiographic progression in the spines of patients with ankylosing spondylitis treated with adalimumab for up to 2 years

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Désirée van der Heijde; David Salonen; Barbara N Weissman; Robert Landewé; Walter P Maksymowych; Hartmut Kupper; Shaila Ballal; Eric Gibson; Robert Wong

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic rheumatic disease associated with spinal inflammation that subsequently leads to progression of structural damage and loss of function. The fully human anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) antibody adalimumab reduces the signs and symptoms and improves overall quality of life in patients with active AS; these benefits have been maintained through 2 years of treatment.

  16. Association of 1.25 vitamin D 3 deficiency, disease activity and low bone mass in ankylosing spondylitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    U. Lange; J. Teichmann; J. Strunk; U. Müller-Ladner; K. L. Schmidt

    2005-01-01

    Vertebral fractures due to osteoporosis are a common but frequently unrecognized complication in established ankylosing spondylitis (AS). It is known that inflammatory activity in rheumatic diseases (i.e., proinflammatory cytokines) itself plays a possible role in the pathophysiology of bone loss. The aim of this study was to analyze whether inflammatory activity and an alteration of the vitamin D metabolism play

  17. Evaluation of the incidence of haemorrhoidal disease in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Caglayan, Mehmet; Türko?lu, Ahmet; Oktayoglu, Pelin; Y?ld?z, Mehmet; Da?l?, Abdullah Zübeyir; Böyük, Abdullah; Em, Serda; Bozkurt, Mehtap; Nas, Kemal

    2015-03-01

    Haemorrhoidal disease (HD) is one of the most common diseases encountered by the clinicians of general surgery. Chronic constipation, pushing during defecation and increased abdominal pressure play an important role in development of haemorrhoidal disease. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) frequently use the Valsalva manoeuvre in their daily lives, which may increase the abdominal pressure, leading to formation of haemorrhoids. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of haemorrhoidal disease in patients with AS. A total of 221 individuals were included in this study in three groups as follows: 72 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 75 patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) and 74 healthy control subjects. Patients were examined both physically and anoscopically, and their histories were taken. The incidence of HD was 45.8% in patients with AS, 16% in patients with chronic LBP and 9.5% in healthy control subjects. The incidence of HD was significantly higher in patients with AS compared to the other groups. Patients with AS have a high incidence of HD, which should be taken into consideration by clinicians during routine examination of these patients. PMID:24985040

  18. Whole Genome Expression Profiling and Signal Pathway Screening of MSCs in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuxi; Wang, Peng; Xie, Zhongyu; Huang, Lin; Yang, Rui; Gao, Liangbin; Tang, Yong; Zhang, Xin; Ye, Jichao; Chen, Keng; Cai, Zhaopeng; Wu, Yanfeng; Shen, Huiyong

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of dysfunctional immunoregulation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is thought to be a complex process that involves multiple genetic alterations. In this study, MSCs derived from both healthy donors and AS patients were cultured in normal media or media mimicking an inflammatory environment. Whole genome expression profiling analysis of 33,351 genes was performed and differentially expressed genes related to AS were analyzed by GO term analysis and KEGG pathway analysis. Our results showed that in normal media 676 genes were differentially expressed in AS, 354 upregulated and 322 downregulated, while in an inflammatory environment 1767 genes were differentially expressed in AS, 1230 upregulated and 537 downregulated. GO analysis showed that these genes were mainly related to cellular processes, physiological processes, biological regulation, regulation of biological processes, and binding. In addition, by KEGG pathway analysis, 14 key genes from the MAPK signaling and 8 key genes from the TLR signaling pathway were identified as differentially regulated. The results of qRT-PCR verified the expression variation of the 9 genes mentioned above. Our study found that in an inflammatory environment ankylosing spondylitis pathogenesis may be related to activation of the MAPK and TLR signaling pathways. PMID:25544849

  19. Core set of recommendations for patients with ankylosing spondylitis concerning behaviour and environmental adaptations.

    PubMed

    Feldtkeller, Ernst; Lind-Albrecht, Gudrun; Rudwaleit, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Advice concerning behaviour and adaptations of living and working environment is considered an unmet need by patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The aim of this study was to develop a core set of recommendations to be given to patients by their rheumatologists. A systematic literature research of scientific and patient-oriented literature revealed 70 raw recommendations. These recommendations were evaluated and ranked at a meeting of the Ankylosing Spondylitis International Federation (ASIF, 26 participants including 19 patients with AS, 5 rheumatologists and 2 physiotherapists from 13 countries) in November 2011. Thereafter, the 59 remaining recommendations were extensively discussed, supplemented, reworded, condensed and voted on during a meeting of local branch leaders of the AS patient organisation in Germany (Deutsche Vereinigung Morbus Bechterew, DVMB) with 80 participants (95 % of whom with AS), 2 rheumatologists and 1 occupational therapist in March 2012. The core set of final recommendations comprises (1) a general statement regarding living with AS which was considered highly important by patients and (2) the following domains: sitting position, walking, sleeping, at work, exercises, sports and recreational activities, diet and lifestyle, sexuality and pregnancy, fall prevention, car driving and advantages of membership in an AS-specific patient organisation. Most recommendations are relevant already in early disease, others concern advanced AS (e.g. fall prevention and car driving). The selected recommendations received high agreements (80-100 %). A first core set of recommendations for the behaviour and environmental adaptations of patients with AS was established under participation of many patients. PMID:23539272

  20. Performance of ultrasound to monitor Achilles enthesitis in patients with ankylosing spondylitis during TNF-a antagonist therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong-Hua; Feng, Yuan; Ren, Zhen; Yang, Xichao; Jia, Jun-Feng; Rong, Meng-Yao; Li, Xue-Yi; Wu, Zhen-Biao

    2015-06-01

    Enthesitis is considered as the primary anatomical lesion in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We aimed to investigate the potential of ultrasound to detect early changes after TNF-a antagonist therapy of Achilles enthesitis of AS patients. One hundred AS patients with active disease, requiring TNF-a antagonist therapy, were included (etanercept n?=?25, infliximab n?=?25, adalimumab n?=?25, non-biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) n?=?25). Physical examination was performed to evaluate disease activity and detect Achilles enthesitis and/or retrocalcaneal bursitis. Ultrasound of the Achilles enthesitis was performed bilaterally. Follow-up examinations were performed 3 months after the initiation of therapy. Gray scale (GS) scores, Power Doppler (PD) scores, and total additive scores (TS) decreased significantly during TNF-a antagonist therapy but not in traditional non-biologic traditional DMARDs group. The bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI), bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index (BASMI), bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI), and Maastricht ankylosing spondylitis enthesitis score (MASES) all showed significant improvements. When three different TNF-a antagonists were analyzed separately, no significant difference was observed in GS, PD, and total scores. Subclinical Achilles enthesitis, detected only with GS ultrasound, is present in a subset of AS patients and a significant improvement can be demonstrated after 3 months of TNF-a antagonist therapy. Doppler ultrasound provides a reliable estimation to monitor the therapeutic response to TNF antagonists in AS patients with Achilles enthesitis. TNF-a antagonists have been shown to be effective in decreasing ultrasound signs of enthesitis after 3 months of therapy in AS patients. PMID:25896532

  1. Circulating cytotoxic CD8(+) CD28(-) T cells in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Michael; Goldberger, Christian; Würzner, Reinhard; Duftner, Christina; Pfeiffer, Karl-P; Clausen, Johannes; Neumayr, Günther; Falkenbach, Albrecht

    2002-01-01

    Circulating CD8(+) CD28(-) T cells were found to be expanded more in patients with ankylosing spondylitis than in an age-matched healthy population (41.2 +/- 17.7% versus 18.6 +/- 7.6%). The level of CD8(+)CD28(-) T cells was dependent on the disease status, but was independent of age. Most of the CD8(+) CD28(-) T cells produced perforin after stimulation in vitro, in contrast to their CD8(+)CD28(+) counterparts. From the clinical perspective, the percentage of the cytotoxic CD8(+) CD28(-) T cells reflected a more severe course of disease, as it correlated with distinct movement restrictions, as well as the metrology score summarizing cervical rotation (in sitting position), chin-to-jugulum distance, thoracic Schober, chest expansion, and fingers-to-floor distance (P = 0.032). PMID:11879540

  2. Circulating cytotoxic CD8+ CD28- T cells in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, Michael; Goldberger, Christian; Würzner, Reinhard; Duftner, Christina; Pfeiffer, Karl-P; Clausen, Johannes; Neumayr, Günther; Falkenbach, Albrecht

    2002-01-01

    Circulating CD8+ CD28- T cells were found to be expanded more in patients with ankylosing spondylitis than in an age-matched healthy population (41.2 ± 17.7% versus 18.6 ± 7.6%). The level of CD8+CD28- T cells was dependent on the disease status, but was independent of age. Most of the CD8+ CD28- T cells produced perforin after stimulation in vitro, in contrast to their CD8+CD28+ counterparts. From the clinical perspective, the percentage of the cytotoxic CD8+ CD28- T cells reflected a more severe course of disease, as it correlated with distinct movement restrictions, as well as the metrology score summarizing cervical rotation (in sitting position), chin-to-jugulum distance, thoracic Schober, chest expansion, and fingers-to-floor distance (P = 0.032). PMID:11879540

  3. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes against disease-associated determinant(s) in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes, induced by stimulating the PBMC of an HLA-B27+ normal individual (B27+, AS-) with the PBMC of an HLA-identical sibling suffering from ankylosing spondylitis (AS) (B27+, AS+), specifically lyse B27+, AS+ PBMC but not PBMC from HLA-27+ or B27-, AS- normal controls, or from HLA-B27- AS patients (B27-,AS+). CTL of similar specificity can also be raised by immunizing in vitro B27+,AS- cells with autologous cells modified by cross-reactive bacterial antigens. These results suggest that CTL can recognize certain bacterial antigens in association with HLA-B27 and that this interaction may lead to an inflammatory episode during the initial stages of the disease. PMID:3528379

  4. Absence of impaired lymphocyte transformation to Klebsiella spp. in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kinsella, T D; Lanteigne, C; Fritzler, M J; Lewkonia, R M

    1984-01-01

    We have evaluated claims that impaired peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) transformation can occur with Klebsiella spp. in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). PBL of four AS patients were cultured in vitro with autogenous faecal klebsiella, as were the PBL of age (+/- 3 years) and sex-matched pairs of 15-20 AS and normal controls cultured with heterogeneous AS-derived klebsiella and control bacterial isolates. Three of four AS patients responded to their own isolates, and no significant differences were found between the matched pairs in response to heterogeneous klebsiella isolates, including K21. Our studies did not show impaired PBL transformation with klebsiella in AS and therefore do not support claims of antigenic cross-reactivity between klebsiella and HLA-B27. PMID:6332581

  5. Airway management in cervical spine ankylosing spondylitis: Between a rock and a hard place.

    PubMed

    Eipe, Naveen; Fossey, Susan; Kingwell, Stephen P

    2013-11-01

    We report the perioperative course of a patient with long standing ankylosing spondylitis with severe dysphagia due to large anterior cervical syndesmophytes at the level of the epiglottis. He was scheduled to undergo anterior cervical decompression and the surgical approach possibly precluded an elective pre-operative tracheostomy. We performed a modified awake fibreoptic nasal intubation through a split nasopharyngeal airway while adequate oxygenation was ensured through a modified nasal trumpet inserted in the other nares. We discuss the role of nasal intubations and the use of both the modified nasopharyngeal airways we used to facilitate tracheal intubation. This modified nasal fibreoptic intubation technique could find the application in other patients with cervical spine abnormalities and in other anticipated difficult airways. PMID:24403620

  6. rs10865331 Associated with Susceptibility and Disease Severity of Ankylosing Spondylitis in a Taiwanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Hung-Yi; Wong, Henry Sung-Ching; Wong, Ruey-Hong; Ikegawa, Shiro; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a highly familial rheumatic disorder and is considered as a chronic inflammatory disease. Genetic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of AS. To identify genes which render people susceptible to AS in a Taiwanese population, we selected six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) which were associated with AS in European descendants and Han Chinese. To assess whether the six SNPs contributed to AS susceptibility and severity in Taiwanese population, 475 AS patients fulfilling the modified New York Criteria and 527 healthy subjects were recruited. We found that rs10865331 was significantly associated with AS susceptibility and with Bath AS Function Index (BASFI). The AA and AG genotypes of rs10865331 were also significantly associated with a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Our findings provided evidence that rs10865331 is associated AS susceptibility and with disease activity (BASFI) in a Taiwanese population. PMID:25184745

  7. Hyperplasia of the coronoid process in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (Bechterew disease).

    PubMed

    Wenghoefer, Matthias; Martini, Markus; Allam, Jean-Piere; Novak, Natalja; Reich, Rudolf; Bergé, Stefaan J

    2008-07-01

    Although involvement of the temporomandibular joint in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS, Bechterew disease) has been described previously, hyperplasia of the mandibular coronoid process in those patients has not been reported yet. Case notes were studied, and records were made of age, sex, clinical symptoms, radiography, and treatment in all patients with a confirmed diagnosis of coronoid hyperplasia presenting at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Bonn, between 1995 and 2007. Sixteen cases of coronoid hyperplasia were recruited, of which 12 were bilateral and 4 were unilateral. Four patients had AS, 3 of them were HLA-B27-positive. Temporomandibular joint symptoms are frequently seen in patients with AS. Nevertheless, it must be considered that a limitation of jaw mobility in those patients might also be caused by an elongation of the mandibular coronoid process. PMID:18650743

  8. Bilateral Alloplastic Prostheses for Temporomandibular Joint Reconstruction in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira-Neto, Patrício Jose; Marchiori, Erica Cristina; de Almeida Lopes, Maria Candida; Moreira, Roger William Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) or Bechterew disease is a chronic, usually progressive, systemic inflammatory joint disease, which predominantly affects the spine and sacroiliac joints. In these joints, early inflammatory changes are followed by lumbosacral pain and progressive restriction of spinal movement associated with radiologically visible intervertebral ossification. Peripheral joint involvement occurs in 10 to 30% of patients and shows a predilection for the shoulders, knees, ankles, feet, and wrists. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement has been described, and its reported frequency varies from 11 to 35%. However, ankylosis is uncommon with a single documented case utilizing an alloplastic prosthesis for total joint replacement. A case report of bilateral ankylosis of the jaw treated with alloplastic prostheses for total TMJ replacement using a Brazilian system in a patient with AS is presented. PMID:25050151

  9. Bilateral alloplastic prostheses for temporomandibular joint reconstruction in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira-Neto, Patrício Jose; Marchiori, Erica Cristina; de Almeida Lopes, Maria Candida; Moreira, Roger William Fernandes

    2014-06-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) or Bechterew disease is a chronic, usually progressive, systemic inflammatory joint disease, which predominantly affects the spine and sacroiliac joints. In these joints, early inflammatory changes are followed by lumbosacral pain and progressive restriction of spinal movement associated with radiologically visible intervertebral ossification. Peripheral joint involvement occurs in 10 to 30% of patients and shows a predilection for the shoulders, knees, ankles, feet, and wrists. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement has been described, and its reported frequency varies from 11 to 35%. However, ankylosis is uncommon with a single documented case utilizing an alloplastic prosthesis for total joint replacement. A case report of bilateral ankylosis of the jaw treated with alloplastic prostheses for total TMJ replacement using a Brazilian system in a patient with AS is presented. PMID:25050151

  10. Blind confirmation in Leiden of Geczy factor on the cells of Dutch patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    SciTech Connect

    Geczy, A.F.; van Leeuwen, A.; van Rood, J.J.; Ivanyi, P.; Breur, B.S.; Cats, A.

    1986-11-01

    A follow-up blind study, of the ability of cross-reactive antisera to distinguish between the cells of Dutch patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and normal controls, was performed in Leiden. Of the 45 cell samples tested, 29 were fresh peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells while 15 were cryopreserved PBM. No false positives but one false negative was identified among the 45 samples, and the negative was confirmed after the recoded cryopreserved cells from this patient were retested. It is concluded that the cross-reactive antisera raised in Sydney give good discrimination between patients and normals. Factors affecting the success of the /sup 51/Cr-release cytotoxicity assay, and possible reasons for the failure of others to confirm these observations, are briefly discussed.

  11. Between adaptive and innate immunity: TLR4-mediated perforin production by CD28null T-helper cells in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Raffeiner, Bernd; Dejaco, Christian; Duftner, Christina; Kullich, Werner; Goldberger, Christian; Vega, Sandra C; Keller, Michael; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix; Schirmer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    CD3+CD4+CD28null and CD3+CD8+CD28null T cells are enriched in patients with immune-mediated diseases compared with healthy controls. This study shows that CD4+CD28null T cells express Toll-like receptors recognizing bacterial lipopolysaccharides in ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. In ankylosing spondylitis, TLR4 (23.1 ± 21.9%) and, to a smaller extent, TLR2 (4.1 ± 5.8%) were expressed on CD4+CD28null T cells, whereas expression was negligible on CD4+CD28+ and CD8+ T cells. CD4+CD28null T cells produced perforin upon stimulation with lipopolysaccharide, and this effect was enhanced by autologous serum or recombinant soluble CD14. Perforin production could be prevented with blocking antibodies directed against CD14 or TLR4. Incubation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with tumour necrosis factor alpha led to an upregulation of TLR4 and TLR2 on CD4+CD28null T cells in vitro, and treatment of patients with antibodies specifically directed against tumour necrosis factor alpha resulted in decreased expression of TLR4 and TLR2 on CD4+CD28null T cells in vivo. We describe here a new pathway for direct activation of cytotoxic CD4+ T cells by components of infectious pathogens. This finding supports the hypothesis that CD4+CD28null T cells represent an immunological link between the innate immune system and the adaptive immune system. PMID:16277694

  12. The genetic basis of ankylosing spondylitis: new insights into disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Florence WL; Tsui, Hing Wo; Akram, Ali; Haroon, Nigil; Inman, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a complex disease involving multiple risk factors, both genetic and environmental. AS patients are predominantly young men, and the disease is characterized by inflammation and ankylosis, mainly at the cartilage–bone interface and enthesis. HLA-B27 has been known to be the major AS-susceptibility gene for more than 40 years. Despite advances made in the past few years, progress in the search for non-human leukocyte antigen susceptibility genes has been hampered by the heterogeneity of the disease. Compared to other complex diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), fewer susceptibility loci have been identified in AS. Furthermore, non-major histocompatibility-complex susceptibility loci discovered, such as ERAP1 and IL23R, are likely contributors to joint inflammation. Identification and confirmation of functional variants remains a significant challenge of investigations involving genome-wide association studies (GWAS). It remains unclear why none of the AS-susceptibility genes identified in GWAS appear to be directly involved in the ankylosing process. Numerous reviews have recently been published on the genetics of AS. Therefore, aside from a brief summary of what AS GWAS has successfully achieved thus far, this review will focus on directions that could address unanswered questions raised by GWAS. PMID:24971029

  13. Prevalence, clinical relevance and characterization of circulating cytotoxic CD4+CD28- T cells in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Duftner, Christina; Goldberger, Christian; Falkenbach, Albrecht; Würzner, Reinhard; Falkensammer, Barbara; Pfeiffer, Karl P; Maerker-Hermann, Elisabeth; Schirmer, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Circulating CD3+CD4+CD28- cells exhibit reduced apoptosis and were found to be more enriched in patients with ankylosing spondylitis than in age-matched healthy control individuals (7.40 +/- 6.6% versus 1.03 +/- 1.0%; P < 0.001). Levels of CD4+CD28- T cells correlate with disease status as measured using a modified metrology score, but they are independent of age and duration of ankylosing spondylitis. CD4+CD28- T cells produce IFN-gamma and perforin, and thus they must be considered proinflammatory and cytotoxic. These T cells share phenotypic and functional properties of natural killer cells, strongly expressing CD57 but lacking the lymphocyte marker CD7. MHC class I recognizing and activating natural killer cell receptors on the surface of CD4+CD28- T cells may be involved in a HLA-B27 mediated co-stimulation of these proinflammatory and cytotoxic cells. PMID:12932293

  14. Prevalence, clinical relevance and characterization of circulating cytotoxic CD4+CD28- T cells in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Duftner, Christina; Goldberger, Christian; Falkenbach, Albrecht; Würzner, Reinhard; Falkensammer, Barbara; Pfeiffer, Karl P; Maerker-Hermann, Elisabeth; Schirmer, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Circulating CD3+CD4+CD28- cells exhibit reduced apoptosis and were found to be more enriched in patients with ankylosing spondylitis than in age-matched healthy control individuals (7.40 ± 6.6% versus 1.03 ± 1.0%; P < 0.001). Levels of CD4+CD28- T cells correlate with disease status as measured using a modified metrology score, but they are independent of age and duration of ankylosing spondylitis. CD4+CD28- T cells produce IFN-? and perforin, and thus they must be considered proinflammatory and cytotoxic. These T cells share phenotypic and functional properties of natural killer cells, strongly expressing CD57 but lacking the lymphocyte marker CD7. MHC class I recognizing and activating natural killer cell receptors on the surface of CD4+CD28- T cells may be involved in a HLA-B27 mediated co-stimulation of these proinflammatory and cytotoxic cells. PMID:12932293

  15. Thoracic Fracture through a Prior Instrumented Arthrodesis in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis without Hardware Loosening: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Saldua, Nelson S.; Harrop, James S.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this article is to report a case of a patient with ankylosing spondylitis who sustained a fracture through a prior solid arthrodesis without loosening or changing posterior instrumentation. There have been few cases reported of a patient with ankylosing spondylitis suffering a fracture through a prior instrumented arthrodesis. None have noted the instrumentation remaining intact with the fracture through the middle of the construct. The surgeon must be aware of this possibility to avoid spinal instability that may lead to a neurological deficit. We retrospectively reviewed the case. A review of the literature was performed through a PubMed search. A patient was found to have a fracture within a prior construct despite the presence of a posterior instrumentation. The mechanism of failure was a three-column spine fracture with “bending” of the rods. This patient was treated with a revision posterior/anterior instrumentation and fusion with placement of larger-diameter rods for added stiffness. Fractures through a prior instrumented arthrodesis are rare but still can occur in the ankylosing spondylitis patient. Given the higher risk of epidural hematoma and neurological compromise in this patient population, the surgeon must keep this on the differential diagnosis when treating patients with a prior instrumented arthrodesis. PMID:24353934

  16. Ankylosing spondylitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... stiff and painful include: The joints between your ribs and breastbone, so that you cannot expand your chest fully Swelling and pain in the joints of the shoulders, knees and ankles Swelling of the eye Fatigue is also a common symptom. Less common ...

  17. Ankylosing Spondylitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as women to be in that group. The study also found that current smokers were more than four times as likely to have severe damage as nonsmokers, and that having a genetic marker called DRB1*0801 seemed to protect against severe ... addition to the studies mentioned above, research has focused on finding the ...

  18. The Cost of Ankylosing Spondylitis in the UK Using Linked Routine and Patient-Reported Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    Cooksey, Roxanne; Husain, Muhammad J.; Brophy, Sinead; Davies, Helen; Rahman, Muhammad A.; Atkinson, Mark D.; Phillips, Ceri J.; Siebert, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis which typically begins in early adulthood and impacts on healthcare resource utilisation and the ability to work. Previous studies examining the cost of AS have relied on patient-reported questionnaires based on recall. This study uses a combination of patient-reported and linked-routine data to examine the cost of AS in Wales, UK. Methods Participants in an existing AS cohort study (n = 570) completed questionnaires regarding work status, out-of-pocket expenses, visits to health professionals and disease severity. Participants gave consent for their data to be linked to routine primary and secondary care clinical datasets. Health resource costs were calculated using a bottom-up micro-costing approach. Human capital costs methods were used to estimate work productivity loss costs, particularly relating to work and early retirement. Regression analyses were used to account for age, gender, disease activity. Results The total cost of AS in the UK is estimated at £19016 per patient per year, calculated to include GP attendance, administration costs and hospital costs derived from routine data records, plus patient-reported non-NHS costs, out-of-pocket AS-related expenses, early retirement, absenteeism, presenteeism and unpaid assistance costs. The majority of the cost (>80%) was as a result of work-related costs. Conclusion The major cost of AS is as a result of loss of working hours, early retirement and unpaid carer’s time. Therefore, much of AS costs are hidden and not easy to quantify. Functional impairment is the main factor associated with increased cost of AS. Interventions which keep people in work to retirement age and reduce functional impairment would have the greatest impact on reducing costs of AS. The combination of patient-reported and linked routine data significantly enhanced the health economic analysis and this methodology that can be applied to other chronic conditions. PMID:26185984

  19. Biomarkers for diagnosis, monitoring of progression, and treatment responses in ankylosing spondylitis and axial spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    With the growing awareness of the impact of chronic back pain and axial spondyloarthritis and recent breakthroughs in genetics and the development of novel treatments which may impact best on early disease, the need for markers that can facilitate early diagnosis and profiling those individuals at the highest risk for a bad outcome has never been greater. The genetic basis of ankylosing spondylitis has been considerably advanced, and HLA-B27 testing has a role in the diagnosis. Knowledge is still incomplete of the rest of the genetic contribution to disease susceptibility, and it is likely premature to use extensive genetic testing (other than HLA-B27) for diagnosis. Serum and plasma biomarkers have been examined extensively in assessing disease activity, treatment response, and as predictors or radiographic severity. For assessing disease activity, other than C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, the most work has been in examining cytokines (particularly interleukin 17 and 23), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) markers (particularly MMP3). For assessing those at the highest risk for radiographic progression, biomarkers of bony metabolism, cartilage and connective tissue degradation products, and adipokines have been most extensively assessed. The problem is that no individual biomarkers has been reproducibly shown to assess disease activity or predict outcome, and this area still remains an unmet need, of relevance to industry stakeholders, to regulatory bodies, to the healthcare system, to academic investigators, and finally to patients and providers. PMID:25939520

  20. Computer Aided Evaluation of Ankylosing Spondylitis Using High-Resolution CT

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianhua; Ward, Michael M.; Yao, Lawrence; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-01-01

    Ankylosing Spondylitis is a disease characterized by abnormal bone structures (syndesmophytes) growing at intervertebral disk spaces. Because this growth is so slow as to be undetectable on plain radiographs taken over years, it is desirable to resort to computerized techniques to complement qualitative human judgment with precise quantitative measures. We developed an algorithm with minimal user intervention that provides such measures using high-resolution computed tomography (CT) images. To the best of our knowledge it is the first time that determination of the disease’s status is attempted by direct measurement of the syndesmophytes. The first part of our algorithm segments the whole vertebral body using a 3-D multiscale cascade of successive level sets. The second part extracts the continuous ridgeline of the vertebral body where syndesmophytes are located. For that we designed a novel level set implementation capable of evolving on the isosurface of an object represented by a triangular mesh using curvature features. The third part of the algorithm segments the syndesmophytes from the vertebral body using local cutting planes and quantitates them. We present experimental work done with 10 patients from each of which we processed five vertebrae. The results of our algorithm were validated by comparison with a semi-quantitative evaluation made by a medical expert who visually inspected the CT scans. Correlation between the two evaluations was found to be 0.936 (p < 10?18). PMID:18779065

  1. Effects of icariin on cytokine-induced ankylosing spondylitis with fibroblastic osteogenesis and its molecular mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chunrong; Liu, Hongxiao; Li, Min; Wu, Zhikui; Feng, Xinghua

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effects of icariin on cytokine induced ankylosing spondylitis fibroblast osteogenesis type expression and its molecular mechanism. The normal fibroblasts were collected as normal control group, and the fibroblasts of hip joint capsule of AS patients were collected, which were respectively added in fetal bovine serum (group AS), fetal bovine serum and cytokines (BMP-2+TGF-beta 1) (group AS), and cell factor solution (icariin group), and observed of the osteogenic expression of fibroblast, to evaluate the impact of Icariin on it. The ALP activity, the content of collagen, osteocalcin content and cbfa1mRNA and OCmRNA of fibroblast of AS group increased compared to the normal control group and AS control group (P < 0.01), indicating that icariin can significantly inhibit the above changes (P < 0.01). Icariin can inhibit fibroblast further osteogenic differentiation through inhibiting the effect of cytokines on the fibroblast osteogenesis type markers and osteogenic gene expression and osteogenic differentiation. PMID:25674296

  2. Effects of icariin on cytokine-induced ankylosing spondylitis with fibroblastic osteogenesis and its molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chunrong; Liu, Hongxiao; Li, Min; Wu, Zhikui; Feng, Xinghua

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effects of icariin on cytokine induced ankylosing spondylitis fibroblast osteogenesis type expression and its molecular mechanism. The normal fibroblasts were collected as normal control group, and the fibroblasts of hip joint capsule of AS patients were collected, which were respectively added in fetal bovine serum (group AS), fetal bovine serum and cytokines (BMP-2+TGF-beta 1) (group AS), and cell factor solution (icariin group), and observed of the osteogenic expression of fibroblast, to evaluate the impact of Icariin on it. The ALP activity, the content of collagen, osteocalcin content and cbfa1mRNA and OCmRNA of fibroblast of AS group increased compared to the normal control group and AS control group (P < 0.01), indicating that icariin can significantly inhibit the above changes (P < 0.01). Icariin can inhibit fibroblast further osteogenic differentiation through inhibiting the effect of cytokines on the fibroblast osteogenesis type markers and osteogenic gene expression and osteogenic differentiation. PMID:25674296

  3. Predictors of Switching Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Therapy in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Won; Kang, Ji-Hyoun; Yim, Yi-Rang; Kim, Ji-Eun; Wen, Lihui; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Park, Dong-Jin; Kim, Tae-Jong; Park, Yong-Wook; Lee, Shin-Seok

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential predictors of switching tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? inhibitors in Korean patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The patients who had been treated with TNF-? inhibitors were divided into two groups depending on whether they had switched TNF-? inhibitors. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and treatment data at the time of initiation of TNF-? inhibitor treatment were compared between switchers and non-switchers, and within switchers according to the reasons for switching. Of the 269 patients, 70 (23%) had switched TNF-? inhibitors once; of these, 11 switched again. The median follow-up time was 52.7 months. Three- and five-year drug survival rates were 52%/48% for infliximab, 62%/42% for etanercept, and 71%/51% for adalimumab, respectively. Switchers were more likely to be prescribed disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs than non-switchers. A history of joint surgery and complete ankylosis of the sacroiliac joint was more frequent in switchers. Multivariate Cox’s proportional hazard analysis showed that the use of adalimumab as the first TNF-? inhibitor was less likely to lead to switching and complete ankylosis of the sacroiliac joints was more likely to lead to switching. The principal reasons for switching were drug inefficacy and adverse events, but the differences in the clinical data of these two groups of switchers were not significant. In AS patients who are candidates for TNF-? inhibitor therapy, switching may improve the therapeutic outcome based on clinical information. PMID:26176701

  4. A polymorphism in ERAP1 is associated with susceptibility to ankylosing spondylitis in a Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Muhammet; Akar, Hatice; Yilmaz, Sedat; Simsek, Ismail; Karkucak, Mutlu; Sagkan, Rahsan Il?kci; Pekel, Aysel; Erdem, Hakan; Avci, Ismail Yasar; Acikel, Cengizhan; Musabak, Ugur; Tunca, Yusuf; Pay, Salih

    2013-11-01

    We assessed the role played by the ERAP1 gene in Turkish patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in terms of disease susceptibility, clinical manifestations, and disease severity. We included 150 consecutive AS patients who met the modified New York classification criteria and 150 healthy controls. We documented the presence of 10 ERAP1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and HLA-B27 in these patients. ERAP1 SNPs were genotyped using competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. Differences between genotype and allele frequencies were compared using the Pearson's Chi-square test. The associations between ERAP1 SNPs, on the one hand, and with disease severity and clinical findings, on the other, were determined. One SNP, rs26653, was significantly associated with AS susceptibility (OR 1.609, 95% CI 1.163-2.226; p = 0.004). The population-attributable risk of possession of the rs26653 SNP allele was 23.4%. No relationship was noted between HLA-B27 positivity and the distribution of rs26653 genotype frequency. No associations were seen between disease severity measures and clinical manifestations of AS. In summary, an ERAP1 polymorphism was associated with AS in a Turkish population. The contributions of HLA-B27 and the rs26653 SNP to AS pathogenesis appear to be independent. PMID:23864143

  5. 2010 update of the ASAS/EULAR recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Braun, J; van den Berg, R; Baraliakos, X; Boehm, H; Burgos-Vargas, R; Collantes-Estevez, E; Dagfinrud, H; Dijkmans, B; Dougados, M; Emery, P; Geher, P; Hammoudeh, M; Inman, RD; Jongkees, M; Khan, MA; Kiltz, U; Kvien, TK; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Maksymowych, WP; Olivieri, I; Pavelka, K; Sieper, J; Stanislawska-Biernat, E; Wendling, D; Özgocmen, S; van Drogen, C; van Royen, BJ; van der Heijde, D

    2011-01-01

    This first update of the ASAS/EULAR recommendations on the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is based on the original paper, a systematic review of existing recommendations and the literature since 2005 and the discussion and agreement among 21 international experts, 2 patients and 2 physiotherapists in a meeting in February 2010. Each original bullet point was discussed in detail and reworded if necessary. Decisions on new recommendations were made — if necessary after voting. The strength of the recommendations (SOR) was scored on an 11-point numerical rating scale after the meeting by email. These recommendations apply to patients of all ages that fulfill the modified NY criteria for AS, independent of extra-articular manifestations, and they take into account all drug and non-drug interventions related to AS. Four overarching principles were introduced, implying that one bullet has been moved to this section. There are now 11 bullet points including 2 new ones, one related to extra-articular manifestations and one to changes in the disease course. With a mean score of 9.1 (range 8-10) the SOR was generally very good. PMID:21540199

  6. 2010 update of the ASAS/EULAR recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Braun, J; van den Berg, R; Baraliakos, X; Boehm, H; Burgos-Vargas, R; Collantes-Estevez, E; Dagfinrud, H; Dijkmans, B; Dougados, M; Emery, P; Geher, P; Hammoudeh, M; Inman, R D; Jongkees, M; Khan, M A; Kiltz, U; Kvien, Tk; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Maksymowych, W P; Olivieri, I; Pavelka, K; Sieper, J; Stanislawska-Biernat, E; Wendling, D; Ozgocmen, S; van Drogen, C; van Royen, Bj; van der Heijde, D

    2011-06-01

    This first update of the ASAS/EULAR recommendations on the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is based on the original paper, a systematic review of existing recommendations and the literature since 2005 and the discussion and agreement among 21 international experts, 2 patients and 2 physiotherapists in a meeting in February 2010. Each original bullet point was discussed in detail and reworded if necessary. Decisions on new recommendations were made - if necessary after voting. The strength of the recommendations (SOR) was scored on an 11-point numerical rating scale after the meeting by email. These recommendations apply to patients of all ages that fulfill the modified NY criteria for AS, independent of extra-articular manifestations, and they take into account all drug and non-drug interventions related to AS. Four overarching principles were introduced, implying that one bullet has been moved to this section. There are now 11 bullet points including 2 new ones, one related to extra-articular manifestations and one to changes in the disease course. With a mean score of 9.1 (range 8-10) the SOR was generally very good. PMID:21540199

  7. The Risk of Asthma in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Lin, Cheng-Li; Wei, Chang-Ching; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between asthma and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is controversial. We examined the risk of asthma among AS patients in a nationwide population. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from the National Health Insurance (NHI) system of Taiwan. The cohort included 5,974 patients newly diagnosed with AS from 2000 to 2010. The date of diagnosis was defined as the index date. A 4-fold of general population without AS was randomly selected frequency matched by age, gender and the index year. The occurrence and hazard ratio (HR) of asthma were estimated by the end of 2011. Results The overall incidence of asthma was 1.74 folds greater in the AS cohort than in the non-AS cohort (8.26 versus 4.74 per 1000 person-years) with a multivariable Cox method measured adjusted HR of 1.54 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.34–1.76). The adjusted HR of asthma associated with AS was higher in women (1.59; 95% CI, 1.33–1.90), those aged 50–64 years (1.66; 95% CI, 1.31–2.09), or those without comorbidities (1.82; 95% CI, 1.54–2.13). Conclusion Patients with AS are at a higher risk of developing asthma than the general population, regardless of gender and age. The pathophysiology needs further investigation. PMID:25658339

  8. Level set based vertebra segmentation for the evaluation of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Sovira; Yao, Jianhua; Ward, Michael M.; Yao, Lawrence; Summers, Ronald M.

    2006-03-01

    Ankylosing Spondylitis is a disease of the vertebra where abnormal bone structures (syndesmophytes) grow at intervertebral disk spaces. Because this growth is so slow as to be undetectable on plain radiographs taken over years, it is necessary to resort to computerized techniques to complement qualitative human judgment with precise quantitative measures on 3-D CT images. Very fine segmentation of the vertebral body is required to capture the small structures caused by the pathology. We propose a segmentation algorithm based on a cascade of three level set stages and requiring no training or prior knowledge. First, the noise inside the vertebral body that often blocks the proper evolution of level set surfaces is attenuated by a sigmoid function whose parameters are determined automatically. The 1st level set (geodesic active contour) is designed to roughly segment the interior of the vertebra despite often highly inhomogeneous and even discontinuous boundaries. The result is used as an initial contour for the 2nd level set (Laplacian level set) that closely captures the inner boundary of the cortical bone. The last level set (reversed Laplacian level set) segments the outer boundary of the cortical bone and also corrects small flaws of the previous stage. We carried out extensive tests on 30 vertebrae (5 from each of 6 patients). Two medical experts scored the results at intervertebral disk spaces focusing on end plates and syndesmophytes. Only two minor segmentation errors at vertebral end plates were reported and two syndesmophytes were considered slightly under-segmented.

  9. Impact of ankylosing spondylitis on sexual function: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YA-FEI; DONG, HUI; CHEN, ZHE; WANG, YU; TU, SHENG-HAO

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have reported the association of sexual problems with ankylosing spondylitis (AS); however, the results have been conflicting. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of AS on sexual function. To develop a more comprehensive understanding of sexual function in patients with AS, a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature up to 2013 was conducted. Studies that assessed the impact of AS on sexual function by adopting the International Index of Erectile Function or the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) scoring system were included. Statistical analysis was performed using Review Manager statistical software (version 5.2). The weighted mean differences were calculated by employing a fixed or random effects model. A total of 484 cases from five studies were identified as being well-documented and included in the meta-analysis. Compared with healthy controls, male patients with AS have a significant reduction in sexual function scores of erectile function (?3.07), orgasmic function (?1.17), sexual drive (?0.72) and intercourse satisfaction (?1.89). Female patients with AS have a lower FSFI score in domains of desire (?0.34) and arousal (?0.87). In conclusion, AS has a certain impact on the sexual function of male patients. AS appears to have a greater influence on the sexual function of males compared with that of females. However, the mechanism by which AS affects sexual function requires further evaluation by further studies of a larger population of patients. PMID:25780459

  10. A registry of ankylosing spondylitis registries and prospects for global interfacing

    PubMed Central

    Reveille, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the optimal criteria and conditions for establishing a clinical registry, as well as detailing their application in a number of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) Registries already in existence. Recent findings Recent genetic studies and studies of long-term treatment efficacy and side-effects have underscored the need for large numbers of patients, much larger than would be possible from a single center or consortium. An optimal Registry should have its aims established upfront, with appropriate governance and oversight, and inclusion and exclusion criteria for participating collaborators and subject defined. Collaborators contributing subjects to a Registry should use validated instruments for which they have been previously trained. The numerous cross-sectional and longitudinal Registries on AS and axSpA have been recently established that differ widely depending on the referral and selection issues. Summary The challenge of large-scale examinations of genetics, comorbidities, medication usage, and side-effects in spondyloarthritis underscores the need for combining data from well characterized registries of AS patients which require careful planning. There are currently many such registries available internationally, offering promise for collaborations and data pooling that can answer some of the pressing questions facing rheumatology clinicians and researchers. PMID:23656716

  11. Multicenter validation of the value of BASFI and BASDAI in Chinese ankylosing spondylitis and undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiming; He, Peigen; Gao, Jiesheng; Zuo, Xiaoxia; Ye, Zhizhong; Shao, Fengmin; Zhan, Feng; Lin, Jinying; Li, Li; Wei, Yanlin; Xu, Manlong; Liao, Zetao; Lin, Qu

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reliability of Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI) and Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI) in Chinese ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy (USpA) patients. 664 AS patients by the revised New York criteria for AS and 252 USpA patients by the European Spondyloarthropathy Study Group criteria were enrolled. BASDAI and BASFI questionnaires were translated into Chinese. Participants were required to fill in BASFI and BASDAI questionnaires again after 24 h. Moreover, BASDAI and BASFI were compared in AS patients receiving Enbrel or infliximab before and after treatment. For AS group, BASDAI ICC: 0.9502 (95% CI: 0.9330–0.9502, ? = 0.9702), BASFI ICC: 0.9587 (95% CI: 0.9521–0.9645, ? = 0.9789). For USpA group, BASDAI ICC: 0.9530 (95% CI: 0.9402–0.9632, ? = 0.9760), BASFI ICC: 0.9900 (95% CI: 0.9871–0.9922, ? = 0.9950). In the AS group, disease duration, occipital wall distance, modified Schober test, chest expansion, ESR, and CRP showed significant correlation with BASDAI and BASFI (all P < 0.01). In the USpA group, onset age, ESR, and CRP were significantly correlated with BASDAI (all P < 0.05), while modified Schober test, ESR, and CRP were significantly associated with BASFI (all P < 0.05). The change in BASDAI and BASFI via Enbrel or infliximab treatment showed a significant positive correlation (P < 0.01). The two instruments have good reliability and reference value regarding the evaluation of patient’s condition and anti-TNF-? treatment response. PMID:20012866

  12. Application of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Tools to Identify Putative Transcription Factor-Gene Regulatory Network of Ankylosing Spondylitis and Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dongseok; Sharma, Srilakshmi M; Pasadhika, Sirichai; Kang, Zhixin; Harrington, Christina A.; Smith, Justine R.; Planck, Stephen R.; Rosenbaum, James T.

