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Sample records for arthritis ankylosing spondylitis

  1. [Rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Jaji?, Z; Jaji?, I; Dubravica, M

    1995-01-01

    A case of a patient having ankylosing spondylitis of 16 years duration is presented. Eight years ago developed a clinical picture with symptoms which completely fulfill criteria for diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis with exception of rheumatoid factor. As a conclusion we can say that in our patient there have been developed ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis as a coexistence of two diseases. PMID:8693201

  2. Radiographic changes in the temporomandibular joint of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic, arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Wenneberg, B; Könönen, M; Kallenberg, A

    1990-01-01

    Sixty-one subjects with rheumatoid arthritis, 61 with psoriatic arthritis, 61 with ankylosing spondylitis, and 77 healthy controls were examined using orthopantomography to determine the frequency of radiographic changes in the condyle of the temporomandibular joint. Radiographic changes were found significantly more often in subjects with rheumatoid arthritis (66%), psoriatic arthritis (38%), and ankylosing spondylitis (30%) than in controls (12%). Subjects with rheumatoid arthritis also had significantly more radiographic changes, especially cortical erosions and subcortical cysts, than subjects with psoriatic arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis. It may be concluded that rheumatoid arthritis is a more severe disease than psoriatic arthritis or ankylosing arthritis regarding temporomandibular joint involvement. PMID:2098385

  3. [HLA B 27 uveitis in ankylosing spondylitis and reactive arthritis].

    PubMed

    Dumbr?veanu, Lilia; Cu?nir, V; Groppa, Liliana; Calinina, Liana

    2010-01-01

    Clinical features of uveitis HLA B27 in patients with uveitis associated with ankylosing spondylitis and reactive arthritis. The study was made on 64 patients with uveitis treated in the municipal hospital between 2005-2008. The diagnosis was established after a complex ophthalmologic investigation. Histocompatibility HLA-B27 was determined in all groups of patients. Each patient was consulted by the rheumatologist. In the study were included 50 (78%) men and 14 (22%) women. The frequency of HLA B27+ was 72%. At HLA B27+ associated with ankylosing spondylitis and reactive arthritis is present in the anterior form in 85%, unilateral affection in 92%. Their evolution is chronic in 17% and has a tendency for recidivism in 11% of patients. HLA B27 is a genetic factor of uveitis associated with spondylarthropathies in 72%. The study determined the disease in 78% of men, 72% were acute, 85% were anterior and 92% were unilateral. The study of HLA B27 in patients with uveitis is one of the shortest ways for the earlier diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:20540366

  4. Ankylosing Spondylitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Members of this class of medications are genetically engineered to block proteins involved in the body’s inflammatory response. Four biologics—adalimumab, etanercept, golimumab, and infliximab—are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating ankylosing spondylitis. ...

  5. Management strategies for osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, H Ralph

    2004-06-01

    Rheumatic diseases are among the most frequent causes of pain and disability. Effective management of rheumatic diseases including osteoarthritis (OA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and gouty arthritis requires an understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms.Symptoms of OA result from both mechanical factors and elements of inflammation. Current management strategies target both of these factors and generally consist of nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic interventions, including use of nonspecific nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cyclooxygenase-2-specific inhibitors (coxibs), which have analgesic and antiinflammatory properties. Other approaches include intraarticular hyaluronate and the use of alternative therapies under investigation such as acupuncture or glucosamine.Disease mechanisms in AS involve enthesitis, an inflammation at the site of insertion of ligaments, tendons, or joint capsules to bone. Posture and exercise are important nonpharmacologic strategies that may be made easier with the use of NSAIDs or coxibs. Recently developed therapies, including tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, target the underlying disease mechanisms and have demonstrated dramatic symptomatic effects. Disease-modifying effects still need to be established.In gout, hyperuricemia leads to crystal-induced inflammation in some patients. Etoricoxib, one of the newer coxibs, has shown promise in treating acute gout, with efficacy similar to indomethacin, the current standard NSAID often used in these patients. Oral or intraarticular steroids can also be considered. For chronic care uricosurics can be beneficial if renal function is normal and excretion is not excessive, but allopurinol is used most often. Nonpharmacologic modalities, such as rest and cold applications, are useful for acute episodes, and lifestyle modification in the form of diet can also play a role in chronic disease management. PMID:17043496

  6. Surgery in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Law, W. Alexander

    1948-01-01

    The pain, deformities and disabilities resulting from rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis must be treated by a team composed of physician, physical medicine expert, orthopædic surgeon, and, in certain cases, deep X-ray therapist working simultaneously. The principle of “rest” in order to relieve pain has to be combined with methods designed to preserve and restore function. The multiple joint deformities in these cases may necessitate a long programme of reconstructive or functional treatment, which entails whole-hearted co-operation on the part of the patient in intensive post-operative exercise regime. Procedures advocated for the upper limb include excision of the acromion process together with the subacromial bursa to allow free movement between the central tendon of the deltoid and the tendinous shoulder cuff: arthrodesis of the shoulder in cases where there is more severe joint destruction: in certain cases of elbow-joint arthritis, excision of the radial head and sub-total synovectomy may preserve joint function and avoid or delay the necessity for arthroplasty which can be carried out in two ways: (a) similar to the formal joint excision, or (b) re-shaping the lower end of the humerus and upper end of the ulna lining these surfaces with fascia. The former method is preferable in cases of rheumatoid arthritis. To overcome wrist-joint deformity and restore pronation and supination excision of the lower end of the ulna together with radiocarpal fusion in position for optimum function is advocated. Finger and toe joints may be corrected by resection of the bone ends and capsulectomy. In the lower limbs bilateral involvement of the hip-joint is best treated by vitallium mould arthroplasty which may be carried out in four ways: (1) Routine arthroplasty; (2) Modified Whitman procedure; (3) Modified Colonna operation; and (4) The proximal shaft or intertrochanteric arthroplasty. It is essential in these operations to have knowledge of the operative technique, the use of special hip gouges and reamers, and detailed post-operative supervision. For dorsal kyphosis of the spine, spinal osteotomy at the lumbar level provides excellent correction but is an operation demanding care and skill in its execution. The author's remarks are based on experience gained when working with Dr. M. N. Smith-Petersen at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, U.S.A. PMID:18914877

  7. Ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Edavalath, Mukesh

    2010-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis belongs to a group of rheumatic diseases known as the spondyloarthropathies (SpA), which show a strong association with the genetic marker HLA-B27. Inflammatory back pain and stiffness are prominent early in the disease, whereas chronic, aggressive disease may produce pain and marked axial immobility or deformity. Modern medicine has no established treatment for it. From the Ayurvedic perspective, the disease can fall under amavata, which may be effectively managed when intervention is started in its early stages. Niruha basthi with Balaguduchyadi yoga, combined by Shamana treatment with Rasnerandadi kwatha and Simhanada guggulu have been found effective in curbing its progression. This article presents a single case report in which these treatments achieved considerable success. PMID:21547050

  8. Ankylosing spondylitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... spondylitis may occur with other conditions, such as: Psoriasis Ulcerative colitis or Crohn disease Chronic eye inflammation ( ... large intestine ( colitis ) Inflammation in the eye (iritis) Psoriasis, a chronic skin disorder

  9. Do the radiological changes of classic ankylosing spondylitis differ from the changes found in the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease, psoriasis, and reactive arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, P; Hickling, P; Wright, V

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—In 1971 McEwen and colleagues suggested that the radiological changes of classic ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and the changes of the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease differ in several respects from the radiological features of psoriatic and reactive spondylitis. The findings of this study have never been confirmed. The aim of this study was to replicate the McEwen study comparing films blinded to diagnostic group.?METHODS—The study population comprised 91 patients with classic AS, 15 patients with regional enteritis, 16 patients with ulcerative colitis, five patients with sexually acquired reactive arthritis, two with post-dysenteric arthritis, and 34 with psoriatic arthritis. Blinded reading of spinal radiographs was undertaken, scoring for severity, symmetry, paravertebral ossification, size of syndesmophytes, ligamentous calcification, squaring, discitis, pseudo-fractures, zygoapophyseal joint involvement, and complete ankylosis.?RESULTS—Comparison of the four groups—classic, enteropathic, psoriatic, and reactive AS— showed differences with respect to symmetry of sacroiliitis, symmetry of lumbar spinal involvement, and frequency and size of syndesmophytes. Zygoapophyseal joint involvement was more frequent in the lumbar spine in classic and enteropathic spondylitis but no between group differences were found with respect to symphisitis, squaring, apophyseal joint involvement and ligamentous calcification in the lumbar spine, and other areas.?CONCLUSIONS—Some of the radiological differences described by McEwen et al, notably the asymmetry, the less severe changes, and the distinctive syndesmophytes in psoriasis, have been confirmed. A number of hypotheses are proposed to explain these differences including biomechanical, biochemical, and genetic factors.?? Keywords: psoriatic arthritis; ankylosing spondylitis; reactive arthritis; inflammatory bowel disease PMID:9640127

  10. [Clinical results of a multicentral double-blind examination of naproxen compared to indomethacin in chronic rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and osteoarthrosis].

    PubMed

    Aeidler, H

    1975-02-01

    In a multicenter double-blind cross-over trial the therapeutic effect and the tolerance of d-2-(6'-methoxy-2'-naphthyl)-propionic acid (naproxen) and indometacin were compared including 46 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 35 patients with ankylosing spondylitis and 19 patients with osteoarthrosis. Duration of treatment with both drugs was two to four weeks each. The daily dose of naproxen was 750 mg, that of indometacin l50 mg. In rheumatoid arthritis the combined clinical effect of indometacin was stronger than that of naproxen while both drugs had the same clinical effectiveness in ankylosing spondylitis and osteoarthrosis. When differentiating the total clinical effect as to indices of pain, inflammation and function, indometacin was shown to be superior in all three diseases with regard to pain index. On the other hand, naproxen showed a better effect in ankylosing spondylitis and osteoarthrosis than indometacin as to inflammation, and as to function in osteoarthrosis. PMID:1096903

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Ankylosing spondylitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can affect the joints between the spine and ribs, restricting movement of the chest and making it difficult to breathe deeply. People with advanced disease are also more prone to fractures of the vertebrae. Ankylosing spondylitis affects the eyes ...

  12. Alternative Treatments for Ankylosing Spondylitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a chiropractor? Download our free educational brochure >>> . Chiropractic Management of Low Back Disorders: Report From a Consensus ... on long-term treatment of ankylosing spondylitis with integrated traditional Chinese and western medicine. Zhongguo Zhong XiYi ...

  13. Scientists Gain New Insights into Genetic Mechanisms of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2000 1999 Spotlight on Research 2012 January 2012 Scientists Gain New Insights into Genetic Mechanisms of Ankylosing Spondylitis New research supported, in part, by the National Institute of Arthritis and ... brought scientists a step closer to understanding the genetic mechanisms ...

  14. Treating spondyloarthritis, including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, to target: recommendations of an international task force

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, Josef S; Braun, Jürgen; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; FitzGerald, Oliver; Helliwell, Philip; Kavanaugh, Arthur; Kvien, Tore K; Landewé, Robert; Luger, Thomas; Mease, Philip; Olivieri, Ignazio; Reveille, John; Ritchlin, Christopher; Rudwaleit, Martin; Schoels, Monika; Sieper, Joachim; de Wit, Martinus; Baraliakos, Xenofon; Betteridge, Neil; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Collantes-Estevez, Eduardo; Deodhar, Atul; Elewaut, Dirk; Gossec, Laure; Jongkees, Merryn; Maccarone, Mara; Redlich, Kurt; van den Bosch, Filip; Wei, James Cheng-Chung; Winthrop, Kevin; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2014-01-01

    Background Therapeutic targets have been defined for diseases like diabetes, hypertension or rheumatoid arthritis and adhering to them has improved outcomes. Such targets are just emerging for spondyloarthritis (SpA). Objective To define the treatment target for SpA including ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and develop recommendations for achieving the target, including a treat-to-target management strategy. Methods Based on results of a systematic literature review and expert opinion, a task force of expert physicians and patients developed recommendations which were broadly discussed and voted upon in a Delphi-like process. Level of evidence, grade and strength of the recommendations were derived by respective means. The commonalities between axial SpA, peripheral SpA and PsA were discussed in detail. Results Although the literature review did not reveal trials comparing a treat-to-target approach with another or no strategy, it provided indirect evidence regarding an optimised approach to therapy that facilitated the development of recommendations. The group agreed on 5 overarching principles and 11 recommendations; 9 of these recommendations related commonly to the whole spectrum of SpA and PsA, and only 2 were designed separately for axial SpA, peripheral SpA and PsA. The main treatment target, which should be based on a shared decision with the patient, was defined as remission, with the alternative target of low disease activity. Follow-up examinations at regular intervals that depend on the patient's status should safeguard the evolution of disease activity towards the targeted goal. Additional recommendations relate to extra-articular and extramusculoskeletal aspects and other important factors, such as comorbidity. While the level of evidence was generally quite low, the mean strength of recommendation was 9–10 (10: maximum agreement) for all recommendations. A research agenda was formulated. Conclusions The task force defined the treatment target as remission or, alternatively, low disease activity, being aware that the evidence base is not strong and needs to be expanded by future research. These recommendations can inform the various stakeholders about expert opinion that aims for reaching optimal outcomes of SpA. PMID:23749611

  15. Ankylosing spondylitis: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Sieper, J; Braun, J; Rudwaleit, M; Boonen, A; Zink, A

    2002-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a complex, potentially debilitating disease that is insidious in onset, progressing to radiological sacroiliitis over several years. Patients with symptomatic AS lose productivity owing to work disability and unemployment, have a substantial use of healthcare resources, and reduced quality of life. The pathogenesis of AS is poorly understood. However, immune mediated mechanisms involving human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B27, inflammatory cellular infiltrates, cytokines (for example, tumour necrosis factor ? and interleukin 10), and genetic and environmental factors are thought to have key roles. The detection of sacroiliitis by radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, or computed tomography in the presence of clinical manifestations is diagnostic for AS, although the presence of inflammatory back pain plus at least two other typical features of spondyloarthropathy (for example, enthesitis and uveitis) is highly predictive of early AS. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) effectively relieve inflammatory symptoms and are presently first line drug treatment. However, NSAID treatment has only a symptomatic effect and probably does not alter the disease course. For symptoms refractory to NSAIDs, second line treatments, including corticosteroids and various disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, are employed but are of limited benefit. Emerging biological therapies target the inflammatory processes underlying AS, and thus, may favourably alter the disease process, in addition to providing symptom relief. PMID:12381506

  16. Common MIR146A Polymorphisms in Chinese Ankylosing Spondylitis Subjects and Controls

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Zhenmin; Wang, Jiucun; Zou, Hejian; Yang, Chengde; Huang, Wei; Jin, Li

    2015-01-01

    Common polymorphisms of microRNA gene MIR146A were reported as associated with different autoimmune diseases, include systemic lupus erythematosus, psoriatic arthritis, asthma and ankylosing spondylitis. In this study we investigated MIR146A SNPs in Chinese people with ankylosing spondylitis. Three common SNPs: rs2910164, rs2431697 and rs57095329 were selected and genotyped in 611 patients and 617 controls. We found no association between these SNPs and ankylosing spondylitis in our samples. PMID:26366721

  17. What Is Ankylosing Spondylitis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... publication. To order the Ankylosing Spondylitiis Q&A full-text version, please contact the NIAMS using the contact ... mailed to you? Visit our online order form. Full NIAMS Site NIH… Turning Discovery Into Health ® ... Comments Moderation Policy Site Map | Viewers and Players

  18. Coping Strategies for Health and Daily-Life Stressors in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis, Ankylosing Spondylitis, and Gout

    PubMed Central

    Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris; Boonen, Annelis; Vázquez-Mellado, Janitzia; Reyes-Lagunes, Isabel; Hernández-Garduño, Adolfo; Goycochea, Maria Victoria; Bernard-Medina, Ana G.; Rodríguez-Amado, Jacqueline; Casasola-Vargas, Julio; Garza-Elizondo, Mario A.; Aceves, Francisco J.; Shumski, Clara; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article aims to identify the strategies for coping with health and daily-life stressors of Mexican patients with chronic rheumatic disease. We analyzed the baseline data of a cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and gout. Their strategies for coping were identified with a validated questionnaire. Comparisons between health and daily-life stressors and between the 3 clinical conditions were made. With regression analyses, we determined the contribution of individual, socioeconomic, educational, and health-related quality-of-life variables to health status and coping strategy. We identified several predominant coping strategies in response to daily-life and health stressors in 261 patients with RA, 226 with AS, and 206 with gout. Evasive and reappraisal strategies were predominant when patients cope with health stressors; emotional/negative and evasive strategies predominated when coping with daily-life stressors. There was a significant association between the evasive pattern and the low short-form health survey (SF-36) scores and health stressors across the 3 diseases. Besides some differences between diagnoses, the most important finding was the predominance of the evasive strategy and its association with low SF-36 score and high level of pain in patients with gout. Patients with rheumatic diseases cope in different ways when confronted with health and daily-life stressors. The strategy of coping differs across diagnoses; emotional/negative and evasive strategies are associated with poor health-related quality of life. The identification of the coping strategies could result in the design of psychosocial interventions to improve self-management. PMID:25761177

  19. Association of single nucleotide polymorphism at position ?308 of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene with ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Manolova, Irena; Ivanova, Mariana; Stoilov, Rumen; Rashkov, Rasho; Stanilova, Spaska

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the putative association between the ?308 G/A polymorphism in the promoter region of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ? gene (rs1800629) and chronic inflammatory arthritis in the Bulgarian population. A case-control study was carried out on 58 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 108 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and 177 healthy subjects. ?308 G/A TNF-? genotypes of patients and controls were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR). No significant association between the rs1800629 polymorphism and RA risk in the study cohort was observed. However, there were significant differences in the genotype and allele frequencies of the ?308 G/A TNF-? polymorphism between AS patients and the healthy subjects. In logistic regression analysis, the presence of the TNF-? ?308A allele in the genotype (AA + AG vs. GG) was associated with a 3.298 times lower risk of developing AS. In addition, in AS, there were associations for age at disease onset (<29 years; odds ratio (OR) = 0.222), disease severity (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) score > 4; OR = 0.152) and response to anti-TNF treatment (OR = 2.25) under a dominant model (AA + AG vs. GG). In conclusion, our results suggested that the promoter polymorphism ?308 G/A in the TNF-? gene had no significant effect on RA development, but could play a role in AS development and in determining the age of disease onset, disease severity and therapeutic outcome of AS in the Bulgarian patients who participated in our study. PMID:26019597

  20. Urolithiasis in ankylosing spondylitis: Correlation with Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI), Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI) and Bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index (BASMI)

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi, Sasan; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Gharibdoost, Farhad; Mahmoud, Mahdi i; Paragomi, Pedram; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein; Farhadi, Elham; Qorbani, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Background: Increased incidence of renal stone has been reported in ankylosing spondylitis (AS), but unlike some well-known renal involvements, they have not been fully studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of AS with urolithiasis and also the relation between urinary stone and severity markers. Methods: One hundred-sixty three AS patients were included in a cross-sectional study from Iranian AS association, Iran Rheumatology Center and Rheumatology Clinic of Shariati Hospital in Tehran. Prevalence of urolithiasis in AS patients was compared with results of a nationwide survey in Iran. Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI), bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI) and bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index (BASMI) were determined for assessment of disease severity. Results: Urolithiasis was observed in 11.7% of AS patients versus 5.7% of normal population (p=0.001). After the elimination of corticosteroid effect, the prevalence of urolithiasis was still higher in AS patients than normal population but without maintaining significant difference. Significant higher values of BASFI, BASMI, BASDAI scores were observed in AS with urolithiasis than AS without urolithiasis. Conclusion: The results confirmed the association of AS with urolithiasis. However, this may be partly due to the effect of other factors such as corticosteroid. Moreover, urolithiais is accompanied with more severe diseases. PMID:24009925

  1. Efficacy of cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibition by etoricoxib and naproxen on the axial manifestations of ankylosing spondylitis in the presence of peripheral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gossec, L; van der Heijde, D; Melian, A; Krupa, D; James, M; Cavanaugh, P; Reicin, A; Dougados, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The combined efficacy of selective and non-selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition on the axial manifestations of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in the presence or absence of chronic peripheral arthritis was evaluated. Methods: In a post hoc subgroup analysis of a 6 week, randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial, 387 patients with active axial AS were randomised to receive etoricoxib 90 mg or 120 mg once a day, naproxen 500 mg twice daily, or placebo. Randomisation was stratified by the presence or absence of chronic peripheral arthritis. The primary outcome measure was the time weighted average change from baseline of spine pain intensity. Efficacy data from the three groups receiving active treatment (the NSAID/COX-2 inhibitor group) were combined to improve precision. An analysis of covariance model was used to evaluate the effect of peripheral disease on treatment response. Results: 93 patients were allocated to receive placebo and 294 to active treatment (naproxen or etoricoxib). The combined NSAID/COX-2 inhibitor group had a significant treatment response compared with the placebo group for all efficacy measures, both in patients with and without peripheral arthritis. A significantly greater difference in mean patient assessment of spine pain was found between active and placebo treatments in patients without compared with those with peripheral arthritis (p = 0.005; –32.5 mm v –17.0 mm, respectively). Similar differences, although not statistically significant, were seen for other end points. Conclusion: NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors have a clinically relevant symptomatic effect on axial AS irrespective of the presence of peripheral arthritis. In this exploratory analysis spinal improvement appeared to be greater in patients without peripheral disease. PMID:15731291

  2. [Diet of patients with ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Jaji?, I; Jaji?, Z; Cegnar, M; Ozi?-Bebek, M; Jaji?, I

    1991-01-01

    Diet in 77 patients with ankylosing spondylitis, among them 51 men (66%) and 26 women (34%), has been examined. All the patients use constantly or occasionally foodstuff which contains flour (bread and paste) and occasionally cakes, every day or occasionally they use meat and meat products, most frequently pork, chicken and beef. Majority of examinees use milk and milk products (tough cheese) every day. Further more, 38 out of 77 patients do not use butter, oil is used by 56 of them every day and by 19 of them occasionally. Only 1/3 of the patients use vegetables every day, while fresh fruit is used by only 55 of them every day and by 21 of the patients occasionally. It has not been noticed that our patients have any restriction in their diet because it is very much alike diet in other population. Therefore it would be useful to create and organize specific "menu" for the patients with ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:1809993

  3. Imbalance between HAT and HDAC Activities in the PBMCs of Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis or Rheumatoid Arthritis and Influence of HDAC Inhibitors on TNF Alpha Production

    PubMed Central

    Toussirot, Eric; Abbas, Wasim; Khan, Kashif Aziz; Tissot, Marion; Jeudy, Alicia; Baud, Lucile; Bertolini, Ewa; Wendling, Daniel; Herbein, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Objective Acetylation or deacetylation of histone proteins may modulate cytokine gene transcription such as TNF alpha (TNF). We evaluated the balance between histone deacetytlase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or ankylosing spondylitis (AS) compared to healthy controls (HC) and determined the influence of HDAC inhibitors (trichostatin A -TSA- or Sirtinol -Sirt-) on these enzymatic activities and on the PBMC production of TNF. Methods 52 patients with RA, 21 with AS and 38 HC were evaluated. HAT and HDAC activities were measured on nuclear extracts from PBMC using colorimetric assays. Enzymatic activities were determined prior to and after ex vivo treatment of PBMC by TSA or Sirt. TNF levels were evaluated in PBMC culture supernatants in the absence or presence of TSA or Sirt. Results HAT and HDAC activities were significantly reduced in AS, while these activities reached similar levels in RA and HC. Ex vivo treatment of PBMC by HDACi tended to decrease HDAC expression in HC, but Sirt significantly reduced HAT in RA. TNF production by PBMC was significantly down-regulated by Sirt in HC and AS patients. Conclusion HAT and HDAC were disturbed in AS while no major changes were found in RA. HDACi may modulate HDAC and HAT PBMC expression, especially Sirt in RA. Sirtinol was able to down regulate TNF production by PBMC in HC and AS. An imbalance between HAT and HDAC activities might provide the rationale for the development of HDACi in the therapeutic approach to inflammatory rheumatic diseases. PMID:24039666

  4. Treatment of ankylosing spondylitis: focus on etanercept

    PubMed Central

    Frech, Tracy

    2007-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory condition which preferentially affects the axial skeleton, often beginning in the sacroiliac joints. The etiology of the pathologic lesions of this condition including enthesitis, erosive articular changes, osteitis, and fibrous ankylosis, as well as changes which occur in the eye, gastrointestinal tract, cardiovascular system, and lungs is unknown; however, there is a strong association with HLA-B27, which indicates altered immunity. One of the major mediators of the immune response is TNF-?, which functions as a pleiotrophic soluble messenger primarily from macrophages. TNF-? is principally involved with activation of both normal and transformed cells, including endothelium, synoviocytes, osteoclasts, chondrocytes, and fibroblasts. The cornerstone of medical management of ankylosing spondylitis includes intensive physical therapy and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories for symptomatic relief. However, it is becoming increasingly recognized that TNF-? blockade has an important role in the reduction of spine and joint inflammation. This review discusses the data that supports use of etanercept in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:19707347

  5. Divergent perceptions in health-related quality of life between family members and patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Remus, Cesar; Castillo-Ortiz, José Dionisio; Sandoval-Castro, Carlos; Paez-Agraz, Francisco; Sanchez-Ortiz, Adriana; Aceves-Avila, Francisco Javier

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether family members perceive health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of family members with rheumatic illnesses differently from the perceptions of these patients themselves. Cross-sectional study of consecutive patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) attending two outpatient rheumatic clinics. HRQoL was assessed using the Spanish version of the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Scale (WHODAS-II) questionnaire; the "proxy" version is available for relatives. All patients and one proxy per patient separately answered the questionnaire at the clinic. Differences were determined by coefficients of determination (r (2)), Z scores, and meaningful differences of 30 %. Two hundred and ninety-one patients (111 SLE, 100 RA, and 80 AS) and their respective proxies were included. The mean age was 35 ± 13 years in SLE, 49.5 ± 14 years in RA, and 40 ± 14 years in AS patients. Divergent perceptions between patients and their proxies were found in 57 % of the SLE group, in 69 % of the RA group, and in 47 % of the AS group as per WHODAS-II global score. Stronger disagreement occurred for all the three groups in domains representing cognition and interaction with other people: around 60 % in the SLE group, 80 % in the RA group, and 40 % in the AS group. A substantial proportion of family members perceived the HRQoL of rheumatic family members differently from the perception of the patients themselves, most of the time biased toward underestimation, suggesting problems in the dynamics of efficient communication and social support. PMID:24859395

  6. Coping strategies for health and daily-life stressors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and gout: STROBE-compliant article.

    PubMed

    Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris; Boonen, Annelis; Vázquez-Mellado, Janitzia; Reyes-Lagunes, Isabel; Hernández-Garduño, Adolfo; Goycochea, Maria Victoria; Bernard-Medina, Ana G; Rodríguez-Amado, Jacqueline; Casasola-Vargas, Julio; Garza-Elizondo, Mario A; Aceves, Francisco J; Shumski, Clara; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben

    2015-03-01

    This article aims to identify the strategies for coping with health and daily-life stressors of Mexican patients with chronic rheumatic disease. We analyzed the baseline data of a cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and gout. Their strategies for coping were identified with a validated questionnaire. Comparisons between health and daily-life stressors and between the 3 clinical conditions were made. With regression analyses, we determined the contribution of individual, socioeconomic, educational, and health-related quality-of-life variables to health status and coping strategy. We identified several predominant coping strategies in response to daily-life and health stressors in 261 patients with RA, 226 with AS, and 206 with gout. Evasive and reappraisal strategies were predominant when patients cope with health stressors; emotional/negative and evasive strategies predominated when coping with daily-life stressors. There was a significant association between the evasive pattern and the low short-form health survey (SF-36) scores and health stressors across the 3 diseases. Besides some differences between diagnoses, the most important finding was the predominance of the evasive strategy and its association with low SF-36 score and high level of pain in patients with gout. Patients with rheumatic diseases cope in different ways when confronted with health and daily-life stressors. The strategy of coping differs across diagnoses; emotional/negative and evasive strategies are associated with poor health-related quality of life. The identification of the coping strategies could result in the design of psychosocial interventions to improve self-management. PMID:25761177

  7. The assessment of ankylosing spondylitis in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Raj; Stone, Millicent A

    2007-09-01

    Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis that predominantly affects the axial skeleton in adolescent patients causing spinal pain and stiffness. There is a marked delay, on average 8 years, between onset of disease symptoms and clinical diagnosis. The distinction between the symptoms of mechanical and inflammatory back pain remains one of the main contributing factors for the delay in diagnosis. Several classification criteria exist to aid the diagnosis of AS, but their accuracy is poor. The Ankylosing Spondylitis Assessment Study group (ASAS) has defined a core set of domains for clinical outcome measurement in AS in order to assess the disease process in individual patients and to identify those with rapidly progressive disease. New therapies, such as the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors, have transformed the treatment paradigm in AS, especially for those patients with aggressive disease. Thus, the definition of both patient selection criteria for these agents and the development of clinical methods to assess response to therapy have become a priority. This Review focuses on measuring the degree of disease activity, function and damage in patients with AS in an ambulatory care setting, and the assessment of suitability of various outcome measures for monitoring response to treatment with TNF inhibitors. PMID:17762848

  8. Treatment trials in ankylosing spondylitis: current and future considerations

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijde, D; Braun, J; McGonagle, D; Siegel, J

    2002-01-01

    Emerging treatment options in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are giving new hope to patients with this chronic and potentially disabling disease. Clinical development of new treatments requires that rigorous and well controlled trials be conducted to demonstrate safety and efficacy. A number of classification systems have been developed in recent years as a result of enhanced understanding of the pathogenesis of AS. Although new outcome measures have been developed and a consensus has been reached on the use of assessment instruments in clinical trials, there is still need for improvement and implementation. The ASsessments in Ankylosing Spondylitis (ASAS) Working Group has addressed some of these dilemmas by establishing a core set of domains for the evaluation of AS and by selecting specific assessment methods for each domain. They have also published improvement criteria for assessing short term improvement with symptom modifying antirheumatic drugs and are presently in the process of developing response criteria for disease controlling antirheumatic treatment. Various experts are also currently examining discrepancies and inadequacies of classification systems for AS. Imaging studies, magnetic resonance imaging, in particular, may provide better classification criteria in the near future. In addition to consensus on outcome assessment and classification of AS, lessons learnt from clinical trials in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may serve as a template for AS. Guidance provided by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical trials in RA may be of particular use. The FDA has defined the claims that sponsors can receive for RA products and the clinical trial data that would be expected to be submitted to support such claims. PMID:12381508

  9. Ankylosing Spondylitis: From Cells to Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano-Zaragoza, José Francisco; Agraz-Cibrian, Juan Manuel; González-Reyes, Christian; Durán-Avelar, Ma. de Jesús; Vibanco-Pérez, Norberto

    2013-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology, though it is considered an autoimmune disease. HLA-B27 is the risk factor most often associated with AS, and although the mechanism of involvement is unclear, the subtypes and other features of the relationship between HLA-B27 and AS have been studied for years. Additionally, the key role of IL-17 and Th17 cells in autoimmunity and inflammation suggests that the latter and the cytokines involved in their generation could play a role in the pathogenesis of this disease. Recent studies have described the sources of IL-17 and IL-23, as well as the characterization of Th17 cells in autoimmune diseases. Other cells, such as NK and regulatory T cells, have been implicated in autoimmunity and have been evaluated to ascertain their possible role in AS. Moreover, several polymorphisms, mutations and deletions in the regulatory proteins, protein-coding regions, and promoter regions of different genes involved in immune responses have been discovered and evaluated for possible genetic linkages to AS. In this review, we analyze the features of HLA-B27 and the suggested mechanisms of its involvement in AS while also focusing on the characterization of the immune response and the identification of genes associated with AS. PMID:23970995

  10. Employment perspectives of patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Chorus, A; Boonen, A; Miedema, H; van der Linden, S.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the labour market position of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in relation to disease duration and to identify potential factors in relation to withdrawal from the labour force. Methods: A cross sectional mail survey was conducted among 658 patients with AS. Participation in the labour force was defined as having a paid job. The independent effect of duration of disease was examined by an indirect method of standardisation. A broad variety of risk factors were examined separately and in a combined analysis, including sociodemographic factors, disease related variables, coping styles, and work related factors. Attributable and preventable fractions were calculated from the combined analyses to assess the relative importance of the contributing factors. Results: Probability of participation in the labour force was similarly reduced in patients with AS with different durations of disease. Pacing to cope with limitations was the most relevant factor in increasing the risk of withdrawal from the labour force, accounting for 73% of withdrawals. Coping with limitations by often seeking creative solutions, high disease activity, increased age, and insufficient support from colleagues or management were also positively associated with withdrawal from the labour force. Technical or ergonomic adjustments of the workplace, working in large companies, and coping with dependency style through frequent acceptance were negatively associated. Of these factors, technical or ergonomic adjustment was the most relevant in terms of reducing the risk. Conclusion: Sociodemographic factors, disease related factors, coping styles, and work related factors contribute simultaneously to withdrawal from the labour force. PMID:12117674

  11. Integrative Structural Biomechanical Concepts of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Alfonse T.; Nair, Kalyani; Andonian, Brian J.; Prus, Kristina M.; Kelly, Joseph; Sanchez, Jose R.; Henderson, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is not fully explained by inflammatory processes. Clinical, epidemiological, genetic, and course of disease features indicate additional host-related risk processes and predispositions. Collectively, the pattern of predisposition to onset in adolescent and young adult ages, male preponderance, and widely varied severity of AS is unique among rheumatic diseases. However, this pattern could reflect biomechanical and structural differences between the sexes, naturally occurring musculoskeletal changes over life cycles, and a population polymorphism. During juvenile development, the body is more flexible and weaker than during adolescent maturation and young adulthood, when strengthening and stiffening considerably increase. During middle and later ages, the musculoskeletal system again weakens. The novel concept of an innate axial myofascial hypertonicity reflects basic mechanobiological principles in human function, tissue reactivity, and pathology. However, these processes have been little studied and require critical testing. The proposed physical mechanisms likely interact with recognized immunobiological pathways. The structural biomechanical processes and tissue reactions might possibly precede initiation of other AS-related pathways. Research in the combined structural mechanobiology and immunobiology processes promises to improve understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of AS than prevailing concepts. The combined processes might better explain characteristic enthesopathic and inflammatory processes in AS. PMID:22216409

  12. Whole body MR imaging in ankylosing spondylitis: a descriptive pilot study in patients with suspected early and active confirmed ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ulrich; Pfirrmann, Christian WA; Kissling, Rudolf O; Hodler, Juerg; Zanetti, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disorder which usually begins in early adulthood. The diagnosis is often delayed by many years. MR imaging has become the preferred imaging method for detection of early inflammation of the axial skeleton in ankylosing spondylitis. The goal of this study was to assess the frequency and distribution of abnormalities on whole body MR imaging in patients with suspected early ankylosing spondylitis and with active confirmed ankylosing spondylitis. Methods Ten patients with suspected early ankylosing spondylitis and ten patients with confirmed ankylosing spondylitis were enrolled. On an 18-channel MR system, coronal and sagittal T1 weighted and STIR sequences were acquired covering the entire spine, sacrum, anterior chest wall, shoulder girdle, and pelvis. The total examination time was 30 minutes. Results In both groups inflammatory lesions of the lower thoracic spine were frequent (number of patients with suspected early/confirmed ankylosing spondylitis: 7/9). In confirmed ankylosing spondylitis the upper thoracic spine (3/6) and the lumbar spine (4/8) were more commonly involved. The inferior iliac quadrant of the sacroiliac joints was frequently altered in both groups (8/8). The superior iliac (2/5), inferior sacral (6/10) and superior sacral (3/6) quadrants were more frequently affected in confirmed ankylosing spondylitis. Abnormalities of the manubriosternal joint (2/4), the sternoclavicular joints (1/2) and hip joint effusion (4/3) were also seen. Conclusion In both suspected early ankylosing spondylitis and confirmed ankylosing spondylitis, whole body MR examinations frequently demonstrate inflammatory lesions outside the sacroiliac joints. These lesions are similarly distributed but occur less frequently in suspected early compared to confirmed ankylosing spondylitis. Due to the small sample size in this pilot study these results need to be confirmed in larger studies with this emerging technique. PMID:17326845

  13. The role of secukinumab in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi; Perry, Lisa; Deodhar, Atul

    2015-12-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder involving the sacroiliac joint, spine and less frequently the peripheral joints. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and TNF-? inhibitors are utilized to reduce signs and symptoms. Whether these agents slow disease progression, is still debatable. Secukinumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody against IL-17 that has been studied in patients with ankylosing spondylitis with promising results. It has demonstrated improvement in signs, symptoms, patient reported outcomes and functional status and has been well tolerated. The clinical improvement is also mirrored in the improvement in sacroiliac joint magnetic resonance imaging scans. PMID:26595091

  14. Cervical spine surgery in ankylosing spondylitis: Review and current concept.

    PubMed

    Lazennec, J-Y; d'Astorg, H; Rousseau, M-A

    2015-06-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis of the cervical spine is associated with stiff kyphosis and increased risk of transversal unstable fracture. A spine surgeon may be involved mainly in the management of trauma cases, but in some situations, corrective surgery of a kyphotic cervical deformity is needed. Both types of cases carry specific aspects and rely on principles that differ from those associated with more common cervical surgery. This paper is a review of the literature regarding cervical surgery in cases of ankylosing spondylitis. It addresses practical technical questions. PMID:25863707

  15. Abnormal autonomic cardiovascular control in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Toussirot, E.; Bahjaoui-Bouhaddi, M.; Poncet, J.; Cappelle, S.; Henriet, M.; Wendling, D.; Regnard, J.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—This study was aimed at assessing the contribution of the autonomic nervous system to adjustments of cardiovascular function in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS).?METHODS—In 18 AS patients (mean age: 34.9; mean disease duration: 6.4 years) and 13 healthy controls (mean age: 31.7) the changes of heart rate (HR) with deep breathing (E/I ratio) and standing up (30/15 ratio) were recorded. The slope of cardiac baroreflex, the times series of blood pressure and HR values upon lying and standing, and venous plasma concentrations of catecholamines were also analysed. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), plasma C reactive protein (CRP) concentration and a clinical index (BASDAI score) were used to assess the degree of disease activity in patients.?RESULTS—In the standing patients, blood pressure was found to decrease progressively (p< 0.001). Furthermore, the patients with a BASDAI score > 5 had a higher heart rate than patients with a BASDAI score < 5 (p<0.02), and there was a trend for a similar difference when patients were classified according to their ESR and CRP. Plasma catecholamine concentrations and the E/I ratio were not different in patients from controls. The 30/15 ratio and the slope of the spontaneous baroreflex during standing were both lower in AS patients than controls (p< 0.01).?CONCLUSIONS—This study demonstrated a change in autonomic nervous system function of AS patients, with a decreased parasympathetic activity, as evidenced by higher HR and lower baroreflex slope. As these significant deviances were mainly observed in patients with more active (or more inflammatory) disease, the autonomic nervous system involvement could be related to the inflammatory process. This autonomic strain may be related to the cardiac involvement in AS patients.?? PMID:10419866

  16. Effect of Pilates training on people with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Altan, L; Korkmaz, N; Dizdar, M; Yurtkuran, M

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of Pilates on pain, functional status, and quality of life in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The study was performed as a randomized, prospective, controlled, and single-blind trial. Fifty-five participants (30 men, 25 women) who were under a regular follow-up protocol in our Rheumatology Clinic with the diagnosis of AS according to the modified New York criteria were included in the study. The participants were randomly assigned into two groups: in group I, Pilates exercise program of 1 h was given by a certified trainer to 30 participants 3 times a week for 12 weeks, and in group II, designed as the control group, 25 participants continued previous standard treatment programs. In groups, pre-(week 0) and post treatment (week 12 and week 24) evaluation was performed by one of the authors who was blind to the group allocation. Primary outcome measure was functional capacity. Evaluation was done using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI). Exploratory outcome measures were Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), Chest expansion, and ankylosing spondylitis quality of life (ASQOL) questionnaire. In group I, BASFI showed significant improvement at week 12 (P = 0.031) and week 24 (P = 0.007). In group II, this parameter was not found to have significantly changed at week 12 and week 24. Comparison of the groups showed significantly superior results for group I at week 24 (P = 0.023). We suggest Pilates exercises as an effective and safe method to improve physical capacity in AS patients. Our study is the first clinical study designed to investigate the role of Pilates method in AS treatment. We believe that further research with more participants and longer follow-up periods could help assess the therapeutic value of this popular physical exercise method in AS. PMID:21499876

  17. Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Kobak, Senol; Yilmaz, Hatice; Karaarslan, Ahmet; Yalcin, Murat

    2014-01-01

    A 26-year-old male patient presented to our rheumatology clinic with pain, swelling and limitation of movement in his right ankle, and also purpuric skin lesions in the lower extremity pretibial region. He was asked questions, and he said that he had been having chronic low back pain and morning stiffness for the last few years. His physical examination revealed that he had arthritis in his right ankle, purpuric skin lesions in pretibial regions of both legs, and bilateral FABERE/FADIR positivity. The sacroiliac joint imaging and MRI revealed bilateral sacroiliitis findings, and the lateral heel imaging revealed enthesitis. HLA-B27 was positive. Skin biopsy from lower skin lesions was reported to be consistent with leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Based on clinical, laboratory, radiological, and pathological examinations, the patient was diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis and leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Administration of corticosteroid, salazopyrin, and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory medications was started. Notable clinical and laboratory regression was observed during his checks 3 months later. PMID:24653851

  18. Progressive Pulmonary Fibrocystic Changes of Both Upper Lungs in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Youn; Lee, Seok Jeong; Lee, Jin Hwa; Chang, Jung Hyun; Kim, Yookyung

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory multisystem disease that primarily affects the axial joints. Pleuropulmonary involvement is an uncommon extra-articular manifestation of ankylosing spondylitis. There is a wide spectrum of pulmonary parenchymal changes in ankylosing spondylitis, beginning in the early stages of the disease and increasing over time. The lesions are usually asymptomatic, and not visible on chest radiographs in early stages. We reported a case of advanced ankylosing spondylitis in a 56-year-old man with progressive pulmonary bullous fibrocystic changes on both upper lobes that were misdiagnosed as tuberculosis in the early stages of the disease. PMID:26508946

  19. Management of spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    El Tecle, Najib E; Abode-Iyamah, Kingsley O; Hitchon, Patrick W; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2015-12-01

    Ankylosing spondlylitis is a seronegative spondyloarthropathy that primarily affects the spinal column and sacroiliac joints. With disease progression autofusion of the spinal column takes place. This combined with the brittle bone quality make patients prone to fractures and spinal cord injury. The typical fracture pattern is extension type and involves all three columns. These fractures and injuries may involve the craniovertebral junction, the subaxial cervical spine, and the thoracolumbar spine. While at times these fractures are challenging to manage especially when they affect the elderly, there is evidence that supports long segment fixation and fusion. This article presents a narrative review on managing spinal fractures in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:26513429

  20. Rare association of insulin autoimmune syndrome with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Raizada, Nishant; Rahaman, S H; Kandasamy, D

    2015-01-01

    Summary Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) is a rare cause of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemia, which is known to occur in association with the use of sulfhydryl-containing drugs and autoimmune disorders. We describe a patient with hitherto an unreported association of IAS with ankylosing spondylitis. We have also performed and described a simplified method of polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation of an insulin bound antibody in the serum. Learning points IAS should be considered in differential diagnosis of endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemia. Ankylosing spondylitis can be associated with IAS apart from several other autoimmune diseases. Very high serum insulin levels (100–10?000??U/ml) are frequently seen in IAS. When faced with very high serum insulin before suspecting insulinoma, it is advisable that PEG precipitation of serum be done to identify antibody bound insulin. A clinical suspicion of IAS can avoid expensive imaging and unnecessary surgery in affected patients. PMID:26527431

  1. A Case of Ankylosing Spondylitis and Discussion of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ranjith, M.P.; Divya, R.

    2013-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a systemic inflammatory disease. Its pathogenesis has not been completely understood, but the HLA-B 27 positive immune cells are thought to be involved. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents are the first line drugs and they effectively relieve the symptoms. Biological agents such as Infliximab may help in targeting the underlying inflammatory process and have been used recently. Here, we are reporting a case of AS with established classical skeletal deformities. PMID:23905135

  2. Ankylosing spondylitis in an athlete with chronic sacroiliac joint pain.

    PubMed

    Miller, Timothy L; Cass, Nathan; Siegel, Courtney

    2014-02-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a disease in which inflammation of joints, most often in the axial skeleton, can lead to reactive fibrosis and eventual joint fusion with associated immobility and kyphosis. The disease often involves extra-articular features, such as uveitis and aortic regurgitation, as well as associated inflammatory conditions of the intestines. Its etiology is unknown. Ankylosing spondylitis most commonly presents in young males (15-30 years old) as persistent low back pain and stiffness that is worse in the morning and at night and improves with activity. The authors report the case of a young male athlete whose symptoms were initially incorrectly diagnosed as sacroiliac joint instability and dysfunction and later as a sacroiliac stress fracture before further workup revealed a seronegative spondyloarthropathy and the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis. The patient was prescribed oral indomethacin daily by the attending rheumatologist and started on a slow progression of return to running, jumping, and weight lifting. Within 4 weeks of beginning this treatment, the patient had complete cessation of pain with the medication. At follow-up 1 year after graduation from his university, the patient was nearly symptom free and working in a non-heavy labor job. The purpose of this case report is to remind sports medicine physicians of the prevalence of rheumatologic diseases in general and ankylosing spondylitis in particular and of the various ways in which spondyloarthropathies may present in athletes. Increased suspicion may lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment, potentially reducing illness severity and duration and improving the performance of athletes with this condition. PMID:24679210

  3. Sexual function in male patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ozkorumak, E; Karkucak, M; Civil, F; Tiryaki, A; Ozden, G

    2011-01-01

    Sexuality is an important part of healthy life. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) may be vulnerable to sexual problems because of disease activity and comorbid emotional problems. However, sexuality is a scarcely studied subject in AS. The aim of this study is to compare patients with AS with healthy control. A total of 43 male patients, who referred to the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinics of the Karadeniz Technical University Farabi Hospital between May 2010 and July 2010, and were diagnosed as AS according to modified New York criteria, were included in the study. Control group consisted of healthy 43 age- and sex-matched male individuals with normal inflammatory levels. The AS patients were compared in means of sociodemographic variables and sexual function with Glombok-Rust Sexual Satisfaction Scale (GRSSS) and clinical interview. Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were used to determine anxiety and depression levels, respectively. The disease activity and functional conditions were evaluated with the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI) and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDI). A total of 43 patients with AS and 43 healthy heterosexual male were included in the study. The total GRSSS score was significantly higher in patients with AS, whereas they also had significantly higher sexual complaint than healthy control. The diagnosis of sexual dysfunction according to DSM-IV was significantly higher in the patients with AS as well as depression and anxiety. In study group, GRSSS total score was modestly correlated with disease activity. The psychological status had close relation with sexual functions in AS. Overall assessment is required for complete evaluation in patients with AS. PMID:21814226

  4. Serum from patients with ankylosing spondylitis can increase PPARD, fra-1, MMP7, OPG and RANKL expression in MG63 cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zaiying; Lin, Dongfang; Qi, Jun; Qiu, Minli; Lv, Qing; Li, Qiuxia; Lin, Zhiming; Liao, Zetao; Pan, Yunfeng; Jin, Ou; Wu, Yuqiong; Gu, Jieruo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the effects of serum from patients with ankylosing spondylitis on the canonical Wnt/?-catenin pathway and to assess whether the serum has an osteogenic effect in MG63 cells. METHODS: MG63 cells were cultured with serum from 45 ankylosing spondylitis patients, 30 healthy controls, or 45 rheumatoid arthritis patients. The relative PPARD, fra-1, MMP7, OPG and RANKL mRNA levels were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Associations between gene expression and patient demographics and clinical assessments were then analyzed. RESULTS: MG63 cells treated with serum from ankylosing spondylitis patients had higher PPARD, fra-1, MMP7 and OPG gene expression than did cells treated with serum from controls or rheumatoid arthritis patients (all p<0.05). RANKL expression was higher in MG63 cells treated with serum from patients with ankylosing spondylitis or rheumatoid arthritis than in those treated with serum from controls (both p<0.05). The OPG/RANKL ratio was also higher in MG63 cells treated with serum from ankylosing spondylitis patients than in those treated with serum from controls (p<0.05). No associations were found between the expression of the five genes and the patient demographics and clinical assessments (all p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS : Serum from ankylosing spondylitis patients increases PPARD, fra-1, MMP7, OPG and RANKL expression and the OPG/RANKL ratio in MG63 cells; these effects may be due to the stimulatory effect of the serum on the Wnt pathway. PMID:26602520

  5. Do sex hormones play a role in ankylosing spondylitis?

    PubMed

    Masi, A T

    1992-02-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has a striking disease marker, i.e., HLA-B27, indicating the major genetic predisposition; however, expression of disease is also strongly influenced by age- and sex-related factors. Sex steroids studies suggest greater androgenicity in AS than normal control persons. Therapeutic interventions that normalize such sex steroid status have shown clinical improvements in males and females. Muscle histopathology in AS shows frequent changes early in disease consistent with neuropathic and myopathic mechanisms of a noninflammatory nature. Accepting the available, aggregate data, one may infer that sex steroid imbalance in persons susceptible to AS may target axial and proximal muscle tissues, resulting in relative functional hypertonicity. Such phenomenon, developing in preteen and younger adult ages, may contribute to peripheral and axial manifestations of enthesopathy in this disease by complex and currently unknown mechanisms. PMID:1561401

  6. Ankylosing spondylitis: A state of the art factual backbone

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi-rad, Mohammad; Attaya, Hosam; Lesha, Emal; Vegh, Andrea; Maleki-Miandoab, Tooraj; Nosair, Emad; Sepehrvand, Nariman; Davarian, Ali; Rajebi, Hamid; Pakniat, Abdolghader; Fazeli, Seyed Amirhossein; Mohammadi, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects 1% of the general population. As one of the most severe types of spondyloarthropathy, AS affects the spinal vertebrae and sacroiliac joints, causing debilitating pain and loss of mobility. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of AS, from the pathophysiological changes that occur as the disease progresses, to genetic factors that are involved with its onset. Considering the high prevalence in the population, and the debilitating life changes that occur as a result of the disease, a strong emphasis is placed on the diagnostic imaging methods that are used to detect this condition, as well as several treatment methods that could improve the health of individuals diagnosed with AS. PMID:26435775

  7. Ankylosing spondylitis and secretor status: a re-evaluation.

    PubMed

    Smith, G W; James, V; Mackenzie, D A; Stewart, J; Blackwell, C C; Elton, R A; Nuki, G

    1997-07-01

    Non-secretion of ABO blood group substances in body fluids is associated with susceptibility to some bacterial infections. Non-secretors were previously found to be over-represented in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) (49%) compared to controls (27%). Re-evaluation of secretor status in a population of 92 AS patients and 103 controls revealed identical proportions of non-secretors (28%). Of 43 patients studied in both surveys, 6/22 typed initially as non-secretors proved to be secretors using both haemagglutination inhibition assay (HAI) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques. Loss of secreted blood group antigens in the saliva is the cause of this mis-typing. Careful attention to the method of collection, handling and preservation of saliva specimens is essential for accurate assessment of secretor status. Therefore, there is no link between secretor status and AS. PMID:9255113

  8. Normal anti-Klebsiella lymphocytotoxicity in ankylosing spondylitis

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.D.; Fritzler, M.J.; Lewkonia, R.M.