    2009-01-01

    Transcription factors and corresponding cis-regulatory elements are considered key components in gene regulation. We combined biostatistics and bioinformatics tools to streamline identification of putative transcription factor-gene regulatory networks unique for two immune-mediated diseases, ankylosing spondylitis and sarcoidosis. After identifying differentially expressed genes from microarrays, we employed tightCluster to find tight clusters of potentially co-regulated genes. By subsequently applying bioinformatics tools to search for common cis-regulatory elements, putative transcription factor-gene regulatory networks were found. Recognition of these networks by applying this methodology could pave the way for new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:20037664

  13. Carbonic anhydrase I (CA1) is involved in the process of bone formation and is susceptible to ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is characterized by abnormal bone formation in the spine and the sacroiliac joints. In vitro assays demonstrate that carbonic anhydrase I (CA1) promotes calcium precipitation. This study investigated the function of CA1 for bio-mineralization and determined if common polymorphisms in the CA1 gene might contribute to AS risk. Methods Calcification was induced in Saos-2 cells, a human osteosarcoma cell line, with ascorbic acid and ?-glycerophosphate. Calcification was determined by Alizarin Red-S (AR-S) staining. Expressions of CA1, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), osteocalcin (OCN), osterix (OSX) and runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx2) were determined by real-time PCR and western blotting. The cells were also treated with acetazolamide, an anti-carbonic anhydrase drug. Genotyping was performed using Illumina VeraCode microarray in a case-control study including 51 AS patients, 267 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and 160 healthy controls. The result was confirmed by Taqman assay, including 258 AS patients, 288 RA patients and 288 healthy controls. Results Following the induction of calcification, Saos-2 cells produced large amounts of calcium-rich deposits. Increased transcriptions of CA1, ALP, BSP, OCN, OSX and Runx2, essential genes for ossification, were detected in the cultured cells. Following treatmen with acetazolamide, the expression of CA1 obviously declined and mineralized nodule formation was also decreased. Illumina microarray indicates that SNP at rs7841425 also showed significant differences in allelic frequency (P = 0.01396) and genotypic frequency (P = 0.005902) between AS cases and controls. In addition, SNP at rs7827474 showed significant differences in allelic frequency (P = 5.83E-04) and genotypic frequency (P = 0.000186) between RA cases and controls (P values were adjusted to multiple comparisons). The Taqman assay revealed that rs725605 demonstrated statistically significant evidence of allele frequency (P = 0.022307) and gene frequency (P = 0.007731) for association with AS. This SNP did not show significant differences in allelic frequencies and gene frequencies between RA patients and controls. Conclusions CA1 may play an essential role in bio-mineralization and new bone formation. The gene encoding CA1 is susceptible to AS. PMID:22838845

  14. Preferential type 1 chemokine receptors and cytokine production of CD28? T cells in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Duftner, C; Dejaco, C; Kullich, W; Klauser, A; Goldberger, C; Falkenbach, A; Schirmer, M

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine serum levels of type 1 and type 2 chemokines and lymphocytic expression of chemokine receptors, and to compare the results with lymphocytic cytokine production in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods Twelve patients with AS (mean (SD) age 44.9 (14.7)?years) and 27 healthy controls (46.4 (12.8)?years) were enrolled into the study. The expression of chemokine receptors (CCR?5, CXCR?3, CCR?4) and cytokines (interferon ? (IFN?), interleukin (IL)2, IL4, IL10, tumour necrosis factor ? (TNF?)) on CD28+ and CD28? T cell subtypes was analysed by a three colour FACS technique of peripheral blood samples. Serum ELISAs were performed to detect the CCR?5 ligands CCL?5, CCL?3; the CXCR?3 ligands CXCL?10, CXCL?9; and the CCR?4 ligand, CCL?17 before and after administration of the TNF? blocking agent infliximab. Results CD4+CD28? T cells had higher ratios of CXCR?3 to CCR?4 than CD4+CD28+ T cells. Both, CD4+ and CD8+CD28? T cells of patients with AS produced more IFN?, TNF?, and IL10 than their CD28+ counterparts (p<0.05), and lacked the production of IL2 and IL4. Serum levels of CXCL?9 were increased in patients with AS to 59.2?pg/ml (34.1–730.5) compared with 32.5?pg/ml (20.0–79.5) in healthy controls (p?=?0.016). The levels of both type 1 (CCL?5, CXCL?9) and type 2 chemokines (CCL?17) decreased under blockade of TNF? (p<0.05). Conclusions The profile of chemokine receptor expression and cytokine production by CD28? T cells suggests a type 1 immune reaction in AS, although IL10 is frequently produced by CD28? T cells. Treatment with TNF? blocking antibodies decreased both types of chemokines in patients' sera. PMID:16219708

  15. Mannose-binding lectin 2 gene haplotype analysis in Korean patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Im, Churl Hyun; Kim, Jinhyun; Lee, Yun Jong; Lee, Eun Young; Lee, Eun Bong; Park, Kyung Sook; Song, Yeong Wook

    2012-08-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) serum levels or genetic polymorphisms are known to be associated with autoimmune diseases. We investigated MBL2 genetic polymorphisms in 95 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and in 252 healthy controls. MBL2 promoter polymorphisms at -550 (H/L), -221 (Y/X), +4 (P/Q), and exon polymorphisms at codon 52 (Arg/Cys), 54 (Gly/Asp, or A/B), and 57 (Gly/Glu) were investigated using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Genetic polymorphisms were analyzed using SPSS (ver 12.0) and Haploview (ver 4.2). MBL2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were not significantly different between patients with AS and controls. By haplotype analysis, LYPB frequency was significantly lower in AS (10.7% vs. 21.3%, OR 0.441, 95% CI: 0.266-0.733, P value = 0.001, Pc value = 0.008). The frequency of LYPA (15.4% vs. 9.2%, OR 1.802, 95% CI: 1.097-2.961, P value = 0.019, Pc value = 0.101) and HYPB (3.5% vs. 0.8%, OR 4.457, 95% CI: 1.289-15.409, P value = 0.011, Pc value = 0.060) tended to be higher in AS. Clinical characteristics of AS were not associated with any MBL2 SNP or haplotype. In summary, haplotypes of MBL2 genetic polymorphisms were found to be associated with AS, which suggests that MBL2 genetic polymorphisms may play a role during the development of AS. PMID:21544638

  16. The economic burden of the ankylosing spondylitis in the Czech Republic: comparison between 2005 and 2008.

    PubMed

    Pet?íková, Alena; Doležal, Tomáš; Klimeš, Ji?í; Vocelka, Milan; Sedová, Liliana; Kolá?, Jozef

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the burden of ankylosing spondylitis in the Czech Republic as a baseline for future health economic evaluations. Data were obtained from two cross-sectional studies Beda I (2005) and Beda II (2008), performed in 1,008 and 509 patients, respectively. Methodology used was Cost-of-Illness prevalence-based analysis bottom-up approach. Analysis was performed from payer (health insurance companies) and societal perspective (including productivity costs using friction cost approach). Mean age of sample in Beda I and Beda II was 50.2 and 52.5 years, male were present by 61.0 and 62.7 %; average disease duration was 23.0 and 26.4 years, respectively. Mean total annual costs per patient in the sample were €4,782 in Beda I and €5806 in Beda II. Average direct costs per patient in the sample per year are estimated at €1,812 (Beda I) and €2,588 (Beda II) with the average productivity costs €2,970 (Beda I) and €3,218 (Beda II). We observed a small decrement in percentage (6.7 %) of productivity costs for Beda II as an influence of higher consumption of biologic drugs, hence higher direct costs and possible productivity preservation. The largest direct cost burdens were spa procedures (45.3 %, Beda I) and biological drugs (52.8 %, Beda II). Unique analysis of the burden of the AS in the Central-Eastern Europe presents health care resource and cost consumption by comparing two cross-sectional prevalence-based studies. Further analysis should be carried to obtain data connecting health status with costs consumption in order to analyse the AS from this perspective. PMID:23314983

  17. Association Study of IL-12B Polymorphisms Susceptibility with Ankylosing Spondylitis in Mainland Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Yang, Ting; Ding, Ning; Hu, Yanting; Cai, Guoqi; Wang, Li; Xin, Lihong; Xia, Qing; Li, Xiaona; Xu, Shengqian; Xu, Jianhua; Yang, Xiao; Zou, Yanfeng; Pan, Faming

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to determine whether the genetic polymorphisms of IL-12B gene is a susceptibility factor to Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in mainland Han Chinese population. Method Eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs10045431, rs11167764, rs3212227, rs6556412, rs6556416, rs6871626, rs6887695 and rs7709212) in the IL-12B gene were genotyped by iMLDR Assay technology in 400 patients [96% (384/400) HLA-B27(+)] and 395 geographically and ethnically matched healthy controls in mainland Han Chinese population. The correlation between IL-12B genetic polymorphisms and AS activity index (BASDAI, BASFI) were tested. Results The significant difference was found in genotype distribution between AS and healthy controls (?2 = 6.942, P-value = 0.031) of the SNP rs6871626. Furthermore, significant evidence was also detected under the recessive model for minor allele A. The AA genotype carrier had 1.830 fold risk compared with C allele carrier (with CC and AC genotypes) [OR (95% CI) = 1.830 (1.131-2.961), P-value = 0.014]. Nevertheless, the difference was no longer significant after Bonferroni correction. Subset analysis on cases with HLA-B27(+) did find the same results. Three genotypic groups (AA, CC and CA) in rs6871626 site was highly associated with the BASDAI and BASFI (P-value = 0.012 and P-value = 0.023, respectively), after adjustment for effect of age, sex, and disease duration, the P-value was 0.031 and 0.041, respectively. The AA genotype of rs6871626 was also significantly correlated with an increased BASDAI and BASFI compared to the AC and CC genotypes in AS patients. Conclusion Our findings suggest that rs6871626 may be associated AS susceptibility and with disease activity (BASDAI, BASFI) in mainland Han Chinese population. PMID:26103568

  18. Association between apparent diffusion coefficient and intervertebral disc degeneration in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Resorlu, Mustafa; Gokmen, Ferhat; Resorlu, Hatice; Adam, Gurhan; Akbal, Ayla; Cevizci, Sibel; Sariyildirim, Abdullah; Savas, Yilmaz; Guven, Mustafa; Aras, Adem Bozkurt

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the relation between ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and degenerative disc disease emerging in association with various intrinsic and extrinsic factors and to evaluate the correlation between degree of degeneration in intervertebral discs and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Methods: Thirty-five patients with AS and a control group of 35 patients were included in the study. Three hundred fifty intervertebral discs were assessed in terms of degeneration by analyzing signal intensities and morphologies on T2 weighted series of a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner. ADC values were determined in diffusion weighted images (DWI) using a “b value of 500 s/mm2”. Patients in the AS and control groups were compared in terms of intervertebral disc degeneration, and association between degree of degeneration and ADC values was analyzed. Results: The mean of total degeneration degrees for five lumbar intervertebral discs was significantly higher in the patients with AS compared to the control group (16.77±4.67 vs 13.00±4.08, respectively; P=0.001). When intervertebral discs were analyzed separately, disc degeneration was again significantly higher in patients with AS compared to the control group, with the exception of L5-S1. Age, cholesterol level, triglyceride level, duration of disease and BASFI index were significantly associated with degree of degeneration in patients with AS. A negative correlation was determined between disc degeneration and ADC value. Conclusion: AS is a risk factor for degenerative disc disease due to its systemic effects, the fact it leads to posture impairment and its inflammatory effects on the vertebrae. A decrease in ADC values is observed as degeneration worsens in degenerative disc disease. PMID:25785119

  19. Occupational Physical Activities and Long-Term Functional and Radiographic Outcomes in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Michael M.; Reveille, John D.; Learch, Thomas J.; Davis, John C.; Weisman, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective We sought to identify specific occupational activities associated with functional limitations and radiographic damage in patients with longstanding ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods We asked patients diagnosed with AS for ?20 years to report all past occupations, which we mapped to specific physical activities using the Occupational Information Network, which is the US Department of Labor job classification database. For each occupation reported, we obtained ratings for 13 physical abilities of the worker and 13 aspects of the work environment or work tasks (work context) thought to be most relevant to patients with AS. Averages for each measure, weighted by the number of years in each job, were related to the degree of functional limitation as assessed by the Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI) and to the extent of spinal radiographic damage as assessed by the Bath AS Radiology Index for the spine (BASRI-s). Results Among 397 patients, those with a history of jobs requiring dynamic flexibility (the ability to repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach) had more functional limitations than those whose past jobs required little or no dynamic flexibility (adjusted mean BASFI score 48.3 in the top quartile versus 38.1 in all others). Those whose past jobs required more dynamic flexibility, extent flexibility, and exposure to whole body vibration also had significantly higher BASRI-s scores. Conclusion Bending, twisting, and stretching are the occupational activities associated with greater functional limitations and radiographic damage in patients with longstanding AS. Exposure to whole body vibration was also associated with more radiographic damage. PMID:18512723

  20. Red blood cell distribution width: a potential maker estimating disease activity of ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, You-Fan; Zhang, Qiong; Cao, Ling; Liu, Yang; Chen, Dan; Sun, Yu-Kun; Zhang, Zhao-Xia

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a autoimmune disease, early and accurate detection is vital for effective treatment. Very recently, a large of novel laboratory index were found to diagnose AS. However, the correlation between red blood cell distribution width (RDW) and AS has been poorly discussed in previous study. Then, our aim was to focus on the association between RDW and AS. AS patients without drugs treatments and healthy individuals were incorporated in our study. Laboratory parameters including RDW tests were conducted consecutively on the entire cohort of AS patients and healthy individuals. AS patients with increased RDW showed significant difference compared to healthy individuals (13.66±0.77 vs. 12.77±0.47, P<0.01), similarly, difference of AS patients and heathy individuals stratified by sex was almost the same as that in two groups. Some significantly positive correlation were observed between RDW and CRP, ESR, IgG, BASDAI score in patients with AS (r=0.356, P=0.018; r=0.481, P=0.001; r=0.385, P=0.010; r=0.586, P<0.01), almost identical results were showed when AS patients was stratified by gender. Finally, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of RDW levels to identify AS patients exhibited a statistically significant level (area under the curve of 0.853; sensitivity of 72.7%, specificity of 81.4%). The results suggested that increased RDW was associated with AS and may be used as a potential marker estimating disease activity of AS. PMID:25664033

  1. Ankylosing spondylitis is associated with the anthrax toxin receptor 2 gene (ANTXR2)

    PubMed Central

    Karaderi, T; Keidel, S M; Pointon, J J; Appleton, L H; Brown, M A; Evans, D M; Wordsworth, B P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives ANTXR2 variants have been associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in two previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (p?9×10?8). However, a genome-wide significant association (p<5×10?8) was not observed. We conducted a more comprehensive analysis of ANTXR2 in an independent UK sample to confirm and refine this association. Methods A replication study was carried out with 2978 cases and 8365 controls. Then, these were combined with non-overlapping samples from the two previous GWAS in a meta-analysis. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 stratification was also performed to test for ANTXR2-HLA-B27 interaction. Results Out of nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the study, five SNPs were nominally associated (p<0.05) with AS in the replication dataset. In the meta-analysis, eight SNPs showed evidence of association, the strongest being with rs12504282 (OR=0.88, p=6.7×10?9). Seven of these SNPs showed evidence for association in the HLA-B27-positive subgroup, but none was associated with HLA-B27-negative AS. However, no statistically significant interaction was detected between HLA-B27 and ANTXR2 variants. Conclusions ANTXR2 variants are clearly associated with AS. The top SNPs from two previous GWAS (rs4333130 and rs4389526) and this study (rs12504282) are in strong linkage disequilibrium (r2?0.76). All are located near a putative regulatory region. Further studies are required to clarify the role played by these ANTXR2 variants in AS. PMID:25169729

  2. Predicting the potential ankylosing spondylitis-related genes utilizing bioinformatics approaches.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hao; Wang, Dan; Fu, Deyu; Xue, Luan

    2015-06-01

    Given that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) occurs in approximately 5 out of 1,000 adults of European descent and the unclear pathogenesis, the aim of the research was to further predict the molecular mechanism of this disease. The Affymetrix chip data GSE25101 were available from Gene Expression Omnibus database. First of all, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified by Limma package in R. Moreover, DAVID was used to perform gene set enrichment analysis of DEGs. In addition, miRanda, miRDB, miRWalk, RNA22 and TargetScan were applied to predict microRNA-target associations. Meanwhile, STRING 9.0 was utilized to collect protein-protein interactions (PPIs) with confidence score >0.4. Then, the PPI networks for up- and down-regulated genes were constructed, and the clustering analysis was undergone using ClusterONE. Finally, protein-domain enrichment analysis of modules was conducted using DAVID. Total 145 DEGs were identified, including 103 up-regulated and 42 down-regulated genes. These DEGs were significantly enriched in phosphorylation (p = 1.21E-05) and positive regulation of gene expression (p = 1.25E-03). Furthermore, one module was screened out from the up-regulated network, which contained 39 nodes and 205 edges. Moreover, the nodes in the module were significantly enriched in ribosomal protein (RPL17, ribosomal protein L17 and MRPL22, mitochondrial ribosomal protein L22) and proteasome (PSMA6, proteasome subunit, alpha type 6, PSMA4)-related domains. Our findings that might explore the potential pathogenesis of AS and RPL17, MRPL22, PSMA6 and PSMA4 have the potential to be the biomarkers for the disease. PMID:25432079

  3. Participation of antigens related to the psoriasis associated antigen, pso p27, in immune complex formation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E Rødahl; K Asbakk; O J Iversen

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of five serum samples and three synovial fluids from patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and five serum samples from healthy blood donors for the presence of antibodies cross reacting with the Fc part of rabbit IgG (rheumatoid factors (RFs] using an isotype specific, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed only insignificant amounts of free RFs, while IgG RFs were

  4. Comparison of early and late pleuropulmonary findings of ankylosing spondylitis by high-resolution computed tomography and effects on patients’ daily life

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Remzi Altin; ?enay Özdolap; Ahmet Savranlar; Selda Sar?kaya; Meltem Tor; Levent Kart; Hüseyin Özdemir

    2005-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a multisystemic disease and extra-articular features may develop as pleuropulmonary involvement. We aimed to show and compare the early and late pleuropulmonary findings of AS and its effects on patients’ daily life by causing dyspnea. The study consisted of 38 patients (33 male, 5 female). All patients met the New York criteria for AS. Patients were

  5. Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation of Etoricoxib versus Celecoxib and Nonselective NSAIDs in the Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis in Norway.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Jeroen P; Taylor, Stephanie D

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of etoricoxib (90?mg) relative to celecoxib (200/400?mg), and the nonselective NSAIDs naproxen (1000?mg) and diclofenac (150?mg) in the initial treatment of ankylosing spondylitis in Norway. Methods. A previously developed Markov state-transition model was used to estimate costs and benefits associated with initiating treatment with the different competing NSAIDs. Efficacy, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular safety, and resource use data were obtained from the literature. Data from different studies were synthesized and translated into direct costs and quality adjusted life years by means of a Bayesian comprehensive decision modeling approach. Results. Over a 30-year time horizon, etoricoxib is associated with about 0.4 more quality adjusted life years than the other interventions. At 1 year, naproxen is the most cost-saving strategy. However, etoricoxib is cost and quality adjusted life year saving relative to celecoxib, as well as diclofenac and naproxen after 5 years of follow-up. For a willingness-to-pay ceiling ratio of 200,000 Norwegian krones per quality adjusted life year, there is a >95% probability that etoricoxib is the most-cost-effective treatment when a time horizon of 5 or more years is considered. Conclusions. Etoricoxib is the most cost-effective NSAID for initiating treatment of ankylosing spondylitis in Norway. PMID:21772851

  6. Follow-up Testing of Interferon-Gamma Release Assays Are Useful in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients Receiving Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha for Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the utility of follow-up interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) for the diagnosis of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) or new tuberculosis in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF?). The study participants (n=127) had a negative IGRA screening before receiving anti-TNF? and were evaluated by follow-up IGRA. We retrospectively examined data of the subjects according to age, gender, tuberculosis prophylaxis, concomitant medications, IGRA conversion and anti-TNF?, including type and treatment duration. The median duration of anti-TNF? was 21.5 months, and the median age was 35.3 yr. Of the 127 patients, IGRA conversion was found in 10 patients (7.9%). There was no significant variation between IGRA conversion rate and any risk factors except for age. IGRA conversion rate was not significantly different between AS and rheumatoid arthritis (P=0.12). IGRA conversion was observed in AS patients receiving anti-TNF? in Korea. A follow-up IGRA test can be helpful for identifying LTBI or new tuberculosis in AS patients receiving anti-TNF?. Graphical Abstract PMID:25120318

  7. Follow-up testing of interferon-gamma release assays are useful in ankylosing spondylitis patients receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha for latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Son, Chang-Nam; Jun, Jae-Bum; Kim, Jong-Heon; Sung, Il-Hoon; Yoo, Dae-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2014-08-01

    We evaluated the utility of follow-up interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) for the diagnosis of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) or new tuberculosis in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF?). The study participants (n=127) had a negative IGRA screening before receiving anti-TNF? and were evaluated by follow-up IGRA. We retrospectively examined data of the subjects according to age, gender, tuberculosis prophylaxis, concomitant medications, IGRA conversion and anti-TNF?, including type and treatment duration. The median duration of anti-TNF? was 21.5 months, and the median age was 35.3 yr. Of the 127 patients, IGRA conversion was found in 10 patients (7.9%). There was no significant variation between IGRA conversion rate and any risk factors except for age. IGRA conversion rate was not significantly different between AS and rheumatoid arthritis (P=0.12). IGRA conversion was observed in AS patients receiving anti-TNF? in Korea. A follow-up IGRA test can be helpful for identifying LTBI or new tuberculosis in AS patients receiving anti-TNF?. PMID:25120318

  8. Adverse Events of Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor ? Therapy in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Qiang; Cai, Qing; de Mooij, Tristan; Xu, Xia; Dai, Shengming; Qu, Wenchun; Zhao, Dongbao

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to investigate the prevalence of short-term and long-term adverse events associated with tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) blocker treatment in Chinese Han patients suffering from ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods The study included 402 Chinese Han AS patients treated with TNF-? blockers. Baseline data was collected. All patients were monitored for adverse events 2 hours following administration. Long-term treatment was evaluated at 8, 12, 52 and 104 weeks follow-up for 172 patients treated with TNF-? blockers. Results Short-term adverse events occurred in 20.15% (81/402), including rash (3.5%; 14/402), pruritus (1.2%; 5/402), nausea (2.2%; 9/402), headache (0.7%; 3/402), skin allergies (4.0%; 16/402), fever (0.5%; 2/402), palpitations (3.0%; 12/402), dyspnea (0.5%; 2/402), chest pain (0.2%; 2/402), abdominal pain (1.0%; 4/402), hypertension (2.2%; 9/402), papilledema (0.5%; 2/402), laryngeal edema (0.2%; 1/402) and premature ventricular contraction (0.2%; 1/402). Long-term adverse events occurred in 59 (34.3%; 59/172) patients, including pneumonia (7.6%; 13/172), urinary tract infections (9.9%; 17/172), otitis media (4.7%; 8/172), tuberculosis (3.5%; 17/172), abscess (1.2%; 2/172), oral candidiasis (0.6%; 1/172), elevation of transaminase (1.7%; 3/172), anemia (1.2%; 2/172), hematuresis (0.6%; 1/172), constipation (2.3%; 4/172), weight loss (0.6%; 1/172), exfoliative dermatitis (0.6%; 1/172). CRP, ESR and disease duration were found to be associated with an increased risk of immediate and long-term adverse events (P<0.05). Long-term treatment with Infliximab was associated with more adverse events than rhTNFR-Fc (P<0.01). Conclusion This study reports on the prevalence of adverse events in short-term and long-term treatment with TNF-? blocker monotherapy in Chinese Han AS patients. Duration of disease, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and c-reactive protein serum levels were found to be associated with increased adverse events with anti-TNF-? therapy. Long-term treatment with Infliximab was associated with more adverse events than rhTNFR-Fc. PMID:25764452

  9. Etanercept in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YA-FEI; DONG, HUI; TU, SHENG-HAO; ZHENG, CUI-HONG; LIU, PEI-LIN; HU, YONG-HONG

    2014-01-01

    Etanercept (ETN) has been widely applied in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). As the use of ETN has increased, associated adverse effects have been reported frequently. Previous meta-analyses have focused on comparing the differences in clinical outcomes between ETN and placebo (PBO). The present meta-analysis evaluated randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to compare the effects of ETN and a PBO or sulfasalazine (SSZ) in patients with AS. The study population characteristics and the main results, including the Assessment in AS 20% response (ASAS 20), the Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and the Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI), were extracted. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) or weighted mean differences (MDs) were calculated using a fixed or random effects model. Fifteen randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving 2,194 subjects were included. Compared with a PBO, ETN significantly improved the ASAS 20 [P<0.00001; OR, 8.25; 95% confidence interval (CI), 5.92–11.50], BASDAI (P<0.00001; MD, ?18.81; 95% CI, ?24.47 to ?13.15) and BASFI (P<0.00001; standard MD, ?0.68; 95% CI, ?0.85 to ?0.50). In comparison with SSZ, ETN significantly decreased the BASDAI (P<0.00001; MD, ?2.40; 95% CI, ?2.89 to ?1.90) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (P<0.0001; MD, ?8.01; 95% CI, ?11.73 to ?4.29). The most common adverse effect of ETN was an injection site reaction. This meta-analysis shows that ETN monotherapy is effective in improving physical function and reducing disease activity in patients with AS. Compared with SSZ, ETN markedly decreased the BASDAI and CRP levels. However, the efficacy of ETN in treating AS requires further evaluation by more RCTs in a larger population of patients prior to recommending ETN as a substitute for synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) monotherapy, or combinations of synthetic DMARDs. PMID:25289064

  10. [German patient version of the ASAS/EULAR recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Kiltz, U; Feldtkeller, E; Braun, J

    2010-03-01

    The evidence-based recommendations on the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have enjoyed a high level of acceptance and circulation in Germany, as well as in other European countries. To make patient participation in the decision-making process regarding their disease easier, as well as to strengthen the physician-patient relationship, the ASAS and EULAR have set up an initiative to formulate a patient-friendly version of the recommendations, initially in English. In order that this lay version can also be used in German-speaking countries, a group predominantly comprising patients was formed to ensure that the German translation of this version has the broadest possible basis. In cooperation with the German (DVMB), Austrian (OVMB) and Swiss Morbus Bechterew Associations (SVMB), as well as the German Rheumatology League, patients from Germany, Austria and Switzerland with appropriate English skills were invited to a meeting in 2008. The aim of the translation was to leave the content unchanged while finding a level of speech easily understandable to the lay person. The translated text was considered as accepted when a minimum of 12 patients (>80%) gave their approval on the wording of the translation of individual recommendations in an open vote. The rheumatologist given the function of moderator was not entitled to vote. The level of approval for each recommendation was determined (0: no approval to 10: full approval). The 14 patients were able to translate the English patient version into German. Choice of words and style of speech were discussed intensively. Acceptance of the translation of the 10 recommendations was generally high. The content was clearly accepted with an approval rate of 8.4+/-1.6. This was the first time that patients, in cooperation with rheumatologists, have translated an international patient version on AS management into German under controlled conditions. The translation text was approved by the majority in terms of both form and content. Acceptance and circulation of the German patient version should be evaluated in the near future. PMID:19214540

  11. Vertebral Osteotomies in Ankylosing Spondylitis—Comparison of Outcomes Following Closing Wedge Osteotomy versus Opening Wedge Osteotomy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ravinsky, Robert A.; Ouellet, Jean-Albert; Brodt, Erika D.; Dettori, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design?Systematic review. Study Rationale?To seek out and assess the best quality evidence available comparing opening wedge osteotomy (OWO) and closing wedge osteotomy (CWO) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis to determine whether their results differ with regard to several different subjective and objective outcome measures. Objective?The aim of this study is to determine whether there is a difference in subjective and objective outcomes when comparing CWO and OWO in patients with ankylosing spondylitis suffering from clinically significant thoracolumbar kyphosis with respect to quality-of-life assessments, complication risks, and the amount of correction of the spine achieved at follow-up. Methods?A systematic review was undertaken of articles published up to July 2012. Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched to identify studies comparing effectiveness and safety outcomes between adult patients with ankylosing spondylitis who received closing wedge versus opening wedge osteotomies. Studies that included pediatric patients, polysegmental osteotomies, or revision procedures were excluded. Two independent reviewers assessed the strength of evidence using the GRADE criteria and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results?From a total of 67 possible citations, 4 retrospective cohorts (class of evidence III) met our inclusion criteria and form the basis for this report. No differences in Oswestry Disability Index, visual analog scale for pain, Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-24 score, SRS-22 score, and patient satisfaction were reported between the closing and opening wedge groups across two studies. Regarding radiological outcomes following closing versus opening osteotomies, mean change in sagittal vertical axis ranged from 8.9 to 10.8 cm and 8.0 to 10.9 cm, respectively, across three studies; mean change in lumbar lordosis ranged from 36 to 47 degrees and 19 to 41 degrees across four studies; and mean change in global kyphosis ranged from 38 to 40 degrees and 28 to 35 degrees across two studies. Across all studies, overall complication risks ranged from 0 to 16.7% following CWO and from 0 to 23.6% following OWO. Conclusion?No statistically significant differences were seen in patient-reported or radiographic outcomes between CWO and OWO in any study. The risks of dural tear, neurological injury, and reoperation were similar between groups. Blood loss was greater in the closing wedge compared with the opening wedge group, while the risk of paralytic ileus was less. The overall strength of evidence for the conclusions is low. PMID:24436696

  12. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitor therapy in ankylosing spondylitis: differential effects on pain and fatigue and brain correlates.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Inman, Robert D; Davis, Karen D

    2015-02-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is associated with back pain and fatigue and impacts mobility but can be treated with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi). The differential effects of TNFi treatment on multiple symptoms and the brain is not well delineated. Thus, we conducted a 2-part study. In study 1, we conducted a retrospective chart review in 129 ankylosing spondylitis patients to assess TNFi effects on pain, fatigue, motor function, mobility, and quality of life (QoL). After at least 10 weeks of TNFi treatment, patients had clinically significant improvements (>30%) in pain (including neuropathic pain), most disease and QoL factors, and normalized sensory detection thresholds. However, residual fatigue (mean = 5.3) was prominent. Although 60% of patients had significant relief of pain, only 22% of patients had significant relief of both pain and fatigue. Therefore, the preferential TNFi treatment effect on pain compared with fatigue could contribute to suboptimal effects on QoL. Part 2 was a prospective study in 14 patients to identify TNFi treatment effects on pain, fatigue, sensory and psychological factors, and brain cortical thickness based on 3T magnetic resonance imaging. Centrally, TNFi was associated with statistically significant cortical thinning of motor, premotor, and posterior parietal regions. Pain intensity reduction was associated with cortical thinning of the secondary somatosensory cortex, and pain unpleasantness reduction was associated with the cortical thinning of motor areas. In contrast, fatigue reduction correlated with cortical thinning of the insula, primary sensory cortex/inferior parietal sulcus, and superior temporal polysensory areas. This indicates that TNFi treatment produces changes in brain areas implicated in sensory, motor, affective, and cognitive functions. PMID:25599451

  13. Association Study of Polymorphisms rs4552569 and rs17095830 and the Risk of Ankylosing Spondylitis in a Taiwanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wei, James Cheng-Chung; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Hung, Kuo-Sheng; Wong, Ruey-Hong; Huang, Chun-Huang; Liu, Yi-Tzu; Guo, Yuh-Cherng; Ikegawa, Shiro; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2013-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammation of the sacroiliac joints, spine and peripheral joints. However, the development of anklosing spondylitis is unclear. Human leukocyte antigens HLA-B27 and ERAP1 have been widely reported to be associated with AS susceptibility. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) showed that two new susceptibility loci between EDIL3 and HAPLN1 at 5q14.3 (rs4552569) and within ANO6 at 12q12 (rs17095830) contribute to the risk of AS in Han Chinese. In this study, we enrolled 475 AS patients and 475 healthy subjects to assess whether these genetic variations contribute to the susceptibility and the severity of AS in the Taiwanese population. The correlation between genetic polymorphisms, AS activity indexes, (namely, BASDAI, BASFI and BAS-G) and AS complications (uveitis and inflammatory bowel disease) were tested using the markers, rs4552569 and rs17095830. Although no association between rs4552569/rs17095830 genetic polymorphisms and AS susceptibility/severity was found, a significant association between rs17095830 and inflammatory bowel disease was observed in a Taiwanese population. PMID:23308121

  14. Increased expression of T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 4 is positively associated with the disease severity of patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongdong; He, Jianying; Lu, Changchang; Zhou, Jihang; Fang, Kexin; Liu, Xiaoguang; Xu, Liyun

    2015-06-01

    Monocytes and associated cytokines have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 4 (Tim-4) was identified on monocytes/macrophages and dentritic cells (DCs) and plays important roles in regulating the activities of macrophages and DCs. The current study investigated the association between Tim-4 expression and AS. Our results showed that Tim-4 expression on monocytes and Tim-4 level in plasma were highly increased in AS patients than in controls. Furthermore, TNF-? production and bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI) have positive relationships with Tim-4 expression in AS patients. High expression of Tim-4 was thought to contribute to the pathogenesis and an underlying mechanism of AS. PMID:25359708

  15. Genetic polymorphisms of the matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) modulate the development of ankylosing spondylitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J C-C Wei; H-S Lee; W-C Chen; L-J Shiu; S-F Yang; R-H Wong

    2009-01-01

    Background:The aetiology of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) remains unclear. Inflammation progresses to fibrosis and calcification of the spine and sacroiliac joints in AS development. Fibrosis results from excessive accumulations of the extracellular matrix (ECM). ECM turnover depends on the balance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs).Objective:To evaluate the effects of the MMP-3 -1171 and TIMP-1 372 T>C polymorphisms

  16. The relationship between disease activity measured by the BASDAI and psychological status, stressful life events, and sleep quality in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yutong; Yang, Mingcan; Wu, Husheng; Song, Hui; Zhan, Feng; Liu, Shengyun; Gao, Guanmin; Liu, Zhangsuo; Hu, Zhaoxian; He, Peigen; Zhang, Shengtao; Hu, Zaiying; Lin, Zhiming; Zhang, Yanli; Li, Yinong; Shen, Lingxun; Huang, Anbing; Liao, Zetao; Cao, Shuangyan; Wei, Yanlin; Li, Li; Li, Qiuxia; Lv, Qing; Qi, Jun; Huang, Jianlin; Li, Tianwang; Jin, O; Pan, Yunfeng; Gu, J

    2015-03-01

    Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) is a standard instrument regularly used to assess disease activity of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). However, the well-being of a patient is also affected by impairment of function as well as psychological status and other factors. The objective of this study was to evaluate if psychological status, stressful life events, and sleep quality contribute significantly to BASDAI. Six hundred eighty-three AS patients satisfying the Modified New York Criteria for AS were recruited from the rheumatology clinics of seven hospitals in China. Patients with other concomitant disorders were excluded. Participants were requested to complete a set of clinical examinations and the following questionnaires: Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index Questionnaire (PSQI), Health Assessment Questionnaire for Spondyloarthropathies (HAQ-S), and Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS). Spearman correlation analysis showed that BASDAI was highly associated with degree and duration of morning stiffness, overall pain, nocturnal back pain, overall back pain, anxiety, and BASFI (all P??0.05). Multiple stepwise regression analysis indicated that overall pain was the maximal statistical contribution in predicting disease activity (standardized coefficient, 0.335). In hierarchic multiple regression analysis, psychological variables added an only additional 2.7% to the overall R(2) beyond that accounted for by demographic and medical variables, resulting in a final R(2) of 53.5%. Although BASDAI is a very good measurement of pain and stiffness and to a certain extent effect of functional impairment in AS, it barely takes into account psychological status, stress life events, and sleep quality These factors should be evaluated by other modalities. PMID:24946723

  17. HLA-B60 and B61 are strongly associated with ankylosing spondylitis in HLA-B27-negative Taiwan Chinese patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. C. Wei; W. C. Tsai; H. S. Lin; C. Y. Tsai; C. T. Chou

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. Carriage of HLA-B60 has been shown to increase the risk of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in B27-positive Caucasian patients, but the association in B27-negative cases is less certain. This study assessed HLA class I gene associations in Chinese HLA-B27-negative AS patients. Methods. Forty-one Chinese HLA-B27-negative AS patients fulfilling the modified New York diagnostic criteria for AS were recruited, and 11

  18. Translation into Brazilian Portuguese, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Stanford presenteeism scale-6 and work instability scale for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Frauendorf, Renata; de Medeiros Pinheiro, Marcelo; Ciconelli, Rozana Mesquita

    2014-12-01

    Loss of productivity at work, as a result of health problems, is becoming an issue of interest due to the high burden it represents in society. The measurement of such phenomenon can be made using generic and specific scales for certain diseases such as the Stanford Presenteeism Scale (SPS-6) and the Work Instability Scale for Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS-WIS), specific for patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The aim of this study was to translate and perform a cross-cultural adaptation of SPS-6 and AS-WIS into Portuguese and check their psychometric properties. The study also aimed to evaluate the relationship between the general scores of the scales and the main sociodemographic and clinical data, lifestyles, and absenteeism in patients with AS and correlate these variables with SPS-6 and AS-WIS scales. A sample of 120 patients with AS and 80 workers at a university hospital was evaluated. The processes for the translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the instruments followed preestablished steps and rules presented in the literature. For the evaluation of measurement properties and correlations between scales, intra-class correlation coefficient (reproducibility analysis), Cronbach alpha (internal consistency), and Pearson correlation coefficient (validity) were employed. The inter-observer (0.986) and intra-observer (0.992) reproducibilities of the AS-WIS were shown to be high as well as the internal consistency (0.995). Similarly, the inter-observer reliability of SPS-6 was considered good (0.890), although it showed a poorer performance when considering the same observer (Pearson correlation coefficient?=?0.675 and intra-class correlation?=?0.656). Internal consistency, for the total number of items, as measured by Cronbach alpha, was 0.889. The validity of the scales was evaluated thru the comparison of the achieved scores with the results of the WLQ, SF-36, ASQoL, BASFI, BASDAI, HAQ-S, and SRQ-20 instruments. Correlations between loss of productivity at work, worse quality of life, presence of emotional disturbances, and worse health conditions were positive. The process of translation, cross-cultural adaptation, and validation of the SPS-6 as a generic measurement for the loss of productivity at work and of the AS-WIS as a specific measurement for patients with AS are valid, reproducible, and specific instruments to be used in Brazil. In both scales, productivity at work was associated to advanced age, higher rate of absenteeism in the last month and year, presence of peripheral arthritis, and a larger number of comorbidities in patients with AS. The AS-WIS and SPS-6 showed a good correlation among them although they are not mutually exclusive but supplementary. PMID:24221505

  19. Interleukin-6 serum concentration in ankylosing spondylitis: a reliable predictor of disease progression in the subsequent year?

    PubMed

    Falkenbach, A; Herold, M; Wigand, R

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether in ankylosing spondylitis (AS), interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a reliable predictor of changes in mobility in the subsequent year. Of 261 AS patients who had been enrolled in a previous study, 128 returned for treatment at our health centre after 1 year (+/-3 months). The variables for mobility after 1 year (II) were compared with the findings of the previous year (I). Differences in parameters for mobility were related to the serum concentration of IL-6 in the previous year. Relation between serum concentration of IL-6 and difference (II-I) in occiput-to-wall distance (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient r(s), P value) was 0.02, 0.82; chin-chest distance -0.09, 0.31; cervical rotation -0.08, 0.39; chest expansion 0.05, 0.54; finger-floor distance -0.02, 0.84; Ott sign (flexibility of the thoracic spine) -0.11, 0.22; Schober sign 0.01, 0.94. After 1 year there was a significant improvement in cervical rotation in patients with low IL-6 serum concentration (lower quartile), but not in those with high levels of IL-6 (upper quartile). No further difference was seen between patients with high or low levels of IL-6. The present data suggest that the serum concentration of IL-6 does not allow a prediction of disease progression in the subsequent year. PMID:10836525

  20. Improved precision of syndesmophyte measurement for the evaluation of ankylosing spondylitis using CT: a phantom and patient study

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sovira; Yao, Jianhua; Yao, Lawrence; Ward, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a disease characterized by abnormal bone formation (syndesmophyte) at the margins of intervertebral disk spaces. Syndesmophyte growth is currently typically monitored by visual inspection of radiographs. The limitations inherent to the modality (2D projection of a 3D object) and rater (qualitative human judgment) may compromise sensitivity. With newly available treatments, more precise measures of syndesmophytes are needed to determine if treatment can slow rates of syndesmophyte growth. We previously presented a computer algorithm measuring syndesmophyte volumes and heights in the 3D space of CT scans. In this study we present improvements to the original algorithm and evaluate the gain in precision as applied to an anthropomorphic vertebral phantom and patients. Each patient was scanned twice in one day, thus providing two syndesmophyte volume and height measures. The difference between those two measures (ideally zero) determines our algorithm’s precision. The technical improvements to the algorithm decreased the mean volume difference (standard deviation) between scans from 3.01% (2.83%) to 1.31% (0.95%) and the mean height difference between scans from 3.16% (2.99%) to 1.56% (1.13%). The high precision of the improved algorithm holds promise for application to longitudinal clinical studies. PMID:22750760

  1. Improved precision of syndesmophyte measurement for the evaluation of ankylosing spondylitis using CT: a phantom and patient study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Sovira; Yao, Jianhua; Yao, Lawrence; Ward, Michael M.

    2012-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a disease characterized by abnormal bone formation (syndesmophyte) at the margins of inter-vertebral disc spaces. Syndesmophyte growth is currently typically monitored by the visual inspection of radiographs. The limitations inherent to the modality (2D projection of a 3D object) and rater (qualitative human judgment) may compromise sensitivity. With newly available treatments, more precise measures of syndesmophytes are needed to determine whether treatment can slow rates of syndesmophyte growth. We previously presented a computer algorithm measuring syndesmophyte volumes and heights in the 3D space of CT scans. In this study, we present improvements to the original algorithm and evaluate the gain in precision as applied to an anthropomorphic vertebral phantom and patients. Each patient was scanned twice in one day, thus providing two syndesmophyte volume and height measures. The difference between those two measures (ideally zero) determines our algorithm's precision. The technical improvements to the algorithm decreased the mean volume difference (standard deviation) between scans from 3.01% (2.83%) to 1.31% (0.95%) and the mean height difference between scans from 3.16% (2.99%) to 1.56% (1.13%). The high precision of the improved algorithm holds promise for application to longitudinal clinical studies.

  2. Risk of coronary artery disease in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Srivali, Narat; Kittanamongkolchai, Wonngarm

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between coronary artery disease (CAD) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies that reported relative risks, hazard ratios, standardized prevalence ratio or standardized incidence ratios with 95% confidence comparing CAD risk in patients with AS versus non-AS controls. Pooled risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance of DerSimonian and Laird. Results Out of 229 potentially relevant articles, ten studies (five retrospective cohort studies and five cross-sectional studies) were identified and included in our data analysis. The overall pooled risk ratio of CAD in patients with AS was 1.41 (95% CI: 1.29-1.54). The pooled risk ratios for cross-sectional and cohort studies were 2.08 (95% CI: 1.28-3.40) and 1.36 (95% CI: 1.31-1.41), respectively. The statistical heterogeneity of this meta-analysis was moderate with an I2 of 56%. Conclusions Our study demonstrated a statistically significant increased CAD risk among patients with AS with 41% excess risk. PMID:25861606

  3. A Rare Co-Segregation-Mutation in the Insulin Receptor Substrate 1 Gene in One Chinese Family with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pingping; Wu, Xinyu; Huang, Jinxian; Li, Chao; Liao, Zetao; Xie, Yingying; Lv, Qing; Wei, Qiujing; Li, Tianwang; Huang, Jianlin; Cao, Shuangyan; Shen, Yan; Gu, Jieruo

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS; MIM 106300) is a common rheumatic disease with strong genetic components affecting approximately 0.3% of the population. The exact genetic mechanism of AS remains elusive. Our previous study showed that AS could be transmitted in an autosomal dominant inheritance mode and a 6-cM candidate region located on the chromosome 2q36.1-36.3 was mapped in a Chinese family. Mutation screening was conducted within the candidate region in the family and other AS by sequencing, and the novel mutation will be further validated in other AS families, sporadic cases and healthy controls by mass spectrometry. We identified a rare non-synonymous mutation (Arg580Gly) in insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) co-segregated with disease phenotype in patients of the family, which was not found in other AS families, sporadic patients and healthy controls. In the study, we found a rare non-synonymous mutation in IRS1 co-segregation in one Chinese family with AS, which indicated a new candidate disease causative gene for AS. PMID:25978640

  4. Circulating Levels of Soluble Receptor Activator of NF-?B Ligand and Matrix Metalloproteinase 3 (and Their Antagonists) in Asian Indian Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rajni; Aggarwal, Amita

    2013-01-01

    Background. Bone loss in ankylosing spondylitis may be related to inflammation. Data from previous studies on circulating levels of sRANKL, OPG, MMP3, and TIMP is inconsistent; thus this study is planned to look at this aspect in Asian Indian patients. Methods. Cross-sectional study included patients with ankylosing spondylitis and age- and gender-similar controls. Serum levels of sRANKL, OPG, MMP-3, and TIMP-1 were measured by ELISA. Results. Included 85 patients (M?:?F = 82?:?3) having mean age (±SD) 33.0 ± 10.0 years and disease duration 11.3 ± 7.3 years. BASDAI, BASFI, BASMI, and ESR were 4.0 ± 2.2, 3.9 ± 2.8, 3.0 ± 2.8, and 59.2 ± 31.2, respectively. Patients had higher mean (±SD) OPG level (649.7 ± 286.8, 389.3 ± 244.8?pg/mL, P < 0.001). However, there was no difference in sRANKL (349.2 ± 872.0, 554.7 ± 1850.1, P = ns). Serum MMP-3 (91.4 ± 84.7, 55.9 ± 37.1?ng/mL, P < 0.01) and TIMP-1 (520.6 ± 450.7, 296.5 ± 114.2?ng/mL, P < 0.001) levels were higher in patients; however, there was no difference in MMP-3/TIMP-1 ratio. Conclusion. Circulating levels of OPG were higher; however, there was no difference in sRANKL in Asian Indian ankylosing spondylitis patients. Although both MMP-3 and TIMP-1 were raised, their ratio was not different from that of controls. PMID:24078814

  5. Daily physical activity in ankylosing spondylitis: validity and reliability of the IPAQ and SQUASH and the relation with clinical assessments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the construct validity and test-retest reliability of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ; long form) and the Short QUestionnaire to Assess Health-enhancing physical activity (SQUASH) and to investigate the relation between daily physical activity and clinical assessments in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods For validity, the self-report questionnaires IPAQ and SQUASH were compared with daily physical activity assessed with the ActiGraph accelerometer during 7 consecutive days in 63 AS outpatients. For reliability, the IPAQ and SQUASH were administered twice approximately 1 week apart in 52 AS outpatients. In all 115 patients, clinical assessments were performed at the outpatient clinic. Results IPAQ and SQUASH total scores correlated significantly with accelerometer outcome: ? = 0.38 and r = 0.35, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients between first and second assessments of the IPAQ and SQUASH were 0.83 and 0.89, respectively. Bland-Altman analyses showed no systemic bias, but in particular for the IPAQ the 95% limits of agreement were wide. Daily physical activity assessed by accelerometer, IPAQ, and SQUASH correlated significantly with disease activity, physical activity, and quality of life. A relation with spinal mobility was found only for the accelerometer and SQUASH. The direction of these correlations indicates that higher daily physical activity is related to lower disease activity and better physical function, spinal mobility and quality of life. Conclusions Both physical activity questionnaires showed modest construct validity. The SQUASH showed good test-retest reliability, superior to the IPAQ. These results indicate that the SQUASH is more suitable than the IPAQ to assess daily physical activity in AS population studies. However, it is desirable to add questions on AS-specific physical activity. Further studies are needed to investigate the causality of the relation between daily physical activity and clinical assessments. PMID:23971767

  6. Adaptation and validation of the Ankylosing Spondylitis Work Instability Scale (AS-WIS) for use in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Küçükdeveci, Ay?e A; Ataman, ?ebnem; Genç, Aysun; Kutlay, ?ehim; Elhan, Atilla H; ?ztuna, Derya; Tennant, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Ankylosing Spondylitis Work Instability Scale (AS-WIS) is a recently developed 20-item measure to assess work instability in AS. This study aimed to adapt the AS-WIS to Turkish and to test its reliability and validity. After the translation process, 132 AS patients were assessed by the AS-WIS, Bath AS Disease Activity Index, Bath AS Functional Index and the AS Quality of Life Questionnaire. Reliability was tested by internal consistency, person separation index (PSI) and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC); internal construct validity by Rasch analysis; external construct validity by associations with comparator scales and cross-cultural validity by comparison with the original UK data. Reliability of the Turkish AS-WIS was good with Cronbach's ? and PSI of 0.88 and test-retest ICC of 0.91. Data showed good fit to Rasch model [mean item fit: -0.477 (SD 1.047), Chi-square interaction: 60.9 (df = 40, p = 0.018)]. There was no differential item functioning by age, gender, disease duration or work type. The scale was strictly unidimensional. 51 % of the patients were at moderate risk, and 9 % were at high risk of having to give up their work. External construct validity was confirmed by expected correlations with comparator scales, and a clear gradient of disease activity and functional status across increasing levels of risk. Cross-cultural validity showed some differences in item locations, but this cancelled out at the test level. Turkish version of the AS-WIS is reliable, valid and available for use in routine clinical setting to identify patients who are at risk of having to give up their current job. PMID:24889835

  7. Is the work ability index useful to evaluate absence days in ankylosing spondylitis patients? A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Katharina; Niedermann, Karin; Tschopp, Alois; Klipstein, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background The work incapacity of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) ranges between 3% and 50% in Europe. In many countries, work incapacity is difficult to quantify. The work ability index (WAI) is applied to measure the work ability in workers, but it is not well investigated in patients. Aims To investigate the work incapacity in terms of absence days in patients with AS and to evaluate whether the WAI reflects the absence from work. Hypothesis Absence days can be estimated based on the WAI and other variables. Design Cross-sectional design. Setting In a secondary care centre in Switzerland, the WAI and a questionnaire about work absence were administered in AS patients prior to cardiovascular training. The number of absence days was collected retrospectively. The absence days were estimated using a two-part regression model. Participants 92 AS patients (58 men (63%)). Inclusion criteria: AS diagnosis, ability to cycle, age between 18 and 65?years. Exclusion criteria: severe heart disease. Primary and secondary outcome measures Absence days. Results Of the 92 patients, 14 received a disability pension and 78 were in the working process. The median absence days per year of the 78 patients due to AS alone and including other reasons was 0 days (IQR 0–12.3) and 2.5?days (IQR 0–19), respectively. The WAI score (regression coefficient=?4.66 (p<0.001, CI ?6.1 to ?3.2), ‘getting a disability pension’ (regression coefficient=?106.8 (p<0.001, 95% CI ?141.6 to ?72.0) and other not significant variables explained 70% of the variance in absence days (p<0.001), and therefore may estimate the number of absence days. Conclusions Absences in our sample of AS patients were equal to pan-European countries. In groups of AS patients, the WAI and other variables are valid to estimate absence days with the help of a two-part regression model. PMID:23524041

  8. Lumbar osteotomy for correction of thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity in ankylosing spondylitis. A structured review of three methods of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Van Royen, B J; De Gast, A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Three operative techniques have been described to correct thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity (TLKD) resulting from ankylosing spondylitis (AS) at the level of the lumbar spine: opening wedge osteotomy, polysegmental wedge osteotomies, and closing wedge osteotomy. Little knowledge exists on the indication for, and outcome of these corrective lumbar osteotomies.?METHODS—A structured review of the medical literature was performed.?RESULTS—A search of the literature revealed 856 patients reported in 41 articles published between 1945 and 1998. The mean age at time of operation was 41 years, male-female ratio 7.5 to 1. In 451 patients an open wedge osteotomy was performed. Polysegmental wedge osteotomies were performed in 249 patients and a closing wedge osteotomy in 156 patients. Most of the studies primarily focus on the surgical technique. Technical outcome data were poorly reported. Sixteen reports, including 523 patients, met the inclusion criteria of this study, and could be analysed for technical outcome data. The average correction achieved with each surgical techniques ranged from 37 to 40 degrees. Loss of correction was mainly reported in patients treated by open wedge osteotomy and polysegmental wedge osteotomies. Neurological complications were reported in all three techniques. The perioperative mortality was 4%. Pulmonary, cardiac and intestinal problems were found to be the major cause of fatal complications.?CONCLUSION—Lumbar osteotomy for correction of TLKD resulting from AS is a major surgery. The indication for these lumbar osteotomies as well as the degree of correction in the lumbar spine has not yet been established. Furthermore, there is a need for a generally accepted clinical score that encompasses accurate preoperative and postoperative assessment of the spinal deformity. The results of this review suggest that the data from the literature are not suitable for decision making with regard to surgical treatment of TLKD resulting from AS.?? PMID:10381482

  9. Prevalence of ankylosing spondylitis in Poland and costs generated by AS patients in the public healthcare system.

    PubMed

    ?liwczy?ski, A; Raciborski, F; K?ak, A; Brzozowska, M; Czeleko, T; Kwiatkowska, B; J?drzejczyk, T; Marczak, M

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the research was to analyse the prevalence of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in Poland and to assess the costs generated by AS patients in the system of public health care. The database of national payer-National Health Fund (NHF)-has been analysed. For the analysis, the information has been extracted from IT system about each treated patient with ICD-10 = M45 code as main or coexisting diagnosis included in the mandatory reports from entities of public healthcare service. In the years 2008-2013, from 28,800 to 32,800 persons diagnosed with AS as main or coexisting diagnosis have been registered in NHF database. In 2013, the prevalence amounted to 7.48 for 10,000 persons of general population-the highest in Kujawy-Pomerania province (10.92 per 10,000 inhabitants), Silesia (10.04) and ?wi?tokrzyskie province (9.81). In male patients, this coefficient amounted to 8.91 per 10,000 inhabitants, whereas in female-to 6.15. In 2013, the prevalence for men was the highest in the age group of 60-64 years and for women in the group of 65-69 years. The healthcare expenses related to AS financed by the NHF increased from 13,200 million PLN (6.3 million USD) in 2008 to 72,600 million PLN (21,900 million USD) in 2013. The increase in healthcare expenses related to AS patients in the public healthcare system is significant and noticeable. High regional diversity is also a vital issue. It is necessary to carry out further research on the incidence rate of AS in Polish population. PMID:25773659

  10. Are clinical measures influenced by various ethnic origins in Iranian patients with ankylosing spondylitis?A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi, Sasan; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Qorbani, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) may manifest with heterogeneous patterns according to ethnic origins. The purpose of this study was to describe the influence of various Iranian ethnic origins on clinical measures in patients with AS. Methods: 0ne hundred sixty-three AS patients diagnosed by modified New York 1984 criteria were enrolled consecutively. The patients were classified into Fars, Turk, Kord, Lor and other ethnic origins. Several clinical measures were described and compared between the ethnic origins. Results: The highest and the lowest finger to floor distance was observed for Fars ethnicity (20.4±14.8) and other ethnicities (5.9±8.1), respectively (P=0.04). The frequency of severe decrease in cervical slope was significantly different between various ethnicities (P=0.025). The most and the least frequency of severe decrease in cervical slope was observed in Fars patients (61.3%) and other ethnicities (20%), respectively. The frequency of severe thoracic kyphosis was significantly dissimilar between various ethnicities (P=0.006). The most and the least frequency of severe increase in thoracic kyphosis was observed in Fars (68.8%) and Lor patients (25%), respectively. A significant relationship was seen only between other ethnicities and finger to floor distance, lateral lumbar flexion, chest expansion and BASDAI (P<0.05). Conclusion: Clinical expression variations in AS disease might be influenced by various Iranian ethnic origins. A larger sample size with other Iranian ethnicities (Baluch, Arab, etc) is required to clear the definite relationship between Iranian ethnicities and clinical expression. PMID:24778778

  11. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Infliximab in ankylosing spondylitis: alone or in

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    with methotrexate? A pharmacokinetic comparative study Denis Mulleman1,2* , Francine Lauféron1,2 , Daniel Wendling3 Introduction: Methotrexate (MTX) has been shown to modify infliximab pharmacokinetics in rheumatoid arthritis responders at 24 weeks [1]. Although methotrexate (MTX) is often used for patients with pre- dominantly

  12. Genetic Polymorphisms of Stromal Interaction Molecule 1 Associated with the Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate and C-Reactive Protein in HLA-B27 Positive Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wei, James Cheng-Chung; Hung, Kuo-Sheng; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Wong, Ruey-Hong; Huang, Chun-Huang; Jan, Ming-Shiou; Wu, Shyh-Jong; Juan, Yung-Shun; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2012-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammation of the sacroiliac joints, spine and peripheral joints. The development of ankylosing spondylitis is still unclear. Genetics factors such as human leukocyte antigen HLA-B27 and ERAP1 have been widely reported to associate to AS susceptibility. In this study, we enrolled 361 AS patients and selected four tagging single nucleotides polymorphisms (tSNPs) at STIM1 gene. The correlation between STIM1 genetic polymorphisms and AS activity index (BASDAI, BASFI, BAS-G) as well as laboratory parameters of inflammation (erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP)) were tested. Our results indicated that HLA-B27 positive AS patients who are carrying the minor allele homozygous G/G genotype of SNP rs3750996 significantly associated with a higher level of ESR in serum. Furthermore, rs3750996/rs3750994 pairwise allele analysis indicated that G-C haplotypes also significantly correlated with higher level of ESR as well as CRP. These findings provide a better understanding of STIM1 genetic contribution to the pathogenesis of AS. PMID:23272049

  13. Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 score (RAPID3) correlates well with Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity index (BASDAI) in the assessment of disease activity and monitoring progression of axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Danve, Abhijeet; Reddy, Anusha; Vakil-Gilani, Kiana; Garg, Neha; Dinno, Alexis; Deodhar, Atul

    2015-01-01

    Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3) is a composite index, very useful for assessment of disease activity of various rheumatic diseases including RA. If RAPID3 can also reliably measure disease activity in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), it may prove to be a practical and effective quantitative assessment tool in busy practices. We studied the association of RAPID3 with Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) seen from 2007 to 2012 were classified as having AS or non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA) using modified New York criteria and Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society criteria, respectively. Patients with simultaneous BASDAI and RAPID3 scores were enrolled (N?=?112; 105 with AS, seven with nr-axSpA). Multiple regression and nonparametric receiver operating characteristics were used. Baseline mean (SD) BASDAI and RAPID3 were 4.2 (2.5) and 3.8 (2.3), respectively. Multiple linear regressions modeled a quadratic relationship between BASDAI and RAPID3 for 321 observations in 112 patients with axSpA (1) cross-sectionally: BASDAI predicted by RAPID3 (??=?1.171; s.e.?=?0.113, p?