    1986-03-01

    We compared in vitro lymphocytotoxicity (LCT) of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), obtained from patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and normal controls (NC). Assays were performed with antibacterial antisera prepared from AS- and NC-derived Klebsiella and coliforms Escherichia coli. LCT assessed by eosin staining was not significantly different in PBL of 12 AS patients and 28 controls when reacted with 3 Klebsiella and 1 E coli antisera. LCT assessed by /sup 51/Cr release was not significantly different for PBL of 20 age- and sex-matched pairs of AS patients and NC when reacted with 3 Klebsiella and 1 E coli antisera. Similarly, LCT-/sup 51/Cr of PBL of 15 matched AS and NC pairs was not significantly different for anti-K21, a serotype putatively implicated in Klebsiella-HLA-B27 antigenic cross-reactivity. Our results do not support the notion of molecular mimicry between Klebsiella and B27 in the pathogenesis of primary AS.

  9. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis using adalimumab.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Kirla Wagner Poti; Benevides, André Nunes; Vieira, Francisco José Fernandes; Burlamaqui, Maggy Poti de Morais; Vieira, Marcos de Almeida e Pontes; Fontenelle, Lysiane Maria Adeodato Ramos

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is an anthropozoonosis caused by species of Leishmania and can have different clinical presentations, depending on the parasite-host relationship. Tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) is a cytokine essential to infection control, especially against intracellular parasites such as Leishmania. Anti-TNF-? strategies have had a marked impact on the treatment of rheumatic diseases, but the clinical use of those antagonists has been accompanied by an increased report of infections. We report the first case of cutaneous leishmaniasis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis treated with adalimumab and methotrexate in Brazil. We believe that, in this case, there was no association between the anti-TNF-? treatment and cutaneous leishmaniasis, because the disease was limited to only one ulcer that healed completely after treatment. More studies, however, are necessary to better understand the possible relationship between anti-TNF-? agents and leishmaniasis. PMID:22641598

  10. Interaction between ERAP1 and HLA-B27 in ankylosing spondylitis implicates peptide handling in the mechanism for HLA-B27 in disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Evans, David M; Spencer, Chris C A; Pointon, Jennifer J; Su, Zhan; Harvey, David; Kochan, Grazyna; Oppermann, Udo; Opperman, Udo; Dilthey, Alexander; Pirinen, Matti; Stone, Millicent A; Appleton, Louise; Moutsianas, Loukas; Moutsianis, Loukas; Leslie, Stephen; Wordsworth, Tom; Kenna, Tony J; Karaderi, Tugce; Thomas, Gethin P; Ward, Michael M; Weisman, Michael H; Farrar, Claire; Bradbury, Linda A; Danoy, Patrick; Inman, Robert D; Maksymowych, Walter; Gladman, Dafna; Rahman, Proton; Morgan, Ann; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Bowness, Paul; Gaffney, Karl; Gaston, J S Hill; Smith, Malcolm; Bruges-Armas, Jacome; Couto, Ana-Rita; Sorrentino, Rosa; Paladini, Fabiana; Ferreira, Manuel A; Xu, Huji; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Lei; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Díaz-Peña, Roberto; López-Vázquez, Antonio; Zayats, Tetyana; Band, Gavin; Bellenguez, Céline; Blackburn, Hannah; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Bramon, Elvira; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Casas, Juan P; Corvin, Aiden; Craddock, Nicholas; Deloukas, Panos; Dronov, Serge; Duncanson, Audrey; Edkins, Sarah; Freeman, Colin; Gillman, Matthew; Gray, Emma; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hammond, Naomi; Hunt, Sarah E; Jankowski, Janusz; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; Langford, Cordelia; Liddle, Jennifer; Markus, Hugh S; Mathew, Christopher G; McCann, Owen T; McCarthy, Mark I; Palmer, Colin N A; Peltonen, Leena; Plomin, Robert; Potter, Simon C; Rautanen, Anna; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Ricketts, Michelle; Samani, Nilesh; Sawcer, Stephen J; Strange, Amy; Trembath, Richard C; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Waller, Matthew; Weston, Paul; Whittaker, Pamela; Widaa, Sara; Wood, Nicholas W; McVean, Gilean; Reveille, John D; Wordsworth, B Paul; Brown, Matthew A; Donnelly, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common form of inflammatory arthritis predominantly affecting the spine and pelvis that occurs in approximately 5 out of 1,000 adults of European descent. Here we report the identification of three variants in the RUNX3, LTBR-TNFRSF1A and IL12B regions convincingly associated with ankylosing spondylitis (P < 5 × 10(-8) in the combined discovery and replication datasets) and a further four loci at PTGER4, TBKBP1, ANTXR2 and CARD9 that show strong association across all our datasets (P < 5 × 10(-6) overall, with support in each of the three datasets studied). We also show that polymorphisms of ERAP1, which encodes an endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase involved in peptide trimming before HLA class I presentation, only affect ankylosing spondylitis risk in HLA-B27-positive individuals. These findings provide strong evidence that HLA-B27 operates in ankylosing spondylitis through a mechanism involving aberrant processing of antigenic peptides. PMID:21743469

  11. Interaction between ERAP1 and HLA-B27 in ankylosing spondylitis implicates peptide handling in the mechanism for HLA-B27 in disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David M; Spencer, Chris C A; Pointon, Jennifer J; Su, Zhan; Harvey, David; Kochan, Grazyna; Oppermann, Udo; Dilthey, Alexander; Pirinen, Matti; Stone, Millicent A; Appleton, Louise; Moutsianas, Loukas; Leslie, Stephen; Wordsworth, Tom; Kenna, Tony J; Karaderi, Tugce; Thomas, Gethin P; Ward, Michael M; Weisman, Michael H; Farrar, Claire; Bradbury, Linda A; Danoy, Patrick; Inman, Robert D; Maksymowych, Walter; Gladman, Dafna; Rahman, Proton; Morgan, Ann; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Bowness, Paul; Gaffney, Karl; Gaston, J S Hill; Smith, Malcolm; Bruges-Armas, Jacome; Couto, Ana-Rita; Sorrentino, Rosa; Paladini, Fabiana; Ferreira, Manuel A; Xu, Huji; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Lei; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Díaz-Peña, Roberto; López-Vázquez, Antonio; Zayats, Tetyana; Band, Gavin; Bellenguez, Céline; Blackburn, Hannah; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Bramon, Elvira; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Casas, Juan P; Corvin, Aiden; Craddock, Nicholas; Deloukas, Panos; Dronov, Serge; Duncanson, Audrey; Edkins, Sarah; Freeman, Colin; Gillman, Matthew; Gray, Emma; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hammond, Naomi; Hunt, Sarah E; Jankowski, Janusz; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; Langford, Cordelia; Liddle, Jennifer; Markus, Hugh S; Mathew, Christopher G; McCann, Owen T; McCarthy, Mark I; Palmer, Colin N A; Peltonen, Leena; Plomin, Robert; Potter, Simon C; Rautanen, Anna; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Ricketts, Michelle; Samani, Nilesh; Sawcer, Stephen J; Strange, Amy; Trembath, Richard C; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Waller, Matthew; Weston, Paul; Whittaker, Pamela; Widaa, Sara; Wood, Nicholas W; McVean, Gilean; Reveille, John D; Wordsworth, B Paul; Brown, Matthew A; Donnelly, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common form of inflammatory arthritis predominantly affecting the spine and pelvis that occurs in approximately 5 out of 1,000 adults of European descent. Here we report the identification of three variants in the RUNX3, LTBRTNFRSF1A and IL12B regions convincingly associated with ankylosing spondylitis (P < 5 × 10?8 in the combined discovery and replication datasets) and a further four loci at PTGER4, TBKBP1, ANTXR2 and CARD9 that show strong association across all our datasets (P < 5 × 10?6 overall, with support in each of the three datasets studied). We also show that polymorphisms of ERAP1, which encodes an endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase involved in peptide trimming before HLA class I presentation, only affect ankylosing spondylitis risk in HLA-B27–positive individuals. These findings provide strong evidence that HLA-B27 operates in ankylosing spondylitis through a mechanism involving aberrant processing of antigenic peptides. PMID:21743469

  12. High-dose thalidomide increases the risk of peripheral neuropathy in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hong-Xia; Fu, Wen-Yi; Cui, Hua-Dong; Yang, Li-Li; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Li-Juan

    2015-05-01

    Thalidomide is an effective drug for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis but might induce peripheral neuropathy. This major adverse reaction has attracted much concern. The current study aimed to observe the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy among ankylosing spondylitis patients for 1 year after treatment. In this study, 207 ankylosing spondylitis cases received thalidomide treatment, while 116 ankylosing spondylitis cases received other treatments. Results showed that the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy in the thalidomide group was higher than that in the non-thalidomide group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of neuropathy between the < 6 months medication and ? 6 months medication groups. There were no differences in the mean age, gender, or daily dose between the two groups. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy among patients receiving 25, 50, 75, or 100 mg thalidomide per day was 4.6%, 8.5%, 17.1%, 21.7%, respectively. The incidence was significantly different between the groups receiving 25 mg and 100 mg thalidomide. In conclusion, thalidomide can induce peripheral neuropathy within 1 year after treatment of ankylosing spondylitis; however, age and gender have no obvious impact on the incidence of peripheral neuropathy. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy is associated with increasing daily doses of thalidomide. PMID:26109960

  13. High-dose thalidomide increases the risk of peripheral neuropathy in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hong-xia; Fu, Wen-yi; Cui, Hua-dong; Yang, Li-li; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Li-juan

    2015-01-01

    Thalidomide is an effective drug for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis but might induce peripheral neuropathy. This major adverse reaction has attracted much concern. The current study aimed to observe the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy among ankylosing spondylitis patients for 1 year after treatment. In this study, 207 ankylosing spondylitis cases received thalidomide treatment, while 116 ankylosing spondylitis cases received other treatments. Results showed that the incidence of thalidomide-induced peripheral neuropathy in the thalidomide group was higher than that in the non-thalidomide group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of neuropathy between the < 6 months medication and ? 6 months medication groups. There were no differences in the mean age, gender, or daily dose between the two groups. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy among patients receiving 25, 50, 75, or 100 mg thalidomide per day was 4.6%, 8.5%, 17.1%, 21.7%, respectively. The incidence was significantly different between the groups receiving 25 mg and 100 mg thalidomide. In conclusion, thalidomide can induce peripheral neuropathy within 1 year after treatment of ankylosing spondylitis; however, age and gender have no obvious impact on the incidence of peripheral neuropathy. The incidence of peripheral neuropathy is associated with increasing daily doses of thalidomide. PMID:26109960

  14. Serum matrix metalloproteinases-3 levels in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Gao, J W; Zhang, K F; Lu, J S; Su, T

    2015-01-01

    Cumulated evidence indicates that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) is significantly involved in cancer progression. Recent studies yielded conflicting results regarding the association between serum MMP-3 and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). To clarify this correlation, we performed a meta-analysis. Potential relevant studies were identified by searching the following databases: PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Science Citation Index database, the Cochrane Library, Current Contents Index, Chinese Biomedical, the Chinese Journal Full-Text, and the Weipu Journal. Data from eligible studies were extracted and included into the meta-analysis using a random-effect model. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the association between serum MMP-3 levels and AS. Thirteen case-control studies, including 707 AS cases and 442 healthy controls, were selected for the meta-analysis. The results indicate a significantly higher serum MMP-3 level in patients with AS than that in the controls (cases vs controls: SMD = 1.31, 95%CI = 0.84-1.78, P < 0.001). Ethnicity-subgroup analysis indicated a higher MMP-3 level in Asian and Caucasian patients with AS (all P < 0.05). This meta-analysis indicates that increased serum MMP-3 level correlates with the development of AS, suggesting that MMP-3 may present a clinical value in reflecting the progression of AS. Further larger sample size studies are warranted. PMID:26681054

  15. First update of the international ASAS consensus statement for the use of anti?TNF agents in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Braun, J; Davis, J; Dougados, M; Sieper, J; van der Linden, S; van der Heijde, D

    2006-01-01

    Objective To update the international recommendations for use of anti?tumour necrosis factor (TNF) agents in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. Methods The published recommendations on anti?TNF treatment in ankylosing spondylitis formed the basis of the update. A questionnaire was sent to the ASAS (assessment in ankylosing spondylitis) members before the final decisions were agreed upon at an international meeting of the ASAS working group. Results Only minor changes to the original consensus statement were required. For the initiation of anti?TNF treatment, there should be: a diagnosis of definitive ankylosing spondylitis (normally based on modified New York criteria); active disease for at least four weeks, as defined by a sustained Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI) of ?4 on a 0–10 scale and expert opinion based on clinical findings; refractory disease, defined by failure of at least two non?steroidal anti?inflammatory drugs during a three month period, failure of intra?articular steroids (if indicated), and failure of sulfasalazine in patients with predominantly peripheral arthritis; and application of the usual precautions and contraindications for biological treatment. For monitoring anti?TNF treatment: both the ASAS core set for clinical practice and the BASDAI should be followed after the initiation of treatment. Discontinuation of anti?TNF treatment in non?responders should be considered after 6–12?weeks. Response is defined by improvement of at least 50% or 2 units (on a 0–10 scale) of the BASDAI. Conclusions This updated consensus statement is recommended in guiding clinical practice and as a basis for developing national guidelines. Evaluation and regular update of this consensus statement is subject to further research by the ASAS group. PMID:16096329

  16. Delayed Traumatic Diaphragm Hernia after Thoracolumbar Fracture in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoun-Ho; Kim, Sang Woo; Jung, Young Jin

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic diaphragm hernia can occur in rare cases and generally accompanies thoracic or abdominal injuries. When suffering from ankylosing spondylitis, a small force can develop into vertebral fracture and an adjacent structural injury, and lead to diaphragm hernia without accompanying concomitant thoracoabdominal injury. A high level of suspicion may be a most reliable diagnostic tool in the detection of a diaphragm injury, and we need to keep in mind a possibility in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis and a thoracolumbar fracture, even in the case of minor trauma. PMID:25733996

  17. Long-term safety and efficacy of infliximab for the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Elalouf, Ofir; Elkayam, Ori

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of TNF? blockers has revolutionized the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The objectives of this review are to summarize the most up-to-date data on long-term efficacy and safety of infliximab in AS, with special emphasis on axial and extra-articular disease, predictors of response, and radiological response. The general consensus of this literature search was that infliximab is highly efficacious in the treatment of AS. Most studies have demonstrated good clinical outcomes after 3 years of treatment, as measured by Spondyloarthritis International Society response in 75%–85% of treated AS patients. Reports on the long-term effects of infliximab as documented by radiological findings, however, are controversial. While some studies reported a similar progression rate as that of the historical OASIS cohort, others have suggested that infliximab may halt new bone formation. The long-term safety of infliximab is well known, mainly from data stored in national registries. While it has been suggested that side effects of infliximab may be fewer in AS compared to rheumatoid arthritis, data on this issue are sparse, with most of the information on long-term safety pertaining to rheumatoid arthritis. It can however be concluded that the long-term efficacy of infliximab is apparently maintained in AS and with an acceptable safety profile. PMID:26640380

  18. Logistic transmission modeling of HLA and ankylosing spondylitis

    SciTech Connect

    Scofield, R.H.; Neas, B.R.; Harley, J.B.

    1994-09-01

    A nonparametric and general method of linkage analysis has been developed and used to evaluate histocompatibility (HLA) linkage to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) from the data of Berg & Moller. The conditional logistic function has been used to establish linkage by stepwise modelling of transmission from parent to progeny. Logistic transmission models have been explored to better understand the relationship of HLA to AS. The alleles at HLA-A and -B were determined in 38 families (32 monoplex and 6 multiplex). We have found that linkage is supported in this data over the random transmission of alleles at only HLA-B. Models constructed at HLA-B are powerful with, for example, coefficients for B27 of 1.9 (S.E. = 0.4) and B40 of 1.6 (S.E. = 0.8) contributing to a model with {chi}{sup 2} = 30 with 2 df and p < 3x10{sup -7}. No models are found supporting linkage at HLA-A and, therefore, the data at HLA-A does not add support for linkage beyond that present at HLA-B (e.g., {chi}{sup 2} for improvement < 1). These results establish that HLA-B is linked to AS. They further provide evidence that the gene responsible for AS is located nearer to HLA-B than it is to HLA-A. Also, the analysis shows that a number of HLA-B alleles may contribute to the risk of AS, beyond the B27 allele which has repeatedly been associated with AS.

  19. ASAS/EULAR recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Zochling, J; van der Heijde, D; Burgos?Vargas, R; Collantes, E; Davis, J C; Dijkmans, B; Dougados, M; Géher, P; Inman, R D; Khan, M A; Kvien, T K; Leirisalo?Repo, M; Olivieri, I; Pavelka, K; Sieper, J; Stucki, G; Sturrock, R D; van der Linden, S; Wendling, D; Böhm, H; van Royen, B J; Braun, J

    2006-01-01

    Objective To develop evidence based recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) as a combined effort of the ‘ASsessment in AS' international working group and the European League Against Rheumatism. Methods Each of the 22 participants was asked to contribute up to 15 propositions describing key clinical aspects of AS management. A Delphi process was used to select 10 final propositions. A systematic literature search was then performed to obtain scientific evidence for each proposition. Outcome data for efficacy, adverse effects, and cost effectiveness were abstracted. The effect size, relative risk, number needed to treat, and incremental cost effectiveness ratio were calculated. On the basis of the search results, 10 major recommendations for the management of AS were constructed. The strength of recommendation was assessed based on the strength of the literature evidence, risk?benefit trade?off, and clinical expertise. Results The final recommendations considered the use of non?steroidal anti?inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (conventional NSAIDs, coxibs, and co?prescription of gastroprotective agents), disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, treatments with biological agents, simple analgesics, local and systemic steroids, non?pharmacological treatment (including education, exercise, and physiotherapy), and surgical interventions. Three general recommendations were also included. Research evidence (categories I–IV) supported 11 interventions in the treatment of AS. Strength of recommendation varied, depending on the category of evidence and expert opinion. Conclusion Ten key recommendations for the treatment of AS were developed and assessed using a combination of research based evidence and expert consensus. Regular updating will be carried out to keep abreast of new developments in the management of AS. PMID:16126791

  20. The impact of ankylosing spondylitis on audiovestibular functions.

    PubMed

    Kapusuz Gencer, Zeliha; Özk?r??, Mahmut; Günayd?n, Ilhan; Saydam, Levent

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the audiovestibular functions in the patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This prospective study was performed in collaboration by the Otolaryngology and Rheumatology Departments of Bozok University School of Medicine between May 1, 2012, and January 1, 2013. We studied 80 subjects consisting of 40 AS patients (37 men and 3 women) in whom the diagnosis confirmed by the criteria of New York and 40 healthy controls (35 men and 5 women). All participants were evaluated by routine audiologic (including tympanometric evaluation, pure-tone audiograms, speech tests) and vestibular studies (including spontaneous nystagmus, gaze, optokinetic, saccadic movements, smooth pursuit, caloric test and Dix-Hallpike tests). The tympanometric values did not show a statistically significant difference between the AS group and the healthy subjects (p > 0.05). At low frequencies (250, 500, 1,000, and 2,000 Hz) pure-tone audiologic evaluations also proved statistically non-significant results at mean air conduction thresholds (ACT) and bone conduction thresholds (BCT) between the AS and control groups (p > 0.05). At high frequencies (4,000, 6,000, and 8,000 Hz), the ACTs and BCTs in AS group were lower than control group which was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The results of spontaneous nystagmus, gaze, optokinetic, canal paresis and saccadic movement tests between the two groups were statistically insignificant (p > 0.05). The comparison of smooth pursuit and Dix-Hallpike tests reached statistical significance (p < 0.05). Videonystagmographic test (VNG) revealed central abnormalities in 7 patients (17.5 %), peripheral abnormalities in 16 patients (40 %), and mixed abnormalities in 3 patients (7.5 %). Our findings suggest a possible association between AS and audiovestibular system dysfunction. We assume that the hearing and vestibular disturbances in AS are more prevalent than previously recognized. PMID:24096816

  1. Chest Wall Motion during Speech Production in Patients with Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalliakosta, Georgia; Mandros, Charalampos; Tzelepis, George E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production. Method: The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45 plus or minus 8 years, Schober test 1.45 plus or…

  2. Elevated serum interleukin-23 levels in ankylosing spondylitis patients and the relationship with disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Ugur, Mahir; Baygutalp, Nurcan Kilic; Melikoglu, Meltem Alkan; Baygutalp, Fatih; Altas, Elif Umay; Seferoglu, Buminhan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study was aimed to evaluate the relationship between serum interleukin-23 (IL-23) levels and ankylosing spondylitis (AS).Twenty male patients diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis according to the 1984 modified New York criteria for AS and twenty male healthy controls were included in this study.The demographic characteristics, clinical and laboratory findings of the patients were recorded. Serum IL-23 levels, C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were measured in both the AS and control groups. The Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity ?ndex (BASDAI), the Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI), and the Bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index (BASMI) were evaluated as disease activity parameters. The AS patients were divided into two subgroups as active and inactive in respect of CRP, ESR levels and BASDAI scores. The mean serum IL-23 levels of the AS and control groups were 334.45±176.54 pg/ml and 166.49±177.50 pg/ml respectively, and there was a significant difference between the groups. Correlation analysis of serum IL-23 levels with clinical and laboratory parameters showed that there were positive correlations between serum IL-23 levels and the BASDAI, BASFI scores in total, active and inactive patients and the BASMI scores in total and inactive patients and negative correlations between serum IL-23 levels and ESR in inactive patients. It was shown that altered serum IL-23 levels were related to AS disease activity. Further studies in large patient series are necessary to investigate the role of IL-23 protein in etiopathogenesis of AS. PMID:26663940

  3. Anti-tumour necrosis factor ? therapy for ankylosing spondylitis: international experience

    PubMed Central

    Braun, J; Sieper, J; Breban, M; Collantes-Estevez, E; Davis, J; Inman, R; Marzo-Ortega, H; Mielants, H

    2002-01-01

    The conventional approach to treatment of patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA), particularly ankylosing spondylitis (AS), has serious limitations, adding a sense of urgency to the evaluation of new treatments for these rheumatic disorders. Tumour necrosis factor ? (TNF?) is a cytokine that has been shown to mediate inflammatory and regulatory activities in SpA and other immune mediated diseases, including other arthritides and inflammatory bowel disease. Positive results have been reported in several international open label and randomised controlled trials of infliximab and etanercept, the two main biological agents targeting TNF?, which have included approximately 300 patients with SpA. Specifically, TNF?-directed therapy resulted in significant improvements in disease activity, function, and quality of life in these patients, most of whom had AS and received infliximab. Preliminary evidence from open label, long term extension trials suggests clinical benefit with continued use. Serious side effects were rare and consistent with experience from patient groups receiving infliximab or etanercept treatment for inflammatory bowel disease or rheumatoid arthritis. Together, these findings herald an age of more effective treatment of patients with AS with anti-TNF? and other emerging biological agents. PMID:12381511

  4. Integrated Genomics Identifies Convergence of Ankylosing Spondylitis with Global Immune Mediated Disease Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammed; Codner, Dianne; Mahmud Hasan, S M; Scherer, Stephen W; O’Rielly, Darren D; Rahman, Proton

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis(AS), a highly heritable complex inflammatory arthritis. Although, a handful of non-HLA risk loci have been identified, capturing the unexplained genetic contribution to AS pathogenesis remains a challenge attributed to additive, pleiotropic and epistatic-interactions at the molecular level. Here, we developed multiple integrated genomic approaches to quantify molecular convergence of non-HLA loci with global immune mediated diseases. We show that non-HLA genes are significantly sensitive to deleterious mutation accumulation in the general population compared with tolerant genes. Human developmental proteomics (prenatal to adult) analysis revealed that proteins encoded by non-HLA AS risk loci are 2-fold more expressed in adult hematopoietic cells.Enrichment analysis revealed AS risk genes overlap with a significant number of immune related pathways (p?

  5. Major histocompatibility complex associations of ankylosing spondylitis are complex and involve further epistasis with ERAP1

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Adrian; Pulit, Sara L.; Leo, Paul J.; Pointon, Jenny J.; Robinson, Philip C.; Weisman, Michael H.; Ward, Michael; Gensler, Lianne S.; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A.; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Bradbury, Linda A.; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Haroon, Nigil; Mulero, Juan; Blanco, Francisco J.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Lopez-Larrea, C; Bowness, Paul; Gaffney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D.; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P.; Crusius, J. Bart A.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M.; Inman, Robert D.; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Reveille, John D.; Evans, David M.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Brown, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a common, highly heritable, inflammatory arthritis for which HLA-B*27 is the major genetic risk factor, although its role in the aetiology of AS remains elusive. To better understand the genetic basis of the MHC susceptibility loci, we genotyped 7,264 MHC SNPs in 22,647 AS cases and controls of European descent. We impute SNPs, classical HLA alleles and amino-acid residues within HLA proteins, and tested these for association to AS status. Here we show that in addition to effects due to HLA-B*27 alleles, several other HLA-B alleles also affect susceptibility. After controlling for the associated haplotypes in HLA-B, we observe independent associations with variants in the HLA-A, HLA-DPB1 and HLA-DRB1 loci. We also demonstrate that the ERAP1 SNP rs30187 association is not restricted only to carriers of HLA-B*27 but also found in HLA-B*40:01 carriers independently of HLA-B*27 genotype. PMID:25994336

  6. Successful lumbar puncture with Taylor's approach for the diagnostic workup of meningitis in a patient with Ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Gentle Sunder; Acharya, Subhash Prasad; Keyal, Niraj; Paneru, Hem Raj; Shrestha, Pramesh Sunder

    2015-01-01

    Meningitis and encephalitis are the neurological emergencies. As the clinical findings lack specificity, once suspected, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis should be performed and parenteral antimicrobials should be administered without delay. Lumbar puncture can be technically challenging in patients with ankylosing spondylitis due to ossification of ligaments and obliteration of interspinous spaces. Here, we present a case of ankylosing spondylitis where attempts for lumbar puncture by conventional approach failed. CSF sample was successfully obtained by Taylor's approach. PMID:26628829

  7. Large differences in cost of illness and wellbeing between patients with fibromyalgia, chronic low back pain, or ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Boonen, A; van den Heuvel, R; van Tubergen, A; Goossens, M; Severens, J; van der Heijde, D; van der Linden, S

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the cost of illness of three musculoskeletal conditions in relation to general wellbeing. Methods: Patients with fibromyalgia, chronic low back pain (CLBP), and ankylosing spondylitis who were referred to a specialist and participated in three randomised trials completed a cost diary for the duration of the study, comprising direct medical and non-medical resource utilisation and inability to perform paid and unpaid work. Patients rated perceived wellbeing (0–100) at baseline. Univariate differences in costs between the groups were estimated by bootstrapping. Regression analyses assessed which variables, in addition to the condition, contributed to costs and wellbeing. Results: 70 patients with fibromyalgia, 110 with chronic low back pain, and 111 with ankylosing spondylitis provided data for the cost analyses. Average annual disease related total societal costs per patient were €7813 for fibromyalgia, €8533 for CLBP, and €3205 for ankylosing spondylitis. Total costs were higher for fibromyalgia and CLBP than for ankylosing spondylitis, mainly because of cost of formal and informal care, aids and adaptations, and work days lost. Wellbeing was lower in fibromyalgia (mean, 48) and low back pain (mean, 42) than in ankylosing spondylitis (mean, 67). No variables other than diagnostic group contributed to differences in costs or wellbeing. Conclusions: In patients under the care of a specialist, there were marked differences in costs and wellbeing between those with fibromyalgia or CLBP and those with ankylosing spondylitis. In particular, direct non-medical costs and productivity costs were higher in fibromyalgia and CLBP. PMID:15271773

  8. A Literature Review of Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis: Perioperative Considerations and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Putnis, S.E; Wartemberg, G.K; Khan, W.S; Agarwal, S

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a spondyloarthropathy affecting the sacro-iliac joints with subsequent progression to the spine and the hip joints. The hip joints are affected by synovitis, enthesial inflammation, involvement of medullary bone, progressive degeneration and secondary osteoarthritis. Clinical presentation is usually in the form of pain and stiffness progressing to disabling fixed flexion contractures and in some instances, complete ankylosis. Hip arthroplasty should be considered for hip pain, postural and functional disability, or pain in adjacent joints due to hip stiffness. We conducted a literature review to determine peri-operative considerations and outcome in ankylosing spondylitis patients undergoing hip arthroplasty. In this review, we have discussed pre-operative surgical planning, thromboprophylaxis, anaesthetic considerations and heterotopic ossification. Outcomes of arthroplasty include range of movement, pain relief, survivorship and complications. PMID:26587066

  9. The indirect costs of ankylosing spondylitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Krzysztof Piotr; Kawalec, Pawe?

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to collect and summarize all current data on the indirect costs related to absenteeism and presenteeism associated with ankylosing spondylitis. The search was conducted using Medline, Embase and Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases. All collected costs were recalculated to average annual cost per patient, expressed in 2013 prices USD using the consumer price index and purchasing power parity. Identified studies were then analyzed to assess their possible inclusion in the meta-analysis. We identified 32 records. The average annual indirect cost per patient varies among all the identified results from US$660.95 to 45,953.87. The mean annual indirect per patient equals US$6454.76. This systematic review summarizes current data related to indirect costs generated by ankylosing spondylitis; it revealed the great economic burden of the disease for society. We observed a great variety of the considered components of indirect costs and their definitions. PMID:25579502

  10. Outcomes of a multicentre randomised clinical trial of etanercept to treat ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Calin, A; Dijkmans, B; Emery, P; Hakala, M; Kalden, J; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Mola, E; Salvarani, C; Sanmarti, R; Sany, J; Sibilia, J; Sieper, J; van der Linden, S; Veys, E; Appel, A; Fatenejad, S

    2004-01-01

    Objective: A double blind, randomised, placebo controlled study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of etanercept to treat adult patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods: Adult patients with AS at 14 European sites were randomly assigned to 25 mg injections of etanercept or placebo twice weekly for 12 weeks. The primary efficacy end point was an improvement of at least 20% in patient reported symptoms, based on the multicomponent Assessments in Ankylosing Spondylitis (ASAS) response criteria (ASAS 20). Secondary end points included ASAS 50 and ASAS 70 responses and improved scores on individual components of ASAS, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), acute phase reactants, and spinal mobility tests. Safety was evaluated during scheduled visits. Results: Of 84 patients enrolled, 45 received etanercept and 39 received placebo. Significantly more etanercept patients than placebo patients responded at the ASAS 20 level as early as week 2, and sustained differences were evident up to week 12. Significantly more etanercept patients reported ASAS 50 responses at all times and ASAS 70 responses at weeks 2, 4, and 8; reported lower composite and fatigue BASDAI scores; had lower acute phase reactant levels; and had improved spinal flexion. Etanercept was well tolerated. Most adverse events were mild to moderate; the only between-group difference was injection site reactions, which occurred significantly more often in etanercept patients. Conclusions: Etanercept is a well tolerated and effective treatment for reducing clinical symptoms and signs of AS. PMID:15345498

  11. Tc-99m HIG Scintigraphy in Detection of Active Inflammation in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Özdo?an, Özhan; De?irmenci, Berna; ?enocak, Özlem; Gülbahar, Selmin; Arslan, Gülhan; Ta?ç?, Cengiz; Akal?n, Elif; Durak, Hatice

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The diagnosis of active inflammation in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is crucial for treatment to delay possible persistent deformities. There are no specific laboratory tests and imaging methods to clarify the active disease. We evaluated the value of Tc-99m human immunoglobulin (HIG) scintigraphy in detection of active inflammation. Material and Methods: Twenty-nine patients were included. Tc-99m methylenediphosphonate bone (MDP) and HIG scintigraphies were performed within 2-5 day intervals. Two control groups were constituted both for MDP and HIG scintigraphies. Active inflammation was determined clinically and by serologic tests. Both scintigraphies were evaluated visually. Sacroiliac joint index values (SII) were calculated. Results: Active inflammation was considered in five (sacroiliitis in 2, sacroiliitis-spinal inflammation in 1, achilles tendinitis in 1, arthritis of coxafemoral joints in 1) patients. HIG scintigraphy demonstrated active disease in all 3 patients with active sacroiliitis. But, it was negative in the rest. The other 2 active cases were HIG negative. Right and left SII obtained from HIG scintigraphy was higher (p<0.05) in clinically active patients than inactive patients. There was not any significant difference between patients with inactive sacroiliitis and normal controls. Right and left SII obtained from bone scintigraphy was higher (p<0.05) in patient group than in control group. Conclusion: Clinically inactive AS patients, behave no differently than normal controls with quantitative sacroiliac joint evaluation on HIG scintigraphy. HIG scintigraphy may be valuable for evaluation of sacroiliac joints in patients with uncResults:ertain laboratory and clinical findings. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23486228

  12. Which patients with ankylosing spondylitis should be treated with tumour necrosis factor inhibiting therapy? A survey among Dutch rheumatologists

    PubMed Central

    Landewe, R; Rump, B; van der Heijde, D; van der Linden, S

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To determine the criteria considered important by Dutch rheumatologists in judging whether a patient with ankylosing spondylitis should start tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blocking therapy. Methods: 19 Dutch rheumatologists were asked to prioritise various demographic and clinical features for their importance in judging whether a patient should be treated with TNF blocking therapy. In addition, nine Dutch physicians who had referred patients with ankylosing spondylitis for inclusion in an ongoing long term observational study (OASIS) were asked to determine on the basis of case record review for each of their patients whether or not TNF blocking therapy would be considered appropriate. Results: The variables considered most important were: rate of development of functional impairment; physician's global assessment of current disease activity; physician's global assessment of cumulative disease activity; presence of hip arthritis; physician's global assessment of disease severity. Analysis of the OASIS data (79 patients) showed that patients in whom TNF blocking therapy was considered justified (n = 24; 30%) differed significantly from those in whom it was not considered justified in: patient reported disease activity; functional impairment; spinal mobility; radiographic damage score. Multivariate analysis showed that male sex, function, and radiographic damage were the only independent determinants of a decision to start TNF blocking drugs. Conclusions: Physicians reported that disease activity, function, and severity were critically important in judging whether to start TNF blocking therapy. In practice, they based their decision more on severity than on activity. They were able to select patients with a high level of radiographic damage, which suggests that this feature captures other domains such as disease activity, spinal mobility, and function. PMID:15082483

  13. Fluoroscopy-guided Intra-articular Sacroiliac Joint Steroid Injection for Sacroiliitis in Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, PUA; Dewar, NA; Tulloch-Reid, D

    2014-01-01

    Sacroiliitis, a condition commonly seen in ankylosing spondylitis, is well known to be one of the main pain generators of low back pain, which may result in difficulty with walking. A 20-year old male with history of ankylosing spondylitis presented to the University Hospital of the West Indies, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic, with a two-year history of right buttock, low back and groin pain. Radiographic evaluation revealed increased sclerosis and erosive changes in bilateral sacroiliac joints, right greater than left. Right intra-articular sacroiliac joint steroid injection was administered under fluoroscopy guidance. Post-injection visual analogue pain scale (VAS) score with activity improved from 8 to 1 and Oswestry Disability Index improved from 40% moderate disability to 16% minimal disability. The patient's overall assessment was 95% perceived improvement in pain. This case report illustrates the effectiveness of intra-articular sacroiliac joint steroid injection in treating sacroiliitis in ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:25303203

  14. Airway management in a patient of ankylosing spondylitis with traumatic cervical spine injury.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nilesh; Bindra, Ashish; Mahajan, Charu; Yadav, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic cervical lesions compressing the spinal cord pose a significant risk of exacerbating the existing neurological condition during tracheal intubation and subsequent positioning. Preexisting ankylosing spondylitis with spinal column involvement renders the spinal column more rigid and introduces difficulty in airway management of the patient with traumatic cervical spinal cord. To improve ease and success, and reduce cervical spine movement, awake fibreoptic intubation (FOI) is considered the gold standard technique for airway management in such cases. Attaining appropriate position for intubation was challenge in this case due to rigid curvature of the ankylosed spinal column. To prevent neurological injury to the spinal cord and preserve spinal cord function, minimizing movement during intubation and attaining appropriate position was of prime concern. Optimal sedation with self-positioning by the patient in a comfortable posture is quite imperative and assures both airway as well as neurological protection in such expected difficult situations. We report the use of dexmedetomidine for self-positioning and awake FOI in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis having traumatic cervical spine who was otherwise neither able to co-operative nor able to give appropriate position for FOI. PMID:26240557

  15. Results of Corrective Osteotomy and Treatment Strategy for Ankylosing Spondylitis with Kyphotic Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Tack; Lee, Sang-Hun; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background To report the radiological and clinical results after corrective osteotomy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. Furthermore, this study intended to classify the types of deformity and to suggest appropriate surgical treatment options. Methods We retrospectively analyzed ankylosing spondylitis patients who underwent corrective osteotomy between 1996 and 2009. The radiographic assessments included the sagittal vertical axis (SVA), spinopelvic alignment parameters, correction angle, correction loss, type of deformity related to the location of the apex, and the craniocervical range of motion (CCROM). The clinical outcomes were assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores. Results A total of 292 corrective osteotomies were performed in 248 patients with a mean follow-up of 40.1 months (range, 24 to 78 months). There were 183 cases of single pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO), 19 cases of multiple Smith-Petersen osteotomy (SPO), 17 cases of PSO + SPO, 14 cases of single SPO, six cases of posterior vertebral column resection (PVCR), five cases of PSO + partial pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PPSO), and four cases of PPSO. The mean correction angles were 31.9° ± 11.7° with PSO, 14.3° ± 8.4° with SPO, 38.3° ± 12.7° with PVCR, and 19.3° ± 7.1° with PPSO. The thoracolumbar type was the most common. The outcome analysis showed a significant improvement in the ODI score (p < 0.05). Statistical analysis revealed that the ODI score improvements correlated significantly with the postoperative SVA and CCROM (p < 0.05). There was no correlation between the clinical outcomes and spinopelvic parameters. There were 38 surgery-related complications in 25 patients (10.1%). Conclusions Corrective osteotomy is an effective method for treating a fixed kyphotic deformity occurring in ankylosing spondylitis, resulting in satisfactory outcomes with acceptable complications. The CCROM and postoperative SVA were important factors in determining the outcome. PMID:26330955

  16. Intestinal Behçet's disease appearing during treatment with adalimumab in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sook Hee; Park, Soo Jung; Hong, Sung Pil; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho

    2013-08-28

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting multiple organ systems, such as the skin, joints, blood vessels, central nervous system, and gastrointestinal tract. Intestinal BD is characterized by intestinal ulcerations and gastrointestinal symptoms. The medical treatment of intestinal BD includes corticosteroids and immunosupressants. There have been several reports of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) blockers being successful in treatment of refractory intestinal BD. Here, we report on a patient who was diagnosed with intestinal BD despite treatment with the fully humanized TNF-? blocker (adalimumab) for underlying ankylosing spondylitis. This patient achieved clinical remission and complete mucosal healing through the addition of a steroid and azathioprine to the adalimumab regimen. PMID:23983446

  17. Elevated Serum Levels of Soluble CD30 in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients and Its Association with Disease Severity-Related Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Rongfen; Sun, Wei; Chen, Yu; Su, Yuying; Wang, Chenqiong; Dong, Lingli

    2015-01-01

    Soluble CD30 (sCD30), a transmembrane glycoprotein that belongs to the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily, has been shown to be associated with various pathological conditions. This study was designed to measure the levels of serum sCD30 in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to evaluate the relationships between serum sCD30 levels and other disease severity-related indexes, including bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index (BASDAI), ankylosing spondylitis disease activity score (ASDAS), and bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI). Our results demonstrated significantly elevated sCD30 levels in AS patients compared to healthy controls (HCs) with mean values of 32.0 ± 12.2 and 24.9 ± 8.0?ng/mL, respectively (P** = 0.007), suggesting a potential role of sCD30 in the pathogenesis of AS. However, no significant correlations of sCD30 with BASDAI, ASDAS, or BASFI were detected in our study (P > 0.05). Therefore, sCD30 cannot be used as a reliable marker for reflecting disease activity and functional ability of AS patients. PMID:26273636

  18. Bilateral hip pain in a young man? It may be worth considering juvenile-onset ankylosing spondylitis (JAS).

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Neetu Nandkishore; Patil, Dnyanesh; Nagendra, Shashank; Jadhav, Shailesh Maruti

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old boy with severe bilateral hip joint pain and restriction of mobility presented to the casualty ward. He had earlier been treated for tuberculosis of the hip, with no relief. Our work up revealed a case of severe juvenile-onset ankylosing spondylitis with predominant hip involvement and accompanying sacroiliitis. PMID:26511993

  19. Is magnetotherapy applied to bilateral hips effective in ankylosing spondylitis patients? A randomized, double-blind, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Turan, Yasemin; Bayraktar, Kevser; Kahvecioglu, Fatih; Tastaban, Engin; Aydin, Elif; Kurt Omurlu, Imran; Berkit, Isil Karatas

    2014-03-01

    This double-blind, randomized controlled study was conducted with the aim to investigate the effect of magnetic field therapy applied to the hip region on clinical and functional status in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Patients with AS (n = 66) who were diagnosed according to modified New York criteria were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomly divided in two groups. Participants were randomly assigned to receive magnetic field therapy (2 Hz) (n = 35), or placebo magnetic field therapy (n = 31) each hip region for 20 min. Patients in each group were given heat pack and short-wave treatments applied to bilateral hip regions. Both groups had articular range of motion and stretching exercises and strengthening exercises for surrounding muscles for the hip region as well as breathing and postural exercises by the same physical therapist. These treatment protocols were continued for a total of 15 sessions (1 session per day), and patients were examined by the same physician at months 1, 3 and 6. Visual analogue scale (VAS) pain, VAS fatigue, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrologic Index (BASMI), DFI, Harris hip assessment index and Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life scale (ASQOL) were obtained at the beginning of therapy and at month 1, month 3 and month 6 for each patient. There were no significant differences between groups in the VAS pain, VAS fatigue, morning stiffness, BASDAI, BASFI, BASMI, DFI, Harris hip assessment index and ASQoL at baseline, month 1, month 3 or month 6 (p > 0.05). Further randomized, double-blind controlled studies are needed in order to establish the evidence level for the efficacy of modalities with known analgesic and anti-inflammatory action such as magnetotherapy, particularly in rheumatic disorders associated with chronic pain. PMID:24399455

  20. Direct and indirect costs associated with ankylosing spondylitis and related disease activity scores in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Akkoç, Nurullah; Direskeneli, Haner; Erdem, Hakan; Gül, Ahmet; Kabasakal, Yasemin; Kiraz, Sedat; Balkan Tezer, Dilara; Hac?bedel, Ba?ak; Hamuryudan, Vedat

    2015-09-01

    This study assessed quality of life, direct and indirect healthcare costs related to ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This study included 650 prevalent AS patients visiting seven centers at tertiary healthcare institutions in Turkey who were interviewed using a standard questionnaire to determine annual direct and indirect healthcare costs. Eligible patients were age ?18 years with AS for at least 12 months. Direct costs were categorized as inpatient, outpatient and pharmacy, and AS-related consultation. Indirect costs were categorized as workday loss, additional AS-related costs, and caregiver costs. Clinical outcome measures were obtained, including Patients' Global Disease Activity (Pt-GDA); visual analog scale (Pain-VAS) for pain; Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Functional Index (BASFI), and Metrology Index (BASMI) scores, and EuroQoL 5 dimension (EQ-5D) health status survey scores. Mean (€,335.20) and median (€5,671.00) annual costs per patient were calculated. Pharmacy costs (€4,032.73) were highest among overall expenditures, followed by additional AS-related consultation (€2,480.38), outpatient (€225.02), and inpatient costs (€29.98). Over half of AS patients (54.8 %) experienced work loss. Related average annual costs were €414.16, based on income level. 10.3 % of AS patients incurred an additional €2,008.07 in 1 year. 6.8 % of patients required caregivers and incurred €778.70 in average annual patient paid costs. Mean Pt-GDA, Pain-VAS, EQ-5D, BASDAI, BASFI, and BASMI scores were 4.4, 40.5, 62.7, 3.6, 3.1, and 2.9, respectively. Direct and indirect AS-related costs are high and represent a considerable economic burden on Turkish AS patients. PMID:25749712

  1. Patient perspectives of managing fatigue in Ankylosing Spondylitis, and views on potential interventions: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fatigue is a major component of living with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), though it has been largely over-looked, and currently there are no specific agreed management strategies. Methods This qualitative exploratory study involved participants who are members of an existing population-based ankylosing spondylitis (PAS) cohort. Participants residing in South West Wales were invited to participate in a focus group to discuss; (1) effects of fatigue, (2) self-management strategies and (3) potential future interventions. The focus groups were audio-recorded and the transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Participants consisted of 3 males/4 females (group 1) and 4 males/3 females (group 2), aged between 35 and 73?years (mean age 53?years). Three main themes were identified: (1) The effects of fatigue were multi-dimensional with participants expressing feelings of being ‘drained’ (physical), ‘upset’ (emotional) and experiencing ‘low-mood’ (psychological); (2) The most commonly reported self-management strategy for fatigue was a balanced combination of activity (exercise) and rest. Medication was reluctantly taken due to side-effects and worries over dependency; (3) Participants expressed a preference for psychological therapies rather than pharmacological for managing fatigue. Information on Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) was received with interest, with recommendations for delivery in a group format with the option of distance-based delivery for people who were not able to attend a group course. Conclusions Patients frequently try and manage their fatigue without any formal guidance or support. Our research indicates there is a need for future research to focus on psychological interventions to address the multi-faceted aspects of fatigue in AS. PMID:23659344

  2. Translation and validation of the Turkish version of the Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQOL) questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Duruöz, M T; Doward, L; Turan, Y; Cerrahoglu, L; Yurtkuran, M; Calis, M; Tas, N; Ozgocmen, S; Yoleri, O; Durmaz, B; Oncel, S; Tuncer, T; Sendur, O; Birtane, M; Tuzun, F; Bingol, U; Kirnap, M; Celik Erturk, G; Ardicoglu, O; Memis, A; Atamaz, F; Kizil, R; Kacar, C; Gurer, G; Uzunca, K; Sari, H

    2013-11-01

    The Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) questionnaire is a disease-specific measure of needs-based quality of life developed in the UK and the Netherlands. This study describes translation, validation, and reliability of the scale into Turkish population. The ASQoL was translated into Turkish using the dual-panel process. Content validity was assessed via cognitive debriefing interviews with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Patients with AS according to modified New York criteria were recruited into the study from 12 hospitals of all part of Turkey. Psychometric and scaling properties were assessed via a two administration survey involving the ASQoL, the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI), and Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). Classical psychometrics assessed reliability, convergent validity (correlation of ASQoL with NHP, BASFI, and BASDAI) and discriminative validity (correlation of ASQoL with perceived AS-severity and general health). Cognitive debriefing showed the new Turkish ASQoL to be clear, relevant, and comprehensive. Completed survey questionnaires were received from 277 AS patients (80% Male, mean age 42.2/SD 11.6, mean AS duration 9.4 years/SD 9.4). Test-retest reliability was excellent (0.96), indicating low random measurement error for the scale. Correlations of ASQoL with NHP sections were low to moderate (NHP Sleep 0.34; NHP Emotional Reactions 0.83) suggesting the measures assess related but distinct constructs. The measure was able to discriminate between patients based on their perceived disease severity (p < 0.0001) and self-reported general health (p < 0.0001). The Turkish version of ASQoL has good reliability and validity properties. It is practical and useful scale to assess the quality of life in AS patients in Turkish population. PMID:23765201