  14. Decreased Frequencies of Circulating Follicular Helper T Cell Counterparts and Plasmablasts in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients Naïve for TNF Blockers

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Caro, María-Belén; Arroyo-Villa, Irene; Castillo-Gallego, Concepción; de Miguel, Eugenio; Peiteado, Diana; Plasencia-Rodríguez, Chamaida; Villalba, Alejandro; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Puig-Kröger, Amaya; Martín-Mola, Emilio; Miranda-Carús, María-Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    Follicular helper T cells (Tfh), localized in lymphoid organs, promote B cell differentiation and function. Circulating CD4 T cells expressing CXCR5, ICOS and/or PD-1 are counterparts of Tfh. Three subpopulations of circulating CD4+CXCR5+ cells have been described: CXCR3+CCR6- (Tfh-Th1), CXCR3-CCR6+ (Tfh-Th17), and CXCR3-CCR6- (Tfh-Th2). Only Tfh-Th17 and Tfh-Th2 function as B cell helpers. Our objective was to study the frequencies of circulating Tfh (cTfh), cTfh subsets and plasmablasts (CD19+CD20-CD27+CD38high cells), and the function of cTfh cells, in patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). To this end, peripheral blood was drawn from healthy controls (HC) (n?=?50), AS patients naïve for TNF blockers (AS/nb) (n?=?25) and AS patients treated with TNF blockers (AS/b) (n?=?25). The frequencies of cTfh and plasmablasts were determined by flow cytometry. Cocultures of magnetically sorted CD4+CXCR5+ T cells with autologous CD19+CD27- naïve B cells were established from 3 AS/nb patients and 3 HC, and concentrations of IgG, A and M were measured in supernatants. We obseved that AS/nb but not AS/b patients, demonstrated decreased frequencies of circulating CD4+CXCR5+ICOS+PD-1+ cells and plasmablasts, together with a decreased (Tfh-Th17+Tfh-Th2)/Tfh-Th1 ratio. The amounts of IgG and IgA produced in cocultures of CD4+CXCR5+ T cells with CD19+CD27- B cells of AS/nb patients were significantly lower than observed in cocultures established from HC. In summary, AS/nb but not AS/b patients, demonstrate a decreased frequency of cTfh and plasmablasts, and an underrepresentation of cTfh subsets bearing a B helper phenotype. In addition, peripheral blood CD4+CXCR5+ T cells of AS/nb patients showed a decreased capacity to help B cells ex vivo. PMID:25203742

  15. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and parathyroid hormone in patients with ankylosing spondylitis before and after a three-week rehabilitation treatment at high altitude during winter and spring.

    PubMed

    Falkenbach, A; Tripathi, R; Sedlmeyer, A; Staudinger, M; Herold, M

    2001-04-30

    Does a sojourn at high altitude during the winter and spring improve vitamin D status (and possibly suppress parathyroid hormone [PTH]) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS)? In 73 patients with AS, serum concentrations of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D] and PTH were determined before and after a three-week rehabilitation treatment at Bad Gastein (1000 m above sea level). At the first examination, serum 25(OH)D was median (25th, 75th percentile) 15.5 ng mL-1 (10.0 ng mL-1, 20.6 ng mL-1). Thirteen patients (18%) had a 25(OH)D concentration below 8 ng mL-1. In 53 patients (73%) the level was below 20 ng mL-1. After the sojourn, 25(OH)D significantly (p = 0.02) increased to 19.7 (11.3, 24.6) ng mL-1. PTH did not change significantly, being 32 (22.4, 43.9) pg mL-1 before and 30.3 (24.1, 39.9) pg mL-1 after the sojourn. Analysing different periods of sojourn, a significant (p < 0.001) increase in 25(OH)D was found in April but not in the other months. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis may have extremely low levels of 25(OH)D. The results of the present study suggest that a sojourn at high altitude in early spring is liable to reduce vitamin D deficiency. PMID:11388078

  16. Case-only designs for exploring the interaction between FCRL4 gene and suspected environmental factors in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Hu, Yanting; Zeng, Zhen; Liu, Si; Liu, Li; Yang, Ting; Wu, Shanshan; Fan, Dazhi; Xu, Shengqian; Xu, Jianhua; Wang, Jing; Pan, Faming

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the interaction between FCRL4 gene and environmental factors in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Two hundred ninety-seven ankylosing spondylitis (AS) Han Chinese patients were selected who were diagnosed at the Department of Rheumatology, First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University, in accordance with the modified New York criteria. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was genotyped by multiplex SNaPshot technique. The interaction between FCRL4 gene and ten environmental factors in AS patients was assessed by using a case-only study. The interaction between FCRL4 gene (rs2777963) and environmental factors was analyzed by chi-square test and logistic models. p values, odds ratio, and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were used for estimating the effects of interaction. Odds ratio (OR) for the interaction of gene × environment (G?×?E) between drinking group and non-drinking group was 2.61 [95 % CI (1.30, 5.23), p=0.007], with statistical significance. Within the cooking oil group, there also may be an interaction of G?×?E between main animal oil and main plant oil [OR=10.55, 95 % CI (5.55, 20.04), p<0.001]. However, there was no interaction between FCRL4 gene and the other eight environmental factors in patients with AS. The observed significant gene-environment interaction suggests that drinking and cooking oil with FCRL4 gene has a significant interaction. Drinking and cooking oil may be risk exposure factors to take a combined action with predisposing genes in patients with AS. A larger sample case-control study is needed to illustrate the interaction mechanism in the further study. PMID:25012527

  17. Diagnosis of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... any restriction of chest expansion. Other symptoms and indicators are also taken into account including a history ... racial groups. It can be a very strong indicator in that over 95% of people in the ...

  18. Symptoms of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in a peripheral joint such as the hip, ankle, elbow, knee, heel or shoulder. This pain is commonly caused by enthesitis, which is the inflammation of the site where a ligament or tendon attaches to bone. Inflammation and pain ...

  19. In ankylosing spondylitis serum interleukin-6 correlates with the degree of mobility restriction, but not with short-term changes in the variables for mobility.

    PubMed

    Falkenbach, A; Herold, M

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the serum concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6) reflects disease activity in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A group of 271 AS patients were enrolled in the study, 261 of whom completed the entire protocol (201 males, 60 females, median age of 53 years). Serum IL-6 was measured three times (I, baseline; II, after 10-12 days; III, after 17-24 days) during a 3- or 4-week treatment at the health resort. At the same times, the variables for mobility were measured, and the patients were asked to assess their complaints (score) in a self-styled questionnaire. The serum concentration of IL-6 correlated with the measurements of occiput-to-wall distance, cervical rotation, finger-floor distance and Schober sign, and with morning pain at all three evaluations. Comparisons between changes in IL-6 and changes in the variables (measures of mobility, scores of the questionnaires) did not reveal significant correlations. Present data would suggest that in AS the serum concentration of IL-6 indicates the degree of mobility restriction resulting from previous disease progression, but is not a reliable marker of current disease activity. PMID:9833250

  20. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Improves the Effects of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on the Treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Deng; Wang, Peng; Li, Yuxi; Xie, Zhongyu; Wang, Le; Su, Hongjun; Deng, Wen; Wu, Yanfeng; Shen, Huiyong

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the immunosuppressive effects of both all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The present study aimed to assess the immunoregulatory effects of ATRA on MSCs in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Bone marrow-derived MSCs from healthy donors were pretreated with ATRA and cocultured with CD3/28-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from AS patients. Frequencies of Th17 and regulatory T (Treg) cells were analyzed using flow cytometry. The secretion and the mRNA level of key cytokines were measured with cytometric bead array and quantitative real-time PCR, respectively. ATRA pretreatment increased interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion of MSCs. Th17 and Treg subset populations were increased and reduced by ATRA-pretreated MSCs, respectively. ATRA-pretreated MSCs significantly decreased not only the vital pathogenic cytokine in AS, tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), but also AS-boosting factors interleukin-17 (IL-17A) and interferon-? (IFN-?). These results indicated that IL-6 may be a potential protective factor in AS and highlighted the promising role of ATRA in improving the efficacy of MSC-based treatment of AS. PMID:26124839

  1. Participation of antigens related to the psoriasis associated antigen, pso p27, in immune complex formation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rødahl, E; Asbakk, K; Iversen, O J

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of five serum samples and three synovial fluids from patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and five serum samples from healthy blood donors for the presence of antibodies cross reacting with the Fc part of rabbit IgG (rheumatoid factors (RFs] using an isotype specific, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed only insignificant amounts of free RFs, while IgG RFs were observed in alkaline dissociated circulating immune complexes (CICs). Only insignificant amounts of free antibodies reacting with the psoriasis associated antigen pso p27 could be detected in the samples, while extensive amounts of IgG antibodies and moderate amounts of IgM antibodies reacting with pso p27 were detected in alkaline dissociated CICs from the patients. Pso p27 has been reported to share a common determinant with the Fc part of human IgG. Removal of the RF activity from the CICs of patients with AS by absorption with IgG resulted in a decrease of the anti-pso p27 activity. Monoclonal anti-pso p27 antibodies in a sandwich ELISA were used to detect antigens cross reacting with pso p27. A positive reaction was observed in all serum CICs and in one of the synovial fluid CICs. The data indicate that antigens related to pso p27 participate in CIC formation in AS and may also be responsible for the elicitation of rheumatoid factors in patients with AS. PMID:3415362

  2. Participation of antigens related to the psoriasis associated antigen, pso p27, in immune complex formation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Rødahl, E; Asbakk, K; Iversen, O J

    1988-08-01

    Analysis of five serum samples and three synovial fluids from patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and five serum samples from healthy blood donors for the presence of antibodies cross reacting with the Fc part of rabbit IgG (rheumatoid factors (RFs] using an isotype specific, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed only insignificant amounts of free RFs, while IgG RFs were observed in alkaline dissociated circulating immune complexes (CICs). Only insignificant amounts of free antibodies reacting with the psoriasis associated antigen pso p27 could be detected in the samples, while extensive amounts of IgG antibodies and moderate amounts of IgM antibodies reacting with pso p27 were detected in alkaline dissociated CICs from the patients. Pso p27 has been reported to share a common determinant with the Fc part of human IgG. Removal of the RF activity from the CICs of patients with AS by absorption with IgG resulted in a decrease of the anti-pso p27 activity. Monoclonal anti-pso p27 antibodies in a sandwich ELISA were used to detect antigens cross reacting with pso p27. A positive reaction was observed in all serum CICs and in one of the synovial fluid CICs. The data indicate that antigens related to pso p27 participate in CIC formation in AS and may also be responsible for the elicitation of rheumatoid factors in patients with AS. PMID:3415362

  3. Influence of Anti-TNF and Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs Therapy on Pulmonary Forced Vital Capacity Associated to Ankylosing Spondylitis: A 2-Year Follow-Up Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe; Vásquez-Jiménez, José Clemente; De la Cerda-Trujillo, Liliana Faviola; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Norma Alejandra; Díaz-Rizo, Valeria; Díaz-González, Viviana; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto German; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Ingrid Patricia; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo Hernan; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of anti-TNF agents plus synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) versus DMARDs alone for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) with reduced pulmonary function vital capacity (FVC%). Methods. In an observational study, we included AS who had FVC% <80% at baseline. Twenty patients were taking DMARDs and 16 received anti-TNF + DMARDs. Outcome measures: changes in FVC%, BASDAI, BASFI, 6-minute walk test (6MWT), Borg scale after 6MWT, and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire at 24 months. Results. Both DMARDs and anti-TNF + DMARDs groups had similar baseline values in FVC%. Significant improvement was achieved with anti-TNF + DMARDs in FVC%, at 24 months, when compared to DMARDs alone (P = 0.04). Similarly, patients in anti-TNF + DMARDs group had greater improvement in BASDAI, BASFI, Borg scale, and 6MWT when compared to DMARDs alone. After 2 years of follow-up, 14/16 (87.5%) in the anti-TNF + DMARDs group achieved the primary outcome: FVC% ?80%, compared with 11/20 (55%) in the DMARDs group (P = 0.04). Conclusions. Patients with anti-TNF + DMARDs had a greater improvement in FVC% and cardiopulmonary scales at 24 months compared with DMARDs. This preliminary study supports the fact that anti-TNF agents may offer additional benefits compared to DMARDs in patients with AS who have reduced FVC%. PMID:26078986

  4. Association between mean platelet volume and bone mineral density in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Resorlu, Hatice; Resorlu, Mustafa; Gokmen, Ferhat; Akbal, Ayla; Adam, Gurhan; Komurcu, Erkam; Goksel, Ferdi; Guven, Mustafa; Aras, Adem Bozkurt; Sariyildirim, Abdullah; Cevizci, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim this study was to assess the relation between bone mineral density (BMD) and mean platelet volume (MPV) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients, and evaluate the diagnostic role of the diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). [Subjects and Methods] Fifty patients diagnosed with AS were divided into two groups on the basis of BMD, a normal group (n=30) and an osteopenic (n=20) group. [Results] Duration of disease in the group with a normal BMD was 10.3±7.0?years, while it was 16.7±12.2?years in the osteopenia group. MPV was high in the osteopenia group, while no significant differences were observed between the groups in terms of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and platelet distribution width (PDW). There was a positive correlation between MPV and duration of disease. Correlations between ADC value and the lumbar T score, femoral neck T score, and duration of disease were insignificant. A negative correlation was observed between BMD and disease duration. [Conclusion] Diffusion-weighted imaging provides valuable results in osteoporosis but is not a suitable technique for evaluating BMD in patients with AS because of the local and systemic inflammatory effects in the musculoskeletal system. The common pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and osteoporosis plays an important role in the negative correlation observed between MPV and BMD in patients with AS. PMID:25995574

  5. Expression of PADI4 in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and its role in mediating the effects of TNF-? on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Dai, Min

    2015-08-01

    Peptidyl arginine deiminase, type IV (PADI4) plays an important role in inflammation and in the immune response, and it has been shown to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). However, little is known about the precise role of PADI4 in the pathogenic process in vitro. In this study, we aimed to investigate the expression of PADI4 in the synovial tissue of patients with AS and to determine the potential effects of PADI4 on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) proliferation and osteogenic differentiation under normal and pathological conditions. Synovial tissues were collected from 18 patients with AS and 11 control subjects. The results of reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis revealed that the expression of PADI4 was upregulated in the patients with AS. In the hMSCs, the protein expression of PADI4 was increased following treatment with tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MTT assay revealed that TNF-? promoted hMSC proliferation. In addition, we found that TNF-? promoted the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, as demonstrated by an increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, as well as an increase in the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and Osterix. The hMSCs were transfected with PADI4 siRNA to silence PADI4 expression. We found that, under normal conditions, the silencing of PADI4 did not have any effect on hMSC proliferation or osteogenic differentiation. However, in the presence of TNF-?, hMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation were induced. These effects were attenuated by the silencing of PADI4. In conclusion, the findings of this study demonstrate that the expression of PADI4 differs between patients with AS and normal subjects. In addition, our data suggest that PADI4 plays a role in hMSC proliferation and differentiation, which are induced by TNF-?. PMID:26082376

  6. Long-Term Frequent Use of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Might Protect Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis from Cardiovascular Diseases: A Nationwide Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wen-Chan; Ou, Tsan-Teng; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Wu, Cheng-Chin; Tung, Yi-Ching

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this case-control study was to investigate the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) following non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A total of 10,763 new AS patients were identified from the National Taiwan Health Insurance claims database during the period from 1997 to 2008. In all, 421 AS patients with CVD were recruited as cases, and up to 2-fold as many sex- and age-matched controls were selected. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) between NSAID use and CVD incidence. The medication possession rate (MPR) was used to evaluate NSAID exposure during the study period. AS patients had increased risk of CVD (OR, 1.68; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.57 to 1.80). Among frequent (MPR?80%) COX II users, the risks for all types of CVD were ten times lower than those among non-users at 24 months (OR, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.92). Among frequent NSAID users, the risks of major adverse cardiac event (MACE) were significantly lower at 12 months (OR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.76)—a trend showing that longer exposure correlated with lower risk. Regarding non-frequent NSAID users (MPR<80%), short-term exposure did carry higher risk (for 6 months: OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.86), but after 12 months, the risk no longer existed. We conclude that long-term frequent use of NSAIDs might protect AS patients from CVD; however, NSAIDs still carried higher short-term risk in the non-frequent users. PMID:25970845

  7. A cautionary note on the impact of protocol changes for genome-wide association SNP × SNP interaction studies: an example on ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Bessonov, Kyrylo; Gusareva, Elena S; Van Steen, Kristel

    2015-07-01

    Genome-wide association interaction (GWAI) studies have increased in popularity. Yet to date, no standard protocol exists. In practice, any GWAI workflow involves making choices about quality control strategy, SNP filtering, linkage disequilibrium (LD) pruning, analytic tool to model or to test for genetic interactions. Each of these can have an impact on the final epistasis findings and may affect their reproducibility in follow-up analyses. Choosing an analytic tool is not straightforward, as different tools exist and current understanding about their performance is based on often very particular simulation settings. In the present study, we wish to create awareness for the impact of (minor) changes in a GWAI analysis protocol can have on final epistasis findings. In particular, we investigate the influence of marker selection and marker prioritization strategies, LD pruning and the choice of epistasis detection analytics on study results, giving rise to 8 GWAI protocols. Discussions are made in the context of the ankylosing spondylitis (AS) data obtained via the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC2). As expected, the largest impact on AS epistasis findings is caused by the choice of marker selection criterion, followed by marker coding and LD pruning. In MB-MDR, co-dominant coding of main effects is more robust to the effects of LD pruning than additive coding. We were able to reproduce previously reported epistasis involvement of HLA-B and ERAP1 in AS pathology. In addition, our results suggest involvement of MAGI3 and PARK2, responsible for cell adhesion and cellular trafficking. Gene ontology biological function enrichment analysis across the 8 considered GWAI protocols also suggested that AS could be associated to the central nervous system malfunctions, specifically, in nerve impulse propagation and in neurotransmitters metabolic processes. PMID:25939665

  8. ERAP1 variants are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in East Asian population: a new Chinese case-control study and meta-analysis of published series.

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Zhang, X

    2015-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) has been confirmed to be associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in Caucasian. However, whether they are associated with AS in East Asian population remains unidentified. We investigated this relationship by a new Chinese case-control study and a meta-analysis of published series. 368 cases and 460 controls were recruited in the Chinese case-control study. Genotyping was completed using the chip-based matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Allelic associations were analysed using contingency tables. In the meta-analysis, up to 2748 cases and 2774 controls from seven different studies and the new Chinese study were combined using Review Manager software version 5.1.1. Mantel-Haenszel or Inverse Variance test was used to calculate fixed or random-effects pooled ORs. In the new Chinese study, strong association with AS was observed for marker rs10050860, rs27434 and rs1065407 at P value of <0.001. Moderate association was observed for rs30187 at P value of <0.01, while no association was observed for rs27044 (P = 0.37) and rs2287987 (P = 0.23). The meta-analysis showed that rs27037 and rs30187 were strongly associated with AS (P < 0.00001). Significant association was also observed for rs27434 (P = 0.001). No association was shown for rs27044 (P = 0.70). We concluded that ERAP1 variants are associated with AS in East Asian population, indicating a common pathogenic mechanism for AS in East Asians and Caucasians. PMID:25817437

  9. Long-term frequent use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs might protect patients with ankylosing spondylitis from cardiovascular diseases: a nationwide case-control study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Chan; Ou, Tsan-Teng; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Wu, Cheng-Chin; Tung, Yi-Ching

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this case-control study was to investigate the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) following non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A total of 10,763 new AS patients were identified from the National Taiwan Health Insurance claims database during the period from 1997 to 2008. In all, 421 AS patients with CVD were recruited as cases, and up to 2-fold as many sex- and age-matched controls were selected. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) between NSAID use and CVD incidence. The medication possession rate (MPR) was used to evaluate NSAID exposure during the study period. AS patients had increased risk of CVD (OR, 1.68; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.57 to 1.80). Among frequent (MPR?80%) COX II users, the risks for all types of CVD were ten times lower than those among non-users at 24 months (OR, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.92). Among frequent NSAID users, the risks of major adverse cardiac event (MACE) were significantly lower at 12 months (OR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.76)-a trend showing that longer exposure correlated with lower risk. Regarding non-frequent NSAID users (MPR<80%), short-term exposure did carry higher risk (for 6 months: OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.86), but after 12 months, the risk no longer existed. We conclude that long-term frequent use of NSAIDs might protect AS patients from CVD; however, NSAIDs still carried higher short-term risk in the non-frequent users. PMID:25970845

  10. Efficacy and Safety of Celecoxib in Chinese Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis: A 6-Week Randomized, Double-Blinded Study with 6-Week Open-Label Extension Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Feng; Gu, Jieruo; Liu, Yi; Zhu, Ping; Zheng, Yi; Fu, Jin; Pan, Sharon; Le, Shi

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the first-line option for treating ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in China. However, no large-scale controlled trials have been conducted in this ethnic population. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of 6 weeks’ treatment with celecoxib in patients with AS in China. Methods This Phase 3, double-blind, parallel-group study randomized patients with AS aged ?18 to 65 years 1:1 to receive celecoxib 200 mg once daily or diclofenac sustained release 75 mg once daily. After 6 weeks, patients could use celecoxib 400 mg once daily or maintain blinded therapy. The primary efficacy end point was mean change from baseline at Week 6 for Patient’s Global Assessment of Pain Intensity score (100-mm visual analog scale). Noninferiority was established if the upper bound of the CI was <10 mm. Secondary objectives included patients’ and physicians’ assessments of disease activity, change from baseline in C-reactive protein level, and safety. Results In the per-protocol analysis set the least squares mean change from baseline in the Patient’s Global Assessment of Pain Intensity score at Week 6 was –23.8 mm and –27.1 mm in patients receiving celecoxib (n = 111) and diclofenac (n = 108), respectively. The 2-sided 95% CI for the treatment difference (celecoxib – diclofenac) was –2.2 to 8.8. Overall, 4.2% and 6.7% of patients in the celecoxib and diclofenac groups, respectively, reported treatment-related adverse events. All were mild to moderate in severity. Conclusions Celecoxib 200 mg once daily is noninferior to diclofenac sustained release 75 mg once daily for pain treatment in Chinese patients with AS. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00762463. PMID:25516774

  11. A 17 year old with isolated proximal tibiofibular joint arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The proximal tibiofibular joint (TFJ) is rarely affected in rheumatic diseases, and we frequently interpret pain of the lateral knee as the result of overuse or trauma. Nonetheless, the TFJ is a synovial joint that communicates with the tibiofemoral joint in a proportion of patients. While proximal TFJ arthritis has been rarely associated with existing spondyloarthritis, isolated TFJ arthritis as the presenting manifestation of spondyloarthritis has not yet been described. Here, we report the clinical and radiographic presentation of an adolescent with chronic proximal TFJ arthritis heralding spondyloarthritis highly suggestive of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:23302539

  12. Is Nephrolithiasis an Unrecognized Extra-Articular Manifestation in Ankylosing Spondylitis? A Prospective Population-Based Swedish National Cohort Study with Matched General Population Comparator Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Ane Krag; Jacobsson, Lennart T. H.; Patschan, Oliver; Askling, Johan; Kristensen, Lars Erik

    2014-01-01

    Background Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is associated with several extra-articular manifestations. Nephrolithiasis (NL) has not been recognized as one of those, however, several factors known to increase the risk of NL are at play in AS patients. The objective was to estimate rates and predictors of NL in Swedish patients with AS compared to the general population. Methods and Findings We performed a prospective population-based nationwide cohort study based on linkage of data from Swedish registries. 8,572 AS patients were followed for 49,258 person-years (py) and 39,639 matched general population comparators were followed for 223,985 py. Patients were followed prospectively together with comparator subjects from January 2001 through December 2009. The first occurrence of NL during follow-up was the primary outcome. Hazard Ratios (HR) were used to compare these rates adjusting for comorbidities and treatment, and to assess predictors for NL. Mean age at study entry was 46 years (inter quartile range 36–56 years), 65% were males. Based on 250 vs. 466 NL events, the adjusted HR of NL in AS patients was 2.1 (95%CI 1.8 to 2.4). Predictors of NL within the AS group included prior diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (HR 2.3; 95%CI 1.7 to 3.3), prior diagnosis of NL (HR 16.4; 95%CI 11.5 to 23.4), and patients receiving anti-TNF treatment (HR 1.6; 95%CI 1.2 to 2.1). Male sex was a risk factor for NL both in AS patients and in the general population. Limitations The risk for residual confounding and inability to study the chemical nature of NL were considered the main limitations of the study. Conclusions Patients with AS are at increased risk of NL, which may be considered a novel extra-articular manifestation. Previous history of NL, IBD, AS disease severity and male sex were identified as predictors of NL in AS. PMID:25423471

  13. The Relationship of Bone Mineral Density to Oxidant/Antioxidant Status and Inflammatory and Bone Turnover Markers in a Multicenter Cross-Sectional Study of Young Men with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Gao, Liangbin; Jin, Dan; Wang, Peng; Yang, Bo; Deng, Wen; Xie, Zhongyu; Tang, Yong; Wu, Yanfeng; Shen, Huiyong

    2015-07-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) is an important complication of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) that seriously affects men and their quality of life, even in young patients. However, the relationships among redox; levels of bone turnover markers (BTMs), inflammatory markers and disease activity; and low BMD in AS require clarification. We recruited 102 men aged 30-39 year with AS and 102 healthy, sex- and age-matched controls for this cross-sectional study. The subjects were analyzed for lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Significantly lower BMD and corresponding T-scores were observed in the AS patients compared with the controls (P < 0.05). The oxidant biomarker and antioxidant levels were significantly (P < 0.05) higher and lower, respectively, in the AS subjects compared with the controls, and the bone resorption and inflammatory marker levels were higher (P < 0.05). In subgroup analyses, the patients with osteoporosis or active disease had the highest levels of oxidant biomarkers (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the BMD T-scores in AS were found to be negatively correlated with oxidative status (P < 0.05). Multivariate binary logistic analysis showed that low BMD in the AS patients was associated with higher levels of advanced oxidation protein products, malondialdehyde and C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen; lower levels of glutathione peroxidase; and higher scores of a bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index. In conclusion, imbalanced redox was independently associated with low BMD in young men with AS and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of AS-related low BMD. PMID:26025702

  14. Urinary glucaric acid excretion in rheumatoid arthritis: influence of disease activity and disease modifying drugs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R Addyman; C Beyeler; C Astbury; H A Bird

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine if a correlation exists between cytochrome P-450 enzyme induction and disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), measuring urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid (GA) as an index of phase II drug metabolism. METHODS: Patients with RA were treated with sulphasalazine, sodium aurothiomalate, or D-penicillamine in standard dose regimens, for 24 weeks. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS)

  15. Histopathology of intestinal inflammation related to reactive arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Cuvelier, C; Barbatis, C; Mielants, H; De Vos, M; Roels, H; Veys, E

    1987-01-01

    This study has identified a group of patients with inflammatory chronic, or relapsing acute arthritis who even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms have histological evidence of ileocolitis. At colonoscopy simultaneous biopsies of the terminal ileum and colon were taken from 108 patients with reactive arthritis (n = 55) or ankylosing spondylitis (n = 53), 47 patients with other rheumatic diseases and 19 control patients suffering from colonic polyps, adenocarcinoma, or chronic constipation. All control patients and all but one patient with rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile chronic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, lumbar back ache, and psoriatic arthritis did not have histological evidence of acute or chronic inflammatory bowel disease. In contrast, in 30 of 35 (56.6%) patients with ankylosing spondylitis, and in 37 of 55 (67%) patients with reactive arthritis, regardless of HLA B27 phenotype, there was histological evidence of inflammatory bowel disease with features either of acute enterocolitis, or early Crohn's disease. Only 18 of 67 (27%) of the patients with histological gut inflammation, however, had intestinal symptoms. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 6 PMID:3495471

  16. A long-term, observational cohort study on the safety of low-dose glucocorticoids in ankylosing spondylitis: adverse events and effects on bone mineral density, blood lipid and glucose levels and body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Ping; Gong, Yao; Zeng, Qing Yu; Hou, Zhi-Duo; Xiao, Zheng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to investigate the risk of adverse events and effects on bone mineral density (BMD), blood lipid and glucose levels and body mass index (BMI) of low-dose glucocorticoid (GC) treatment in ankylosing spondylitis. Design We performed a retrospective, observational cohort study. Adverse effects were compared between GC users and non-GC users, and we analysed differences in the duration of GC exposure (no GC exposure, <6?months, 6?months to 2?years and >2?years). Setting Outpatient clinic in a tertiary general hospital in China, rheumatology follow-up visits over the past 30?years. Participants We included 830 patients with ankylosing spondylitis who were followed up for at least 6?months without a previous history or current complications of active gastrointestinal problems, hypertension, psychiatric or mental problems, diabetes mellitus, tuberculosis and hepatitis. The median follow-up time was 1.6?years (range 0.5–15?years, a total of 1801 patient-years). Results A total of 555 (66.9%) patients were treated with low-dose GCs, and the median cumulative duration of GC therapy was 1.3?years (range 0.1–8.5?years). Dermatological incidents, including acne, bruisability and cutaneous infections, were the most common adverse events, with a cumulative incidence rate of 5.4% (22.2 events per 1000 patient-years), followed by a puffy and rounded face (1.6%), symptoms of weight gain (1.1%) and serious infections (1.0%). The rates of all other types of adverse events were less than 1%. The GC groups (GC users and non-GC users) and the duration of GC therapy were not associated with the frequency of low BMD, dyslipidaemia, hyperglycaemia or obesity (p<0.05). Conclusions Adverse events during long-term treatment of low-dose GCs are limited. Low-dose GCs do not have an adverse effect on BMD, blood lipid and glucose levels and BMI. PMID:26041488

  17. Heredity and Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... environmental influences that may cause disease. What are genetics and genes? Part of the study of genetics ... 70%, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  18. Optimisation of rheumatology indices: dactylitis and enthesitis in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, E G; Coates, L C

    2014-01-01

    Outcome measures are a key part of study design and clinical assessment. Enthesitis and dactylitis are typical features of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and the spondyloarthritides but traditionally scoring systems for enthesitis have mainly been validated in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). There are many scoring systems which are not validated used for dactylitis although newer validated scores are now available. Recently there have been advances in composite scores that include enthesitis and dactylitis to assess disease activity. These are currently being validated further and have not yet been tested in routine clinical practice. PMID:25365099

  19. The clinical usefulness of ESR, CRP, and disease duration in ankylosing spondylitis: the product of these acute-phase reactants and disease duration is associated with patient's poor physical mobility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Hsiung; Chen, Hung-An; Liao, Hsien-Tzung; Liu, Chin-Hsiu; Tsai, Chang-Youh; Chou, Chung-Tei

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated the clinical usefulness of ESR, CRP, and disease duration in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) disease severity. There were 156 Chinese AS patients included in Taiwan. Patients completed the questionnaires, containing demographic data, disease activity (BASDAI), functional status (BASFI), and patient's global assessment (BASG). Meanwhile, patient's physical mobility (BASMI) and acute-phase reactants, including ESR and CRP levels were measured. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) plot analysis was used to evaluate the performance of ESR, CRP, and disease duration in the AS patients. ESR mildly correlated with BASFI (r = 0.176, p = 0.028) and disease duration (r = 0.214, p = 0.008), and moderately correlated with BASMI (r = 0.427, p < 0.001). CRP moderately correlated with BASMI (r = 0.410, p < 0.001). By using ROC plot analysis, ESR, CRP, and disease duration showed the best and significant "area under the curve (AUC)", in distinguishing the AS patients with poor physical mobility (BASMI ? 3.6, the Median) (AUC = 0.748, 0.751 and 0.738, respectively, all p < 0.001), as compared to BASDAI, BASFI, and BASG. ESR × disease duration (AUC = 0.801, p < 0.001) and CRP × disease duration (AUC = 0.821, p < 0.001) showed higher AUC values than ESR or CRP alone in indicating poor physical mobility. For detecting poor physical mobility (BASMI ? 3.6) in the AS patients: ESR × disease duration (?60.0 mm/h × year): sensitivity = 72.7 % and specificity = 72.8 %; CRP × disease duration (?8.3 mg/dl × year): sensitivity = 72.7 % and specificity = 74.6 %. ESR, CRP, and disease duration are particularly related to AS patient's poor physical mobility. Combining the usefulness of acute-phase reactants and disease duration, the values of ESR × disease duration and CRP × disease duration demonstrate better association with poor physical mobility in AS patients. PMID:25708781

  20. Working status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis: results from the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register

    PubMed Central

    Verstappen, Suzanne M. M.; Watson, Kath D.; Lunt, Mark; McGrother, Katie; Symmons, Deborah P. M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To describe working status in patients with RA, AS and PsA treated with anti-TNF therapy registered with the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register. Methods. Patients with RA (n = 3291), AS (n = 229) and PsA (n = 254) treated with anti-TNF therapy were included in this study. In addition, biologic-naive patients with RA (n = 379) were included. At baseline and 3 years after registration, all patients reported their working status. Baseline characteristics between working and work-disabled patients were compared. Logistic regression analysis was applied to identify factors associated with new work disability in patients with RA. Results. At baseline, work disability rates were already high: 49% for RA, 39% for PsA, 41% for AS and 36% for biologic-naive patients. Work-disabled patients had a higher HAQ score and worse disease activity than working patients. Working patients with a high HAQ score [odds ratio (OR) 2.79; 95% CI 1.89, 4.12] and a manual job (OR 2.31; 95% CI 1.52, 3.52) at baseline were more likely to become work disabled at follow-up, while those patients in remission 6 months after commencing anti-TNF therapy were less likely to become work disabled. However, use of anti-TNF therapy did not prevent patients with RA from becoming work disabled (OR for RA control patients vs RA anti-TNF patients 0.80; 95% CI 0.36, 1.81, adjusted for baseline variables). Conclusion. A high percentage of patients with RA, AS and PsA were already work disabled at the start of anti-TNF therapy. There is less future work disability in working patients with RA who responded to anti-TNF therapy. PMID:20444856

  1. Spanish Rheumatology Society and Hospital Pharmacy Society Consensus on recommendations for biologics optimization in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Fernández, Carmen; Dorantes-Calderón, Benito; García-Vicuña, Rosario; Hernández-Cruz, Blanca; Herrero-Ambrosio, Alicia; Ibarra-Barrueta, Olatz; Martín-Mola, Emilio; Monte-Boquet, Emilio; Morell-Baladrón, Alberto; Sanmartí, Raimon; Sanz-Sanz, Jesús; de Toro-Santos, Francisco Javier; Vela, Paloma; Román Ivorra, José Andrés; Poveda-Andrés, José Luis; Muñoz-Fernández, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to establish guidelines for the optimization of biologic therapies for health professionals involved in the management of patients with RA, AS and PsA. Methods. Recommendations were established via consensus by a panel of experts in rheumatology and hospital pharmacy, based on analysis of available scientific evidence obtained from four systematic reviews and on the clinical experience of panellists. The Delphi method was used to evaluate these recommendations, both between panellists and among a wider group of rheumatologists. Results. Previous concepts concerning better management of RA, AS and PsA were reviewed and, more specifically, guidelines for the optimization of biologic therapies used to treat these diseases were formulated. Recommendations were made with the aim of establishing a plan for when and how to taper biologic treatment in patients with these diseases. Conclusion. The recommendations established herein aim not only to provide advice on how to improve the risk:benefit ratio and efficiency of such treatments, but also to reduce variability in daily clinical practice in the use of biologic therapies for rheumatic diseases. PMID:25526976

  2. Reactive Arthritis Diagnosis

    MedlinePLUS

    Reactive Arthritis (ReA): Quick Links Overview >>> Symptoms >>> Diagnosis >>> Treatment >>> Medication >>> Doctor Q&A From Spondylitis Plus >>> REACTIVE ARTHRITIS Overview Because there is no specific laboratory test ...

  3. Reactive Arthritis Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    Reactive Arthritis (ReA): Quick Links Overview >>> Symptoms >>> Diagnosis >>> Treatment >>> Medication >>> Doctor Q&A From Spondylitis Plus >>> REACTIVE ARTHRITIS Overview Seeing a rheumatologist is essential to beginning ...

  4. The skin tissue is adversely affected by TNF-alpha blockers in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis: a 5-year prospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Natalia P.; dos Reis Neto, Edgard Torres; Soares, Maria Roberta M. P.; Freitas, Daniele S.; Porro, Adriana; Ciconelli, Rozana M.; Pinheiro, Marcelo M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the incidence of and the main risk factors associated with cutaneous adverse events in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis following anti-TNF-? therapy. METHODS: A total of 257 patients with active arthritis who were taking TNF-? blockers, including 158 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 87 with ankylosing spondylitis and 12 with psoriatic arthritis, were enrolled in a 5-year prospective analysis. Patients with overlapping or other rheumatic diseases were excluded. Anthropometric, socioeconomic, demographic and clinical data were evaluated, including the Disease Activity Score-28, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index and Psoriasis Area Severity Index. Skin conditions were evaluated by two dermatology experts, and in doubtful cases, skin lesion biopsies were performed. Associations between adverse cutaneous events and clinical, demographic and epidemiological variables were determined using the chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors. The significance level was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: After 60 months of follow-up, 71 adverse events (73.85/1000 patient-years) were observed, of which allergic and immune-mediated phenomena were the most frequent events, followed by infectious conditions involving bacterial (47.1%), parasitic (23.5%), fungal (20.6%) and viral (8.8%) agents. CONCLUSION: The skin is significantly affected by adverse reactions resulting from the use of TNF-? blockers, and the main risk factors for cutaneous events were advanced age, female sex, a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, disease activity and the use of infliximab. PMID:24141833

  5. Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to make it accessible Adjust desk height if wheelchair or scooter is used Make sure materials and ... A laborer in a warehouse was having difficulty standing for long periods due to ankylosing spondylitis. As ...

  6. Der BASDAI-D - ein Fragebogen zur Erfassung der Krankheitsaktivität bei Spondylitis ankylosans und verwandten Erkrankungen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Bönisch; I. Ehlebracht-König

    2003-01-01

    Zusammenfassung. Das Ziel der vorliegenden Arbeit war die Übersetzung und Validierung des Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) zur Erfassung der Krankheitsaktivität bei Spondylitis ankylosans und verwandten Erkrankungen. Die deutsche Version BASDAI-D wurde in enger Anlehnung an das Original erstellt und geringfügig modifiziert. Das Instrument besteht aus 6 Items, die auf einer 10 cm langen visuellen Analog-Skala hinsichtlich des

  7. Psoriatic arthritis: recent progress in pathophysiology and drug development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is the second most common inflammatory arthropathy, after rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis, in early arthritis clinics. Most patients have established psoriasis, often for years, prior to the onset of joint pain and swelling; in addition, associated features of nail disease, dactylitis, enthesitis, spondylitis or uveitis may be present. Psoriasis may not be immediately apparent, as small or patchy lesions may occur in the scalp or perineum. PsA presents as a symmetrical polyarthritis, similar to rheumatoid arthritis, or an asymmetrical oligoarthritis with a predilection for the distal interphalangeal joints. Spinal involvement is similar, although not identical, to ankylosing spondylitis. Joint damage occurs early; up to 50% of PsA patients have an 11% annual erosion rate in the first 2 years of disease duration, suggesting it is not a benign condition. There have been significant advances in our understanding of PsA pathogenesis in recent years, in the areas of genetics and molecular biology, implicating both the innate and the adaptive immune systems. This has lead to the introduction of evidence-based targeted therapy, primarily with tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) agents. Therapy with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, such as methotrexate and leflunomide, remains the first-choice therapeutic intervention, even though there are few randomised controlled trials with these agents. In contrast, a number of successful studies of TNFi agents demonstrate excellent efficacy, in combination with methotrexate, and several novel agents are currently in development for the treatment of PsA. PMID:24611179

  8. Microencapsulation: an acclaimed novel drug-delivery system for NSAIDs in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Manjanna, K M; Shivakumar, B; Pramod Kumar, T M

    2010-01-01

    Arthritis refers to different medical conditions associated with disorders of the primary structures that determine joint functioning, such as bones, cartilage, and synovial membranes. Drug discovery and delivery to retard the degeneration of joint tissues are challenging. Current treatment of different types of arthritis such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, septic arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis involves the administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, diclofenac, aceclofenac, ibuprofen, flurbiprofen, indomethacin piroxicam, dexibuprofen, ketoprofen, nabumetone, nimesulide, and naproxen, mainly by the oral, parenteral, or topical route. However, the frequent dosing that is required with NSAIDs often leads to patient noncompliance, so drug-delivery technologies should be developed to reduce the frequency of dosing and to allow sustained release of medications. Microencapsulation is one of the novel drug-delivery technologies employed to sustain drug release. This method reduces dosing and eliminates gastrointestinal irritation, thus ultimately improving patient compliance in the pharmacotherapy of arthritis. We provide a comprehensive overview of several microencapsulation technologies used in the treatment of arthritis that may reduce the dose-related adverse effects caused by NSAIDs. PMID:21175420

  9. Comparison of Pyogenic Spondylitis and Tuberculous Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pyogenic spondylitis and tuberculous spondylitis are common causes of spinal infection. It is difficult to differentiate tuberculous spondylitis and pyogenic spondylitis clinically and radiologically. Recently magnetic resonance imaging has been reported to be beneficial for early diagnosis and differential diagnosis of the spondylitis, and is being used extensively for diagnosis. However, the diagnosis must be considered in combination with corresponding changes in clinical manifestations, radiological findings, blood and tissue cultures and histopathological findings. Conservative treatments, including antimicrobial medications, are started initially. Surgical treatments, which include anterior or posterior approach, single-stage or two-stage surgery, with or without instrumentation, may be performed as indicated. PMID:24761207

  10. Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... when taking arthritis medicines . Over-the-counter medicines: Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is often the first medicine tried. Take ... are available without a prescription that also contain acetaminophen, you will need to include them in the ...

  11. High Level Serum Procalcitonin Associated Gouty Arthritis Susceptibility: From a Southern Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Su, Qun; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Yan Lin; Chen, Jie; Duan, Lihua; Shi, Guixiu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To study the serum Procalcitonin (PCT) level in inflammatory arthritis including gouty arthritis (GA), Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) without any evidence of infection were evaluated the possible discriminative role of PCT in gouty arthritis susceptibility in southern Chinese Han Population. Material and Methods From Feb, 2012 to Feb, 2015, 51 patients with GA, 37 patients with RA, 41 patients with AS and 33 healthy control were enrolled in this study with no evidence of infections. The serum level of PCT (normal range < 0.05 ng/ml) was measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA). Disease activity was determined by scores of VAS (4.07 ± 1.15), DAS28 (4.97 ± 1.12), and ASDAS (2.97 ± 0.81) in GA, RA and AS groups respectively. Other laboratory parameters such as, serum creatinine (CRE), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), uric acid (UA) and white blood cells (WBC) were extracted from medical record system. Results Serum PCT level was predominantly higher in gouty arthritis than in RA and AS patients, especially in the GA patients with tophi. PCT was significantly positively correlated with VAS, CRP and ESR in gouty arthritis and CRP in AS. PCT also had positive correlation-ship with ESR, DAS28 and ASDAS in RA and AS patients respectively, but significant differences were not observed. Conclusions These data suggested that PCT is not solely a biomarker for infection, but also an indicator in inflammatory arthritis, especially in gouty arthritis. PMID:26182343

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthropathies, and relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Rochella A; Takagishi, Troy; Robinson, John

    2014-01-01

    The neurologic complications of rheumatic disease are highly variable and their manifestations are linked to the pathogenesis and clinical phenotype of the specific rheumatologic syndrome. In active rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the peripheral nervous system is most commonly involved and mononeuritis multiplex, nerve entrapment and vascultitic sensorimotor neuropathy are not uncommon. Central nervous system complications such as pachymeningitis and cerebral vasculitis are rare. TNF blockade therapy of RA is rarely associated with demyelinating syndromes. In the spondyloarthropathies, especially ankylosing spondylitis (AS), neurologic complications are more frequent in long-standing, advanced disease and include atlantoaxial subluxation, cauda equina syndrome, spinal stenosis, and acute vertebral fractures. Peripheral nervous system involvement in any of the spondyloarthropaties is rare. Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is characterized by recurring bouts of inflammation, destruction of cartilaginous structures, and systemic and rarely central nervous system vasculitis. Visual-oculo and auditory complications are common. Definitive treatment of the neurologic complications and prevention of subsequent ones is dependent upon effective treatment of RA, AS or RP. PMID:24365312

  13. Role of IL-17 in the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Smriti K; Saxena, Ankit; Raychaudhuri, Siba P

    2015-06-01

    Th17 cells are a discrete subset of T cell subpopulation, which produce IL-17 and certain other pro-inflammatory cytokines. A regulatory role of Th17 cells have been proposed in several autoimmune diseases including psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis (PsA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, and multiple sclerosis. Psoriatic disease is an autoimmune disease which mainly involves skin and joints. Until recently, psoriasis and PsA were thought to be Th1 mediated disease, but after the discovery of IL-17 and IL-17 knockout animal studies as well as human experimental data indicate a crucial role of the Th17 cells in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and PsA. Our research group have not only found abundance of CD4(+)IL-17(+) T cells, mainly the memory phenotype (CD4RO(+)CD45RA(-)CD11a(+)) in the synovial fluid, but also have shown the existence of a functional IL-17 receptor in synovial fibroblast of psoriatic arthritis patients. Similarly, both animal and human studies indicate a regulatory role of the Th17 cells in AS; most critical observations are that Th17 cytokines (IL-17 and IL-22) can contribute to bone erosion, osteitis and new bone formation the hall mark skeletal features associated with the pathophysiology of AS. In this review article, we have discussed the contributing role of the IL-23/IL-17 axis in the pathogenesis of PsA and AS. PMID:25939522

  14. Induction of Regulatory t Cells by Low Dose il2 in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-20

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Psoriasis; Behcet's Disease; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Takayasu's Disease; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Colitis; Autoimmune Hepatitis; Sclerosing Cholangitis

  15. Autoimmune hepatitis following infliximab therapy for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ozorio, Gerard; McGarity, Bruce; Bak, Haesung; Jordan, Andrew S; Lau, Henry; Marshall, Cathy

    2007-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a rare but increasingly recognised serious complication of treatment with the tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) blocking agent, infliximab. This report adds to the small but growing number of articles describing this significant adverse effect. Baseline liver function should be routinely tested in all patients receiving anti-TNF-alpha agents, and periodic monitoring for the development of hepatitis is important. PMID:17979620

  16. [Physical Therapy in the early treatment of ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Mur, Erich

    2008-01-01

    The primary goals of physiotherapeutic interventions at the early phase of M. Bechterew are alleviation of pain and prevention of functional impairments in patients. In order to achieve these goals, measures that have proved effective at later stages of the disease can also be implemented early in the course of the disease. Movement therapy is of particular importance, and so are thermo- and electrotherapeutic interventions. Combined with adequate pharmacotherapy, established physiotherapeutic procedures can have a positive influence on the course of this disease. PMID:18500472

  17. Recurrent disc herniation in a man with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Stenback, B A; Reigo, T

    1994-01-01

    Disc herniation in patients with Bechterew disease is rare; even rarer are recurrent disc herniations, a condition which we have not found described before. The patient was operated on with an excellent result. PMID:7866832

  18. Spondylitis: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with psoriasis, it is called psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Reactive Arthritis (ReA) - Reactive Arthritis (also known as Reiter's Syndrome) is a form ... the bladder, the genitals and the mucus membranes. Reactive arthritis is thought to occur as a "reaction" to ...

  19. Doppler US in rheumatic diseases with special emphasis on rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Toprak, Hüseyin; K?l?ç, Erkan; Serter, Asl?; Kocakoç, Ercan; Özgöçmen, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Developments in digital ultrasonography (US) technology and the use of high-frequency broadband transducers have increased the quality of US imaging, particularly of superficial tissues. Thus, US, particularly color US or power Doppler US, in which high-resolution transducers are used, has become an important imaging modality in the assessment of rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, therapeutic interventions and biopsies can be performed under US guidance during the assessment of lesions. In this era of effective treatments, such as biologics, improvements in synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis as well as changes in enthesitis in spondyloarthropathies, including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, can be monitored effectively using gray-scale and/or power Doppler US. US is also a good imaging modality for crystal arthropathies, including gout and pseudogout, in which synovitis, erosions, tophi, and crystal deposition within or around the joint can be visualized readily. Vascular and tenosynovial structures, as well as the salivary glands, can be assessed with US in vasculitis and connective tissue disorders, including systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome. Current research is focused on improving the sensitivity, specificity, validity, and reproducibility of US findings. In this review, we summarized the role of US, particularly power Doppler US, in rheumatic diseases and inflammation in superficial tissues. PMID:23996840

  20. Doppler US in rheumatic diseases with special emphasis on rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Toprak, Hüseyin; K?l?ç, Erkan; Serter, Asl?; Kocakoç, Ercan; Özgöçmen, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Developments in digital ultrasonography (US) technology and the use of high-frequency broadband transducers have increased the quality of US imaging, particularly of superficial tissues. Thus, US, particularly color US or power Doppler US, in which high-resolution transducers are used, has become an important imaging modality in the assessment of rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, therapeutic interventions and biopsies can be performed under US guidance during the assessment of lesions. In this era of effective treatments, such as biologics, improvements in synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis as well as changes in enthesitis in spondyloarthropathies, including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, can be monitored effectively using gray-scale and/or power Doppler US. US is also a good imaging modality for crystal arthropathies, including gout and pseudogout, in which synovitis, erosions, tophi, and crystal deposition within or around the joint can be visualized readily. Vascular and tenosynovial structures, as well as the salivary glands, can be assessed with US in vasculitis and connective tissue disorders, including systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren’s syndrome. Current research is focused on improving the sensitivity, specificity, validity, and reproducibility of US findings. In this review, we summarized the role of US, particularly power Doppler US, in rheumatic diseases and inflammation in superficial tissues. PMID:23996840

  1. Reevaluation of some double-blind, randomized studies of dexibuprofen (Seractil): a state-of-the-art overview. Studies in patients with lumbar vertebral column syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, distortion of the ankle joint, gonarthrosis, ankylosing spondylitis, and activated coxarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Rahlfs, V W; Stat, C

    1996-12-01

    This article presents a reevaluation of studies previously performed regarding the efficacy and safety of dexibuprofen (Seractil; S(+)-ibuprofen) for use in patients with inflammatory or degenerative diseases. Using appropriate standardized measures (univariate and multivariate analysis with the Mann-Whitney statistic with confidence intervals), the authors were able to compare the effects of treatment in different diseases. For the primary criterion and for the combined analysis of all efficacy criteria, one-sided equivalence was proved in all six studies reviewed. PMID:9013382

  2. Differentiation between Tuberculous Spondylitis and Pyogenic Spondylitis on MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Han; Shin, Hye-Seon; Park, Jong Tae; Kim, Tae Young

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of tuberculous spondylitis with pyogenic spondylitis. Methods MR images of the spines of 41 patients with infectious spondylitis at our institution over 8-years of period were retrospectively reviewed. Eighteen patients with infective spondylitis were excluded because their results on the marrow biopsy and culture were negative. MR imaging findings in 6 patients with tuberculous spondylitis (3 male, 3 female) were compared with those of 17 patients (10 male, 7 female) with pyogenic spondylitis. Results Two MR imaging findings were statiscally significant in differentiating the tuberculous spondylitis from pyogenic spondylitis: a well defined paraspinal abnormal signal and a thin and smooth abscess wall. There were no significant differences in the following MR imaging findings: paraspinal abscess or intraosseous abscess, subligamentous spread to three or more vertebra, involvement of multiple vertebra, hyperintense signal on T2-weighted images, heterogenous low signal on T1-weighted images, involvement of posterior element, epidural extension, involvement of intervertebral disk, disk space narrowing, rim enhancement of the abscess, skip lesion, and endplate destruction. Conclusion MR imaging is an appropriate modality for differentiation of tuberculous spondylitis from pyogenic spondylitis.

  3. Switching TNF antagonists in patients with chronic arthritis: an observational study of 488 patients over a four-year period

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Carmona, Loreto

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this work is to analyze the survival of infliximab, etanercept and adalimumab in patients who have switched among tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists for the treatment of chronic arthritis. BIOBADASER is a national registry of patients with different forms of chronic arthritis who are treated with biologics. Using this registry, we have analyzed patient switching of TNF antagonists. The cumulative discontinuation rate was calculated using the actuarial method. The log-rank test was used to compare survival curves, and Cox regression models were used to assess independent factors associated with discontinuing medication. Between February 2000 and September 2004, 4,706 patients were registered in BIOBADASER, of whom 68% had rheumatoid arthritis, 11% ankylosing spondylitis, 10% psoriatic arthritis, and 11% other forms of chronic arthritis. One- and two-year drug survival rates of the TNF antagonist were 0.83 and 0.75, respectively. There were 488 patients treated with more than one TNF antagonist. In this situation, survival of the second TNF antagonist decreased to 0.68 and 0.60 at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Survival was better in patients replacing the first TNF antagonist because of adverse events (hazard ratio (HR) for discontinuation 0.55 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34–0.84)), and worse in patients older than 60 years (HR 1.10 (95% CI 0.97–2.49)) or who were treated with infliximab (HR 3.22 (95% CI 2.13–4.87)). In summary, in patients who require continuous therapy and have failed to respond to a TNF antagonist, replacement with a different TNF antagonist may be of use under certain situations. This issue will deserve continuous reassessment with the arrival of new medications. PMID:16507128

  4. Profile of certolizumab and its potential in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chimenti, Maria Sole; Saraceno, Rosita; Chiricozzi, Andrea; Giunta, Alessandro; Chimenti, Sergio; Perricone, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory arthropathy associated with psoriasis (PsO). PsA could be considered an enthesal disease because of the link between mechanical stress (entheses) and immunologically active tissue (synovium). Evidence of efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) is supported by reduction of histological vascularity and immune cell infiltrates in synovial tissue after treatment. Certolizumab pegol (CZP) is a polyethylene glycolylated (PEGylated) Fab’ fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds and neutralizes human TNF-?. The PEG moiety of the Fab fragment, markedly increases the half-life of CZP and confers to the drug a unique structure that differs from the other anti-TNF-? agents tested for the treatment of Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, axial spondyloarthritis, nonradiographic spondyloarthritis, PsO, and PsA. In contrast to other anti-TNF-? agents, CZP did not mediate increased levels of apoptosis, suggesting that these mechanisms are not essential for the anti-TNF-? efficacy in Crohn’s disease. As CZP, infliximab, and adalimumab, but not etanercept, almost completely inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin-1 beta release from monocytes, this cytokine-production inhibition may be relevant for drug efficacy. Due to these characteristics, it has been demonstrated in clinical studies that CZP effectively improves signs and symptoms of arthritis and physical function and skin manifestations of PsO, with a safety profile similar to rheumatoid arthritis. This drug can be considered as a valid treatment in patients affected by PsA. The efficacy and tolerability profiles suggest CZP as a suitable antipsoriatic drug in the treatment of PsA. PMID:23620660

  5. Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs (DMARDs) (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... such as ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. (See "Patient information: Rheumatoid arthritis symptoms and ... also very frequently used for treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus. It can be combined with steroid medications ...

  6. Spondylitis Web Info for Teens

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Special Accommodations Transition to College Friends & family Friends & Family Relationships Stay Positive! Join Us Connect with us Your ... yourself? How does living with spondylitis affect your relationships with your family and friends? Does it affect your school life? ...

  7. Eikenella-corrodens-induzierte Spondylitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Zeifang; M. Haag; C. A. Lill; D. Sabo

    2002-01-01

    Zusammenfassung  \\u000a Der erforderliche Erregernachweis bei Patienten mit Spondylitis gelingt nach offener Materialgewinnung nur bei 75–90% der\\u000a Patienten. Im Folgenden soll der seltene Fall einer durch Eikenella corrodens induzierten Spondylitis dargestellt werden,\\u000a dessen Nachweis erst durch Einsatz der Polymerasekettenreaktion (16 s RNA-PCR) gelang, nachdem die mikrobiologische Anzchtung\\u000a erfolglos verlief. Eikenella corrodens ist ein fakultativ anaerober gramnegativer Keim, der meist im Mund-Rachen-Raum

  8. PADI2 Is Significantly Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiaotian; Xia, Yifang; Pan, Jihong; Meng, Qingsong; Zhao, Yan; Yan, Xinfeng

    2013-01-01

    Citrullination, a posttranslational modification of peptidyl arginine to citrulline, plays an essential role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Citrullination is catalyzed by a group of peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs) including PADI 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6. Many studies have indicated that the gene encoding PADI4 is a factor in susceptibility to RA. Some studies have detected PADI2 expression in RA synovial tissues, suggesting that PADI2 also plays an important role in the disease. This study evaluated the possible association between the PADI2-encoding gene and RA. Seventeen tag SNPs across the PAD locus were genotyped using a custom-designed Illumina 96-SNP VeraCode microarray. Peripheral blood samples were collected from patients with RA (n?=?267), ankylosing spondylitis (AS, n?=?51) and healthy controls (n?=?160). The results of genotyping were verified using Sequenom MassARRAY in an independent cohort of 307 patients with RA, 324 patients with AS and 509 healthy controls. A western blot analysis was performed using synovial tissue from patients with RA (n?=?7), osteoarthritis (OA, n?=?7) and AS (n?=?5) to determine the levels of expression of PADI2. A microarray analysis revealed a significant association between three selected PADI2 SNPs (rs2235926, rs2057094, rs2076616) and the presence of RA. The increased susceptibility to RA associated with rs2235926 (OR?=?1.706733, 95% CI?=?[1.576366–1.866587], p?=?0.000839) and rs2057094 (OR?=?1.360432, 95% CI?=?[1.065483–1.869482], p?=?0.003291) was further confirmed by the Sequenom MassARRAY. No tag SNPs in the PADI2 locus showed a significant association with AS. Increased expression of PADI2 was detected in RA synovial tissues compared with samples from patients with OA and AS. PADI2 is significantly associated with RA and may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:24339914

  9. The CARRA Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-22

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Mixed Connective Tissue Disease; Juvenile Ankylosing Spondylitis; Juvenile Dermatomyositis; Localized Scleroderma; Systemic Sclerosis; Vasculitis; Sarcoid; Fibromyalgia, Primary; Auto-inflammatory Disease; Idiopathic Uveitis Idiopathic

  10. Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs improve autonomic neuropathy in arthritis: DIANA study.

    PubMed

    Syngle, Ashit; Verma, Inderjeet; Krishan, Pawan; Garg, Nidhi; Syngle, Vijaita

    2015-07-01

    Autonomic neuropathy (AN) is a risk predictor for sudden cardiac death in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). However, the impact of most commonly employed disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) therapy on autonomic neuropathy in rheumatic diseases is not known. Hence, we investigated the efficacy of DMARDs on autonomic neuropathy in RA and AS. We performed autonomic function assessment in 60 patients in this open-label, 12-week pilot study including 42 patients with RA, 18 with AS, and 30 aged-matched healthy subjects. The methodology included assessment of cardiovascular autonomic reflex tests according to Ewing. Parasympathetic dysfunction was established by performing three tests: heart rate response to deep breathing, standing, and Valsalva tests. Sympathetic dysfunction was examined by applying two tests: blood pressure response to standing and handgrip tests. Sudomotor function was assessed by Sudoscan. Cardiovascular reflex tests were impaired significantly among the patients as compared to healthy subjects (p?

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Arthritis Overview What is rheumatoid arthritis? Rheumatoid (say: "roo-mah-toyd") arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease ... bone thinning, cataracts and diabetes. Antirheumatic (say: "anti-roo-mat-ick") medicines can help fight RA. If ...

  12. Joint Involvement Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. De Vos

    2009-01-01

    Joint involvement associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) belongs to the concept of spondyloarthritis (SpA) and includes two types of arthritis: a peripheral arthritis characterized by the presence of pauciarticular asymmetrical arthritis affecting preferentially joints of lower extremities and an axial arthropathy including inflammatory back pain, sacroiliitis and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Treatment of arthritis includes a short-term use of NSAIDs

  13. Investigating a pathogenic role for TXNDC5 in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Expression of TXNDC5, which is induced by hypoxia, stimulates cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Our previous study detected increased TXNDC5 expression in the synovial tissues of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients using proteomic methods. The current study investigated a pathogenic role for TXNDC5 in RA. Method Expression of TXNDC5 in synovial membranes was quantitatively analyzed by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Serum TXNDC5 levels and serum anti-TXNDC5 antibody levels were determined using sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A total of 96 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in or near the TXNDC5 gene were genotyped using custom-designed Illumina 96-SNP VeraCode microassay. Allele frequencies and genotype frequencies of SNPs were assessed using a case-control design in a cohort of 267 Chinese patients with RA, 51 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and 160 healthy controls. Additional genotyping of 951 patients with RA and 898 healthy controls was performed for four SNPs (rs2277105, rs369086, rs443861 and rs11962800) using the TaqMan method. Results Real-time PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry detected significantly higher TXNDC5 expression in the synovial tissues of RA patients compared to samples from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) or AS. ELISA detected significantly higher levels of TXNDC5 in the blood of RA patients compared to OA, AS and systemic lupus erythematosus patients, and healthy controls. ELISA did not detect significantly different levels of anti-TXNDC5 antibody in the blood of RA, OA and AS patients and healthy controls. A total of 9 SNPs (rs9505298, rs41302895, rs1225936, rs1225938, rs372578, rs443861, rs408014, rs9392189 and rs2743992) showed significant association with RA, while 16 SNPs (rs1044104, rs1225937, rs1225938, rs372578, rs89715, rs378963, rs1225944, rs1225947, rs1238994, rs369086, rs408014, rs368074, rs1225954, rs1225955, rs13209404 and rs3812162) showed significant association with AS. Taqman SNP assay demonstrated that rs443861 has an association with RA, which correlates with the microassay results. Conclusions TXNDC5 is up-regulated in synovial tissues of RA patients. TXNDC5 has a genetic effect on the risk of RA and AS. PMID:21801346

  14. Psoriatic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  15. CD38 and E2F transcription factor 2 have uniquely increased expression in rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chang, X; Yue, L; Liu, W; Wang, Y; Wang, L; Xu, B; Wang, Y; Pan, J; Yan, X

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to find novel rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-specific gene expression by simultaneously comparing the expression profiles of the synovial tissues from patients with RA, osteoarthritis (OA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The Illumina Human HT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip was used to investigate the global gene expression profiles in synovial tissues from RA (n?=?12), OA (n?=?14) and AS (n?=?7) patients. By comparing the profiles in synovial tissues from RA, OA and AS, we identified the CD38, ankyrin repeat domain 38 (ANKRD38), E2F transcription factor 2 (E2F2), craniofacial development protein 1 (CFDP1), cluster of differentiation (CD)7, interferon-stimulated exonuclease gene 20?kDa (ISG20) and interleukin-2 receptor gamma (IL)-2RG genes as differentially expressed gene expression in RA synovial tissues. The increased expression of CD38, E2F2 and IL-2RG, as revealed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with synovial tissues from RA (n?=?30), OA (n?=?26) and AS patients (n?=?20), was in agreement with the microarray data. Immunohistochemistry revealed significant CD38 expression and E2F2 in synovial membranes from RA patients (n?=?5). The CD38+ cells had high a percentage in the RA patients' blood (n?=?103) and in the CD3+ and CD56+ subsets. The CD38+ cell percentage was correlated significantly with RF level (P?=?0·026) in RA patients. The IL-1? and IL-? levels were depressed significantly in the culture medium of RA synovial fibroblast cells (n?=?5) following treatment with siRNAs targeting the E2F2 or CD38 genes. This study suggests that the uniquely increased expression of CD38 and E2F2 in RA synovial tissues contribute to the immunoactivation of the disease. PMID:24397353

  16. Increased Soluble CD4 in Serum of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Is Generated by Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-Like Proteinases

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Nien-Yi; Chou, Yeh-Pin; Wu, Yeong-Jian Jan; Luo, Shue-Fen; Kuo, Chang-Fu; Lin, Ko-Ming; Lin, Hsi-Hsien

    2013-01-01

    Higher soluble CD4 (sCD4) levels in serum have been detected in patients of infectious and chronic inflammatory diseases. However, how and why sCD4 is produced remains poorly understood. We establish sensitive ELISA and WB assays for sCD4 detection in conditioned medium of in vitro cell culture system and serum of chronic inflammatory patients. Serum samples from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (n?=?79), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n?=?59), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) (n?=?25), gout (n?=?31), and normal controls (n?=?99) were analyzed using ELISA for sCD4 detection. Results from each assay were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test. Dunn’s multiple comparison post-test was then applied between groups. We confirm that cells expressing exogenous CD4 produce sCD4 in a constitutive and PMA-induced manner. Importantly, sCD4 production in a heterologous expression system is inhibited by GM6001 and TAPI-0, suggesting receptor shedding by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-like proteinases. Moreover, similar findings are recapitulated in human primary CD4+ T cells. Finally, we show that serum sCD4 levels are increased in patients of chronic inflammatory diseases including RA and SLE, but not in those with gout. Intriguingly, sCD4 levels in RA patients are correlated positively with the disease activities and higher sCD4 levels seem to associate with poor prognosis. Taken together, we conclude that CD4 is shed from cell surface by a MMP-like sheddase and sCD4 level is closely related with the inflammatory condition in certain chronic diseases. Hence, sCD4 might be considered an important parameter for RA disease progression with potential diagnostic importance. PMID:23700441

  17. Recognition of inflammatory back pain and ankylosing spondylitis in primary care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. N. Jois; A. J. Macgregor; K. Gaffney

    2008-01-01

    Objective. The diagnosis of AS is often delayed in primary care. This may partly be due to inability to differentiate inflammatory back pain (IBP) from mechanical. The aim of this study was to assess current practice of general practitioners (GPs) in using clinical, radiological and laboratory investigations to assess patients with IBP. Methods. A postal questionnaire was sent to all

  18. 316. A ONE-DAY EXERCISE PROGRAMME: COACHING FOR EXERCISE FOR ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS (COAX-AS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claire Dubois; Sarang Chitale; Robert N. Thompson; Christina Estrach; Lorraine A. McFarland; Sheila Leddington Wright; Jane Tooby; Julie Barlow

    Background: Rheumatologist-performed musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) has gained popularity in the UK. A UK-based survey in 2005 suggested interest and motivation to learn this skill and identified the need for structured training with assessment. Our aim was to review the current status of MSUS in the UK and explore suggestions to improve training. Methods: We sent a questionnaire electronically to all

  19. [Special considerations in therapy of injuries of the cervical spine in ankylosing spondylitis (Bechterew disease)].

    PubMed

    Einsiedel, T; Kleimann, M; Nothofer, W; Neugebauer, R

    2001-12-01

    Cervical spine changed by Bechterew's disease is severely endangered with any increased load. Even decent trauma is enough to produce a fracture with affection of spinal cord. Because of little knowledge in these special items, late diagnosis of overlooked injury is not rare, especially in two-level injuries. Neurolesions following secondary fracture dislocations may occur ("fatal pause"). From january 1990 to february 2000 12 patients underwent surgery (dorsoventral stabilisation, ventral stabilisation, laminectomy). Diagnostic procedures, levels of injury, pre- and postoperative neurostatus (following Frankel's score), operative technique, typical complications and follow-up (Ø 17.8 months) were analyzed and compared with the literature. 11 patients showed preoperative neurodeficits. They were better in five cases and disappeared at all in another five cases after surgery (83% positive neurological outcome). There was no increase of neurology failure. Two patients died (ARDS and cerebral ischemia with destruction of vertebral arteries). One patient had to be reoperated because of implant dislocation. MRI is obvious in diagnostic for these lesions. There is also an absolute need for total (both clinical and radiological) examination of the whole spinal column, because there is often injury of more than one level (three times in our study). Therapy should be operative (dorsoventral stabilisation, in certain cases only anterior procedure or laminectomy). Late diagnosis and therapy with secondary worsening after fracture dislocation is not rare because of "overlooked injury". There were four patients, that would not have suffered cervical spine fracture (minimal injury force) without Bechterew's changes. There is often pulmonary failure through limitation of thoracic movement and cerebral ischemia following rupture of vertebral arteries as typical complications. Mortality (2 cases; 16%) in our collective is less than literature's medium rates (35-57%). PMID:11803718

  20. Comparison of two ELISA versions for infliximab serum levels in patients diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Flórez, Diana; Valor, Lara; de la Torre, Inmaculada; Nieto, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Estupiñán, Lina; González, Carlos; López-Longo, Francisco Javier; Monteagudo, Indalecio; Garrido, Jesús; Naredo, Esperanza; Carreño, Luis

    2015-06-01

    There are various immunosorbent assays which can be used to determine infliximab (IFX) levels. Results vary between assays complicating reliability in everyday clinical practice. The aim of this study was to determine whether quantitative or qualitative assay data prove more accurate in the assessment of infliximab levels in AS patients. We analyzed 40 serum samples, taken prior to infusion, from AS patients who had been undergoing IFX therapy as a first-line of biological treatment for more than a year. IFX levels and IFX-anti-drug antibodies (ADA) were measured using two different ELISA assays [Promonitor(®) IFX R1 and R2 (version 1), Promonitor(®) IFX and anti-IFX (version 2) (Progenika Biopharma, Spain)] strictly following the manufacturer's guidelines. Cohen's unweighted kappa and the intraclass correlation coefficient determined qualitative and quantitative agreement for serum levels in version 1 and version 2. Bland-Altman plots were drawn to compare both assays. The comparison of data measuring IFX levels for version 1 and version 2 resulted in questionable quantitative agreement (ICC 0.659; 95 % CI 0.317-0.830) and moderate qualitative agreement (? 0.607; 95 % CI 0.387-0.879) owing to systematically higher values in version 2 than version 1. Version 2 consistently detected higher levels of infliximab, particularly when analyzed in a quantitative context. Further research is needed to synchronize cutoff levels between essays and diseases so therapeutic drug ranges can be established. PMID:25410014

  1. Infection risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Spondyloarthropathy patients under treatment with DMARDs, Corticosteroids and TNF-? antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Infections which complicate rheumatic diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Spondyloarthropathy (SpA) (Psoriatic Arthritis [PA] and Ankylosing Spondylitis [AS]), may cause significant morbidity and mortality. However, among the studies on the incidence rate (IR) of infections in such patients, very few have involved controls and the results have been controversial, probably due to methodological difficulties. To estimate infection rates in RA and SpA patients under disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), corticosteroids (CS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)? antagonists, alone or combined, a single-centre retrospective observational cohort study has been performed. Patients and methods Incidence rates/100 patient-years of any infections were evaluated in RA and SpA outpatients observed in the period November 1, 2003 through December 31, 2009 and stratified according to therapy. Infection incidence rate ratios (IRR) were calculated using Poisson regression models which adjusted for demographic/clinical characteristics of the patients. Results Three hundred and thirtyone infections [318 (96.1%) non-serious and 13 (3.9%) serious] have been registered among 176 of the 341 patients (52%). The IR/100 patient-years of all infections was 36.3 ranging from 12.4 (DMARDs + CS) to 62.7 (anti-TNF??+?CS). The most frequent infection site was respiratory tract, and bacteria were responsible for three quarters of all infections. In the multivariate analysis, adding anti-TNF? to DMARDs doubled the IRR compared to DMARDs alone, anti-TNF??+?CS significantly tripled it, whereas anti-TNF??+?CS + DMARDs only increased the risk 2.5 times. The degree of disease activity was strongly and significantly associated with the infection risk (severe or moderate versus mild, IRR?=?4). Female sex was significantly associated with increased infection risk, while duration of disease and anti-influenza vaccination were protective, the latter even for cutaneous/soft-tissue (mainly herpetic) infections. Conclusion The combination anti-TNF? with CS was found to be the most pro-infective treatment, whereas DMARDs alone were relatively safe. Physicians, therefore, should be aware that there may be an increased risk of infection when using anti-TNF? and CS therapy together. Anti-influenza vaccination appears to provide broad protection, adding evidence to support its use in these patients, and deserves further study. PMID:24655394

  2. Fungal arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    Fungal arthritis, also called mycotic arthritis, is a rare condition. This disease can be caused by any of the invasive types of fungi. These organisms may affect bone or joint tissue. One or more joints may ...

  3. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of patients who have a skin rash called psoriasis. This particular arthritis can affect any joint in ... Psoriatic arthritis can occur in people without skin psoriasis, particularly in those who have relatives with psoriasis. ...

  4. Juvenile spondyloarthropathies: clinical manifestations and medical imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Michel Azouz; Ciarfin M. Duffy

    1995-01-01

    The spondyloarthropathies comprise four distinct entities — ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, the arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel disease, and Reiter's syndrome and other related forms of reactive arthritis. Although these are distinct diseases, they have a number of clinical, radiologie, and genetic characteristics in common which permit them to be classified under the unifying term “spondyloarthropathy”. They are diseases of

  5. Varicella arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gibson, N F; Ogden, W S

    1986-08-01

    Varicella arthritis is an acute self-limited arthritis, occurring in close temporal association with clinical varicella, which is usually monarthric, involving the knee of a prepubertal girl. We have reported a case of varicella arthritis and summarized the clinical and laboratory findings of our case and the cases reported in the English literature. It is important to differentiate this condition from septic arthritis. PMID:3738578

  6. Phenomics in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-04

    Healthy Volunteer; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus/Antiphospholipid Syndrome; FMF; Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes /TNF-receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome; Vasculitis; Uveitis; Myositis; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Rectocolitis; Type 1 Diabetes; Unclassified IAD Knee and/or Hip Arthritis, Muscular Dystrophy

  7. Restorative management of severely ankylosed primary molars.

    PubMed

    de Moura, Marcoeli Silva; Pontes, Alessandra Silva; Brito, Maria Hellen Sâmia Fortes; de Deus Moura, Lucia; de Deus Moura de Lima, Marina; de Melo Simplício, Alexandre Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Severe dentoalveolar ankylosis is an etiological factor for malocclusion. When infraocclusion occurs early, it progresses with time, leading to severe consequences in young children because of compensatory supra-eruption of the antagonist tooth and mesialization of adjacent teeth. Early diagnosis allows for interception of the problem and may prevent orthodontic treatment. The purpose of this manuscript is to report two cases of infraocclusion of primary mandibular second molars that were diagnosed early and were treated with composite resin crowns. The use of indirect composite restorations for ankylosed teeth is a good option for primary teeth with a moderate/ severe degree of ankylosis. PMID:25909842

  8. Enteropathic Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the two best-known types of which are ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. About one in five people with Crohn's or ulcerative colitis will develop enteropathic arthritis. The most common areas ...

  9. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes itchy or sore patches of thick, red skin with silvery ... other parts of your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and ...

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Grainger, Andrew J; Rowbotham, Emma L

    2013-02-01

    Since the advent of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, there has been an increasing emphasis on the early diagnosis and monitoring of this condition. This has led to the greater involvement of advanced imaging techniques such as ultrasound and MRI. Ultrasound appearances of common findings in rheumatoid arthritis are discussed in this review. Comparison of ultrasound in terms of sensitivity and specificity with other imaging modalities and with clinical examination is also made. Quantification is also discussed as a tool to allow assessment of response to drug therapy, an area that is likely to progress further as techniques become increasingly reproducible. Finally, as ultrasound techniques continue to develop, its involvement in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis is increasing. New techniques such as fusion imaging and sonoelastography, while at present still largely research-based entities, may offer increasingly improved diagnostic benefits in the field of inflammatory arthropathy. PMID:23487337

  11. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis have increased sick leave—a registry-based case–control study over 7 yrs

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsson, Lennart T. H.; Bremander, Ann; Englund, Martin; Heide, Anders; Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Petersson, Ingemar F.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. Using prospectively collected registry data to investigate sick leave (sickness benefit and sickness compensation) over a 7-yr period in patients with AS in comparison with population-based controls matched for age, sex and residential area. Methods. We investigated 122 (21 women and 101 men) outpatients with AS in South Sweden, born 1942 or later, from rheumatology specialist care for their sick leave during a 7-yr period. Mean (s.d.) age was 43 (11) yrs and mean (s.d.) disease duration was 20 (11) yrs. Two controls per case, matched for age, sex and residential area were selected from the Swedish National Population Register. Data concerning sick leave for cases and controls, based on the subjects’ unique 10-digit personal identification number, were retrieved from the national register of the Swedish Social Insurance Agency. Results. More AS patients than controls were registered for sickness benefit (52 vs 36%, P < 0.01) and sickness compensation (42 vs 11%, P < 0.001). Cases had an increased risk for sick leave compared with controls with a relative risk of 1.8; 95% CI 1.5, 2.1; and cases had more days with sick leave than controls (median number of more days per year 30; 95% CI 2, 72). Conclusions. Using the Swedish Social Insurance Agency's registers for sick leave, we found that patients with AS in rheumatology specialist care in South Sweden have an increased level of sick leave compared with controls. These population-based registers have a great potential for studies of the effects of different interventions on sick leave. PMID:19164425

  12. Alopecia Areata Universalis Elicited during Treatment with Adalimumab

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nedzmidin Pelivani; Akmal S. Hassan; Lasse R. Braathen; Robert E. Hunger; Nikhil Yawalkar

    2008-01-01

    Adalimumab is a fully humanized recombinant anti-tumour-necrosis-factor (TNF-?) monoclonal antibody which has been approved for rheumatoid arthritis, active ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis and Crohn’s disease. We report a case of alopecia areata (AA) universalis occurring 6 months after administration of adalimumab monotherapy in a patient with a long-standing history of psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis. The diagnosis was confirmed by a

  13. Neurological adverse events associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonio G. Tristano

    2010-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) drugs have been successfully used for the treatment of rheumatic autoimmune diseases\\u000a including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis, ankylosing spondylitis (AS), juvenile chronic arthritis,\\u000a and Crohn’s disease. However, they have been associated with different neurological disorders, including alterations of peripheral\\u000a nerves, multiple sclerosis (MS), optic neuritis (ON) and acute transverse myelitis (ATM). This article

  14. Potential of 18F-FDG-PET as a valuable adjunct to clinical and response assessment in rheumatoid arthritis and seronegative spondyloarthropathies

    PubMed Central

    Vijayant, Vishu; Sarma, Manjit; Aurangabadkar, Hrushikesh; Bichile, Lata; Basu, Sandip

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the role of fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) in various rheumatic diseases and its potential in the early assessment of treatment response in a limited number of patients. METHODS: This study involved 28 newly diagnosed patients, of these 17 had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 11 had seronegative spondyloarthropathy (SSA). In the SSA group, 7 patients had ankylosing spondylitis, 3 had psoriatic arthritis, and one had non-specific SSA. Patients with RA were selected as per the American College of Rheumatology criteria. One hour after FDG injection, a whole body PET scan was performed from the skull vertex to below the knee joints using a GE Advance dedicated PET scanner. Separate scans were acquired for both upper and lower limbs. Post-treatment scans were performed in 9 patients in the RA group (at 6-9 wk from baseline) and in 1 patient with psoriatic arthropathy. The pattern of FDG uptake was analysed visually and quantified as maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) in a standard region of interest. Metabolic response on the scan was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively and was correlated with clinical assessment. RESULTS: The qualitative FDG uptake was in agreement with the clinically involved joints, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein values and the clinical assessment by the rheumatologist. All 17 patients in the RA group showed the highest FDG avidity in painful/swollen/tender joints. The uptake pattern was homogeneous, intense and poly-articular in distribution. Hypermetabolism in the regional nodes (axillary nodes in the case of upper limb joint involvement and inguinal nodes in lower limb joints) was a constant feature in patients with RA. Multiple other extra-articular lesions were also observed including thyroid glands (in associated thyroiditis) and in the subcutaneous nodules. Treatment response was better appreciated using SUVmax values than visual interpretation, when compared with clinical evaluation. Four patients showed a favourable response, while 3 had stable disease and 2 showed disease progression. The resolution of regional nodal uptake (axillary or inguinal nodes based on site of joint involvement) in RA following disease modifying anti-rheumatoid drugs was noteworthy, which could be regarded as an additional parameter for identifying responding patients. In the SSA group, uptake in the affected joint was heterogeneous, low grade and non-symmetrical. In particular, there was intense tendon and muscular uptake corresponding to symptomatic joints. The patients with psoriatic arthritis showed intense FDG uptake in the joints and soft tissue. CONCLUSION: 18F-FDG PET accurately delineates the ongoing inflammatory activity in various rheumatic diseases (both at articular and extra-articular sites) and relates well to clinical symptoms. Different metabolic patterns on FDG-PET scanning in RA and SSA can have important implications for their diagnosis and management in the future with the support of larger studies. FDG-PET molecular imaging is also a sensitive tool in the early assessment of treatment response, especially when using quantitative information. With these benefits, FDG-PET could play a pivotal clinical role in the management of inflammatory joint disorders in the future. PMID:23320137

  15. Sex and Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pain Pregnancy and Rheumatic Disease Sex and Arthritis Sex and Arthritis PRINT Download PDF Description Sexuality is ... sensation Erectile dysfunction or impotence Begin overcoming barriers Sex is not simply about reaching rapid orgasm with ...

  16. Attempted traction of impacted and ankylosed maxillary canines.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Marlio Vinícius; Pithon, Matheus Melo

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this article is to report the clinical orthodontic treatment of an adult patient with 2 impacted maxillary canines. Traction was applied to the impacted teeth; however, after 7 months, the teeth were found to be ankylosed and were extracted. The extraction spaces were closed by moving the posterior teeth mesially with mini-implant anchorage. The results were satisfactory, with the premolars in the functional position of the canines. PMID:22748996

  17. Aseptic spondylitis as the initial manifestation of the SAPHO syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Kotilainen; R. E. Gullichsen; R. Saario; I. Manner; E. Kotilainen

    1997-01-01

    We describe the case of a 61-year-old female patient who presented with spondylitis of the lumbar spine. Although the microbiological cultures of the bone biopsy specimens obtained during laminotomy remained negative, the patient was treated with broad-spectrum antimicrobials for 2 months. Eight months later she started to suffer from pain and tenderness in her sternum and the medial portion of

  18. MR Imaging Characteristics of Tuberculous Spondylitis vs Vertebral Osteomyelitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alison S. Smith; Meredith A. Weinstein; Akira Mizushima; Bret Coughlin; Stephen P. Hayden; Milton M. Lakin; Charles F. Lanzieri

    Retrospective evaluation was made of four patients with tuberculous spondylitis wbe had been studied by MR with Ti- and T2-weighted images in the sagittal plane and spin-density-weighted images in the axial plane. Evaluation was made of the distribution of abnormal signals within the body and posterior elements of the vertebrae, the intervertebral disk, and the associated paraspinal and epidural areas.

  19. Arthritis: joints inflamed.

    PubMed

    Casey, Georgina

    2015-06-01

    ARTHRITIS IS a generic term for inflammatory joint disease. There are various forms of arthritis, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. Arthritis can be a chronic debilitating condition or a transient effect of bacterial or viral infections. As a chronic condition, arthritis can cause loss of quality of life, disability and, with rheumatoid disease, early death. The economic burden of arthritis, in terms of management and loss of productivity due to disability, is high and set to increase with the ageing population. Recent advances in our understanding of the causes and progression of a number of forms of arthritis have raised hopes of better management and possible remission. Pharmacotherapy has moved from symptom management to addressing underlying disease processes. However, therapies that prevent or cure arthritis remain elusive. Current care for people with arthritis relies on a multidisciplinary approach and substantial pharmacological intervention. Nurses have a key role to play in guiding patients through treatment, ensuring they receive optimal therapy to reduce the impact of arthritis and its management on their lives. PMID:26168559

  20. Advances in rheumatology: new targeted therapeutics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul P Tak; Joachim R Kalden

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of inflammatory arthritides - including rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis -\\u000a has seen much progress in recent years, partially due to increased understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases at\\u000a the cellular and molecular levels. These conditions share some common mechanisms. Biologic therapies have provided a clear\\u000a advance in the treatment of rheumatological conditions. Currently available TNF-targeting

  1. Atlantoaxial Subluxation after Pyogenic Spondylitis around the Odontoid Process

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Atsushi; Yagi, Mitsuru; Takemitsu, Masakazu; Machida, Masafumi; Asazuma, Takashi; Ichimura, Shoichi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. A case report and review of the literature. Objective. The aim of this study was to describe the conservative management of pyogenic spondylitis around the odontoid process. Summary of Background Data. Atlantoaxial subluxation after pyogenic spondylitis is rare. The therapeutic approach to infection of the upper cervical spine is controversial. Methods. Medical chart and radiological images of a 76-year-old male patient were retrospectively reviewed. Radiography revealed atlantoaxial subluxation, and an abscess was seen around the odontoid process on magnetic resonance images. Intravenous antibiotics and a halo vest were used to treat the patient. We then observed the patient's conservative treatment course. Results. C-reactive protein levels returned to normal 4 weeks after administration of the intravenous antibiotics. The patient's muscle weakness also completely recovered 8 weeks after administration of the intravenous antibiotics. Because the patient was able to walk without any support, surgical treatment was not necessary. Conclusions. Pyogenic spondylitis of the upper cervical spine is a rare manifestation. Surgical or conservative treatment must be selected carefully based on the patient's symptoms. If early diagnosis and treatment can be provided to the patients, conservative treatment can be achieved.

  2. Profile of arthritis disability.

    PubMed Central

    Verbrugge, L. M.; Juarez, L.

    2001-01-01

    Using the 1994-95 National Health Interview Supplement Disability Supplement, the authors study levels of disabilities and accommodations among US adults with arthritis disability, compared to people with disability due to other conditions. Arthritis-disabled people are defined in two ways. One definition covers a broad range of arthritis and rheumatic conditions, and the other concentrates solely on arthritis. The authors find that arthritis-disabled people have more total disabilities than other-disabled peop e. However, their disabilities are less severe, have shorter durations, and accumulate more gradually over time. Despite more disabilities, people with arthritis disability use fewer assistive and service accommodations than other-disabled people. They do use more mobility aids. Because arthritis is the leading chronic condition for middle-aged and older adults, th s profile of extensive but mild-to-moderate disability is experienced by many millions of adults. Accommodations for arthritis may also be extensive but aimed more toward self-care than toward assistive and medical services. PMID:11889283

  3. Staphylococcal peptidoglycans induce arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zai-Qing Liu; Guo-Min Deng; Simon Foster; Andrej Tarkowski

    2001-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important pathogens in septic arthritis. To analyse the arthritogenic properties of staphylococcal peptidoglycan (PGN), highly purified PGN from S. aureus was intra-articularly injected into murine joints. The results demonstrate that PGN will trigger arthritis in a dose-dependent manner. A single injection of this compound leads to massive infiltration of predominantly macrophages and polymorphonuclear

  4. Postinfectious Arthritis in Pediatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    PLESCA, Doina Anca; LUMINOS, Monica; SPATARIU, Luminita; STEFANESCU, Mihaela; CINTEZA, Eliza; BALGRADEAN, Mihaela

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Postinfectious arthritis is a relatively often encountered in pediatric practice. The authors present the most important data concerneing this pathology, with up to date informations exemplifying with case presentations. Clinical cases bring to attention the most common forms of postinfectious arthritis (reactive arthritis, postinfectious arthritis bacterial, viral, spirochete, and so on). Although highly studied and commonly found in current pediatric practice, arthritis occurring after infections remains controversial entities, especially regarding terminology. While, according to some authors, postinfectious arthritis belongs to the large group of reactive arthritis, by other authors, these joint events are independent entities. PMID:24371480

  5. Arthritis in hip (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Cartilage normally protects the joint, allowing for smooth movement. Cartilage also absorbs shock when pressure is placed on ... like when walking. Arthritis involves the breakdown of cartilage. Without the usual amount of cartilage, the bones ...

  6. Arthritis and the Feet

    MedlinePLUS

    ... beans that may play a role. Psoriatic arthritis: Psoriasis is often thought of as a skin disorder, ... affect the joints as well. On the skin, psoriasis appears as dry, scaly patches. Not all people ...

  7. Physical Activity and Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Osteoarthritis [PDF - 3.44MB] American College of Rheumatology treatment guidelines For a scientific summary on the ... to Exercise and Physical Activity . American College of Rheumatology — Exercise and Arthritis . American Council on Exercise . YMCA . ...

  8. Arthritis in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... challenging. However, with care from a team of rheumatology professionals, most children with arthritis live full and ... JIA is used most by specialists in pediatric rheumatology, JRA is commonly used in the United States. ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... treatments are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  10. Handout on Health: Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Genetic variation increases risk of rheumatoid arthritis and lupus: Separate research found a SNP in a large ... both rheumatoid arthritis and another autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus). The STAT4 gene encodes a protein ...

  11. Maintenance of improvement in spinal mobility, physical function and quality of life in patients with ankylosing spondylitis after 5 years in a clinical trial of adalimumab

    PubMed Central

    Breban, Maxime; Halter, Dale; DiVittorio, Gino; Bratt, Johan; Cantini, Fabrizio; Kary, Sonja; Pangan, Aileen L.; Kupper, Hartmut; Rathmann, Suchitrita S.; Sieper, Joachim; Mease, Phillip J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Chronic pain and progressive loss of physical function with AS may adversely affect health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The objective of this study was to assess the 5-year data regarding spinal mobility, physical function and HRQoL in patients with AS who participated in the Adalimumab Trial Evaluating Long-term Efficacy and Safety for AS (ATLAS) study. Methods. Patients received blinded adalimumab 40 mg or placebo every other week for 24 weeks, then open-label adalimumab for up to 5 years. Spinal mobility was evaluated using linear BASMI (BASMIlin). BASDAI, total back pain, CRP, BASFI, Short Form-36 and AS quality of life (ASQoL) were also assessed. Correlations between BASMIlin and clinical, functional and ASQoL outcomes after 12 weeks and after 5years of adalimumab exposure were evaluated using Spearman’s rank correlation. Associations were further analysed using multivariate regression. Results. Three hundred and eleven patients received ?1 dose of adalimumab; 125 of the 208 patients originally randomized to adalimumab received treatment for 5 years. Improvements in BASMIlin were sustained through 5 years, with a mean change of –0.6 from baseline in the population who completed 5 years of treatment with adalimumab. Improvements in disease activity, physical function and ASQoL were also sustained through 5 years. BASMIlin was significantly correlated with all evaluated clinical outcomes (P < 0.001). The highest correlation was with BASFI at 12 weeks (r = 0.52) and at 5 years (r = 0.65). Multivariate regression analysis confirmed this association (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Treatment with adalimumab for up to 5 years demonstrated sustained benefits in spinal mobility, disease activity, physical function and HRQoL in patients with active AS. Spinal mobility was significantly associated with short- and long-term physical function in these patients. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ NCT00085644. PMID:25541333

  12. Estimates of radiation doses in tissue and organs and risk of excess cancer in the single-course radiotherapy patients treated for ankylosing spondylitis in England and Wales

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.

    1982-02-01

    The estimates of absorbed doses of x rays and excess risk of cancer in bone marrow and heavily irradiated sites are extremely crude and are based on very limited data and on a number of assumptions. Some of these assumptions may later prove to be incorrect, but it is probable that they are correct to within a factor of 2. The excess cancer risk estimates calculated compare well with the most reliable epidemiological surveys thus far studied. This is particularly important for cancers of heavily irradiated sites with long latent periods. The mean followup period for the patients was 16.2 y, and an increase in cancers of heavily irradiated sites may appear in these patients in the 1970s in tissues and organs with long latent periods for the induction of cancer. The accuracy of these estimates is severely limited by the inadequacy of information on doses absorbed by the tissues at risk in the irradiated patients. The information on absorbed dose is essential for an accurate assessment of dose-cancer incidence analysis. Furthermore, in this valuable series of irradiated patients, the information on radiation dosimetry on the radiotherapy charts is central to any reliable determination of somatic risks of radiation with regard to carcinogenesis in man. The work necessary to obtain these data is under way; only when they are available can more precise estimates of risk of cancer induction by radiation in man be obtained.