  3. Non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis: what are the similarities and differences?

    PubMed Central

    Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2015-01-01

    The development of the axial spondyloarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis (ASAS) classification criteria has had several implications for our understanding of the entire spectrum of spondyloarthritides (SpA). Going beyond the modified New York criteria, which concentrate on conventional radiographs of the sacroiliac joints (SIJ) for the classification of ankylosing spondylitis, the ASAS criteria add active inflammation of the SIJ as obtained by MRI and human leucocyte antigen (HLA) B27 to classify patients with chronic back pain starting at a young age as axial SpA (axSpA). AxSpA should be considered as one disease that includes AS, the radiographic form, as well as the non-radiographic (nr-axSpA) form. Similarities and differences between these subgroups have been described in 3 studies: 1 local study, 1 national study (German SpA Inception Cohort) and 1 international study mainly conducted to test the efficacy of a tumour necrosis factor ? blocker. Most clinical features and assessments of axSpA showed the same prevalence in patients with and without radiographic changes. However, some differences have been observed: the male:female ratio, the proportion of patients with objective signs of inflammation such as bone marrow oedema as detected by MRI, and the proportion of patients with increased levels of C reactive protein were higher in patients with AS. Importantly, these factors have also been identified as prognostic factors for more severe disease in terms of new bone formation. Thus, nr-axSpA may represent an early stage of AS but may also just be an abortive form of a disease which does cause much pain but which may also never lead to structural changes of the axial skeleton. Since the cut-off between nr-axSpA and AS is artificial and unreliable, we think that the term nr-axSpA should not be used for diagnosis but only for classification for historical reasons. PMID:26557375

  4. Destructive Dural Ectasia of Dorsal and Lumbar Spine with Cauda Equina Syndrome in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Van Hoydonck, Marijke; de Vlam, Kurt; Westhovens, Rene; Luyten, Frank P; Lories, Rik J

    2010-01-01

    We present a patient with longstanding ankylosing spondylitis complicated with cauda equina syndrome. The patient suffered from increasing pain in the leg with reduced sensitivity and extremely cold feet associated with incontinence. Diagnostic workup revealed dural ectasia, arachnoiditis and a spinal inflammatory mass leading to extensive vertebral bone destruction. Of interest, this was not only found in the lumbar spine region (which is typical in cases of cauda equina syndrome associated with ankylosing spondylitis) but also in the lower cervical spine (C7) and upper dorsal spine. Moreover, the bone destructive phenotype of this complication of long-standing AS contrasts with the usual characteristics of new bone formation and ankylosis. As initial treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs was not sufficiently successful, infliximab therapy was started which resulted in manifest clinical improvement as chronic pain, incontinence and laboratory signs of inflammation progressively disappeared. PMID:21331306

  5. Trends in treatment and outcomes of ankylosing spondylitis in outpatient rheumatological care in Germany between 2000 and 2012

    PubMed Central

    Huscher, Dörte; Thiele, Katja; Rudwaleit, Martin; Albrecht, Katinka Charlotte; Bischoff, Sascha; Krause, Andreas; Karberg, Kirsten; Wassenberg, Siegfried; Zink, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe changes in drug treatment and clinical outcomes of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) during the past decade. Methods The national database of the German collaborative arthritis centres collects clinical and patient-derived data from unselected outpatients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Cross-sectional data from 2000 to 2012 of around 1000 patients with AS per year were compared with regard to clinical presentation and quality of life indicators. Results Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been the predominant treatment choice in AS over the years with a prescription rate of 67% of patients in 2012. Currently, almost half of the patients with AS in German rheumatology centres are treated with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi). Often, both treatments are used in combination (33%), followed by combinations of NSAIDs and synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (sDMARDs) with 23% or TNFi alone (21%). In 2012, 10% of patients each received NSAID or sDMARD monotherapy. Methotrexate, sulfasalazine, glucocorticoids and analgaesics alone or in combination with other treatments were given to 10% of patients, respectively. Over the years, we have seen remarkable improvements in disease control and patient reported outcomes. These developments are consistent with enhanced functional status, increasing employment rates and decreasing sick leave, hospitalisation and work disability. Conclusions In the German rheumatology secondary/tertiary care setting, routine care of patients with AS has changed tremendously during the past decade. Increasingly, more efficacious treatment options are reflected in improved clinical outcomes, quality of life and participation in the labour force. PMID:26535133

  6. The Cost of Ankylosing Spondylitis in the UK Using Linked Routine and Patient-Reported Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    Cooksey, Roxanne; Husain, Muhammad J.; Brophy, Sinead; Davies, Helen; Rahman, Muhammad A.; Atkinson, Mark D.; Phillips, Ceri J.; Siebert, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis which typically begins in early adulthood and impacts on healthcare resource utilisation and the ability to work. Previous studies examining the cost of AS have relied on patient-reported questionnaires based on recall. This study uses a combination of patient-reported and linked-routine data to examine the cost of AS in Wales, UK. Methods Participants in an existing AS cohort study (n = 570) completed questionnaires regarding work status, out-of-pocket expenses, visits to health professionals and disease severity. Participants gave consent for their data to be linked to routine primary and secondary care clinical datasets. Health resource costs were calculated using a bottom-up micro-costing approach. Human capital costs methods were used to estimate work productivity loss costs, particularly relating to work and early retirement. Regression analyses were used to account for age, gender, disease activity. Results The total cost of AS in the UK is estimated at £19016 per patient per year, calculated to include GP attendance, administration costs and hospital costs derived from routine data records, plus patient-reported non-NHS costs, out-of-pocket AS-related expenses, early retirement, absenteeism, presenteeism and unpaid assistance costs. The majority of the cost (>80%) was as a result of work-related costs. Conclusion The major cost of AS is as a result of loss of working hours, early retirement and unpaid carer’s time. Therefore, much of AS costs are hidden and not easy to quantify. Functional impairment is the main factor associated with increased cost of AS. Interventions which keep people in work to retirement age and reduce functional impairment would have the greatest impact on reducing costs of AS. The combination of patient-reported and linked routine data significantly enhanced the health economic analysis and this methodology that can be applied to other chronic conditions. PMID:26185984

  7. International ASAS consensus statement for the use of anti-tumour necrosis factor agents in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Braun, J; Pham, T; Sieper, J; Davis, J; van der Linden, S.; Dougados, M; van der Heijde, D

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To obtain an international consensus about the use of anti-tumour necrosis factor ? (anti-TNF?) for treating patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods: These recommendations were developed by a review of published reports in combination with expert opinion, including a Delphi exercise, and a consensus meeting of the ASsessments in AS (ASAS) Working Group. Results: The final consensus comprises the following requirements: (1) For the initiation of anti-TNF? therapy: (a) a diagnosis of definitive AS; (b) presence of active disease for at least four weeks as defined by both a sustained Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) of at least 4 and an expert opinion based on clinical features, acute phase reactants, and imaging modalities; (c) presence of refractory disease defined by failure of at least two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs during a single three month period, failure of intra-articular steroids if indicated, and failure of sulfasalazine in patients with peripheral arthritis; (d) application and implementation of the usual precautions and contraindications for biological therapy. (2) For the monitoring of anti-TNF? therapy: both the BASDAI and the ASAS core set for clinical practice should be followed regularly. (3) For the discontinuation of anti-TNF? therapy: in non-responders, consideration should be made after 6–12 weeks' treatment. Response is defined as improvement of (a) at least 50% or 2 units (on a 0–10 scale) of the BASDAI, (b) expert opinion that treatment should be continued. Conclusion: This consensus statement on anti-TNF? treatment in AS may be used for guidance in clinical decision making and as the basis for the development of guidelines. Evaluation of the healthcare consequences of this consensus is subject to further research by the ASAS group. PMID:12922952

  8. Infliximab therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: an open label 12 month study

    PubMed Central

    Temekonidis, T; Alamanos, Y; Nikas, S; Bougias, D; Georgiadis, A; Voulgari, P; Drosos, A

    2003-01-01

    Patients and methods: Twenty five patients (24 male, 1 female; mean (SD) age 36.0 (10.5); disease duration 13.8 (8.5) years) with AS fulfilling the modified New York criteria for AS were investigated. Twenty two (88%) patients were HLA-B27 positive. All patients had active axial disease (Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) ?30/100) and C reactive protein (CRP) ?10 mg/l, despite adequate treatment. Intravenous infliximab (5 mg/kg) was given at weeks 0, 2, 6, and every eight weeks thereafter for 12 months. The primary end point was the reduction of the patient's global assessment of pain (GAP) by >20% on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. Results: GAP was reduced by >20% in 23 (92%) patients, by 50% in 21 (84%) patients, and by 70% in 13 (52%). The change in BASDAI and CRP from baseline was statistically significant. The treatment was well tolerated with minimal side effects. One patient dropped out owing to inefficacy and one stopped treatment owing to an allergic reaction. Conclusion: This longer length study confirms the efficacy of infliximab and the good safety profile in patients with AS. PMID:14644863

  9. Isolation of IgG Antibodies to Toxocara in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients with Acute Anterior Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Balderas, Francisco-Javier; García-Jaimes, Janete; Ríos, Rita; Zonana-Nacach, Abraham; Tapia-Romero, Raquel; Villanueva, Nayeli; Méndez-Samperio, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Since few reports had been published on the prevalence of toxocariasis in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients with acute non-granulomatous anterior uveitis (ANGAU), the aim of this work was to determine the presence of antibodies against Toxocara canis in AS patients with ANGAU. Methods Thirty-six patients (14 female and 22 male) with AS were enrolled in the study. The history of ANGAU was accepted only if diagnosed by an ophthalmologist. The detection of IgG antibodies to T. canis was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides were also tested to verify non-specific reactions. Results The prevalence of ANGAU in the AS patients was 58% (21 / 36), and 38% (8 / 21) of the patients with ANGAU were positive for antibodies to Toxocara, while 7% (1 / 15) of AS patients without ANGAU were positive for T. canis (p = 0.038, two tails; mid-p exact). No antibodies were detected to A. lumbricoides antigens in the serum samples of patients with AS. Conclusions These data suggest that the seroprevalence of antibodies to T. canis is high in Mexican patients with AS-associated uveitis, suggesting a chronic asymptomatic toxocariosis, which could be associated with the pathogenesis of ANGAU; however, further larger-scale studies are needed to confirm this observation. PMID:24882953

  10. Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Femoral Cartilage Thickness in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Batmaz, ?; Kara, M; Tiftik, T; Çapkin, E; Karkucak, M; Serdar, ÖF; Kartal, F; Sar?y?ld?z, MA; Özçakar, L

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate femoral cartilage thickness in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) by using ultrasonography. Methods: Eighty-four patients (55 M, 29 F) with a diagnosis of AS and 84 age-, gender- and body mass index-matched healthy subjects were enrolled. Demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients including disease duration, morning stiffness and medications were recorded. The femoral cartilage thicknesses of both knees were measured with a 7–12 MHz linear probe while subjects' knees were held in maximum flexion. Three mid-point measurements were taken from both knees (lateral femoral condyle (LFC), intercondylar area (ICA) and medial femoral condyle (MFC)). Results: Concerning both ICA (p < 0.001) and left MFC (p = 0.013), cartilage measurements were significantly thicker in AS patients than control subjects. In a subgroup analysis (anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) users vs anti-TNF naive) cartilage thickness measurements – bilateral ICA (p = 0.000) and left MFC (p = 0.017) – were found to be greater in AS patients under anti-TNF treatment (n = 65) when compared with those of healthy controls. Conclusion: We imply that AS patients seem to have thicker femoral cartilage, which could be related to anti-TNF treatment. PMID:25429476

  11. Anthrax toxin receptor 2 gene (ANTXR2) rs4333130 is associated with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Yanjuan

    2015-01-01

    Results of recent published studies on the association between the ANTXR2 rs4333130 polymorphism and the risk of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have often been conflicting. To make a more precise estimation of the potential relationship, a meta-analysis was performed. We conducted a comprehensive search in the electronic database of PubMed and Embase to retrieve relevant articles. Nine studies including 14,523 cases and 34,421 controls were finally selected in this meta-analysis. ANTXR2 rs4333130 was significantly associated with a decreased risk of AS (OR=0.87; 95% CI, 0.84-0.90; P<0.00001). In the subgroup analysis by race, ANTXR2 rs4333130 was significantly associated with a decreased risk of AS in both Asian (OR=0.80; 95% CI, 0.65-0.99; P=0.04) and Caucasian (OR=0.87; 95% CI, 0.84-0.90; P<0.00001). In the subgroup analysis by HLA-B27 status, HLA-B27 positive individuals with ANTXR2 rs4333130 showed decreased AS risk (OR=0.89; 95% CI, 0.83-0.96; P=0.002). However, HLA-B27 negative individuals with this polymorphism did not showed decreased AS risk (OR=0.96; 95% CI, 0.88-1.06; P=0.44). In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested a significant association between ANTXR2 rs4333130 polymorphism and AS risk. PMID:26221317

  12. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Ankylosing Spondylitis by iTRAQ.

    PubMed

    Cai, Anji; Qi, Suwen; Su, Zhuowa; Shen, Huaqing; Yang, Yu; He, Liang; Dai, Yong

    2015-10-01

    This study was designed to identify and quantify the different proteins expression levels in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to explore the pathogenesis of AS. We performed isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) coupled with multiple chromatographic fractionation and tandem mass spectrometry to detect the proteins profiling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from AS patients and healthy controls. Mascot software and the International Protein Index and the Gene Ontology (GO) database were used to conduct the bioinformatics analysis. The differentially expressed proteins were validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A total of 1,232 proteins were identified by iTRAQ, of which 183 showed differential expression and 18 differentially expressed proteins were acute phase reactants. Upon mapping of the differentially expressed proteins to GO database, we found four differentially expressed proteins involved in the biological process of cell killing, including up-regulated cathepsin G (CTSG), neutrophil defensin3 (DEFA3), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type C (PTPRC), and down-regulated peroxiredoxin-1(PRDX1),which were consistent with the verified results of ELISA. Our proteomic analyses suggested that the proteins involved in the biological process of cell killing might play an important role in the pathogenesis of AS. PMID:25788137

  13. The relationship between plasma homocysteine level and different treatment modalities in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Capkin, Erhan; Karkucak, Murat; Akyüz, Ay?e; Alver, Ahmet; Turkyilmaz, Aysegul Kucukali; Zengin, Elif

    2012-08-01

    To determine plasma homocysteine levels in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and their correlation with disease activity measurements. To examine the effects of different treatment modalities on homocysteine levels. One hundred eight patients diagnosed with AS according to New York criteria and 65 healthy individuals matched in terms of age and gender were enrolled in the study. Patients were given detailed physical examinations. The Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) was used for disease activity, the Bath AS Metrology Index (BASMI) for spinal mobility, the Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI) to determine functional status and the Bath AS Radiological Index (BASRI) for radiological analysis. Sedimentation rate (ESR) and C reactive protein (CRP) levels, acute phase reactants, were measured. Plasma homocysteine levels, serum interleukin (IL) -6 and serum tumor necrosis factor- ? (TNF- ?) levels were investigated using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Plasma homocysteine levels in AS patients were statistically significantly lower compared with those in the healthy control group (P = 0.0001). There was no significant difference among sub-groups established on the basis of medical treatments and disease activity (BASDAI ?4 and >4). No statistically significant correlation was determined between homocysteine level and disease activity parameters, radiological score and functional indices. A significant negative correlation was, however, established between age and homocysteine level in the AS group (P < 0.05, r = -0.426). Plasma homocysteine was lower in AS patients compared with the control group. This is not correlated with disease activation and medical treatment employed. PMID:21644039

  14. Allicin attenuates inflammation and suppresses HLA-B27 protein expression in ankylosing spondylitis mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xin; Wu, Haishan; Fu, Peiliang

    2013-01-01

    Here we aimed to determine the therapeutic effect of allicin on ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and explore the mechanism(s) of action. AS mouse model was constructed by transferring the HLA-B2704 gene into Kunming mice and verified by RT-PCR and CT imaging. Verified AS mice were randomly divided into model group (n = 6) and allicin-treated groups (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, resp., n = 6, p.o., for 2 months). Wild type mice were used as control (n = 6). The levels of AS-related inflammatory factors were measured by ELISA. mRNA and protein expressions of HLA-B27 were checked by RT-PCR and western blotting. As the results, the mouse model of AS was successfully established, and high-dose allicin could markedly alleviate spine inflammatory injury possibly via reducing the secretion of the inflammatory factors (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF- ? ) sharply in AS mice. Moreover, allicin significantly inhibited HLA-B27 protein translation but failed to suppress HLA-B27 gene transcription in AS mice, indicating a posttranscriptional mechanism of this modulation. In conclusion, allicin has potential to be used for AS treatment as an anti-inflammatory nutraceutical. PMID:24324956

  15. Allicin Attenuates Inflammation and Suppresses HLA-B27 Protein Expression in Ankylosing Spondylitis Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xin; Wu, Haishan; Fu, Peiliang

    2013-01-01

    Here we aimed to determine the therapeutic effect of allicin on ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and explore the mechanism(s) of action. AS mouse model was constructed by transferring the HLA-B2704 gene into Kunming mice and verified by RT-PCR and CT imaging. Verified AS mice were randomly divided into model group (n = 6) and allicin-treated groups (50, 100, and 200?mg/kg, resp., n = 6, p.o., for 2 months). Wild type mice were used as control (n = 6). The levels of AS-related inflammatory factors were measured by ELISA. mRNA and protein expressions of HLA-B27 were checked by RT-PCR and western blotting. As the results, the mouse model of AS was successfully established, and high-dose allicin could markedly alleviate spine inflammatory injury possibly via reducing the secretion of the inflammatory factors (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-?) sharply in AS mice. Moreover, allicin significantly inhibited HLA-B27 protein translation but failed to suppress HLA-B27 gene transcription in AS mice, indicating a posttranscriptional mechanism of this modulation. In conclusion, allicin has potential to be used for AS treatment as an anti-inflammatory nutraceutical. PMID:24324956

  16. Anthrax toxin receptor 2 gene (ANTXR2) rs4333130 is associated with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yanjuan

    2015-01-01

    Results of recent published studies on the association between the ANTXR2 rs4333130 polymorphism and the risk of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have often been conflicting. To make a more precise estimation of the potential relationship, a meta-analysis was performed. We conducted a comprehensive search in the electronic database of PubMed and Embase to retrieve relevant articles. Nine studies including 14,523 cases and 34,421 controls were finally selected in this meta-analysis. ANTXR2 rs4333130 was significantly associated with a decreased risk of AS (OR=0.87; 95% CI, 0.84-0.90; P<0.00001). In the subgroup analysis by race, ANTXR2 rs4333130 was significantly associated with a decreased risk of AS in both Asian (OR=0.80; 95% CI, 0.65-0.99; P=0.04) and Caucasian (OR=0.87; 95% CI, 0.84-0.90; P<0.00001). In the subgroup analysis by HLA-B27 status, HLA-B27 positive individuals with ANTXR2 rs4333130 showed decreased AS risk (OR=0.89; 95% CI, 0.83-0.96; P=0.002). However, HLA-B27 negative individuals with this polymorphism did not showed decreased AS risk (OR=0.96; 95% CI, 0.88-1.06; P=0.44). In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggested a significant association between ANTXR2 rs4333130 polymorphism and AS risk. PMID:26221317

  17. Predictors of Switching Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Therapy in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Won; Kang, Ji-Hyoun; Yim, Yi-Rang; Kim, Ji-Eun; Wen, Lihui; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Park, Dong-Jin; Kim, Tae-Jong; Park, Yong-Wook; Lee, Shin-Seok

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential predictors of switching tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? inhibitors in Korean patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The patients who had been treated with TNF-? inhibitors were divided into two groups depending on whether they had switched TNF-? inhibitors. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and treatment data at the time of initiation of TNF-? inhibitor treatment were compared between switchers and non-switchers, and within switchers according to the reasons for switching. Of the 269 patients, 70 (23%) had switched TNF-? inhibitors once; of these, 11 switched again. The median follow-up time was 52.7 months. Three- and five-year drug survival rates were 52%/48% for infliximab, 62%/42% for etanercept, and 71%/51% for adalimumab, respectively. Switchers were more likely to be prescribed disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs than non-switchers. A history of joint surgery and complete ankylosis of the sacroiliac joint was more frequent in switchers. Multivariate Cox’s proportional hazard analysis showed that the use of adalimumab as the first TNF-? inhibitor was less likely to lead to switching and complete ankylosis of the sacroiliac joints was more likely to lead to switching. The principal reasons for switching were drug inefficacy and adverse events, but the differences in the clinical data of these two groups of switchers were not significant. In AS patients who are candidates for TNF-? inhibitor therapy, switching may improve the therapeutic outcome based on clinical information. PMID:26176701

  18. 2010 update of the ASAS/EULAR recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Braun, J; van den Berg, R; Baraliakos, X; Boehm, H; Burgos-Vargas, R; Collantes-Estevez, E; Dagfinrud, H; Dijkmans, B; Dougados, M; Emery, P; Geher, P; Hammoudeh, M; Inman, R D; Jongkees, M; Khan, M A; Kiltz, U; Kvien, Tk; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Maksymowych, W P; Olivieri, I; Pavelka, K; Sieper, J; Stanislawska-Biernat, E; Wendling, D; Ozgocmen, S; van Drogen, C; van Royen, Bj; van der Heijde, D

    2011-06-01

    This first update of the ASAS/EULAR recommendations on the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is based on the original paper, a systematic review of existing recommendations and the literature since 2005 and the discussion and agreement among 21 international experts, 2 patients and 2 physiotherapists in a meeting in February 2010. Each original bullet point was discussed in detail and reworded if necessary. Decisions on new recommendations were made - if necessary after voting. The strength of the recommendations (SOR) was scored on an 11-point numerical rating scale after the meeting by email. These recommendations apply to patients of all ages that fulfill the modified NY criteria for AS, independent of extra-articular manifestations, and they take into account all drug and non-drug interventions related to AS. Four overarching principles were introduced, implying that one bullet has been moved to this section. There are now 11 bullet points including 2 new ones, one related to extra-articular manifestations and one to changes in the disease course. With a mean score of 9.1 (range 8-10) the SOR was generally very good. PMID:21540199

  19. Spine injury following a low-energy trauma in ankylosing spondylitis: a study of two cases.

    PubMed

    Savall, Frederic; Mokrane, Fatima-Zohra; Dedouit, Fabrice; Capuani, Caroline; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Rougé, Daniel; Telmon, Norbert

    2014-08-01

    We report two cases of spine injury following a low-energy trauma in persons with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and discuss the forensic considerations. A 60-year-old man presented with a wide anterior fracture of the superior endplate of T8 after an accidental fall down three wooden steps. A 93-year-old man presented with disjunction between C6 and C7 and 90-degree spinal angulation after a fall from a standing height or a fall from a bed. Post-mortem multislice computed tomography (MSCT) was performed before autopsy in both the cases. MSCT and autopsy findings were in agreement with a past medical history of AS. A spine injury occurring after a low-energy trauma is unusual and could be suspicious. In the forensic literature we found only a single case, which concerned multiple spinal fractures after a fall from a bicycle at low speed. Such specific mechanisms must be studied and known to the forensic expert. In this context, MSCT is a useful tool to investigate the spine and knowledge of the victim's entire past medical history is essential. PMID:24911528

  20. 2010 update of the ASAS/EULAR recommendations for the management of ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Braun, J; van den Berg, R; Baraliakos, X; Boehm, H; Burgos-Vargas, R; Collantes-Estevez, E; Dagfinrud, H; Dijkmans, B; Dougados, M; Emery, P; Geher, P; Hammoudeh, M; Inman, RD; Jongkees, M; Khan, MA; Kiltz, U; Kvien, TK; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Maksymowych, WP; Olivieri, I; Pavelka, K; Sieper, J; Stanislawska-Biernat, E; Wendling, D; Özgocmen, S; van Drogen, C; van Royen, BJ; van der Heijde, D

    2011-01-01

    This first update of the ASAS/EULAR recommendations on the management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is based on the original paper, a systematic review of existing recommendations and the literature since 2005 and the discussion and agreement among 21 international experts, 2 patients and 2 physiotherapists in a meeting in February 2010. Each original bullet point was discussed in detail and reworded if necessary. Decisions on new recommendations were made — if necessary after voting. The strength of the recommendations (SOR) was scored on an 11-point numerical rating scale after the meeting by email. These recommendations apply to patients of all ages that fulfill the modified NY criteria for AS, independent of extra-articular manifestations, and they take into account all drug and non-drug interventions related to AS. Four overarching principles were introduced, implying that one bullet has been moved to this section. There are now 11 bullet points including 2 new ones, one related to extra-articular manifestations and one to changes in the disease course. With a mean score of 9.1 (range 8-10) the SOR was generally very good. PMID:21540199

  1. Lifestyle factors may modify the effect of disease activity on radiographic progression in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a longitudinal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramiro, Sofia; Landewé, Robert; van Tubergen, Astrid; Boonen, Annelies; Stolwijk, Carmen; Dougados, Maxime; van den Bosch, Filip; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the complex relationship between inflammation, mechanical stress and radiographic progression in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), using job type as a proxy for continuous mechanical stress. Methods Patients from the Outcome in Ankylosing Spondylitis International Study were followed up for 12?years, with 2-yearly assessments. Two readers independently scored the X-rays according to the modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score (mSASSS). Disease activity was assessed by the AS Disease Activity Score C reactive protein (ASDAS-CRP). The relationship between ASDAS and spinal radiographic progression was investigated with longitudinal analysis, with job type at baseline (physically demanding (‘blue-collar’) versus sedentary (‘white-collar’) labour) as a potential factor influencing this relationship. The effects of smoking status and socioeconomic factors were also investigated. Results In total, 184 patients were included in the analyses (70% males, 83% human leucocyte antigen-B27 positive, 39% smokers, 48% blue-collar workers (65/136 patients in whom data on job type were available)). The relationship between disease activity and radiographic progression was significantly and independently modified by job type: In ‘blue-collar’ workers versus ‘white-collar’ workers, every additional unit of ASDAS resulted in an increase of 1.2 versus 0.2 mSASSS-units/2-years (p=0.014 for the difference between blue-collar and white-collar workers). In smokers versus non-smokers, every additional unit of ASDAS resulted in an increase of 1.9 versus 0.4 mSASSS-units/2-years. Conclusions Physically demanding jobs may amplify the potentiating effects of inflammation on bone formation in AS. Smoking and socioeconomic factors most likely confound this relationship and may have separate effects on bone formation. PMID:26535153

  2. The Incidence and Management of Dural Tears and Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage during Corrective Osteotomy for Ankylosing Spondylitis with Kyphotic Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Dae-Jean; Kim, Ki-Tack; Lee, Sang-Hun; Cho, Myung-Guk

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present the incidence and management of dural tears and cerebrospinal fluid leakage during corrective osteotomy [Pedicle Subtraction Osteotomy (PSO) or Smith-Petersen Osteotomy (SPO)] for ankylosing spondylitis with kyphotic deformity. Methods A retrospective study was performed for ankylosing spondylitis patients with fixed sagittal imbalance, who had undergone corrective osteotomy (PSO or SPO) at lumbar level. 87 patients were included in this study. 55 patients underwent PSO, 32 patients underwent SPO. The mean age of the patients at the time of surgery was 41.7 years (21-70 years). Of the 87 patients, 15 patients had intraoperative dural tears. Results The overall incidence of dural tears was 17.2%. The incidence of dural tears during PSO was 20.0%, SPO was 12.5%. There was significant difference in the incidence of dural tears based on surgical procedures (PSO vs. SPO) (p<0.05). The dural tears ranged in size from 12 to 221 mm2. A nine of 15 patients had the relatively small dural tears, underwent direct repair via watertight closure. The remaining 6 patients had the large dural tears, consequently direct repair was impossible. The large dural tears were repaired with an on-lay graft of muscle, fascia or fat harvested from the adjacent operation site. All patients had a successful repair with no patient requiring reoperation for the cerebrospinal fluid leak. Conclusion The overall incidence of dural tears during PSO or SPO for ankylosing spondylitis with kyphotic deformity was 17.2%. The risk factor of dural tears was complexity of surgery. All dural tears were repaired primarily using direct suture, muscle, fascia or fat graft. PMID:26279815

  3. Health status of patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a comparison with the general population

    PubMed Central

    Dagfinrud, H; Mengshoel, A; Hagen, K; Loge, J; Kvien, T

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the subjective health in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) compared with the general population, and to explore the associations between health status and age, sex of the patients, and educational level in AS. Methods: Health status was assessed with a generic instrument (SF-36) in 314 patients with AS and in 2323 people from the general population. Subgroup analyses were performed according to age, sex, and educational level. Standard difference scores (s-scores) were calculated to ensure the clinical meaningfulness of the norm based comparisons. Results: Both men and women with AS reported significantly impaired health on all scales of the SF-36. Women reported significantly worse health on physical health domains. However, when calculating differences from the general population, numerically larger s-scores were found for men (except for physical role and vitality). The relative impact of AS seems to diminish with increasing age. In AS, better health was significantly associated with higher education across all scales. Deviations from the general population on the non-physical health aspects were especially pronounced in patients with low education. Conclusions: All key dimensions of health are affected by AS. The physical aspects seem to be most severely affected, but in the less educated group of patients, the disease impact on the mental health aspects was also considerable. Evaluation and management planning should take the complexity of AS into consideration. The focus on physical function should be maintained, and additional attention should be paid to the mental and social consequences of AS. PMID:15547084

  4. The oxidative metabolism of circulating phagocytes in ankylosing spondylitis: determination by whole blood chemiluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Ho, K.; Chen, P.; Chang, C.; Lu, F.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Superoxide anion radicals within the human body are regarded as a major cause of inflammation. However, their role in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has not been well identified. This study aimed at investigating the relation between AS and the oxidative metabolism of phagocytes in whole blood.?METHODS—24 patients with classic AS were examined to determine their clinical status; complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C reactive protein (CRP) were determined, and levels of the superoxide anion radicals in the patients with AS and 21 healthy subjects were assessed by the ultraweak chemiluminescence method. Subsequently, the relation between this disease and phagocytes was examined by using N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) stimulants.?RESULTS—In clinical assessments, patients with AS had abnormally raised serum CRP (>10 mg/l) and ESR (>15 mm/1st h) levels. In contrast with healthy subjects, patients with AS had significantly increased rates of superoxide anion radical production in their whole blood either in the resting state or with either fMLP or PMA stimulation. In addition, chemiluminescence maximum light intensity was significantly higher in patients with AS than in healthy subjects after fMLP or PMA stimulation.?CONCLUSIONS—Our results suggest that the phagocytes of patients with AS are partly activated in the resting state, and are sensitive to fMLP or PMA stimulation. The priming of phagocytes in the bloodstream is likely to be a causative factor in the onset of AS.?? PMID:10784514

  5. Anti-TNF-? therapy reduces endothelial cell activation in non-diabetic ankylosing spondylitis patients.

    PubMed

    Genre, Fernanda; López-Mejías, Raquel; Miranda-Filloy, José A; Ubilla, Begoña; Mijares, Verónica; Carnero-López, Beatriz; Gómez-Acebo, Inés; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Blanco, Ricardo; Pina, Trinitario; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Llorca, Javier; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction can be detected by the presence of elevated levels of biomarkers of endothelial cell activation. In this study, we aimed to establish whether correlations of these biomarkers with characteristics of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) exist. We also studied the effect of anti-TNF-? therapy on these biomarkers. Serum sE-selectin, MCP-1 and sVCAM-1 levels were measured by ELISA in 30 non-diabetic AS patients undergoing anti-TNF-? therapy, immediately before and after an infusion of infliximab. Correlations of these biomarkers with clinical features, systemic inflammation, metabolic syndrome and other serum and plasma biomarkers of cardiovascular risk were studied. Potential changes in the concentration of these biomarkers following an infliximab infusion were also assessed. sE-selectin showed a positive correlation with CRP (p = 0.02) and with other endothelial cell activation biomarkers such as sVCAM-1 (p = 0.019) and apelin (p = 0.008). sVCAM-1 negatively correlated with BMI (p = 0.018), diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.008) and serum glucose (p = 0.04). sVCAM-1 also showed a positive correlation with VAS spinal pain (p = 0.014) and apelin (p < 0.001). MCP-1 had a negative correlation with LDL cholesterol (p = 0.026) and ESR (p = 0.017). Patients with hip involvement and synovitis and/or enthesitis in other peripheral joints showed higher levels of MCP-1 (p = 0.004 and 0.02, respectively). A single infliximab infusion led to a significant reduction in sE-selectin (p = 0.0015) and sVCAM-1 (p = 0.04). Endothelial dysfunction correlates with inflammation and metabolic syndrome features in patients with AS. A beneficial effect of the anti-TNF-? blockade on endothelial dysfunction, manifested by a reduction in levels of biomarkers of endothelial cell activation, was observed. PMID:26143161

  6. Ankylosing spondylitis is associated with the anthrax toxin receptor 2 gene (ANTXR2)

    PubMed Central

    Karaderi, T; Keidel, S M; Pointon, J J; Appleton, L H; Brown, M A; Evans, D M; Wordsworth, B P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives ANTXR2 variants have been associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in two previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) (p?9×10?8). However, a genome-wide significant association (p<5×10?8) was not observed. We conducted a more comprehensive analysis of ANTXR2 in an independent UK sample to confirm and refine this association. Methods A replication study was carried out with 2978 cases and 8365 controls. Then, these were combined with non-overlapping samples from the two previous GWAS in a meta-analysis. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 stratification was also performed to test for ANTXR2-HLA-B27 interaction. Results Out of nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the study, five SNPs were nominally associated (p<0.05) with AS in the replication dataset. In the meta-analysis, eight SNPs showed evidence of association, the strongest being with rs12504282 (OR=0.88, p=6.7×10?9). Seven of these SNPs showed evidence for association in the HLA-B27-positive subgroup, but none was associated with HLA-B27-negative AS. However, no statistically significant interaction was detected between HLA-B27 and ANTXR2 variants. Conclusions ANTXR2 variants are clearly associated with AS. The top SNPs from two previous GWAS (rs4333130 and rs4389526) and this study (rs12504282) are in strong linkage disequilibrium (r2?0.76). All are located near a putative regulatory region. Further studies are required to clarify the role played by these ANTXR2 variants in AS. PMID:25169729

  7. Fifteen-year trends of long-term disability and sick leaves in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Remus, Cesar; Hernandez-Rios, Guillermo; Duran-Barragan, Sergio; Sanchez-Ortiz, Adriana; Aceves-Avila, Francisco Javier; Castillo-Ortiz, Jose Dionisio; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the trends in work disability and sick leave in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). In 1993 and 2007, patients diagnosed with AS that attended to a secondary- or a tertiary-care outpatient rheumatology clinics were evaluated for demographics, disease characteristics, axial mobility, working status, and work days missed due to sick leave or permanent disability. Factors that impacted labor status were identified by multiple regression analysis. In 1993, 91 study individuals (mean age 35 years, mean disease duration 10?±?8 years) included 28 (31%) on permanent disability and 63 currently working; of these 63, 42 (67%) had missed at least 1 work day in the previous 12 months (mean 69?±?63 days). In the next 5 years, the annual permanent disability was 3%. In 2007, 185 study individuals (mean age 42, mean disease duration 12?±?10 years) included 53 (39%) on permanent disability and 132 active workers; 35 (66%) out of the 53 began permanent disability between 1999 and 2007 (2.1% annual disability rate), and 53 (40%) out of 132 active workers missed at least 1 work day in the previous 12 months (mean 52?±?63 days). Only age predicted disability, with 10% and 11% increases in risk per year in 1993 and 2007, respectively (hazard ratios 1.09 and 1.11, respectively; p?=?0.03 for both). Although the impact of AS on work seems to decrease slightly during the last 15 years, the actual impact is still substantial. An important proportion of patients went on permanent disability in the three decades before retirement. Extrapolating these results to official data for the year 2005, we may infer that between 1.3 million and nearly 15 million working days were missed that year due to AS. PMID:21210289

  8. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory features of Turkish patients with late onset ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Karaarslan, Ahmet; Yilmaz, Hatice; Aycan, Hakan; Orman, Mehmet; Kobak, Senol

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease, which typically begins in early decades of life with primarily axial joints involvement. This disease rarely affects patients older than 50 years of age. The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the demographic, clinical, and laboratory features of late onset and early onset AS patients who were followed up in a single rheumatology center. A total of 339 patients who have been diagnosed with AS according to modified New York criteria were included in the study. The patients whose initial symptoms were observed after 50 years of age were accepted as late onset AS. Out of 339 patients, 27 (7.9%) were diagnosed as late onset AS and 312 (92.3%) patients were evaluated as early onset AS. Of 27 late onset patients, 10 were male and 17 were female. Delay in the diagnosis was 5.8 years for early onset AS, while it was 3.8 years for late onset AS (p = 0.001). Higher levels of acute phase reactants and more methotrexate (MTX) use were detected in early onset AS patients compared to late onset AS (p = 0.001, p = 0.007, respectively). Statistically, there was no difference between these two groups, with regard to disease clinical activity indexes, anthropometric measurement parameters, uveitis and peripheral joint involvement. In this study, we showed that early and late onset AS patients may present with different clinical, genetic, and laboratory features. Late onset AS patients are characterized with lower human leukocyte antigen-B27 sequence, less inflammatory sign, delayed diagnosis, and less MTX and anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha drug usage. PMID:26295296

  9. The effect of physical activity and motivation on function in ankylosing spondylitis: A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Sinead; Cooksey, Roxanne; Davies, Helen; Dennis, Michael S.; Zhou, Shang-Ming; Siebert, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Exercise is reported to improve function for people with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) but it is not clear if this effect is causal or if patients with milder disease find it easier to exercise. This study examines the effect of exercise and motivation to exercise on function, while controlling for disease severity. Methods Participants who were members of an existing AS cohort were asked about physical activity, motivation to exercise, function, and disease severity. Path analysis on STATA was used to examine the correlation between factors associated with function at time of exercise and with function after 3 months of follow-up. Results The response rate to the questionnaire was 88% (326/371). Improvement in function was greatest for people with higher physical activity levels and those who were more motivated to exercise—this was especially the case for patients with the most severe disease activity. The effect of motivation to exercise not only had a direct effect on function, but also an indirect effect of improving activity levels thereby improving both current and future function. People with high intrinsic motivation (driven by pleasure) had the greatest benefit to activity and function. Conclusions Exercise does improve function, especially for those with severe disease. In addition, motivation alone improves function as much as exercising itself. Therefore, interventions targeting motivation to exercise would have as much effect on improving function as interventions offering exercise opportunities. In addition, any intervention that both improves motivation and increases opportunities to exercise would have a 2-fold influence on function. PMID:23351615

  10. Effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy on Osteoclasts Precursors in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Lopes, Joana; Vieira-Sousa, Elsa; Campanilho-Marques, Raquel; Ponte, Cristina; Canhão, Helena; Ainola, Mari; Fonseca, João E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) is characterized by excessive local bone formation and concomitant systemic bone loss. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a central role in the inflammation of axial skeleton and enthesis of AS patients. Despite reduction of inflammation and systemic bone loss, AS patients treated with TNF inhibitors (TNFi) have ongoing local bone formation. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TNFi in the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts (OC) in AS patients. Methods 13 AS patients treated with TNFi were analyzed at baseline and after a minimum follow-up period of 6 months. 25 healthy donors were recruited as controls. Blood samples were collected to assess receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) surface expression on circulating leukocytes and frequency and phenotype of monocyte subpopulations. Quantification of serum levels of bone turnover markers and cytokines, in vitro OC differentiation assay and qRT-PCR for OC specific genes were performed. Results RANKL+ circulating lymphocytes (B and T cells) and IL-17A, IL-23 and TGF-? levels were decreased after TNFi treatment. We found no differences in the frequency of the different monocyte subpopulations, however, we found decreased expression of CCR2 and increased expression of CD62L after TNFi treatment. OC number was reduced in patients at baseline when compared to controls. OC specific gene expression was reduced in circulating OC precursors after TNFi treatment. However, when cultured in OC differentiating conditions, OC precursors from AS TNFi-treated patients showed increased activity as compared to baseline. Conclusion In AS patients, TNFi treatment reduces systemic pro osteoclastogenic stimuli. However, OC precursors from AS patients exposed to TNFi therapy have increased in vitro activity in response to osteoclastogenic stimuli. PMID:26674064

  11. Sulfasalazine Treatment Suppresses the Formation of HLA-B27 Heavy Chain Homodimer in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Chun; Lu, Ming-Chi; Huang, Kuang-Yung; Huang, Hsien-Lu; Liu, Su-Qin; Huang, Hsien-Bin; Lai, Ning-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Human leukocytic antigen-B27 heavy chain (HLA-B27 HC) has the tendency to fold slowly, in turn gradually forming a homodimer, (B27-HC)? via a disulfide linkage to activate killer cells and T-helper 17 cells and inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress to trigger the IL-23/IL-17 axis for pro-inflammatory reactions. All these consequences lead to the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Sulfasalazine (SSA) is a common medication used for treatment of patients with AS. However, the effects of SSA treatment on (B27-HC)? formation and on suppression of IL-23/IL-17 axis of AS patients remain to be determined. In the current study, we examine the (B27-HC)? of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), the mean grade of sarcoiliitis and lumbar spine Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiology Index (BASRI) scores of 23 AS patients. The results indicated that AS patients without (B27-HC)? on PBMC showed the lower levels of mean grade of sarcoiliitis and the lumbar spine BASRI scores. In addition, after treatment with SSA for four months, the levels of (B27-HC)? on PBMCs were significantly reduced. Cytokines mRNA levels, including TNF?, IL-17A, IL-17F and IFN?, were also significantly down-regulated in PBMCs. However, SSA treatment did not affect the levels of IL-23 and IL-23R mRNAs. PMID:26729099

  12. The potential of selected South African plants with anti-Klebsiella activity for the treatment and prevention of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Cock, I E; van Vuuren, S F

    2015-02-01

    A wide variety of herbal remedies are used in traditional African medicine to treat inflammatory disorders, including some autoimmune diseases. Thirty-four extracts from 13 South African plant species traditionally used for the treatment of inflammation were investigated for their ability to control a microbial trigger for ankylosing spondylitis (Klebsiella pneumoniae). Twenty-six of the extracts (76.5%) inhibited the growth of K. pneumoniae. Methanol and water extracts of Ballota africana, Carpobrotus edulis leaves, Kigellia africana, Lippia javanica, Pelargonium fasiculata, Syzygium cordatum (including bark), Terminalia pruinoides and Terminalia sericea were effective K. pneumoniae inhibitors, with MIC values <1000 µg/ml. The roots of Tulbaghia violaceae and bark from Warburgia salutaris also demonstrated efficacy. The most potent extracts were examined by RP-HPLC and UV-Vis spectroscopy for the presence of resveratrol. Methanolic extracts of B. africana, C. edulis leaves, L. javanica, T. pruinoides and T. sericea, as well as aqueous B. africana, T. pruinoides and T. sericea extracts, displayed peaks with retention times and UV-Vis spectra consistent with the presence of resveratrol. Resveratrol was generally a minor component, indicating that resveratrol was not solely responsible for the anti-Klebsiella growth inhibitory properties. Plant extracts with K. pneumoniae inhibitory activity were either non-toxic, or of low toxicity in the Artemia (brine shrimp) nauplii bioassay. Their low toxicity and antibiotic bioactivity against K. pneumoniae indicate their potential for both preventing the onset of ankylosing spondylitis and minimising its symptoms once the disease is established. PMID:25412961

  13. Efficacy of certolizumab pegol on signs and symptoms of axial spondyloarthritis including ankylosing spondylitis: 24-week results of a double-blind randomised placebo-controlled Phase 3 study

    PubMed Central

    Landewé, R; Braun, J; Deodhar, A; Dougados, M; Maksymowych, W P; Mease, P J; Reveille, J D; Rudwaleit, M; van der Heijde, D; Stach, C; Hoepken, B; Fichtner, A; Coteur, G; de Longueville, M; Sieper, J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of certolizumab pegol (CZP) after 24?weeks in RAPID-axSpA (NCT01087762), an ongoing Phase 3 trial in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), including patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and non-radiographic axSpA (nr-axSpA). Methods Patients with active axSpA were randomised 1:1:1 to placebo, CZP 200?mg every 2?weeks (Q2W) or CZP 400?mg every 4?weeks (Q4W). In total 325 patients were randomised. Primary endpoint was ASAS20 (Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society 20) response at week 12. Secondary outcomes included change from baseline in Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI) linear. Results Baseline disease activity was similar between AS and nr-axSpA. At week 12, ASAS20 response rates were significantly higher in CZP 200?mg Q2W and CZP 400?mg Q4W arms versus placebo (57.7 and 63.6 vs 38.3, p?0.004). At week 24, combined CZP arms showed significant (p<0.001) differences in change from baseline versus placebo in BASFI (?2.28 vs ?0.40), BASDAI (?3.05 vs ?1.05), and BASMI (?0.52 vs ?0.07). Improvements were observed as early as week 1. Similar improvements were reported with CZP versus placebo in both AS and nr-axSpA subpopulations. Adverse events were reported in 70.4% vs 62.6%, and serious adverse events in 4.7% vs 4.7% of All CZP versus placebo groups. No deaths or malignancies were reported. Conclusions CZP rapidly reduced the signs and symptoms of axSpA, with no new safety signals observed compared to the safety profile of CZP in RA. Similar improvements were observed across CZP dosing regimens, and in AS and nr-axSpA patients. PMID:24013647

  14. Follow-up Testing of Interferon-Gamma Release Assays Are Useful in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients Receiving Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha for Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the utility of follow-up interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) for the diagnosis of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) or new tuberculosis in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF?). The study participants (n=127) had a negative IGRA screening before receiving anti-TNF? and were evaluated by follow-up IGRA. We retrospectively examined data of the subjects according to age, gender, tuberculosis prophylaxis, concomitant medications, IGRA conversion and anti-TNF?, including type and treatment duration. The median duration of anti-TNF? was 21.5 months, and the median age was 35.3 yr. Of the 127 patients, IGRA conversion was found in 10 patients (7.9%). There was no significant variation between IGRA conversion rate and any risk factors except for age. IGRA conversion rate was not significantly different between AS and rheumatoid arthritis (P=0.12). IGRA conversion was observed in AS patients receiving anti-TNF? in Korea. A follow-up IGRA test can be helpful for identifying LTBI or new tuberculosis in AS patients receiving anti-TNF?. Graphical Abstract PMID:25120318

  15. UGT2B17 copy number gain in a large ankylosing spondylitis multiplex family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this study is to identify novel copy number variations (CNVs) associated with familial ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A customized genome-wide microarray was designed to detect CNVs and applied to a multiplex AS family with six (6) affected family members. CNVs were detected using the built-in DNA analytics aberration detection method-2 (ADM-2) algorithm. Gene enrichment analysis was performed to observe the segregation. Subsequent validation was performed using real time quantitative fluorescence polymerase reaction (QF-PCR). The frequency of copy number variation for the UGT2B17 gene was then performed on two well-defined AS cohorts. Fisher exact test was performed to quantify the association. Results Our family-based analysis revealed ten gene-enriched CNVs that segregate with all six family members affected with AS. Based on the proposed function and the polymorphic nature of the UGT2B17 gene, the UGT2B17 gene CNV was selected for validation using real time QF-PCR with full concordance. The frequency of two copies of the UGT2B17 gene CNV was 0.41 in the Newfoundland AS cases and 0.35 in the Newfoundland controls (OR = 1.26(0.99-1.59); p < 0.05)), whereas the frequency of two (2) copies of the UGT2B17 gene CNV was 0.40 in the Alberta AS cases and 0.39 in the Alberta controls (OR = 1.05(95% CI: 0.83-1.33); p < 0.71)). Conclusions A genome-wide microarray interrogation of a large multiplex AS family revealed segregation of the UGT2B17 gene CNV among all affected family members. The association of the UGT2B17 CNV with AS is particularly interesting given the recent association of this CNV with osteoporosis and the proposed function as it encodes a key enzyme that inhibits androgens. However, two copies of the UGT2B17 gene CNV were only marginally significant in a uniplex AS cohort from Newfoundland but not in a uniplex AS cohort from Alberta. PMID:23927372

  16. Surgical Therapy of Cervical Spine Fracture in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Wang, Ce; Zhou, Xuhui; Zhou, Shengyuan; Jia, Lianshun

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to explore surgical treatments and assess the effects based on the features of cervical spine fracture in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to summarize the experiences in perioperative management. Retrospective analysis was performed in 25 AS patients with cervical spine fracture treated in our hospital from January 2011 to December 2013. The patients were divided according to fracture segments, including 4 cases at C4 to C5, 8 cases at C5 to C6, and 13 cases at C6 to C7. Among them, 12 belonged to I type, 5 to II type, and 8 to III type based on the improved classification method for AS cervical spine fracture. The Subaxial Cervical Spine Injury Classification score for these patients was 7.2?±?1.3, and the assessment of their neurological function states showed 6 patients (24%) were in American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) A grade, 1 (4%) in ASIA B grade, 3 (12%) in ASIA C grade, 12 (48%) in ASIA D grade, and 3 (12%) in ASIA E grade. Surgical methods contained simple anterior approach alone, posterior approach alone, and combined posterior-anterior or anterior-posterior approach. The average duration of patients' hospital stay was 38.6?±?37.6, and the first surgical methods were as follows: anterior approach alone on 6 cases, posterior surgery alone on 9 cases, and combined posterior-anterior or anterior-posterior approach on 10 patients. The median segments of fixation and fusion were 4.1?±?1.4 sections. Thirteen patients developed complications. During 2 to 36 months of postoperative follow-up, 1 patient died of respiratory failure caused by pulmonary infections 2 months after leaving hospital. At the end of the follow-up, bone graft fusion was achieved in the rest of patients, and obvious looseness or migration of internal fixation was not observed. In addition, the preoperative neurological injury in 12 patients (54.5%) was also alleviated in different levels. AS cervical spine fracture, an unstable fracture, should be treated with operation, and satisfactory effects will be achieved after the individualized surgical treatment according to the improved classification method for AS cervical spine fracture. PMID:26554765

  17. Roles of Sagittal Anatomical Parameters of the Pelvis in Primary Total Hip Replacement for Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Gu, Minghui; Zhang, Zhiqi; Kang, Yan; Sheng, Puyi; Yang, Zibo; Zhang, Ziji; Liao, Weiming

    2015-12-01

    We examined the correlation between acetabular prostheses and sagittal anatomical parameters of the pelvis for the preoperative evaluation of total hip arthroplasty in 29 patients with ankylosing spondylitis between April 2004 and November 2011. No implant dislocation or subsidence was observed at 4.18 years. The relationship between sagittal parameters conformed to the equation Pelvic incidence (PI)=Pelvic tilt (PT)+Sacral slope (SS). Better outcomes were achieved in the SS>PT group, postoperative function was positively correlated with SS/PI. Functional abduction and anteversion were positively correlated with PT but negatively correlated with SS. Due to the compensatory changes in the pelvis and spine of patients with AS, the preoperative assessment of sagittal parameters plays pivotal roles in placing acetabular prostheses in optimal positions and preventing postoperative impingement and dislocation. PMID:26164560

  18. The relationship between disease activity measured by the BASDAI and psychological status, stressful life events, and sleep quality in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yutong; Yang, Mingcan; Wu, Husheng; Song, Hui; Zhan, Feng; Liu, Shengyun; Gao, Guanmin; Liu, Zhangsuo; Hu, Zhaoxian; He, Peigen; Zhang, Shengtao; Hu, Zaiying; Lin, Zhiming; Zhang, Yanli; Li, Yinong; Shen, Lingxun; Huang, Anbing; Liao, Zetao; Cao, Shuangyan; Wei, Yanlin; Li, Li; Li, Qiuxia; Lv, Qing; Qi, Jun; Huang, Jianlin; Li, Tianwang; Jin, O; Pan, Yunfeng; Gu, J

    2015-03-01

    Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) is a standard instrument regularly used to assess disease activity of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). However, the well-being of a patient is also affected by impairment of function as well as psychological status and other factors. The objective of this study was to evaluate if psychological status, stressful life events, and sleep quality contribute significantly to BASDAI. Six hundred eighty-three AS patients satisfying the Modified New York Criteria for AS were recruited from the rheumatology clinics of seven hospitals in China. Patients with other concomitant disorders were excluded. Participants were requested to complete a set of clinical examinations and the following questionnaires: Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index Questionnaire (PSQI), Health Assessment Questionnaire for Spondyloarthropathies (HAQ-S), and Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS). Spearman correlation analysis showed that BASDAI was highly associated with degree and duration of morning stiffness, overall pain, nocturnal back pain, overall back pain, anxiety, and BASFI (all P??0.05). Multiple stepwise regression analysis indicated that overall pain was the maximal statistical contribution in predicting disease activity (standardized coefficient, 0.335). In hierarchic multiple regression analysis, psychological variables added an only additional 2.7% to the overall R(2) beyond that accounted for by demographic and medical variables, resulting in a final R(2) of 53.5%. Although BASDAI is a very good measurement of pain and stiffness and to a certain extent effect of functional impairment in AS, it barely takes into account psychological status, stress life events, and sleep quality These factors should be evaluated by other modalities. PMID:24946723

  19. Development of a health index in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (ASAS HI): final result of a global initiative based on the ICF guided by ASAS

    PubMed Central

    Kiltz, U; van der Heijde, D; Boonen, A; Cieza, A; Stucki, G; Khan, M A; Maksymowych, W P; Marzo-Ortega, H; Reveille, J; Stebbings, S; Bostan, C; Braun, J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The burden of disease in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) can be considerable. However, no agreement has been reached among expert members of Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS) to define severity of AS. Based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), a core set of items for AS has been selected to represent the entire spectrum of possible problems in functioning. Based on this, the objective of this study was to develop a tool to quantify health in AS, the ASAS Health Index. Methods First, based on a literature search, experts’ and patients’ opinion, a large item pool covering the categories of the ICF core set was generated. In several steps this item pool was reduced based on reliability, Rasch analysis and consensus building after two cross-sectional surveys to come up with the best fitting items representing most categories of the ICF core set for AS. Results After the first survey with 1754 patients, the item pool of 251 items was reduced to 82. After selection by an expert committee, 50 items remained which were tested in a second cross-sectional survey. The results were used to reduce the number of items to a final set of 17 items. This selection showed the best reliability and fit to the Rasch model, no residual correlation, and absence of consistent differential item function and a Person Separation Index of 0.82. Conclusions In this long sequential study, 17 items which cover most of the ICF core set were identified that showed the best representation of the health status of patients with AS. The ASAS Health Index is a linear composite measure which differs from other measures in the public domain. PMID:24399232

  20. Efficacy of tripterygium glycosides tablet in treating ankylosing spondylitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Guo, Feng; Luo, Yu-Chun; Zhu, Jian-Ping; Wang, Jian-Liang

    2015-11-01

    Hundreds of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on tripterygium glycosides tablet (TGT) in the treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have been published, but the therapeutic effects have never been systematically reviewed yet. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of TGT on AS based on RCTs. PubMed, ScienceDirect, Cochrane Library, China Journals Full-text Database, and Wanfang Data were searched. The RCT quality was evaluated by the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. The RCT characteristics including publication years, sample sizes, and follow-up periods as well as outcome measures including symptoms improvement, morning stiffness (MS), bath ankylosing spondylitis patient global score (BAS-G), pain index (PI), swelling index (SI), finger to floor distance (FFD), pillow wall distance (PWD), Schober test (Schober), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C reactive protein (CRP) were extracted. The odds ratio (OR), mean difference (MD), and its 95 % confidence interval (CI) were selected for overall effect sizes. Subgroup, sensitivity, and meta-regression analyses were conducted to confirm the results. Eleven RCTs with 807 participants were included, the quality of which was moderate. OR of TGT in treating AS was 0.46 (95 % CI 0.24, 0.90]. MD of MS was 11.79 (95 % CI 3.13, 20.45). MD of BAS-G was 0.13 (95 % CI -19.73, 19.99). MD of PI was 0.78 (95 % CI 0.22, 1.34). MD of SI was 0.80 (95 % CI 0.06, 1.53). MD of FFD was 0.80 (95 % CI 0.06, 1.53). MD of PWD was 1.37 (95 % CI -0.64, 3.38). MD of Schober was -0.36 (95 % CI -0.65, -0.07]. MD of ESR was 4.58 (95 % CI 2.10, 7.06). MD of CRP was 1.86 (95 % CI -2.03, 5.76). Subgroup, sensitivity, and meta-regression analyses found the robust results. In conclusion, TGT could not treat AS effectively, as suggested by the moderate RCT quality and meta-analysis evidence. PMID:26255190

  1. Investigation of effects of two-different treatment modalities on nerve conduction in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Capkin, Erhan; Karkucak, Murat; Kose, Muammer Muslim; Çakmak, Vildan Altunayo?lu; Turkyilmaz, Aysegul Kucukali; Tosun, Mehmet

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate any relationship between peripheral neuropathy and anti-TNF-? therapy used in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Thirty-nine patients monitored in our clinic with a diagnosis of AS and without neuropathic symptoms were enrolled in the study. Patients were divided into two groups. The first consisted of 21 patients using biological agents for more than one year. The control group was made up of 18 patients of similar age and demographic characteristics receiving non-biological therapy. Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) scores were calculated, and sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels measured. Motor and sensory nerve conduction analysis for the median, tibial, and sural nerves was performed. The nerve conduction results of the biological therapy group were then compared with those of the non-biological therapy group. Thirty-nine patients with a mean age of 37.05 ± 8.1 were enrolled. Patients were divided into two groups, depending on drugs used. The first group (using anti-TNF-?) consisted of 21 patients with a mean age of 42.2 ± 8.8, and the second (the non-biological group) of 18 patients with a mean age of 35.8 ± 7.5. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of age, sex, drug use, or duration of disease (p = 0.052, p = 0.55, p = 0.33, and p = 0.72, respectively). Sedimentation rate, CRP, and BASDAI scores were statistically significantly higher in the second group (p = 0.04, p = 0.03, and p = 0.009, respectively). No statistically significant difference was determined in any parameters at nerve conduction analysis between the two groups (p > 0.05). There was a positive correlation between sedimentation rate and median sensory conduction velocity (p = 0.02, r = 0.48) and tibial conduction velocity (p = 0.07, r = 0.43). A negative correlation was determined between duration of disease and median distal motor latency (p = 0.22, r = -0.37) and between length of drug use and median sensory conduction velocity (p = 0.02, r = -0.38). There was no significant correlation between other clinical and demographic data and nerve conduction parameters. No effect on nerve conduction of biological agents in AS patients without neurological symptoms was determined. Clinicians should be alert for signs and symptoms, suggesting neuropathy in patients given anti-TNF-?. PMID:21120488

  2. Ankylosing spondylitis, HLA-B27, and Klebsiella: a study of lymphocyte reactivity of anti-Klebsiella sera.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, B; Milton, J D; Woodrow, J C

    1986-01-01

    Twenty three anti-Klebsiella antisera were tested for their cytotoxic activity and four for their binding capacity for peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from patients with HLA-B27 positive ankylosing spondylitis (AS+B27+) and from B27 positive (AS-B27+) and B27 negative (AS-B27-) healthy individuals. None of the antisera showed specific activity against PBL from any particular group. The antisera tested included two anti-Klebsiella K43 sera provided by an Australian group, who have reported them to be specifically cytotoxic for AS+B27+ PBL, four antisera raised against a Klebsiella K43 strain provided by this group, and an antiserum from another group, who have reported it as having increased binding capacity for AS+B27+ and AS-B27+ PBL compared with AS-B27- PBL. The results of other workers who have attempted to reproduce the results of either group are reviewed and the possible reasons for the repeated failure to confirm the reported findings are discussed. PMID:3485408

  3. Effect of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption on disease activity and physical functioning in ankylosing spondylitis: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengli; Li, Yan; Xu, Xiangjin; Feng, Xiugao; Yang, Dawei; Lin, Guiying

    2015-01-01

    The effect of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption on the disease activity and physical functioning in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is currently understated. Present study aims to investigate the relationship between them. A total of 425 patients with AS were recruited in the study and their smoking and drinking habit were investigated with a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and Metrology Index (BASMI) were evaluated. Parameters including fingertip-to-floor distance, overall assessment of health, nocturnal pain, total back pain and morning stiffness were analyzed as well. Blood erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were determined. For 118 (27.8%) AS patients with smoking habit, the scorings of BASDAI, BASFI, BASMI and other physical parameters (including fingertip-to-floor, overall assessment of health, nocturnal pain and total back pain) were higher than those in patients without smoking. 101 (23.8%) AS patients with alcohol consumption demonstrated significantly higher scores in BASMI (P < 0.05). In hierarchical multiple regression analysis, the cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption variables contributed to the variance in BASDAI scores, adding an additional 1.6% to the overall R-square, resulting in a final R-square of 5.1%. Smoking has a negative effect on disease activity of patients with AS and the patients’ physical functioning. Alcohol consumption would aggravate the overall physical functioning of AS patient. The results indicated the potential benefit of quitting smoking and drinking for AS patients. PMID:26550348

  4. Effects of home-based exercise intervention on health-related quality of life for patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; Zhang, Hua; Ji, Haiyan; Wang, Chunmei

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this paper was to objectively evaluate the effectiveness of home-based exercise interventions for improving health-related quality of life in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Databases including PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, Ovid-Medline, and The Cochrane Library were electronically searched published from inception through October 2014 involving home-based exercise intervention in AS patients. Studies that measured the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), depression and pain as outcomes were included. Studies involving patients with multiple diseases or received combinations of other interventions were excluded. Two independent investigators screened the identified articles, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. Qualitative descriptions were conducted, and quantitative analysis was performed with RevMan software (version 5.2). A total of six studies comprising 1098 participants were included in the study. Meta-analyses showed that home-based exercise interventions significantly reduced the BASFI scores (MD?=?-0.39, 95 % CI -0.57, -0.20, p?=?0.001), BASDAI scores (MD?=?-0.50, 95 % CI -0.99, -0.02, p?=?0.04), depression scores (MD?=?-2.31, 95 % CI -3.33, -1.30, p?=?0.001), and for pain scores because of different evaluation methods among these studies; therefore, a subgroup analysis should be conducted for comparison. The results show that home-based exercise interventions can effectively improve the health-related quality of life in patients with AS. The benefit and clinical performance of home-based exercise care requires further investigation by a series of multicenter, large-sample size randomized controlled trails. PMID:25771852

  5. Concurrent Intervention With Exercises and Stabilized Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy Reduced the Disease Activity in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; Li, Wen-Rong; Zhang, Hua; Tian, Xu; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2015-12-01

    Since the use of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy is becoming wider, the effects of concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are different. The study aimed to objectively evaluate whether concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS.A search from PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was electronically performed to collect studies which compared concurrent intervention with exercise and TNF inhibitor to conventional approach in terms of disease activity in patients with AS published from their inception to June 2015. Studies that measured the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), and chest expansion as outcomes were included. Two independent investigators screened the identified articles, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. Quantitative analysis was performed with Review Manager (RevMan) software (version 5.3.0).A total of 5 studies comprising 221 participants were included in the study. Meta-analyses showed that concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy significantly reduced the BASMI scores (MD, -0.99; 95% CI, -1.61 to -0.38) and BASDAI scores (MD, -0.58; 95% CI, -1.10 to -0.06), but the BASFI scores (MD, -0.31; 95% CI, -0.76 to 0.15) was not reduced, and chest expansion (MD, 0.80; 95% CI, -0.18 to 1.78) was not increased.Concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. More randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with high-quality, large-scale, and appropriate follow-up are warranted to further establish the benefit of concurrent intervention with exercises and TNF inhibitors for this given population due to some limitations impaired the power of our study. PMID:26683943

  6. Lumbar osteotomy for correction of thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity in ankylosing spondylitis. A structured review of three methods of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Van Royen, B J; De Gast, A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Three operative techniques have been described to correct thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity (TLKD) resulting from ankylosing spondylitis (AS) at the level of the lumbar spine: opening wedge osteotomy, polysegmental wedge osteotomies, and closing wedge osteotomy. Little knowledge exists on the indication for, and outcome of these corrective lumbar osteotomies.?METHODS—A structured review of the medical literature was performed.?RESULTS—A search of the literature revealed 856 patients reported in 41 articles published between 1945 and 1998. The mean age at time of operation was 41 years, male-female ratio 7.5 to 1. In 451 patients an open wedge osteotomy was performed. Polysegmental wedge osteotomies were performed in 249 patients and a closing wedge osteotomy in 156 patients. Most of the studies primarily focus on the surgical technique. Technical outcome data were poorly reported. Sixteen reports, including 523 patients, met the inclusion criteria of this study, and could be analysed for technical outcome data. The average correction achieved with each surgical techniques ranged from 37 to 40 degrees. Loss of correction was mainly reported in patients treated by open wedge osteotomy and polysegmental wedge osteotomies. Neurological complications were reported in all three techniques. The perioperative mortality was 4%. Pulmonary, cardiac and intestinal problems were found to be the major cause of fatal complications.?CONCLUSION—Lumbar osteotomy for correction of TLKD resulting from AS is a major surgery. The indication for these lumbar osteotomies as well as the degree of correction in the lumbar spine has not yet been established. Furthermore, there is a need for a generally accepted clinical score that encompasses accurate preoperative and postoperative assessment of the spinal deformity. The results of this review suggest that the data from the literature are not suitable for decision making with regard to surgical treatment of TLKD resulting from AS.?? PMID:10381482

  7. Decreased physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness in adults with ankylosing spondylitis: a cross-sectional controlled study.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, Tom; O'Shea, Finbar; Wilson, Fiona

    2015-11-01

    The health benefits of physical activity (PA) in the general population are numerous; however, few studies have measured PA among adults with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The aims of this study were to: (1) objectively measure the PA levels and cardiorespiratory fitness of adults with AS and compare these to population controls, and (2) examine the relationships between PA, cardiorespiratory function and condition-specific outcomes. This cross-sectional study included participants (>18 years) meeting the modified New York criteria for AS, and matched population controls. Exclusion criteria were the presence of comorbidities limiting PA, or recent changes in medication usage. Participants completed clinical questionnaires assessing disease activity, physical function and quality of life. Tri-axial accelerometers recorded habitual PA over 1 week. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed by submaximal treadmill test with breath-by-breath gas analysis and heart rate monitoring. Thirty-nine adults with AS and 39 controls were recruited. The AS group spent significantly less time performing vigorous-intensity PA than controls [mean difference (95 % CI) 1.8 min/day (1.2-2.7)] and performed significantly fewer bouts of health-enhancing PA [1.7 min/day (1.1-2.5)]. The AS group had significantly lower predicted VO2MAX than controls [6.0 mL kg(-1) min(-1) (1.8-10.1)]. PA was associated with aerobic capacity. Sedentary time was associated with disease activity and physical function. Adults with AS participate in less health-enhancing PA than population controls. Fewer than half meet PA recommendations, despite exercise being a key component of AS management. Explorations of PA behaviour and strategies to increase PA participation are needed. PMID:26254884

  8. Disease-associated polymorphisms in ERAP1 do not alter endoplasmic reticulum stress in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Kenna, T J; Lau, M C; Keith, P; Ciccia, F; Costello, M-E; Bradbury, L; Low, P-L; Agrawal, N; Triolo, G; Alessandro, R; Robinson, P C; Thomas, G P; Brown, M A

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which human leukocyte antigen B27 (HLA-B27) contributes to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) remains unclear. Genetic studies demonstrate that association with and interaction between polymorphisms of endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) and HLA-B27 influence the risk of AS. It has been hypothesised that ERAP1-mediated HLA-B27 misfolding increases endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, driving an interleukin (IL) 23-dependent, pro-inflammatory immune response. We tested the hypothesis that AS-risk ERAP1 variants increase ER-stress and concomitant pro-inflammatory cytokine production in HLA-B27(+) but not HLA-B27(-) AS patients or controls. Forty-nine AS cases and 22 healthy controls were grouped according to HLA-B27 status and AS-associated ERAP1 rs30187 genotypes: HLA-B27(+)ERAP1(risk), HLA-B27(+)ERAP1(protective), HLA-B27(-)ERAP1(risk) and HLA-B27(-)ERAP1(protective). Expression levels of ER-stress markers GRP78 (8?kDa glucose-regulated protein), CHOP (C/EBP-homologous protein) and inflammatory cytokines were determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cell and ileal biopsies. We found no differences in ER-stress gene expression between HLA-B27(+) and HLA-B27(-) cases or healthy controls, or between cases or controls stratified by carriage of ERAP1 risk or protective alleles in the presence or absence of HLA-B27. No differences were observed between expression of IL17A or TNF (tumour necrosis factor) in HLA-B27(+)ERAP1(risk), HLA-B27(+)ERAP1(protective) and HLA-B27(-)ERAP1(protective) cases. These data demonstrate that aberrant ERAP1 activity and HLA-B27 carriage does not alter ER-stress levels in AS, suggesting that ERAP1 and HLA-B27 may influence disease susceptibility through other mechanisms. PMID:25354578

  9. [Physical exercise in the treatment of Ankylosing Spondylitis: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Fernando; Leite, Mário; Silva, Francisco; Sousa, Otília

    2007-01-01

    Physical exercise (PE) is a regular component in various disorders management, such as ankylosing spondilitis (AS). AS is a chronic and systematic rheumatic disorder without an effective treatment to restore the health. PE plays an important role on the prevention and management of the deformities related to AS. This review summarizes the randomized controlled trials that have examined the role of PE in AS patients' therapeutic process in order to promote an evidence based practise and to improve the AS patients care. Thirteen randomized controlled trials with a total of 1056 participants were identified in a Cochrane Central, Pubmed/ Medline and PEDro databases computer-based search. The quality assessment of the thirteen randomized controlled trial was 5,62 points in the PEDro scoring scale. Three trials assessed the effects induced by the addition of PE interventions to the medication program, three trials compared individualized home exercise with supervised group exercise, five trials compared alternative exercise programs (hydrotherapy and global posture reeducation) with traditional exercise programs usually recommended to treat AS patients, and two trials investigated the therapy effectiveness. The trials included in this review suggest that PE is a helpful therapy in the management of AS patients; PE should be performed in group under the physiotherapist supervision. New exercise-based approaches, hydrotherapy or global posture reeducation, offers promising results in the management of patients suffering AS. PMID:17572651

  10. Spinal Radiographic Progression in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis Treated with TNF-? Blocking Therapy: A Prospective Longitudinal Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Fiona; Spoorenberg, Anneke; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Bos, Reinhard; Efde, Monique; Chaudhry, Rizwana N.; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.; Wolf, Rinze; Bootsma, Hendrika; van der Veer, Eveline; Arends, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate spinal radiographic damage over time and to explore the associations of radiographic progression with patient characteristics and clinical assessments including disease activity in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) blocking therapy in daily clinical practice. Methods Consecutive outpatients from the Groningen Leeuwarden AS (GLAS) cohort were included based on the availability of cervical and lumbar radiographs before start of TNF-? blocking therapy and after 2, 4, and/or 6 years of follow-up. Clinical data were assessed at the same time points. Radiographs were scored by two independent readers using the modified Stoke AS Spine Score (mSASSS). Spinal radiographic progression in relation to clinical assessments was analyzed using generalized estimating equations. Results 176 AS patients were included, 58% had syndesmophytes at baseline. Median mSASSS increased significantly from 10.7 (IQR: 4.6–24.0) at baseline to 14.8 (IQR: 7.9–32.8) at 6 years. At the group level, spinal radiographic progression was linear with a mean progression rate of 1.3 mSASSS units per 2 years. Both spinal radiographic damage at baseline and radiographic progression were highly variable between AS patients. Male gender, older age, longer disease duration, higher BMI, longer smoking duration, high CRP, and high ASDAS were significantly associated with syndesmophytes at baseline. Significantly more radiographic progression was seen in patients with versus without syndesmophytes (2.0 vs. 0.5 mSASSS units per 2 years) and in patients >40 versus ?40 years of age (1.8 vs. 0.7 mSASSS units per 2 years). No longitudinal associations between radiographic progression and clinical assessments were found. Conclusions This prospective longitudinal observational cohort study in daily clinical practice shows overall slow and linear spinal radiographic progression in AS patients treated with TNF-? blocking therapy. At the individual level, progression was highly variable. Patients with syndesmophytes at baseline showed a 4-fold higher radiographic progression rate than patients without syndesmophytes. PMID:25879956

  11. A patient-reported outcome measures-based composite index (RAPID3) for the assessment of disease activity in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Muhammet; Yilmaz, Sedat; Cinar, Fatma Ilknur; Koca, Suleyman Serdar; Erdem, Hakan; Pay, Salih; Dinc, Ayhan; Yazici, Yusuf; Simsek, Ismail

    2015-09-01

    A single questionnaire regarding to disease activity for all rheumatic diseases may present advantages to introduce quantitative measurement into routine care. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation of routine assessment of patient index data 3 (RAPID3) with Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) and Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS). A total of 341 consecutive AS patients who met the modified New York classification criteria were included. All patients completed BASDAI and RAPID3 at each visit, and their physicians completed physician global assessment. ASDASs were calculated using defined formulas. Proposed RAPID3 severity categories were compared to BASDAI and ASDAS categories. Spearman's rho correlation test and kappa statistics were used to analyze statistical significance. The median age of AS patients was 34.0 (21.0-69.0) years and the median disease duration 10.0 (2.0-35.0) years. Median scores for RAPID3, BASDAI, ASDAS-CRP, and ASDAS-ESR were 13.0 (0.0-27.3), 4.7 (0.0-9.7), 3.0 (0.4-5.8), and 2.5 (0.5-6.3), respectively. RAPID3 was strongly correlated with BASDAI and ASDAS-ESR (r = 0.842, r = 0.815; p < 0.001, respectively). Among the 209 patients with high disease activity according to BASDAI, 83.3 % had high or moderate severity according to RAPID3 (kappa 0.693; p < 0.001). Among the 133 patients with moderate, high, and very high disease activity on ASDAS-CRP, 91.7 % had high or moderate severity according to RAPID3 (kappa 0.548; p < 0.001). RAPID3 is as informative as BASDAI and ASDAS in our cohort of AS patients. We therefore suggest that RAPID3 may be used to assess the patient status quantitatively in AS patients, as part of routine care. PMID:25794571

  12. Gender of patients and level of osteotomy are predictive factors for blood loss in ankylosing spondylitis patients undergoing pedicle subtraction osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanjun; Ma, Zhengliang; Gu, Xiaoping

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the predictive factors of blood loss in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Retrospective analysis was performed in patients with thoracolumbar kyphotic deformity secondary to ankylosing spondylitis who underwent PSO from 2008 through 2013. Patient’s demographics, preoperative and postsurgical global kyphosis (GK) angle, preoperative hematologic tests and other factors related to PSO were analyzed. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine the predictive factors of intraoperative blood loss. A total of 67 AS patients including 61 males and 6 females were included in the study. These had an average age of 33.97 years (17-55 years) and an average preoperative height of 167.77 cm (124-182 cm). There were 55 patients undergoing one-level osteotomy and 12 patients undergoing two-level osteotomy. Preoperative and postoperative GK angles were 79.08° ± 24.11° and 35.68° ± 21.48°, respectively. The mean surgical correction rate was 56.62% ± 21.45%. The mean length of surgery was 404.25 ± 82.57 minutes, and the estimated intraoperative blood loss was 2899.25 ± 1444.54 ml. The average percentage of estimated blood loss (EBL)/estimated blood volume (EBV) was 69.98% ± 41.44% (range, 23.57%-248.52%). Multiple stepwise analysis identified male sex (P = 0.000), and two-level osteotomy (P = 0.016) to be predictive factors of increased EBL/EBV percentage in AS patients undergoing PSO for thoracolumbar kyphosis. Male and two-level osteotomy are the two most significant factors predicting increased EBL/EBV percentage in AS patients undergoing PSO for thoracolumbar kyphosis. These predictors can provide more adequate preoperative preparations. PMID:26309646

  13. Diagnosis of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... right). The x-rays are supposed to show erosion typical of sacroiliitis. Sacroiliitis is the inflammation of ... not, be of help. Elevated ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate), also known as SED rate, and CRP (C- ...

  14. Symptoms of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can spread up the spine and into the neck. Pain and tenderness spreading to the ribs, shoulder blades, ... have stated that their symptoms started in the neck rather than in the lower back. ... a minority of individuals, the pain does not start in the lower back, but ...

  15. Feasibility of US-CT image fusion to identify the sources of abnormal vascularization in posterior sacroiliac joints of ankylosing spondylitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhenlong; Zhu, Jiaan; Liu, Fang; Wang, Niansong; Xue, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) can be used to evaluate the inflammatory activity of the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients, but to precisely locate the abnormal vascularization observed on color Doppler US (CDUS) was difficult. To address this issue, we performed US and computed tomography (CT) fusion imaging of SIJs with 84 inpatients and 30 controls, and then assessed the sources of abnormal vascularization in the posterior SIJs of AS patients based on the fused images. Several possible factors impacting the fusion process were considered including the lesion classes of SIJ, the skinfold thickness of the sacral region and the cross-sectional levels of the first, second and third posterior sacral foramina. Our data showed high image fusion success rates at the 3 levels in the AS group (97.0%, 87.5% and 79.8%, respectively) and the control group (96.7%, 86.7%, and 86.7%, respectively).The skinfold thickness was identified as the main factor affecting the success rates. The successfully fused images revealed significant differences in the distribution of abnormal vascularization between 3 levels, as detected via CDUS (P?=?0.011), which suggested that inflammation occurred in distinct tissues at different levels of the SIJ (intraligamentous inflammation in Regions 1 and 2; intracapsular inflammation in Region 3). PMID:26669847

  16. Ectopic Germinal Centers and IgG4-Producing Plasmacytes Observed in Synovia of HLA-B27+ Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients with Advanced Hip Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiugao; Xu, Xiangjin; Wang, Yue; Zheng, Zhiyong; Lin, Guiying

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Ectopic lymphoid neogenesis and the presence of IgG4-positive plasmacytes have been confirmed in chronic inflammatory sclerosing diseases. This study aims to investigate hip synovial tissues of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients for IgG4-positive plasma cells and ectopic lymphoid tissues with germinal centers (GCs). Methods. Synovial samples were collected from 7 AS patients who received total hip replacement and were evaluated using immunohistochemistry for the presence of CD20+ B-cells, CD3+ T-cells, CD21+ follicular dendritic cells (FDC), and CD38+ plasma cells. Furthermore, immunoglobulin G (IgG and IgG4), IgA, IgM, and complement components C3d and C4d in synovia were evaluated. Both synovial CD21+ FDCs and IgG4-producing plasmacytes were analyzed. Results. All seven patients had severe fibrosis. Massive infiltrations of lymphocytes were found in 5 out of 7 patients' synovia. Ectopic lymphoid tissues with CD21+ FDC networks and IgG4-positive plasma cells were observed coincidentally in two patients' synovia. Conclusion. The pathophysiological mechanism of AS patients' hip damage might be related to the coincidental presence of ectopic lymphoid tissue with FDCs network and IgG4-positive plasma cells identified here for the first time in AS patients' inflamed synovial tissue. PMID:25954311

  17. Association between rs7517847 and rs2201841 polymorphisms in IL-23 receptor gene and risk of ankylosing spondylitis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin; Ma, Jian-xiong; Jia, Hao-bo; Feng, Rui; Xu, Li-yan

    2015-01-01

    To comprehensively evaluate the association between rs7517847 and rs2201841 polymorphisms in the Interleukin-23 (IL-23) receptor gene and ankylosing spondylitis (AS), a meta-analysis was performed. The Pubmed, Embase, MEDLINE, Cochrane, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), VIP, Wanfang and China Biology Medicine disc (CBMdisc) databases were searched to identify eligible studies on rs7517847 and rs2201841 polymorphisms in the IL-23 receptor gene and AS that were published through September 2014. Data of interest were extracted from each study, and the meta-analysis was performed using STATA 12.0. Four studies were eligible for the meta-analysis and included a total patient population of 2,465. With regards to rs7517847, the current study showed that the genotype GG and allele G might play a protective role during AS (OR = 0.76, 95% CI [0.59–0.99]; OR = 0.88, 95% CI [0.78–0.99] for homozygote and allelic models, respectively). However, according to the meta-analysis, there was no statistical association between the genotype or allele of rs2201841 and an individual’s susceptibility to AS in all genetic models. In conclusion, it was the IL-23 rs7517847 polymorphism rather than the rs2201841 polymorphism that had a statistical association with AS. Nevertheless, more evidence is needed to confirm this result. Consequently, it is necessary to carry out more high-quality studies to confirm the associations between these two single nucleotide polymorphisms and AS. PMID:25922796

  18. Ankylosing spondylitis or diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis in royal Egyptian mummies of 18th -20th Dynasties? CT and archaeology studies.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Sahar N; Hawass, Zahi

    2014-12-01

    Objective. To study the computed tomography(CT) images of royal Ancient Egyptian mummies dated to the 18th to early 20th Dynasties for the claimed diagnoses of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) and to correlate the findings with the archaeology literature.Methods. We studied the CT images of 13 royal Ancient Egyptian mummies (1492–1153 BC) for evidence of AS and DISH and correlated our findings with the archaeology literature.Results. The findings of the CT scans excluded the diagnosis of AS, based on the absence of sacroiliac joint erosions or fusion of the facet joints. Four mummies fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for DISH:Amenhotep III (18th Dynasty), Ramesses II, his son Merenptah, and Ramesses III (19th to early 20th Dynasties).The diagnosis of DISH, a commonly a symptomatic disease of old age, in the 4 pharaohs is in concordance with their longevity and active lifestyles.Conclusion. CT findings excluded the diagnosis of AS in the studied royal Ancient Egyptian mummies and brought into question the antiquity of the disease. The CT features of DISH during this ancient period were similar to those commonly seen in modern populations,and it is likely that they will also be similar in the future.The affection of Ramesses II and his son Merenptah supports familial clustering of DISH. The process of mummification may induce changes in the spine that should be considered during investigations of disease in ancient mummies. PMID:25329920

  19. Influence of Anti-TNF and Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs Therapy on Pulmonary Forced Vital Capacity Associated to Ankylosing Spondylitis: A 2-Year Follow-Up Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Muñoz, Alberto Daniel; Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Zavala-Cerna, María Guadalupe; Vásquez-Jiménez, José Clemente; De la Cerda-Trujillo, Liliana Faviola; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Norma Alejandra; Díaz-Rizo, Valeria; Díaz-González, Viviana; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto German; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Ingrid Patricia; Salazar-Paramo, Mario; Gamez-Nava, Jorge Ivan; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo Hernan; Gonzalez-Lopez, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of anti-TNF agents plus synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) versus DMARDs alone for ankylosing spondylitis (AS) with reduced pulmonary function vital capacity (FVC%). Methods. In an observational study, we included AS who had FVC% <80% at baseline. Twenty patients were taking DMARDs and 16 received anti-TNF + DMARDs. Outcome measures: changes in FVC%, BASDAI, BASFI, 6-minute walk test (6MWT), Borg scale after 6MWT, and St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire at 24 months. Results. Both DMARDs and anti-TNF + DMARDs groups had similar baseline values in FVC%. Significant improvement was achieved with anti-TNF + DMARDs in FVC%, at 24 months, when compared to DMARDs alone (P = 0.04). Similarly, patients in anti-TNF + DMARDs group had greater improvement in BASDAI, BASFI, Borg scale, and 6MWT when compared to DMARDs alone. After 2 years of follow-up, 14/16 (87.5%) in the anti-TNF + DMARDs group achieved the primary outcome: FVC% ?80%, compared with 11/20 (55%) in the DMARDs group (P = 0.04). Conclusions. Patients with anti-TNF + DMARDs had a greater improvement in FVC% and cardiopulmonary scales at 24 months compared with DMARDs. This preliminary study supports the fact that anti-TNF agents may offer additional benefits compared to DMARDs in patients with AS who have reduced FVC%. PMID:26078986

  20. Association between mean platelet volume and bone mineral density in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Resorlu, Hatice; Resorlu, Mustafa; Gokmen, Ferhat; Akbal, Ayla; Adam, Gurhan; Komurcu, Erkam; Goksel, Ferdi; Guven, Mustafa; Aras, Adem Bozkurt; Sariyildirim, Abdullah; Cevizci, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim this study was to assess the relation between bone mineral density (BMD) and mean platelet volume (MPV) in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients, and evaluate the diagnostic role of the diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). [Subjects and Methods] Fifty patients diagnosed with AS were divided into two groups on the basis of BMD, a normal group (n=30) and an osteopenic (n=20) group. [Results] Duration of disease in the group with a normal BMD was 10.3±7.0?years, while it was 16.7±12.2?years in the osteopenia group. MPV was high in the osteopenia group, while no significant differences were observed between the groups in terms of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and platelet distribution width (PDW). There was a positive correlation between MPV and duration of disease. Correlations between ADC value and the lumbar T score, femoral neck T score, and duration of disease were insignificant. A negative correlation was observed between BMD and disease duration. [Conclusion] Diffusion-weighted imaging provides valuable results in osteoporosis but is not a suitable technique for evaluating BMD in patients with AS because of the local and systemic inflammatory effects in the musculoskeletal system. The common pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and osteoporosis plays an important role in the negative correlation observed between MPV and BMD in patients with AS. PMID:25995574

  1. Double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial with adalimumab for treatment of juvenile onset ankylosing spondylitis (JoAS): significant short term improvement

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction While adalimumab is licensed for ankylosing spondylitis (AS), open uncontrolled studies suggest therapeutic efficacy of TNF-inhibitors in juvenile onset AS (JoAS). Methods A total of 32 patients aged 12 to 17 years with severe, active and refractory JoAS were enrolled in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel study of 12 weeks, followed by open-label adalimumab until week 24 for all patients. ASAS40 was used as the primary, and ASAS20, PedACR and single items were used as the secondary outcome measures for the intention to treat population. Results A total of 17 patients were randomized to receive adalimumab 40 mg/2 weeks and 15 patients received placebo. Two patients (one of each group) discontinued prematurely due to insufficient efficacy and were labeled as non-responders. In the double-blind part, more patients on adalimumab achieved an ASAS40 at week 4 (41%), week 8 (53%) and week 12 (53%) than on placebo (20%, 33%, 33%), while differences at week 8 only reached borderline significance (P = 0.05). Also, at 4, 8 and 12 weeks ASAS20/PedACR30/70 response rates were higher in the adalimumab group (53%/53%/29%; 59%/76%/41%; 53%/65%/53%) compared to placebo (27%/27%/7%; 27%/33%/13%; 33%/40%/27%). In the adalimumab group a significant decrease of all disease activity parameters was noted at week 12 and was even more pronounced at week 24. At week 12 the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease activity spinal inflammation score decreased by 65% (P <0.001), the back pain score decreased by 50% (P <0.005), the Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI) score decreased by 47% (P <0.02), while the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (CHAQ-DI) score improved by 65% (P <0.005). ANCOVA analysis demonstrated superiority of adalimumab over placebo for the physician global assessment of disease activity, parents' global assessment of subject's overall well-being, active joint count (all P <0.05) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (P <0.01). During the 12-week controlled phase, 29 AEs occurred in 10 patients on placebo compared to 27 AEs in 11 patients on adalimumab. Injection site reactions were the most common adverse events. There were 17 various infections occurring in the double-blind phase, 8 on placebo, 9 on adalimumab and a further 19 in the open label period. Conclusions Adalimumab was well tolerated and highly effective in a double-blind randomized trial in patients with JoAS. Treatment effects rapidly occurred and persisted for at least 24 weeks of treatment. Trial registration EudraCT 2007-003358-27. PMID:23095307

  2. Interaction between HLA-B60 and HLA-B27 as a Better Predictor of Ankylosing Spondylitis in a Taiwanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yu-Wen; Wen, Ya-Feng; Wang, Wen-Chang; Wong, Ruey-Hong; Lu, Hsing-Fang; van Gaalen, Floris A.; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2015-01-01

    Objective Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a form of chronic inflammatory spondyloarthritis (SpA) that causes pain and stiffness in spines or joints. Human leukocyte antigen B27 (HLA-B27) and B60 (HLA-B60) have been reported as major genetic risk factors of AS. In addition, rs13202464, located on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, showed high sensitivity (98.7%) and specificity (98.0%) for HLA-B27. Design The aim of our study is to test whether the interaction between HLA-B60 and HLA-B27 (rs13202464) can serve as a better predictor of AS. We have genotyped HLA-B60 and rs13202464 among 471 patients with AS and 557 healthy subjects. Combined risk factors were investigated to test the biological interaction. Results Our results indicated that the relative risk (RR) for HLA-B27+/HLA-B60? was 152 (95% CI 91 to 255) and it increased to 201 (95% CI 85 to 475) in HLA-B27+/HLA-B60+ patients (with HLA-B27?/HLA-B60? as reference). Combinational analysis of two risk factors (HLA-B27+/HLA-B60+) showed a relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) of 46.79 (95% CI: -117.58 to 211.16), attributable proportion (AP) of 0.23 (95% CI: -0.41 to 0.88) and a synergy index (S) of 1.31 (95% CI: 0.56 to 3.04). Conclusion In conclusion, genetic interaction analysis revealed that the interaction between HLA-B60 and HLA-B27 is a better marker for the risk of AS susceptibility in a Taiwanese population. PMID:26469786

  3. Do patients with ankylosing spondylitis adapt to their disease? Evidence from a ‘then-test’ in patients treated with TNF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Essers, Ivette; van Tubergen, Astrid; Heldmann, Frank; Baraliakos, Xenofon; Braun, Jürgen; Kiltz, Uta; Boonen, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) adapt to their disease, using the ‘then-test’. Methods Data from patients participating in the AS Study for Evaluation of Recombinant Infliximab Therapy (ASSERT) and continuing in the European AS Infliximab Cohort (EASIC) were used. At 5 assessments in EASIC, patients were asked to rerate their global well-being before the start of infliximab in ASSERT. The patients evaluated their past situation by using a ‘then-test’ (‘retrospective patient global’). Initial and retrospective patient global were compared using a paired t test, and mixed linear models investigated whether the retrospective score of well-being was stable at all follow-up assessments in EASIC. Linear regression analysis explored whether treatment response was associated with the difference between the initial and retrospective score (‘gap’) while adjusting for possible confounders. Results 86 patients (mean age 39.8?years (SD=10.4), mean disease duration 10.8?years (SD=8.5)) contributed to the current analyses. At the time of starting infliximab, patients judged their global at 7.0 (SD=1.6), and with the ‘then-test’ at 7.2 (SD=2.3) (p=0.45). Time elapsed did not influence the ‘then-test’ (p=0.13). Multivariably, the gap was irrespective of treatment response, but associated with initial patient global (p<0.01) and initial Bath AS Disease Activity Index (p=0.02). Conclusions Patients with AS accurately judged their global well-being before starting treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibition, even though substantial time had elapsed. The difference between initial and retrospective judgment was irrespective of treatment response. In this setting, the ‘then-test’ could not prove adaptation in AS. Trial registration number NCT01286545. PMID:26629367

  4. Peptide handling by HLA-B27 subtypes influences their biological behavior, association with ankylosing spondylitis and susceptibility to endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1).

    PubMed

    García-Medel, Noel; Sanz-Bravo, Alejandro; Alvarez-Navarro, Carlos; Gómez-Molina, Patricia; Barnea, Eilon; Marcilla, Miguel; Admon, Arie; de Castro, José A López

    2014-12-01

    HLA-B27 is strongly associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We analyzed the relationship between structure, peptide specificity, folding, and stability of the seven major HLA-B27 subtypes to determine the role of their constitutive peptidomes in the pathogenicity of this molecule. Identification of large numbers of ligands allowed us to define the differences among subtype-bound peptidomes and to elucidate the peptide features associated with AS and molecular stability. The peptides identified only in AS-associated or high thermostability subtypes with identical A and B pockets were longer and had bulkier and more diverse C-terminal residues than those found only among non-AS-associated/lower-thermostability subtypes. Peptides sequenced from all AS-associated subtypes and not from non-AS-associated ones, thus strictly correlating with disease, were very rare. Residue 116 was critical in determining peptide binding, thermodynamic properties, and folding, thus emerging as a key feature that unified HLA-B27 biology. HLA-B27 ligands were better suited to TAP transport than their N-terminal precursors, and AS-associated subtype ligands were better than those from non-AS-associated subtypes, suggesting a particular capacity of AS-associated subtypes to bind epitopes directly produced in the cytosol. Peptides identified only from AS-associated/high-thermostability subtypes showed a higher frequency of ERAP1-resistant N-terminal residues than ligands found only in non-AS-associated/low-thermostability subtypes, reflecting a more pronounced effect of ERAP1 on the former group. Our results reveal the basis for the relationship between peptide specificity and other features of HLA-B27, provide a unified view of HLA-B27 biology and pathogenicity, and suggest a larger influence of ERAP1 polymorphism on AS-associated than non-AS-associated subtypes. PMID:25187574

  5. Whole blood transcriptional profiling in ankylosing spondylitis identifies novel candidate genes that might contribute to the inflammatory and tissue-destructive disease aspects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction A number of genetic-association studies have identified genes contributing to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) susceptibility but such approaches provide little information as to the gene activity changes occurring during the disease process. Transcriptional profiling generates a 'snapshot' of the sampled cells' activity and thus can provide insights into the molecular processes driving the disease process. We undertook a whole-genome microarray approach to identify candidate genes associated with AS and validated these gene-expression changes in a larger sample cohort. Methods A total of 18 active AS patients, classified according to the New York criteria, and 18 gender- and age-matched controls were profiled using Illumina HT-12 whole-genome expression BeadChips which carry cDNAs for 48,000 genes and transcripts. Class comparison analysis identified a number of differentially expressed candidate genes. These candidate genes were then validated in a larger cohort using qPCR-based TaqMan low density arrays (TLDAs). Results A total of 239 probes corresponding to 221 genes were identified as being significantly different between patients and controls with a P-value <0.0005 (80% confidence level of false discovery rate). Forty-seven genes were then selected for validation studies, using the TLDAs. Thirteen of these genes were validated in the second patient cohort with 12 downregulated 1.3- to 2-fold and only 1 upregulated (1.6-fold). Among a number of identified genes with well-documented inflammatory roles we also validated genes that might be of great interest to the understanding of AS progression such as SPOCK2 (osteonectin) and EP300, which modulate cartilage and bone metabolism. Conclusions We have validated a gene expression signature for AS from whole blood and identified strong candidate genes that may play roles in both the inflammatory and joint destruction aspects of the disease. PMID:21470430

  6. Evidence that autophagy, but not the unfolded protein response, regulates the expression of IL-23 in the gut of patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis and subclinical gut inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ciccia, Francesco; Accardo-Palumbo, Antonina; Rizzo, Aroldo; Guggino, Giuliana; Raimondo, Stefania; Giardina, AnnaRita; Cannizzaro, Alessandra; Colbert, Robert A.; Alessandro, Riccardo; Triolo, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Objectives IL-23 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS). Aim of the study was to clarify the mechanisms underlying the increased IL-23 expression in the gut of AS patients. Methods Consecutive gut biopsies from 30 HLA-B27+ AS patients, 15 Crohn’s disease (CD) patients and 10 normal subjects were obtained. Evidence for HLA-B27 misfolding was studied. Unfolded protein response (UPR) and autophagy were assessed by rt-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The contribution of UPR and autophagy in the regulation of IL-23 expression was evaluated in in vitro experiments on isolated lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs). Results Intracellular co-localization of SYVN1 and FHCs but not a significant over-expression of UPR genes was observed in the gut of AS patients. Conversely, up-regulation of the genes involved in the autophagy pathway was observed in the gut of AS and CD patients. Immunohistochemistry showed an increased expression of LC3II, ATG5 and ATG12 but not of SQSTM1 in the ileum of AS and CD patients. LC3II was expressed among infiltrating mononuclear cells and epithelial cells resembling Paneth cells and co-localized with ATG5 in AS and CD. Autophagy but not UPR was required to modulate the expression of IL-23 in isolated LPMCs of AS patients with chronic gut inflammation, CD patients and controls. Conclusions Our data suggest that HLA-B27 misfolding occurs in the gut of AS patients and is accompanied by activation of autophagy rather than an unfolded protein response. Autophagy appears to be associated with intestinal modulation of IL-23 in AS. PMID:23740229

  7. Increasing proportion of female patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a population-based study of trends in the incidence and prevalence of AS

    PubMed Central

    Haroon, Nisha N; Paterson, J Michael; Li, Ping; Haroon, Nigil

    2014-01-01

    Objective With the introduction of MRI in diagnosis and tumour necrosis factor inhibitors for treatment, the field of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has undergone significant changes. We carried out a population-based study of the trends in incidence and prevalence of AS over the past 15?years. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of provincial health administrative databases. Residents of Ontario, Canada aged 15?years or older diagnosed with AS between 1995 and 2010 were included in the study. Crude as well as age-standardised and sex-standardised incidence and prevalence of AS between 1995 and 2010 were calculated. Trends in prevalence and incidence of male and female patients with AS were separately analysed. Results We identified 24?976 Ontarians with AS. Age/sex-standardised AS prevalence increased from 79/100?000 in 1995 to 213/100?000 in 2010. Men had higher prevalence than women, but the male/female prevalence ratio decreased from 1.70 in 1995 to 1.21 by 2010. A higher proportion of male compared with female patients with AS were diagnosed in the 15–45 age group. Annual incidence rates revealed increasing diagnosis of AS among women after 2003. Conclusions The prevalence of AS in Ontario has nearly tripled over the past two decades. The proportion of women with new diagnosis of AS is increasing, a trend that began around the year 2003. A higher proportion of male compared with female patients with AS are diagnosed at an earlier age. PMID:25510888

  8. Obesity and inflammatory arthritis: impact on occurrence, disease characteristics and therapeutic response

    PubMed Central

    Daïen, Claire I; Sellam, Jérémie

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are increasing worldwide and now reach about one-third of the world's population. Obesity also involves patients with inflammatory arthritis. Knowing the impact of obesity on rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis) is thus an important issue. This article first reviews the epidemiological and clinical data available on obesity in inflammatory rheumatic diseases, that is, its impact on incident disease, disease characteristics and the therapeutic response. The second part of this review gives an overview of the factors potentially involved in the specifics of inflammatory arthritis in patients with obesity, such as limitations in the clinical assessment, diet, microbiota and adipokines. PMID:26509048

  9. Major cost savings associated with biologic dose reduction in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, C L; Awan, S; Sullivan, M O; Chavrimootoo, S; Bannon, C; Martin, L; Duffy, T; Murphy, E; Barry, M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether patients with Inflammatory Arthritis (IA) (Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) or Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS)) would remain in remission following a reduction in biologic dosing frequency and to calculate the cost savings associated with dose reduction. This prospective non-blinded non-randomised study commenced in 2010. Patients with Inflammatory Arthritis being treated with a biologic agent were screened for disease activity. A cohort of those in remission according to standardized disease activity indices (DAS28 < 2.6, BASDAI < 4) was offered a reduction in dosing frequency of two commonly used biologic therapies (etanercept 50 mg once per fortnight instead of weekly, adalimumab 40 mg once per month instead of fortnightly). Patients were assessed for disease activity at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months following reduction in dosing frequency. Cost saving was calculated. 79 patients with inflammatory arthritis in remission were recruited. 57% had rheumatoid arthritis (n = 45), 13% psoriatic arthritis (n = 10) and 30% ankylosing spondylitis (n = 24). 57% (n = 45) were taking etanercept and 43% (n = 34) adalimumab. The percentage of patients in remission at 24 months was 56% (n = 44). This resulted in an actual saving to the state of approximately 600,000 euro over two years. This study demonstrates the reduction in biologic dosing frequency is feasible in Inflammatory Arthritis. There was a considerable cost saving at two years. The potential for major cost savings in biologic usage should be pursued further. PMID:25702349

  10. A randomised, double-blind, multicentre, parallel-group, prospective study comparing the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of CT-P13 and innovator infliximab in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: the PLANETAS study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Won; Hrycaj, Pawel; Jeka, Slawomir; Kovalenko, Volodymyr; Lysenko, Grygorii; Miranda, Pedro; Mikazane, Helena; Gutierrez-Ureña, Sergio; Lim, MieJin; Lee, Yeon-Ah; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, HoUng; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Braun, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety and efficacy of innovator infliximab (INX) and CT-P13, a biosimilar to INX, in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods Phase 1 randomised, double-blind, multicentre, multinational, parallel-group study. Patients were randomised to receive 5?mg/kg of CT-P13 (n=125) or INX (n=125). Primary endpoints were area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) at steady state and observed maximum steady state serum concentration (Cmax,ss) between weeks 22 and 30. Additional PK, efficacy endpoints, including 20% and 40% improvement response according to Assessment in Ankylosing Spondylitis International Working Group criteria (ASAS20 and ASAS40), and safety outcomes were also assessed. Results Geometric mean AUC was 32?765.8??gh/ml for CT-P13 and 31?359.3??gh/ml for INX. Geometric mean Cmax,ss was 147.0 ??g/ml for CT-P13 and 144.8??g/ml for INX. The ratio of geometric means was 104.5% (90% CI 94% to 116%) for AUC and 101.5% (90% CI 95% to 109%) for Cmax,ss. ASAS20 and ASAS40 responses at week 30 were 70.5% and 51.8% for CT-P13 and 72.4% and 47.4% for INX, respectively. In the CT-P13 and INX groups more than one adverse event occurred in 64.8% and 63.9% of patients, infusion reactions occurred in 3.9% and 4.9%, active tuberculosis occurred in 1.6% and 0.8%, and 27.4% and 22.5% of patients tested positive for anti-drug antibodies, respectively. Conclusions The PK profiles of CT-P13 and INX were equivalent in patients with active AS. CT-P13 was well tolerated, with an efficacy and safety profile comparable to that of INX up to week 30. PMID:23687259

  11. Role of histone deacetylase 3 in ankylosing spondylitis via negative feedback loop with microRNA-130a and enhancement of tumor necrosis factor-1? expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, YA; WANG, LIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The interaction between micro (mi)RNA-130a and its target tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-1? and histone deactylase (HDAC)3 was assessed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from AS patients. Increased HDAC3 and decreased miRNA-130a levels were observed in PBMCs from AS patients. HDAC3 knockdown or HDAC3 inhibition promoted the expression of miRNA-130a, and HDAC3 was recruited to the promoter region of the gene encoding miRNA-130a in PBMCs. In addition, miR-130a overexpression led to a decrease, whereas miR-130a inhibition led to an increase of TNF-1? expression in PBMCs. Furthermore, HDAC3 knockdown or HDAC3 inhibition was associated with simultaneous upregulation of the expression of miR-130a and downregulation of the expression of TNF-1? in PBMCs. These results indicated that HDAC3 was involved in the regulation of the underlying molecular mechanism of AS by forming a negative feedback loop with miR-130a and enhancement of TNF-1? expression. PMID:26531724

  12. Can Whole-Body Cryotherapy with Subsequent Kinesiotherapy Procedures in Closed Type Cryogenic Chamber Improve BASDAI, BASFI, and Some Spine Mobility Parameters and Decrease Pain Intensity in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis?