  13. Neonatal Candida arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Saurabh; Gangwal, Kapil

    2014-05-01

    Fungal arthritis is an uncommon yet serious disorder in the newborn. Delay in diagnosis and management can lead to significant morbidity. We report our experience with management of two such cases. Two preterm neonates with multifocal arthritis caused by Candida were studied. Diagnosis was made by clinical examination, laboratory investigations, radiological investigations and culture. Both were treated by aspiration, arthrotomy and antifungal therapy. One patient recovered fully from the infection while the other had growth disturbances resulting in limb length inequality at recent followup. Prompt and expeditious evacuation of pus from joints and antifungal therapy is imperative for treatment. Associated osteomyelitis leads to further difficulty in treatment. PMID:24932046

  14. Hyaluronic acid production by irradiated human synovial fibroblasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Yaron; Ilana Yaron; Moshe Levita; Mala Herzberg

    1977-01-01

    Radioactive particles as well as x irradiation from an external source has been used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis. In order to clarify effects of ionizing irradiation on synovial cells, radioactive gold (¹⁹⁸Au) and yttrium (⁹°Y) were added to fibroblast cultures derived from human synovial membranes. Other cultures were irradiated by a Picker x-ray machine.

  15. Perspectives on autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, I.R.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: HLA and Autoimmunity; Self-Recognition and Symmetry in the Immune System; Immunology of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus; Multiple Sclerosis; Autoimmunity and Immune Pathological Aspects of Virus Disease; Analyses of the Idiotypes and Ligand Binding Characteristics of Human Monoclonal Autoantibodies to DNA: Do We Understand Better Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Autoimmunity and Rheumatic Fever; Autoimmune Arthritis Induced by Immunization to Mycobacterial Antigens; and The Interaction Between Genetic Factors and Micro-Organisms in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Facts and Fiction.

  16. Tumor Necrosis Factor-? Promoter Polymorphisms in Mexican Patients With Spondyloarthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gilberto Vargas-Alarcón; Julio Casasola-Vargas; José Manuel Rodríguez-Pérez; Gabriela Huerta-Sil; Nonanzit Pérez-Hernández; John Londoño; Cesar Pacheco-Tena; Mario H. Cardiel; Julio Granados; Rubén Burgos-Vargas

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the role of tumor necrosis factor–? (TNF-?) gene as susceptibility marker for spondyloarthritis (SpA), two polymorphisms (?238 and ?308 positions) were analyzed in 229 patients with SpA (113 with ankylosing spondylitis [AS], 92 with undifferentiated SpA [U-SpA], 24 with reactive arthritis), and 169 ethnically matched healthy control subjects. The HLA-B alleles were detected by PCR-SSP technique and the

  17. Association study of LMP gene polymorphisms in Mexican patients with spondyloarthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gilberto Vargas-Alarcón; Ricardo Gamboa; Joaquín Zuñiga; José Manuel Fragoso; Guadalupe Hernández-Pacheco; John Londoño; Cesar Pacheco-Tena; Mario H. Cardiel; Julio Granados; Rubén Burgos-Vargas

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the role of LMP (low molecular weight protein) genes as susceptibility markers for spondyloarthritis (SpA), LMP gene polymorphisms were analyzed in 223 Mexican patients with SpA (81 undifferentiated SpA [U-SpA], 117 with ankylosing spondylitis [AS], 25 with reactive arthritis) and in 139 ethnically matched healthy individuals. LMP genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The

  18. Paradoxical Reaction to Golimumab: Tumor Necrosis Factor ? Inhibitor Inducing Psoriasis Pustulosa

    PubMed Central

    Soto Lopes, Marien Siqueira; Trope, Beatriz Moritz; Rochedo Rodriguez, Maria Paula Rua; Grynszpan, Rachel Lima; Cuzzi, Tullia; Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    Importance Golimumab is a human monoclonal antibody, used for rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. Adverse reactions are increasing with this class of medication (tumor necrosis factor ? inhibitors). Observations The authors present a case of a female patient who presented with psoriasis pustulosa after the use of golimumab for rheumatoid arthritis. Conclusions and Relevance Paradoxically, in this case, golimumab, which is used for psoriasis, induced the pustular form of this disease. We are observing an increasing number of patients who develop collateral effects with tumor necrosis factor ? inhibitors, and the understanding of the mechanism of action and how these adverse reactions occur may contribute to avoid these sometimes severe situations. PMID:24348382

  19. Rheumatic diseases. 2. Therapeutic considerations.

    PubMed

    Weiss, T E; Gum, O B; Biundo, J J

    1976-12-01

    In the management of rheumatic diseases, the use of corticosteroids should be reserved for active arthritis. Phenylbutazone (Butazolidin) is probably the drug of choice for acute gout and is also effective in ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, and psoriatic arthritis. Indomethacin (Indocin) also is useful in these conditions. Ibuprofen (Motrin) is only slightly more efficacious than aspirin. Aspirin is still the preferred treatment for rheumatoid arthritis and should be tried before ibuprofen. Osteoarthritis of the cervical or lumbar spine calls for a full program of physical therapy. Experimental procedures for total replacement of joints other than hip and knee show promise. PMID:1087014

  20. Oxidation in rheumatoid arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carol A Hitchon; Hani S El-Gabalawy

    2004-01-01

    Oxygen metabolism has an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the course of cellular oxidative phosphorylation, and by activated phagocytic cells during oxidative bursts, exceed the physiological buffering capacity and result in oxidative stress. The excessive production of ROS can damage protein, lipids, nucleic acids, and matrix components. They also serve as

  1. Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery for Tubercular Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Roop; Gogna, Paritosh; Parshad, Sanjeev; Karwasra, Rajender Kumar; Karwasra, Parmod Kumar; Kaur, Kiranpreet

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the outcome of video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) in 9 patients (males = 6, females = 3) with clinico-radiological diagnosis of tubercular spondylitis of the dorsal spine. The mean duration of surgery was 140.88 ± 20.09 minutes, mean blood was 417.77 ± 190.90?mL, and mean duration of postoperative hospital stay was 5.77 ± 0.97 days, Seven patients had a preoperative Grade A neurological involvement, while at the time of final followup the only deficit was Grade D power in 2 patients. In patients without bone graft placement (n = 6), average increase in Kyphosis angle was 16°, while in patients with bone graft placement (n = 3) the deformity remained stationary. At the time of final follow up, fusion was achieved in all patients, the VAS score for back pain improved from a pretreatment score of 8.3 to 2, and the function assessment yielded excellent (n = 4) to good (n = 5) results. In two patients minithoracotomy had to be resorted due to extensive pleural adhesions (n = 1) or difficulty in placement of graft (n = 1). Videoassisted thoracoscopic surgery provides a safe and effective approach in the management of spinal tuberculosis. It has the advantages of decreased blood loss and post operative morbidity with minimal complications. PMID:24804092

  2. [Pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Hertzberger-ten Cate, R; Fiselier, T

    1991-10-01

    On basis of clinical and immunogenetic factors most children with pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis can be included in one of the subtypes: type 1 and type 2 pauciarticular JCA. Type 1 occurs in young children, mainly girls, with involvement of knees, ankles or elbows. In the majority of children antinuclear antibodies can be detected. The presence of these autoantibodies is associated with chronic anterior uveitis. Type 2 or the juvenile spondylarthropathies include morbus Bechterew, the reactive arthritides and arthritis associated with psoriasis and inflammatory bowel diseases. Large joints of the lower extremities are involved, back pain is unusual at onset, but enthesitis is frequently present. There is a strong association with HLA-B27. Treatment of both subsets consists of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, application of intra-articular steroids, physio- and hydrotherapy and splinting. In children with a polyarticular course of type 1, or a prolonged course of type 2 disease modifying drugs are often needed. PMID:1957301

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis in greece

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. P. Andonopoulos; V. Galanopoulou; A. A. Drosos; H. M. Moutsopoulos

    1987-01-01

    A high frequency of anti-Ro (SSA) circulating antibodies and lack of HLA-DR4 association described recently in Greek rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, prompted us to study their clinical and laboratory picture and compare it with that described in the literature. One hundred and ninety seven patients with definite or classical RA were divided into three groups A, B, and C with

  4. Pericarditis in rheumatoid arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. G. Jurik; H. Graudal

    1986-01-01

    The annual incidence of clinically manifest pericarditis was found to be 0.34% in 157 females and 0.44% in 77 males with rheumatoid arthritis, observed for a mean time of 5.7 years. The development of pericarditis was independent of disease duration, but was related to extensive joint involvement, subcutaneous nodules, and a high Waaler Rose titre. Concomitant pleural effusion was present

  5. Spontaneous infective spondylitis and mycotic aneurysm: incidence, risk factors, outcome and management experience

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Lin, Wei-Che; Chou, Wen-Yi

    2007-01-01

    Infective spondylitis occurring concomitantly with mycotic aneurysm is rare. A retrospective record review was conducted in all cases of mycotic aneurysm from January 1995 to December 2004, occurring in a primary care and tertiary referral center. Spontaneous infective spondylitis and mycotic aneurysm were found in six cases (10.3% of 58 mycotic aneurysm patients). Neurological deficit (50% vs. 0; P < 0.001) is the significant clinical manifestation in patients with spontaneous infective spondylitis and mycotic aneurysm. The presence of psoas abscess on computed tomography (83.3% vs. 0; P < 0.001) and endplate destruction on radiography (50% vs. 0; P < 0.001) are predominated in patients with spontaneous infective spondylitis and mycotic aneurysm. Of these six patients, four with Salmonella infection received surgical intervention and all survived. Another two patients (one with Streptococcus pyogenes, another with Staphylococcus aureus) received conservative therapy and subsequently died from rupture of aneurysm or septic shock. Paravertebral soft tissue swelling, presence of psoas abscess and/or unclear soft tissue plane between the aorta and vertebral body in relation to mycotic aneurysm may indicate a concomitant infection in the spine. In contrast, if prevertebral mass is found in the survey of spine infection, coexisting mycotic aneurysm should be considered. PMID:18046585

  6. Laminotomy with Continuous Irrigation in Patients with Pyogenic Spondylitis in Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Hyun; Jang, Jae-Won; Seo, Bo-Ra; Kim, Tae-Sun; Kim, Soo-Han

    2011-01-01

    Objective Pyogenic spondylitis often results in acute neurological deterioration requiring adequate surgical intervention and appropriate antibiotic treatment. The purpose of this study was to conduct an analysis of the clinical effect of continuous irrigation via laminotomy in a series of patients with pyogenic spondylitis in thoracic and lumbar spine. Methods The authors conducted a retrospective investigation of 31 consecutive patients with pyogenic thoracic and lumbar spondylitis who underwent continuous irrigation through laminotomy from 2004 to 2008. The study included 22 men and 9 women, ranging in age from 38 to 78 years (mean 58.1 years). The average follow-up duration was 13.4 months (range, 8-34 months). We performed debridement and abscess removal after simple laminotomy, and then washed out epidural and disc space using a continuous irrigation system. Broad spectrum antibiotics were administered empirically and changed according to the subsequent culture result. Clinical outcomes were based on the low back outcome scale (LBOS), visual analogue scale (VAS) score, and Frankel grade at the last follow-up. Radiological assessment involved plain radiographs, including functional views. Results Common predisposing factors included local injection for pain therapy, diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, and liver cirrhosis. Causative microorganisms were identified in 22 cases (70.9%) : Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus spp. were the main organisms. After surgery, LBOS, VAS score, and Frankel grade showed significant improvement in most patients. Spinal stability was maintained during the follow-up period, making secondary reconstructive surgery unnecessary for all patients, except one. Conclusion Simple laminotomy with continuous irrigation by insertion of a catheter into intervertebral disc space or epidural space was minimally invasive and effective in the treatment of pyogenic spondylitis. This procedure could be a beneficial treatment option in patients with thoracolumbar spondylitis combined with minimal or moderate destructive change of vertebrae. PMID:22200016

  7. Characterization of proteoglycan-reactive T cell lines and hybridomas from mice with proteoglycan-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Leroux, J Y; Poole, A R; Webber, C; Vipparti, V; Choi, H U; Rosenberg, L C; Banerjee, S

    1992-04-01

    Hyperimmunization with chondroitin sulfate-depleted fetal human cartilage proteoglycan (HFPG) leads to the development of peripheral arthritis and spondylitis in BALB/c mice. Chondroitin-sulfate-depleted adult human cartilage proteoglycan (HAPG) is much less effective at inducing arthritis. These observations suggest age differences in the presence of arthritogenic proteoglycan (PG) epitopes. Earlier studies from this laboratory have indicated an important role for PG-reactive T cells in the pathogenesis of this arthritis model. To investigate further the cellular immunity to PG in mice, two T cell lines, JY.A and JY.D, and two T cell hybridomas, TH5 and TH14, were isolated from mice with PG-induced arthritis and characterized. Two patterns of reactivity to PG emerged from the analysis of these T cells. One pattern, as demonstrated by the T cell line JY.D and the two T cell hybridomas, TH5 and TH14, was characterized by reactivity to HFPG, HAPG, chondroitin sulfate-depleted bovine cartilage PG, the G1 domain (hyaluronate binding region) of bovine cartilage PG and bovine link protein. The epitope(s) recognized by these T cells appear to be part of the homologous regions shared between the G1 domain and the link protein. The second pattern of reactivity, as demonstrated by the T cell line JY.A, was characterized by reactivity to HFPG but not to HAPG or the other PG Ag or bovine link protein. All the T cell lines and hybridomas had a CD4+, CD8- phenotype, possibly belonged to the TH1 subset (IL-2+, IL-4-), and were MHC class II restricted. These studies indicate that HFPG has T cell epitopes in common with HAPG (such as in the G1 domain) and different than those in HAPG. The significance of this data in terms of PG structure, changes with age, and induction of arthritis remains to be established. PMID:1372024

  8. [10-year epidemiological study on rheumatic diseases in Shantou area].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Q; Huang, S; Chen, R

    1997-03-01

    22,049 adults were surveyed in a ten-year epidemiological study. The frequency of common rheumatic symptoms in Shantou population was much lower than that in northern China. The prevalence of ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis and gout was 0.20%-0.32%, 0.20%-0.26%, 8.3%-10.8%, 12.4% and 0.15%-0.17% respectively. The frequency of HLA-B27 was 4.1% among general population and 90.6% in ankylosing spondylitis. The most commonly involved sites of osteoarthritis were lumbar spine, neck, and knee; but hands and hip were rarely involved. 85% subjects under investigation were found to be short of calcium intake. The differences between the north and the south of China in the prevalence of rheumatic symptoms may be related to the diversities in consciousness of seeking medical advice, reduction of bone content, climate and ergonomics. PMID:10374316

  9. [Update in psoriatic arthritis treatment].

    PubMed

    Berner, Jeanne; Zufferey, Pascal

    2015-01-14

    Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease. It affects up to 40% of patients suffe- ring from skin psoriasis. Joint involvement is relatively heterogeneous. Some clinical manifestations are similar to those of rheumatoid arthritis, others are close to spondylarthritis manifestations and are therefore considered as part of this entity. Treatment depends on initial presentation (peripheral or axial) but often begins with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and methotrexate, followed by anti-TNFalpha if needed. New therapeutic op- tions are available or under evaluation, parti- cularly targeting cytokines involved in psoriatic arthritis (IL-12/IL-23 and IL-17). PMID:25799671

  10. Cervical Myelopathy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, N.; Todd, N. V.

    2011-01-01

    Involvement of the cervical spine is common in rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical presentation can be variable, and symptoms may be due to neck pain or compressive myeloradiculopathy. We discuss the pathology, grading systems, clinical presentation, indications for surgery and surgical management of cervical myelopathy related to rheumatoid arthritis in this paper. We describe our surgical technique and results. We recommend early consultation for surgical management when involvement of the cervical spine is suspected in rheumatoid arthritis. Even patients with advanced cervical myelopathy should be discussed for surgical treatment, since in our experience improvement in function after surgery is common. PMID:22203899

  11. Injuries Up Risk of Psoriatic Arthritis for People with Psoriasis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Up Risk of Psoriatic Arthritis for People With Psoriasis Researchers said effect was even stronger if bones ... risk of psoriatic arthritis in people who have psoriasis, a new study suggests. Psoriatic arthritis -- chronic arthritis ...

  12. Golimumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody against TNFalpha.

    PubMed

    Hutas, Gabor

    2008-08-01

    Centocor Inc and licensees Schering-Plough Corp, Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corp and Janssen Pharmaceutical KK are developing golimumab, a fully human mAb antibody against TNFalpha, for the potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and ulcerative colitis. Golimumab is currently in phase III clinical trials for RA, PsA and AS and preliminary data have shown an improvement in a number of physical functions, disease activity, productivity and quality-of-life measurements. PMID:18683105

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis in Lesotho.

    PubMed Central

    Moolenburgh, J D; Moore, S; Valkenburg, H A; Erasmus, M G

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-nine black African patients were seen with probable, definite or classical rheumatoid arthritis (RA); 32 of these were seen in a prospective study out of a total of 15 834 new patients 15 years and older at presentation seen in a 12-month period. The diagnosis was based on the American Rheumatism Association criteria for RA or the Rome criteria for inactive RA. The high incidence of severe disease as well as the occurrence of advanced disease in young patients is notable. 80% of the patients came from rural areas. Radiological lesions were found in 74% and serological abnormalities in 92%. Rheumatoid factor (RF) was found to be positive in 12% of an age and sex matched control group and in 19% of a group of patients suffering from tuberculosis. PMID:6696515

  14. Smoking and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kathleen; Yang, So Min; Kim, Seong Heon; Han, Kyoung Hee; Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper. PMID:25479074

  15. Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kolarz, G

    1988-01-01

    This report gives a review on recent results of investigations of cellular aspects of inflammation. The role of macrophages and T-helper-cells with particular focus to the effects of the various mediators on their target cells will be discussed. Interleukin 1, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Interleukin 2, and Interferon as well as arachidonic acid metabolites contribute to the clinical findings of inflammation. We have to admit that the whole process of inflammation in rheumatic arthritis (RA) is not yet clear. For example we do not know in detail why RA is self perpetuating, why and when rheumatoid pannus occurs or under which circumstances immune complexes may cause the various organ manifestations. Recent findings are discussed. PMID:2464266

  16. Atlantoaxial subluxation after pyogenic spondylitis of the atlanto-occipital joint

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazuhiko Tsunoda; Haku Iizuka; Yasunori Sorimachi; Tsuyoshi Ara; Masahiro Nishinome; Yasuhiko Takechi; Kenji Takagishi

    2011-01-01

    This report presents a case of atlanto-axial subluxation after treatment of pyogenic spondylitis of the atlanto-occipital\\u000a joint. A 60-year-old male had 1-month history of neck pain with fever. Magnetic resonance imaging showed inflammation around\\u000a the odontoid process. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was administrated immediately. After 6 weeks, CRP had returned almost\\u000a to normal. After 4 months, laboratory data was still normal, but the

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Are Here: Home ? Multiple Languages ? All Health Topics ? Rheumatoid Arthritis URL of this page: http://www.nlm.nih. ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Rheumatoid Arthritis - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  18. Psoriatic arthritis in a military aviator.

    PubMed

    Sulit, Daryl J; Clarke, Jonathan E

    2005-07-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic spondyloarthropathy whose pathogenesis is unknown. We present a case of a naval flight officer who presented with chronic psoriatic arthritis, which ultimately became well controlled with etanercept treatment. The naval flight officer was granted military aeromedical waivers for psoriatic arthritis, cutaneous psoriasis, and chronic medication use. We also review the medical literature on psoriatic arthritis disease and etanercept and discuss their aeromedical implications in military aviation. PMID:16018354

  19. Rheumatological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Voulgari, Paraskevi V.

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are frequent and include peripheral arthritis, axial involvement and peripheral enthesitis. Secondary osteoporosis and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy may also occur. Complications of IBD (e.g. septic arthritis) must be distinguished from sterile inflammation. Adverse effects of corticosteroid treatment, such as osteonecrosis, may also affect joints. Axial involvement ranges from low back pain to true ankylosing spondylitis. Human leukocyte antigen B27 is associated with axial involvement of IBD. Peripheral arthritis has been classified into two types. Type I is a pauciarticular, asymmetric usually non destructive arthritis affecting large joints and is usually associated with active bowel disease. Type II is a polyarthritis affecting small joints and tends to run a course independent of the bowel disease. Treatment of joint symptoms in IBD include sulphasalazine, azathioprine, methotrexate and glucocorticoids. Anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies are effective in treating resistant or complicated Crohn’s disease as well as peripheral arthritis and axial involvement. PMID:24713717

  20. Prostaglandins and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Mohammad Javad; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, autoimmune, and complex inflammatory disease leading to bone and cartilage destruction, whose cause remains obscure. Accumulation of genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, and dysregulated immune responses are necessary for mounting this self-reacting disease. Inflamed joints are infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of cellular and soluble mediators of the immune system, such as T cells, B cells, macrophages, cytokines, and prostaglandins (PGs). Prostaglandins are lipid inflammatory mediators derived from the arachidonic acid by multienzymatic reactions. They both sustain homeostatic mechanisms and mediate pathogenic processes, including the inflammatory reaction. They play both beneficial and harmful roles during inflammation, according to their site of action and the etiology of the inflammatory response. With respect to the role of PGs in inflammation, they can be effective mediators in the pathophysiology of RA. Thus the use of agonists or antagonists of PG receptors may be considered as a new therapeutic protocol in RA. In this paper, we try to elucidate the role of PGs in the immunopathology of RA. PMID:23193470

  1. Monitoring outcomes of arthritis and longitudinal data collection in routine care using a patient questionnaire that incorporates a clinical note on one piece of paper.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Yusuf

    2007-08-01

    Patient questionnaires are the quantitative tools available to rheumatologists to monitor their patients' health status and responses to therapy. The Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and its derivatives have been shown to be the most significant predictors of functional and work disability, costs, joint replacement surgery, and mortality; generally at higher levels of significance than joint counts, radiographs, and laboratory tests. Every encounter of a patient with a rheumatologist provides an opportunity to collect data. Yet patient questionnaires, which can be used in all rheumatic diseases, including osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, fibromyalgia, scleroderma, and ankylosing spondylitis, are not included in routine care by most rheumatologists. Questionnaires can be adapted to include a simple subjective-objective-assessment-plan (SOAP) clinical encounter note that helps with data entry and also provides all the necessary information for clinical decision making in one sheet of paper. Data that are feasible to collect in clinical care provide the optimal approach to assessing quantitatively how patients are doing. If data are not collected and recorded, that opportunity, on that day, is lost forever. Rheumatologists would find it valuable to adapt questionnaires to the care they provide for all their patients, to document and improve the care they provide, and add quantitative data to standard clinical care. PMID:17678824

  2. Aspergillus arthritis and organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cantarovich, Diego; Tattevin, Pierre; Le Pogamp, Patrick; Polard, Jean-Louis; Stock, Nathalie; Blancho, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a kidney and pancreas transplanted patient, hospitalized for septic hip arthritis. The whole diagnostic work-up including synovial and bone biopsies remained negative. After inefficient empirical anti-bacterial antibiotic treatment, femoral head resection was performed and tissue analysis revealed Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae. Treatment with voriconazole along with hip replacement led to complete recovery. However, drug interaction between immunosuppressive and anti-fungal drugs was complicated by cellular acute graft rejection. Aspergillus fumigatus arthritis is an uncommon and serious infection that should be evoked especially in the case of resistance to anti-microbial antibiotics and/or an atypical clinical picture.

  3. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jabbari, Ali; Cheung, Wang; Kamino, Hideko; Soter, Nicholas A

    2009-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman with a history of arthritis presented for a long-standing history of symmetric, indurated plaques on her thighs and lateral aspects of the trunk. Histopathologic examination of skin biopsy specimens was consistent with interstitial granulomatous dermatitis, and a diagnosis of interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis was made. Administration of topical potent glucocorticoids, intralesional glucocorticoids, and narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy, in addition to continuation of systemic glucocorticoids and methotrexate, resulted in improvement of her cutaneous and musculoskeletal disease. PMID:19891930

  4. Arthritis associated with HIV infection: radiographic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Z S; Norman, A; Solomon, G

    1989-10-01

    Radiographs of symptomatic joints were retrospectively evaluated in 24 patients with inflammatory arthritis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Clinically, 20 patients had a seronegative arthritis including Reiter syndrome (54%), psoriatic arthritis (17%), and undifferentiated forms of spondyloarthropathy (13%). These patients were indistinguishable radiographically from patients with typical seronegative disorders except for the predominance of lower-extremity abnormalities. Four patients (17%) had a rheumatoidlike arthritis defined as acute symmetric polyarthritis (ASP). With the exception of extensive proliferative periostitis, ASP simulated classic rheumatoid arthritis. HIV-associated arthritis was manifest during various stages of HIV infection. It preceded acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in 64% of patients with stage IV HIV infection. Awareness of the coexistence of HIV infection in patients with the above-mentioned arthritides is important, since immunosuppressive therapy, commonly used in the treatment of arthritis, can have detrimental effects in patients with HIV infection. PMID:2781004

  5. Leprosy and rheumatoid arthritis: consequence or association?

    PubMed

    Henriques, Celia Coelho; Lopéz, Begoña; Mestre, Tiago; Grima, Bruno; Panarra, António; Riso, Nuno

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy or Hansen's disease is a chronic granulomatous infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae with a high prevalence in some developing countries however, it is rarely seen in non-endemic regions. Arthritis has been described in all types of Hansen's disease. Chronic arthritis is known to exist even in paucibacillary forms, resolved or treated disease and in patients without reaction, suggesting a perpetuated inflammatory process. In these cases leprosy can mimic some autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. When a patient with a history of leprosy presents with a symmetric, distal, polyarthritis the diagnosis may not be linear. Possibly it is a rheumatoid-like leprous arthritis with M leprae acting as the trigger element for the chronic process or it is an overlap condition, with a concomitant rheumatoid arthritis? A case report of a patient with a chronic inflammatory arthritis with 10 years of evolution is presented. The differential diagnosis between leprous and rheumatoid arthritis is discussed. PMID:22891014

  6. Minimally invasive endoscopic treatment for lumbar infectious spondylitis: a retrospective study in a tertiary referral center

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Spinal infections remain a challenge for clinicians because of their variable presentation and complicated course. Common management approaches include conservative administration of antibiotics or aggressive surgical debridement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous endoscopic debridement with dilute betadine solution irrigation (PEDI) for treating patients with lumbar infectious spondylitis. Methods From January 2005 to July 2010, a total of 32 patients undergoing PEDI were retrospectively enrolled in this study. The surgical indications of the enrolled patients included single-level infectious spondylodiscitis, postoperative infectious spondylodiscitis, advanced infection with epidural abscess, psoas muscle abscess, pre-vertebral or para-vertebral abscess, multilevel infectious spondylitis, and recurrent infection after anterior debridement and fusion. Clinical outcomes were assessed by careful physical examination, Macnab criteria, regular serologic testing, and imaging studies to determine whether continued antibiotics treatment or surgical intervention was required. Results Causative bacteria were identified in 28 (87.5%) of 32 biopsy specimens. Appropriate parenteral antibiotics for the predominant pathogen isolated from infected tissue biopsy cultures were prescribed to patients. Twenty-seven (84.4%) patients reported satisfactory relief of their back pain after PEDI. Twenty-six (81.3%) patients recovered uneventfully after PEDI and sequential antibiotic therapy. No surgery-related major complications were found, except 3 patients with transient paresthesia in the affected lumbar segment. Conclusions PEDI was successful in obtaining a bacteriologic diagnosis, relieving the patient’s symptoms, and assisting in the eradication of lumbar infectious spondylitis. This procedure could be an effective alternative for patients who have a poor response to conservative treatment before a major open surgery. PMID:24669940

  7. Recent advances in rheumatoid arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ernest Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has radically changed over the last decade. Diagnostic methods have improved with availability of highly specific tests such as antibody to cyclic citrullinated peptide (specificity ?96%), and introduction of advanced imaging modalities such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging to facilitate earlier diagnosis. The current aim of management is to achieve remission and prevent joint

  8. Psoriatic arthritis: Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jung-Tai; Yeh, Horng-Ming; Liu, Shyun-Yeu; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of psoriatic arthritis has evolved as new knowledge of the disease has emerged. However, the exact prevalence of psoriatic arthritis is unknown, and its pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated. Genetic, environmental, and immunologic factors have all been implicated in disease development. Early diagnosis and treatment have become primary objectives in clinical rheumatology. Psoriatic arthritis not only causes functional impairment, but also increases mortality risk of patients. The advent of new therapeutic agents capable of arresting the progression of joint damage is expected. However, early psoriatic arthritis assessment remains limited. The objectives of this article are to outline the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of psoriatic arthritis and to suggest a paradigm for identifying early psoriatic arthritis patients. PMID:25232529

  9. Acromioclavicular septic arthritis and sternoclavicular septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis.

    PubMed

    Corey, Sally A; Agger, William A; Saterbak, Andrew T

    2015-03-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) and sternoclavicular (SC) septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis are rare, especially in immunocompetent individuals. We report a case of septic AC joint with pyomyositis of the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles and a separate case with septic SC joint with pyomysitis of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Both patients had similar presentations of infections with Staphylococcus aureus and were successfully treated with surgical incision and drainage followed by prolonged antibiotic therapy. PMID:25729529

  10. Acromioclavicular Septic Arthritis and Sternoclavicular Septic Arthritis with Contiguous Pyomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Sally A.; Saterbak, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) and sternoclavicular (SC) septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis are rare, especially in immunocompetent individuals. We report a case of septic AC joint with pyomyositis of the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles and a separate case with septic SC joint with pyomysitis of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Both patients had similar presentations of infections with Staphylococcus aureus and were successfully treated with surgical incision and drainage followed by prolonged antibiotic therapy. PMID:25729529

  11. Atlanto-axial subluxation after pyogenic spondylitis of the atlanto-occipital joint.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Kazuhiko; Iizuka, Haku; Sorimachi, Yasunori; Ara, Tsuyoshi; Nishinome, Masahiro; Takechi, Yasuhiko; Takagishi, Kenji

    2011-07-01

    This report presents a case of atlanto-axial subluxation after treatment of pyogenic spondylitis of the atlanto-occipital joint. A 60-year-old male had 1-month history of neck pain with fever. Magnetic resonance imaging showed inflammation around the odontoid process. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was administrated immediately. After 6 weeks, CRP had returned almost to normal. After 4 months, laboratory data was still normal, but the patient experienced increasing neck pain. Lateral cervical radiography in the neutral position showed instability between C1 and C2. Computed tomography showed a bony union of the atlanto-occipital joint and severe destruction of the atlanto-axial joint on the left side. Transarticular screw fixation for the atlanto-axial joint was performed. A lateral cervical radiograph in the neutral position after surgery showed a solid bony union. Neck pain improved following surgery. We speculate that spondylitis of the atlanto-occipital joint induced a loosening of the transverse ligament and articulation of the atlanto-axial joint. A bony fusion of the atlanto-occipital joint after antibiotic treatment resolved the pyogenic inflammation concentrated stress to the damaged atlanto-axial joint, resulting in further damage. The atlanto-axial instability was finally managed by the insertion of a transarticular screw. PMID:21140176

  12. Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ????) French (français) Hindi (??????) Japanese (???) Korean (???) Russian (???????) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) ... ??? - ??? (Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Korean (???) Arthritis ??? - ??? (Korean) Bilingual PDF Health ...

  13. Immune modulation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Dimitrios A; Geraldino-Pardilla, Laura; Bathon, Joan M

    2011-12-01

    The approval - several years ago - of the first tumour necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) inhibitor for the management of rheumatoid arthritis launched a new era in the therapeutics of rheumatology. Since then an almost cataclysmic discovery of new treatment targets and corresponding biologic agents ensued. Nowadays, the rheumatologist and the rheumatologic patient have the luxury of several immune modulators available to successfully treat the majority of patients with RA or other inflammatory arthritides and conditions. In this review we focus on a discussion of the approved immune modulators/biologic agents available for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. We also present an overview of agents under development. For the immune modulators discussed, we describe their mechanism of action and summarise initial data and recent updates on efficacy and safety. PMID:22265267

  14. Dietary intervention in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, Jennifer R

    1987-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a disabling disease prevalent in modern society. Dietary prevention may be possible in a subgroup of individuals who appear to suffer food intolerance; dietary intervention, as an adjunct to other management strategies, may be useful in modifying the inflammatory response. The former suggestion is supported by anecdotal evidence; the latter by some in vitro experimentation which implicates arachidonic acid metabolism in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid tissue inflammation. While the value of dietary modification in the prevention and control of rheumatoid arthritis remains unproven, the potential benefits are significant. Further clinical investigation is justified. In the interim dietary modification which takes congnisance of arachidonic acid metabolism can be justified provided this falls within general dietary recommendations for modern society.

  15. Degenerative sternoclavicular arthritis and hyperostosis.

    PubMed

    Noble, Jeffrey S

    2003-04-01

    Symptomatic arthritic involvement of the sternoclavicular joint is relatively uncommon and can be a result of distant trauma, infection, and sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis, post-menopausal arthritis, condensing osteitis of the proximal clavicle, or secondary to an underlying arthropathy. Patients with degenerative osteoarthritis due to trauma most commonly have had either an anterior or posterior dislocation, subluxation, or periarticular fracture. Medical claviculectomy with or without ligamentous stabilization is indicated only in situations of painful primary and secondary rheumatoid arthritis, or in patients with neoplastic lesions. Numerous authors have recommended surgical reconstruction but few have reported series larger than two or three cases. This article reviews a few specific arthropathy conditions about the sternoclavicular joint and discusses their nonoperative and operative management. PMID:12825539

  16. Fungal osteomyelitis and septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bariteau, Jason T; Waryasz, Gregory R; McDonnell, Matthew; Fischer, Staci A; Hayda, Roman A; Born, Christopher T

    2014-06-01

    Management of fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis is challenging, especially in the setting of immunodeficiency and conditions that require immunosuppression. Because fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis are rare conditions, study of their pathophysiology and treatment has been limited. In the literature, evidence-based treatment is lacking and, historically, outcomes have been poor. The most common offending organisms are Candida and Aspergillus, which are widely distributed in humans and soil. However, some fungal pathogens, such as Histoplasma, Blastomyces, Coccidioides, Cryptococcus, and Sporothrix, have more focal areas of endemicity. Fungal bone and joint infections result from direct inoculation, contiguous infection spread, or hematogenous seeding of organisms. These infections may be difficult to diagnose and eradicate, especially in the setting of total joint arthroplasty. Although there is no clear consensus on treatment, guidelines are available for management of many of these pathogens. PMID:24860135

  17. Microbial Infection and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song; Yu, Yangsheng; Yue, Yinshi; Zhang, Zhixin; Su, Kaihong

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex autoimmune disease affecting 1–2% of general worldwide population. The etiopathogenesis of RA involves the interplay of multiple genetic risk factors and environmental triggers. Microbial infections are believed to play an important role in the initiation and perpetuation of RA. Recent clinical studies have shown the association of microbial infections with RA. Accumulated studies using animal models have also found that microbial infections can induce and/or exaggerate the symptoms of experimental arthritis. In this review, we have identified the most common microbial infections associated with RA in the literature and summarized the current evidence supporting their pathogenic role in RA. We also discussed the potential mechanisms whereby infection may promote the development of RA, such as generation of neo-autoantigens, induction of loss of tolerance by molecular mimicry, and bystander activation of the immune system. PMID:25133066

  18. Recent advances in reactive arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ines Colmegna; Luis R. Espinoza

    2005-01-01

    Reactive arthritis (ReA), one of the spondyloarthropathies, is an infectious related disease that occurs in a genetically\\u000a predisposed individual, characterized by an immunemediated synovitis with intra-articular persistence of viable nonculturable\\u000a bacteria and\\/or immunogenic bacterial antigens. ReA long term prognosis is not as good as it was earlier believed. Two-thirds\\u000a of patients develop prolonged joint discomfort, low back pain, or enthesopathies

  19. Autoimmune correlation of rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, Lalitha Tanjore

    2014-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis, both, chronic inflammatory diseases share certain common diagnostic, pathological, immunogenetic and therapeutic features. A recently discovered enzymatic mimicry between human and bacterial species is novel and it opens up a new terrain for therapeutic blockade in the management of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25425834

  20. Clinical approaches to early inflammatory arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ben A. C. Dijkmans; Dirkjan van Schaardenburg

    2009-01-01

    Several advances have been made in the understanding of the pathogenesis, as well as in the clinical evaluation and treatment, of early inflammatory arthritis. The presence of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) has emerged as a major new biomarker for use in clinical practice. The presence of ACPAs can be used to divide patients with early arthritis into subsets that are

  1. Autoimmune correlation of rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, Lalitha Tanjore

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis, both, chronic inflammatory diseases share certain common diagnostic, pathological, immunogenetic and therapeutic features. A recently discovered enzymatic mimicry between human and bacterial species is novel and it opens up a new terrain for therapeutic blockade in the management of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25425834

  2. The nail dystrophy of psoriatic arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C J Eastmond; V Wright

    1979-01-01

    Nail abnormalities occur frequently in patients with psoriatic arthritis. This study of the finger nails of 46 patients with psoriatic arthritis, 100 nonpsoriatic rheumatism patients, and 100 nonpsoriatic general medical patients was designed to characterise these abnormalities with particular reference to the severity of nail pitting. The results of the study suggest: (1) Onycholysis alone in the absence of previous

  3. Septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Blankstein; J. L. Amsallem; E. Rubinstein; H. Horoszowski; I. Farin

    1985-01-01

    A patient with isolated pyogenous arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint (A-C joint) caused by Streptococcus viridans is described. The patient had no underlying disease. Minor trauma preceded shortly the development of the septic process. The patient was treated successfully with surgical drainage and antibiotics. To our knowledge this is the first case report of septic arthritis of the A-C joint

  4. Early treatment in early undifferentiated arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ignazio Olivieri; Piercarlo Sarzi-Puttini; Serena Bugatti; Fabiola Atzeni; Salvatore d'Angelo; Roberto Caporali

    The early diagnosis of new-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has become a major objective for rheumatologists in order to identify a management strategy able to change the natural history of the disease and to prevent joint damage and functional impairment. Emergent evidence emphasizes the benefits of early aggressive therapy of RA. By the nineties, early arthritis cohorts have been collected throughout

  5. Macrophage Activation Syndrome as Onset of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Guido; Didona, Dario; Stifano, Giuseppina; Feola, Aldo; Granata, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a potentially fatal condition. It belongs to the hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis group of diseases. In adults, MAS is rarely associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, but it also arises as complication of several systemic autoimmune disorders, like ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and adult-onset Still's disease. Several treatment options for MAS have been reported in the literature, including a therapeutic regimen of etoposide, dexamethasone, and cyclosporine. Here we report a case of 42-year-old woman in whom MAS occurred as onset of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  6. Bone Loss Triggered by the Cytokine Network in Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amarasekara, Dulshara Sachini; Yu, Jiyeon; Rho, Jaerang

    2015-01-01

    Bone remodeling is a lifelong process in vertebrates that relies on the correct balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Bone loss and fracture risk are implicated in inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus. The network of inflammatory cytokines produced during chronic inflammation induces an uncoupling of bone formation and resorption, resulting in significant bone loss in patients with inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Here, we review and discuss the involvement of the inflammatory cytokine network in the pathophysiological aspects and the therapeutic advances in inflammatory autoimmune diseases.

  7. Pulmonary Manifestations of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    COJOCARU, Manole; COJOCARU, Inimioara Mihaela; SILOSI, Isabela; VRABIE, Camelia Doina

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Systemic autoimmune diseases (SAD) are a heterogeneous group of immunologically mediated inflammatory disorders including multiorgan involvement. As expected in a multisystem disease, the entire pulmonary system is vulnerable to injury. Any of its compartments may be independently or simultaneously affected. It is difficult to assess the true prevalence of lung disease in cases of SAD. In this article, we will review the pulmonary manifestations caused by systemic lupus erithematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, Sjögren's syndrome, mixed connective tissue disease, Wegener's granulomatosis, Churg-Strauss syndrome, Goodpasture's syndrome, and ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:22368703

  8. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:23085914

  9. Paralysis Developing as a Paradoxical Response During the Treatment for Tuberculous Spondylitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hyeon; Kim, Yeo Hyung; Kwon, Chan Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    It can be difficult for clinicians to distinguish a paradoxical response to antituberculous therapy, worsening of an existing lesion despite adequate treatment, treatment failure, and drug resistance. We report a case of a 69-year-old woman who experienced bilateral lower extremity paralysis secondary to a paradoxical response. She had been suffering for 1 month from low back pain, due to tuberculous spondylitis. Her low back pain improved after antituberculous therapy. The low back pain, however, reappeared 2 months after treatment, accompanied by newly developed lower extremity weakness. Imaging studies showed an increased extent of her previous lesions. Consequently, the patient underwent a vertebral corpectomy with interbody fusion of the thoracolumbar spine. Histopathological examination showed chronic inflamed granulation tissue with no microorganisms. Although the antituberculous medication was not changed, the patient's symptoms and signs, including the paralysis, resolved after surgery. PMID:25024967

  10. Invasion, stress, and spinal arthritis in cane toads Gregory P. Brown*, Cathy Shilton

    E-print Network

    Shine, Rick

    , Australia; and Department of Primary Industries, Fisheries, and Mines, Berrimah Veterinary Laboratories the Australian tropics. anuran invasive species locomotion spondylitis colonization The increasing rate at which

  11. The window of opportunity: a relevant concept for axial spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The window of opportunity is a concept critical to rheumatoid arthritis treatment. Early treatment changes the outcome of rheumatoid arthritis treatment, in that response rates are higher with earlier disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment and damage is substantially reduced. Axial spondyloarthritis is an inflammatory axial disease encompassing both nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis and established ankylosing spondylitis. In axial spondyloarthritis, studies of magnetic resonance imaging as well as tumor necrosis factor inhibitor treatment and withdrawal studies all suggest that early effective suppression of inflammation has the potential to reduce radiographic damage. This potential would suggest that the concept of a window of opportunity is relevant not only to rheumatoid arthritis but also to axial spondyloarthritis. The challenge now remains to identify high-risk patients early and to commence treatment without delay. Developments in risk stratification include new classification criteria, identification of clinical risk factors, biomarkers, genetic associations, potential antibody associations and an ankylosing spondylitis-specific microbiome signature. Further research needs to focus on the evidence for early intervention and the early identification of high-risk individuals. PMID:25167369

  12. Leprosy and rheumatoid arthritis: consequence or association?

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Celia Coelho; Lopéz, Begoña; Mestre, Tiago; Grima, Bruno; Panarra, António; Riso, Nuno

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy or Hansen’s disease is a chronic granulomatous infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae with a high prevalence in some developing countries however, it is rarely seen in non-endemic regions. Arthritis has been described in all types of Hansen’s disease. Chronic arthritis is known to exist even in paucibacillary forms, resolved or treated disease and in patients without reaction, suggesting a perpetuated inflammatory process. In these cases leprosy can mimic some autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. When a patient with a history of leprosy presents with a symmetric, distal, polyarthritis the diagnosis may not be linear. Possibly it is a rheumatoid-like leprous arthritis with M leprae acting as the trigger element for the chronic process or it is an overlap condition, with a concomitant rheumatoid arthritis? A case report of a patient with a chronic inflammatory arthritis with 10 years of evolution is presented. The differential diagnosis between leprous and rheumatoid arthritis is discussed. PMID:22891014

  13. Arthritis risk after acute bacterial gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Amit X.; Pope, Janet E.; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Clark, William F.; Ouimet, Janine

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Reactive arthritis may occur from bacterial gastroenteritis. We studied the risk of arthritis after an outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Campylobacter species within a regional drinking water supply to examine the relationship between the severity of acute diarrhea and subsequent symptoms of arthritis. Methods Participants with no known history or arthritis before the outbreak participated in a long-term follow-up study. Of the 2299 participants, 788 were asymptomatic during the outbreak, 1034 had moderate symptoms of acute gastroenteritis, and 477 had severe symptoms, which necessitated medical attention. The outcomes of interest were new arthritis by self-report and a new prescription of medication for arthritis during the follow-up period. Results After a mean follow-up of 4.5 years after the outbreak, arthritis was reported in 15.7% of participants who had been asymptomatic during the outbreak, and in 17.6% and 21.6% of those who had moderate and severe symptoms of acute gastroenteritis respectively (p for trend =0.009). Compared with the asymptomatic participants, those with moderate and severe symptoms of gastroenteritis had an adjusted relative risk of arthritis of 1.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.99–1.43) and 1.33 (95% CI 1.07–1.66) respectively. No association was observed between gastroenteritis and the subsequent risk of prescription medication for arthritis (p=0.49). Conclusions Acute bacterial gastroenteritis necessitating medical attention was associated with a higher risk of arthritic symptoms, but not arthritic medications, up to four years later. The nature and chronicity of these arthritic symptoms requires further study. PMID:18184664

  14. Gout: epitome of painful arthritis.

    PubMed

    VanItallie, Theodore B

    2010-10-01

    Arthritic pain and disability are at or near the top of the list of reasons adult patients seek medical attention. At least 47.8 million US residents have arthritis. In Europe, the magnitude of the problem is similar, affecting 8 million in the United Kingdom and 108 million across the continent. Osteoarthritis is by far the most common form of arthritis. In a regional UK study, nearly half of adults 50 years or older reported some form of osteoarthritic knee pain over a 1-year period. Among the arthritides, gout is notable for the agonizing nature and unique pathogenesis of the pain it generates. Gout is the most common cause of inflammatory arthritis among men and postmenopausal women. Because of the atypical nature of some of its clinical manifestations, gout can present serious diagnostic challenges for practicing physicians. In recent years, knowledge about gout's pathogenesis, pathophysiology, and differential diagnosis has advanced on a broad front. Genetic variants within a newly identified transport gene, SLC2A9, have been associated with a low fractional excretion of uric acid and the presence of gout in several population samples. The SLC2A9 gene encodes glucose transporter 9-a unique hexose and high-capacity urate transporter. In addition, human ATP-binding cassette, subfamily G2 (ABCG2), encoded by the ABCG2 gene, has been found to mediate renal urate secretion. Introduction of a mutation encoded in a model system by a common single nucleotide polymorphism, rs2231142, resulted in a 53% reduction in urate transport rates compared with wild-type ABCG2. Based on a large population study, it has been estimated that at least 10% of all gout cases in white persons may be attributable to this single nucleotide polymorphism causal genetic variant. Of the various categories of arthritis, the crystal-induced arthropathies, gout and pseudogout, are manifested by acute inflammation and tissue damage arising from deposition in joints and periarticular tissues of monosodium urate (MSU), calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate, or basic calcium phosphate crystals. The innate immune system rapidly detects invading pathogenic microbes and nonmicrobial "danger signals" such as MSU crystals. When these crystals are deposited in synovial tissues, NLR proteins (NOD-like receptors) form multiprotein complexes known as inflammasomes that trigger secretion of inflammation-producing cytokines like interleukin-1? and interleukin-18. Usually, gout can be diagnosed by medical history, physical examination, and presence of hyperuricemia (urate >416 ?mol/L). However, a urate concentration less than 416 does not by itself rule out gout. Confirmation of the diagnosis by identification of typical MSU crystals in aspirated synovial fluid is definitive. Analysis of joint fluid is mandatory to rule out septic arthritis, which can rapidly become lethal. Because of its special ability to identify and quantitate urate deposits in peripheral tissues, dual-energy computed tomography should prove valuable in the differential diagnosis of gout. Gout mimics a variety of illnesses; for example, spinal gout may masquerade as metastatic cancer, epidural abscess, and nerve compression syndrome. PMID:20837191

  15. My Treatment Approach to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Davis, John M.; Matteson, Eric L.

    2012-01-01

    The past decade has brought important advances in the understanding of rheumatoid arthritis and its management and treatment. New classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, better definitions of treatment outcome and remission, and the introduction of biologic response-modifying drugs designed to inhibit the inflammatory process have greatly altered the approach to managing this disease. More aggressive management of rheumatoid arthritis early after diagnosis and throughout the course of the disease has resulted in improvement in patient functioning and quality of life, reduction in comorbid conditions, and enhanced survival. PMID:22766086

  16. Gene Discoveries Could Help Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... HealthDay . All rights reserved. More Health News on: Genes and Gene Therapy Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Genes and Gene Therapy Rheumatoid Arthritis About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  17. Overview of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A 2012 review by the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular biology highlights turmeric’s ability to alter ... of psoriasis + psoriatic arthritis Thanks to diligent scientific research, today’s treatments are providing a wide range of ...