    PubMed Central

    Stanek, Agata; Cholewka, Armand; Gadula, Jolanta; Drzazga, Zofia; Sieron, Aleksander; Sieron-Stoltny, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated whether whole-body cryotherapy (WBC) procedures could potentially have more beneficial effects on index of BASDAI and BASFI, pain intensity, and spine mobility parameters: Ott test, modified Schober test, chest expansion in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients, than kinesiotherapy procedures used separately. AS patients were exposed to a cycle of WBC procedures lasting 3 minutes a day, with a subsequent 60 minutes of kinesiotherapy or 60 minutes of kinesiotherapy only, for 10 consecutive days excluding weekend. After the completion of the cycle of WBC procedures with subsequent kinesiotherapy in the AS patients, BASDAI index decreased about 40% in comparison with the input value, whereas in the group of patients who received only kinesiotherapy it decreased only about 15% in comparison with the input value. After the completion of the treatment in the WBC group, BASFI index decreased about 30% in comparison with the input value, whereas in the kinesiotherapy group it only decreased about 16% in comparison with the input value. The important conclusion was that, in WBC group with subsequent kinesiotherapy, we observed on average about twice better results than in the group treated only by kinesiotherapy. PMID:26273618

  13. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of human leukocyte proteins from patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Willard, K.E.; Thorsrud, A.K.; Munthe, E.; Jellum, E.

    1982-04-01

    Human leukocyte proteins from more than 150 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, together with age- and sex-matched controls, were analyzed by use of the ISO-DALT technique of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis, polymyalgia rheumatica, psoriatic arthritis, calcium tendinitis, post-infectious arthritis, and asymmetrical seronegative arthritis were also included as positive controls. Synthesis of several proteins, referred to by number as members of the Rheuma set, is shown to increase in the leukocyte preparations from patients with classical rheumatoid arthritis. Several of these proteins are specific to monocytes or granulocytes; others are of unknown cellular origin, but appear to be unique to rheumatoid arthritis. The Rheuma proteins appear to be indicators of disease activity, because their increased synthesis can be correlated with sedimentation rate and other clinical indices of rheumatoid disease activity.

  14. The clinical usefulness of ESR, CRP, and disease duration in ankylosing spondylitis: the product of these acute-phase reactants and disease duration is associated with patient's poor physical mobility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Hsiung; Chen, Hung-An; Liao, Hsien-Tzung; Liu, Chin-Hsiu; Tsai, Chang-Youh; Chou, Chung-Tei

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated the clinical usefulness of ESR, CRP, and disease duration in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) disease severity. There were 156 Chinese AS patients included in Taiwan. Patients completed the questionnaires, containing demographic data, disease activity (BASDAI), functional status (BASFI), and patient's global assessment (BASG). Meanwhile, patient's physical mobility (BASMI) and acute-phase reactants, including ESR and CRP levels were measured. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) plot analysis was used to evaluate the performance of ESR, CRP, and disease duration in the AS patients. ESR mildly correlated with BASFI (r = 0.176, p = 0.028) and disease duration (r = 0.214, p = 0.008), and moderately correlated with BASMI (r = 0.427, p < 0.001). CRP moderately correlated with BASMI (r = 0.410, p < 0.001). By using ROC plot analysis, ESR, CRP, and disease duration showed the best and significant "area under the curve (AUC)", in distinguishing the AS patients with poor physical mobility (BASMI ? 3.6, the Median) (AUC = 0.748, 0.751 and 0.738, respectively, all p < 0.001), as compared to BASDAI, BASFI, and BASG. ESR × disease duration (AUC = 0.801, p < 0.001) and CRP × disease duration (AUC = 0.821, p < 0.001) showed higher AUC values than ESR or CRP alone in indicating poor physical mobility. For detecting poor physical mobility (BASMI ? 3.6) in the AS patients: ESR × disease duration (?60.0 mm/h × year): sensitivity = 72.7 % and specificity = 72.8 %; CRP × disease duration (?8.3 mg/dl × year): sensitivity = 72.7 % and specificity = 74.6 %. ESR, CRP, and disease duration are particularly related to AS patient's poor physical mobility. Combining the usefulness of acute-phase reactants and disease duration, the values of ESR × disease duration and CRP × disease duration demonstrate better association with poor physical mobility in AS patients. PMID:25708781

  15. Prevalence of HLA-B27 in Moroccan healthy subjects and patients with ankylosing spondylitis and mapping construction of several factors influencing AS diagnosis by using multiple correspondence analysis.

    PubMed

    Akassou, Amal; Yacoubi, Hanae; Jamil, Afaf; Dakka, Nadia; Amzazi, Saaïd; Sadki, Khalid; Niamane, Redouane; Elhassani, Selma; Bakri, Youssef

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of human leukocyte antigen HLA-B27 in Moroccan healthy controls and in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and to analyze the correlation between HLA-B27 and AS in Moroccan patients. The prevalence of HLA-B27 was determined by evaluating the number of HLA-B27-positive samples in 128 healthy subjects and in 53 patients diagnosed with AS according to the ESSG and AMOR criteria. HLA-B27 was determined by the polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific primers. Multivariate analysis of our data (HLA-B27, age, sex, and family history) for AS and healthy controls was performed by multiple correspondence analysis (MCA). The frequency of HLA-B27 was significantly greater in AS patients (45.3 %) than in healthy controls (4.7 %) [p < 0.0001, OR 16.8, and CI 95 % (5.83-51.03)]. In addition, HLA-B27 was more common in male patients than in female ones (p < 0.05). 100 % of the AS patients reported a family history of AS, whereas only 20 % of the healthy controls reported a family history of AS. The graphical interpretation of MCA showed a significant relation between the presence of HLA-B27 and AS. This study strengthens the link between HLA-B27 and AS and represents a very valuable informative diagnostic tool, especially in regard to male patients who have a family history of AS. PMID:26248534

  16. Diet and Spondylitis

    MedlinePLUS

    Diet & Spondylitis Learn About Spondyloarthritis / Diet & Spondylitis Overview For The Newly Diagnosed Educational Materials - Books, Brochures & More ... AS / Low Starch Diet Blood Work and Spondylitis Diet & Spondylitis Overview Diet's Effect On Spondylitis Symptoms In ...

  17. Classification and diagnostic criteria for psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Helliwell, P; Taylor, W

    2005-01-01

    Background: The study of psoriatic arthritis is difficult and has lagged behind the study of other arthropathies in that there are no universally agreed or properly validated case definitions. Method: This paper examined the validity and practicality of the original Moll and Wright criteria and subsequent criteria sets. Key features discriminating between psoriatic and other arthropathies were reviewed. A comparative study involving patients with psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis was used to contrast the different classification methods. Results: Although the Moll and Wright criteria continue to be widely used, they have been shown to discriminate poorly between psoriatic and rheumatoid arthritis. In comparison, the most sensitive criteria were those of Vasey and Espinoza, McGonagle et al, and Gladman et al (99%), whereas the others were significantly less sensitive (between 56% and 94%). The specificity of all methods was high and statistically similar (between 93% and 99%). Models that had reasonably good accuracy even without such key variables as psoriasis or rheumatoid factor were developed. Spinal involvement continues to be a key feature of psoriatic arthritis, but dissimilarities with classic ankylosing spondylitis have been highlighted. Conclusions: Further work is required to produce classification criteria for psoriatic arthritis. A prospective study collecting clinical, radiological, human leucocyte antigen (HLA) and immunological data from both psoriatic and non-psoriatic cases should provide agreed criteria for use in psoriatic arthritis studies in the future. PMID:15708931

  18. Evaluation of plasma C3d and immune complex determinations in the assessment of disease activity of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and spondylitis ancylopoetica.

    PubMed

    Krauledat, P B; Krapf, F E; Manger, B; Kalden, J R

    1985-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and spondylitis ancylopoetica were examined, along with healthy controls, for C3d plasma levels, circulating immune complexes, C3 serum levels, and CRP. Immune complexes were determined using a Clq binding assay, a 2.75% PEG precipitation technique, including the analysis of IgG and C3, and a new laser nephelometric latex test. C3d plasma levels were significantly (P less than 1%) elevated in all groups of patients as compared to controls. With regard to the demonstration of circulating immune complexes, the PEG precipitation method discriminated best between patients and the control population. It was not possible to differentiate between the different disease entities with neither C3d serum levels or immune complexes. Concerning the assessment of disease activity, none of the evaluated parameters alone appears to be of clinical relevance. The individual application of more than one immune complex assay in combination with the measurement of C3d serum levels must be recommended if disease activity is to be assessed. PMID:3892637

  19. Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... arthritis is often a life-long, progressive disease. Gout Gout is a type of arthritis that usually only ... in the United States, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, and fibromyalgia. In fact, about half of ...

  20. Prevalence of Arthritis in Africa: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Usenbo, Anthony; Kramer, Veronika; Young, Taryn; Musekiwa, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this systematic review, we estimate the prevalence of six types of arthritis in Africa; namely rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, juvenile arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, gout, and ankylosing spondylitis. Methods We comprehensively searched literature on 31 August 2014 in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library to identify eligible studies from 1975 up to 31 July 2014. Two review authors independently selected studies, extracted data, and appraised studies. We carried out random effects meta-analysis of prevalence of arthritis and assessed heterogeneity through subgroup analyses. We performed separate analyses for population- and hospital-based studies, as well as rural and urban settings. Main Findings We included 27 cross-sectional studies (20 population-based and 7 hospital-based) from Africa reporting on the prevalence of arthritis. The majority of the studies were from South Africa (44.4%, 12/27). Rheumatoid arthritis in urban settings ranged from 0.1% in Algeria, 0.6% in the DRC, to a meta-analysis overall prevalence of 2.5% in South Africa, and in rural settings ranged from a meta-analysis overall prevalence of 0.07% in South Africa, 0.3% in Egypt, to 0.4% in Lesotho. Osteoarthritis was the most prevalent form of arthritis and in urban settings it was 55.1% in South Africa and in rural settings, all in South Africa, ranged from 29.5%, 29.7%, up to 82.7% among adults aged over 65 years. Other results include highest prevalence of 33.1% for knee osteoarthritis in rural South Africa, 0.1% for ankylosing spondylitis in rural South Africa, 4.4% for psoriatic arthritis in urban South Africa, 0.7% for gout in urban South Africa, and 0.3% for juvenile idiopathic arthritis in urban Egypt. A third of the included studies had a low risk of bias (33.3%, 9/27), 40.8% (11/27) moderate risk, and 25.9% (7/27) had a high risk of bias. Conclusions In this systematic review, we have identified the paucity of latest prevalence data on arthritis in Africa. More studies are needed to address the prevalence and the true burden of this disease in Africa. PMID:26241756

  1. Validation of Portuguese-translated computer touch-screen questionnaires in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis, compared with paper formats.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Miranda, Luís; Santos, Helena; Miguel, Cláudia; Silva, Cândida; Barcelos, Filipe; Borges, Joana; Trinca, Ricardo; Vicente, Vera; Silva, Tiago

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to assess the validity and reliability of the touch-screen standard Portuguese version of the following patient-reported outcomes (PROs), compared with paper format, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis: Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life scale (ASQoL), Short-Form 36 (SF-36), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and visual analogue scales (VAS) measuring pain and burden of disease. Adult patients with RA and spondyloarthritis attending the Portuguese Institute of Rheumatology were recruited from March 2013 to January 2014. Patients filled the paper and touch-screen formats of the standard Portuguese versions of the PROs. Two groups of VAS were used, RA and psoriatic arthritis (Global VAS) and another specific for spondyloarthrites (Spa-VAS). Paper questionnaires were filled 15 min before touch-screen formats. Agreement between formats (validity) was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), while internal consistency of scales (reliability) was assessed by Cronbach's alpha. Overall, 134 patients were included with a mean age of 51 years, 74.6 % female and 57.5 % presenting RA. BASDAI, BASFI, HAQ and ASQoL showed high ICC between paper and touch-screen formats (0.977, 0.958, 0.974 and 0.940, respectively). ICC for Global VAS ranged from 0.906 to 0.921, while Spa-VAS ranged from 0.867 to 0.943. The mean ICC for all SF-36 domains was 0.889 (ICC for each domain ranged from 0.781 to 0.944). Touch-screen standard Portuguese formats of these PROs may be valid and reliable tools for PRO measurement in rheumatology. PMID:26346588

  2. Psoriatic arthritis assessment tools in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Mease, P; Antoni, C; Gladman, D; Taylor, W

    2005-01-01

    In order to measure disease activity, progression, and change with therapy in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), it is important to use accurate, reliable, and feasible outcome measures that can ideally be employed in longitudinal cohorts, clinical trials, and clinical practice. Until recently, there has been little focus on this methodology in PsA. Clinical trials and long term clinical registries have used disparate outcome measures. With emerging therapies, the focus on the methodology of outcome assessment has increased to ensure that discriminant and responsive instruments are used. The Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA), in conjunction with the society, Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT), is focused on refining and developing outcome measures for a variety of disease domains reviewed in this report. Key domains to assess include joints, skin, enthesitis, dactylitis, spine, joint damage as assessed radiologically, quality of life, and function. These domains can be assessed by individual and composite measures. A number of measures have been "borrowed" from the fields of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriasis and adapted to PsA. Others are being developed specifically for PsA. Few are validated but most have been shown to perform well in distinguishing placebo from treatment response. This report reviews the current state of the art of assessment in PsA and points toward future directions of development of this field. PMID:15708937

  3. Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... might have arthritis. Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, a swollen joint can become severely ...

  4. Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... when taking arthritis medicines . Over-the-counter medicines: Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is often the first medicine tried. Take up to 4000 mg a day (two arthritis-strength Tylenol every 8 hours). To prevent damage to your ...

  5. Anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment increases circulating T helper type 17 cells similarly in different types of inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hull, D N; Williams, R O; Pathan, E; Alzabin, S; Abraham, S; Taylor, P C

    2015-09-01

    We investigated changes in circulating T helper type 17 (Th17) cells following anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from 25 RA, 15 AS and eight PsA patients at baseline 4 and 12 weeks after treatment, and Th17 cell frequencies were analysed using interleukin (IL)-17 enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) and flow cytometry. A significant increase in IL-17-producing cells was observed by ELISPOT in RA and AS patients at 12 weeks. Flow cytometry confirmed significant increases in CD4(+) IL-17(+) cells at 12 weeks in RA and AS and 4 weeks in PsA patients. Anti-TNF treatment increases circulating Th17 cells in three different diseases. PMID:25766640

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Psoriatic arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... arthritis ; bacteria ; bone loss ; chronic ; distal ; gene ; HLA ; immune system ; inflammation ; inheritance ; inheritance pattern ; injury ; joint ; joint inflammation ; leukocyte ; population ; progression ; psoriasis ; spondylitis ; stress ; tissue ; white blood cells You may find definitions ...

  7. High Level Serum Procalcitonin Associated Gouty Arthritis Susceptibility: From a Southern Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Su, Qun; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Yan Lin; Chen, Jie; Duan, Lihua; Shi, Guixiu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To study the serum Procalcitonin (PCT) level in inflammatory arthritis including gouty arthritis (GA), Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) without any evidence of infection were evaluated the possible discriminative role of PCT in gouty arthritis susceptibility in southern Chinese Han Population. Material and Methods From Feb, 2012 to Feb, 2015, 51 patients with GA, 37 patients with RA, 41 patients with AS and 33 healthy control were enrolled in this study with no evidence of infections. The serum level of PCT (normal range < 0.05 ng/ml) was measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA). Disease activity was determined by scores of VAS (4.07 ± 1.15), DAS28 (4.97 ± 1.12), and ASDAS (2.97 ± 0.81) in GA, RA and AS groups respectively. Other laboratory parameters such as, serum creatinine (CRE), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), uric acid (UA) and white blood cells (WBC) were extracted from medical record system. Results Serum PCT level was predominantly higher in gouty arthritis than in RA and AS patients, especially in the GA patients with tophi. PCT was significantly positively correlated with VAS, CRP and ESR in gouty arthritis and CRP in AS. PCT also had positive correlation-ship with ESR, DAS28 and ASDAS in RA and AS patients respectively, but significant differences were not observed. Conclusions These data suggested that PCT is not solely a biomarker for infection, but also an indicator in inflammatory arthritis, especially in gouty arthritis. PMID:26182343

  8. Spondylitis Association of America

    MedlinePLUS

    Learn About Spondyloarthritis You Shop, Amazon Gives! Spondylitis Association of America: How We Can Help - Our Work Connect With Others: Support Groups, Message Boards & More... Educational Materials ...

  9. Antibiotic treatment and long term prognosis of reactive arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Laasila, K; Laasonen, L; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether a three month course of lymecycline has an effect on the long term prognosis of reactive arthritis (ReA). Methods: In 1987–88 a double-blind controlled study with three month course of lymecycline/placebo was conducted. 17 of 23 patients treated at the outpatient department of Helsinki University Central Hospital volunteered to take part in a follow up study, where a physical examination were performed, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C reactive protein, rheumatoid factor, and radiographs of the lumbosacral spine and sacroiliac joints and of symptomatic peripheral joints were examined. Results: 16/17 (94%) patients reported some kind of back pain and 10/17 (59%) peripheral joint symptoms during the follow up. Two patients had unilateral grade 1 sacroiliitis, one patient grade 4 sacroiliitis, and one patient bilateral grade 2 sacroiliitis. In one patient the disease had progressed to ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and in another to chronic spondyloarthropathy. In addition, two patients had small erosions in radiocarpal joints. No statistically significant differences were found between placebo and lymecycline groups in the development of chronic arthritis, sacroiliitis, or AS. Conclusion: The results of the initial study showed that long term treatment with lymecycline in patients with acute ReA decreased the duration of arthritis in those with Chlamydia trachomatis triggered ReA, but not in other patients with ReA. Ten years after the acute arthritis one patient had developed AS, and three had radiological sacroiliitis, three patients had radiological changes at peripheral joints. Long term lymecycline treatment did not change the natural history of the disease. PMID:12810429

  10. Induction of Regulatory t Cells by Low Dose il2 in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-04

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Psoriasis; Behcet's Disease; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Takayasu's Disease; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Colitis; Autoimmune Hepatitis; Sclerosing Cholangitis

  11. Vitamin D concentrations and disease activity in Moroccan children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In addition to its important metabolic activities, vitamin D also contributes to the regulation of the immune system. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between hypovitaminosis D and disease activity in Moroccan children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods In this cross-sectional study, forty children with JIA were included, all having been diagnosed according to the classification criteria of International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR). The children underwent anthropometric assessment and clinical evaluation. Disease activity was measured using the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) for polyarticular and oligoarticular JIA and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) for enthesitis-related arthritis. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin [25(OH)D] D2 and D3 were measured using radioimmunoassay (RIA). Hypovitaminosis D was defined as serum 25(OH)D <30 ng/ml. Results The average age of participants was 11 years?±?4.23. Hypovitaminosis D was observed in 75% of patients. In univariate analyses, 25(OH)D levels were negatively associated with DAS28 for polyarticular and oligoarticular JIA. No significant relationship was found between 25(OH)D levels and BASDAI for juvenile spondylarthropathy. In multivariate linear regression analysis, no association persisted between 25(OH)D levels and DAS28. Conclusions Our study suggested that serum levels of vitamin D were low in Moroccan children with JIA disease. Future studies with a larger population are needed to confirm our results. PMID:24690195

  12. Switching TNF antagonists in patients with chronic arthritis: an observational study of 488 patients over a four-year period

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Carmona, Loreto

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this work is to analyze the survival of infliximab, etanercept and adalimumab in patients who have switched among tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists for the treatment of chronic arthritis. BIOBADASER is a national registry of patients with different forms of chronic arthritis who are treated with biologics. Using this registry, we have analyzed patient switching of TNF antagonists. The cumulative discontinuation rate was calculated using the actuarial method. The log-rank test was used to compare survival curves, and Cox regression models were used to assess independent factors associated with discontinuing medication. Between February 2000 and September 2004, 4,706 patients were registered in BIOBADASER, of whom 68% had rheumatoid arthritis, 11% ankylosing spondylitis, 10% psoriatic arthritis, and 11% other forms of chronic arthritis. One- and two-year drug survival rates of the TNF antagonist were 0.83 and 0.75, respectively. There were 488 patients treated with more than one TNF antagonist. In this situation, survival of the second TNF antagonist decreased to 0.68 and 0.60 at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Survival was better in patients replacing the first TNF antagonist because of adverse events (hazard ratio (HR) for discontinuation 0.55 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34–0.84)), and worse in patients older than 60 years (HR 1.10 (95% CI 0.97–2.49)) or who were treated with infliximab (HR 3.22 (95% CI 2.13–4.87)). In summary, in patients who require continuous therapy and have failed to respond to a TNF antagonist, replacement with a different TNF antagonist may be of use under certain situations. This issue will deserve continuous reassessment with the arrival of new medications. PMID:16507128

  13. SAPHO syndrome associated spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Masato; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Misawa, Haruo; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Takahata, Tomohiro; Nakahara, Hiroyuki; Nakahara, Shinnosuke; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2008-01-01

    The concept of synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome has been well clarified, after Chamot et al. suggested this peculiar disorder in 1987. The most commonly affected site in SAPHO syndrome is the anterior chest, followed by the spine. However, the clinical course and taxonomic concept of SAPHO spinal lesions are poorly understood. This study was performed to analyze: (1) the detailed clinical course of spinal lesions in SAPHO syndrome, and (2) the relationship between SAPHO syndrome with spinal lesions and seronegative spondyloarthropathy. Thirteen patients with spondylitis in SAPHO syndrome were analyzed. The features of spinal lesions were a chronic onset with a slight inflammatory reaction, and slowly progressing non-marginal syndesmophytes at multi spinal levels, besides the coexistence of specific skin lesions. SAPHO syndrome, especially spinal lesions related to palmoplantar pustulosis, can be recognized as a subtype of seronegative spondyloarthropathy. PMID:18642032

  14. Incidence of active mycobacterial infections in Brazilian patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis and negative evaluation for latent tuberculosis infection at baseline - A longitudinal analysis after using TNFa blockers.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Carina Mori Frade; Terreri, Maria Teresa; Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel de; Barbosa, Cássia; Machado, Natália Pereira; Melo, Maria Roberta; Pinheiro, Marcelo Medeiros

    2015-11-01

    Several studies point to the increased risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIAs) after using tumour necrosis factor (TNF)a blockers. To study the incidence of active mycobacterial infections (aMI) in patients starting TNFa blockers, 262 patients were included in this study: 109 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 93 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 44 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and 16 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). All patients had indication for anti-TNFatherapy. Epidemiologic and clinical data were evaluated and a simple X-ray and tuberculin skin test (TST) were performed. The control group included 215 healthy individuals. The follow-up was 48 months to identify cases of aMI. TST positivity was higher in patients with AS (37.6%) than in RA (12.8%), PsA (18.8%) and JIA (6.8%) (p < 0.001). In the control group, TST positivity was 32.7%. Nine (3.43%) patients were diagnosed with aMI. The overall incidence rate of aMI was 86.93/100,000 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI) 23.6-217.9] for patients and 35.79/100,000 person-years (95% CI 12.4-69.6) for control group (p < 0.001). All patients who developed aMI had no evidence of LTBI at the baseline evaluation. Patients with CIA starting TNFa blockers and no evidence of LTBI at baseline, particularly with nonreactive TST, may have higher risk of aMI. PMID:26560983

  15. Incidence of active mycobacterial infections in Brazilian patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis and negative evaluation for latent tuberculosis infection at baseline - A longitudinal analysis after using TNF? blockers

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Carina Mori Frade; Terreri, Maria Teresa; de Moraes-Pinto, Maria Isabel; Barbosa, Cássia; Machado, Natália Pereira; Melo, Maria Roberta; Pinheiro, Marcelo Medeiros

    2015-01-01

    Several studies point to the increased risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis (CIAs) after using tumour necrosis factor (TNF)? blockers. To study the incidence of active mycobacterial infections (aMI) in patients starting TNF ? blockers, 262 patients were included in this study: 109 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 93 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 44 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and 16 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). All patients had indication for anti-TNF ? therapy. Epidemiologic and clinical data were evaluated and a simple X-ray and tuberculin skin test (TST) were performed. The control group included 215 healthy individuals. The follow-up was 48 months to identify cases of aMI. TST positivity was higher in patients with AS (37.6%) than in RA (12.8%), PsA (18.8%) and JIA (6.8%) (p < 0.001). In the control group, TST positivity was 32.7%. Nine (3.43%) patients were diagnosed with aMI. The overall incidence rate of aMI was 86.93/100,000 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI) 23.6-217.9] for patients and 35.79/100,000 person-years (95% CI 12.4-69.6) for control group (p < 0.001). All patients who developed aMI had no evidence of LTBI at the baseline evaluation. Patients with CIA starting TNF ? blockers and no evidence of LTBI at baseline, particularly with nonreactive TST, may have higher risk of aMI. PMID:26560983

  16. Pregnancy and early onset pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Musiej-Nowakowska, E.; Ploski, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To study interaction of early onset pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis (EOP-JCA) and pregnancy in the Polish population, in particular to confirm the ameliorating effect of pregnancy on disease activity reported by others and to analyse the factors that govern the occurrence of postpartum flare, with emphasis on the potential role of breast feeding.?METHODS—The reproductive outcome and disease status in 39 adult women with history of EOP- JCA was examined by means of a questionnaire and an interview. In all patients the disease onset occurred before the 6th birthday, 19 had persistent pauciarticular JCA (PeEOP-JCA) and 20 had extended pauciarticular JCA (ExEOP-JCA).?RESULTS—23 women had at least one successful pregnancy, seven had unsuccessful pregnancies but all of them had also one or more successful pregnancies. Among those who have never been pregnant (n=16) there was a higher frequency of eye disease and ExEOP-JCA compared with the rest of the group. In almost all cases pregnancy was associated with remission of disease activity, however a postpartum flare appeared after 22 pregnancies (52%). The flares were more frequent in women who had an active disease before pregnancy, had a flare after a previous pregnancy and/or were breast feeding.?CONCLUSIONS—In EOP-JCA patients pregnancy generally has a good outcome and induces amelioration of disease activity. After delivery, however, a flare of disease often appears, especially in women who were breast feeding, had a postparum flare previously or had an active disease before pregnancy. The pattern of interaction between disease and pregnancy found in EOP-JCA makes EOP-JCA similar in this respect to RA, but different from systemic lupus erythematosus and ankylosing spondylitis.?? PMID:10419865

  17. The CARRA Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Mixed Connective Tissue Disease; Juvenile Ankylosing Spondylitis; Juvenile Dermatomyositis; Localized Scleroderma; Systemic Sclerosis; Vasculitis; Sarcoid; Fibromyalgia, Primary; Auto-inflammatory Disease; Idiopathic Uveitis Idiopathic

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  19. Prevalence of acute and chronic viral seropositivity and characteristics of disease in patients with psoriatic arthritis treated with cyclosporine: a post hoc analysis from a sex point of view on the observational study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Delia; Chimenti, Sergio; Grossi, Paolo Antonio; Marchesoni, Antonio; Bardazzi, Federico; Ayala, Fabio; Simoni, Lucia; Vassellatti, Donatella; Bellia, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Sex medicine studies have shown that there are sex differences with regard to disease characteristics in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, in immune response and susceptibility to viral infections. We performed a post hoc analysis of the Observational Study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis (SYNERGY) study in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treated with immunosuppressive regimens including cyclosporine, in order to evaluate potential between-sex differences in severity of disease and prevalence of viral infections. Methods SYNERGY was an observational study conducted in 24 Italian dermatology clinics, which included 238 consecutively enrolled patients with PsA, under treatment with immunosuppressant regimens including cyclosporin A. In this post hoc analysis, patients’ demographical data and clinical characteristics of psoriasis, severity and activity of PsA, prevalence of seropositivity for at least one viral infection, and treatments administered for PsA and infections were compared between sexes. Results A total of 225 patients were evaluated in this post hoc analysis, and 121 (54%) were males. Demographic characteristics and concomitant diseases were comparable between sexes. Statistically significant sex differences were observed at baseline in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (higher in males), mean number of painful joints, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, and the global activity of disease assessed by patients (all higher in females). The percentage of patients with at least one seropositivity detected at baseline, indicative of concomitant or former viral infection, was significantly higher among women than among men. No between-sex differences were detected in other measures, at other time points, and in treatments. Patients developed no hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus reactivation during cyclosporine treatment. Conclusion Our post hoc sex analysis suggests that women with PsA have a greater articular involvement and a higher activity of disease compared to males. Immunosuppressive treatment with cyclosporine seems not to increase susceptibility to new infections or infectious reactivations, with no sex differences.

  20. Thoughts and perceptions of ankylosing spondylitis patients with regard to TNF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Fatma Ilknur; Cinar, Muhammet; Yilmaz, Sedat; Simsek, Ismail; Erdem, Hakan; Pay, Salih

    2014-07-01

    The risk of infections and malignancies is the major area of concern with anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) agents. The aim of this study was to investigate patients' views about their treatments and the factors that influence patients' treatment decisions concerning the use of anti-TNF-? drugs. This descriptive study was conducted in a single rheumatology unit. Patients using anti-TNF-? drugs for at least 3 months were included. Patients' thoughts and perceptions about their treatment were evaluated using a questionnaire. A total of 101 (94.1% male) patients were recruited. The patients described their feelings as hopeful, worried, happy, scared, desperate, and hopeless, with the order decreasing beginning with the first. Hope for healing and an expectation of increased quality of life were the most significant determinants for acceptance of treatment. After the drug information was given, patients described their feelings as follows: increase in anxiety, psychologically wearisome, and worrying about their condition worsening in the future. After anti-TNF-? treatment, patients described their experience as follows: "the most effective medicine that I have ever used," "it saved my life," "control procedures that were carried out before the treatment and once every 3 months after the treatment were essential," "I feel myself safe with these controls," and "I advised other people." This study, to our knowledge, is the first to evaluate the attitudes of patients concerning anti-TNF-? drugs from the stage of informed consent to the post-experience stage. We found that standard consent forms caused an increase in the level of anxiety among new users of anti-TNF-? drugs, although the aim was the exact opposite. The reasons for acceptance were the hope for healing, reliance on physicians, and advice of other patients. Most patients accepted follow-up control procedures, which aimed to diagnose adverse effects early. PMID:24374358

  1. Differential Th1/Th2 cytokine patterns in chronic arthritis: interferon ? is highly expressed in synovium of rheumatoid arthritis compared with seronegative spondyloarthropathies

    PubMed Central

    Canete, J.; Martinez, S.; Farres, J.; Sanmarti, R.; Blay, M.; Gomez, A.; Salvador, G.; Munoz-Gomez, J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate possible differences in Th1 and Th2 cytokine mRNA expression in the synovial tissue (ST) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and seronegative spondyloarthropathies (SpA) with diagnostic and/or pathogenic interest.?METHODS—Eleven RA patients and 14 SpA patients (10 with undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy (USpA), two with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and two with psoriatic arthritis (PsA)) were included. Th1 (interferon ?, interleukin 2) and Th2 (interleukin 4, interleukin 5 and interleukin 10) cytokine mRNA levels from arthritic knee ST were quantified by using an optimised polymerase chain reaction method with a computerised analysis system. Protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin 1, tumour necrosis factor ? and interleukin 6) in synovial fluid were quantified with a specific ELISA test.?RESULTS—Th1 cytokines were detected in all of RA ST samples in contrast with 58% (interferon ?) and 71% (interleukin 2) of SpA samples. Th2 cytokines were expressed in 90% of RA ST samples, but the findings in SpA were interleukin 10 in 90%, interleukin 4 in 60% and interleukin 5 in 40% of ST samples. However, when the mRNA levels of each cytokine were quantified and corrected for T cell mRNA levels, only interferon ? levels were significantly higher in RA than in SpA (p<0.003). Thus, the Th1/Th2 cytokine ratio in RA was fivefold that of SpA. Synovial fluid interleukin 1? concentrations were higher in RA than in SpA (p<0.05); there were also higher synovial fluid levels of tumour necrosis factor ? in RA than in SpA, but without statistical significance.?CONCLUSION—This study has detected both Th1 and Th2 cytokine gene expression in ST from RA and SpA patients. Synovium interferon ? mRNA levels and SF interleukin 1? protein levels were significantly higher in RA than in SpA, so reflecting the known proinflammatory activity of interferon ? through macrophage activation. Thus, the Th1 (interferon ?)/Th2 (interleukin 4) ratio is significantly higher in RA than in SpA ST. These data confirm previous studies on ST Th1/Th2 balance in RA and extend previous work in comparing ST RA with subgroups of SpA distinct of ReA.?? PMID:10733472

  2. Psoriatic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  3. Increased prevalence of anti-third generation cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and CREST syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wu, R; Shovman, O; Zhang, Y; Gilburd, B; Zandman-Goddard, G; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2007-02-01

    To investigate the prevalence of anti-third generation cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP3) in patients with systemic connective tissue diseases, we assembled a training set consisting of 115 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 52 with Calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, telangiectasia (CREST) syndrome, 21 with scleroderma, 20 with ankylosing spondylitis, 18 with reactive arthritis, 25 with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 51 with osteoarthritis, 26 with mixed connective tissue disease, 23 with primary Sjogren's syndrome, 74 with systemic lupus erythematosus, 49 with Polymyalgia rheumatica, and 39 with polymyositis/dermatomyositis. The commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect anti-CCP antibodies, including anti-CCP2 (regular, second generation of CCP antigen) and anti-CCP3 (third generation of CCP antigen) in disease-related specimens and normal controls. These serum samples were also evaluated for anti-centomere antibodies by anti-centromere ELISA kit. The higher frequencies of anti-CCP3 and anti-CCP2 were detected in 75.6 and 70.4% patients with RA, respectively. At the same time, anti-CCP3 (not anti-CCP2) was significantly increased in samples isolated from patients with CREST syndrome. The clinical sensitivity of IgG anti-CCP3 for the patients with CREST syndrome was 29% (15 of 52) and the specificity was 96% (384 of 397), with the exception of the RA group. The anti-centromere antibodies were significantly higher in patients with CREST only. The results of our study suggest that compared to anti-CCP2 assay, the new anti-CCP3 assay can enhance the clinical sensitivity for diagnosis of RA and, as an associate marker combined with anticentromere, can distinguish CREST syndrome from other systemic connective tissue diseases, especially RA. The clinical specificity of anti-CCP3 was lower than anti-CCP2 assay in diagnosis of RA because of the crossreaction to the patients with CREST syndrome. PMID:17426360

  4. Childhood arthritis.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    Essential facts About 15,000 children and young people are believed to have arthritis, a condition that causes joint inflammation and pain. Most types of childhood arthritis are known as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The exact cause of JIA is unknown but it is treatable and many children affected have an excellent quality of life. PMID:26647679

  5. Golimumab for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Epstein, D; Bojke, L; Craig, D; Light, K; Bruce, I; Sculpher, M; Woolacott, N

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the use of golimumab for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The main clinical effectiveness data were derived from a single phase III randomised controlled trial (RCT: GO-REVEAL) that compared golimumab with placebo for treating patients with active and progressive PsA who were symptomatic despite the use of previous disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The 14-week data showed that, compared with placebo, golimumab 50 mg significantly improved joint disease response as measured by American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20 [relative risk (RR) 5.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.24 to 10.56] and Psoriatic Arthritis Response Criteria (PsARC) (RR 3.45, 95% CI 2.49 to 4.87), and skin disease response as measured by the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) 75 (RR 15.95, 95% CI 4.62 to 59.11). The 24-week absolute data showed that these treatment benefits were maintained. There was a significant improvement in patients' functional status as measured by the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) change from baseline at 24 weeks (-0.33, p < 0.001). The open-label extension data showed that these beneficial effects were also maintained at 52 and 104 weeks. However, PASI 50 and PASI 90 at 14 weeks, and all of the PASI outcomes at 24 weeks, were not performed on the basis of intention-to-treat analysis. Furthermore, analyses of the 24-week data were less robust, failing to adjust for treatment contamination due to patient crossover at week 16. The manufacturer conducted a mixed treatment comparison (MTC) analysis. The ERG considered the assumption of exchangeability between the trials for the purpose of the MTC analysis to be acceptable, and the statistical approach in the MTC analysis to be reliable. Regarding the safety evaluation of golimumab, the manufacturer failed to provide longer-term data or to consider adverse event data of golimumab from controlled studies in other conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. Although the adverse effect profile of golimumab appears similar to other anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) agents, the longer-term safety profile of golimumab remains uncertain. The manufacturer's submission presented a decision model to compare etanercept, infliximab, golimumab and adalimumab versus palliative care for patients with PsA. In the base-case model, 73% of the cohort of patients were assumed to have significant psoriasis (> 3% of body surface area). Estimates of the effectiveness of anti-TNF agents in terms of PsARC, HAQ change and PASI change were obtained from an MTC analysis of RCT data. The manufacturer failed to calculate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) correctly by comparing golimumab with palliative care instead of the most cost-effective alternative (etanercept). Despite the manufacturer's claim that golimumab is a cost-effective treatment option, the manufacturer's own model showed that golimumab is not cost-effective compared with other biologics when the ICERs are correctly calculated. None of the sensitivity analyses carried out by the manufacturer or the ERG regarding uncertainty in the estimates of clinical effectiveness, the acquisition and administration cost of drugs, the cost of treating psoriasis and the utility functions estimated to generate health outcomes changed this conclusion. However, a key area in determining the cost-effectiveness of anti-TNF agents is whether they should be treated as a class. If all anti-TNF agents are considered equally effective then etanercept, adalimumab and golimumab have very nearly equal costs and equal quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and all have an ICER of about £ 15,000 per QALY versus palliative care, whereas infliximab with a higher acquisition cost is dominated by the other biologics. PMID:21609657

  6. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), a part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Institutes of Health (NIH), is to support research into the causes, treatment, and prevention of arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin ...

  7. HLA-B27 positive juvenile arthritis with cardiac involvement preceding sacroiliac joint changes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S; Im H, Y; Schueller, W

    2001-01-01

    While cardiovascular disease develops in up to 50% of adult patients with ankylosing spondylitis, it is very uncommon in its juvenile counterpart. Regarding the early stage of the disease, before onset of sacroiliac joint changes, only two cases with aortic incompetence have been published while reports of mitral valve involvement are not available. A 13 year old boy is described with an HLA-B27 positive asymmetric oligoarthritis and enthesitis, without back pain or radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis. Echocardiography showed an echogenic structure measuring 8 × 11 × 20 mm at the fibrous continuity between the aortic and mitral valves extending through a false tendon into an echogenic thickened posterior papillary muscle, causing a grade II aortic and grade I/II mitral regurgitation. Short term corticosteroid and long term non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and disease modifying antirheumatic drug treatments efficiently controlled the symptoms. The cardiac findings remained unchanged during a follow up of 20 months. Careful cardiac evaluation appears to be mandatory even in these young patients.???Keywords: juvenile ankylosing spondylitis; HLA-B27; aortic valve insufficiency; mitral valve insufficiency PMID:11711484

  8. Phenomics in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-04

    Healthy Volunteer; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus/Antiphospholipid Syndrome; FMF; Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes /TNF-receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome; Vasculitis; Uveitis; Myositis; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Rectocolitis; Type 1 Diabetes; Unclassified IAD Knee and/or Hip Arthritis, Muscular Dystrophy

  9. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube Assay for Screening Arthritis Patients for Latent Tuberculosis Infection before Starting Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Hwang, Ji-Won; Lee, Jaejoon; Cha, Hoon-Suk; Koh, Eun-Mi; Kang, Eun-Suk; Koh, Won-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) treatment are at an increased risk of reactivating a latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). This study evaluated the effectiveness of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT) assay for diagnosing LTBI in arthritis patients undergoing anti-TNF treatment. Methods We enrolled 342 consecutive patients from August 2007 to October 2013: 176 (51.5%) patients with ankylosing spondylitis and 166 (48.5%) with rheumatoid arthritis. Screening tests included tuberculin skin test (TST) and QFT assay. Positive QFT results, regardless of TST results, were considered an indicator for LTBI treatment. Results Bacillus Calmette-Guérin scars were found in 236 (69.0%) patients. Of 342 patients, TST and QFT were positive in 122 (35.7%) and 103 (30.1%) patients, respectively, and discordant in 101 (29.5%) patients. During a median follow-up duration of 41.7 months, five patients (1.5%) developed TB in a median of 20.8 months after initiation of anti-TNF treatment (428/100,000 person-years). TB did not occur in 62 TST+/QFT+ patients who received LTBI treatment. Of 41 TST?/QFT+ patients who received LTBI treatment, one (2.4%) developed TB 20.5 months after starting anti-TNF treatment (705/100,000 person-years). Of 60 TST+/QFT? patients who did not receive LTBI treatment, two (3.3%) developed TB 20.8 and 22.0 months after starting anti-TNF treatment (871/100,000 person-years). Of 179 TST?/QFT? patients, two (1.1%) developed TB 7.2 and 22.7 months, respectively, after initiating anti-TNF treatment (341/100,000 person-years). TB incidence rate during the follow-up period did not differ among TST?/QFT+, TST+/QFT?, and TST?/QFT? patients (P = 0.661). Conclusion QFT might be used instead of TST for diagnosing LTBI in patients before starting anti-TNF therapy in countries, such as Korea, where the TB prevalence is intermediate and the BCG vaccination is mandatory at birth. In the absence of a true gold standard test for LTBI, however, there is still a risk of TB development during anti-TNF treatment. PMID:25746854

  10. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... can affect people under age 17. What Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis? Arthritis doesn't affect young people as much ... describe a disease that has no known cause. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which is different from the idiopathic arthritis that ...

  11. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that can cause attacks of arthritis . Like with gout, crystals form in the joints. But in calcium ... pyrophosphate arthritis can be misdiagnosed as: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis

  12. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with eating food or handling something that has bacteria on it. To diagnose infectious arthritis, your health care provider may do tests of your blood, urine, and joint fluid. Treatment includes medicines and sometimes surgery.

  13. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes itchy or sore patches of thick, red skin with silvery ... other parts of your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and ...

  14. Fungal arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... arthritis is infection of a joint by a fungus. ... Culture of joint fluid that grows fungus Joint x-ray showing joint changes Positive antibody test (serology) for fungal disease Synovial biopsy showing fungus

  15. Arthritis Advice

    MedlinePLUS

    ... people most often have osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or gout. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of ... heart , muscles, blood vessels, nervous system, and eyes . Gout is one of the most painful kinds of ...

  16. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... stiffness, inflammation, swelling and, sometimes, destruction of joints. Gout — a form of arthritis that occurs when uric ... the joints. Some 2.1 million Americans have gout. Lupus — a form of arthritis, like rheumatoid arthritis, ...

  17. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Information Arthritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Rheumatoid Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  18. Impact of pregnancy on health related quality of life evaluated prospectively in pregnant women with rheumatic diseases by the SF-36 health survey

    PubMed Central

    Forger, F; Ostensen, M; Schumacher, A; Villiger, P

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To gain insight into patient experience of the disease course and health related quality of life during and after pregnancy in women with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. Methods: 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 10 patients with ankylosing spondylitis, and 29 age matched healthy pregnant controls were evaluated by the medical outcomes study short form 36 (SF-36) health survey once at each trimester and at 6, 12, and 24 weeks postpartum. A group of non-pregnant age matched female patients (40 rheumatoid arthritis, 16 ankylosing spondylitis) was studied for comparison. Results: Impaired physical dimensions as well as increased bodily pain was observed in healthy women in late pregnancy. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis showed improved physical functioning scores in the second trimester and reduced pain in the third trimester. Among pregnant patients, those with ankylosing spondylitis suffered the greatest impairment of health related quality of life during pregnancy. In all patient groups the physical impairment in the third trimester was less pronounced than in healthy controls. Mental health scores remained stable even with persisting active disease during pregnancy, or with a postpartum flare. Conclusions: Pregnancy reduced physical functioning in healthy women and patients, but had no impact on mental and emotional health, even at times of disease aggravation. The pregnancy experience documented in our patients may be helpful when counselling patients contemplating pregnancy. PMID:15778241

  19. Treating Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Are you newly diagnosed? Have questions? Connect with ...

  20. Living with Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Are you newly diagnosed? Have questions? Connect with ...

  1. Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Are you newly diagnosed? Have questions? Connect with ...

  2. Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Are you newly diagnosed? Have questions? Connect with ...

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  4. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; JRA; Still's disease; Juvenile idiopathic arthritis ... role of exercise therapy in the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Curr Opin Rheumatol . 2010 Mar;22(2):213- ...

  5. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    MedlinePLUS

    Juvenile Arthritis PDF Version Size: 123 KB November 2014 What Is Juvenile Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ... The most common type that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis (idiopathic means “from unknown causes”). There are several ...

  6. Etanercept-induced cystic acne.

    PubMed

    Kashat, Maria; Caretti, Katherine; Kado, Jessica

    2014-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor ? antagonists are potent biologics used to treat a variety of autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, Crohn disease, psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis. These medications are known to have many side effects (eg, infusion reactions, cytopenia, risk for infection, heart failure); however, only a few cases of acne vulgaris have been associated with the use of these biologics, particularly infliximab and adalimumab. We report a rare case of etanercept-induced cystic acne. PMID:25101341

  7. Infections and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; Ravindran, Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can all cause arthritis of either acute or chronic nature, which can be divided into infective/septic, reactive, or inflammatory. Considerable advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques in the recent decades resulting in better treatment outcomes in patients with infective arthritis. Detection of emerging arthritogenic viruses has changed the epidemiology of infection-related arthritis. The role of viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis is increasingly being recognized. We discuss the various causative agents of infective arthritis and emphasize on the approach to each type of arthritis, highlighting the diagnostic tests, along with their statistical accuracy. Various investigations including newer methods such as nucleic acid amplification using polymerase chain reaction are discussed along with the pitfalls in interpreting the tests. PMID:26096095

  8. Clinical Characteristics and Risk Factors of Pyogenic Spondylitis Caused by Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seung-Ji; Jang, Hee-Chang; Jung, Sook-In; Choe, Pyoeng Gyun; Park, Wan Beom; Kim, Chung-Jong; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Hong Bin; Oh, Myoung-don

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited data describing the clinical characteristics of pyogenic spondylitis caused by Gram-negative bacteria (GNB). The aim of this study was to investigate the predisposing factors and clinical characteristics of pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB compared to Gram-positive cocci (GPC). Methods We performed a retrospective review of medical records from patients with culture-confirmed pyogenic spondylitis at four tertiary teaching hospitals over an 8-year period. Results A total of 344 patients with culture-confirmed pyogenic spondylitis were evaluated. There were 62 patients (18.0%) with pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB and the most common organism was Escherichia coli (n = 35, 10.2%), followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 10, 2.9%). Pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB was more frequently associated with the female gender (64.5 vs. 35.5%, P <0.01), preexisting or synchronous genitourinary tract infection (32.3 vs. 2.1%, P< 0.01), and intra-abdominal infection (12.9 vs. 0.4%, P< 0.01) compared to patients with GPC. Although pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB presented with severe sepsis more frequently (24.2 vs. 11.3%, P = 0.01), the mortality rate (6.0 vs. 5.2%) and the proportion of patients with residual disability (6.0 vs. 9.0%), defined as grade 3 or 4 (P = 0.78) 3 months after completion of treatment, were not significantly different compared to GPC patients. Conclusion GNB should be considered as the etiologic organism when infectious spondylitis develops in a patient with preexisting or synchronous genitourinary tract and intra-abdominal infection. In addition, the mortality rate and clinical outcomes are not significantly different between pyogenic spondylitis caused by GNB and GPC. PMID:25978839

  9. Postinfectious Arthritis in Pediatric Practice

    PubMed Central

    PLESCA, Doina Anca; LUMINOS, Monica; SPATARIU, Luminita; STEFANESCU, Mihaela; CINTEZA, Eliza; BALGRADEAN, Mihaela

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Postinfectious arthritis is a relatively often encountered in pediatric practice. The authors present the most important data concerneing this pathology, with up to date informations exemplifying with case presentations. Clinical cases bring to attention the most common forms of postinfectious arthritis (reactive arthritis, postinfectious arthritis bacterial, viral, spirochete, and so on). Although highly studied and commonly found in current pediatric practice, arthritis occurring after infections remains controversial entities, especially regarding terminology. While, according to some authors, postinfectious arthritis belongs to the large group of reactive arthritis, by other authors, these joint events are independent entities. PMID:24371480

  10. Reverse Latissimus Dorsi Muscle Flap for an Extensive Soft Tissue Defect Accompanied by Infectious Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Chai Min; Hwang, Soo Hyun; Park, Kyung Bum

    2012-01-01

    Spinal infection is an inflammatory process around the vertebral body, and it can extend to the epidural space, posterior elements and paravertebral soft tissues. Infectious spondylitis is a rare infectious disorder, which is often associated with significant neurologic deficits and mortality. When an extensive soft tissue defect is accompanied by infectious spondylitis, effective infection control and proper coverage of soft tissue are directly connected to successful outcomes. However, it is not simple to choose the appropriate treatment methods for infectious spondylitis accompanied by a soft tissue defect. Herein, we report a case of severe infectious spondylitis that was accompanied by an extensive soft tissue defect which was closed with a reverse latissimus muscle flap after traumatic spinal epidural hemorrhage. PMID:23133738

  11. Ankylosing spondylitis patients display altered dendritic cell and T cell populations that implicate pathogenic roles for the IL-23 cytokine axis and intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Pamela B.; McEntegart, Anne; McCarey, David; McInnes, Iain B.; Siebert, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. AS is a systemic inflammatory disease of the SpA family. Polymorphisms at loci including HLA-B27, IL-23R and ERAP-1 directly implicate immune mechanisms in AS pathogenesis. Previously, in an SpA model, we identified HLA-B27–mediated effects on dendritic cells that promoted disease-associated Th17 cells. Here we extend these studies to AS patients using deep immunophenotyping of candidate pathogenic cell populations. The aim of our study was to functionally characterize the immune populations mediating AS pathology. Methods. Using 11-parameter flow cytometry, we characterized the phenotype and functions of lymphocyte and myeloid cells from peripheral blood, and the synovial phenotype of AS patients and age-matched healthy controls. Results. Significantly fewer circulating CD1c-expressing dendritic cells were observed in AS patients, offset by an increase in CD14? CD16+ mononuclear cells. Ex vivo functional analysis revealed that this latter population induced CCR6 expression and promoted secretion of IL-1? and IL-6 when co-cultured with naive CD4+ T cells. Additionally, systemic inflammation in AS patients significantly correlated with increased proportions of activated CCR9+ CD4+ T cells. Conclusion. CD14? CD16+ mononuclear cells may contribute to AS by promoting Th17 responses, and antigen-presenting cells of mucosal origin are likely to contribute to systemic inflammation in AS. PMID:26320138

  12. Estimates of radiation doses in tissue and organs and risk of excess cancer in the single-course radiotherapy patients treated for ankylosing spondylitis in England and Wales

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.

    1982-02-01

    The estimates of absorbed doses of x rays and excess risk of cancer in bone marrow and heavily irradiated sites are extremely crude and are based on very limited data and on a number of assumptions. Some of these assumptions may later prove to be incorrect, but it is probable that they are correct to within a factor of 2. The excess cancer risk estimates calculated compare well with the most reliable epidemiological surveys thus far studied. This is particularly important for cancers of heavily irradiated sites with long latent periods. The mean followup period for the patients was 16.2 y, and an increase in cancers of heavily irradiated sites may appear in these patients in the 1970s in tissues and organs with long latent periods for the induction of cancer. The accuracy of these estimates is severely limited by the inadequacy of information on doses absorbed by the tissues at risk in the irradiated patients. The information on absorbed dose is essential for an accurate assessment of dose-cancer incidence analysis. Furthermore, in this valuable series of irradiated patients, the information on radiation dosimetry on the radiotherapy charts is central to any reliable determination of somatic risks of radiation with regard to carcinogenesis in man. The work necessary to obtain these data is under way; only when they are available can more precise estimates of risk of cancer induction by radiation in man be obtained.

  13. Arthritis and the Feet

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for months, or years, then abate, sometimes permanently. Gout (gouty arthritis) : Gout is a condition caused by a buildup of ... sauces, shellfish, and brandy is popularly associated with gout, there are other protein compounds in foods such ...

  14. Prostaglandin production in arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Sturge, R A; Yates, D B; Gordon, D; Franco, M; Paul, W; Bray, A; Morley, J

    1978-01-01

    Inflammatory cell populations from synovial effusions or synovial villi in rheumatoid arthritis have been cultured in vitro. Prostaglandin productive capacity, measured by radioimmunoassay, showed the polymorphonuclear leucocyte rich populations from synovial effusions to be poor sources of PGE production whereas the synovial fragments produced substantial amounts of PGE activity. It is suggested that the macrophage is the major source of local prostaglandin formation both in gout and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:686864

  15. Enthesitis-related arthritis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Amita; Misra, Durga Prasanna

    2015-11-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic arthritis of childhood. Currently, it is characterized by seven categories. The enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) category usually affects boys older than 6 years and presents with lower limb asymmetrical arthritis associated with enthesitis. Later, these children can develop inflammatory lumbosacral pain (IBP). These children are at risk of developing acute anterior uveitis. A recently devised disease activity index, Juvenile Spondyloarthropathy Disease Activity Index (JSpADA), has been validated in retrospective cohorts. The corner stone of treatment is NSAIDs, local corticosteroid injections, and exercise. Methotrexate and sulfasalazine can be used for peripheral arthritis while anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are sometimes used to treat refractory enthesitis and sacroiliitis. Almost two third of patients with ERA have persistent disease and often have impairments in their quality of life. The presence of hip or ankle arthritis and a family history of spondyloarthropathy or polyarticular joint involvement at onset are associated with poorer prognosis. PMID:26233720

  16. Physical Activity and Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Psoriatic Arthritis Info Kit Resources Community icon: Link text: Post your questions in our online community and ... psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Talk Psoriasis icon: Link text: Are you newly diagnosed? Have questions? Connect with ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  18. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis.

    PubMed

    Altaykan, Asli; Erkin, Gül; Boztepe, Gonca; Gököz, Aytaç

    2004-07-01

    Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis is an uncommon disorder. In its original description, the presence of linear inflammatory indurations on the lateral aspects of the trunk (the rope sign) in association with arthritis were considered the pathognomonic clinical features. Later cases presenting with plaques and papules have been reported. Herein we describe a case of interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis without the rope sign. The present case supports the idea that interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis may have variable clinical appearances. PMID:15257555

  19. Acute Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shirtliff, Mark E.; Mader, Jon T.

    2002-01-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection. PMID:12364368

  20. [Pulmonary manifestations in rheumatic systemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Schlossbauer, T; Becker-Gaab, C; Eibel, R

    2005-07-01

    Collagen based vascular diseases with pulmonary involvement comprise rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, progressive systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis and polymyositis, ankylosing spondylitis, Sjögren's syndrome, and mixed connective tissue diseases. The different characteristics of pulmonary involvement are described. In such circumstances, early recognition of lung involvement is of considerable significance and the relationship to the corresponding disease has to be made. Frequently unrecognised pulmonary involvement ends up as fibrosis with irreversible deficits in respiratory function. PMID:15983755

  1. Perspectives on autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, I.R.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: HLA and Autoimmunity; Self-Recognition and Symmetry in the Immune System; Immunology of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus; Multiple Sclerosis; Autoimmunity and Immune Pathological Aspects of Virus Disease; Analyses of the Idiotypes and Ligand Binding Characteristics of Human Monoclonal Autoantibodies to DNA: Do We Understand Better Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Autoimmunity and Rheumatic Fever; Autoimmune Arthritis Induced by Immunization to Mycobacterial Antigens; and The Interaction Between Genetic Factors and Micro-Organisms in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Facts and Fiction.

  2. Glucocorticoids and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Joana Fonseca; Ahmed Mohamed, Alaa Abdelkhalik; Emery, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) were discovered in the 1940s and were administered for the first time to patients with rheumatoid arthritis in 1948. However, side effects were subsequently reported. In the last 7 decades, the mechanisms of action for both therapeutic properties and side effects have been elucidated. Mechanisms for minimizing side effects were also developed. GCs are the most frequently used class of drugs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis because of their efficacy in relieving symptoms and their low cost. A review of clinical applications, side effects, and drug interactions is presented. PMID:26611549

  3. Poncet's disease with high titers of rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies mimicking rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hirokazu; Inagaki, Masako; Shioda, Mikio; Nagasaka, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Reactive arthritis accompanying tuberculosis (TB), also known as Poncet's disease, is a rare condition. In the present report, we describe the case of a patient with Poncet's disease, who presented with high titers of rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA), which mimicked rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A 69-year-old man with a childhood history of chronic left gonitis suffered from right knee arthritis for 3 years. Chronic monoarthritis in his right knee and positive results obtained on interferon-gamma release assay were suggestive of tuberculous arthritis. However, there was no evidence of TB infection. Moreover, the high titers of RF and ACPA suggested a diagnosis of RA. Surprisingly, the culture of a small sample from his bony ankylosed left knee that had no focal signs of infection, exhibited a positive result for TB infection. Thus, based on these findings, the patient was diagnosed with Poncet's disease. His symptoms improved after initiation of anti-TB therapy, which supported the accuracy of the diagnosis. In addition, we analyzed the characteristics of Poncet's disease by conducting a literature review, and identified that the presence of extra-articular manifestation and negative results for RF and ACPA tests were the features that facilitated distinguishing between typical Poncet's disease and RA; however, since tuberculous patients occasionally exhibit positive results for ACPA tests, the differential diagnosis is essential in ACPA-positive arthritic patients. PMID:25150438

  4. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NIAMS publication. To order Reactive Arthritis Q&A full-text version, please contact NIAMS using the contact information ... nih.gov Website: http://www.niams.nih.gov Full NIAMS Site NIH… Turning Discovery Into Health ® ... Comments Moderation Policy Site Map | Viewers and Players

  5. Remission in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caperon, Anna; Helliwell, Philip S

    2012-07-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a multifaceted disease that challenges outcome methodologists. A number of measures have been used to define remission in PsA but they have been mostly articular. Composite measures of disease activity and low disease states are now emerging, but further work is required to assess the implications of achieving these goals and to develop cost-effective treatment strategies to achieve them. PMID:22751584

  6. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pietrosimone, K. M.; Jin, M.; Poston, B.; Liu, P.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) 21 days after the first injection. These mice typically develop disease 26 to 35 days after the initial injection. C57BL/6J mice are resistant to arthritis induced by type II bovine collagen, but can develop arthritis when immunized with type II chicken collagen in CFA, and receive a boost of type II chicken collagen in IFA 21 days after the first injection. The concentration of heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37RA (MT) in CFA also differs for each strain. DBA/1J mice develop arthritis with 1 mg/ml MT, while C57BL/6J mice require and 3–4 mg/ml MT in order to develop arthritis. CIA develops slowly in C57BL/6J mice and cases of arthritis are mild when compared to DBA/1J mice. This protocol describes immunization of DBA/1J mice with type II bovine collagen and the immunization of C57BL/6J mice with type II chicken collagen. PMID:26539560

  7. Prologue: 2013 Annual Meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA).

    PubMed

    Boehncke, Wolf-Henning; Gladman, Dafna D

    2014-06-01

    The 2013 Annual Meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) was held in July 2013 in Toronto, Canada, and attended by rheumatologists, dermatologists, and representatives of biopharmaceutical companies and patient groups. We introduce the articles that summarize the meeting: A summary of a GRAPPA-organized Fellows Symposium adjacent to the 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology meeting in Istanbul; at the GRAPPA meeting proper, proceedings of a trainee symposium, where rheumatology fellows and dermatology residents presented their research; a summary of experiences and perspectives of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) research of 8 patient research partners with PsA who were invited to participate as delegates. Other presentations and discussions included an interactive session on composite measures of disease severity and response, including voting by GRAPPA members; a 3 part update of basic/translational/clinical science, including new bone formation, enthesitis pathophysiology, and comorbidity monitoring; a 3 part dermatology update on psoriasis outcome measures, the Brigham Scalp Nail Inverse Palmoplantar Psoriasis Composite Index, and large-scale databases; a short summary of the ongoing GRAPPA effort to update treatment guidelines for PsA; updates on several GRAPPA educational and rheumatology-related projects; and a discussion of clinical criteria to identify inflammatory arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis as distinguished from non-inflammatory conditions. PMID:24882850

  8. Infectious Spondylitis with Bacteremia Caused by Roseomonas mucosa in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyong-Young; Hur, Jaehyung; Jo, Wonyong; Hong, Jeongmin; Cho, Oh-Hyun; Kang, Dong Ho; Kim, Sunjoo

    2015-01-01

    Roseomonas are a gram-negative bacteria species that have been isolated from environmental sources. Human Roseomonas infections typically occur in immunocompromised patients, most commonly as catheter-related bloodstream infections. However, Roseomonas infections are rarely reported in immunocompetent hosts. We report what we believe to be the first case in Korea of infectious spondylitis with bacteremia due to Roseomonas mucosa in an immunocompetent patient who had undergone vertebroplasty for compression fractures of his thoracic and lumbar spine. PMID:26483995

  9. Atypical Imaging Features of Tuberculous Spondylitis: Case Report with Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Momjian, Rita; George, Mina

    2014-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis in its typical form that shows destruction of two adjacent vertebral bodies and opposing end plates, destruction of the intervening intervertebral disc and a paravertebral or psoas abscess, is easily recognized and readily treated. Atypical tuberculous spondylitis without the above mentioned imaging features, although seen infrequently, has been well documented. We present, in this report, a case of atypical tuberculous spondylitis showing involvement of contiguous lower dorsal vertebral bodies and posterior elements with paravertebral and epidural abscess but with preserved intervertebral discs. The patient presented in advanced stage with progressive severe neurological symptoms due to spinal cord compression. Non-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging led to misdiagnosis of the lesion as a neoplastic process. It was followed by contrast enhanced computed tomography of the chest and abdomen that raised the possibility of an infectious process and, post-operatively, histopathological examination of the operative specimen confirmed tuberculosis. This case indicates the difficulty in differentiating atypical spinal tuberculosis from other diseases causing spinal cord compression. The different forms of atypical tuberculous spondylitis reported in the literature are reviewed. The role of the radiologist in tuberculous spondylitis is not only to recognize the imaging characteristics of the disease by best imaging modality, which is contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, but also to be alert to the more atypical presentations to ensure early diagnosis and prompt treatment to prevent complications. However, when neither clinical examination nor magnetic resonance imaging findings are reliable in differentiating spinal infection from one another and from neoplasm, adequate biopsy, either imaging guided or surgical biopsy is essential for early diagnosis. PMID:25926906

  10. Golimumab as the first monthly subcutaneous fully human anti-TNF-alpha antibody in the treatment of inflammatory arthropathies.

    PubMed

    Hutas, Gabor

    2010-07-01

    Golimumab (Simponi, Centocor Ortho Biotech Inc., PA, USA) is the first transgenic human monoclonal antibody against TNF-alpha that has been approved in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. Golimumab is synthesized using conventional hybridoma technique after immunizing transgenic mice containing human immunoglobulin genes. The constant region of golimumab is identical to that of infliximab, but the variable regions of golimumab have fully human sequences. In this article, we present the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties as well as the clinical efficacy and tolerability of golimumab. PMID:20635999

  11. Understanding IFN? in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Unraveling the mechanisms underlying the inflammatory response in rheumatoid arthritis is crucial in order to better understand the disease and to develop novel therapeutic approaches. Although the effect of type I interferons on fibroblasts and in the context of rheumatoid arthritis has been described for some time, little is known on the effects of the type III interferons, also known as IFN?. In a previous issue, Xu and colleagues demonstrate that one of the members of the IFN? family, IFN?1, enhances Toll-like receptor expression and consequently promotes the production of proinflammatory cytokines known to be involved in initiating and maintaining the inflammatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24443794

  12. A case of back pain caused by Salmonella spondylitis -A case report-

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Woo-Jin; Yun, So-Hui; Lee, Seung-Yun; Park, Sang Hyun; Park, Jong Cook; Jang, Eun Hee; Shin, Hhe-Young

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella spondylitis is a rare illness, and it generally occurs in patients who have already had sickle cell anemia, and it is even rarer in patients who are without sickle cell anemia. A 61-year-old male patient was hospitalized for the evaluation of his renal function and then treatment was started for his back pain. His back pain had developed about 2 months previously without any specific trauma. Only a bulging disc was detected on the initial lumbar MRI. Regarding his fever, it was diagnosed as possible atypical pneumonia, scrub typhus, etc., and multiple antibiotic therapy was administered. At the time of transfer, the leucocytes and hs-CRP were normal and the ESR was elevated. A diagnostic epidural block was performed for his back pain, but his symptoms were not improved. Lumbar MRI was performed again and it showed findings of infective spondylitis. Salmonella D was identified on the abscess culture and so he was diagnosed as suffering from Salmonella spondylitis. After antibiotic treatment, his back pain was improved and the patient was able to walk. PMID:21286449

  13. Handout on Health: Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... term side effects of methotrexate is liver damage. Climate: Some people notice that their arthritis gets worse ... However, there is no evidence that a specific climate can prevent or reduce the effects of rheumatoid ...

  14. Stay active and exercise - arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your overall health and sense of well-being. Exercise keeps your muscles strong and increases your range ... Water exercises may be the best exercise for your arthritis. Swimming laps, water aerobics, or even just walking in ...

  15. Physiotherapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented. PMID:15266230

  16. Simple analgesics for arthritis.

    PubMed

    Huskisson, E C

    1974-10-26

    A series of experiments has been carried out with single doses of simple analgesics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using a consistent polyad design. This method proved to be both valid and useful. Pain relief scores were a better measure of the effectiveness of analgesics than preference.Aspirin, Codis, and Distalgesic were the most effective analgesics tested, with paracetamol, pentazocine, and Ciba 44,328 intermediate between these agents and placebo. Placebo given after an active analgesic was more effective than when given before; this phenomenon was not abolished by telling the patients that apparently identical tablets were, in fact, different or by making them different in colour. The effectiveness of soluble placebo depended on its colour, red being the most effective. PMID:4421738

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... occurs in combination with a skin disorder called psoriasis. Psoriasis is a condition characterized by patches of red, ... by flaky white scales. Some affected individuals develop psoriasis before arthritis while others first develop arthritis. Other ...

  18. Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Doctors Relieve Arthritis Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... R Doctors Relieve Arthritis Pain PM&R Doctors Relieve Arthritis Pain Page Content Over 40 million Americans ... a physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist can help relieve pain and even slow some of the degenerative ...

  19. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team identified 42 ... Distracted Driving Raises Crash Risk Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery Oxytocin Affects Facial Recognition Connect with ...

  20. Gastrointestinal lesions associated with spondyloarthropathies

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Ambrogio; Renna, Sara; Perricone, Giovanni; Cottone, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Subclinical gut inflammation has been described in up to two-thirds of patients with spondyloarthropathies (SpA). Arthritis represents an extra-intestinal manifestation of several gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Whipple’s disease, Behcet’s disease, celiac disease, intestinal bypass surgery, parasitic infections of the gut and pseudomembranous colitis. Moreover about two-thirds of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug users demonstrate intestinal inflammation. Arthritis may manifest as a peripheral or axial arthritis. The spondyloarthropathy family consists of the following entities: ankylosing spondylitis, undifferentiated spondyloarthritis, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritis associated with IBD, juvenile onset spondyloarthritis. This topic reviews the major gastrointestinal manifestations that can occur in patients with SpA and in nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs users. PMID:19468992

  1. Bilateral Portal Percutaneous Endoscopic Debridement and Lavage for Lumbar Pyogenic Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Chen; Tseng, Tzu-Ming; Yang, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Hung-Shu; Yen, Cheng-Yo; Tu, Yuan-Kun

    2015-10-01

    Common management approaches for spinal infections include conservative administration of antibiotics and aggressive surgical debridement. Minimally invasive endoscopic treatment has been reported and is gaining widespread attention because of its simplicity and effectiveness. This study retrospectively evaluated the clinical outcomes of bilateral portal percutaneous endoscopic debridement and lavage with dilute povidone-iodine solution in the treatment of patients with lumbar pyogenic spondylitis. From January 2007 to December 2011, a total of 22 patients diagnosed with single-level lumbar pyogenic spondylitis underwent bilateral portal percutaneous endoscopic debridement and lavage with dilute povidone-iodine solution at the authors' institution. Clinical outcomes were assessed by careful physical examination, visual analog scale pain score, modified MacNab criteria functional score, regular serologic testing, and imaging studies to determine whether percutaneous endoscopic debridement and lavage treatment was successful or if surgical intervention was required. Causative bacteria were identified in 19 (86.4%) of 22 biopsy specimens. Eighteen patients had satisfactory relief of back pain and uneventful recovery after this treatment. The success rate was 81.8% (18 of 22). Both visual analog scale and modified MacNab criteria scores improved significantly in successfully treated patients. No major surgical complications were noted, except for 3 patients who had residual or subsequent paresthesia in the affected lumbar segment. Percutaneous endoscopic debridement and lavage is a minimally invasive procedure that can yield a higher bacterial diagnosis, relieve back pain, and help to eradicate lumbar pyogenic spondylitis. It is an effective alternative treatment for patients with spinal infection before extensive open surgery. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(10):e856-e863.]. PMID:26488778

  2. [Leishmaniasis in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Pizzorni, C; Secchi, M E; Cutolo, M

    2007-01-01

    Leishmaniasis represents a complex of diseases with an important clinical and epidemiological diversity. Visceral leishmaniasis is of higher priority than cutaneous leishmaniasis as it is a fatal disease in the absence of treatment. The clinical spectrum of leishmaniasis and control of the infection are influenced by the parasite-host relationship. The role of cellular immune responses of the Th1 type in the protection against disease in experimental and human leishmaniasis is well established. TNF-alpha has been implicated in cytokine-induced macrophage activation and tissue granuloma formation, two activities linked to control of intracellular visceral infection caused by Leishmania donovani. Anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) strategies have had a marked and substantial impact in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, however the clinical use of TNF-alpha antagonists has been accompanied by increased reporting of infections. Here we report the first case of visceral leishmaniasis in a patient treated for a long period of time with human anti TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody, adalimumab. Due to the low incidence rate of Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis, a systematic screening for leishmaniasis in all patients treated with biologics may be not recommended. However, for those patients living at high risk of leishmaniasis exposure, a periodical serological monitoring should be performed during therapy with anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies. PMID:17898884

  3. The Epidemiology of Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ogdie, Alexis; Weiss, Pamela

    2015-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by joint and entheseal inflammation with a prevalence of 0.05% to 0.25% of the population and 6% to 41% of patients with psoriasis. PsA is a highly heterogeneous inflammatory arthritis. In this review, current knowledge is discussed regarding the epidemiology of PsA, including disease manifestations, classification criteria for adult and juvenile PsA, methods for recognizing early PsA, including use of screening tools and knowledge of risk factors for PsA, and medical comorbidities associated with PsA. PMID:26476218

  4. Treatment of arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, with radioactive isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E.; Bordoni, M.E.; Thornton, A.K.

    1988-06-21

    A radioactive composition is described for the treatment of arthritis comprising, in combination, a ferric hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide aggregate suspension having a particle size of 3 to 20 microns, wherein a radionuclide is entrapped, the radionuclide being /sup 166/Holmium.

  5. Worker productivity loss associated with arthritis.

    PubMed

    Burton, Wayne N; Chen, Chin-Yu; Schultz, Alyssa B; Conti, Daniel J; Pransky, Glenn; Edington, Dee W

    2006-06-01

    This study at a major financial services corporation sought to investigate the association of arthritis with on-the-job productivity, also termed "presenteeism." Using a modified version of the Work Limitations Questionnaire (WLQ) incorporated into a Health Risk Appraisal (HRA), 17,685 employees responded to the survey in 2002. Of the 16,651 respondents meeting inclusion criteria, 2,469 (14.8%) reported having arthritis, and 986 (39.9% of those with arthritis) also reported that they were under medical care and/or taking medication for arthritis. Employees with arthritis were older, predominantly female, and reported a higher number of comorbidities. Although all four domains of the WLQ (physical, time, mental, and output) were impacted by arthritis, the greatest productivity effect, as expected, was on physical work tasks. Health risks also play a role in the relationship between arthritis and presenteeism, with high-risk individuals reporting 7%-10% additional loss of productivity compared to lowrisk individuals. In addition, those who reported receiving medication and/or treatment for arthritis had a 2.5% excess productivity loss independently attributed to their arthritis, which equals approximately 1,250 US dollars per employee per year, or 5.4 million US dollars to the corporation. This arthritis effect was discernible in those with low and moderate levels of health risk, but was not as evident in those with high health risks; in that group, health-associated decrements in productivity were much larger. Arthritis is associated with work productivity loss. Disease management programs should focus on pain management and arthritis-associated health risks and comorbidities in order to significantly decrease arthritis-related losses in on-the-job productivity. PMID:16764531

  6. 77 FR 14529 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ...No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of...public. Name of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General...moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis who have had an inadequate...

  7. 76 FR 29767 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ...No. FDA-2011-N-0002] Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice...public. Name of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General...ILARIS is indicated for the treatment of gouty arthritis attacks. ILARIS has also...

  8. Genetics of psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    O'Rielly, Darren D; Rahman, Proton

    2014-10-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) represents a group of inflammatory rheumatic diseases that cluster within families and possess overlapping clinical features. The pathogenesis of SpA encompasses a complex array of genetic, immunological and environmental factors. In this article, we will briefly review the genetics of PsA, and then focus on the genes that may be potentially linked either directly or indirectly to the immunopathology of the Th-17 pathway. The most consistent and dominant genetic effect of PsV and PsA is located on chromosome 6p21.3 within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, which accounts for approximately one-third of the genetic contribution of PsV and PsA. To date, 36 genes have reached genome-wide significance, accounting for approximately 22% of psoriasis (PsV) heritability. Prominent genes identified via GWAS include HLA-Cw6, IL12B, IL23R, IL23A, TNIP1, TNFAIP3, LCE3B-LCE3C, TRAF3IP2, NFkBIA, FBXL19, TYK2, IFIH1, REL, and ERAP1. Genes identified in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has largely echoed those in PsV and include HLA-B/C, HLA-B, IL-12B, IL-23R, TNIP1, TRAF3IP2, FBXL19, and REL. The lack of identified genetic susceptibility loci is largely attributed to the much smaller number of PsA patients and the greater clinical heterogeneity of PsA. Searching for different types of genetic variants such as small CNVs and/or insertions/deletions has also led to the identification of several genes with a function relative to PsV in particular including DEFB4, LCE3C_LCE3B, and IL-22 gene (exon 1). The candidate genes identified in PsV/PsA have highlighted pathways of critical importance to psoriatic disease including distinct signaling pathways comprised of barrier integrity, innate immune response and adaptive immune response, mediated primarily by Th-17 and Th-1 signalling. While GWAS studies have yielded great insights into the genes that contribute to the pathogenesis of PsV and PsA, replication in large cohorts, fine-mapping and resequencing efforts, together with functional studies of genetic variants identified, are warranted to better understand susceptibility to and progression of these diseases. That searching solely for common variants by GWAS will identify only a fraction of the entire genetic burden of disease, a concerted effort is underway to search for highly penetrant but rare disease alleles in families with PsV and PsA, using next-generation sequencing and through epigenetic investigations. PMID:25488777

  9. Which Psoriasis Patients Develop Psoriatic Arthritis?

    PubMed

    Busse, Kristine; Liao, Wilson

    2010-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a major comorbidity of psoriasis that significantly impairs quality of life and physical function. Because skin lesions classically precede joint symptoms, dermatologists are in a unique position to identify patients at risk for psoriatic arthritis before irreversible joint damage occurs. Here we review the literature to identify the clinical and genetic factors most highly associated with development of psoriatic arthritis, with the goal of assisting dermatologists in risk-stratifying their psoriasis patients. PMID:25346592

  10. Constrictive pericarditis in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Thould, A K

    1986-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is an unusual complication of rheumatoid arthritis, and its development appears to be uninfluenced by second-line therapy. Five patients are described who developed the disease, with possibly two more. Medical treatment is ineffective: the treatment of choice is surgical, and the postoperative prognosis is good. The crude prevalence rate for the association is 0.64% for males and 0.06% for females. PMID:3947148

  11. [Bone structure in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Ono, Kumiko; Ohashi, Satoru; Tanaka, Sakae; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2013-07-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) , the osteoclast pathway is activated by abnormal immune conditions accompanied by chronic inflammation, resulting in periarticular osteoporosis and local bone destruction around joints. In addition, multiple factors, including reduced physical activity and pharmacotherapies such as steroids, lead to systemic osteoporosis. These conditions cause decreasing bone mineral density and deterioration of bone quality, and expose patients to increased risk of fracture. Understanding the bone structures of RA and evaluating fracture risk are central to the treatment of RA. PMID:23811586

  12. Treatment recommendations for psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ritchlin, C T; Kavanaugh, A; Gladman, D D; Mease, P J; Helliwell, P; Boehncke, W-H; de Vlam, K; Fiorentino, D; FitzGerald, O; Gottlieb, A B; McHugh, N J; Nash, P; Qureshi, A A; Soriano, E R; Taylor, W J

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To develop comprehensive recommendations for the treatment of the various clinical manifestations of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) based on evidence obtained from a systematic review of the literature and from consensus opinion. Methods: Formal literature reviews of treatment for the most significant discrete clinical manifestations of PsA (skin and nails, peripheral arthritis, axial disease, dactylitis and enthesitis) were performed and published by members of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA). Treatment recommendations were drafted for each of the clinical manifestations by rheumatologists, dermatologists and PsA patients based on the literature reviews and consensus opinion. The level of agreement for the individual treatment recommendations among GRAPPA members was assessed with an online questionnaire. Results: Treatment recommendations were developed for peripheral arthritis, axial disease, psoriasis, nail disease, dactylitis and enthesitis in the setting of PsA. In rotal, 19 recommendations were drafted, and over 80% agreement was obtained on 16 of them. In addition, a grid that factors disease severity into each of the different disease manifestations was developed to help the clinician with treatment decisions for the individual patient from an evidenced-based perspective. Conclusions: Treatment recommendations for the cardinal physical manifestations of PsA were developed based on a literature review and consensus between rheumatologists and dermatologists. In addition, a grid was established to assist in therapeutic reasoning and decision making for individual patients. It is anticipated that periodic updates will take place using this framework as new data become available. PMID:18952643

  13. The Extended Posterior Circumferential Decompression Technique in the Management of Tubercular Spondylitis with and without Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Rathinavelu, Barani; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Amritanand, Rohit; Sundararaj, Gabriel David

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective clinical series. Purpose To study the clinical, functional and radiological results of patients with tuberculous spondylitis with and without paraplegia, treated surgically using the "Extended Posterior Circumferential Decompression (EPCD)" technique. Overview of Literature With the increasing possibility of addressing all three columns by a single approach, posterior and posterolateral approaches are gaining acceptance. A single exposure for cases with neurological deficit and kyphotic deformity requiring circumferential decompression, anterior column reconstruction and posterior instrumentation is helpful. Methods Forty-one patients with dorsal/dorsolumbar/lumbar tubercular spondylitis who were operated using the EPCD approach between 2006 to 2009 were included. Postoperatively, patients were started on nine-month anti-tuberculous treatment. They were serially followed up to thirty-six months and both clinical measures (including pain, neurological status and ambulatory status) and radiological measures (including kyphotic angle correction, loss of correction and healing status) were used for assessment. Results Disease-healing with bony fusion (interbody fusion) was seen in 97.5% of cases. Average deformity (kyphosis) correction was 54.6% in dorsal spine and 207.3% in lumbar spine. Corresponding loss of correction was 3.6 degrees in dorsal spine and 1.9 degrees in the lumbar spine. Neurological recovery in Frankel B and C paraplegia was 85.7% and 62.5%, respectively. Conclusions The EPCD approach permits all the advantages of a single or dual session anterior and posterior surgery, with significant benefits in terms of decreased operative time, reduced hospital stay and better kyphotic angle correction. PMID:25558312

  14. Atherosclerosis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jednacz, Ewa; Rutkowska-Sak, Lidia

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries. Clinical consequences of the atherosclerotic process occur in the adult population, however atherosclerotic process begins in childhood. The classic risk factors for atherosclerosis include obesity, dyslipidaemia, age, gender or family history. In recent years, attention has been drawn to the similarity between atherosclerotic inflammatory processes and inflammatory changes in the course of systemic connective tissue disease, in particular systemic lupus etythematosus (SLE) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There is also observed the similarity of the pathogenetic background of development of atherosclerosis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are observed in the course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also homocysteine concentrations, which may play a significant role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, are observed higher in patients with JIA. Some studies revealed higher carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) index values in children with JIA. In view of the fact that atherosclerotic process begins as early as in childhood, the introduction of appropriate preventive measures in children is a matter of utmost importance. PMID:22933832

  15. Bone Loss Triggered by the Cytokine Network in Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amarasekara, Dulshara Sachini; Yu, Jiyeon; Rho, Jaerang

    2015-01-01

    Bone remodeling is a lifelong process in vertebrates that relies on the correct balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Bone loss and fracture risk are implicated in inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus. The network of inflammatory cytokines produced during chronic inflammation induces an uncoupling of bone formation and resorption, resulting in significant bone loss in patients with inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Here, we review and discuss the involvement of the inflammatory cytokine network in the pathophysiological aspects and the therapeutic advances in inflammatory autoimmune diseases. PMID:26065006

  16. How important is patient education?

    PubMed

    Ramos-Remus, C; Salcedo-Rocha, A L; Prieto-Parra, R E; Galvan-Villegas, F

    2000-12-01

    The prevalence and disability rate of rheumatic diseases are increasing. It seems that non-medical causes play an important role in the morbidity, disability and mortality of these patients. Efforts to reduce their impact are extremely important. Patient education is thought to be one way to limit disability in rheumatic diseases and to achieve an improvement in quality of life. In this chapter, we review the influence of non-medical causes of morbidity on disease outcome, some basic aspects of education and the evidence of the effectiveness of patient education in diseases such as ankylosing spondylitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia syndrome. PMID:11092796

  17. Macrophage Activation Syndrome as Onset of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Guido; Didona, Dario; Stifano, Giuseppina; Feola, Aldo; Granata, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a potentially fatal condition. It belongs to the hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis group of diseases. In adults, MAS is rarely associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, but it also arises as complication of several systemic autoimmune disorders, like ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and adult-onset Still's disease. Several treatment options for MAS have been reported in the literature, including a therapeutic regimen of etoposide, dexamethasone, and cyclosporine. Here we report a case of 42-year-old woman in whom MAS occurred as onset of systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:26064125

  18. [The effectiveness of BACTEC MGIT 960 system hit analysis of surgery material of patients with tubercular spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Solov'eva, N S; Manicheva, O A; Steklova, L N; Ole?nik, V V; Shul'gina, M V

    2013-12-01

    The article considers the comparison of effectiveness of cultivation of 290 surgery samples from focus of destruction in patients with tubercular spondylitis in liquid medium Middlebrook 7119 with fluorescent detection of growth and two dense egg medium -Levenschtein-Yensen and Finn-II. The sensitivity of methods of inoculation in liquid medium Middlebrook 7H9 and in dense egg mediums has no difference (38.2% and 43.1%, p = 0.271). The duration of growth consisted 2 +/- 2.3 days for liquid mediums and 40.6 +/- 3.2 days for dense mediums. The method of pre-inoculation processing of surgery material. In case of inoculation of 440 samples in liquid mediums contamination consisted 3.9%. In case of inoculation of bone fragments of focus of destruction in liquid medium Middlebrook 7119 the culture was isolated in 43.5% of samples of patients with tubercular spondylitis. PMID:24757865

  19. Metabolic activity of erosions in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, P; Berry, H; Clarke, M; Foley, H; Barratt, J; Parsons, V

    1986-01-01

    The hands of 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were investigated with diphosphonate scanning and radiology. Increased uptake of isotope can be associated with some erosions but not all and also reflects other processes more linked to acute inflammatory areas unassociated with the development of erosions. If the latter are the hallmark of active rheumatoid arthritis then bone scans are not. PMID:3954472

  20. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:23085914

  1. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  2. EXTENDED REPORT DNA methylome signature in rheumatoid arthritis

    E-print Network

    Wang, Wei

    EXTENDED REPORT DNA methylome signature in rheumatoid arthritis Kazuhisa Nakano,1 John W Whitaker,2 in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) isolated from the site of disease in rheumatoid arthritis (RA epigenetic contributions to inflammatory arthritis. INTRODUCTION Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an immune

  3. Circadian disorganization in experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cardinali, Daniel P; Esquifino, Ana I

    2003-01-01

    This review discusses the experimental evidence indicating that arthritis disrupts circadian organization, which was mainly derived from animal studies employing Freund's complete mycobacterial adjuvant (FCA). The defense response to antigenic challenge, mediated in part by cytokines, includes changes in chronobiological central nervous system function, like depressed daily activity, superficial sleep or anorexia. Interferon (IFN)-gamma receptors are detectable in the central circadian pacemaker, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei, at a time when the capacity for photic entrainment of the pacemaker became established. The disruptive effects of the systemic injection of IFN on the circadian rhythms of locomotor activity, body temperature and clock-gene mRNA expression have been documented. In the last few years we have examined a number of immune and neuroendocrine circadian rhythms in FCA-injected rats, both in the preclinical phase of arthritis (2-3 days after FCA injection) as well as in the acute phase of the disease (18 days after FCA injection). In arthritic rats, the 24-hour organization of immune and neuroendocrine responses becomes altered. A hormonal pathway involving the circadian secretion of melatonin and a purely neural pathway including, as a motor leg, the autonomic nervous system innervating the lymph nodes were identified. The significant effects of the immune-mediated inflammatory response on the diurnal rhythmicity of adenohypophysial and hypophysiotropic hormones occurred in arthritic rats. Melatonin treatment prevented the alteration in 24-hour rhythms of serum ACTH, prolactin and luteinizing hormone in rats injected with FCA. In addition, melatonin pretreatment prevented the alteration in the 24-hour variation in hypothalamic serotonin and dopamine turnover during the preclinical phase of Freund's adjuvant arthritis in rats. Some pinealectomy-induced immune changes in arthritic rats were also prevented by physiological concentrations of melatonin. Melatonin may play the role of an 'internal synchronizer' for the immune system. PMID:14739557

  4. Neuropsychiatric manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Joaquim, Andrei F; Appenzeller, Simone

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease characterized by persistent synovitis, systemic inflammation, and the presence of autoantibodies. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are quite common in RA, including depression, cognitive dysfunction, behavior changes, spinal cord compression and peripheral nerve involvement. Potential causes include systemic inflammatory process, neural compression due to bone and joint destruction, side effects of medications and copying difficulties due to the chronicity of the disease. A high level of suspicious is required for an adequate diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we will discuss topographically the main neuropsychiatric manifestations described in RA patients, in an attempt to help in the management of these complex and multifaceted disease. PMID:26238502

  5. Single-Stage Anterior Debridement and Fibular Allograft Implantation Followed by Posterior Instrumentation for Complicated Infectious Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Tzu-Chun; Yang, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Hung-Shu; Kao, Yu-Hsien; Tu, Yuan-Kun; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Complicated infectious spondylitis is an infrequent infection with severe spinal destruction, and is indicated for combined anterior and posterior surgeries. Staged debridement and subsequent reconstruction is advocated in the literature. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility and clinical outcome of patients who underwent single-stage combined anterior debridement and fibular allograft implantation followed by supplemental posterior fixation for complicated infectious spondylitis. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 20 patients who underwent single-stage combined anterior and posterior surgeries for complicated infectious spondylitis from January 2005 to December 2010. Complicated infectious spondylitis was defined as at least 1 vertebral osteomyelitis with pathological fracture or severe bony destruction and adjacent discitis, based on imaging studies. The severity of the neurological status was evaluated using the Frankel scale. The clinical outcomes were assessed by careful physical examination and regular serological tests to determine the visual analog scale (VAS) score and Macnab criteria. Correction of the sagittal Cobb angle on radiography was also compared before and after surgery. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to analyze patient surgical prognosis and radiological findings. All patients with complicated infectious spondylitis were successfully treated by single-stage combined anterior and posterior surgeries. No patients experienced neurologic deterioration. The average VAS score was 7.8 before surgery and significantly decreased to 2.1 at discharge. Three patients had excellent outcomes and 17 had good outcomes, based on Macnab criteria. The average length of the allograft for reconstruction was 64.0 mm. Kyphotic deformity improved in all patients, with an average correction angle of 13.4°. There was no implant breakage or allograft dislodgement during at least 36 months of follow-up. Single-stage anterior debridement and fibular allograft implantation followed by posterior pedicle screw instrumentation provide immediate stability, satisfactory alignment, and successful infection control. Fibular allograft implantation seems to be a good alternative for anterior reconstruction; it can proceed to bony incorporation and avoids donor site morbidity. PMID:25501067

  6. Inhibition of Inflammatory Arthritis Using Fullerene Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Dellinger, Anthony L.; Cunin, Pierre; Lee, David; Kung, Andrew L.; Brooks, D. Bradford; Zhou, Zhiguo; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Kepley, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA) is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC). Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked Fc?R- and TNF-?-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-?-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and Fc?R-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-?B activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA) were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-?. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis. PMID:25879437

  7. [Shoulder arthritis due to Haemophilus aphrophilus].

    PubMed

    Bouldouyre, M-A; Stawiarski, N; Michon, M; Nguyen Van, J-C; Ben-Ali, A; Rajzbaum, G; Goldstein, F-W

    2005-06-01

    We report a case of shoulder arthritis due to Haemophilus aphrophilus. The patient, a 56 year-old woman, was immunocompetent. She presented with a septic arthritis of the left shoulder without portal of entry. A synovial fluid sample was cultured and positive for a gram-negative bacillus after 8 days. It was identified as Haemophilus aphrophilus, in the HACCEK group, by PCR ARN 16S. We did not find any associated endocarditis. The patient recovered. As far as we know, this is only the 5th reported case of arthritis due to this microorganism. PMID:15982845

  8. Acute anterior uveitis and other extra-articular manifestations of spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mitulescu, TC; Popescu, C; Naie, A; Prede?eanu, D; Popescu, V; Alexandrescu, C; Voinea, LM

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is associated with an array of peripheral manifestations. Our study aims to evaluate extra-articular manifestations of SpA in a Romanian academic clinical setting and to observe their associations with different disease measures. Methods: The study was designed to note the extra-articular manifestations of SpA patients in a cross-sectional and retrospective manner. Records included demographics, inflammation markers, SpA clinical characteristics, treatment regimes, associated osteoporosis and cardiovascular morbidity. Data were assessed by using appropriate non-parametric tests. Results: A total of 126 SpA patients were included. The most common extra-articular manifestations were skin involvement in the form of psoriasis (34.1%), eye involvement in the form of acute anterior uveitis (8.7%) and dactylitis (7.2%). Compared to patients with no record of uveitis, uveitis-affected cases were more frequently males, more frequently diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis, but less frequently dyslipidemic and diagnosed with psoriasis. Psoriasis-affected patients were older and had a higher prevalence of peripheral SpA diagnosis, but a lower prevalence of radiographic sacroiliitis. Conclusions:Acute anterior uveitis in SpA predominantly affects males with AS. This is relevant both to clinical and fundamental science, since its management requires both ophthalmology and rheumatology clinical settings. Psoriasis was associated more frequently with peripheral SpA. Abbreviations: AHT = arterial hypertension, AS = ankylosing spondylitis, ASAS = Assessment in SpondyloArthritis international Society, aSpA = axial spondyloarthritis, BASFI = Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, BASDAI = Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, CRP = C-reactive protein, ESR = erythrocyte sedimentation rate, DM2 = type 2 diabetes mellitus, HLA = human leukocyte antigen, IBD = inflammatory bowel disease, MRI = magnetic resonance imaging, mSpA = mixed (peripheral and axial) spondyloarthritis, NSAIDs = non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, pSpA = peripheral spondyloarthritis, PsA = psoriatic arthritis, ReA = reactive arthritis, SD = standard deviation, SI = sacroiliitis, SpA = spondyloarthritis, UDSpA = undifferentiated spondyloarthritis. PMID:26351533

  9. Secukinumab: first global approval.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Mark; McKeage, Kate

    2015-02-01

    Secukinumab (Cosentyx™) is a fully human monoclonal antibody against interleukin-17A, formulated for intravenous and subcutaneous administration. It received its first global approval in Japan on 26 December 2014 for the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in adults who are not adequately responding to systemic therapies (except for biologic agents). In the USA and the EU, secukinumab was approved in early 2015 for the treatment of patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Secukinumab is also being investigated in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis. This article summarizes the milestones in the development of secukinumab leading to its first approval for the treatment of adult patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. PMID:25648267

  10. Vocational Rehabilitation for Persons with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaire, Saralynn H.

    1998-01-01

    Useful vocational rehabilitation strategies for persons with rheumatoid arthritis include (1) management of symptoms and reduction of energy demand; (2) reasonable job accommodations; (3) identification of suitable jobs and necessary training; and (4) enhancement of self-advocacy skills. (SK)

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... List of All Topics All Rheumatoid Arthritis - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Simplified (????) Chinese - Traditional (????) Korean (???) Spanish (español) Vietnamese (Tiê?ng Viê?t) Chinese - Simplified ( ...

  12. Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... XYZ List of All Topics All Arthritis - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (???????) Chinese - Simplified (????) French (français) Hindi (??????) Japanese (???) Korean (???) Russian (???????) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) ...

  13. ASTROMEDICINE IN THE TREATMENT OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Janai, Sudhakar; Biviji, A. T.; Naik, D. G.; Lakhe, R. T.; Rao, V. Bhaskar

    1991-01-01

    One patient of rheumatoid arthritis was treated according to astromedicine. Wearing of Coral beads had remarkable effect on the disease. The interesting finding are reported in this paper. PMID:22556538

  14. Arthritis at the shoulder joint.

    PubMed

    Sankaye, Prashant; Ostlere, Simon

    2015-07-01

    The shoulder is a complex joint with numerous structures contributing to mobility and stability. Shoulder pain is a common clinical complaint that may be due to a wide spectrum of disorders including rotator cuff disease, instability, and arthropathy. Primary osteoarthritis of the shoulder joint is uncommon because it is a non-weight-bearing joint. Significant osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint is unusual in the absence of trauma, and the detection of advanced degenerative changes in patients without a known history of trauma should alert the clinician to search for other disorders. This article reviews the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and key imaging findings of the common categories of the arthritis affecting the glenohumeral joint. PMID:26021591

  15. Laryngeal Manifestations of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hamdan, A. L.; Sarieddine, D.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a destructive autoimmune disease that affects 3% of the adult population. It is characterized by the formation of both articular and extra-articular lesions with predilection for small joints. There are ubiquitous reports on the head and neck manifestations of RA with emphasis on the larynx. The laryngeal presenting features of this systemic disease may mimic a plethora of medical conditions, inflammatory and neoplastic. The main phonatory and respiratory symptoms are often subtle and misleading. This paper represents a literature review of the laryngeal manifestations of RA with emphasis on the clinical symptoms, laryngeal findings, diagnosis, and treatment. An early diagnosis of laryngeal involvement may prevent drastic complications. PMID:23864939

  16. Proteomics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Research

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yune-Jung; Chung, Min Kyung; Hwang, Daehee

    2015-01-01

    Although rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease, diagnosis of RA is currently based on clinical manifestations, and there is no simple, practical assessment tool in the clinical field to assess disease activity and severity. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the discovery of new diagnostic RA biomarkers that can assist in evaluating disease activity, severity, and treatment response. Proteomics, the large-scale study of the proteome, has emerged as a powerful technique for protein identification and characterization. For the past 10 years, proteomic techniques have been applied to different biological samples (synovial tissue/fluid, blood, and urine) from RA patients and experimental animal models. In this review, we summarize the current state of the application of proteomics in RA and its importance in identifying biomarkers and treatment targets. PMID:26330803

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Almoallim, Hani M.; Alharbi, Laila A.