  18. Mechanisms and Mediators That Drive Arthritis Pain.

    PubMed

    Krustev, Eugene; Rioux, Danielle; McDougall, Jason J

    2015-08-01

    There are over 100 different types of arthritis and each can differ greatly in their aetiology and pathophysiology; however, one characteristic that is common to all arthritic conditions is joint pain. Musculoskeletal pain is the leading cause of disability in the world, and the number one reason arthritis patients visit their primary care physician. Despite the prevalence and burden of arthritis pain, current analgesics lack sufficient efficacy and are plagued by multiple adverse side effects. In this review, we outline the current landscape of research concerning joint pain, drawing from both preclinical and clinical studies. Specifically, this review is a discussion of the different neurophysiological processes that occur during joint disease and how inflammatory and neuropathic aspects contribute to the development of arthritis pain. PMID:26025232

  19. Psoriasis/Psoriatic Arthritis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... have psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis? Are you pregnant or breastfeeding? Dr. Eichenfield, a pediatric and adolescent dermatologist with ... FACT SHEET Now you can get pregnancy and breastfeeding health tips from OTIS throughout the day! Join ...

  20. Some Arthritis Meds Cost Seniors Thousands Annually

    MedlinePLUS

    ... April 21 online report in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatology . "Many patients face a growing and unacceptable financial ... author Dr. Jinoos Yazdany of the division of rheumatology at the University of California, San Francisco. "Rather ...

  1. Recommendations on the use of biosimilars by the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology, Brazilian Society of Dermatology, Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Study Group on Inflammatory Bowel Disease-Focus on clinical evaluation of monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Valderílio Feijó; de Souza Meirelles, Eduardo; Kochen, Jussara de Almeida Lima; Medeiros, Ana Cristina; Miszputen, Sender J; Teixeira, Fábio Vieira; Damião, Adérson Osmar Mourão Cintra; Kotze, Paulo Gustavo; Romiti, Ricardo; Arnone, Marcelo; Ferreira Magalhães, Renata; Maia, Cláudia Pires Amaral; de Carvalho, André Vicente E

    2015-09-01

    The Brazilian Societies of Rheumatology (SBR) and Dermatology (SBD), the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology (FBG) and the Brazilian Study Group on Inflammatory Bowel Disease (GEDIIB) gathered a group of their respective specialists on the topic of interest to discuss the most relevant issues regarding the clinical use of biosimilar medicines in Brazil. The main aim of that meeting was to prepare a document with recommendations to guide medical specialists and to help the national regulatory and policy-making agencies as concerns the authorization for marketing biosimilars used in autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, Crohn's disease, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and ulcerative colitis. In addition to considerations on the typical differences between innovator medicines and biosimilars, the specialists established a set of seven recommendations on regulatory advances related to clinical studies, indication extrapolation, nomenclature, interchangeability, automatic substitution and pharmacovigilance. PMID:25936608

  2. Paraproteins in rheumatoid arthritis and related disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clive Anthony Kelly

    1992-01-01

    Summary  There is evidence that the prevalence of monoclonal parparoteinaemia is slightly increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.\\u000a The possibility that this may be a marker of the development of later malignancy in such patients is explored. Mortality rates\\u000a in rheumatoid arthritis are increased although the development of lymphoreticular malignancy contributes only a small percentage\\u000a of this increase. However, it does

  3. Clinical management of septic arthritis in cattle.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, André; Francoz, David

    2014-03-01

    Synovial fluid, ultrasound, and radiographic imaging are common diagnostic tools for septic arthritis. Mycoplasma septic arthritis is suspected in calves with clinical signs of otitis and pneumonia. Commonly affected joints are carpus, stifle, and tarsus. Treatment strategy must include long-term antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, and joint lavage. Knowledge of communication and boundaries for commonly affected joints is essential to perform joint lavage and arthrotomy. PMID:24534665

  4. Primary and Posttraumatic Arthritis of the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Debdut; Wysocki, Robert W.; Cohen, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Whether degenerative joint disease of the elbow may be the result of primary or posttraumatic etiologies, arthritis of the elbow commonly leads to pain, loss of motion, and functional disability. A detailed history and focused physical examination, in combination with imaging modalities, can help localize the origin of symptoms and help direct treatment. Although nonoperative treatment is the initial therapy for arthritis of the elbow, surgical interventions may provide substantial relief to the appropriately selected patient. PMID:23781338

  5. [Pulmonary changes in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Kohout, A; Resl, M; Bácová, M

    2001-07-01

    A 78-year-old smoker with a medical history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) diagnosed 23 years before death and treated for 10 years by sulfasalazine followed by 7 years of therapy by purine antimetabolite (AZAMUN, Leiras Co.). Two years before his death chemotherapy was added to treat a low grade malignant lymphoma. Pulmonary changes revealed during autopsy consisted of diffuse interstitial fibrosis, diffuse alveolar damage in its acute to subacute phase, and massive multiple bilateral ossifications. The possible side effect of RA treatment on pulmonary tissue is discussed. Post mortem low-voltage X-ray examination appears as a method which may contribute to the accurate distribution and correct diagnosis of multiple pulmonary ossification. PMID:11669018

  6. Arthritis at the shoulder joint.

    PubMed

    Sankaye, Prashant; Ostlere, Simon

    2015-07-01

    The shoulder is a complex joint with numerous structures contributing to mobility and stability. Shoulder pain is a common clinical complaint that may be due to a wide spectrum of disorders including rotator cuff disease, instability, and arthropathy. Primary osteoarthritis of the shoulder joint is uncommon because it is a non-weight-bearing joint. Significant osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint is unusual in the absence of trauma, and the detection of advanced degenerative changes in patients without a known history of trauma should alert the clinician to search for other disorders. This article reviews the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and key imaging findings of the common categories of the arthritis affecting the glenohumeral joint. PMID:26021591

  7. Psychosocial Concepts in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    McGillivray, Donald C.

    1973-01-01

    This article reviews and tabulates some of the current concepts of the role of psychosocial factors in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Concepts prevalent during the 1950's are listed followed by discussion of some of the variable factors that complicate studies in this field. Studies are then cited which lead to the following conclusions: 1. Patients with RA tend to have certain personality characteristics, such as depression, rigidity, dependency, neurotic response patterns, emotional instability, feelings of guilt and low ego strength. 2. These are not specific to RA. 3. They may well be sequelae of the disease rather than pre-morbid features. 4. There is no clear evidence as to the role of psychological stress in causing or activating RA. 5. Personality factors have an influence on the course of the disease. PMID:20468900

  8. Laryngeal Manifestations of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hamdan, A. L.; Sarieddine, D.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a destructive autoimmune disease that affects 3% of the adult population. It is characterized by the formation of both articular and extra-articular lesions with predilection for small joints. There are ubiquitous reports on the head and neck manifestations of RA with emphasis on the larynx. The laryngeal presenting features of this systemic disease may mimic a plethora of medical conditions, inflammatory and neoplastic. The main phonatory and respiratory symptoms are often subtle and misleading. This paper represents a literature review of the laryngeal manifestations of RA with emphasis on the clinical symptoms, laryngeal findings, diagnosis, and treatment. An early diagnosis of laryngeal involvement may prevent drastic complications. PMID:23864939

  9. Can Rheumatoid Arthritis Be Prevented?

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of elevations of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-related biomarkers prior to the onset of clinically apparent RA raises hopes that individuals who are at risk for future RA can be identified in a preclinical phase of disease that is defined as abnormalities of RA-related immune activity prior to the clinically apparent onset of joint disease. Additionally, there is a growing understanding of the immunologic processes that are occurring in preclinical RA, as well as a growing understanding of risk factors that may be mechanistically related to RA development. Furthermore, there are data supporting that treatment of early RA can lead to drug free remission. Taken as a whole, these findings suggest that it may be possible to use biomarkers and other factors to accurately identify the likelihood and timing of onset of future RA, and intervene with immunomodulatory therapies and/or risk factor modification to prevent the future onset of RA in at-risk individuals. Importantly, several clinical prevention trials for RA have already been tried, and one is underway. However, while our understanding of the growing understanding of the mechanisms and natural history of RA development may be leading us to the implementation of prevention strategies for RA, there are still several challenges to be met. These include developing sufficiently accurate methods of predicting those at high risk for future RA so that clinical trials can be developed based on accurate rates of development of arthritis and subjects can be adequately informed of their risk for disease, identifying the appropriate interventions and biologic targets for optimal prevention, and addressing the psychosocial and economic aspects that are crucial to developing broadly applicable prevention measures for RA. These issues notwithstanding, prevention of RA may be within reach in the near future. PMID:24315049

  10. Abnormal bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bogoch, E R; Moran, E

    1998-08-01

    Osteopenia is responsible for substantial comorbidity in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and is an important factor in the surgical management of joint disease. In animal models of bone loss stimulated by inflammatory arthritis, increased bone remodelling and altered microstructure of bone have been documented. The subchondral bone plate near the joint surface is narrow and perforated by vascular inflammatory invasion, and in the shaft the thin cortices are weakened by giant resorption defects. Biomechanical tests and a mathematical model of bone strength suggest that cortical defects, much larger than those found in normal osteonal remodelling, are principally responsible for the experimentally observed loss of strength. Similarly, these defects may explain the increased femoral fracture risk in rheumatoid arthritis. The osteoclast, the cell resorbing bone, is demonstrated in increased number and activity in rheumatoid arthritis and in animal models. Bisphosphonates, drugs that inhibit osteoclast function, have been shown experimentally to reduce both focal and generalized osteopenia and to prevent loss of bone strength. Bisphosphonates also protect articular cartilage from damage characteristic of inflammatory arthritis. The mechanism of chondroprotection may be prevention of subchondral bone resorption by the osteoclast and also an altered distribution of bone marrow cells. Thus, bisphosphonates, currently in clinical use for other bone metabolic diseases, appear to have potential as prophylaxis and treatment for osteopenia and joint damage in inflammatory arthritis. PMID:9711159

  11. Arthritis induced by proteoglycan aggrecan G1 domain in BALB/c mice. Evidence for t cell involvement and the immunosuppressive influence of keratan sulfate on recognition of t and b cell epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Guerassimov, A; Leroux, J Y; Cartman, A; Webber, C; Lalic, R; de Miguel, E; Rosenberg, L C; Poole, A R

    1998-01-01

    Our previous work showed that the proteoglycan aggrecan can induce erosive polyarthritis and spondylitis in BALB/c mice, and that the G1 domain of the proteoglycan aggrecan (G1) is the arthritogenic region. In this study, two T cell epitopes residing on G1 within residues 70-84 (peptide G5) and 150-169 (peptide G9) were identified using synthetic peptides and aggrecan-specific T cell lines. Two G1-specific T cell hybridomas exclusively responded to peptide G5. When the G5-specific T cell line was injected intraperitoneally into BALB/c mice, it induced acute inflammatory arthritis in joints, but only in those that had been injected with the epitope recognized by these T cells. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that the keratan sulfate chain(s) (KS) on G1 possess immunosuppressive properties with respect to T and B cell epitope recognition. T cell lines that recognize both G1 and peptide G5 show an increased response to G1 after KS is removed. Antibodies in hyperimmune sera of mice immunized with G1 show increased epitope recognition (quantitative and qualitative) after KS removal before immunization. These studies reveal that a T cell line specific to an epitope on the G1 domain of aggrecan, also recognizing a corresponding mouse G1 epitope, can induce arthritis by adoptive transfer and homing to the intraarticular epitope, thereby implicating T cells in arthritis development caused by immunity to the G1 domain of aggrecan. Moreover, the presence of KS on G1 can inhibit arthritis development by suppressing T and B cell epitope recognition. PMID:9541498

  12. Techniques for assessing knee joint pain in arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Volker Neugebauer; Jeong S Han; Hita Adwanikar; Yu Fu; Guangchen Ji

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of pain is of critical importance for mechanistic studies as well as for the validation of drug targets. This review will focus on knee joint pain associated with arthritis. Different animal models have been developed for the study of knee joint arthritis. Behavioral tests in animal models of knee joint arthritis typically measure knee joint pain rather indirectly.

  13. The results of simultaneous posterior–anterior–posterior surgery in multilevel tuberculosis spondylitis associated with severe kyphosis

    PubMed Central

    Tezer, Mehmet; Aydogan, Mehmet; Mirzanl?, Cunety; Ozturk, ?rfan

    2010-01-01

    We retrospectively studied the cases with tuberculous spondylitis of thoracolumbar region with two or more levels of involvement that underwent posterior instrumentation and fusion and anterior fusion with titanium mesh following anterior decompression using simultaneous successive posterior–anterior–posterior surgery. Among all patients with tuberculous spondylitis accompanied by medium or severe kyphosis, 20 patients who underwent simultaneous successive decompression, fusion and instrumentation with posterior–anterior–posterior surgery between 1999 and 2004 were included in the study. Patients were evaluated for fusion formation and neurological and functional status. Kyphosis angles were measured at early and long-term follow-up. Antituberculosis chemotherapy was initiated in all patients and continued for 9 months; initially as quadruple therapy for 3 months, and then as triple therapy. Average follow-up period was 52.7 months (range 37–94). Solid fusion was achieved in all patients. All patients returned to their previous occupation; 75% (15 subjects) with mild pain or no pain and 15% (3 subjects) with major limitations. There were 11 patients with neurological deficit, 9 of these achieved complete neurological recoveries. Regarding kyphosis angle, an average 35.1° correction (84.8%) was obtained in postoperative period (p < 0.001) and there was no significant correction loss during the follow-up period (p < 0.05). There were no grafts or instrumentation-related stabilization problems. In subjects with tuberculous spondylitis with involvements at two or more levels accompanied by medium and severe kyphosis, decompression, fusion and instrumentation by simultaneous successive posterior–anterior–posterior surgery is an effective and safe management method for effective kyphosis correction with high fusion rates. PMID:20589519

  14. Pemetrexed ameliorates experimental arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Karatas, Ahmet; Koca, Suleyman Serdar; Ozgen, Metin; Dagli, Adile Ferda; Erman, Fazilet; Sahin, Nuran; Sahin, Kazim; Isik, Ahmet

    2015-02-01

    Pemetrexed (PMTX) is an anti-folate drug as methotrexate. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of PMTX on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Forty Wistar albino rats were randomized into four groups. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of chicken type II collagen combined with incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Animals were sacrificed at the 15th day after the onset of arthritis. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?), interleukin (IL)-17, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were increased, and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and the expressions of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were decreased in the arthritis group. In the PMTX-treated (0.2 and 1 mg/kg/week i.p.) groups, the levels of TNF-?, IL-17, and MDA were decreased; the activities of SOD, CAT, and GPx and the expressions of Nrf2 and HO-1 were restored, and perisynovial inflammation and cartilage-bone destruction were decreased. PMTX has anti-arthritic potential in the CIA model and may be a therapeutic agent for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25129058

  15. The microbiome and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Scher, Jose U.; Abramson, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Humans are not (and have never been) alone. From the moment we are born, millions of micro-organisms populate our bodies and coexist with us rather peacefully for the rest of our lives. This microbiome represents the totality of micro-organisms (and their genomes) that we necessarily acquire from the environment. Micro-organisms living in or on us have evolved to extract the energy they require to survive, and in exchange they support the physiological, metabolic and immune capacities that have contributed to our evolutionary success. Although currently categorized as an autoimmune disorder and regarded as a complex genetic disease, the ultimate cause of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains elusive. It seems that interplay between predisposing genetic factors and environmental triggers is required for disease manifestation. New insights from DNA sequence-based analyses of gut microbial communities and a renewed interest in mucosal immunology suggest that the microbiome represents an important environmental factor that can influence autoimmune disease manifestation. This Review summarizes the historical clues that suggest a possible role for the microbiota in the pathogenesis of RA, and will focus on new technologies that might provide scientific evidence to support this hypothesis. PMID:21862983

  16. Cytokine blockers in psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mease, P

    2001-01-01

    The cellular events underlying the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and psoriasis have not yet been fully elucidated. Nevertheless, some clues to these conditions are beginning to emerge. In particular, a growing body of data supports the role of proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF), in the pathophysiology of PsA and psoriasis. Raised levels of these cytokines are found in the joints of patients with PsA, as well as in psoriatic skin lesions. Physiotherapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, corticosteroids, and disease modifying antirheumatic agents, such as methotrexate, are the most commonly used treatments for PsA. However, the data supporting the effectiveness of these treatments are limited, and disease resolution is usually incomplete. This study examined the effects of etanercept, a TNF inhibitor, in patients with PsA. Etanercept treatment was well tolerated and resulted in significant improvement in the signs and symptoms of PsA and in psoriatic skin lesions. Infliximab, another TNF inhibitor, has also been shown to be effective in patients with PsA. Such studies confirm the importance of proinflammatory cytokines in PsA, and hold out hope for patients who require new options for the treatment of their disease.?? PMID:11890650

  17. Gene Profiling of Chikungunya Virus Arthritis in a Mouse Model Reveals Significant Overlap With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Helder I.; Gardner, Joy; Poo, Yee-Suan; Major, Lee; Pulendran, Bali; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Objective Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes a chronic debilitating polyarthralgia/polyarthritis, for which current treatments are often inadequate. To assess whether new drugs being developed for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) might find utility in the treatment of alphaviral arthritides, we sought to determine whether the inflammatory gene expression signature of CHIKV arthritis shows any similarities with RA or collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), a mouse model of RA. Methods Using a recently developed animal model of CHIKV arthritis in adult wild-type mice, we generated a consensus CHIKV arthritis gene expression signature, which was used to interrogate publicly available microarray studies of RA and CIA. Pathway analyses were then performed using the overlapping gene signatures. Results Gene set enrichment analysis showed that there was a highly significant overlap in the differentially expressed genes in the CHIKV arthritis model and in RA. This concordance also increased with the severity of RA, as measured by the inflammation score. A highly significant overlap was also seen between CHIKV arthritis and CIA. Pathway analysis revealed that the overlap between these arthritides was spread over a range of different inflammatory processes. Involvement of T cells and interferon-? (IFN?) in CHIKV arthritis was confirmed in studies of MHCII-deficient mice and IFN?-deficient mice, respectively. Conclusion These results suggest that RA, a chronic autoimmune arthritis, and CHIKV disease, usually a self-limiting viral arthropathy, share multiple inflammatory processes. New drugs and biologic therapies being developed for RA may thus find application in the treatment of alphaviral arthritides. PMID:22833339

  18. Induction of adjuvant arthritis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, B; Katz, D R; Isenberg, D A; Ibrahim, M A; Le Page, S; Hutchings, P; Schwartz, R S; Cooke, A

    1992-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis, induced by injections of Freund's complete adjuvant into the footpads of some rat strains, has been recognized as a useful animal model for many years. There has, however, been notable lack of success in reproducing this model in other species. We now describe the development of adjuvant arthritis in healthy strain mice approximately 2 months after injection of Freund's complete adjuvant. Although the clinical appearance of the mice and the joint histopathology closely resemble the adjuvant arthritis reported in the rat, we were unable to detect rheumatoid factor in sera from the affected animals. In parallel studies of T cell proliferation, affected animals responded to some mycobacterial antigens but not to the 65-kD heat shock protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, suggesting that some other epitope is important in the development of the disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 2 PMID:1458683

  19. Pharmacogenetics of treatment response in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jani, Meghna; Barton, Anne; Ho, Pauline

    2015-07-01

    TNF-blocking agents, non-biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (nbDMARDs) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly prescribed treatments in psoriatic arthritis. A large proportion of patients do not respond to these medications, although unfortunately clinically useful biomarkers that predict future response are currently lacking. Several candidate gene polymorphisms have been associated with responses to biologic therapies and nbDMARDs; however, replication and validation of these variants in large prospective psoriatic arthritis cohorts are required before translating these to clinical practice. In this review, we discuss the advances made in pharmacogenetics of treatment response in psoriatic arthritis to date, with focus on biologic therapies approved for use, nbDMARDs and NSAIDs, as well as outline emerging methodologies to obtain data that will help inform a future precision medicine approach in this condition. PMID:25980667

  20. How citrullination invaded rheumatoid arthritis research

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Citrullination and the immune response to citrullinated proteins have been fundamental for the early recognition of rheumatoid arthritis by serological tests and a better understanding of its pathophysiology. In the first years after the initial publications, the focus was on the antibodies directed to citrullinated proteins. It is now realized that citrullinating enzymes and citrullinated proteins may have important roles in the maintenance of the inflammatory processes in the joints. There is also accumulating evidence for a direct role of citrullination in tissue destruction in the rheumatoid synovium. Here we will discuss the development and importance of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis as well as recent findings implicating citrullination in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24472574

  1. Radiosynovectomy in the Therapeutic Management of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Knut, Liepe

    2015-01-01

    Radiosynovectomy is a well-established therapy in arthritis and involves an intra-articular injection of small radioactive particles to treat a synovitis. In Europe, frequent indications are rheumatoid and poly-arthritis. Especially in Germany radiosynovectomy is the second common therapy in Nuclear Medicine with about 40,000–60,000 treated joints per year. In Spain, USA, Turkey, Argentines and Philippines the therapy is more use in hemophilic arthritis with excellent results. Especially in developing countries with low availability of clotting factors, the radiosynovectomy represent a cost effective therapeutic option for repeated bleedings in hemophilic arthropathy. The special focus in these countries is maintaining of mobility and work ability. Often only the knee and medium joints (ankle, elbow and shoulder) are treated using yttrium-90, rhenium-186 or phosphorus-32. However, in rheumatoid arthritis most common affected joints are the fingers. For the treatment in these small joints, erbium-169 is necessary. Unfortunately, erbium-169 is only available in Europe. Further indications for radiosynovectomy are osteoarthritis and the articular effusion after joint replacement. The reported response rates in rheumatoid and poly-arthritis range from 60% to 80% depends from the stage of previous arthrosis. The best effectiveness of therapy was observed in hemophilic arthritis with response rate of 90% and significant reducing of bleeding frequency. The therapy is well-tolerated with low rate of side effects. In respect of the specific uptake of particles in the synovia and short range of beta radiation, the radiation exposure outside the joint is very low. The radiosynovectomy has efforts in comparison to surgical synovectomy: it's a minor intervention with low costs; and simultaneous treatments of multiple joints or treatment in short intervals are possible. The presented paper summarized the published papers and reports our own experiences in >15,000 treated joints. PMID:25709538

  2. Radiosynovectomy in the therapeutic management of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Knut, Liepe

    2015-01-01

    Radiosynovectomy is a well-established therapy in arthritis and involves an intra-articular injection of small radioactive particles to treat a synovitis. In Europe, frequent indications are rheumatoid and poly-arthritis. Especially in Germany radiosynovectomy is the second common therapy in Nuclear Medicine with about 40,000-60,000 treated joints per year. In Spain, USA, Turkey, Argentines and Philippines the therapy is more use in hemophilic arthritis with excellent results. Especially in developing countries with low availability of clotting factors, the radiosynovectomy represent a cost effective therapeutic option for repeated bleedings in hemophilic arthropathy. The special focus in these countries is maintaining of mobility and work ability. Often only the knee and medium joints (ankle, elbow and shoulder) are treated using yttrium-90, rhenium-186 or phosphorus-32. However, in rheumatoid arthritis most common affected joints are the fingers. For the treatment in these small joints, erbium-169 is necessary. Unfortunately, erbium-169 is only available in Europe. Further indications for radiosynovectomy are osteoarthritis and the articular effusion after joint replacement. The reported response rates in rheumatoid and poly-arthritis range from 60% to 80% depends from the stage of previous arthrosis. The best effectiveness of therapy was observed in hemophilic arthritis with response rate of 90% and significant reducing of bleeding frequency. The therapy is well-tolerated with low rate of side effects. In respect of the specific uptake of particles in the synovia and short range of beta radiation, the radiation exposure outside the joint is very low. The radiosynovectomy has efforts in comparison to surgical synovectomy: it's a minor intervention with low costs; and simultaneous treatments of multiple joints or treatment in short intervals are possible. The presented paper summarized the published papers and reports our own experiences in >15,000 treated joints. PMID:25709538

  3. Late Onset Takayasu Arteritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Verweij, K. E.; van Well, A. M. E.; vd Sluijs, J. W.; Dees, A.

    2012-01-01

    We encountered the rare case of a 48-year-old Caucasian woman who developed Takayasu arteritis (TA) while suffering from seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Several studies have reported an association between TA and various autoimmune disorders, however, the concurrent presence of Takayasu arteritis and rheumatoid arthritis is described in only few cases in the literature to date. The exact nature of the relationship between TA and RA remains unknown. Perhaps the development of these two diseases represents non-specific systemic inflammatory changes in the presence of a hereditary background predisposing to both RA and TA. PMID:22844294

  4. [Medical treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Kröger, Liisa; Vähäsalo, Paula; Tynjälä, Pirjo; Aalto, Kristiina; Säilä, Hanna; Malin, Merja; Putto-Laurila, Anne; Lahdenne, Pekka

    2012-01-01

    Although etiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is currently not known, better understanding of immunologic pathways of inflammation and the development of new therapies with biologic agents have remarkably improved the treatment of JIA. However, approximately 30% of the patients with JIA do not seem to response adequately to conventional anti-rheumatic drugs but the arthritis runs a continuously active course and may lead to the evolution of erosions. Such patients benefit from biologic agents, of which the longest clinical experience comes from anti-TNF therapies. Molecules targeting IL-1, IL-6 and B- and T-lymphocytes are also used in the treatment of severe JIA. PMID:22486063

  5. Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis from the Dermatologist’s View

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory arthropathy associated with skin psoriasis. It is considered a unique arthropathy with distinct clinical and radiologic features. Up to 40% of patients with psoriasis may develop psoriatic arthritis. Psoriasis usually precedes psoriatic arthritis, so dermatologists are in a critical position for screening patients of psoriatic arthritis early in the disease course. Psoriatic arthritis may be challenging to diagnose, especially for dermatologists, because it has an insidious disease course, non-specific symptoms, and no specific biomarkers. Psoriatic arthritis is a polygenic autoimmune disorder of unknown etiology, but immunologic roles have recently been validated. In recent years, treatment modalities have rapidly advanced in the fields of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Biologic agents, including TNF-? inhibitors and anti-IL12/23 agents, have shown dramatic improvement.

  6. Avian viral arthritis as a model for rheumatoid arthritis: a gross, histologic, and immunofluorescent study of experimentally induced viral arthritis in chickens 

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Susan Emmagene

    1976-01-01

    Model for Rheumatoid Arthritis-- A Gross, Histologic, and Immunofluorescent Study of Experimentally Induced Viral Arthritis in Chickens. (August 1976) Susan Emmagene Wilson, B. S. , Texas A&M University D. V. M. , Texas A&M University Chairman... arthritis. In the acute phase the gross changes included edema, hyperemia, and joint effusion. The synovial membrane became noticeably thickened early in the disease. In the chronic disease, fibrosis of tendons and other joint structures became apparent...

  7. Heat shock protein 60 and adjuvant arthritis: a model for T cell regulation in human arthritis.

    PubMed

    Prakken, Berent J; Roord, Sarah; Ronaghy, Arash; Wauben, Marca; Albani, Salvatore; van Eden, Willem

    2003-08-01

    Heat shock proteins (hsp) are highly conserved, immune-dominant microbial proteins, whose expression is increased at sites of inflammation. In the experimental model of adjuvant arthritis (AA) immune responses to hsp determine the outcome of disease. AA can be transferred with a single T cell clone specific for a sequence of mycobacterial hsp65 (Mhsp65). Immunization with whole Mhsp65 on the other hand, protects in virtually all forms of experimental arthritis, including AA. This protective effect seems the consequence of the induction of a T cell response directed against self-hsp60. A similar protective effect of self-hsp60-specific T cells seems present in patients with a spontaneous remitting form of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Next to hsp60, other hsp have similar protective effects in arthritis, while other conserved microbial proteins lack such capacity. Nasal administration of hsp60 peptides induces IL-10-driven regulatory T cells that are highly effective in suppressing arthritis. Thus hsp60, or peptides derived from hsp60, are suitable candidates for immune therapy in chronic arthritis. PMID:12904891

  8. Diagnosis of arthritis through fuzzy inference system.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sachidanand; Kumar, Atul; Panneerselvam, K; Vennila, J Jannet

    2012-06-01

    Expert or knowledge-based systems are the most common type of AIM (artificial intelligence in medicine) system in routine clinical use. They contain medical knowledge, usually about a very specifically defined task, and are able to reason with data from individual patients to come up with reasoned conclusion. Although there are many variations, the knowledge within an expert system is typically represented in the form of a set of rules. Arthritis is a chronic disease and about three fourth of the patients are suffering from osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis which are undiagnosed and the delay of detection may cause the severity of the disease at higher risk. Thus, earlier detection of arthritis and treatment of its type of arthritis and related locomotry abnormalities is of vital importance. Thus the work was aimed to design a system for the diagnosis of Arthitis using fuzzy logic controller (FLC) which is, a successful application of Zadeh's fuzzy set theory. It is a potential tool for dealing with uncertainty and imprecision. Thus, the knowledge of a doctor can be modelled using an FLC. The performance of an FLC depends on its knowledge base which consists of a data base and a rule base. It is observed that the performance of an FLC mainly depends on its rule base, and optimizing the membership function distributions stored in the data base is a fine tuning process. PMID:20927572

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis in a military aviator.

    PubMed

    Moszyk, Danielle J; Sulit, Daryl J

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory condition whose pathogenesis is determined partially by genetic and environmental factors. Without treatment, 20 to 30% of individuals with this condition will become permanently disabled in a few years. Rheumatoid arthritis and its potential complications can cause significant disability and could seriously affect the performance of an aviator. Traditionally, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) and biologics have not been used until disease progression occurs, but they recently have been added earlier in the course of disease for a more aggressive approach to treatment. It has been shown to significantly reduce the number of affected joints, pain, and disability. This newer treatment regimen has helped a military pilot continue his aviation career. We present the case of an experienced designated military pilot who was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. He was initially treated early with a DMARD and biologic medication. He has remained in remission and currently only uses etanercept (biologic medication) and a non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drug to control his disease. He has responded favorably to therapy and has few limitations. Due to his positive response to treatment, the aviator was granted military aeromedical waivers for rheumatoid arthritis and chronic medication use. PMID:17225486

  10. Cytokines in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Georg Schett; Iain B. McInnes

    2007-01-01

    Cytokines regulate a broad range of inflammatory processes that are implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. In rheumatoid joints, it is well known that an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine activities favours the induction of autoimmunity, chronic inflammation and thereby joint damage. However, it remains less clear how cytokines are organized within a hierarchical regulatory network, and therefore

  11. Asporin repeat polymorphism in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Torres, B; Orozco, G; García?Lozano, J R; Oliver, J; Fernández, O; González?Gay, M A; Balsa, A; García, A; Pascual?Salcedo, D; López?Nevot, M A; Núñez?Roldán, A; Martín, J

    2007-01-01

    Background Asporin belongs to a family of proteins associated with the cartilage matrix. Objective To investigate the role of the functional polymorphism consisting of an aspartic acid (D) repeat polymorphism located in the ASPN gene in the susceptibility to and clinical outcome of rheumatoid arthritis. Methods A total of 803 Spanish Caucasian patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 904 controls of the same ethnic origin and matched for age and sex were included in the study. The asporin D repeat polymorphism was genotyped using polymerase chain reaction with a fluorescent primer. Results No significant differences were detected in the distribution of the 10 alleles found in our population on comparing patients with rheumatoid arthritis with control groups. Nevertheless, individuals bearing D14 produced rheumatoid factor more often than the rest (85.7% v 72.1%, p?=?0.006, odds ratio (OR) ?=?2.35, 95% confidence interval 1.21 to 4.50), and the mean (SD) onset age was higher in the group of individuals bearing D13 (50.09 (13.94)) compared with the rest (47.21 (14.31)), although the difference did not reach significance (p?=?0.06). Conclusion The results do not support a major role for asporin D repeat polymorphism in the susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis. Nevertheless, they support the influence of this gene on the outcome of the disease. PMID:16707531

  12. Arthroplasty for fifth carpometacarpal joint arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Scheker, Luis R; Kumar, Kannan K

    2015-05-01

    Background?Fifth-carpometacarpal (CMC)-joint fractures and dislocations can produce carpometacarpal joint arthritis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiographic and clinical outcomes of arthroplasty for fifth carpometacarpal joint arthritis. Material and Methods?A series of six patients who had symptomatic advanced fifth-CMC arthritis and had failed to respond to conservative treatment. All patients underwent Dupert's technique of fifth-CMC arthroplasty with a mean follow-up of 17.6 months. Results were reviewed clinically and radiographically. Results?Union between the fourth and fifth metacarpals was observed at an average of 6.2 weeks after surgery. Grip strength improved. Range of motion (ROM) of the fifth metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint and the fifth metacarpal height remained unchanged. Visual analog scale (VAS) results improved significantly. Conclusion?Despite the medium-term follow-up and small number of patients, our results suggest fifth-CMC arthroplasty with arthrodesis of the fourth and fifth metacarpal bases may be a reliable procedure for fifth-CMC arthritis. PMID:25945295

  13. SEPTIC ARTHRITIS IN MALES WITH HAEMOPHILIA

    PubMed Central

    Ashrani, Aneel A.; Key, Nigel S.; Soucie, J. Michael; Duffy, Nancy; Forsyth, Angela; Geraghty, Sue

    2014-01-01

    We used data collected as part of the Universal Data Collection (UDC) surveillance project in haemophilia treatment centers (HTC) to study the incidence, risk factors, and impact of septic arthritis among males with haemophilia. Patients participating in UDC on 2 or more occasions were included. Cases were defined as patients with documented joint infection. Characteristics of the cases were compared with those of haemophilia patients without infection. Among the 8026 eligible patients with 36,015 person-years of follow-up, 30 (0.37%) had a documented joint infection (incidence rate 83 per 100,000 person-years). In a logistic regression model, only increasing age (OR = 6.1 for age ?30), race/ethnicity other than white (OR = 3.9), presence of inhibitor (OR = 3.9), invasive procedure in the past year (OR = 2.7) and presence of one or more target joints (OR = 3.2) remained statistically significant. CVAD use and HCV and HIV infection were not associated with septic arthritis risk after adjusting for potential confounders. Study limitations include possible underestimation of septic arthritis rate in this population and its retrospective design. We conclude that septic arthritis is an uncommon complication of haemophilia occurring primarily in joints most affected by bleeding and reparative surgical interventions. PMID:18298584

  14. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrich, Christian; Diddens, Heyke C.; Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

    1995-03-01

    The only early therapy of rheumatoid arthritis in orthopedic surgery is a synovectomy, which is restricted to more or less big joints. A laser-synovectomy of small joints is ineffective yet. An alternative method may be photodynamic therapy. In our study we describe the photodynamic effect of Photosan 3 in a cell culture study.

  15. State-of-the-art: rheumatoid arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Iain B McInnes; James R ODell

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of the pathogenesis and optimal therapeutics for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has advanced remarkably over the last decade. This review highlights these key advances, particularly the outcomes of genome-wide scans which have provided an increasingly robust appraisal of the complex genetics that underpin RA. Such observations are placed in pathogenetic context, particularly concerning the breach of tolerance that presages

  16. Hard Metal Alveolitis Accompanied by Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paula A. Hahtola; Ritva E. Järvenpää; Kari Lounatmaa; Jorma J. Mattila; Immo Rantala; Jukka A. Uitti; Seppo Sutinen

    2000-01-01

    Hard metal lung diseases (HML) are rare, and complex to diagnose. We describe the case of a patient with allergic alveolitis accompanied by rheumatoid arthritis. A sharpener of hard metal by trade, our patient was a 45-year-old, nonsmoking Caucasian female who experienced symptoms of cough and phlegm, and dyspnea on exertion. Preliminary lung findings were inspiratory rales in both basal

  17. Acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ED Goergens; A McEvoy; M Watson; IR Barrett

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To review the clinical presentation, clinical management and organisms responsible for acute haematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO) and septic arthritis (SA) in the post Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib) vaccine era and to evaluate current Australian antibiotic guidelines for these conditions. Methods: A retrospective chart review of children less than 16 years of age presenting to The Children's Hospital at Westmead

  18. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Andrew D.; Fischer, Philip R.; Reed, Ann M.; Wylam, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. PMID:26171269

  19. [Diet, nutrition and rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Miggiano, G A D; Gagliardi, L

    2005-01-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease resulting in diarthrodial joints inflammation (particularly joints of hands, wrists, feet, knees, cubitus, ankles, shoulder, etc.) that is manifested by swelling and functional impairment. The associated complications, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease, make RA important in public health terms. During the active phase of disease, elevated plasma concentrations of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and acute-phase proteins, lead to reduction of fat free body mass (FFM) with a loss mean of 15% of cell body mass (CM) and consequent reduction of muscle strength. The pharmacological therapy (non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), slow acting antirheumatic drugs and corticosteroids), have the potential to cause side-effects, such as gastrointestinal bleeding, bone loss beyond to increase the requirement of some nutrients and reduce their absorption. The diet may play role in the management of RA, particularly in alleviating the symptoms of the disease, combating the side-effects of therapy and reducing the risk of complications. The increase of the caloric and proteic intake is not sufficient to offset a increased metabolic rhythm and important proteic catabolism but a diet balanced may warrant an adequate intake of nutrients. The carbohydrates of the diet provide 55-60% of the caloric intake, the diet is normo-proteinic or hyper-proteinic in the active phase of disease, and lipids represent 25-30% of the caloric intake (saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated fatty acids in the ratio 1:1:1). omega-3 fatty acids supplementation, in combination with reduction of fatty acids omega-6 and adequate intake of monounsaturated fatty acids induce improvement in symptoms and sometimes a reduction in NSAIDs usage. Proper antioxidant nutrients (Vitamin A, Vitamin C, selenium) may provide an important defence against the increased oxidant stress and a supplementation of folate and vitamin B12, in patients treated with methotrexate (MTX), reduce the incidence of side effects and offset the elevation in plasma homocysteine frequent in these patients. Calcium and vitamin D, in patients treated with corticosteroids, reduce the bone loss, while a supplementation with iron may prevent anaemia. Finally, elimination diets may be feasible therapy only in patients with positive skin prick test. PMID:16048032

  20. Choline kinase inhibition in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Guma, M; Sanchez-Lopez, E; Lodi, A; Garcia-Carbonell, R; Tiziani, S; Karin, M; Lacal, J C; Firestein, G S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about targeting the metabolome in non-cancer conditions. Choline kinase (ChoK?), an essential enzyme for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis, is required for cell proliferation and has been implicated in cancer invasiveness. Aggressive behaviour of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) led us to evaluate whether this metabolic pathway could play a role in RA FLS function and joint damage. Methods Choline metabolic profile of FLS cells was determined by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS) under conditions of ChoK? inhibition. FLS function was evaluated using the ChoK? inhibitor MN58b (IC50=4.2 ?M). For arthritis experiments, mice were injected with K/BxN sera. MN58b (3 mg/kg) was injected daily intraperitoneal beginning on day 0 or day 4 after serum administration. Results The enzyme is expressed in synovial tissue and in cultured RA FLS. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulation increased ChoK? expression and levels of phosphocholine in FLS measured by Western Blot (WB) and metabolomic studies of choline-containing compounds in cultured RA FLS extracts respectively, suggesting activation of this pathway in RA synovial environment. A ChoK? inhibitor also suppressed the behaviour of cultured FLS, including cell migration and resistance to apoptosis, which might contribute to cartilage destruction in RA. In a passive K/BxN arthritis model, pharmacologic ChoK? inhibition significantly decreased arthritis in pretreatment protocols as well as in established disease. Conclusions These data suggest that ChoK? inhibition could be an effective strategy in inflammatory arthritis. It also suggests that targeting the metabolome can be a new treatment strategy in non-cancer conditions. PMID:25274633

  1. Interleukin-17 is a critical target for the treatment of ankylosing enthesitis and psoriasis-like dermatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Shin; Date, Fumiko; Dong, Yupeng; Ono, Masao

    2015-06-01

    Ankylosis is a major pathological manifestation of spondyloarthropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of anti-IL-17 therapy on spontaneous ankylosing enthesitis in mice. In this study, we used male DBA/1 mice as a spontaneous ankylosis model. Serum IL-17 concentrations were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Male DBA/1 mice from different litters were mixed and caged together preceding the treatment at 10 weeks (wk) of age (prophylaxis) or 21?wk of age (intervention). Treatment with anti-IL-17 antibodies or saline was initiated after caging in groups of mice and administered weekly. The onset of tarsal ankylosis was assessed by ankle swelling and histopathological examination. Pathological changes and mRNA expression levels were assessed in joints and ears obtained at the experimental end-point. We found that circulating IL-17 increased with the onset of ankylosis in male DBA/1 mice, coinciding with the onset of dermatitis. The symptoms of dermatitis corresponded to the pathological characteristics of psoriasis: acanthosis with mild hyperkeratosis, scaling, epidermal microabscess formation and augmented expression of K16, S100A8 and S100A9. Prophylactic administration of anti-IL-17 antibodies significantly prevented the development of both ankylosis and dermatitis in male DBA/1 mice caged together. On the other hand, administration of anti-IL-17 antibodies after disease onset had a lesser but significant effect on ankylosis progression but did not affect dermatitis progression. In conclusion, IL-17 is a key mediator in the pathogenic process of tarsal ankylosis and psoriasis-like dermatitis in male DBA/1 mice caged together. Thus, IL-17 is a potential therapeutic target in ankylosing enthesitis and psoriasis in humans. PMID:25352178

  2. [Treatment of rheumatic patients in a warm climate abroad].

    PubMed

    Forseth, Karin Øien

    2007-02-15

    Adult rheumatic and psoriatic patients in Norway have been offered state-funded treatment in a warm climate since 1976. The offer has since then been extended to other patient groups with chronic diseases. We here present a program, which mainly consists of intensive physical treatment in a warm, sunny and dry climate, for adults with chronic rheumatic disease. The article is based on available statistics and literature found by searching Medline, PubMed and Cochrane. Patients are selected for the program according to diagnosis, physical function and disease severity and activity. The majority of the patients have rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis or psoriatic arthritis. The treatment is demanding and is not suitable for all. There are two closing dates for applications, 1. October and 1. February. PMID:17304274

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... disease, which means the arthritis results from your immune system attacking your body's own tissues. The course of ...

  4. Arthritis Critically Dependent on Innate Immune System Players

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hong Ji; Koichiro Ohmura; Umar Mahmood; David M Lee; Frans M. A Hofhuis; Susan A Boackle; Kazue Takahashi; V. Michael Holers; Mark Walport; Craig Gerard; Alan Ezekowitz; Michael C Carroll; Michael Brenner; Ralph Weissleder; J. Sjef Verbeek; Veronique Duchatelle; Claude Degott; Christophe Benoist; Diane Mathis

    2002-01-01

    K\\/BxN T cell receptor transgenic mice are a model of inflammatory arthritis, similar to rheumatoid arthritis. Disease in these animals is focused specifically on the joints but stems from autoreactivity to a ubiquitously expressed antigen, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI). T and B cells are both required for disease initiation, but anti-GPI immunoglobulins (Igs), alone, can induce arthritis in lymphocyte-deficient recipients. Here,

  5. [Unusual presentation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and autoimmune hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Moreno Prieto, M; Carbonero Celis, M J; Cuadrado Caballero, M C

    2015-01-01

    The coexistence of autoimmune hepatitis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis is very rare. This is the case of an 18 month old female patient whose first sign of disease was torticollis due to an underlying atlanto-axial subluxation. Three months later, bilateral knee arthritis developed and she was diagnosed with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Throughout the disease a persistent elevation of liver enzymes was noted, combined with positive antinuclear antibodies and hypergammaglobulinemia, reaching the diagnosis of concomitant autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:25066796

  6. The eVects of interferon beta treatment on arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. P. Tak; M. C. Kraan; M. Jonker; T. J. M. Smeets; F. C. Breedveld

    Objective. To determine whether interferon beta (IFN-b) therapy might have a beneficial eVect on arthritis, we evaluated the eVect of IFN-b on collagen type II-induced arthritis (CIA) in rhesus monkeys and conducted a pilot study in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Four rhesus monkeys with CIA were treated with 10? 106 U( MIU )\\/kg mammalian cell-derived recombinant IFN-b (RebifA;

  7. Oral phosphatidylcholine pretreatment alleviates the signs of experimental rheumatoid arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabor Er?s; Saleh Ibrahim; Nikolai Siebert; Mihály Boros; Brigitte Vollmar

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylcholine-derived metabolites exhibit anti-inflammatory properties in various stress conditions. We hypothesized that dietary phosphatidylcholine may potentially function as an anti-inflammatory substance and may decrease inflammatory activation in a chronic murine model of rheumatoid arthritis (collagen-induced arthritis). METHODS: The experiments were performed on male DBA1\\/J mice. In groups 1 to 3 (n = 10 each), collagen-induced arthritis was

  8. MicroRNA 155 controls the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephan Blüml; Michael Bonelli; Birgit Niederreiter; Antonia Puchner; Georg Mayr; Silvia Hayer; Marije I Koenders; Wim B van den Berg; Josef Smolen; Kurt Redlich

    2011-01-01

    ObjectiveMicro RNAs (miRNAs) are a new class of regulatory elements. Altered expression of miRNAs has been demonstrated in inflamed joints of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the exact role of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of this disease has not been defined so far.MethodsCollagen induced arthritis (CIA) and K\\/BxN serum transfer arthritis was induced in wt and miR155?\\/? mice.