    2014-01-01

    The status of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Saudi Arabia (SA) was examined from various perspectives based on a systematic literature review and the authors’ personal experiences. In this regard, database and journal search were conducted to identify studies on RA in SA, yielding a total of 43 articles. Although efforts have been made to promote RA research in SA, current studies mostly represent only a few centers and may not accurately portray the national status of RA care. Notably, biological therapies were introduced early for almost all practicing rheumatologists in SA (government and private). However, no national guidelines regarding the management of RA have been developed based on local needs and regulations. Also, while efforts were made to establish RA data registries, they have not been successful. Taken together, this analysis can contribute to the planning of future guidelines and directives for RA care in SA. PMID:25491208

  18. CD44 in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Naor, David; Nedvetzki, Shlomo

    2003-01-01

    CD44 is a multistructural cell-surface glycoprotein that can theoretically generate close to 800 isoforms by differential alternative splicing. At present, several dozen isoforms are known. The polymorphic nature of CD44 might explain its multifunctionality and its ability to interact with many cell-surface and extracellular ligands, the principal one being hyaluronic acid (HA). Of the many CD44 functions, our review focuses on its involvement in cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions, as well as on its implication in the support of cell migration and the presentation of growth factors to their cognate receptors. Cells involved in pathological activities such as cancer cells and destructive inflammatory cells, and also normal cells engaged in physiological functions, use cell-surface CD44 for their localization and expansion at extravascular sites. This article reviews the evidence that the joint synovium of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) contains considerable amounts of various CD44 isoforms as well as the HA ligand. The review also shows that anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against constant epitopes, shared by all CD44 isoforms, can markedly reduce the inflammatory activity of arthritis induced by collagen or proteoglycans in mice. Anti-CD44 mAb also interferes with the migration of RA synovial-like fibroblasts in vitro and is able to disturb the destructive interaction between RA synovial-like fibroblasts and the cartilaginous matrix. However, the transition from the experimental model to the patient's bedside is dependent on the ability to target the CD44 of cells engaged in RA pathology, while skipping the CD44 of normal cells. PMID:12723975

  19. Can Rheumatoid Arthritis Be Prevented?

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of elevations of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-related biomarkers prior to the onset of clinically apparent RA raises hopes that individuals who are at risk for future RA can be identified in a preclinical phase of disease that is defined as abnormalities of RA-related immune activity prior to the clinically apparent onset of joint disease. Additionally, there is a growing understanding of the immunologic processes that are occurring in preclinical RA, as well as a growing understanding of risk factors that may be mechanistically related to RA development. Furthermore, there are data supporting that treatment of early RA can lead to drug free remission. Taken as a whole, these findings suggest that it may be possible to use biomarkers and other factors to accurately identify the likelihood and timing of onset of future RA, and intervene with immunomodulatory therapies and/or risk factor modification to prevent the future onset of RA in at-risk individuals. Importantly, several clinical prevention trials for RA have already been tried, and one is underway. However, while our understanding of the growing understanding of the mechanisms and natural history of RA development may be leading us to the implementation of prevention strategies for RA, there are still several challenges to be met. These include developing sufficiently accurate methods of predicting those at high risk for future RA so that clinical trials can be developed based on accurate rates of development of arthritis and subjects can be adequately informed of their risk for disease, identifying the appropriate interventions and biologic targets for optimal prevention, and addressing the psychosocial and economic aspects that are crucial to developing broadly applicable prevention measures for RA. These issues notwithstanding, prevention of RA may be within reach in the near future. PMID:24315049

  20. Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... That Help Feelings Q&A Movies & More Quizzes Games Kids' Medical Dictionary En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Girls and Puberty Boys and Puberty Video: Am I Normal? (Girls and Puberty) Movie: Digestive ...

  1. What People with Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What People With Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available in: ... Lupus Osteogenesis Imperfecta Prostate Cancer Smoking Partner Resources Rheumatoid Arthritis (NIAMS) ¿Qué es la artritis reumatoide? (NIAMS) What ...

  2. Cyclophilins in rheumatoid arthritis--stepping into an undiscovered country?

    E-print Network

    Lee, Won-Ha

    Cyclophilins in rheumatoid arthritis--stepping into an undiscovered country? Thomas Pap Division 2005 Recent years have seen enormous progress in under- standing the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an autoimmunological disorder that primarily affects the joints and leads

  3. 78 FR 33423 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ...Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0001] Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting...open to the public. Name of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function...Inc., for the proposed indication of treatment of adult patients with active axial...

  4. Long term prognosis of reactive salmonella arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Leirisalo-Repo, M; Helenius, P; Hannu, T; Lehtinen, A; Kreula, J; Taavitsainen, M; Koskimies, S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Reactive joint complications triggered by salmonella gastroenteritis are increasingly reported, but the outcome and long term prognosis of the patients is incompletely known. This study looked at the prognosis of salmonella arthritis in patients hospitalised in 1970-1986.?METHODS—Hospital records from two hospitals in southern Finland were screened for patients with the discharge diagnosis of salmonellosis or reactive, postinfectious arthritis or Reiter's disease. For the patients with confirmed diagnosis of reactive salmonella arthritis, data about the acute disease were collected from the hospital records. A follow up study was performed.?RESULTS—There were 63 patients (28 women, 35 men, mean age 36.5 years) with salmonella arthritis. Urethritis occurred in 27%, eye inflammation in 13%, and low back pain in 44% of the patients. HLA-B27 was present in 88%. More men than women were HLA-B27 positive. HLA-B27 positive patients had higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (mean 80.9 v 46.5 mm 1st h, p = 0.0180). Also, extra-articular features and radiological sacroiliitis were seen only in HLA-B27 positive patients. A follow up study was performed on 50 patients mean 11.0 (range 5-22 years) later. Twenty patients had recovered completely. Ten patients had mild joint symptoms, 11 patients had had a new acute transient arthritis, and five acute iritis. Eight patients had developed chronic spondyloarthropathy. Radiological sacroiliitis was seen in six of 44 patients, more frequently in male than in female patients (32% v 0%; p = 0.0289). Recurrent or chronic arthritis, iritis or radiological sacroiliitis developed only in HLA-B27 positive patients.?CONCLUSION—Joint symptoms are common after reactive salmonella arthritis. HLA-B27 contributes to the severity of acute disease and to the late prognosis.?? PMID:9370874

  5. Molecular targets in arthritis and recent trends in nanotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Due to its severity and increasing epidemiology, arthritis needs no description. There are various forms of arthritis most of which are disabling, very painful, and common. In spite of breakthroughs in the field of drug discovery, there is no cure for arthritis that can eliminate the disease permanently and ease the pain. The present review focuses on some of the most successful drugs in arthritis therapy and their side effects. Potential new targets in arthritis therapy such as interleukin-1?, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor alpha, osteopontin, and several others have been discussed here, which can lead to refinement of current therapeutic modalities. Mechanisms for different forms of arthritis have been discussed along with the molecules that act as potential biomarkers for arthritis. Due to the difficulty in monitoring the disease progression to detect the advanced manifestations of the diseases, drug-induced cytotoxicity, and problems with drug delivery; nanoparticle therapy has gained the attention of the researchers. The unique properties of nanoparticles make them highly attractive for the design of novel therapeutics or diagnostic agents for arthritis. The review also focuses on the recent trends in nanoformulation development used for arthritis therapy. This review is, therefore, important because it describes the relevance and need for more arthritis research, it brings forth a critical discussion of successful drugs in arthritis and analyses the key molecular targets. The review also identifies several knowledge gaps in the published research so far along with the proposal of new ideas and future directions in arthritis therapy. PMID:26345140

  6. 77 FR 14529 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ... moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis who have had an inadequate response to one or more disease... SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug...: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  7. Remission-inducing drugs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Anastassiades, T. P.

    1980-01-01

    The administration of certain drugs to patients with established rheumatoid arthritis frequently results in improvement that is slow to appear but persists for long periods, even after the drug is discontinued. The three main drugs with this effect, whose efficacy and toxicity are reviewed in this paper, are gold salts, D-penicillamine and chloroquine. The cytotoxic agents used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, which likely have nonspecific anti-inflammatory actions and have serious long-term side effects, are also briefly reviewed. A new drug, levamisole, is currently being tested in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It is suggested that the time for considering the introduction of a remission-inducing drug in patients with progressive rheumatoid arthritis is after an adequate trial of therapy with salicylates or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, or both, and before the oral administration of steroids. It is difficult, however, on the basis of rigorous clinical comparisons, to recommend which of the three main remission-inducing drugs should be tried first, although gold salts have been used the most. Patients who have improved with 6 months of chrysotherapy may continue treatment for at least 3 years, during which time the frequency of mucocutaneous and renal toxic effects will steadily decrease. Some aspects of the medical economics of therapy with remission-inducing drugs for rheumatoid arthritis are discussed. PMID:6768438

  8. Seronegative reactive spondyloarthritis and the skin.

    PubMed

    Generali, Elena; Ceribelli, Angela; Massarotti, Marco; Cantarini, Luca; Selmi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Spondyloarthritidies represent a group of conditions affecting the axial and peripheral muscoloskeletal apparatus and are often associated with psoriasis, infections, and inflammatory bowel diseases. Other diseases included in this category are psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and enteropathic arthritis. Reactive arthritis is an elusive spondyloarthritis, commonly occurring 1 to 3 weeks after a digestive or a genitourinary tract infection, in which microorganisms do not infect the joint directly. Reactive arthritis is classically characterized by large-joint arthritis, urethritis in men and cervicitis in women, and eye inflammation (usually conjunctivitis or uveitis) but encompasses numerous other symptoms and signs, including manifestations of dermatologic interest such as keratoderma blenorrhagicum and circinate balanitis. The diagnosis of reactive arthritis is clinical, and the infectious agent cannot always be identified due to disease latency after the infection. Most cases are self-limiting, but reactive arthritis may become chronic in 30% of cases. Treatment options include anti-inflammatory drugs, steroids, and sulfasalazine; biologic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?) blockers, have been recently used, but there are only a few randomized clinical trials on the treatment of reactive arthritis. The effectiveness of antimicrobials needs further evaluation. PMID:26321399

  9. The microbiome and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Scher, Jose U.; Abramson, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Humans are not (and have never been) alone. From the moment we are born, millions of micro-organisms populate our bodies and coexist with us rather peacefully for the rest of our lives. This microbiome represents the totality of micro-organisms (and their genomes) that we necessarily acquire from the environment. Micro-organisms living in or on us have evolved to extract the energy they require to survive, and in exchange they support the physiological, metabolic and immune capacities that have contributed to our evolutionary success. Although currently categorized as an autoimmune disorder and regarded as a complex genetic disease, the ultimate cause of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains elusive. It seems that interplay between predisposing genetic factors and environmental triggers is required for disease manifestation. New insights from DNA sequence-based analyses of gut microbial communities and a renewed interest in mucosal immunology suggest that the microbiome represents an important environmental factor that can influence autoimmune disease manifestation. This Review summarizes the historical clues that suggest a possible role for the microbiota in the pathogenesis of RA, and will focus on new technologies that might provide scientific evidence to support this hypothesis. PMID:21862983

  10. HLA-linked rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Hasstedt, S.J.; Clegg, D.O.; Ingles, L.; Ward, R.H.

    1994-10-01

    Twenty-eight pedigrees were ascertained through pairs of first-degree relatives diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA was confirmed in 77 pedigree members including probands; the absence of disease was verified in an additional 261 pedigree members. Pedigree members were serologically typed for HLA. We used likelihood analysis to statistically characterize the HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus. The genetic model assumed tight linkage to HLA. The analysis supported the existence of an HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus, estimated the lifetime penetrance as 41% in male homozygotes and as 48% in female homozygotes. Inheritance was recessive in males and was nearly recessive in females. In addition, the analysis attributed 78% of the variance within genotypes to genetic or environmental effects shared by siblings. The genetic model inferred in this analysis is consistent with previous association, linkage, and familial aggregation studies of RA. The inferred HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus accounts for approximately one-fifth of the RA in the population. Although other genes may account for the remaining familial RA, a large portion of RA cases may occur sporadically. 79 refs., 9 tabs.

  11. Apremilast for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Souto, Alejandro; Gómez-Reino, Juan J

    2015-12-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints that occurs in patients with psoriasis. The spectrum of PsA includes arthritis, dactylitis, enthesitis, axial involvement, and skin lesions. Non-biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) such as methotrexate and leflunomide, and biologic DMARDs such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists and ustekinumab, have been used to treat PsA. Apremilast is a novel therapy that inhibits phosphodiesterase 4, increases intracellular cAMP levels, and modulates expression of inflammatory mediators in favor of anti-inflammatory activity. It decreases the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-?, IFN-?, IL-17, and IL-23 and increases the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 under certain conditions. One phase II and four phase III clinical trials as well as long-term extension studies showed significant and sustained clinical efficacy and an adequate safety profile for apremilast in patients with active psoriatic arthritis. PMID:26503917

  12. Total Knee Arthroplasty Considerations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Danoff, Jonathan R.; Geller, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    The definitive treatment for advanced joint destruction in the late stages of rheumatoid arthritis can be successfully treated with total joint arthroplasty. Total knee arthroplasty has been shown to be a well-proven modality that can provide pain relief and restoration of mobility for those with debilitating knee arthritis. It is important for rheumatologists and orthopedic surgeons alike to share an understanding of the special considerations that must be addressed in this unique population of patients to ensure success in the immediate perioperative and postoperative periods including specific modalities to maximize success. PMID:24151549

  13. Yoga for arthritis: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Haaz, Steffany; Bartlett, Susan J

    2011-02-01

    This article reviews the existing literature on using yoga for arthritis. It includes peer-reviewed research from clinical trials (published from 1980 to 2010) that used yoga as an intervention for arthritis and reported quantitative findings. Eleven studies were identified, including 4 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 4 non-RCTs. All trials were small and control groups varied. No adverse events were reported, and attrition was comparable or better than that typical for exercise interventions. Evidence was strongest for reduced disease symptoms (tender/swollen joints, pain) and disability and for improved self-efficacy and mental health. Interventions, research methods, and disease diagnoses were heterogeneous. PMID:21220084

  14. Psychological effects of living with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sarah

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a long-term inflammatory condition that can affect physical, psychological and social function. The condition is not curable - although drug therapy can be used to reduce inflammation - and patients often experience daily symptoms of joint pain and stiffness, fatigue and functional limitations. Patients may also experience psychological challenges. This article focuses on the psychological implications of living with rheumatoid arthritis, including reaction to diagnosis, anxiety and depression, body image, sexuality, self-esteem and social role. It aims to explore the role of the nurse in addressing these psychological challenges to optimise the physical and psychological status of each patient. PMID:25424112

  15. [Socioeconomic aspects of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Jaji?, I; Jaji?, Z; Ozi?-Bebek, M; Su?ur, A

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated the financial parameters of the hospital treatment and of the rehabilitation in the Centers for Rehabilitation for the patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The control group consisted of patients who were ill or had been ill from some other diseases which were controlled at the physician of the primary health service. The average duration of the treatment of the patients with RA in hospital was 28 days (ranging from 21 to 35 days), while the average duration of the treatment of the patients from the control group was 18 days (ranging 7 to 45 days). 45 patients with RA were hospitalized and 22 from 65 patients from the control group (P greater than 0.05). The duration of the hospital treatment of 45 patients with RA was 2548 days and it was 1818 days for the patients from the control group (P = 0.039). The cost of one stay of 28 days in the hospital amounted 56.000 din per one patient with RA and it was 36.000 din per one patient from the control group (according to the price-list from 31. 7. 1991.). 49 patients with RA went for several times to the rehabilitation into the Centers for Rehabilitation and 11 from 65 patients from the control group (P less than 0.0001). The average duration of rehabilitation for the patients with RA was 23 days while it was 26 days for the patients from the control group (P greater than 0.06). The rehabilitation for the patients with RA lasted 4278 days and 832 days for the patients from the control group (P less than 0.0001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1809995

  16. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrich, Christian; Diddens, Heyke C.; Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

    1995-03-01

    The only early therapy of rheumatoid arthritis in orthopedic surgery is a synovectomy, which is restricted to more or less big joints. A laser-synovectomy of small joints is ineffective yet. An alternative method may be photodynamic therapy. In our study we describe the photodynamic effect of Photosan 3 in a cell culture study.

  17. Stem Cell Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    Cells vs Gene TherapyStem Cells vs Gene Therapy For RA, not all genetic causes are known to kill oversecreted or transformed cells Gene therapy may have long term side effects #12;BibliographyStem Cell Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis By: Matt Ferry Biochem 118 Brutlag Winter 2012 #12

  18. Optimizing Exercise Programs for Arthritis Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulware, Dennis W.; Byrd, Shannon L.

    1993-01-01

    Exercise can help decrease pain and improve function in people with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. Physicians must provide individualized, realistic, enjoyable exercise programs that help affected joints, build fitness, and maximize patient compliance. Physicians must also provide appropriate follow-up care, adjusting the exercise program…

  19. Update on Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, A. Caroline

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis consists of use of drugs, physical measures, social work interventions, education and reconstructive surgery. The physician plays a co-ordinating role, since most patients with significant rheumatoid arthritis will require treatment by more than one member of the health-care team. Our drug armamentarium, including anti-inflammatory agents, disease suppressants, analgesics, rarely steroids, and even more rarely immunosuppressants, can be used to good effect in suppressing the synovitis of rheumatoid arthritis and in relieving pain. Physiotherapy, occupational therapy, nursing and social work interventions will help the patient to maintain function and to maintain their optimal level of fitness, including exercise tolerance, joint range, muscle strength and psycho-social function. Coping abilities can be greatly enhanced by a positive approach from the physician, and this, together with the very real benefits of the foregoing treatments, can produce a highly rewarding result for physician and patient alike, in terms of improved quality of life for the rheumatoid arthritis patient. PMID:21263856

  20. Exposure to Mimivirus Collagen Promotes Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nikunj; Hülsmeier, Andreas J.; Hochhold, Nina; Neidhart, Michel; Gay, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in animals, also occur in some recently described nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses such as Mimiviridae, which replicate in amoebae. To clarify the impact of viral collagens on the immune response of animals exposed to Mimiviridae, we have investigated the localization of collagens in Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus particles and the response of mice to immunization with mimivirus particles. Using protein biotinylation, we have first shown that viral collagen encoded by open reading frame L71 is present at the surface of mimivirus particles. Exposure to mimivirus collagens elicited the production of anti-collagen antibodies in DBA/1 mice immunized intradermally with mimivirus protein extracts. This antibody response also targeted mouse collagen type II and was accompanied by T-cell reactivity to collagen and joint inflammation, as observed in collagen-induced arthritis following immunization of mice with bovine collagen type II. The broad distribution of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses in the environment suggests that humans are constantly exposed to such large virus particles. A survey of blood sera from healthy human subjects and from rheumatoid arthritis patients indeed demonstrated that 30% of healthy-subject and 36% of rheumatoid arthritis sera recognized the major mimivirus capsid protein L425. Moreover, whereas 6% of healthy-subject sera recognized the mimivirus collagen protein L71, 22% of rheumatoid arthritis sera were positive for mimivirus L71. Accordingly, our study shows that environmental exposure to mimivirus represents a risk factor in triggering autoimmunity to collagens. PMID:24173233

  1. [Arthritis sternoclavicularis as a cause of mediastinitis].

    PubMed

    Hromádka, P; Cernohorský, S

    2011-07-01

    Sternoclavicular arthtritis is a condition of the joints and movement apparatus which is treated by Rheumatologists and Orthepedists. Incorrect or late treatment of this condition leads to the development of septic arthritis and overall complications. This report describes three rare cases of mediastinitis caused by inflammation of the sternoclavicular joint. The authors analyze the possibilities of surgical treatment and early diagnosis. PMID:22026087

  2. Pleural involvement in systemic autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Bouros, Demosthenes; Pneumatikos, Ioannis; Tzouvelekis, Argyris

    2008-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases, a heterogeneous group of immunologically mediated inflammatory disorders including multiorgan involvement, can affect the pleura with various frequencies, either as a single presenting feature or as part of multisystem involvement. Rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus represent the most common immunological diseases that affect the pleural cavity; however, there is considerable variation regarding the reported prevalence, natural history and prognosis of pleural involvement in both conditions. The definition of pleural disease in the remaining systemic autoimmune disorders is unquestionably imprecise and assumptive, since it is risky to support premises based on single case reports or retrospective data from very small series. In this article, we will review the manifestations of pleural disease caused by rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease, ankylosing spondylitis, Sjogren's syndrome and Wegener's granulomatosis. PMID:18477860

  3. The nonspecific inhibitory effect of synovial tissue extracts on leucocyte migration in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, J E; Hall, N D; Collins, A J; Bacon, P A

    1980-01-01

    The leucocyte migration inhibition test (LMT) has been used to search for specific antigens in rheumatoid synovial tissue. Synovial samples were collected from 20 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, from 1 patient with ankylosing spondylitis, and from 1 patient with pigmented villonodular synovitis. Inhibitory material was obtained from all 21 synovia with inflammatory disease but not from the noninflammatory synovium. The tissue extracts generally caused nonspecific migration inhibition when tested against a total of 157 pairs of rheumatoid and control leucocytes. However, occasional samples did induce migration inhibition restricted to either rheumatoid or control cells. The inhibitory factor was shown to be membrane associated and of high molecular weight (greater than 10(6) daltons). The results of this extensive study do not support the conclusions drawn from earlier reports based on smaller numbers of experiments. No evidence was obtained for the existence of specific antigenic material associated with the synovial membrane in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:7436557

  4. 77 FR 4048 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  5. 75 FR 27352 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases... Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd.,...

  6. 76 FR 55399 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  7. 77 FR 35988 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group; Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review...

  8. 77 FR 12605 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin... invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Clinical Trials Review Committee....

  9. 76 FR 28440 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Initial Review Group, Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Special Grants Review...

  10. 76 FR 6807 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases..., National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health,...

  11. 75 FR 6676 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.846, Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... disease, which means the arthritis results from your immune system attacking your body's own tissues. The course of ...

  13. Differential cytokine profiles in juvenile idiopathic arthritis subtypes revealed by cluster analysis

    E-print Network

    de Boer, Rob J.

    Differential cytokine profiles in juvenile idiopathic arthritis subtypes revealed by cluster of the patterns specific to certain disease groups. In particular, we focus on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. KEY WORDS: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis, Cluster analysis, Inflammation, Cytokines, Biomarkers

  14. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis using infrared imaging Monique Frizea,b

    E-print Network

    Payeur, Pierre

    Detection of rheumatoid arthritis using infrared imaging Monique Frizea,b , Cynthia Adéaa , Pierre Rheumatology, Ottawa Hospital, Riverside Dr., Ottawa, ON, Canada. ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis (RA subjects and 13 patients diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), thermal images were collected from

  15. NONSPECIFIC ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AGENTS—Some Notes on Their Practical Application, Especially in Rheumatic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Edward W.

    1964-01-01

    A number of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders are amenable to varying degrees of therapeutic control with the administration of nonspecific anti-inflammatory drugs. An evaluation of these suppressive agents in the field of rheumatic diseases and practical suggestions regarding their administration are presented. Eight synthetically modified corticosteroid compounds are available commercially. Each of them exhibits qualitative differences in one or several physiologic actions, each has certain advantages and disadvantages in therapy, and each shares the major deterrent features of corticosteroids. Prednisone, prednisolone, methylprednisolone, fluprednisolone and paramethasone have similar therapeutic indices, and there is little choice between them for the usual rheumatoid patient requiring steroid therapy. Conversely, the therapeutic indices of dexamethasone, betamethasone and triamcinolone are lower than that of prednisolone; they are less desirable for routine use and should be reserved for specially selected cases. Salicylates are preferred to adrenocortical steroids in the treatment of the ordinary patient with acute rheumatic fever. Steroid therapy should be reserved for resistant cases and for those with significant carditis. Salicylates are mainstays for pain relief in rheumatoid arthritis, but with the analgesic doses usually employed their anti-inflammatory action is slight. Phenylbutazone is a highly useful anti-inflammatory agent, especially in management of acute gouty arthritis and ankylosing (rheumatoid) spondylitis; its metabolite, oxyphenylbutazone, does not exhibit clear-cut advantages. Colchicine specifically suppresses acute gouty arthritis. Its analogues, desacetylcolchicine and desacetylthiocolchicine, produce fewer unpleasant gastrointestinal symptoms, but may promote agranulocytosis and alopecia. A number of indole preparations with anti-inflammatory activity have been tested clinically. One of them, indomethacin, has received extensive therapeutic trial; with dosages that can be tolerated the drug is fairly effective in the symptomatic control of ankylosing (rheumatoid) spondylitis but it is of questionable value in peripheral rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:14131394

  16. Alternative pathways of osteoclastogenesis in inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Adamopoulos, Iannis E.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoclasts are cells of haematopoietic origin that are uniquely specialized to degrade bone. Under physiological conditions, the osteoclastogenesis pathway depends on macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1, also known as M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor ?B ligand (RANKL). However, an emerging hypothesis is that alternative pathways of osteoclast generation might be active during inflammatory arthritis. In this Perspectives article, we summarize the physiological pathway of osteoclastogenesis and then focus on experimental findings that support the hypothesis that infiltrating inflammatory cells and the cytokine milieu provide multiple routes to bone destruction. The precise identity of osteoclast precursor(s) is not yet known. We propose that myeloid cell differentiation during inflammation could be an important contributor to the differentiation of osteoclast populations and their associated pathologies. Understanding the dynamics of osteoclast differentiation in inflammatory arthritis is crucial for the development of therapeutic strategies for inflammatory joint disease in children and adults. PMID:25422000

  17. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, J.L.; Schell, R.F.; Hejka, A.; England, D.M.; Konick, L.

    1988-09-01

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis.

  18. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  19. Preclinical Rheumatoid Arthritis (Autoantibodies): An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple studies demonstrate that there is a period of development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during which there are elevations of disease-related biomarkers, including autoantibodies, in the absence of and prior to the development of RA; this period can be termed ‘preclinical RA’. These ‘preclinical’ autoantibodies including rheumatoid factor and antibodies to citrullinated protein antigens, and more recent studies have also identified a wider variety of autoantibodies and a wide range of inflammatory biomarkers. These findings in conjunction with established and emerging data about genetic and environmental risk factors for RA support a model of disease development where certain factors lead to an initial triggering of RA-related autoimmunity that expands over time to the point where symptomatic arthritis classifiable as RA develops. Herein will be reviewed updates in the field, as well as a discussion of current limitations of our understanding of preclinical RA, and potential future directions for study. PMID:24643396

  20. Arthritis after infection with Chikungunya virus.

    PubMed

    Ali Ou Alla, Sanae; Combe, Bernard

    2011-06-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an emerging alphavirus responsible for several infectious outbreaks in the world. After an acute stage of illness characterised by a fever-arthralgia syndrome and rash, joint disorders due to CHIKV infection can sometimes persist for several months or years. Chronic arthritis after this emerging disease is well documented, and similarities to rheumatoid arthritis have been described. Knowledge of the geographical epidemiology of CHIKV infection is crucial for better control of the disease. Thus, recent outbreaks have led to several studies, which have highlighted the need for a better understanding of the clinical features of Chikungunya (CHIK) and beginning knowledge of the pathophysiogenesis, which can lead to further research. PMID:22100284

  1. Patient advocacy and arthritis: moving forward.

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Amye L.; Euller-Ziegler, Liana

    2004-01-01

    Patient advocacy is based on the premise that people have the right to make their own choices about their health care. Personal advocacy is centred on the experiential expertise of the individual affected by the condition, whereas group advocacy is grounded on patient-centred strategies and actions. The first patient advocacy groups for arthritis were set up over 20 years ago in the USA and have subsequently spread to many other countries. This paper discusses the growth and impact of personal advocacy as well as recent developments in group advocacy in the Asia-Pacific region, Europe, and North America, in terms of arthritis awareness, research, corporate partnerships, and the Bone and Joint Decade global initiative. PMID:15042233

  2. Yoga for Arthritis: A Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Haaz, Steffany; Bartlett, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The aim of this article was to systematically review the existing literature on the use of yoga for persons with arthritis. We included peer-reviewed research from clinical trials (published from 1980-2010) that used yoga as an intervention for arthritis patients and reported quantitative findings. Eleven studies were identified, including four RCTs and four NRCTs. All trials were small and control groups varied. No adverse events were reported and attrition was comparable or better than typical for exercise interventions. Evidence was strongest for reduction in disease symptoms (tender/swollen joints, pain) and disability, as well as improved self-efficacy and mental health. Interventions, research methods and disease diagnoses were heterogeneous. Larger, rigorous RCTs are necessary to more effectively quantify the effects of yoga for arthritic populations PMID:21220084

  3. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: physical therapy and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, Aysegul; Bolukbas, Nalan

    2005-02-01

    Juvenile arthritis is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases in the childhood period (ages 0 to 16 years). This disease was first defined in the first half of the 16th century. In the course of time, its differential diagnosis and characteristics have been determined, and it has been classified. Incidence and prevalence values are 10 to 20 in 100,000 and 56 to 113 in 100,000, respectively. Various factors are suggested for its underlying cause. Its denomination is also in dispute. Treatment of juvenile arthritis includes education, medical treatment, physical therapy, and occupational therapy. This article summarizes the objectives and methods of physical therapy and rehabilitation that are important parts of treatment. PMID:15759952

  4. A rare cause of septic arthritis: melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Caldera, Aruna Sanjeewa; Kumanan, Thirunavukarasu; Corea, Enoka

    2013-10-01

    Melioidosis is a pyogenic infection with high mortality caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. As the clinical presentation is not distinctive, a high index of clinical suspicion is required for diagnosis. We present a case of a 50-year-old farmer who was diabetic and a chronic alcoholic, who presented to us with pneumonia, followed by septic arthritis. He was ultimately diagnosed as having melioidosis. PMID:24067292

  5. Prognostic factors in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Prieur, A M; Chèdeville, G

    2001-10-01

    Prognostic factors in juvenile arthritis are related to many variables that must be evaluated according to the different subtypes. The International League of Associations of Rheumatologists (ILAR) recently proposed six different categories referred to as the Durban criteria, under the eponym of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The aim of this classification was to define homogeneous groups according to their clinical and biologic features. The prognostic factors were classified into the different categories of JIA. A poor outcome in the systemic form correlated with markers of disease activity, such as fever and polyarticular involvement, within the first 6 months. The risk of joint destruction in oligoarthritis correlated with the severity of arthritis within the first 2 years. Polyarthritis with positive rheumatoid factor is associated with marked disability in adulthood. In a group of psoriatic patients, the risk of developing sacroiliitis is higher in male and HLA-B27-positive patients. Patients with enthesitis-related arthritis with lower limb, knee, and tarsal involvement also are at greater risk of developing sacroiliitis. Chronic uveitis is a complication of JIA observed mainly in patients with oligoarthritis associated with positive antinuclear antibodies in serum. Secondary amyloidosis is observed mainly in children with systemic JIA. The long-term outcome must be discussed according to the various therapies. Corticosteroids contribute to growth retardation and osteoporosis, for which the use of human recombinant growth hormone and biphosphonates may be an option. Newer encouraging therapies such as anticytokines have been proposed for children with active disease. Autologous stem cell transplantation is being evaluated in some centers with promising results; however, it has a high rate of mortality. Further discussion regarding which patients should undergo autologous stem cell transplantation is needed, as is further discussion regarding the technical adaptations necessary. PMID:11564367

  6. Tocilizumab for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshio; Ogata, Atsushi; Narazaki, Masashi

    2010-11-01

    Tocilizumab is a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody, which binds to circulating soluble IL-6 receptor and membrane-expressed IL-6 receptor, inhibiting IL-6 binding to both forms of IL-6 receptor. Several Phase III clinical trials demonstrate the clinical efficacy of tocilizumab as monotherapy or with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs for adult patients with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis. Tocilizumab in combination with methotrexate after 24 weeks of treatment could induce disease remission in 30% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis refractory to anti-TNF antagonist therapy. The most common adverse reactions reported in clinical studies are upper respiratory tract infection, nasopharyngitis, headache, hypertension and mild, reversible increases in alanine aminotransferase enzymes. Serious adverse reactions include infections, gastrointestinal perforations and hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. The clinical efficacy and safety of tocilizumab has led to the approval of this innovative drug for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in more than 70 countries worldwide. PMID:20979549

  7. Gemcitabine-induced gouty arthritis attacks.

    PubMed

    Bottiglieri, Sal; Tierson, Neil; Patel, Raina; Mo, Jae-Hyun; Mehdi, Syed

    2013-09-01

    In this case report, we review the experience of a patient who presented with early stage pancreatic cancer (Stage IIb) who underwent a Whipple procedure and adjuvant chemoradiation. The patient's past medical history included early stage colon cancer in remission, post-traumatic-stress-disorder, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, osteoarthritis, gout, and pre-diabetes. Chemotherapy initially consisted of weekly gemcitabine. The patient developed acute gouty attacks after his second dose of gemcitabine, which brought him to the emergency room for emergent treatment on several occasions. Gemcitabine was held and treatment began with fluorouracil and concurrent radiation. After completion of his chemoradiation with fluorouracil, he was again treated with weekly gemcitabine alone. As soon as the patient started gemcitabine chemotherapy the patient developed gouty arthritis again, requiring discontinuation of chemotherapy. The patient received no additional treatment until his recent recurrence 8 months later where gemcitabine chemotherapy was again introduced with prophylactic medications consisting of allopurinol 100?mg by mouth daily and colchicine 0.6?mg by mouth daily throughout gemcitabine chemotherapy, and no signs of gouty arthritis occurred. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing gout attacks associated with gemcitabine therapy. There is limited data available describing the mechanism that gouty arthritis may be precipitated from gemcitabine chemotherapy. Further monitoring and management may be required in patients receiving gemcitabine chemotherapy with underlying gout. PMID:23169898

  8. Septic Arthritis in the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalisy, Hassan Mahdi; Nikiforov, Ivan; Mansoora, Qurat; Goldman, John; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare event that has only been reported a few dozen times worldwide. This case is remarkable for septic arthritis of the TMJ joint in an otherwise healthy male. Case Report: A 24-year-old male presented to the emergency department with periauricular swelling, erythema, fever, myalgia's and generalized joint pain. He had previously sought medical attention and was placed on ciprofloxacin. However, he developed facial swelling and a rash and had to discontinue the antibiotic. On physical exam the patient had a large swelling and tenderness in his left periauricular area, with erythema and deviation of the right mandible which limited his ability to open the mouth. A computed tomography showed mild asymmetric soft tissue swelling in the left pharyngeal region but did not show joint effusion. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging did show effusion of the joint space. The effusion was drained, and the synovial fluid was submitted for gram stain, culture, and sensitivity. The cultures grew menthicillin sensitive Staphyloccocus Aureus. The patient was discharged to complete a two week course of intravenous (IV) Ceftriaxone and IV Vancomycin via home infusion. Conclusion: Septic Arthritis of the TMJ is a rare event with very specific clinical symptoms. Due to the low sensitivity of the computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging should be considered when computed tomography scan is negative for TMJ effusion. PMID:26713295

  9. A Comparative Metabolomic Evaluation of Behcet’s Disease with Arthritis and Seronegative Arthritis Using Synovial Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungyeon; Hwang, Jiwon; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Cha, Hoon-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Behcet’s disease (BD) with arthritis is often confused with seronegative arthritis (SNA) because of shared clinical symptoms and the lack of definitive biomarkers for BD. To investigate possible metabolic patterns and potential biomarkers of BD with arthritis, metabolomic profiling of synovial fluid (SF) from 6 patients with BD with arthritis and 18 patients with SNA was performed using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. A total of 123 metabolites were identified from samples. Orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis showed clear discrimination between BD with arthritis and SNA. A set of 11 metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers for BD using variable importance for projection values and the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Compared with SNA, BD with arthritis exhibited relatively high levels of glutamate, valine, citramalate, leucine, methionine sulfoxide, glycerate, phosphate, lysine, isoleucine, urea, and citrulline. There were two markers identified, elevated methionine sulfoxide and citrulline, that were associated with increased oxidative stress, providing a potential link to BD-associated neutrophil hyperactivity. Glutamate, citramalate, and valine were selected and validated as putative biomarkers for BD with arthritis (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 61.1%). This is the first report to present potential biomarkers from SF for discriminating BD with arthritis from SNA. The metabolomics of SF may be helpful in searching for potential biomarkers and elucidating the clinicopathogenesis of BD with arthritis. PMID:26270538

  10. Yttrium radiosynoviorthesis in the treatment of knee arthritis in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Heuft-Dorenbosch, L.; de Vet, H. C W; van der Linden, S.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To consider the question: How strong is the evidence in favour of yttrium synovectomy in chronic knee arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in comparison with placebo and intra-articular steroid treatment??METHODS—A systematic review of the literature was performed using Medline and the Embase database.?RESULTS—Initially, seven papers were identified, but only two met the inclusion criteria. Neither study showed evidence in favour of yttrium synovectomy.?CONCLUSION—From the point of view of evidence based medicine it should be seriously questioned whether yttrium synovectomy deserves a place in clinical practice.?? PMID:10913051

  11. Total hip arthroplasty using a combined anterior and posterior approach via a lateral incision in patients with ankylosed hips

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Ming; Wu, Yuesong; Xu, Weidong; Wang, Zimin

    2013-01-01

    Background For most patients with severely ankylosed hips, traditional surgical approaches do not provide sufficient exposure during THAs. We report our experience with a combined anterior and posterior approach using a lateral incision for total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients with severe, spontaneous bony hip ankylosis. Methods Between January 2004 and December 2008, patients with severe, spontaneous bony hip ankylosis underwent THA via a combined anterior and posterior approach using a lateral incision. Results We included 47 patients (76 hips) with a mean age of 53 (range 22–72) years in our study. All surgeries were successful, and no significant postoperative complications occurred. The mean operative duration was 1.5 (range 1.3–1.7) hours, and mean blood loss was 490 (range 450–580) mL. The mean duration of follow-up was 5.5 (range 2–11) years. Harris hip score improved from 53 to 88 points postoperatively, and the outcome was good to excellent in 88.37% of cases. Heterotopic ossification occurred in 6 hips, and infection, which resolved with antibiotics, occurred in 1 patient. Conclusion This combined anterior and posterior approach to THA using a lateral incision in patients with severe, spontaneous ankylosis provides very good exposure, protects the abduction unit and results in good to excellent postoperative recovery. PMID:24067518

  12. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jiangtao; Department of Orthopaedics, Yantaishan Hospital, 91 Jiefang Road, Yantai, Shandong 264001 ; Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-?B-dependent genes, including interleukin 1? (IL-1?), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  13. Comparison between the intermalleolar distance measured on the couch and on the floor in axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Diss, James K J; Georgiou, Andreas; Roussou, Euthalia

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether axial spondyloarthritis (axial SpA) patients' supine position on the couch (OC) or on the floor (OF) affects intermalleolar distance (IMD) measurement and its Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI) scoring, using all three versions of BASMI index. OC- and OF-IMDs were obtained for 43 axial SpA patients (M:F = 19:24). Age, gender, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), disease type and disease duration were also collected. Statistical analyses and correlations were performed as appropriate. Mean IMD measurements obtained with individuals in the two distinct measuring positions were not significantly different in the patients studied. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between OC-IMD and OF-IMD values. There was no significant relationship between IMD and patient age, gender, height, weight, BMI, or disease duration. However, looking at disease type, IMDs of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) were ~30 % greater than those with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in our study population (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between the measured patient characteristics that accounted for the greater IMDs of those diagnosed with AS. IMD measurements and resultant BASMI scores were the same whether the patient was positioned OC or OF in our axial SpA cohort. Unexpectedly, IMD measurements were significantly greater (~30 %) in AS patients than in axial PsA patients. PMID:26254883

  14. Home Care Guide on Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (For Parents).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesecke, Linda L.; And Others

    The booklet, written by the medical staff of a children's hospital, provides information for parents of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Arthritis is a swelling of the joint(s) in children and lasts for over 6 weeks (sometimes many years). Aspirin is the main medicine given for JRA, and it works not only to control pain but also,…

  15. Identification of Urinary Peptide Biomarkers Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    McInnes, Iain B.; Husi, Holger; Klein, Julie; Dakna, Mohammed; Mullen, William; Mischak, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis are associated with improved outcomes but current diagnostic tools such as rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated protein antibodies have shown limited sensitivity. In this pilot study we set out to establish a panel of urinary biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis using capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. We compared the urinary proteome of 33 participants of the Scottish Early Rheumatoid Arthritis inception cohort study with 30 healthy controls and identified 292 potential rheumatoid arthritis-specific peptides. Amongst them, 39 were used to create a classifier model using support vector machine algorithms. Specific peptidic fragments were differentially excreted between groups; fragments of protein S100-A9 and gelsolin were less abundant in rheumatoid arthritis while fragments of uromodulin, complement C3 and fibrinogen were all increasingly excreted. The model generated was subsequently tested in an independent test-set of 31 samples. The classifier demonstrated a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 93% in diagnosing the condition, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93 (p<0.0001). These preliminary results suggest that urinary biomarkers could be useful in the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Further studies are currently being undertaken in larger cohorts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other athridities to assess the potential of the urinary peptide based classifier in the early detection of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25144639

  16. Macrophages exposed to Borrelia burgdorferi induce Lyme arthritis in hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Du Chateau, B K; England, D M; Callister, S M; Lim, L C; Lovrich, S D; Schell, R F

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which Lyme arthritis is induced has not been elucidated. In this study, we showed that macrophages have a direct, effector role in the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis. Severe destructive arthritis was induced in recipients of macrophages obtained from Borrelia burgdorferi-vaccinated and nonvaccinated hamsters exposed to Formalin-inactivated B. burgdorferi in vitro and then challenged with the Lyme spirochete. Swelling of the hind paws was detected within 8 h of infection, increased rapidly, and peaked at 21 h. This initial swelling decreased, and by day 4 only slight swelling was detected. Severe swelling of the hind paws was detected 8 days after infection and increased rapidly, with peak swelling occurring on day 11. Histopathologic examination affirmed that macrophages exposed to Formalin-inactivated spirochetes induced a severe destructive Lyme arthritis. The onset and severity of the severe destructive arthritis were dependent on the number of macrophages transferred. By contrast, macrophages not exposed to Formalin-inactivated B. burgdorferi failed to induce severe destructive arthritis in recipients after challenge with B. burgdorferi. Similarly, severe destructive arthritis was not detected in recipients of macrophages injected with spirochetal growth medium. Our results also showed that transferred macrophages could not protect hamsters from infection with B. burgdorferi, as spirochetes were readily recovered from their tissues when cultured. These findings demonstrate that macrophages exposed to B. burgdorferi are directly involved in the induction of Lyme arthritis. PMID:8698477

  17. Understanding Arthritis Promoting Healthy Lifestyles for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremethick, Mary Jane; Hogan, Patricia I.; Coleman, Barb; Adams, Kady

    2010-01-01

    One of the goals of "Healthy People 2010" is to decrease the incidence of limitation in physical activity due to arthritis. Physical education, recreation, and dance professionals can play an important role in meeting this objective by addressing barriers to physical activity and exercise in older adults with arthritis, and by successfully…

  18. The Child with Arthritis in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanzo, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Arthritis is a condition often associated with the elderly. However, arthritis affects approximately 275,000 children nationwide. Symptoms may vary from one swollen joint to multiply affected joints coupled with fatigue, fever, and rash. Its effect on the school-age child can range from missing a few days of school per year to hospitalizations…

  19. Cimetidine for peptic ulcer in patients with arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Croker, J R; Cotton, P B; Boyle, A C; Kinsella, P

    1980-01-01

    Patients taking anti-inflammatory drugs for arthritis are prone to dyspepsia, and management of peptic ulcer is difficult because surgery is poorly tolerated. In this open study cimetidine treatment was associated with ulcer healing in 17 out of 21 patients with arthritis even when anti-inflammatory treatment was continued. Remission was maintained for 1 year by continued cimetidine therapy. PMID:7416819

  20. Role of viscosupplementation in osteo-arthritis of knee joint.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Rajesh; Mahajan, Sumit

    2013-05-01

    Osteo-arthritis is the chronic degenerative disease associated with joint pain and loss of joint function. It is caused by 'wear and tear' on a joint. Knee is the most commonly Involved joint. Disease is so crippling that patient is unable to walk independently from bed to bathroom. The major causes of osteo-arthritis are age, gender, obesity, medical condition and hereditary. The signs and symptoms of osteo-arthritis are pain, joint stiffness, joint swelling, and loss of function. No blood tests are helpful in diagnosing osteo-arthritis. Management of osteo-arthritis includes non-pharmacological, pharmacological and surgical. A relatively new procedure is viscosupplementation, in which a preparation of hyaluronic acid is injected into the knee joint. Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring substance found in the synovial fluid. It acts as a lubricant to enable bones to move smoothly over each other and a shock absorber for joint loads. The decrease in the elastic and viscous properties of synovial fluid in osteo-arthritis results from both a reduced molecular size and a reduced concentration of hyaluronic acid in the synovial fluid. Viscosupplementation may be a therapeutic option for individuals with osteo-arthritis of the knee. Viscosupplementation has been shown to relieve pain in many patients who cannot get relief from non-medicinal measures or analgesic drugs. This article is to know the mechanism of action, patients' selection criteria, rationale and efficacy of viscosupplimentation in the management of osteo-arthritis of knee. PMID:24765695

  1. Lysosomal ?-glucuronidase regulates Lyme and rheumatoid arthritis severity

    PubMed Central

    Bramwell, Kenneth K.C.; Ma, Ying; Weis, John H.; Chen, Xinjian; Zachary, James F.; Teuscher, Cory; Weis, Janis J.

    2013-01-01

    Lyme disease, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most prevalent arthropod-borne illness in the United States and remains a clinical and social challenge. The spectrum of disease severity among infected patients suggests that host genetics contribute to pathogenic outcomes, particularly in patients who develop arthritis. Using a forward genetics approach, we identified the lysosomal enzyme ?-glucuronidase (GUSB), a member of a large family of coregulated lysosomal enzymes, as a key regulator of Lyme-associated arthritis severity. Severely arthritic C3H mice possessed a naturally occurring hypomorphic allele, Gusbh. C57BL/6 mice congenic for the C3H Gusb allele were prone to increased Lyme-associated arthritis severity. Radiation chimera experiments revealed that resident joint cells drive arthritis susceptibility. C3H mice expressing WT Gusb as a transgene were protected from severe Lyme arthritis. Importantly, the Gusbh allele also exacerbated disease in a serum transfer model of rheumatoid arthritis. A known GUSB function is the prevention of lysosomal accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Development of Lyme and rheumatoid arthritis in Gusbh-expressing mice was associated with heightened accumulation of GAGs in joint tissue. We propose that GUSB modulates arthritis pathogenesis by preventing accumulation of proinflammatory GAGs within inflamed joint tissue, a trait that may be shared by other lysosomal exoglycosidases. PMID:24334460

  2. Prevalence and Impact of Arthritis: Opportunities for Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Ray; Allegrante, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Due to its chronic nature and its associated impact on physical function and life quality, arthritis in its various forms imposes a significant burden on society. Objective: To critically review and evaluate: (1) what has been documented about the burden of arthritis, (2) what is being done in treatment, and (3) what might be done at…

  3. Screening for Psoriatic Arthritis in Korean Psoriasis Patients Using the Psoriatic Arthritis Screening Evaluation Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    You, Hyang-Suk; Kim, Gun-Wook; Cho, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Won-Jeong; Mun, Je-Ho; Song, Margaret; Kim, Hoon-Soo; Ko, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Moon-Bum; Lee, Seung-Geun; Lee, In-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Background Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is chronic seronegative inflammatory arthritis that causes irreversible joint damage. Early recognition of PsA in patients with psoriasis is important for preventing physical disability and deformity. However, diagnosing PsA in a busy dermatology outpatient clinic can be difficult. Objective This study aimed to validate the Psoriatic Arthritis Screening and Evaluation (PASE) questionnaire for the detection of PsA in Korean patients with psoriasis. Methods The PASE questionnaire was prospectively given to 148 patients diagnosed with psoriasis but without a previous diagnosis of PsA. All patients underwent radiologic and laboratory examinations, and a subsequent clinical evaluation by a rheumatologist. Results Eighteen psoriasis patients (12.2%) were diagnosed with PsA according to the Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis. The PASE questionnaire scores of differed significantly between PsA and non-PsA patients. Receiver operator characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.82 (95% confidence interval: 0.72, 0.92) for PASE score. A PASE score cut-off of 37 points had a sensitivity of 77.8% and specificity of 82.3% for the diagnosis of PsA. Conclusion The PASE questionnaire is a simple and convenient screening tool for detecting PsA in Korean dermatology clinics. A PASE questionnaire score of 37 points appears to be an appropriate cut-off for screening Korean psoriasis patients. PMID:26082582

  4. Australian Paediatric Rheumatology Group standards of care for the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Munro, Jane; Murray, Kevin; Boros, Christina; Chaitow, Jeffrey; Allen, Roger C; Akikusa, Jonathan; Adib, Navid; Piper, Susan E; Singh-Grewal, Davinder

    2014-09-01

    This standards document outlines accepted standards of management for children, adolescents and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Australia. This document acknowledges that the chronic inflammatory arthritis conditions (JIA) in childhood are different diseases from inflammatory arthritis in adults and that specific expertise is required in the care of children with arthritis. PMID:25156704

  5. Ankylosed maxillary incisor with severe root resorption treated with a single-tooth dento-osseous osteotomy, vertical alveolar distraction osteogenesis, and mini-implant anchorage.