  9. Pain threshold and intensity in rheumatic patients: correlations with the Hamilton Depression Rating scale.

    PubMed

    Bagnato, Gianluca; De Andres, Ilenia; Sorbara, Stefania; Verduci, Elisa; Corallo, Giorgio; Ferrera, Antonino; Morgante, Salvatore; Roberts, William Neal; Bagnato, Gianfilippo

    2015-03-01

    Individuals suffering from chronic pain are frequently affected by depression, which in turn increases the risk of developing chronic pain over time. This study aims to investigate the relationship between depression and pain intensity and threshold in a group of rheumatic patients compared to healthy subjects. One hundred twenty-four individuals of whom 50 were affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 23 by psoriatic arthritis (PsA), 23 by ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and 28 age-matched controls without chronic pain underwent quantitative sensory testing to assess pressure pain threshold with pressure algometry. Pain intensity was evaluated through the visual analogue scale (VAS) and depression through the Hamilton Depression Rating scale (HAMD). A significant inverse correlation between HAMD values and pressure pain thresholds was found in the entire group of patients (p?arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis that display comorbid depression could represent an additional and integrative method to improve pain/depression overlap management or research. PMID:24407907

  10. Effect and treatment of chronic pain in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yvonne C

    2013-01-01

    Pain is the most common reason patients with inflammatory arthritis see a rheumatologist. Patients consistently rate pain as one of their highest priorities, and pain is the single most important determinant of patient global assessment of disease activity. Although pain is commonly interpreted as a marker of inflammation, the correlation between pain intensity and measures of peripheral inflammation is imperfect. The prevalence of chronic, non-inflammatory pain syndromes such as fibromyalgia is higher among patients with inflammatory arthritis than in the general population. Inflammatory arthritis patients with fibromyalgia have higher measures of disease activity and lower quality of life than inflammatory patients who do not have fibromyalgia. This review article focuses on current literature involving the effects of pain on disease assessment and quality of life for patients with inflammatory arthritis. It also reviews non-pharmacologic and pharmacologic options for treatment of pain for patients with inflammatory arthritis, focusing on the implications of comorbidities and concurrent disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapy. Although several studies have examined the effects of reducing inflammation for patients with inflammatory arthritis, very few clinical trials have examined the safety and efficacy of treatment directed specifically towards pain pathways. Most studies have been small, have focused on rheumatoid arthritis or mixed populations (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis plus osteoarthritis), and have been at high risk of bias. Larger, longitudinal studies are needed to examine the mechanisms of pain in inflammatory arthritis and to determine the safety and efficacy of analgesic medications in this specific patient population. PMID:23292816

  11. Preclinical Rheumatoid Arthritis (Autoantibodies): An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple studies demonstrate that there is a period of development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during which there are elevations of disease-related biomarkers, including autoantibodies, in the absence of and prior to the development of RA; this period can be termed ‘preclinical RA’. These ‘preclinical’ autoantibodies including rheumatoid factor and antibodies to citrullinated protein antigens, and more recent studies have also identified a wider variety of autoantibodies and a wide range of inflammatory biomarkers. These findings in conjunction with established and emerging data about genetic and environmental risk factors for RA support a model of disease development where certain factors lead to an initial triggering of RA-related autoimmunity that expands over time to the point where symptomatic arthritis classifiable as RA develops. Herein will be reviewed updates in the field, as well as a discussion of current limitations of our understanding of preclinical RA, and potential future directions for study. PMID:24643396

  12. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, J L; Schell, R F; Hejka, A; England, D M; Konick, L

    1988-01-01

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis. Images PMID:3410540

  13. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O'Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-07-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease. PMID:26084368

  14. Use of methotrexate in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ramanan, A; Whitworth, P; Baildam, E

    2003-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) has transformed the outlook for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Most of the evidence from uncontrolled clinical trials suggests that MTX is an effective agent for treating active JIA. Data from controlled clinical trials suggests that MTX has statistically significant effects on patient centred disability measures in JIA patients with active arthritis. Although we would like a much larger study directed evidence base for our use of the drug, the studies that have been done are sound and have been followed by a change in clinical expectations and advice that speak of qualitative evidence from clinical practice, confirming the scientifically acquired data. Randomised controlled multicentre trials using sufficient numbers of patients, including functional assessment and quality of life measures, are needed to confirm the long term efficacy and safety of MTX in JIA. PMID:12598376

  15. Perforin deficiency attenuates collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Kristin; Knipper, Annika; Tu-Rapp, Hoang; Koczan, Dirk; Kreutzer, Hans-Jürgen; Nizze, Horst; Mix, Eilhard; Thiesen, Hans-Juergen; Holmdahl, Rikard; Ibrahim, Saleh M

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an approved animal model for rheumatoid arthritis, is thought to be a T cell-dependent disease. There is evidence that CD8+ T cells are a major subset controlling the pathogenesis of CIA. They probably contribute to certain features of disease, namely tissue destruction and synovial hyperplasia. In this study we examined the role of perforin (pfp), a key molecule of the cytotoxic death pathway that is expressed mainly in CD8+ T cells, for the pathogenesis of CIA. We generated DBA/1J mice suffering from mutations of the pfp molecule, DBA/1J-pfp-/-, and studied their susceptibility to arthritis. As a result, pfp-deficient mice showed a reduced incidence (DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 64%; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 54%), a slightly delayed onset (onset of disease: DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 53 ± 3.6; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 59 ± 4.9 (mean ± SEM), and milder form of the disease (maximum disease score: DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 7.3 ± 1.1; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 3.4 ± 1.4 (mean ± SEM); P < 0.05). Concomitantly, peripheral T cell proliferation in response to the specific antigen bovine collagen II was increased in pfp-/- mice compared with pfp+/+ mice, arguing for an impaired killing of autoreactive T cells caused by pfp deficiency. Thus, pfp-mediated cytotoxicity is involved in the initiation of tissue damage in arthritis, but pfp-independent cytotoxic death pathways might also contribute to CIA. PMID:15987490

  16. HLA in Singapore Chinese with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Boey, M L; Wee, G B; Mohan, C; Howe, H S; Chan, S H; Feng, P H

    1992-10-01

    The HLA-A, B, C, DR and DQ antigens were determined in 50 Singapore Chinese patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There was a significant increase in the prevalence of HLA-Bw46, DRw53 and DQ3 in patients with RA. The linkage disequilibrium between Bw46 and DRw53 explains this association. This major histocompatibility complex association differs from the HLA-DR4 link in Caucasian populations and suggests that RA is an immunogenetically heterogeneous disease. PMID:1464861

  17. A rare cause of septic arthritis: melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Caldera, Aruna Sanjeewa; Kumanan, Thirunavukarasu; Corea, Enoka

    2013-10-01

    Melioidosis is a pyogenic infection with high mortality caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. As the clinical presentation is not distinctive, a high index of clinical suspicion is required for diagnosis. We present a case of a 50-year-old farmer who was diabetic and a chronic alcoholic, who presented to us with pneumonia, followed by septic arthritis. He was ultimately diagnosed as having melioidosis. PMID:24067292

  18. Longitudinal immunomonitoring following tocilizumab in rheumatoid arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pascale Louis-Plence; Yves-Marie Pers; Pierre Portales; Julie Quentin; Sylvie Fabre; Jean-François Eliaou; Christian Jorgensen

    2011-01-01

    IntroductionTocilizumab is a humanised anti-interleukin (IL)-6 receptor monoclonal antibody, which binds to circulating soluble IL-6 receptor and membrane-expressed IL-6 receptor, inhibiting IL-6 binding to both forms of IL-6 receptor. Tocilizumab is an efficient therapy for adults with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in whom disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs or a tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor has failed. However, the impact

  19. The burden of illness of rheumatoid arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annelies Boonen; Johan L. Severens

    2011-01-01

    It is necessary to understand the full burden of illness of a disease before the value of interventions can be assessed. Rheumatoid\\u000a arthritis (RA) has an impact on a variety of stakeholders, including patients, healthcare systems, and society as a whole.\\u000a This overview discusses the societal and patient perspectives, distinguishing several domains of impact. Epidemiology is important from a societal

  20. The measurement of helplessness in rheumatoid arthritis. The development of the arthritis helplessness index.

    PubMed

    Nicassio, P M; Wallston, K A; Callahan, L F; Herbert, M; Pincus, T

    1985-06-01

    We describe the development of the Arthritis Helplessness Index (AHI), a self-report instrument designed to measure patients' perceptions of loss of control with arthritis. The participants in this research were 219 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who completed a quantity of mailed materials, including the AHI, functional measures and other psychological scales. Significant evidence of reliability and validity of the AHI was found. Greater helplessness correlated with greater age, lesser education, lower self-esteem, lower internal health locus of control, higher anxiety, and depression, and impairment in performing activities of daily living using a health assessment questionnaire. Over one year, changes in helplessness correlated with changes in difficulty in performing activities of daily living. The AHI appears to be a useful measure for further studies in RA and a valuable clinical tool in monitoring the psychological status of patients with RA. PMID:4045844

  1. Lapatinib ameliorates experimental arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ozgen, Metin; Koca, Suleyman Serdar; Karatas, Ahmet; Dagli, Adile Ferda; Erman, Fazilet; Gundogdu, Baris; Sahin, Kazim; Isik, Ahmet

    2015-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its ligands are commonly expressed by synovial cells. The aim of the present study was to detect the potential effect of lapatinib an inhibitor of EGFR tyrosine kinases on collagen-induced arthritis. Thirty Wistar albino female rats were randomized into three groups. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of chicken type II collagen with incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Serum TNF-?, IL-17, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were analyzed. Tissue superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and heme oxgenase-1 (HO-1) expressions were determined. TNF-?, IL-17 and MDA levels, and Nrf2 and HO-1 expressions were lower in lapatinib-treated (30 mg/kg/day) group compared to sham group, while SOD, catalase, and GPx activities were higher (p?arthritis. PMID:25283886

  2. Advances in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vivar, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    The intense pursuit of novel therapies in rheumatoid arthritis has provided physicians with an assorted set of biologic drugs to treat patients with moderate to severe disease activity. Nine different biologic therapies are currently available: seven inhibitors of pro-inflammatory cytokines (five targeting tumor necrosis factor [TNF], one interleukin [IL]-1 and one IL-6), as well as a T- and a B-lymphocyte targeting agent. All these drugs have roughly similar efficacy profiles and are approved as first- or second-line therapy in patients who failed to respond to conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and in most cases for first line use in rheumatoid arthritis as well. Despite the irrefutable clinical and radiological benefits of biologic therapies, there are still low rates of patients achieving stable remission. Therefore, the quest for new and more effective biologic therapies continues and every year new drugs are tested. Simultaneously, optimal use of established agents is being studied in different ways. Recently, the approval of the first small molecule targeting intracellular pathways has opened a new chapter in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Other emerging treatment strategies include the activation of regulatory T cells as well as new cytokine-targeting therapies. PMID:24860653

  3. Hemochromatosis simulating rheumatoid arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Fabíola Brasil; Callegari, Amanda; Sarinho, José Célso; Lucena, Juliana; Casagrande, Renielly; de Souza, Branca Dias Batista

    2014-01-01

    This is a report of a patient who had a previous diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, nonerosive, rheumatoid factor negative, that despite the therapeutic approach presented progressive worsening of the articular and general condition. After extensive research, she had a diagnosis of hemochromatosis. Joint symptoms are common manifestations in hemochromatosis. The arthropathy of hemochromatosis may resemble inflammatory arthropathy mimicking RA, particularly in the most common sites as 2nd and 3rd metacarpophalangeal. Radiologically are observed decreased joint space, subchondral sclerosis, cyst formation and chondrocalcinosis. Treatment with disease modifying drugs for rheumatoid arthritis tend to worsen the clinical picture, since the liver is the major site of deposition of iron in hemochromatosis and these medications are known to be hepatotoxic. Phlebotomy treatment for hemochromatosis is apparently ineffective in reversing the articular manifestations, which requires the association with iron chelating drugs. Due to the apparent difficulty in differentiating between the two diseases, a screening profile of iron in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with atypical progression is necessary. PMID:24878794

  4. Early treatment in early undifferentiated arthritis.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Ignazio; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Bugatti, Serena; Atzeni, Fabiola; d'Angelo, Salvatore; Caporali, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    The early diagnosis of new-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has become a major objective for rheumatologists in order to identify a management strategy able to change the natural history of the disease and to prevent joint damage and functional impairment. Emergent evidence emphasizes the benefits of early aggressive therapy of RA. By the nineties, early arthritis cohorts have been collected throughout the world with the aim to increase the early referral of patients with early onset disease by the general practitioners and to collect data on the development of full-blown RA. The frequency of undifferentiated arthritis (UA) ranged from 23% to 81% in these early cohorts with most of them reporting a rate of 30%. The transition rate from UA to RA was between 13% and 54%. A percentage of 20-60% of patients with UA had a self-limiting disease. Our article deals with the controversy existing in the management of UA. Should every patient with UA be treated? Could patients with a favorable disease course be exposed to unnecessary risk with initiation of aggressive therapy with synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) or biologic agents? The pros and cons of treating patients with UA are examined. PMID:22037115

  5. Etanercept in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Puig, L; López-Ferrer, A; Laiz, A

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present review is to provide an update on the most important recent studies on the use of etanercept in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Using various assessment tools, such as the Disease Activity Score 28-joint count (DAS28), the PsA Response Criteria (PsARC), and the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) score, several authors have shown that etanercept can reduce the signs and symptoms of psoriatic arthritis and inhibit radiographic progression in studies with follow-up periods of up to 2 years. There is evidence that etanercept is effective in the treatment of psoriatic enthesitis, dactylitis, and axial joint disease as well as in disease affecting the skin and nails. In clinical trials, etanercept had a safety profile similar to that of placebo and this profile did not change over time. Cost-effectiveness models have found etanercept to be the most cost-effective tumor necrosis factor inhibitor in patients with psoriatic arthritis and mild to moderate psoriasis. Etanercept has a favorable risk-benefit profile in the short term. The concomitant use of methotrexate does not alter etanercept survival. PMID:25455504

  6. Campylobacter Reactive Arthritis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Janet E.; Krizova, Adriana; Garg, Amit X.; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Ouimet, Janine M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the literature on the epidemiology of Campylobacter associated ReA. Methods A Medline (PubMed) search identified studies from 1966–2006 that investigated the epidemiology of Campylobacter associated ReA. Search terms included: “reactive arthritis”, “spondyloarthropathy”, “Reiter’s syndrome”, “gastroenteritis”, “diarrhea”, “epidemiology”, “incidence”, “prevalence”, and “Campylobacter”. Results The literature available to date suggests that the incidence of Campylobacter reactive arthritis may occur in 1 to 5% of those infected. The annual incidence of ReA after Campylobacter or Shigella may be 4.3 and 1.3 respectively per 100,000. The duration of acute ReA varies considerably between reports, and the incidence and impact of chronic reactive arthritis from Campylobacter infection is virtually unknown. Conclusions Campylobacter associated ReA incidence and prevalence varies widely from reviews such as: case ascertainment differences, exposure differences, lack of diagnostic criteria for ReA and perhaps genetics and ages of exposed individuals. At the population level it may not be associated with HLA-B27 and inflammatory back involvement is uncommon. Follow up for long-term sequelae is largely unknown. Five percent of Campylobacter ReA may be chronic or relapsing (with respect to musculoskeletal symptoms). PMID:17360026

  7. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiangtao [Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China) [Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, Yantaishan Hospital, 91 Jiefang Road, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China); Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu [Department of Orthopaedics, Yantaishan Hospital, 91 Jiefang Road, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China)] [Department of Orthopaedics, Yantaishan Hospital, 91 Jiefang Road, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China); Zheng, Yanping, E-mail: yanpingzheng@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China)] [Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-?B-dependent genes, including interleukin 1? (IL-1?), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  8. Clothing and Dressing Needs of People with Arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naomi Reich; Patricia Otten

    1991-01-01

    Millions ofAmericans have some form of arthritis. The cumulative effects of aging can further negatively affect clothing dressing ease and the self-image of arthritics and elderly individuals. This research addressed clothing problems and solutions of nearly 800 Arizona residents with either rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. The majority (78%) who responded to the mailed survey were over age 50, and 77%

  9. Synovial fibroblasts spread rheumatoid arthritis to unaffected joints

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephanie Lefèvre; Anette Knedla; Christoph Tennie; Andreas Kampmann; Christina Wunrau; Robert Dinser; Adelheid Korb; Eva-Maria Schnäker; Ingo H Tarner; Paul D Robbins; Christopher H Evans; Henning Stürz; Jürgen Steinmeyer; Steffen Gay; Jürgen Schölmerich; Thomas Pap; Ulf Müller-Ladner; Elena Neumann

    2009-01-01

    Active rheumatoid arthritis originates from few joints but subsequently affects the majority of joints. Thus far, the pathways of the progression of the disease are largely unknown. As rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASFs) which can be found in RA synovium are key players in joint destruction and are able to migrate in vitro, we evaluated the potential of RASFs to

  10. Cells of the synovium in rheumatoid arthritis. Macrophages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raimund W Kinne; Bruno Stuhlmüller; Gerd-R Burmester

    2007-01-01

    The multitude and abundance of macrophage-derived mediators in rheumatoid arthritis and their paracrine\\/autocrine effects identify macrophages as local and systemic amplifiers of disease. Although uncovering the etiology of rheumatoid arthritis remains the ultimate means to silence the pathogenetic process, efforts in understanding how activated macrophages influence disease have led to optimization strategies to selectively target macrophages by agents tailored to

  11. Anglo-French contributions to the recognition of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Kevin J.

    1982-01-01

    Early descriptions of rheumatoid arthritis in the English and French literature are reviewed. Charcot pointed out that the disease was recognised as distinct from gout in eighteenth century England, and pictorial evidence for this is presented. His own work on arthritis led to a series of noteworthy interactions with Alfred Baring Garrod, which are discussed. Images PMID:7051988

  12. The pathogenesis of bone erosions in gouty arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naomi Schlesinger; Ralf G Thiele

    2010-01-01

    The characteristic radiographic hallmarks of chronic gouty arthritis are the presence of macroscopic tophi and erosions with overhanging edges and relative preservation of the joint space. In recent years there has been more insight into the processes underlying the development of bone erosions in gouty arthritis. This review discusses the mechanical, pathological, cellular and immunological factors that may have a

  13. Division of Arthritis & Rheumatic Diseases at Oregon Health & Science University

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    of Arthritis & Rheumatic Diseases Oregon Health & Science University 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road Mailcode OP.ohsu.edu Summer 2014 Division of Arthritis & Rheumatic Diseases 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road Mailcode OP09 that have bridged the deficit in funding for research projects, purchased lab supplies and office equipment

  14. Ocular manifestations in children and adolescents with Lyme arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Huppertz, H.; Munchmeier, D.; Lieb, W.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Lyme arthritis is the most frequent late manifestation of Lyme borreliosis and has been associated with ocular inflammation.?METHODS—A group of 153 children and adolescents with arthritis, 84 of whom had Lyme arthritis and 69 other causes of arthritis, were followed prospectively for 22-73 (median 44) months in the course of a national study.?RESULTS—Three of 84 patients with Lyme arthritis had ocular inflammation (4%), including keratitis, anterior uveitis, and uveitis intermedia. All three had symptoms of decreased visual acuity. Whereas anterior uveitis disappeared without sequelae, a corneal scar and a permanent loss of visual acuity in the patients with keratitis and intermediate uveitis remained. Systematic examination of all patients revealed no further ocular involvement. Of 69 patients with other causes of arthritis who were followed in parallel as a control group, four of 15 patients with early onset pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis had chronic anterior uveitis and two of 12 patients with juvenile spondyloarthropathy had acute anterior uveitis.?CONCLUSIONS—Ocular involvement with keratitis, anterior uveitis, and intermediate uveitis may occur in children and adolescents with Lyme arthritis. Visual loss appears to be symptomatic, making regular ocular screening of such patients unnecessary.?? PMID:10502576

  15. Melioidotic septic arthritis: a case report and literature review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nadeem Sajjad Raja

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is endemic in southeast Asia and northern Australia. In recent years, the incidence of melioidosis has increased worldwide. Septic arthritis is a rare but well-recognized manifestation of melioidosis. Patients with underlying medical conditions, such as diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, cirrhosis, and malignancy are at greater risk. The presentations of melioidotic septic arthritis often

  16. 7th meeting of the global arthritis research network

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Last October, the 7th meeting of the Global Arthritis Research Network was held in Zurich, Switzerland. European and American experts who have made major recent contributions to molecular biology got together to provide insights into novel technologies and approaches useful for biomedical research, especially for research on arthritis and related conditions. PMID:21892971

  17. Identification of Urinary Peptide Biomarkers Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    McInnes, Iain B.; Husi, Holger; Klein, Julie; Dakna, Mohammed; Mullen, William; Mischak, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis are associated with improved outcomes but current diagnostic tools such as rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated protein antibodies have shown limited sensitivity. In this pilot study we set out to establish a panel of urinary biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis using capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. We compared the urinary proteome of 33 participants of the Scottish Early Rheumatoid Arthritis inception cohort study with 30 healthy controls and identified 292 potential rheumatoid arthritis-specific peptides. Amongst them, 39 were used to create a classifier model using support vector machine algorithms. Specific peptidic fragments were differentially excreted between groups; fragments of protein S100-A9 and gelsolin were less abundant in rheumatoid arthritis while fragments of uromodulin, complement C3 and fibrinogen were all increasingly excreted. The model generated was subsequently tested in an independent test-set of 31 samples. The classifier demonstrated a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 93% in diagnosing the condition, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93 (p<0.0001). These preliminary results suggest that urinary biomarkers could be useful in the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Further studies are currently being undertaken in larger cohorts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other athridities to assess the potential of the urinary peptide based classifier in the early detection of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25144639

  18. Ureaplasma septic arthritis in an immunosuppressed patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    George, Michael David; Cardenas, Ana Maria; Birnbaum, Belinda K; Gluckman, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Mycoplasmas, including Ureaplasma and Mycoplasma species, are uncommon but important causes of septic arthritis, especially affecting immunosuppressed patients. Many of the reported cases have been associated with congenital immunodeficiency disorders, especially hypogammaglobulinemia. Mycoplasmas are difficult to grow in the laboratory, and these infections may be underdiagnosed using culture techniques. We report a case of a 21-year-old woman with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and hip arthroplasties treated with rituximab and adalimumab who developed urogenital infections and soft tissue abscesses followed by knee arthritis with negative routine cultures. Ureaplasma species was identified from synovial fluid on 2 separate occasions using a broad-range 16S ribosomal RNA gene polymerase chain reaction. Azithromycin led to rapid improvement in symptoms, but after completion of therapy, involvement of the hip prosthesis became apparent, and again, 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction was positive for Ureaplasma species. The literature is reviewed with a discussion of risk factors for Mycoplasma septic arthritis, clinical presentation, methods of diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:26010188

  19. Screening for Psoriatic Arthritis in Korean Psoriasis Patients Using the Psoriatic Arthritis Screening Evaluation Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    You, Hyang-Suk; Kim, Gun-Wook; Cho, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Won-Jeong; Mun, Je-Ho; Song, Margaret; Kim, Hoon-Soo; Ko, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Moon-Bum; Lee, Seung-Geun; Lee, In-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Background Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is chronic seronegative inflammatory arthritis that causes irreversible joint damage. Early recognition of PsA in patients with psoriasis is important for preventing physical disability and deformity. However, diagnosing PsA in a busy dermatology outpatient clinic can be difficult. Objective This study aimed to validate the Psoriatic Arthritis Screening and Evaluation (PASE) questionnaire for the detection of PsA in Korean patients with psoriasis. Methods The PASE questionnaire was prospectively given to 148 patients diagnosed with psoriasis but without a previous diagnosis of PsA. All patients underwent radiologic and laboratory examinations, and a subsequent clinical evaluation by a rheumatologist. Results Eighteen psoriasis patients (12.2%) were diagnosed with PsA according to the Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis. The PASE questionnaire scores of differed significantly between PsA and non-PsA patients. Receiver operator characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.82 (95% confidence interval: 0.72, 0.92) for PASE score. A PASE score cut-off of 37 points had a sensitivity of 77.8% and specificity of 82.3% for the diagnosis of PsA. Conclusion The PASE questionnaire is a simple and convenient screening tool for detecting PsA in Korean dermatology clinics. A PASE questionnaire score of 37 points appears to be an appropriate cut-off for screening Korean psoriasis patients.

  20. Streptococcus gordonii septic arthritis : two cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite advances in antimicrobial and surgical therapy, septic arthritis remains a rheumatologic emergency that can lead to rapid joint destruction and irreversible loss of function. In adults, Staphylococcus aureus is the most common microorganism isolated from native joints. Streptococcus gordonii is a prominent member of the viridans group of oral bacteria and is among the bacteria most frequently identified as being primary agent of subacute bacterial endocarditis. To the best of our knowledge, Streptococcus gordonii has not yet been described as agent of septic arthritis. Case Presentation We describe here two cases of septic arthritis due to Streptococcus gordonii. It gives us an opportunity to review epidemiology, diagnosis criteria and management of septic arthritis. Conclusion Although implication of S. gordonii as aetiologic agent of subacute endocarditis is well known, this organism is a rare cause of septic arthritis. In this case, the exclusion of associated endocarditis is warranted. PMID:22974507

  1. Myocardial dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis: epidemiology and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Jon T; Fernandes, Verônica; Lima, Joao AC; Bathon, Joan M

    2005-01-01

    Data from population- and clinic-based epidemiologic studies of rheumatoid arthritis patients suggest that individuals with rheumatoid arthritis are at risk for developing clinically evident congestive heart failure. Many established risk factors for congestive heart failure are over-represented in rheumatoid arthritis and likely account for some of the increased risk observed. In particular, data from animal models of cytokine-induced congestive heart failure have implicated the same inflammatory cytokines produced in abundance by rheumatoid synovium as the driving force behind maladaptive processes in the myocardium leading to congestive heart failure. At present, however, the direct effects of inflammatory cytokines (and rheumatoid arthritis therapies) on the myocardia of rheumatoid arthritis patients are incompletely understood. PMID:16207349

  2. Australian Paediatric Rheumatology Group standards of care for the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Munro, Jane; Murray, Kevin; Boros, Christina; Chaitow, Jeffrey; Allen, Roger C; Akikusa, Jonathan; Adib, Navid; Piper, Susan E; Singh-Grewal, Davinder

    2014-09-01

    This standards document outlines accepted standards of management for children, adolescents and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Australia. This document acknowledges that the chronic inflammatory arthritis conditions (JIA) in childhood are different diseases from inflammatory arthritis in adults and that specific expertise is required in the care of children with arthritis. PMID:25156704

  3. Mechanisms of action of cyclosporin a in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Wong

    1993-01-01

    Animal models of rheumatoid arthritis have been used to study the effects of numerous immunosuppressive agents in order to\\u000a provide therapies for human rheumatoid arthritis. This review summarizes the use of cyclosporin A in several models of rheumatoid\\u000a arthritis and supports the rationale for its use in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  4. Prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis and arthritis-attributable activity limitation--United States, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    Arthritis is the most common cause of disability among U.S. adults and is particularly common among persons with multiple chronic conditions. In 2003, arthritis in the United States resulted in an estimated $128 billion in medical-care costs and lost earnings. To update previous U.S. estimates of the prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis and arthritis-attributable activity limitation (AAAL), CDC analyzed 2010-2012 data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which found that 52.5 million (22.7%) of adults aged ?18 years had self-reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis, and 22.7 million (9.8%, or 43.2% of those with arthritis) reported AAAL, matching and exceeding previous projected increases, respectively. Among persons with heart disease, diabetes, and obesity, the prevalences of doctor-diagnosed arthritis were 49.0%, 47.3%, and 31.2%, respectively; the prevalences of AAAL among persons with these specific conditions were 26.8%, 25.7%, and 15.2%, respectively. Greater use of evidence-based interventions, such as chronic disease self-management education and physical activity interventions that have been proven to reduce pain and improve quality-of-life among adults with chronic diseases might help reduce the personal and societal burden of arthritis. PMID:24196662

  5. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis: A Knowledge Transfer Strategy to Empower Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosseau, Lucie; Lineker, Sydney; Bell, Mary; Wells, George; Casimiro, Lynn; Egan, Mary; Cranney, Ann; Tugwell, Peter; Wilson, Keith G.; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to help people with arthritis become aware of and utilize Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Osteoarthritis (OA) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) as they relate to self-management strategies. Second, to evaluate the impact of specific Knowledge Translation (KT) activities on CPG uptake. More…

  6. Hand bone loss in early undifferentiated arthritis: evaluating bone mineral density loss before the development of rheumatoid arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Haugeberg; M J Green; M A Quinn; H Marzo-Ortega; S Proudman; Z Karim; R J Wakefield; P G Conaghan; S Stewart; P Emery

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To examine the change in regional bone mineral density (BMD), including the hands, and assess its role as a predictor of outcome in patients presenting with an early undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis; (2) to examine for associations with the changes in hand BMD.Methods: 74 patients with undifferentiated hand arthritis of less than 12 months’ duration were examined at baseline

  7. Arthritis in the highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Pile, K D; Richens, J E; Laurent, R M; Bhatia, K; Prasad, M L; Lupiwa, T; Hudson, B J; Tapsall, J; McPetrie, R

    1993-01-01

    Acute polyarthritis is an important cause of morbidity in many tropical countries. Classification has often been difficult, with the term tropical polyarthritis used for those in whom a diagnosis could not be made. The implication that this is a distinct entity is probably incorrect, with likely causes being septic arthritis or post-infective reactive arthritis. This study aimed to determine the types of arthritis found in 43 patients (30 men) presenting consecutively to the Goroka Base Hospital in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Gonococcal arthritis was diagnosed in eight patients (six men) on the basis of isolation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from the joint aspirate. In all cases the N gonorrhoeae was identified by the closed culture system on chocolate agar, but not always by routine plating. There were no specific clinical features that identified patients with a gonococcal septic arthritis. The remaining 34 patients had an undifferentiated oligoarthritis. The pattern of arthritis in men and women was of a lower limb pauciarticular arthritis with a predilection for the knee and ankle joints. A total of 30% of male patients had a history of urethral discharge and 44% of all patients had preceding diarrhoea. Arthritis was the only feature in 59% of patients and in 32% there was an associated enthesitis. In this study most patients had an oligoarthritis consistent with a reactive arthritis or a septic arthritis due to N gonorrhoeae. Broth inoculation of synovial fluid was the best method to isolate N gonorrhoeae, with standard methods for gonococcal isolation failing in some patients. It is recommended that the term 'tropical polyarthritis' is no longer used as it does not refer to a specific entity but consists of several known arthritides. PMID:8427514

  8. Depression in Rheumatoid Arthritis and its relation to disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Imran, Muhammad Yaser; Saira Khan, Elaine Anwer; Ahmad, Nighat Mir; Farman Raja, Sumaira; Saeed, Muhammad Ahmed; Ijaz Haider, Imran

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the level of depression in Rheumatoid Arthritis and its relationship with severity of Rheumatoid Arthritis. Methods: This cross sectional analytical study was conducted from March 2014 to May 2014. Total 102 cases of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) diagnosed as per ACR (American College of Rheumatology) 1987 criteria were enrolled from Rheumatology Department, Fatima Memorial Hospital. Severity of Rheumatoid Arthritis was assessed by Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and disease activity score (DAS - 28) while severity of depression was measured by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scale II questionnaire. The relationship between depression and disease activity (severity) of Rheumatoid Arthritis was assessed by calculating correlation coefficient between depression, disease activity score (DAS 28) of Rheumatoid Arthritis and health assessment questionnaire (HAQ). Results: Out of 102 patients, 77(75.5%) were females and 25(24.5%) males. The mean age of patients was 43.5± 11.9 years and the mean duration of disease was 7.8 ± 5.5 years.71.5% of Rheumatoid Arthritis patients were found to have some degree of depression and this was directly related to the severity of disease. Moderate and severe depression were present in 23 (22.5%) and 19(18.6%) patients respectively. Conclusion: In this study, almost three-fourths of Rheumatoid Arthritis patients were found to have depression. There was a strong association between Rheumatoid Arthritis disease activity and the level of depression. So it is imperative for clinicians treating Rheumatoid Arthritis patients to screen them for co morbid depression and manage it accordingly. PMID:26101498

  9. Association between low density lipoprotein and rheumatoid arthritis genetic factors with low density lipoprotein levels in rheumatoid arthritis and non-rheumatoid arthritis controls

    E-print Network

    Liao, K. P.

    Objectives: While genetic determinants of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels are well characterised in the general population, they are understudied in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our objective was to determine ...

  10. Surgical management of sternoclavicular septic arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Nusselt; Hans-Michael Klinger; Sven Freche; Wolfgang Schultz; Mike H. Baums

    2011-01-01

    Introduction  Septic arthritis of the sternoclavicular joint (SCJ) is a rare condition and has many diagnostic and therapeutic standards.\\u000a The purpose of this study was to evaluate our experience with surgical and diagnostic management to provide a surgical pathway\\u000a to help surgeons treat this disease.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  We retrospectively reviewed five patients who were managed surgically between 1999 and 2007. All patients underwent

  11. Diagnosis and classification of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kourilovitch, Maria; Galarza-Maldonado, Claudio; Ortiz-Prado, Esteban

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease of unclear etiology that is manifested in by a progressive and destructive polyarthritis in association with serological evidence of autoreactivity. Its diagnosis is based on the classification criteria that involve four parameters: joint involvement, serology (rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide--anti-CCP), levels of acute phase reactants and the duration of the symptoms Aletaha, et al. [1]. This classification simplifies the categorization of the patients with early RA; however, the diagnosis requires highly trained specialists who are able to differentiate early symptoms of RA from other pathologies. PMID:24568777

  12. Antibiotics for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ogrendik, Mesut

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) commenced in the 1930s with the use of sulfasalazine. Later, tetracyclines were successfully used for the treatment of RA. In double-blind and randomized studies, levofloxacin and macrolide antibiotics (including clarithromycin and roxithromycin) were also shown to be effective in the treatment of RA. There have been several reports in the literature indicating that periodontal pathogens are a possible cause of RA. Oral bacteria are one possible cause of RA. In this review, we aimed to investigate the effects of different antibiotics in RA treatment. PMID:24403843

  13. Reduced locomotor activity correlates with increased severity of arthritis in a mouse model of antibody-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Narendiran; Tran, Ricky; Pascual, Conrado; Xie, Xinmin; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by synovial hyperplasia and progressive cartilage and bone destruction that leads to a substantial loss of general functions and/or a decline in physical activities such as walking speed in humans. The K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in mice shares many immunological and pathological features with human RA. Very few studies are available in mice that investigate the changes in physical activity in relation to arthritis development. In this study we investigate the effect of arthritis on the locomotor activity of mice during K/BxN sera transfer arthritis. Methods Arthritis was induced in Balb/c mice by injecting intraperitoneally with 200ul of K/BxN sera; Balb/c mice injected with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) served as control. Progress of arthritis was estimated by daily measurements of joint thickness. Each mouse's locomotor activity (travel distance and travel time) was assessed every day for duration of 20 minute period using the SmartCage™ platform. Data were analyzed using the SmartCage™ analysis software (CageScore™). Results Arthritic Balb/c mice showed a reduction in distance covered and travel speed when compared to arthritis-free, control Balb/c mice. Maximum decline in locomotor activity was observed during the peak period of the disease and correlated to the increase in joint thickness in the arthritic mice. Conclusion This report demonstrates that measuring locomotor activity of mice during progression of K/BxN sera-induced arthritis using the SmartCage™ platform offers a quantitative method to assess physical activity in mice during arthritis. PMID:25506517

  14. Hamster and murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Munson, Erik; Nardelli, Dean T; Du Chateau, Brian K; Callister, Steven M; Schell, Ronald F

    2012-01-01

    Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-?-) deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology. PMID:22461836

  15. Arthritis in acute leukemia. Clinical and histopathological observations.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, A; Schumacher, H R; Schimmer, B M; Myers, A R; Brogadir, S P

    1981-08-01

    Eight patients had acute leukemia and arthritis. In five the arthritis had no evident cause other than the leukemia, and three had crystal-induced arthritis. Effusions from both groups of patients were often inflammatory. The average synovial fluid leukocyte count from the five effusions attributed to leukemia was 8,790/cu mm. A synovial needle biopsy specimen from one of these patients showed acute and chronic inflammation but no leukemic infiltration. Bone involvement was suggested by bone pain in only one patient. In no case did arthritis persist in the presence of a hematologic remission. In the three patients with crystal-induced arthritis, the average synovial fluid leukocyte count was 13,000/cu mm. There were crystals of monosodium urate in one and of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate in two patients. Suspected blast forms were seen in the synovial fluid of only one patient, one of those with pseudogout. Electron microscopic studies of needle biopsy specimens of synovial membrane from leukemic patients with arthritis described herein for the first time showed no blast forms, virus-like particles, or electron-dense deposits in vessel walls to suggest specific mechanisms for the arthritis. PMID:6942790

  16. Risk Factors for Asymptomatic Ventricular Dysfunction in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garza-García, Carlos; Rocío, Sánchez-Santillán; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Eduardo, Canseco; López-Campos, José Luis; Keirns-Davis, Candace

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to describe echocardiographic abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, concurrent systemic comorbidities, rheumatologic clinical activity, serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory activity. Methods. In an observational, cross-sectional study, rheumatoid arthritis outpatients were included (n = 105). Conventional transthoracic echocardiographic variables were compared between patients with arthritis and non-RA controls (n = 41). For rheumatoid arthritis patients, articular activity and rheumatologic and inflammatory markers were obtained. Results. Ventricular dysfunction was found in 54.3% of the population: systolic (18.1%), diastolic (32.4%), and/or right (24.8%), with lower ejection fraction (P < 0.0001). Pulmonary hypertension was found in 46.9%. Other echocardiographic findings included increased left atrial diameter (P = 0.01), aortic diameter (P = 0.01), ventricular septum (P = 0.01), left ventricular posterior wall (P = 0.013), and right ventricular (P = 0.01) and atrial diameters compared to control subjects. Rheumatoid factor and anti-CCP antibodies levels were significantly elevated in cases with ventricular dysfunction. Angina and myocardial infarction, diabetes, and dyslipidemia were the main risk factors for ventricular dysfunction. Conclusions. Ventricular dysfunction is common in rheumatoid arthritis and associated with longer disease duration and increased serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis. Screening for cardiac abnormalities should be considered in this kind of patients. PMID:24368945

  17. Rapidly Destructive Inflammatory Arthritis of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Ian; Wehrli, Bret; McCalden, Richard W.; Barra, Lillian

    2014-01-01

    Rapidly destructive coxarthrosis (RDC) is a rare syndrome that involves aggressive hip joint destruction within 6–12 months of symptom onset with no single diagnostic laboratory, pathological, or radiographic finding. We report an original case of RDC as an initial presentation of seronegative rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a 57-year-old Caucasian woman presenting with 6 months of progressive right groin pain and no preceding trauma or chronic steroid use. Over 5 months, she was unable to ambulate and plain films showed complete resorption of the right femoral head and erosion of the acetabulum. There were inflammatory features seen on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). She required a right total hip arthroplasty, but arthritis in other joints showed improvement with triple disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) therapy and almost complete remission with the addition of adalimumab. We contrast our case of RDC as an initial presentation of RA to 8 RDC case reports of patients with established RA. Furthermore, this case highlights the importance of obtaining serial imaging to evaluate a patient with persistent hip symptoms and rapid functional deterioration. PMID:25110599

  18. Total ankle replacement for posttraumatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Weme, Rebecca A Nieuwe; van Solinge, Guido; N Doornberg, Job; Sierevelt, Inger; Haverkamp, Daniël; Doets, H Cornelis

    2015-08-01

    Background and purpose - Most studies on total ankle replacement (TAR) have used a case mix of patients. We evaluated the outcome of TAR performed for end-stage arthritis either because of fracture or ligamentous injury. Patients and methods - We prospectively followed 88 consecutive patients (50 postfracture ankles and 40 ankles with instability arthritis (2 bilateral)) who underwent TAR between 2001 and 2009. Mean follow-up for both groups was 5 years. Results - Preoperative varus deformity of 10° or more was present in 23 ankles in the instability group. At 6 years, survival with revision or salvage fusion as an endpoint was 87% (95% CI: 74-99) in the postfracture group and 79% (95% CI: 63-94) in the instability group. Progressive periprosthetic osteolysis was seen in 23 ankles, and required salvage fusion in 6. The number of reoperations was similar in both groups. Clinical outcome, as assessed with 2 ankle scores and 2 questionnaires, showed good results and was similar at the latest follow-up. Interpretation - The outcome was similar in the postfracture and instability groups and also similar to that reported in series including a case mix of patients. In contrast to earlier reports, preoperative frontal plane deformity in this series was not identified as a risk factor for failure. PMID:25772269

  19. Managed care implications in managing rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Owens, Gary M

    2014-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory form of arthritis characterized by joint inflammation, pain, swelling, and stiffness. While contemporary treatment strategies based on early diagnosis, aggressive treatment, and regular monitoring have helped a significant number of patients achieve evidence-based treatment goals, RA still presents substantial management challenges to both clinicians and patients, and has the potential to lead to severe disability over time. In addition to its significant clinical consequences, RA has important economic implications. Both direct and indirect medical costs associated with RA are significant, including costs of medications, ambulatory and office-based care, and quality-of-life and productivity costs. In addition, a significant proportion of patients with prevalent RA have associated cardiovascular disease and other comorbidities, further compounding healthcare costs and complicating management of this disorder. Clinically favorable and cost-effective management must focus on prevention of disease progression and the improved patient health status and productivity than can result from optimal disease control. With the myriad of treatment options both available and emerging, managed care organizations are faced with difficult decisions surrounding the most clinically and cost-effective allocation of treatments designed to improve disease outcomes for patients with RA. It is vital that managed care clinicians and providers analyze both the overall burden and the specific costs of RA. This will allow a better understanding of how costs and issues relating to healthcare utilization affect the treatment of patients with RA and impact individualized therapy, care coordination, and outcomes. PMID:25180623

  20. Arthritis among veterans - United States, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Louise B; Helmick, Charles G; Allen, Kelli D; Theis, Kristina A; Baker, Nancy A; Murray, Glen R; Qin, Jin; Hootman, Jennifer M; Brady, Teresa J; Barbour, Kamil E

    2014-11-01

    Arthritis is among the most common chronic conditions among veterans and is more prevalent among veterans than nonveterans. Contemporary population-based estimates of arthritis prevalence among veterans are needed because previous population-based studies predate the Persian Gulf War, were small, or studied men only despite the fact that women comprise an increasing proportion of military personnel and typically have a higher prevalence of arthritis than men. To address this knowledge gap, CDC analyzed combined 2011, 2012, and 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data among all adults aged ?18 years, by veteran status, to estimate the total and sex-specific prevalence of doctor-diagnosed arthritis overall and by sociodemographic categories, and the state-specific prevalence (overall and sex-specific) of doctor-diagnosed arthritis. This report summarizes the results of these analyses, which found that one in four veterans reported that they had arthritis (25.6%) and that prevalence was higher among veterans than nonveterans across most sociodemographic categories, including sex (prevalence among male and female veterans was 25.0% and 31.3%, respectively). State-specific, age-standardized arthritis prevalence among veterans ranged from 18.8% in Hawaii to 32.7% in West Virginia. Veterans comprise a large and important target group for reducing the growing burden of arthritis. Those interested in veterans' health can help to improve the quality of life of veterans by ensuring that they have access to affordable, evidence-based, physical activity and self-management education classes that reduce the adverse effects of arthritis (e.g., pain and depression) and its common comorbidities (e.g., heart disease and diabetes). PMID:25375071

  1. Prevalence of arthritis in India and Pakistan: a review.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Ehtisham; Bilal, Saira; Kiani, Adnan; Haque, Uzma

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies of rheumatoid arthritis worldwide suggest that prevalence of arthritis is higher in Europe and North America than in developing countries. Prevalence data for major arthritis disorders have been compiled in West for several decades, but figures from the third world are just emerging. A coordinated effort by WHO and ILAR (International League Against Rheumatism) has resulted in collecting data for countries like Philippines, China, Malaysia, Indonesia, and rural South Africa but the information about prevalence of arthritis in India and Pakistan is scarce. Since both countries, i.e., India and Pakistan, share some ethnic identity, we reviewed published literature to examine the prevalence of arthritis in these countries. Medline and Pubmed were searched for suitable articles about arthritis from 1980 and onwards. Findings from these articles were reviewed and summarized. The prevalence, clinical features, and laboratory findings of rheumatoid arthritis are compiled for both India and Pakistan. Data collected from these two countries were compared with each other, and some of the characteristics of the disease were compared with Europe and North America. It is found to be quite similar to developed countries. Additionally, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is of different variety than reported in West. It is more of polyarticular onset type while in West pauciarticular predominates. Additionally, in systemic onset, JRA uveitis and ANA are common finding in developed countries; on the other hand, they are hardly seen in this region. Although the prevalence of arthritis in Pakistan and India is similar to Western countries, there are inherent differences (clinical features, laboratory findings) in the presentation of disease. The major strength of the study is that it is the first to pool reports to provide an estimate of the disease in the Indian subcontinent. Scarcity of data is one of the major limitations. This study helps to understand the pattern of disease in this part of country that can be stepping-stone for policy makers to draft policies that can affect target population more appropriately. PMID:21331574

  2. The clinical features of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Grassi, W; De Angelis, R; Lamanna, G; Cervini, C

    1998-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by progressive damage of synovial-lined joints and variable extra-articular manifestations. Tendon and bursal involvement are frequent and often clinically dominant in early disease. RA can affect any joint, but it is usually found in metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal and metatarsophalangeal joints, as well as in the wrists and knee. Articular and periarticular manifestations include joint swelling and tenderness to palpation, with morning stiffness and severe motion impairment in the involved joints. The clinical presentation of RA varies, but an insidious onset of pain with symmetric swelling of small joints is the most frequent finding. RA onset is acute or subacute in about 25% of patients, but its patterns of presentation also include palindromic onset, monoarticular presentation (both slow and acute forms), extra-articular synovitis (tenosynovitis, bursitis), polymyalgic-like onset, and general symptoms (malaise, fatigue, weight loss, fever). The palindromic onset is characterized by recurrent episodes of oligoarthritis with no residual radiologic damage, while the polymyalgic-like onset may be clinically indistinguishable from polymyalgia rheumatica in elderly subjects. RA is characteristically a symmetric erosive disease. Although any joint, including the cricoarytenoid joint, can be affected, the distal interphalangeal, the sacroiliac, and the lumbar spine joints are rarely involved. The clinical features of synovitis are particularly apparent in the morning. Morning stiffness in and around the joints, lasting at least 1 h before maximal improvement is a typical sign of RA. It is a subjective sign and the patient needs to be carefully informed as to the difference between pain and stiffness. Morning stiffness duration is related to disease activity. Hand involvement is the typical early manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis. Synovitis involving the metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal and wrist joints causes a characteristic tender swelling on palpation with early severe motion impairment and no radiologic evidence of bone damage. Fatigue, feveret, weight loss, and malaise are frequent clinical signs which can be associated with variable manifestations of extra-articular involvement such as rheumatoid nodules, vasculitis, hematologic abnormalities, Felty's syndrome, and visceral involvement. Although there is no laboratory test to exclude or prove the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, several laboratory abnormalities can be detected. Abnormal values of the tests for evaluation of systemic inflammation are the most typical humoral features of RA. These include: erythrocyte sedimentation rate, acute phase proteins and plasma viscosity. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein provide the best information about the acute phase response. The C-reactive protein is strictly correlated with clinical assessment and radiographic changes. Plain film radiography is the standard investigation to assess the extent of anatomic changes in rheumatoid arthritis patients. The radiographic features of the hand joints in early disease are characterized by soft tissue swelling and mild juxtaarticular osteoporosis. In the the past 10 years, ultrasonography has gained acceptance for studying joint, tendon and bursal involvement in RA. It may improve the early clinical assessment and the follow-up of these patients, showing such details as synovial thickening even within finger joints. Other imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance, computed tomography and scintigraphy may provide useful information about both the features and the extent for anatomic damage in selected rheumatoid arthritis patients. The natural history of the disease is poorly defined; its clinical course is fluctuating and the prognosis unpredictable. RA is an epidemiologically relevant cause of disability. An adequate early treatment of RA may alter the diseas PMID:9652497

  3. Ankylosed maxillary incisor with severe root resorption treated with a single-tooth dento-osseous osteotomy, vertical alveolar distraction osteogenesis, and mini-implant anchorage.

    PubMed

    Sen???k, Neslihan Ebru; Koçer, Gülperi; Kaya, Bulem Üreyen

    2014-09-01

    Dentoalveolar ankylosis interferes with the vertical growth of the alveolar process, which can lead to an open bite, an unesthetic smile, and occlusal disharmony. This case report presents a new treatment protocol for an ankylosed tooth with severe root resorption using a combined surgical orthodontic management protocol involving a single-tooth dento-osseous osteotomy and vertical alveolar distraction osteogenesis with intraoral elastics and mini-implant anchorage. After distraction and active orthodontic treatment, the patient's anterior open bite was corrected. A Class I dental relationship was achieved, overjet was decreased, and a normal incisor relationship was obtained. PMID:25172260

  4. Acute ocular myositis occurring under etanercept for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Couderc, Marion; Mathieu, Sylvain; Tournadre, Anne; Dubost, Jean-Jacques; Soubrier, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Ocular myositis is a rare disorder characterized by inflammation of single or multiple extra-ocular eye muscles presenting with painful diplopia and/or ophthalmoplegia. The etiology remains obscure and it is rarely associated with rheumatoid arthritis. We here reported the case of a 61-year-old woman treated by TNF-? blockade, namely etanercept, for rheumatoid arthritis for ten years who developed an acute ocular myositis. The patient improved after etanercept was stopped and initiation of high doses of corticosteroids. To our knowledge, this is the second report of ocular myositis occurring under TNF-? blockade treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24746476

  5. Streptococcus pyogenes Sternoclavicular Septic Arthritis in a Healthy Adult

    PubMed Central

    Savcic-Kos, Radmila M.; Mali, Padmavati; Abraham, Ajit; Issa, Meltiady; Rangu, Venu; Nasser, Rana

    2014-01-01

    Sternoclavicular septic arthritis is a rare infection, accounting for approximately 1% of septic arthritis in the general population. Staphylococcus aureus is the predominant etiologic agent, and it usually occurs in relatively young adults with some type of predisposition to infection. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of group A streptococcal, sternoclavicular arthritis in a previously healthy 62-year-old male patient. We present a detailed history and physical examination, with laboratory findings, imaging studies, cultures, and therapy. PMID:24667224

  6. Beyond the joint: Subclinical atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Scarno, Antongiulio; Perrotta, Fabio Massimo; Cardini, Francesca; Carboni, Alessia; Annibali, Gianmarco; Lubrano, Ennio; Spadaro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease associated with increased cardiovascular risk and higher mortality in respect to general population. Beyond joint disease, inflammation is the major determinant of accelerated atherosclerosis observed in rheumatoid arthritis. We review the relationship between inflammation, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk in rheumatoid arthritis, focusing on the assessment of subclinical atherosclerosis by functional and morphological methods. These tools include flow mediated dilatation, carotid intima-media thickness, ankle/brachial index, coronary calcium content, pulse wave analysis and serum biomarker of subclinical atherosclerosis. PMID:25035836

  7. Immune Tolerance Induction with Multiepitope Peptide Derived from Citrullinated Autoantigens Attenuates Arthritis Manifestations in Adjuvant Arthritis Rats.

    PubMed

    Gertel, Smadar; Serre, Guy; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Amital, Howard

    2015-06-15

    Citrullinated peptides are major targets of disease-specific autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis. Currently, citrullinated peptides are used as biomarkers for diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis by measuring anti-citrullinated protein Ab (ACPA) titers in patients' sera. The accumulation of citrullinated proteins at synovial inflammation sites suggests that they are possible targets for tolerance induction. The objective of the present study was to determine whether citrullinated peptides could induce tolerance in an experimental arthritis model in rats. In view of the multiplicity of target citrullinated autoantigens described for ACPA, we generated a multiepitope citrullinated peptide (Cit-ME), derived from major prevalent citrullinated autoantigens (citrullinated filaggrin, fibrinogen, vimentin, and collagen type II), and studied its effects on arthritic rats. Adjuvant-induced arthritis was induced in Lewis rats. Beginning at day 7 after disease induction, the rats received eight s.c. injections of Cit-ME on alternate days. Differences in clinical status and modulation of T cell populations were analyzed. In adjuvant-induced arthritis rats treated with Cit-ME, disease severity was significantly reduced compared with that of untreated rats. Moreover, amelioration of disease manifestations was related to an increased regulatory T cell subset and an elevated apoptosis rate of T cells associated with reduced Th17 cells. Thus, the use of citrullinated peptides-based immunotherapy may be a promising approach for tolerance induction in experimental arthritis and perhaps even in susceptible individuals that are ACPA-seropositive in human arthritis. PMID:25964493

  8. Treatment strategies in early rheumatoid arthritis and prevention of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Demoruelle, M Kristen; Deane, Kevin D

    2012-10-01

    Data now suggest that current strategies in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) should focus on early identification and diagnosis, followed by early initiation of DMARD therapy. Initiation of treatment in early RA-ideally, less than 3-6 months after symptom onset-improves the success of achieving disease remission and reduces joint damage and disability. While the optimal treatment regimen in early RA is unclear, use of initial DMARD mono- or combination therapy with prompt escalation to achieve low disease activity or remission is an appropriate approach. Ultimately, the goal of RA management should be the prevention of inflammatory joint disease and, thereby, prevention of disability. To date, studies have shown that pharmacologic interventions can delay progression from undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis to classifiable RA. However, further investigation is needed to identify asymptomatic individuals at high risk for future RA and to intervene early enough in the pathogenesis of RA to prevent progression to clinical disease. PMID:22773387

  9. Early treatment of psoriatic arthritis improves prognosis.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Maeve; Ostör, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic, autoimmune disease, affecting up to 1% of the adult population and up to 40% of those with psoriasis. There is no universally accepted definition or diagnostic criteria for the disease although the CASPAR classification of PsA is now the most widely used. PsA has a peak age of onset between 35 and 55 years with an equal gender distribution. Around 20% of patients develop PsA before psoriasis, often many years before skin or nail changes. Enthesitis, pain and tenderness at the insertion of any tendon onto the bone, is characteristic and screening for enthesitis should include palpation of the lateral epicondyle of the humerus, the medial condyle of the femur and the achilles tendon insertion. Diagnosis of PsA relies on a detailed history, particularly as many of the manifestations may be mild or transient, and therefore not reported by the patient. There may be a previous, current, or family history of psoriasis. There are no diagnostic blood tests for PsA. The presence of rheumatoid factor or anti-CCP antibodies does not preclude a diagnosis of PsA, but should prompt careful scrutiny of the diagnosis. X-rays of the hands and feet should be performed at baseline for all those with suspected inflammatory arthritis. Features of back pain that suggest an inflammatory cause, rather than a mechanical problem, include the presence of early morning stiffness and pain that is relieved by exercise and exacerbated by rest. Any patient with suspected inflammatory arthritis and a six-week history of painful, swollen joints should be referred for specialist assessment. Patients with PsA have a higher self-rated disease severity than those with psoriasis only and a 60% higher risk of premature mortality than the general population, their life expectancy is estimated to be approximately three years shorter. Aggressive treatment of early stage progressive PsA can substantially improve the long-term prognosis. PMID:25603589

  10. Glucocorticoid treatment in spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Fendler, C; Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2011-01-01

    Spondyloarthritides (SpA) are chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases that usually affect the axial skeleton and may involve entheses and peripheral joints. The main subtypes are ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Other subtypes are reactive arthritis, arthritis associated with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases and undifferentiated axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis. Although SpA were regarded as variants of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) until the 1970s, it is now well established that the pathogenesis of SpA is quite different from that of RA. There is a lack of good clinical studies on glucocorticoid therapy in the SpA. While there is no reasonable doubt that intraarticular local therapies in SpA are as effective as in RA and other forms of arthritis, the evidence for a systemic use is at best marginal. While very high doses may be effective in some patients with AS, the possible value of low-dose corticosteroid therapy in patients with PsA has never been well addressed, with respect to either clinical efficacy or inhibition of radiographic progression. Future studies are needed to clarify this important issue for usual patient care. PMID:22018200

  11. Drug Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis in Adults: An Update

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Players, and Plug-ins EHC Component EPC Project Topic Title Drug Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis in Adults: ... Review Jun. 1, 2012 Related Products for this Topic Research Protocol Dec. 6, 2010 Executive Summary Apr. ...

  12. Impairment and disability: Renoir's adaptive coping strategies against rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Evan; Chung, Kevin C

    2012-12-01

    Pierre-Auguste Renoir was one of the most influential painters in art history, but few people know that he suffered from debilitating rheumatoid arthritis. Despite his arthritis, he was able to maintain an incredible level of precision and efficiency with his painting. More importantly, he remained positive and did not let his condition affect his passion for painting or take away from the beauty that he saw in the world around him. Renoir applied a wide variety of coping mechanisms and used his ingenuity to come up with different ways to continue painting even as his arthritis weakened him. Renoir's long battle with rheumatoid arthritis serves as an inspiration to patients who experience the pain and limited mobility associated with this disease, encouraging them to persevere and to develop coping mechanisms that prevent the effects of their impairment from disabling them. PMID:24294153

  13. Common Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death Taking methotrexate—a commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory medication—may reduce ... diseases. Previous studies have suggested that treatment with methotrexate is associated with a lower risk of death ...

  14. Study Shows Arthritis' Toll on Work, Social Life

    MedlinePLUS

    ... fullstory_152907.html Study Shows Arthritis' Toll on Work, Social Life Joint disease plus other chronic health conditions ... chronic health conditions can often harm a person's social life and ability to work, a new study finds. About one in seven ...

  15. Treatment in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kasapçopur, Özgür; Barut, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of the childhood with the highest risk of disability. Active disease persists in the adulthood in a significant portion of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis despite many developments in the diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, initiation of efficient treatment in the early period of the disease may provide faster control of the inflammation and prevention of long-term harms. In recent years, treatment options have also increased in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis owing to biological medications. All biological medications used in children have been produced to target the etiopathogenesis leading to disease including anti-tumor necrosis factor, anti-interleukin 1 and anti-interleukin 6 drugs. In this review, scientific data about biological medications used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options will be discussed.

  16. Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis May Also Help Ease Vitiligo

    MedlinePLUS

    Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis May Also Help Ease Vitiligo Case study showed tofacitinib cleared up skin pigmentation ... treatment for the discoloring skin condition known as vitiligo. Vitiligo is characterized by a disfiguring loss of ...

  17. Septic arthritis of the shoulder in a dental patient.

    PubMed

    Dolin, Elana; Perlmutter, Leigh D; Segelnick, Stuart L; Weinberg, Mea A; Schoor, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Septic arthritis of the glenohumoral joint is rare following dental procedures, comprising approximately 3% of all joint infections. Septic arthritis following bacteremia from dental procedures is uncommon and generally occurs in prosthetic joints. Predisposing causes may include immunocompromising diseases such as diabetes, HIV infection, renal failure and intravenous drug abuse. We report a rare case of unilateral glenohumoral joint septic arthritis in a 60-year-old male patient (without a prosthetic joint) secondary to a dental procedure. The insidious nature of the presentation is highlighted. Septic arthritis infections, though rare, require a high level of clinical suspicion. Vague symptoms of shoulder pain may mask the initial diagnosis, as was the case in our patient. Incision and drainage via surgical intervention are often required, followed by parenteral antibiotics. PMID:25647886

  18. ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM Vol. 46, No. 4, April 2002, pp 11091120

    E-print Network

    Park, Jong-Sang

    , American College of Rheumatology Suppression of Collagen-Induced Arthritis by Single Administration of Poly-Nam St. Mary's Hospital, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic

  19. Endogenous galectin-1 exerts tonic inhibition on experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Asif J; Cooper, Dianne; Vugler, Alexander; Gittens, Beatrice R; Moore, Adrian; Perretti, Mauro

    2013-07-01

    Little is known about the role(s) of endogenous galectin-1 (Gal-1) in arthritis. In this study we queried whether antiarthritic functions for this effector of endogenous anti-inflammation could be unveiled by studying collagen-induced arthritis in Gal-1(-/-) mice. Gal-1(-/-) and C57BL/6J [wild-type (WT)] mice received an immunization of chicken type II collagen (CII) in CFA followed by a booster on day 21, which consisted of CII in IFA. Animals were monitored for signs of arthritis from day 14 onward. Clinical and histological signs of arthritis were recorded, and humoral and cellular immune responses against CII were analyzed. A distinct disease penetrance was apparent, with ~ 70% of Gal-1(-/-) mice developing arthritis compared with ~ 50% in WT animals. Gal-1(-/-) mice also exhibited an accelerated disease onset and more severe arthritis characterized by significantly elevated clinical scores. Postmortem analyses (day 42) revealed higher levels of IgG1 and IgG2b anti-CII Ig isotypes in the serum of Gal-1 null animals compared with WT. Finally, T cell responses following ex vivo stimulation with CII revealed a greater degree of proliferation in T cells of Gal-1(-/-) mice compared with WT, which was associated with increased production of IL-17 and IL-22. These data suggest the novel idea that endogenous Gal-1 is an inhibitory factor in the development of arthritis affecting disease severity. We have also highlighted the importance of endogenous Gal-1 in regulating T cell reactivity during experimental arthritis. PMID:23720814

  20. Effect and mechanism of AR6 in experimental rheumatoid arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shi-xue Sun; Yun-man Li; Wei-rong Fang; Peng Cheng; Lifang Liu; Fengwen Li

    2010-01-01

    The root of Clematis chinensis Osbeck has been used widely in rheumatoid arthritis in Chinese traditional medicine and AR-6 is a triterpene saponin isolated from\\u000a it. In this present study, we investigated in vivo effects of oral AR-6 in chronic rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA) and\\u000a in vitro effect in macrophage and synoviocytes cells. Arthritic scores and serum inflammatory mediators were

  1. Serum Levels of Hyaluronic Acid in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Elkayam; I. Yaron; I. Shirazi; M. Yaron; D. Caspi

    2000-01-01

    :   The purpose of this study was to evaluate the serum levels of hyaluronic acid (HA) in a group of patients with psoriatic\\u000a arthritis (PsA), with special emphasis on the relationships between HA levels and clinical parameters of joint and skin activity.\\u000a Thirty-four patients with PsA, 34 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 49 healthy volunteers participated in the study.

  2. Rubens and the question of antiquity of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Appelboom, T; de Boelpaepe, C; Ehrlich, G E; Famaey, J P

    1981-02-01

    Analysis of the hands in paintings attributed to Peter Paul Rubens during the last 30 years of his life seems to show progressive rheumatoid arthritis. Not only does this suggest that rheumatoid arthritis was present at the time, 200 years before some modern authors are willing to date its appearance, but also that Rubens or a major and consistent collaborator suffered from the disease. PMID:7005475

  3. Peptides targeting inflamed synovial vasculature attenuate autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Hua; Rajaiah, Rajesh; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, frequently target one major tissue/organ despite the systemic nature of the immune response. This is particularly perplexing in the case of ubiquitously distributed antigens invoked in arthritis induction. We reasoned that selective targeting of the synovial joints in autoimmune arthritis might be due in part to the unique attributes of the joint vasculature. We examined this proposition using the adjuvant-induced arthritis model of human rheumatoid arthritis, and profiled the synovial vasculature using ex vivo and in vivo screening of a defined phage peptide-display library. We identified phage that preferentially homed to the inflamed joints. The corresponding synthetic peptides showed binding to the joint-derived endothelial cells, as well as specificity in inhibiting binding of the respective phage to the synovial vasculature. Intriguingly, the treatment of arthritic rats with one such peptide resulted in efficient inhibition of the progression of arthritis. The suppression of arthritis was attributable in part to the peptide-induced reduction of T-cell trafficking into the joints and the inhibition of angiogenesis. This peptide differed in sequence, in receptor binding specificity, and in angiogenesis/inflammation-related cell signaling from the previously characterized arginine-glycine-aspartic acid–containing peptide. Thus, our study reveals joint-homing peptides that can be further exploited for the selective delivery of antiarthritic agents into the inflamed joints to enhance their efficacy while reducing systemic toxicity, and also for examining intricacies of the pathogenesis of arthritis. This approach can be customized for application to other organ-specific autoimmune diseases as well. PMID:21768392

  4. The arthritis of Behçet's disease: a prospective study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Yurdakul; H Yazici; Y Tüzün; H Pazarli; B Yalçin; M Altaç; Y Ozyazgan; N Tüzüner; A Müftüo?lu

    1983-01-01

    A prospective study of arthritis was performed in 47 patients with Behçet's disease followed up over a 47-month period (mean 19.25 months, SD 14.09). These patients had a total of 80 episodes of arthritis, which were analysed for joint distribution and symmetry, in 56 of which the duration could also be determined. Attacks were oligoarticular, affecting up to 4 joints

  5. Vitamin D receptor regulates TNF-mediated arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karin Zwerina; Wolfgang Baum; Roland Axmann; Gisela Ruiz Heiland; Jörg H Distler; Josef Smolen; Silvia Hayer; Jochen Zwerina; Georg Schett

    2011-01-01

    ObjectiveReduced vitamin D intake has been linked to increased susceptibility to develop rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased disease activity in RA patients. The pathophysiological role of vitamin D in joint inflammation is, however, unclear.MethodsTo determine the influence of absent vitamin D signalling in chronic arthritis, vitamin D receptor (VDR)-deficient mice were crossed with human

  6. Animal models of rheumatoid arthritis and related inflammation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bina Joe; Marie M. Griffiths; Elaine F. Remmers; Ronald L. Wilder

    1999-01-01

    The major, extensively studied, experimentally-induced rat and mouse models of arthritis with features resembling rheumatoid\\u000a arthritis are reviewed here. Etiopathogenetic studies that were recently published are emphasized. In summary, multiple triggering\\u000a stimuli can induce disease in genetically-prone strains of inbred rats and mice. Multiple genetic loci, including both MHC\\u000a and non-MHC, regulate disease expression in these animals. By comparison with

  7. Pathogenic mechanisms of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. G. Mdurvwa; P. O. Ogunbiyi; H. S. Gakou; P. G. Reddy

    1994-01-01

    Goats infected with caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) show chronic arthritis and cachexia, which are progressive in nature. The immunopathogenic mechanisms responsible for these progressive clinical symptoms have not been fully elucidated. Various haematological and immunological parameters were evaluated in experimentally-infected goats showing typical signs of CAEV-induced disease. Infected goats showed recurrent lymphocytosis that may be due to constant presentation of

  8. Racial and ethnic disparities in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    McBurney, Christine A; Vina, Ernest R

    2012-10-01

    Racial and ethnic health disparities are a national health issue. They are well described in other chronic diseases, but in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), research into their causes, outcomes, and elimination is in its early stages. Health disparities occur in a complex milieu, with system-level, provider-level, and individual-level factors playing roles. Dissecting the overlapping aspects of race/ethnicity, socioeconomic variables, and how their individual components combine to explain the magnitude of disparities in RA can be challenging. Recent research has focused on the extent to which treatment preferences, adherence, trust in physicians, patient-physician communication, health literacy, and depression have contributed to observed disparities in RA. Practicing evidence-based medicine, improving patient-physician communication skills, reducing language and literacy barriers, improving adherence to therapies, raising awareness of racial/ethnic disparities, and recognizing comorbidities such as depression are steps clinicians may take to help eliminate racial/ethnic disparities in RA. PMID:22773376

  9. Impact of rheumatoid arthritis on sexual function

    PubMed Central

    Tristano, Antonio G

    2014-01-01

    Sexuality is a complex aspect of the human being’s life and is more than just the sexual act. Normal sexual functioning consists of sexual activity with transition through the phases from arousal to relaxation with no problems, and with a feeling of pleasure, fulfillment and satisfaction. Rheumatic diseases may affect all aspects of life including sexual functioning. The reasons for disturbing sexual functioning are multifactorial and comprise disease-related factors as well as therapy. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by progressive joint destruction resulting from chronic synovial inflammation. It leads to various degrees of disability, and ultimately has a profound impact on the social, economic, psychological, and sexual aspects of the patient’s life. This is a systemic review about the impact of RA on sexual functioning. PMID:24829873

  10. Autoantibodies to Posttranslational Modifications in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Burska, Agata N.; Hunt, Laura; Strollo, Rocky; Ryan, Brent J.; Vital, Ed; Nissim, Ahuva; Winyard, Paul G.; Emery, Paul; Ponchel, Frederique

    2014-01-01

    Autoantibodies have been associated with human pathologies for a long time, particularly with autoimmune diseases (AIDs). Rheumatoid factor (RF) is known since the late 1930s to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The discovery of anticitrullinated protein antibodies in the last century has changed this and other posttranslational modifications (PTM) relevant to RA have since been described. Such PTM introduce neoepitopes in proteins that can generate novel autoantibody specificities. The recent recognition of these novel specificities in RA provides a unique opportunity to understand human B-cell development in vivo. In this paper, we will review the three of the main classes of PTMs already associated with RA: citrullination, carbamylation, and oxidation. With the advancement of research methodologies it should be expected that other autoantibodies against PTM proteins could be discovered in patients with autoimmune diseases. Many of such autoantibodies may provide significant biomarker potential. PMID:24782594

  11. Adipokines as Potential Biomarkers in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Del Prete, Annalisa; Salvi, Valentina; Sozzani, Silvano

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by severe joint injury. Recently, research has been focusing on the possible identification of predictor markers of disease onset and/or progression, of joint damage, and of therapeutic response. Recent findings have uncovered the role of white adipose tissue as a pleiotropic organ not only specialized in endocrine functions but also able to control multiple physiopathological processes, including inflammation. Adipokines are a family of soluble mediators secreted by white adipose tissue endowed with a wide spectrum of actions. This review will focus on the recent advances on the role of the adipokine network in the pathogenesis of RA. A particular attention will be devoted to the action of these proteins on RA effector cells, and on the possibility to use circulating levels of adipokines as potential biomarkers of disease activity and therapeutic response. PMID:24799765

  12. Comprehensive treatment of dactylitis in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rose, Shawn; Toloza, Sergio; Bautista-Molano, Wilson; Helliwell, Philip S

    2014-11-01

    Dactylitis, a hallmark clinical feature of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and other spondyloarthropathies, may also be a severity marker for PsA and psoriasis. Traditionally, clinicians have used nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and local corticosteroid injections to treat dactylitis, although conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are also used. We performed a systematic literature review to determine the most efficacious current treatment options for dactylitis in PsA. Effect sizes were greatest for the biologic agents ustekinumab, certolizumab, and infliximab, suggesting that therapy with one of these agents should be initiated in patients with dactylitis. However, the limited data highlight the need for randomized, placebo-controlled trials, with dactylitis as a primary outcome, to determine a valid, reliable, and responsive clinical outcome measure for PsA patients with dactylitis. PMID:25362714

  13. Cicatricial Ectropion Secondary to Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gracitelli, Carolina P. B.; Osaki, Tammy Hentona; Valdrighi, Natalia Yumi; Viana, Giovanni André Pires; Osaki, Midori Hentona

    2015-01-01

    Ectropion is characterized by the eversion of the eyelid margin and the consequent exposure of the conjunctiva and cornea. The shortening of the anterior lamella of the lid causes cicatricial ectropion. We described a case of skin pathology causing cicatricial ectropion. The case is about a 68-year-old woman with a 2-year history of psoriatic arthritis. She complained of eyelid tearing and redness for two years. Due to the psoriasis, she presented a very dry skin, also in the periocular region, resulting in cicatricial ectropion. A skin graft was indicated to correct the eyelid malposition. Careful investigation should be performed in patients who have a skin disease that can lead to cicatricial ectropion. PMID:25810938

  14. Leucocyte superoxide dismutase in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, A A; Baron, D N

    1983-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was measured in polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNLs) and mononuclear cells (MNCs) from 60 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in 15 controls. In all patients and controls SOD activity (U/mg protein) in MNCs was twice that in PMNLs. SOD activity in PMNLs and in MNCs from patients with RA was significantly higher than that in controls. SOD activity in PMNLs (but not in MNCs) from patients treated with corticosteroids was significantly higher than that from patients treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. There was no relation between SOD activity in both PMNLs and MNCs and either the patients' age, sex, duration of disease, serum immunoglobulin concentration, IgM rheumatoid factor, and copper level, or the degree of disease activity. PMID:6625704

  15. MicroRNAs in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ceribelli, Angela; Nahid, Md A.; Satoh, Minoru; Chan, Edward K.L.

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and severe autoimmune disease that affects joint tissues, bone, and cartilage. However, the pathogenesis of RA is still unclear. Autoantibodies such as rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide are useful tools for early diagnosis, monitoring disease activity, and predicting prognosis. Recently, many groups have focused their attention on the role of microRNAs in the pathogenesis of RA, as well as a potential biomarker to monitor RA. In fact, the expression of some microRNAs, such as miR-146a, is upregulated in different cell types and tissues in RA patients. MicroRNAs in RA could also be considered as possible future targets for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:21600203

  16. Moving towards personalized medicine in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Tamarah D; Vosslamber, Saskia; Verweij, Cornelis L

    2014-01-01

    To develop personalized medicine strategies for improvement of patient management in rheumatoid arthritis, the clinical and molecular properties of the individual patients need to be well characterized. A crucial step in this approach is to discover subgroups of patients that are characterized by a good or poor treatment outcome. Dennis and colleagues have identified distinct pretreatment gene expression profiles in affected synovial tissue specimens and a tissue type-related systemic protein pattern which are associated with a positive or negative clinical outcome to monotherapy with adalumimab (anti-TNF?) and tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor). These observations assign biological pathways associated with response outcome and provide evidence for the existence of systemic,easy-to-measure predictive biomarkers for clinical benefit of these biologics. PMID:25166016

  17. Light scattering study of rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Beuthan, J; Netz, U; Minet, O; Mueller, G [Institut fur Medizinische Physik/Laser-medizin, Freie Universitat Berlin, Universitaetsklinikum Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Klose, Annerose D; Hielscher, A H [Columbia University, New York (United States); Scheel, A [Department of Medicine, Nephrology and Rheumatology, Georg-August-University, Goettingen (Germany); Henniger, J [Department of Physics, Technical University Dresden (Germany)

    2002-11-30

    The distribution of light scattered by finger joints is studied in the near-IR region. It is shown that variations in the optical parameters of the tissue (scattering coefficient {mu}{sub s}, absorption coefficient {mu}{sub a}, and anisotropy factor g) depend on the presence of the rheumatoid arthritis (RA). At the first stage, the distribution of scattered light was measured in diaphanoscopic experiments. The convolution of a Gaussian error function with the scattering phase function proved to be a good approximation of the data obtained. Then, a new method was developed for the reconstruction of distribution of optical parameters in the finger cross section. Model tests of the quality of this reconstruction method show good results. (laser biology and medicine)

  18. Autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis: a review.

    PubMed

    Mewar, D; Wilson, A G

    2006-12-01

    Emerging insights into the importance of B cells in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as highlighted by the efficacy of B cell depletion is one factor that has contributed to the upsurge of interest in the potential role of autoantibodies both as disease markers and with respect to a pathogenic role. Since the initial description of rheumatoid factor (RF), a large number of both disease-specific and non-specific autoantibodies have been described in patients with RA including antibodies to type II collagen (CII), immunoglobulin binding protein (BiP) and antibodies directed at citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP) and other citrullinated proteins such as vimentin (anti-Sa) . Despite some overlap the serological profile of RA does appear to be distinct from other diseases such as SLE . Although the precise mechanisms responsible for the formation of these antibodies have not been well defined their presence must reflect the interaction between T and B cells believed to be relevant to the pathogenesis of RA. The specificity of the association of such factors as anti-CCP and anti-BiP with RA may reflect unique pathogenic events leading to the processing and presentation of the "cryptic self" . Ease of measurement and stability make autoantibodies attractive diagnostic and prognostic markers particularly in early disease when it may be difficult to distinguish self-limiting synovitis from persistent disease . The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of the spectrum of autoantibodies thus far characterised in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis, and discuss their diagnostic, prognostic and pathogenetic relevance. PMID:17064873

  19. Borrelia burgdorferi arthritis-associated locus Bbaa1 regulates Lyme arthritis and K/B×N serum transfer arthritis through intrinsic control of type I IFN production.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Bramwell, Kenneth K C; Lochhead, Robert B; Paquette, Jackie K; Zachary, James F; Weis, John H; Teuscher, Cory; Weis, Janis J

    2014-12-15

    Localized upregulation of type I IFN was previously implicated in development of Borrelia burgdorferi-induced arthritis in C3H mice, and was remarkable due to its absence in the mildly arthritic C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Independently, forward genetics analysis identified a quantitative trait locus on Chr4, termed B. burgdorferi-associated locus 1 (Bbaa1), that regulates Lyme arthritis severity and includes the 15 type I IFN genes. Involvement of Bbaa1 in arthritis development was confirmed in B6 mice congenic for the C3H allele of Bbaa1 (B6.C3-Bbaa1), which developed more severe Lyme arthritis and K/B×N model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) than did parental B6 mice. Administration of a type I IFN receptor blocking mAb reduced the severity of both Lyme arthritis and RA in B6.C3-Bbaa1 mice, formally linking genetic elements within Bbaa1 to pathological production of type I IFN. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from Bbaa1 congenic mice implicated this locus as a regulator of type I IFN induction and downstream target gene expression. Bbaa1-mediated regulation of IFN-inducible genes was upstream of IFN receptor-dependent amplification; however, the overall magnitude of the response was dependent on autocrine/paracrine responses to IFN-?. In addition, the Bbaa1 locus modulated the functional phenotype ascribed to bone marrow-derived macrophages: the B6 allele promoted expression of M2 markers, whereas the C3H allele promoted induction of M1 responses. This report identifies a genetic locus physically and functionally linked to type I IFN that contributes to the pathogenesis of both Lyme and RA. PMID:25378596

  20. Spontaneous hyphema associated with anterior uveitis.

    PubMed Central

    Fong, D S; Raizman, M B

    1993-01-01

    Few reports have described hyphema in association with anterior uveitis. Five cases of anterior chamber haemorrhage are reported in patients with five different anterior uveitic entities: Reiter's syndrome, juvenile chronic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, idiopathic anterior uveitis, and herpes simplex. Hyphema has been reported in association with idiopathic non-granulomatous anterior uveitis, but not with the other four entities. In three cases, iris rubeosis was present. In two cases the patients were taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. The hyphemas occurred at times of heightened inflammation and resolved spontaneously without complication in all but one case, a boy with idiopathic uveitis who required surgery to remove the blood. The clinical outcome of these cases provides evidence that conservative medical management is usually sufficient. Images PMID:8218031

  1. Spondyloarthritis and smoking: towards a new insight into the disease.

    PubMed

    Wendling, Daniel; Prati, Clément

    2013-06-01

    In spondyloarthritis, smoking was found in several studies from the literature to be associated with earlier onset, more severe disease in activity, function, quality of life and imaging (inflammatory and structural lesions), sometimes in a dose-dependent manner. Smoking is also associated with elevated inflammatory biologic parameters (e.g., C-reactive protein). Periodontitis, associated with smoking, is more frequent in patients with ankylosing spondylitis as compared with controls. This periodontal disease may favor citrullination, as in rheumatoid arthritis. Citrullinated vimentin has been demonstrated to be associated with radiographic damage. In this line, smoking was found to be associated with matrix metalloproteinase levels, which is also a predictive factor for spinal radiographic progression. Finally, smoking has a negative influence on bronchopulmonary and cardiovascular outcomes, already impaired by the disease itself. Smoking represents a target for therapeutic impact and disease modification in spondyloarthritis. PMID:23730882

  2. How do patients with rheumatic disease experience their relationship with their doctors? A qualitative study of experiences of stress and support in the doctor-patient relationship.

    PubMed

    Haugli, Liv; Strand, Elin; Finset, Arnstein

    2004-02-01

    This study is evaluated what patients with rheumatic disease perceive as important in their medical encounters. We interviewed two groups of patients: one with a well-defined inflammatory condition (rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or ankylosing spondylitis) (n = 12) and one with non-inflammatory widespread chronic pain such as fibromyalgia (n = 14). Both groups focused on their relationship to their doctor. Two central themes emerged as of importance: 'to be seen' and 'to be believed'. However, these themes had different connotations for the two groups. For the patients with inflammatory conditions, 'to be seen' implied being seen as an individual and not as a mere diagnosis, and 'to be believed' as far as pain and suffering were concerned. For patients with non-inflammatory chronic pain 'to be seen' and 'to be believed' primarily implied being able to obtain a useful somatic diagnosis. Practical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:15132522

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... In an autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system turns against parts of the body it is ... In an autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system turns against parts of the body it is ...

  4. New Insights Found in Pain Processing and Sleep Disturbance Among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2013 New Insights Found in Pain Processing and Sleep Disturbance Among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients People with rheumatoid ... in the journal Arthritis and Rheumatism. In addition, sleep disruptions, which are common among people with RA, ...

  5. Torilin ameliorates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Endale, Mehari; Lee, Whi Min; Kwak, Yi-Seong; Kim, Na-Mi; Kim, Bok-Kyu; Kim, Seung-Hyung; Cho, Jaeyoul; Kim, Suk; Park, Seung-Chun; Yun, Bong-Sik; Ko, Dukhwan; Rhee, Manhee

    2013-06-01

    Advancements in rheumatoid-arthritis-(RA) therapies have shown considerable progresses in the comprehension of disease. However, the development of new potential agents with relative safety and efficacy continues and natural compounds have been considered as alternatives to identify new entities. Since previous in-vivo data and our in-vitro findings showed that torilin has a strong anti-inflammatory property, we further investigated its effect against collagen-induced-arthritis-(CIA) in mice. CIA-induced DBA/1J mice were treated with torilin or methotrexate (MTX) for 5-weeks. Arthritis severity was evaluated by arthritic score and joint histopathology. Draining lymph node (dLN), joint and peripheral-blood mononuclear-cell (PBMC) counts, and activation/localization of T-/B-lymphocytes, dendritic cells (DCs) and neutrophils were examined by FACS analysis. Serum anti-type-II-collagen-(CII) antibody levels and cultured-splenocyte and serum cytokines were also evaluated. Torilin markedly reduced CIA-induced arthritic score, histopathology and leukocyte counts. Besides, torilin suppressed CIA-activated T-cells including CD3+, CD3+/CD69+, CD8+, CD4+ and CD4+/CD25+ in dLNs or joints. It also modified CD19+ or CD20+/CD23+ (B-cells), MHCII+/CD11c+ (DCs) and Gr-1+/CD11b+ (neutrophil) subpopulations. It further depressed total anti-CII-IgG, anti-CII-IgG1 and anti-CII-IgG2a antibody productions. Moreover, while IFN-? and IL-10 were not affected, torilin suppressed CIA-induced serum TNF-?, IL-1? and IL-6 levels. Interestingly, torilin also blocked IFN-?, IL-17 and IL-6 cytokines while it did not affect IL-10 but enhanced IL-4 in splenocytes. These results show that torilin attenuated arthritis severity, modified leukocyte activations in dLNs or joints, and restored serum and splenocyte cytokine imbalances. Torilin may have immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties with the capacity to ameliorate the inflammatory response in CIA-mice. PMID:23623942

  6. Antibodies to mutated citrullinated vimentin for diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis in anti-CCP-negative patients and for monitoring infliximab therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nicaise Roland, Pascale; Grootenboer Mignot, Sabine; Bruns, Alessandra; Hurtado, Margarita; Palazzo, Elisabeth; Hayem, Gilles; Dieudé, Philippe; Meyer, Olivier; Chollet Martin, Sylvie

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCPs) are useful for diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Antibodies to mutated citrullinated vimentin (MCV) were described recently in RA. The aims of this study were to evaluate the usefulness of anti-MCV for diagnosing RA in anti-CCP-negative patients and to monitor anti-MCV titres during infliximab therapy for RA. Methods We studied two groups of RA patients, one with (n = 80) and one without (n = 76) anti-CCP antibodies. The specificity of anti-MCV was evaluated by investigating 50 healthy controls and 158 patients with other rheumatic diseases (51 psoriatic rheumatism, 58 primary Sjögren syndrome, and 49 ankylosis spondylitis). Serum anti-MCV and anti-CCP titres were measured in 23 patients after 6, 12, 18, and 24 months of infliximab treatment. Anti-CCP2 and anti-MCV levels were assayed using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IgM rheumatoid factor was determined by nephelometry. Results In accordance with the cutoff values recommended by the manufacturer, the specificity of anti-MCV antibodies was 90.9%. We adjusted the cutoff values to obtain the same specificity as that of anti-CCP antibodies (94.2%). With this optimal cutoff, anti-MCV antibodies were found in 11.8% (9/76) of RA patients without anti-CCP, and similarly, anti-CCP antibodies were found in 11.2% (9/80) of RA patients without anti-MCV. Anti-MCV antibodies were positive in 6 patients who tested negative for both anti-CCP and rheumatoid factor. Anti-MCV titres were significantly decreased after 18 and 24 months of infliximab therapy compared with baseline (P < 0.01) as a significant decrease of anti-CCP levels occurred only at 24 months (P < 0.04). Moreover, an anti-MCV decrease was significantly associated with DAS28 (disease activity score using 28 joint counts) improvements 12 months into therapy. Conclusions Our results suggest that anti-MCV antibodies may be valuable for diagnosing RA in anti-CCP-negative patients without replacing them as an equivalent number of anti-CCP-positive RA patients test negative for anti-MCV. Moreover, anti-MCV antibodies could be useful for monitoring the effects of infliximab therapy. PMID:19077182

  7. Psoriatic arthritis of the temporomandibular joints with ankylosis. Literature review and case reports.

    PubMed

    Koorbusch, G F; Zeitler, D L; Fotos, P G; Doss, J B

    1991-03-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is currently defined as psoriasis associated with chronic, erosive inflammatory arthritis, which is seronegative for rheumatoid factor. A review of the etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment is accompanied by two unusual case reports of psoriatic arthritis affecting the temporomandibular joints with ankylosis. PMID:2011347

  8. Randomised, blinded, placebo controlled trial of doxycycline for chronic seronegative arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Smieja; D W MacPherson; W Kean; M L Schmuck; C H Goldsmith; W Buchanan; L E Hart; J B Mahony

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVETo determine whether long term doxycycline improves symptoms in patients with chronic seronegative or reactive arthritis.METHODSA randomised, triple blind, controlled clinical trial of three months' treatment with doxycycline or placebo of patients with chronic reactive or seronegative arthritis was conducted. The primary study end points were three month pain and functional status measured by a self administered Arthritis Impact Measurement

  9. Bacterial Cell Wall-Induced Arthritis: Chemical Composition and Tissue Distribution of Four Lactobacillus Strains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Rimpilainen; L. Lehtonen; X. Zhang; P. Toivanen

    2000-01-01

    To study what determines the arthritogenicity of bacterial cell walls, cell wall-induced arthritis in the rat was applied, using four strains of Lactobacillus. Three of the strains used proved to induce chronic arthritis in the rat; all were Lactobacillus casei. The cell wall of Lactobacillus fermentum did not induce chronic arthritis. All arthritogenic bacterial cell walls had the same peptidoglycan

  10. Direct and buffer effects of social support and personal coping resources in individuals with arthritis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brenda W. J. H. Penninx; Theo Van Tilburg; Dorly J. H. Deeg; Didi M. W. Kriegsman; A. Joan P. Boeke; Jacques T. M. Van Eijk

    1997-01-01

    The direct and buffer effects of various aspects of social support and personal coping resources on depressive symptoms were examined. The study concerned a community-based sample of 1690 older persons aged 55–85 yrs, of whom 719 had no chronic disease, 612 had mild arthritis and 359 had severe arthritis. Persons with arthritis reported more depressive symptoms than persons with no

  11. Acute sarcoid arthritis: occurrence, seasonal onset, clinical features and outcome.

    PubMed

    Glennås, A; Kvien, T K; Melby, K; Refvem, O K; Andrup, O; Karstensen, B; Thoen, J E

    1995-01-01

    In a 2-yr prospective follow-up study of patients presenting clinically with possible reactive arthritis (ReA), 17 (9%) of the patients turned out to have acute sarcoid arthritis (SA). The number of new cases of SA per year was 2.9/100,000 persons in the city of Oslo between 18 and 60 yr of age. The onset of SA clustered in the spring. All the SA patients presented with bilateral ankle joint involvement and bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, and ten (59%) presented with the triad of erythema nodosum, arthritis and lung involvement. A prospective follow-up after 104 weeks showed complete remission of arthritis in all 17 cases of SA. The total duration of arthritis [median (range)] was 11 (2-107) weeks. Erythema nodosum was mild and transient in all cases. At week 104, the lung and hilar manifestations had resolved. We conclude that the outcome of SA appeared favourable. Bilateral ankle joint involvement, erythema nodosum and bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy found at the routine chest X-ray examination are important clues for the diagnosis of SA. PMID:7881838

  12. Divergent T-Cell Cytokine Patterns in Inflammatory Arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A. K.; Seipelt, E.; Sieper, J.

    1994-08-01

    A major immunoregulatory mechanism in inflammatory infections and allergic diseases is the control of the balance of cytokines secreted by Th1/Th2 subsets of T helper (Th) cells. This might also be true in autoimmune diseases; a Th2 pattern that prevents an effective immune response in infections with intracellular bacteria may favor immunosuppression in autoimmune diseases. The pattern of cytokine expression was compared in the synovial tissue from patients with a typical autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and with a disorder with similar synovial pathology but driven by persisting exogenous antigen, reactive arthritis. We screened 12 rheumatoid and 9 reactive arthritis synovial tissues by PCR and in situ hybridization for their expression of T-cell cytokines. The cytokine pattern differs significantly between the two diseases; rheumatoid arthritis samples express a Th1-like pattern whereas in reactive arthritis interferon ? expression is accompanied by that of interleukin 4. Studying the expression of cytokines by in situ hybridization confirmed the results found by PCR; they also show an extremely low frequency of cytokine-transcribing cells. In a double-staining experiment, it was demonstrated that interleukin 4 is made by CD4 cells. These experiments favor the possibility of therapeutic intervention in inflammatory rheumatic diseases by means of inhibitory cytokines.

  13. [Diagnosis of crystal-induced arthritis].

    PubMed

    Lioté, Frédéric

    2011-09-01

    Crystal-induced arthritis (CIA) is easy to diagnose as soon as the physician might suspect the diagnosis. Indeed, CIA can be readily ascertained since one single gold standard is available: identification of microcrystals in synovial fluid or in other materials (tophus, synovial tissue biopsy, periarticular tissues). It is therefore mandatory to perform joint aspiration and to get synovial fluid sample for microscopic examination. Monosodium urate crystals are the key feature of gout, and calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) crystals are associated with CPP disease, also called "chondrocalcinosis" in France. Diagnosis of gout can be readily suspected when considering typical clinical presentations such as podagra, presence of tophi, cardiovascular comorbidities, and diuretics use. Plain radiographs, as long as technical quality is present, are an easy way to suspect and eventually to diagnose CPP disease or apatite deposits in any articular or periarticular site. Joint ultrasonography when performed by skilled physicians can easily help in displaying crystal deposits at the cartilage surface (gout) or within the cartilage (CPP), along with peri-tophaceous inflammatory reaction as evidenced by power Doppler. PMID:21816563

  14. Genetics of neuroendocrine factors in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mravcova, M; Chovanova, L; Paulikova, L; Vlcek, M; Rovensky, J; Killinger, Z; Wendl, J; Imrich, R

    2015-06-01

    Inadequate production of cortisol related to inflammation and decrease in adrenal androgen production are hallmarks of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-related endocrine findings in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In particular, lower dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels were consistently found in a subset of premenopausal RA females. Recently, several new gene variants have been identified in association with serum DHEAS concentrations, such as in SULT2A1 and HHEX genes. These DHEAS-related genes and other variants involved in HPA regulation may play a role in the adrenal androgen deficiency in RA. The aim of our study was to review involvement of genetic mechanisms of HPA regulation, with focus on adrenal androgens, in the context of RA pathophysiology. Although, effects of the DHEAS-related gene variants appear to be relatively small compared to other well-known factors such as age, complex interactions between DHEAS-associated genotypes and adrenal androgen hypofunction phenotype may exist in RA. Further studies analyzing specific neuroendocrine phenotype/genotype in RA are needed. PMID:25502945

  15. Arthritis in a glyptodont (Mammalia, Xenarthra, Cingulata).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Fernando Henrique de Souza; Porpino, Kleberson de Oliveira; Fragoso, Ana Bernadete Lima; Oliveira, Edison Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Arthritic lesions have been frequently diagnosed in the fossil record, with spondyloarthropathy (a type of erosive and pan-mammalian arthritis) being one of the most common types described to date for mammals, though not restricted to this group. Here, we identify spondyloarthropathy in fossil bones from the late Pleistocene in Brazil assignable to a large glyptodont individual. Bone erosions in the peripheral joints (viz., the ulna, radius, left femur and tibiae-fibulae) associated with osteosclerosis allow the diagnosis of spondyloarthropathy. The presence of osteophytes in seven bones of the forelimbs (viz., the ulna and radius) and hind limbs (viz., the tibiae-fibulae, left femur and patellae) and a subchondral cyst in one element (viz., the left femur) indicate secondary osteoarthritis. A calcified deposition on the articular surface of the left patella indicates the presence of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, which, like the observed osteoarthritic alterations, likely represents a complication of spondyloarthropathy. This is the first report of spondyloarthropathy for xenarthrans. PMID:24551126

  16. ACPA and bone loss in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kocijan, Roland; Harre, Ulrike; Schett, Georg

    2013-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease characterized by bone loss. Degree of inflammation and autoantibody positivity have both been identified as important initiators of skeletal damage in RA. Whereas it is well appreciated that inflammation initiates bone loss via the action of cytokines, the effect of autoantibodies in initiating bone destruction has long been underestimated. It has, nonetheless, been known for years that antibodies against citrullinated proteins (ACPA) and rheumatoid factor are associated with a more destructive disease course. It was recently shown that ACPA bind osteoclast precursor cells and directly promote their differentiation into bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Other results have shown that in ACPA-positive individuals bone loss starts even before the onset of clinical disease; this is indicative of the independent effect of these antibodies in initiating skeletal damage. The observation that the mere presence of ACPA is associated with pathological changes suggests that these antibodies have functional properties and initiate the onset of disease long before patients consult the rheumatologist because of symptomatic joint disease. These findings also indicate that "RA" is a syndrome rather than a single disease, suggesting that autoantibody-positive patients are both genetically and clinically distinct phenotypes. PMID:23955066

  17. Mutated citrullinated vimentin antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kuna, Andrea Tesija

    2012-01-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common inflammatory systemic autoimmune disease, primarily affecting the peripheral joints. The past decade has been marked with revolutionary changes both in the therapeutic and diagnostic perspectives of RA. The discovery of an RA-specific citrullination-driven immune reaction gave a substantial contribution in the diagnostic approach to RA. Efforts directed towards the identification of the antigenic target specifically recognized by these autoantibodies resulted in the identification of vimentin in citrullinated form as the potential native antigen, among other proteins. Furthermore, it was found that the mutation of vimentin represents an independent trigger of antigenic properties, in addition to citrullination. As a result of this discovery, a commercial ELISA using mutated citrullinated vimentin (MCV) was developed. Increasingly, data now support the use of anti-MCV in RA diagnosis and prognosis for errosion. This review summarizes the research to date on the use of anti-MCV in RA diagnosis and prognosis and its potential use as a therapeutic marker. The pathologic role of these antibodies in RA disease is also discussed. PMID:22037509

  18. Impaired polymorphonuclear leucocyte chemotaxis in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, D H; Kirk, A P; Kirwan, J R; Johnson, G D; Holborow, E J

    1984-01-01

    This study has investigated the chemotactic activity of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) isolated from the blood of patients with either articular rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or RA with extra-articular manifestations. A double fluorochrome immunofluorescent staining test has been employed to identify cell-associated immunoglobulins, probably immune complexes. The results suggest an inverse relationship between PMN chemotaxis and staining for cell-associated immunoglobulins, either surface bound or internalised. PMNs from RA patients showed reduced chemotaxis, and this was further reduced when RA PMNs were incubated for 30 minutes in autologous serum. A similar reduction in chemotaxis of normal PMNs occurred after incubation in RA sera. Preincubation of both RA and normal PMNs in RA serum (but not normal serum) resulted in an increase in the number of cells in which cell-associated immunoglobulins were demonstrable. This further reduction in RA PMN chemotaxis after exposure to autologous serum, together with an increase in immunoglobulin staining, may indicate selection of certain PMNs at the time of venepuncture due to cell margination. Such a selection process would call for a re-evaluation of previous studies of RA PMN function in relation to the disease process. PMID:6324704

  19. New autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease causing articular cartilage and bone destruction. Since irreversible joint destruction can be prevented by intervention at the early stages of disease, early diagnosis of RA is important. In this study, we identified new autoantibodies in the sera of patients with early (less than one year) RA. Methods We screened the sera of 20 RA patients with disease duration less than one year, 19 RA patients with disease duration more than five years and 23 controls on 8,268 human protein arrays. We confirmed the validity of protein array detection by ELISA assays. We then performed epitope mapping with overlapping 15-mers to analyze RA sera reactivity. Results WIBG (within BGCN homolog (Drosophila)), GABARAPL2 (GABA(A) receptor associated protein like 2) and ZNF706 (zinc finger protein 706) proteins are preferentially recognized by autoantibodies from early RA patients. Of interest, autoantibodies to WIBG are very specific for early RA. Indeed, 33% of early RA patients' sera recognize WIBG versus 5% of RA patients with disease duration more than 5 years and 2% of controls. We identified three linear peptides on WIBG GABARAPL2 and ZNF706 that are preferentially recognized by sera of early RA patients. Conclusions We identified new autoantibodies associated with RA with disease duration less than one year. These autoantibodies could be used as diagnosis markers in RA patients. PMID:23886014

  20. Cell-mediated immunity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Andrianakos, A A; Sharp, J T; Person, D A; Lidsky, M D; Duffy, J

    1977-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was assessed by skin testing with six antigens in 107 patients, 94 of whom were age, sex, and race-matched with healthy individuals or patients with diseases unrelated to immunological abnormalities. 20% of RA patients were anergic. Impaired cell-mediated immunity in the RA patients was manifested by a decrease in the magnitude of skin reactivity as well as a decrease in the incidence of positive reactions to multiple antigens. Depression in cell-mediated immunity was related to age but not to sex, duration of disease, or disease activity. A slight correlation was found between absolute peripheral lymphocyte counts and the number of positive skin tests, and was confirmed by finding an association between lymphocyte counts and the size of skin reactions. A correlation was also found between lymphocyte counts and disease activity. Four explanations of the observed depression in cell-mediated immunity in RA were considered: (1) a preoccupation of the immune mechanism of the host with cell-mediated immunity reactions related to the pathogenesis of the disease; (2) a depression of cell-mediated immune reactivity by a virus infection; (3) depression of cell-mediated immunity by therapy; and (4) immune complex suppression of cell-mediated immunity. No effect of gold therapy was found. The near universal use of salicylates or other anti-inflammatory drugs did not permit investigation of the effect of these drugs on cell-mediated immunity. PMID:843109