    PubMed

    Sen???k, Neslihan Ebru; Koçer, Gülperi; Kaya, Bulem Üreyen

    2014-09-01

    Dentoalveolar ankylosis interferes with the vertical growth of the alveolar process, which can lead to an open bite, an unesthetic smile, and occlusal disharmony. This case report presents a new treatment protocol for an ankylosed tooth with severe root resorption using a combined surgical orthodontic management protocol involving a single-tooth dento-osseous osteotomy and vertical alveolar distraction osteogenesis with intraoral elastics and mini-implant anchorage. After distraction and active orthodontic treatment, the patient's anterior open bite was corrected. A Class I dental relationship was achieved, overjet was decreased, and a normal incisor relationship was obtained. PMID:25172260

  6. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis: A Knowledge Transfer Strategy to Empower Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosseau, Lucie; Lineker, Sydney; Bell, Mary; Wells, George; Casimiro, Lynn; Egan, Mary; Cranney, Ann; Tugwell, Peter; Wilson, Keith G.; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to help people with arthritis become aware of and utilize Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Osteoarthritis (OA) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) as they relate to self-management strategies. Second, to evaluate the impact of specific Knowledge Translation (KT) activities on CPG uptake. More…

  7. Is air pollution a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Essouma, Mickael; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory debilitating disease triggered by a complex interaction involving genetic and environmental factors. Active smoking and occupational exposures such as silica increase its risk, suggesting that initial inflammation and generation of rheumatoid arthritis-related autoantibodies in the lungs may precede the clinical disease. This hypothesis paved the way to epidemiological studies investigating air pollution as a potential determinant of rheumatoid arthritis. Studies designed for epidemiology of rheumatoid arthritis found a link between traffic, a surrogate of air pollution, and this disease. Furthermore, a small case-control study recently found an association between wood smoke exposure and anticyclic citrullinated protein/peptide antibody in sera of patients presenting wood-smoke-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, reports addressing impact of specific pollutants on rheumatoid arthritis incidence and severity across populations are somewhat conflicting. In addition to the link reported between other systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases and particulate matters/gaseous pollutants, experimental observation of exacerbated rheumatoid arthritis incidence and severity in mice models of collagen-induced arthritis after diesel exhaust particles exposure as well as hypovitaminosis D-related autoimmunity can help understand the role of air pollution in rheumatoid arthritis. All these considerations highlight the necessity to extend high quality epidemiological researches investigating different sources of atmospheric pollution across populations and particularly in low-and-middle countries, in order to further explore the biological plausibility of air pollution's effect in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. This should be attempted to better inform policies aiming to reduce the burden of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26225124

  8. Collagen-induced arthritis in common marmosets: a new nonhuman primate model for chronic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction There is an ever-increasing need for animal models to evaluate efficacy and safety of new therapeutics in the field of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Particularly for the early preclinical evaluation of human-specific biologicals targeting the progressive phase of the disease, there is a need for relevant animal models. In response to this requirement we set out to develop a model of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in a small-sized nonhuman primate species (300 to 400 g at adult age); that is, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). Methods Twenty-two animals divided into three experiments were immunized with collagen type II (CII) of either bovine or chicken origin with different immunization strategies. The animals were analyzed for clinical manifestation of arthritis, hematology and clinical chemistry, immunological responses against CII and histopathological features of the arthritis. Results Clinically manifest arthritis was observed in almost 100% (21 out of 22) of the animals. Fifty percent of the animals developed semi-acute CIA while the other 50% displayed a more chronic disease. Both cellular (CD3/CD4 and CD3/CD8) and humoral responses (IgM and IgG) against CII were involved in the development of the disease. Besides mild histopathological changes in bone and cartilage, severe inflammation in extraarticular tissues like periosteum and subcutaneous tissues was observed. Conclusions This new model in marmosets more closely resembles chronic RA with respect to the chronic disease course and pathomorphological presentation than the more acute monophasic and destructive CIA model in macaques. This model can therefore fill a niche in preclinical testing of new human specific therapeutics. PMID:20977720

  9. Association between low density lipoprotein and rheumatoid arthritis genetic factors with low density lipoprotein levels in rheumatoid arthritis and non-rheumatoid arthritis controls

    E-print Network

    Liao, Katherine P.

    Objectives: While genetic determinants of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels are well characterised in the general population, they are understudied in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Our objective was to determine ...

  10. Golimumab Injection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... condition in which the body attacks its own joints causing pain, swelling, and loss of function), ankylosing spondylitis (condition in which the body attacks the joints of the spine and other areas causing pain ...

  11. T cell ALL presenting as seropositive rheumatoid arthritis: case report and review of the literature on seropositive paraneoplastic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Handy, Catherine E; Robles, Glenda; Haque, Uzma; Houston, Brian

    2015-09-01

    We present the case of a 61-year-old female with an acute onset of polyarthritis involving the wrists, hands, knees, and ankles. Associated systemic symptoms included fever, weight loss, and lymphadenopathy. Serologic workup revealed positive rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-cyclic citrullinated protein (anti-CCP) antibodies. Radiograph imaging of her bilateral hands and wrists showed erosive joint disease and lymph node, and bone marrow biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of T cell lymphoblastic leukemia. Our case demonstrates a unique clinical phenotype of paraneoplastic arthritis and is only the second reported case of RF, anti-CCP-positive arthritis related to a hematological malignancy. We review the only three published cases of seropositive paraneoplastic arthritis. In each case, systemic symptoms or a poor response to steroid treatment triggered additional workup. These cases highlight the importance of careful clinical assessment and vigilance to rule out secondary causes of inflammatory arthritis, even in patients with seropositive erosive arthritis. PMID:24889405

  12. The Contribution of Transcriptomics to Biomarker Development in Systemic Vasculitis and SLE

    E-print Network

    Flint, Shaun M.; McKinney, Eoin F.; Lyons, Paul A; Smith, Kenneth G. C.

    2015-04-15

    inflammation. Many of these cells are readily sampled in the peripheral blood as they traffic between lymph node and tissues, providing a rationale that gene expression profiling of blood is as likely to yield relevant patterns as the more technically... between neutrophils and interferon-producing plasmacytoid dendritic cells [67]. 19 Gene%expression%profiling%in%ankylosing%spondylitis% The two major studies of peripheral blood gene expression in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have conflicting...

  13. Pain Treatment in Arthritis-Related Pain: Beyond NSAIDs

    PubMed Central

    van Laar, Mart; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Mellinghoff, Hans-Ulrich; Merchante, Ignacio Morón; Nalamachu, Srinivas; O'Brien, Joanne; Perrot, Serge; Raffa, Robert B

    2012-01-01

    Managing pain from chronic conditions, such as, but not limited to, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, requires the clinician to balance the need for effective analgesia against safety risks associated with analgesic agents. Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis pain is incompletely understood but involves both nociceptive and non-nociceptive mechanisms, including neuropathic mechanisms. Prevailing guidelines for arthritis-related pain do not differentiate between nociceptive and non-nociceptive pain, sometimes leading to recommendations that do not fully address the nature of pain. NSAIDs are effective in treating the nociceptive arthritis-related pain. However, safety concerns of NSAIDs may cause clinicians to undertreat arthritis-related pain. In this context, combination therapy may be more appropriate to manage the different pain mechanisms involved. A panel convened in November 2010 found that among the currently recommended analgesic products for arthritis-related pain, fixed-low-dose combination products hold promise for pain control because such products allow lower doses of individual agents resulting in decreased toxicity and acceptable efficacy due to synergy between the individual drugs. Better evidence and recommendations are required to improve treatment of chronic arthritis-related pain. PMID:23264838

  14. Arthritogenic T cells in autoimmune arthritis.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Noriko; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases, including arthritis, often result from an imbalance between regulatory T (Treg) cells and IL-17-producing (Th17) cells. Dozens of studies in mice and humans have shed light on the pathological significance of T cells in RA. Since Th17 cells play an important role in the exacerbation of inflammation and bone destruction in joints, it has been an important issue how arthritic Th17 cells arise. Th17 cells are generated in the local inflammatory milieu via cytokines produced by macrophages or synovial fibroblasts, while it is reported that Th17 cells are generated in the gut in the presence of specific commensal bacteria. A recent report showed a pathogenic Th17 cell subset with a distinct pattern of gene expression and a potent osteoclastogenic ability are converted from Foxp3(+) T cells in arthritic joints. Since Foxp3(+) Treg cells contain T cells which recognize self-antigens, the fate of plastic Foxp3(+) T cells can be a critical determinant of autoimmunity or self-tolerance. Further analysis on the molecular basis and antigen-specificity of arthritogenic Th17 cell subsets will be helpful to establish novel therapeutic approaches and clarify how self-tolerance breaks down in autoimmune arthritis. PMID:25450406

  15. Disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Following Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Shoichi; Sekiya, Noritaka; Takizawa, Yasunobu; Morioka, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirofumi; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Mitarai, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Satomi; Kamei, Satoshi; Setoguchi, Keigo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium found mainly in patients with respiratory or cutaneous infections, but it rarely causes disseminated infections. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of disseminated M abscessus infection. A 75-year-old Japanese woman who had been treated for 17 years with a corticosteroid for antisynthetase syndrome with antithreonyl-tRNA synthetase antibody developed swelling of her right elbow. X-ray of her right elbow joint showed osteolysis, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed fluid in her right elbow joint. M abscessus grew in joint fluid and blood cultures. She was diagnosed with a disseminated M abscessus infection following septic arthritis. Antimicrobial treatment by clarithromycin, amikacin, and imipenem/cilastatin combined with surgical debridement was administered. Although blood and joint fluid cultures became negative 1 week later, the patient died at 6 weeks from starting antimicrobial treatment. We reviewed 34 cases of disseminated M abscessus infections from the literature. Most of the patients had immunosuppressive backgrounds such as transplantation, use of immunosuppressive agents, hematological malignancy, and end stage renal disease. The duration from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was over 3 months in half of the cases. All fatal cases had positive blood cultures or use of immunosuppressive agents. Clinicians should bear in mind that mycobacterial infections including M abscessus are one of the differential diagnoses in patients with subacute arthritis and soft tissue infections. PMID:26020393

  16. Observations on Drug Prescribing in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, P.; Ahola, S. J.; Grennan, D.; Brooks, P.; Buchanan, W. Watson

    1974-01-01

    A total of 125 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were investigated about their drug therapy before referral to a specialist centre. Most referrals were from general practitioners. Only 47 of the patients had received salicylates as the first drug and 18 had never had them at all. Soluble aspirin was the preparation of salicylates most frequently prescribed (for 63 patients). Only 60 patients had been given an adequate dose and only 62 an adequate course of treatment with salicylates. In 28 patients salicylates had been stopped on account of side effects. About one-third of the patients had been prescribed oral corticosteroids. The referral letters were poor in giving details of past and present drug therapy, and there were serious omissions in reporting of previous side effects. Seventy-five general practitioners were asked to rate several currently marketed antirheumatic drugs in terms of effectiveness. Though prednisolone 15 mg daily ranked higher than aspirin 4 g daily the difference was not significant. The study shows the inadequacies of drug prescribing for rheumatoid arthritis in the Glasgow area. PMID:4544646

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Periodontal Disease. An Update.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Archana; Almas, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    A review of the epidemiological, pathological and immunological relationships between two chronic inflammatory diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease (PD). RA is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, characterized by loss of connective tissue and mineralized structures, the so-called "synovial membrane." Periodontitis is the inflammatory destruction of the periodontal attachment and alveolar bone. While the etiology of these two diseases may differ, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are similar. And it is possible that individuals manifesting both PD and RA may suffer from a unifying underlying systemic deregulation of the inflammatory response. There is an overproduction of a variety of cytokines and MMPs that appears to be common in both diseases. Oral health parameters should be more closely monitored in patients with RA, an autoimmune disease. Data suggest that periodontal therapies combined with routine RA treatments further improve RA status. Interventions to prevent, minimize or treat periodontitis in arthritis patients will definitely promise a better quality of life for these patients. PMID:26521325

  18. Laser transillumination for diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, E.; Podbielska, H.; Bauer, J.; Dmochowska, L.; Dziewi?cka, M.

    2006-02-01

    In this work, the special portable apparatus was constructed for performing the transillumination examination on interphalangeal joints of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. It consisted of He-Ne laser with optics for collimated illumination, special holder for placing the finger (perpendicular to optical axis, dorsal site towards camera), and CCD camera with memory stick. The captured images in JPEG format with 1152x864 resolution were converted into the gray level pictures and analyzed by means of image processing program from OPTIMAS. 35 ill patients and 11 healthy volunteers were examined. The histograms and 35 luminances were calculated. The average function was applied in order to calculate the mean gray level values in images of corresponding fingers of healthy subjects. These values were compared with values calculated for ill persons. We proved that that transillumination images may have a diagnostic value. For RA suffering patients the corresponding transillumination images represented the lower gray level values than the average value of finger of health volunteers. For II finger of left hand 96% images of ill persons have lower gray level and in case of right hand it was 93%. This proves that basing in transillumination one can diagnose with high probability the patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Nocardia Arthritis: 3 Cases and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chaussade, Hélène; Lebeaux, David; Gras, Guillaume; Catherinot, Emilie; Rammaert, Blandine; Poiree, Sylvain; Lecuyer, Hervé; Zeller, Valérie; Bernard, Louis; Lortholary, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Nocardia are Gram-positive filamentous bacteria responsible for infections ranging from opportunistic life-threatening disseminated diseases to chronic skin and soft-tissue infections. Even if virtually all organs can be infected, articular involvement is rare. Therefore, we report 3 recent cases and performed a literature review of cases of Nocardia arthritis in order to describe clinical features, therapeutic challenges, and outcome of these patients. Among 34 patients (31 in the literature plus our 3 cases), 21 (62%) were due to hematogenous dissemination, 9 (26%) were due to direct bacterial inoculation through the skin, and in 4 cases, the mechanism of infection was unknown. Four out of these 34 cases occurred on prosthetic joints. Whereas hematogenous infections mostly occurred in immunocompromised hosts (17 of 21, 81%), direct inoculation was mostly seen in immunocompetent patients. Eighty-two percent of patients (28 out of 34) received trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-containing regimens and median antibiotic treatment duration was 24 weeks (range, 12–120) for hematogenous infections and 12 weeks (range, 6–24) for direct inoculations. Outcome was favorable in 27 cases despite unsystematic surgical management (17 cases) without sequelae in 70% of the cases. Nocardia arthritis is rare but its management is complex and should rely on a combined approach with rheumatologist, infectious diseases expert, and surgeon. PMID:26496274

  20. Population Impact of Arthritis on Disability in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jing; Chang, Rowland W.; Dunlop, Dorothy D.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Disability threatens the independence of older adults and has large economic and societal costs. This article examines the population impact of arthritis on disability incidence among older Americans. Methods The present study used longitudinal data (1998–2000) from the Health and Retirement Study, a national probability sample of elderly Americans. Disability was defined by the inability to perform basic activities of daily living (ADL). A total of 7,758 participants ages ?65 years with no ADL disability at baseline were included in the analyses. Multiple logistic regression was used to measure the impact of baseline arthritis (self reported) on incidence of subsequent ADL disability after controlling for baseline differences in demographics, health factors, health behaviors, and medical access. Results Older adults who had baseline arthritis had a substantially higher incidence of ADL disability compared with those without arthritis (9.3% versus 4.5%). The strong relationship of arthritis and ADL disability was partially explained by demographic, health, behavioral, and medical access factors. However, even after adjusting for all other risk factors, arthritis remained as an independent and significant predictor for developing ADL disability (adjusted odds ratio 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.2–1.8). Almost 1 in every 4 new cases of ADL disability was due to arthritis (adjusted population attributable fraction: 23.7%). Conclusion The high frequency of incident ADL disability attributable to arthritis points to the importance of intervention programs that address the entire spectrum of health and functional problems in persons with arthritis to prevent disability. PMID:16583415

  1. IL-12p40 Homodimer Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon-Yeong; Jung, Young Ok; Kim, Doo-Jin; Kang, Chang-Min; Moon, Young-Mee; Heo, Yu-Jung; Oh, Hye-Jwa; Park, Seong-Jeong; Yang, Se-Hwan; Kwok, Seung Ki; Ju, Ji-Hyeon; Park, Sung-Hwan; Sung, Young Chul

    2015-01-01

    IL-23 is the key cytokine that induces the expansion of Th17 cells. It is composed of p19 and p40 subunits of IL-12. The p40 subunit binds competitively to the receptor of IL-23 and blocks its activity. Our aim was to assess the preventive and therapeutic effect of the IL-12p40 homodimer (p40)2 subunit in autoimmune arthritis animal models. In the current study, using IL-1R antagonist–knockout mice and a collagen-induced arthritis model, we investigated the suppressive effect of (p40)2 on inflammatory arthritis. We demonstrated that the recombinant adenovirus-expressing mouse (p40)2 model prevented the development of arthritis when given before the onset of arthritis. It also decreased the arthritis index and joint erosions in the mouse model if transferred after arthritis was established. (p40)2 inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines and Ag-specific T cell proliferation. It also induced CD4+CD25+Foxp3 regulatory T (Treg) cells in vitro and in vivo, whereas the generation of retinoic acid receptor–related organ receptor ?t and Th17 cells was suppressed. The induction of Treg cells and the suppression of Th17 cells were mediated via activated STAT5 and suppressed STAT3. Our data suggest that (p40)2 suppressed inflammatory arthritis successfully. This could be a useful therapeutic approach in autoimmune arthritis to regulate the Th17/Treg balance and IL-23 signaling. PMID:26324771

  2. The clinical features of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Grassi, W; De Angelis, R; Lamanna, G; Cervini, C

    1998-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by progressive damage of synovial-lined joints and variable extra-articular manifestations. Tendon and bursal involvement are frequent and often clinically dominant in early disease. RA can affect any joint, but it is usually found in metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal and metatarsophalangeal joints, as well as in the wrists and knee. Articular and periarticular manifestations include joint swelling and tenderness to palpation, with morning stiffness and severe motion impairment in the involved joints. The clinical presentation of RA varies, but an insidious onset of pain with symmetric swelling of small joints is the most frequent finding. RA onset is acute or subacute in about 25% of patients, but its patterns of presentation also include palindromic onset, monoarticular presentation (both slow and acute forms), extra-articular synovitis (tenosynovitis, bursitis), polymyalgic-like onset, and general symptoms (malaise, fatigue, weight loss, fever). The palindromic onset is characterized by recurrent episodes of oligoarthritis with no residual radiologic damage, while the polymyalgic-like onset may be clinically indistinguishable from polymyalgia rheumatica in elderly subjects. RA is characteristically a symmetric erosive disease. Although any joint, including the cricoarytenoid joint, can be affected, the distal interphalangeal, the sacroiliac, and the lumbar spine joints are rarely involved. The clinical features of synovitis are particularly apparent in the morning. Morning stiffness in and around the joints, lasting at least 1 h before maximal improvement is a typical sign of RA. It is a subjective sign and the patient needs to be carefully informed as to the difference between pain and stiffness. Morning stiffness duration is related to disease activity. Hand involvement is the typical early manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis. Synovitis involving the metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal and wrist joints causes a characteristic tender swelling on palpation with early severe motion impairment and no radiologic evidence of bone damage. Fatigue, feveret, weight loss, and malaise are frequent clinical signs which can be associated with variable manifestations of extra-articular involvement such as rheumatoid nodules, vasculitis, hematologic abnormalities, Felty's syndrome, and visceral involvement. Although there is no laboratory test to exclude or prove the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, several laboratory abnormalities can be detected. Abnormal values of the tests for evaluation of systemic inflammation are the most typical humoral features of RA. These include: erythrocyte sedimentation rate, acute phase proteins and plasma viscosity. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein provide the best information about the acute phase response. The C-reactive protein is strictly correlated with clinical assessment and radiographic changes. Plain film radiography is the standard investigation to assess the extent of anatomic changes in rheumatoid arthritis patients. The radiographic features of the hand joints in early disease are characterized by soft tissue swelling and mild juxtaarticular osteoporosis. In the the past 10 years, ultrasonography has gained acceptance for studying joint, tendon and bursal involvement in RA. It may improve the early clinical assessment and the follow-up of these patients, showing such details as synovial thickening even within finger joints. Other imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance, computed tomography and scintigraphy may provide useful information about both the features and the extent for anatomic damage in selected rheumatoid arthritis patients. The natural history of the disease is poorly defined; its clinical course is fluctuating and the prognosis unpredictable. RA is an epidemiologically relevant cause of disability. An adequate early treatment of RA may alter the diseas PMID:9652497

  3. Streptococcus pyogenes Sternoclavicular Septic Arthritis in a Healthy Adult

    PubMed Central

    Savcic-Kos, Radmila M.; Mali, Padmavati; Abraham, Ajit; Issa, Meltiady; Rangu, Venu; Nasser, Rana

    2014-01-01

    Sternoclavicular septic arthritis is a rare infection, accounting for approximately 1% of septic arthritis in the general population. Staphylococcus aureus is the predominant etiologic agent, and it usually occurs in relatively young adults with some type of predisposition to infection. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of group A streptococcal, sternoclavicular arthritis in a previously healthy 62-year-old male patient. We present a detailed history and physical examination, with laboratory findings, imaging studies, cultures, and therapy. PMID:24667224

  4. Trace element analysis in rheumatoid arthritis under chrysotheraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecomte, R.; Paradis, P.; Monaro, S.; Barrette, M.; Lamoureux, G.; Menard, H.-A.

    1981-03-01

    Proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis is used to measure trace element concentrations in blood serum from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Initially trace element contaminations in blood-collecting and storing devices are determined. Then mean values and nyctemeral cycles are measured both in normal subjects and patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other similar pathologies. Abnormal concentrations of Cu and Zn and anomalies in the nyctemeral cycle are found in the patients. In the second phase of the project, the special case of chrysotherapeutically treated (gold salt treatment) rheumatoid arthritis patients is studied for extended periods of time (up to 53 weeks).

  5. Immune tolerance induction with multiepitope peptide derived from citrullinated autoantigens attenuates arthritis manifestations in adjuvant arthritis rats.

    PubMed

    Gertel, Smadar; Serre, Guy; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Amital, Howard

    2015-06-15

    Citrullinated peptides are major targets of disease-specific autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis. Currently, citrullinated peptides are used as biomarkers for diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis by measuring anti-citrullinated protein Ab (ACPA) titers in patients' sera. The accumulation of citrullinated proteins at synovial inflammation sites suggests that they are possible targets for tolerance induction. The objective of the present study was to determine whether citrullinated peptides could induce tolerance in an experimental arthritis model in rats. In view of the multiplicity of target citrullinated autoantigens described for ACPA, we generated a multiepitope citrullinated peptide (Cit-ME), derived from major prevalent citrullinated autoantigens (citrullinated filaggrin, fibrinogen, vimentin, and collagen type II), and studied its effects on arthritic rats. Adjuvant-induced arthritis was induced in Lewis rats. Beginning at day 7 after disease induction, the rats received eight s.c. injections of Cit-ME on alternate days. Differences in clinical status and modulation of T cell populations were analyzed. In adjuvant-induced arthritis rats treated with Cit-ME, disease severity was significantly reduced compared with that of untreated rats. Moreover, amelioration of disease manifestations was related to an increased regulatory T cell subset and an elevated apoptosis rate of T cells associated with reduced Th17 cells. Thus, the use of citrullinated peptides-based immunotherapy may be a promising approach for tolerance induction in experimental arthritis and perhaps even in susceptible individuals that are ACPA-seropositive in human arthritis. PMID:25964493

  6. Tuberculous spondylitis in Russia and prominent role of multidrug-resistant clone Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing B0/W148.

    PubMed

    Vyazovaya, Anna; Mokrousov, Igor; Solovieva, Natalia; Mushkin, Alexander; Manicheva, Olga; Vishnevsky, Boris; Zhuravlev, Viacheslav; Narvskaya, Olga

    2015-04-01

    Extrapulmonary and, in particular, spinal tuberculosis (TB) constitutes a minor but significant part of the total TB incidence. In spite of this, almost no studies on the genetic diversity and drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from spinal TB patients have been published to date. Here, we report results of the first Russian and globally largest molecular study of M. tuberculosis isolates recovered from patients with tuberculous spondylitis (TBS). The majority of 107 isolates were assigned to the Beijing genotype (n = 80); the other main families were T (n = 11), Ural (n = 7), and LAM (n = 4). Multidrug resistance (MDR) was more frequently found among Beijing (90.5%) and, intriguingly, Ural (71.4%) isolates than other genotypes (5%; P < 0.001). The extremely drug-resistant (XDR) phenotype was exclusively found in the Beijing isolates (n = 7). A notable prevalence of the rpoB531 and katG315 mutations in Beijing strains that were similarly high in both TBS (this study) and published pulmonary TB (PTB) samples from Russia shows that TBS and PTB Beijing strains follow the same paradigm of acquisition of rifampin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH) resistance. The 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) subtyping of 80 Beijing isolates further discriminated them into 24 types (Hunter Gaston index [HGI] = 0.83); types 100-32 and 94-32 represented the largest groups. A genotype of Russian successful clone B0/W148 was identified in 30 of 80 Beijing isolates. In conclusion, this study highlighted a crucial impact of the Beijing genotype and the especially prominent role of its MDR-associated successful clone B0/W148 cluster in the development of spinal MDR-TB in Russian patients. PMID:25645851

  7. Tuberculous Spondylitis in Russia and Prominent Role of Multidrug-Resistant Clone Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing B0/W148

    PubMed Central

    Solovieva, Natalia; Mushkin, Alexander; Manicheva, Olga; Vishnevsky, Boris; Zhuravlev, Viacheslav; Narvskaya, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Extrapulmonary and, in particular, spinal tuberculosis (TB) constitutes a minor but significant part of the total TB incidence. In spite of this, almost no studies on the genetic diversity and drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from spinal TB patients have been published to date. Here, we report results of the first Russian and globally largest molecular study of M. tuberculosis isolates recovered from patients with tuberculous spondylitis (TBS). The majority of 107 isolates were assigned to the Beijing genotype (n = 80); the other main families were T (n = 11), Ural (n = 7), and LAM (n = 4). Multidrug resistance (MDR) was more frequently found among Beijing (90.5%) and, intriguingly, Ural (71.4%) isolates than other genotypes (5%; P < 0.001). The extremely drug-resistant (XDR) phenotype was exclusively found in the Beijing isolates (n = 7). A notable prevalence of the rpoB531 and katG315 mutations in Beijing strains that were similarly high in both TBS (this study) and published pulmonary TB (PTB) samples from Russia shows that TBS and PTB Beijing strains follow the same paradigm of acquisition of rifampin (RIF) and isoniazid (INH) resistance. The 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit–variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) subtyping of 80 Beijing isolates further discriminated them into 24 types (Hunter Gaston index [HGI] = 0.83); types 100-32 and 94-32 represented the largest groups. A genotype of Russian successful clone B0/W148 was identified in 30 of 80 Beijing isolates. In conclusion, this study highlighted a crucial impact of the Beijing genotype and the especially prominent role of its MDR-associated successful clone B0/W148 cluster in the development of spinal MDR-TB in Russian patients. PMID:25645851

  8. [Gout in the past and uric arthritis today in Croatia] ].

    PubMed

    Cunovi?, S; Cunovi?-Dubroja, R

    2001-01-01

    In the past, gout was well known in these places, from Istria to Dubrovnik. Our very first dictionaries also witness about gout. Old doctors from Krapinske Toplice had also written about gout. Dr Edmund Mai, in his article published in "Lijecnicki vjesnik" in 1904 mentions "171 cases of uric arthritis". But, after that, for long 60 years there wasn't even a word about our patients, except surprise on very high incidence of the disease in the past. Even our handbooks had claimed that uric arthritis is not common in our country. In 1964 after 60 years of silence, the first article about our patients with uric arthritis, was published in "Lijecnicki vjesnik". These patients were medically treated for average of 13 years, and still were misdiagnosed. After that article, the numbers of patients with gout and articles on uric arthritis permanently rise. Today, the incidence of gout in Croatia is similar to that in other European countries. PMID:11845585

  9. Treatment in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kasapçopur, Özgür; Barut, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of the childhood with the highest risk of disability. Active disease persists in the adulthood in a significant portion of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis despite many developments in the diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, initiation of efficient treatment in the early period of the disease may provide faster control of the inflammation and prevention of long-term harms. In recent years, treatment options have also increased in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis owing to biological medications. All biological medications used in children have been produced to target the etiopathogenesis leading to disease including anti-tumor necrosis factor, anti-interleukin 1 and anti-interleukin 6 drugs. In this review, scientific data about biological medications used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options will be discussed. PMID:26078691

  10. Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2000 1999 Spotlight on Research 2014 September 2014 Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis Two types of antibody molecules act in concert to stimulate inflammation in ...

  11. Septic arthritis of the shoulder in a dental patient.

    PubMed

    Dolin, Elana; Perlmutter, Leigh D; Segelnick, Stuart L; Weinberg, Mea A; Schoor, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Septic arthritis of the glenohumoral joint is rare following dental procedures, comprising approximately 3% of all joint infections. Septic arthritis following bacteremia from dental procedures is uncommon and generally occurs in prosthetic joints. Predisposing causes may include immunocompromising diseases such as diabetes, HIV infection, renal failure and intravenous drug abuse. We report a rare case of unilateral glenohumoral joint septic arthritis in a 60-year-old male patient (without a prosthetic joint) secondary to a dental procedure. The insidious nature of the presentation is highlighted. Septic arthritis infections, though rare, require a high level of clinical suspicion. Vague symptoms of shoulder pain may mask the initial diagnosis, as was the case in our patient. Incision and drainage via surgical intervention are often required, followed by parenteral antibiotics. PMID:25647886

  12. Patient education and self-management programs in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Richard H; Spinks, Jean M; Wicks, Ian P

    2004-03-01

    Arthritis self-management programs (ASMPs) are integrated into many clinical practice guidelines and policies, and are the core business of Arthritis Foundations. Australian Arthritis Foundations are embarking on a National Quality Assurance Program which should raise awareness and improve confidence in such programs. ASMPs aim to empower people, improve quality of life while living with chronic disease, increase healthy activities and improve self-monitoring - each of which can assist with clinical management, but can be difficult to evaluate. Although there is modest high-quality evidence of traditional "clinical outcomes" from ASMPs, these programs are strongly endorsed by consumers, are being used as a vehicle for healthcare reform, and have the potential to substantially improve public health. Coordinated national delivery of patient education programs has the potential to improve healthcare and outcomes for people with arthritis. PMID:14984359

  13. Biomarkers for rheumatoid arthritis: Making it personal

    PubMed Central

    Lindstrom, Tamsin M.; Robinson, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Effective treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been hampered by the heterogeneity of the disease. Although early intervention can result in disease remission, it requires early diagnosis – and current diagnostic tests are not sufficiently accurate or sensitive in the early stages of RA. As a result, RA is typically diagnosed only once damage to the joints has already begun, a time at which the window for optimal treatment may have been missed. Furthermore, a significant proportion of RA patients do not respond to any given therapeutic. Research efforts are increasingly focused on discovery of biomarkers that enable early diagnosis and stratification of RA, and thus the implementation of timely, targeted therapy. Biomarkers have the potential to transform the management of RA by enabling not only early diagnosis, but also assessment and prediction of disease severity, selection of therapy, and monitoring of response to therapy. In this mini review, we discuss the development of molecular biomarkers for RA. PMID:20515283

  14. Emerging role of leptin in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, G; Liang, J-N; Wang, Z-Y; Zhou, D

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested the importance of leptin against autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS) and psoriasis. To summarize our current understanding of the role of leptin in inflammatory responses and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a systematic review was conducted to assess the discrepancy of leptin in RA and its effect on immunity according to different studies. Recently, emerging data have indicated that leptin is involved in the pathological function of RA, which is common in autoimmune disorders. This review discusses the possible consequences of leptin levels in RA. Blocking the key signal pathways of leptin and inhibiting the leptin activity-like leptin antagonist may be a promising way for potential therapeutic treatment of RA at risk of detrimental effects. However, leptin was increased in patients with RA and may also regulate joint damage. Thus, more understanding of the mechanism of leptin in RA would be advantageous in the future. PMID:24802245

  15. Galectins in the Pathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song; Yu, Yangsheng; Koehn, Christopher D; Zhang, Zhixin; Su, Kaihong

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex and common systemic autoimmune disease characterized by synovial inflammation and hyperplasia. Multiple proteins, cells, and pathways have been identified to contribute to the pathogenesis of RA. Galectins are a group of lectins that bind to ?-galactoside carbohydrates on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix. They are expressed in a wide variety of tissues and organs with the highest expression in the immune system. Galectins are potent immune regulators and modulate a range of pathological processes, such as inflammation, autoimmunity, and cancer. Accumulated evidence shows that several family members of galectins play positive or negative roles in the disease development of RA, through their effects on T and B lymphocytes, myeloid lineage cells, and fibroblast-like synoviocytes. In this review, we will summarize the function of different galectins in immune modulation and their distinct roles in RA pathogenesis. PMID:24416634

  16. Effect of yogic package on rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay Kumar; Bhandari, R B; Rana, Budhi Bal

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at studying the effect of yogic package (YP) with some selected pranayama, cleansing practices and meditation on pain intensity, inflammation, stiffness, pulse rate (PR), blood pressure (BP), lymphocyte count (LC), C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum uric acid (UA) level among subjects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Randomized control group design was employed to generate pre and post data on participants and controls. Repealed Measure ANOVAs with Bonferroni adjustment were applied to check significant overall difference among pre and post means of participants and controls by using PASW (SPSS Inc. 18th Version). Observed result favored statistically significant positive effect of YP on selected RA parameters and symptoms under study at P<0.05, 0.01 and 0.001 respectively that showed remarkable improvement in RA severity after 40-day practice of YP. It concluded that YP is a significant means to reduce intensity of RA. PMID:23362725

  17. Cicatricial Ectropion Secondary to Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Gracitelli, Carolina P. B.; Osaki, Tammy Hentona; Valdrighi, Natalia Yumi; Viana, Giovanni André Pires; Osaki, Midori Hentona

    2015-01-01

    Ectropion is characterized by the eversion of the eyelid margin and the consequent exposure of the conjunctiva and cornea. The shortening of the anterior lamella of the lid causes cicatricial ectropion. We described a case of skin pathology causing cicatricial ectropion. The case is about a 68-year-old woman with a 2-year history of psoriatic arthritis. She complained of eyelid tearing and redness for two years. Due to the psoriasis, she presented a very dry skin, also in the periocular region, resulting in cicatricial ectropion. A skin graft was indicated to correct the eyelid malposition. Careful investigation should be performed in patients who have a skin disease that can lead to cicatricial ectropion. PMID:25810938

  18. Light scattering study of rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Beuthan, J; Netz, U; Minet, O; Mueller, G; Scheel, A; Henniger, J

    2002-11-30

    The distribution of light scattered by finger joints is studied in the near-IR region. It is shown that variations in the optical parameters of the tissue (scattering coefficient {mu}{sub s}, absorption coefficient {mu}{sub a}, and anisotropy factor g) depend on the presence of the rheumatoid arthritis (RA). At the first stage, the distribution of scattered light was measured in diaphanoscopic experiments. The convolution of a Gaussian error function with the scattering phase function proved to be a good approximation of the data obtained. Then, a new method was developed for the reconstruction of distribution of optical parameters in the finger cross section. Model tests of the quality of this reconstruction method show good results. (laser biology and medicine)

  19. The Wnt signaling pathway and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rabelo, Francieli de Sousa; da Mota, Licia Maria Henrique; Lima, Rodrigo Aires Corrêa; Lima, Francisco Aires Corrêa; Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Amato, Angélica Amorim

    2010-02-01

    The Wnt signaling pathways play a key role in cell renewal, and there are two such pathways. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the synovial membrane expresses genes such as Wnt and Fz at higher levels than those observed in patients without RA. The Wnt proteins are glycoproteins that bind to receptors of the Fz family on the cell surface. The Wnt/Fz complex controls tissue formation during embryogenesis, as well as throughout the process of limb development and joint formation. Recent studies have suggested that this signaling pathway plays a role in the pathophysiology of RA. Greater knowledge of the role of the Wnt signaling pathway in RA could improve understanding of the differences in RA clinical presentation and prognosis. Further studies should also focus on Wnt family members as molecular targets in the treatment of RA. PMID:19683077

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis: recommendations for treat to target.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Deborah; El Miedany, Yasser

    Integrating the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treat-to-target concept into standard clinical practice represents a challenge to health professionals. So far, this practice-changing approach has not been widely implemented, in spite of linking its outcome to payment, which was adopted in the best practice tariffs. The recently published revisions in classification criteria and updated recommendations for optimising the use of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic and biologic agents in the treatment of RA paved the way for re-evaluating the standard clinical care models in order to improve patient outcomes, prevent joint damage, and maintain patients' functional ability as well as their quality of life. This article discusses the recent advances in the management of RA and provides a set of recommendations to provide comprehensive guidance for treatment to target with the aim of improving the quality of care for RA patients. PMID:24690926

  1. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis using infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frize, Monique; Adéa, Cynthia; Payeur, Pierre; Di Primio, Gina; Karsh, Jacob; Ogungbemile, Abiola

    2011-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease causing pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function in joints; it is difficult to diagnose in early stages. An early diagnosis and treatment can delay the onset of severe disability. Infrared (IR) imaging offers a potential approach to detect changes in degree of inflammation. In 18 normal subjects and 13 patients diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), thermal images were collected from joints of hands, wrists, palms, and knees. Regions of interest (ROIs) were manually selected from all subjects and all parts imaged. For each subject, values were calculated from the temperature measurements: Mode/Max, Median/Max, Min/Max, Variance, Max-Min, (Mode-Mean), and Mean/Min. The data sets did not have a normal distribution, therefore non parametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis and Ranksum) were applied to assess if the data from the control group and the patient group were significantly different. Results indicate that: (i) thermal images can be detected on patients with the disease; (ii) the best joints to image are the metacarpophalangeal joints of the 2nd and 3rd fingers and the knees; the difference between the two groups was significant at the 0.05 level; (iii) the best calculations to differentiate between normal subjects and patients with RA are the Mode/Max, Variance, and Max-Min. We concluded that it is possible to reliably detect RA in patients using IR imaging. Future work will include a prospective study of normal subjects and patients that will compare IR results with Magnetic Resonance (MR) analysis.

  2. The Etiology of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato; Bosco, Annalisa; Esposito, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    Over the years, the commonly used term to describe juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has changed. By definition, JIA includes all types of arthritis with no apparent cause, lasting more than 6 weeks, in patients aged less than 16 years at onset. JIA pathogenesis is still poorly understood: the interaction between environmental factors and multiple genes has been proposed as the most relevant working mechanism to the development of JIA. The concept that various microbes that colonize or infect not only the mucosal surfaces, like the oral cavity, but also the airways and gut might trigger autoimmune processes, resulting in chronic arthritides, and JIA was first drafted at the outset of last century. JIA development might be initiated and sustained by the exposure to environmental factors, including infectious agents which affect people at a young age, depending on the underlying genetic predisposition to synovial inflammation. Many data from patients with JIA suggest a scenario in which different external antigens incite multiple antigen-specific pathways, cytotoxic T cell responses, activation of classical complement cascade, and production of proinflammatory cytokines. In this review, emphasis is paid not only to the potential role of parvovirus B19 and Epstein-Barr virus in primis but also to the general involvement of different bacteria as Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Campylobacter spp., Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Bartonella henselae, and Streptococcus pyogenes for the development of immune-mediated arthritides during childhood. No unequivocal evidence favoring or refuting these associations has been clearly proved, and today, the strict definition of JIA etiology remains unknown. The infection can represent a random event in a susceptible individual, or it can be a necessary factor in JIA development, always in combination with a peculiar genetic background. Further studies are needed in order to address the unsolved questions concerning this issue. PMID:25384710

  3. Auto-reactions, autoimmunity and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chimenti, Maria Sole; Triggianese, Paola; Nuccetelli, Marzia; Terracciano, Chiara; Crisanti, Anna; Guarino, Maria Domenica; Bernardini, Sergio; Perricone, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Evidence from the literature suggests that autoimmune processes may drive features of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Such hypothesis is supported by the evidence that class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are associated with susceptibility to develop PsA and auto-reactive cells, such as CD8 T cells, T helper (h) 17 and plasma cells, have been demonstrated in PsA. However, no autoantigens have ever been demonstrated in PsA. The presence of a new autoantibody system, anti-carbamylated protein (anti-CarP) antibodies, has been identified in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. These autoantibodies have been associated with a worse disease progression independent of anti-citrulline antibodies (ACPA). In PsA, anti-CarP antibodies have not been evaluated yet. We aimed at analyzing, for the first time, the anti-CarP antibodies in sera of patients with active PsA who were negative for ACPA in order to explore both their presence and their relationship with disease activity. A total of 70 individuals, 30 patients with diagnosis of PsA (according to CASPAR criteria) and 40 healthy controls (HC) were enrolled. We found significantly increased levels of anti-CarP antibodies in PsA patients compared with HC (P<0.0001). Our findings indicate that anti-CarP antibodies are detectable with high specificity and sensibility in PsA patients suggesting an autoimmune background of PsA. Anti-CarP antibodies can be useful in improving the diagnosis of PsA and are correlated with disease activity. PMID:26254734

  4. [Psoriatic Arthritis concomitant with Paget's Disease - a case report].

    PubMed

    Pereira, D; Cunha, I; Barcelos, A

    2014-01-01

    Paget disease of bone is a focal disorder of bone metabolism; it is characterized by an accelerated rate of bone remodeling, with profound changes in the bone structure, making it fragile. This condition affects approximately 2% to 5% of the population older than 40. The main clinical manifestations of Paget's disease are pain and bone deformity, although the majority of patients are asymptomatic. Psoriatic Arthritis is a spondyloarthritis with a prevalence of about 0,1%. It is characterized by the presence of arthritis, enthesitis and/or dactylitis associated with a familiar or personal history of psoriasis. Several clinical patterns of joint involvement in psoriatic arthritis have been identified, namely, the polyarticular pattern, similar to rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis precedes skin disease in approximately 13 to 17 % of the cases. The authors report a clinical case of a 60 years old patient with polyarthritis and dactylitis who was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis and Paget's disease of bone. The concomitance of the two entities, in the same individual, with so different pathogenesis and clinical features, have never been described on literature. Because of the complexity on the clinical and imaging evaluation as the result of the coexistence of both pathologies, the authors consider relevant to publish this singular case. PMID:25584620

  5. A patient with Lyme arthritis presenting in general practice.

    PubMed

    Mosshammer, Dirk; Hlobil, Harald; Joos, Stefanie; Reichert, Walter

    2013-02-01

    Lyme disease, also known as Lyme borreliosis, is caused by infection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (B. burgdorferi s.l.) complex, a Gram-negative spirochaete bacterium. Infection in humans takes place through tick bites. In principle, Lyme disease may affect every organ of the body and may manifest in different stages. Early localised or disseminated stages are characterised by erythema migrans, lymphadenosis benigna cutis, facial palsy and arthritis and the later stages by arthritis, acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans or encephalomyelitis. The incubation time of the earlier stages varies from several days to months and that of the later stages from weeks to months or even years. Lyme arthritis commonly manifests mono- or oligoarticularly (< 5 joints). Most frequently the knee joint is affected, followed by the ankle, wrist and elbow. The work-up of Lyme arthritis should include a careful history including residence in, or time spent visiting, an endemic region, previous history of tick bite(s), and erythema migrans. In order to confirm a diagnosis of Lyme arthritis clinical findings and specific IgG antibodies are necessary. A lack of IgG antibodies practically rules out Lyme arthritis. Antibodies can be detected even years after infection(s) in asymptomatic individuals with previous Lyme disease treated with antibiotics. In general, the prognosis of Lyme disease is assumed to be good, in particular after antibiotic therapy of early manifestations. PMID:23577517

  6. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.

  7. Prevalence of eye disease in Brazilian patients with psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Fernanda B. F.; Abalem, Maria Fernanda; Ruiz, Danilo G.; de A. F. Gomes, Beatriz; de Azevedo, Mário N. L.; Moraes, Haroldo V.; Yeskel, Ariyah Seth; Kara-Junior, Newton

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to report the type and frequency of ocular manifestations in Brazilian psoriatic arthritis patients. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in a Brazilian tertiary hospital. The test group included 40 patients who had psoriatic arthritis according to the Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis. A control group of 40 individuals was matched for age and gender. All of the patients underwent ophthalmic evaluation, which included best-corrected visual acuity, slit lamp and fundus examinations, and dry eye diagnostic tests (Schirmer I, tear break-up time and rose bengal). Demographic parameters were also evaluated. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 53.9±13.1 years; the mean disease duration was 8±10.5 years. Most of the patients were women (60%), and the majority had polyarticular disease (57.5%). Several ocular abnormalities were found, including punctate keratitis, pinguecula, blepharitis, pterygium, cataract, glaucoma, uveitis, and retinal microvascular abnormalities. There were no significant differences in the rates of these abnormalities compared with the control group, however. The Keratoconjunctivitis sicca and dry eye diagnostic tests were more often positive in the patients with psoriatic arthritis than in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, keratoconjunctivitis sicca was the most common ocular finding related to psoriatic arthritis. Therefore, we recommend early ophthalmologic evaluations for all psoriatic arthritis patients who complain of eye symptoms. PMID:22473406

  8. Lipopolysaccharide found in aseptic loosening of patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nalepka, Jennifer L; Lee, Michael J; Kraay, Matthew J; Marcus, Randall E; Goldberg, Victor M; Chen, Xin; Greenfield, Edward M

    2006-10-01

    Aseptic loosening of orthopaedic implants occurs in the absence of clinical signs of infection. Nevertheless, bacterial endotoxins derived from subclinical infections, systemic sources, or the implant manufacturing process may contribute to aseptic loosening. Also, the rate of implant infection is greater in patients with inflammatory arthritis than in patients with osteoarthritis. We hypothesized that lipopolysaccharide, the classic endotoxin derived from gram-negative bacteria, is more prevalent in periprosthetic tissue surrounding aseptically loose implants in patients with inflammatory arthritis than in patients with osteoarthritis. To test this, we used a modified Limulus amebocyte assay not affected by beta-glucan-like molecules in mammalian tissues. Lipopolysaccharide rarely was detected in periprosthetic tissue from patients with osteoarthritis and aseptic loosening (one of six patients). In contrast, lipopolysaccharide was detected despite the absence of any clinical signs of infection in peri-prosthetic tissue from all four patients with inflammatory arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus). Lipopolysaccharide also was detected in two patients with gram-negative infections, who were included as positive control subjects. Endotoxins derived from low-grade or systemic bacteremia may be important contributors to aseptic loosening particularly in patients with autoimmune conditions such as inflammatory arthritis. PMID:16735873

  9. Impact of the Arthritis Foundation’s Walk With Ease Program on Arthritis Symptoms in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Brooke; Mingo, Chivon A.; Waterman, Mary B.; White, Patience; Cleveland, Rebecca J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Inadequate program design and lack of access to evidence-based programs are major barriers to the management of chronic diseases such as arthritis, particularly for African Americans. This study evaluates the effectiveness of the Arthritis Foundation’s Walk With Ease Program (WWE) in a subsample of African Americans who were part of a larger study that established evidence of the program’s efficacy. Methods Participants were African Americans (N = 117) with self-reported arthritis who chose to participate in either a self-directed (n = 68) or group (n = 49) 6-week WWE program. Arthritis-related symptoms (ie, pain, fatigue, stiffness; measured using visual analog scales) were assessed at baseline, 6 weeks, and 1 year. Independent samples t tests were conducted to examine group differences (ie, self-directed vs group) in arthritis-related symptoms at baseline, and paired sample t tests were conducted to examine differences over time (ie, baseline to 6 weeks and baseline to 1 year) in symptoms. Satisfaction was examined by descriptive statistics. Results Younger, more educated individuals chose the self-directed format (P < .001, P = .008; respectively). After the 6-week intervention, participants reported a decrease in pain (P < .001), fatigue (P = .002), and stiffness (P < .001). At 1 year, the decrease in pain (P = .04) and stiffness (P = .002) remained constant. Overall, participants were satisfied with both program formats. Conclusion The individualized and group formats of the WWE program improved arthritis-related pain, fatigue, and stiffness in African Americans. Culturally appealing arthritis interventions ultimately may increase the use of existing arthritis interventions. PMID:25393747

  10. Insights into IL-37, the role in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wang-Dong; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by the impaired function and the destruction of tissues that are caused by an immune response in which aberrant antibodies are generated and attack the body's own cells and tissues. Interleukin (IL) -37, a new member of the IL-1 family, broadly reduces innate inflammation as well as acquired immune responses. Recently, studies have shown that expression of IL-37 was abnormal in autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriasis, Graves' disease (GD). In addition, functional analysis indicated that IL-37 is negatively involved in the development and pathogenesis of these autoimmune disorders. The strong association of this cytokine with autoimmune diseases promotes us to systematically review what had been published recently on the crucial nature of IL-37 in relation to autoimmune diseases gaining attention for its regulatory capability in these autoimmune disorders. PMID:26264940

  11. Consensus statement on surgical pathology of the aorta from the Society for Cardiovascular Pathology and the Association for European Cardiovascular Pathology: I. Inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Stone, James R; Bruneval, Patrick; Angelini, Annalisa; Bartoloni, Giovanni; Basso, Cristina; Batoroeva, Lubov; Buja, L Maximilian; Butany, Jagdish; d'Amati, Giulia; Fallon, John T; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; Gouveia, Rosa H; Halushka, Marc K; Kelly, Karen L; Kholova, Ivana; Leone, Ornella; Litovsky, Silvio H; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Miller, Dylan V; Mitchell, Richard N; Preston, Stephen D; Pucci, Angela; Radio, Stanley J; Rodriguez, E Rene; Sheppard, Mary N; Suvarna, S Kim; Tan, Carmela D; Thiene, Gaetano; van der Wal, Allard C; Veinot, John P

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the aorta include routine atherosclerosis, aortitis, periaortitis, and atherosclerosis with excessive inflammatory responses, such as inflammatory atherosclerotic aneurysms. The nomenclature and histologic features of these disorders are reviewed and discussed. In addition, diagnostic criteria are provided to distinguish between these disorders in surgical pathology specimens. An initial classification scheme is provided for aortitis and periaortitis based on the pattern of the inflammatory infiltrate: granulomatous/giant cell pattern, lymphoplasmacytic pattern, mixed inflammatory pattern, and the suppurative pattern. These inflammatory patterns are discussed in relation to specific systemic diseases including giant cell arteritis, Takayasu arteritis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's), rheumatoid arthritis, sarcoidosis, ankylosing spondylitis, Cogan syndrome, Behçet's disease, relapsing polychondritis, syphilitic aortitis, and bacterial and fungal infections. PMID:26051917

  12. Perioperative Complications in Patients with Inflammatory Arthropathy Undergoing Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Schnaser, Erik A; Browne, James A; Padgett, Douglas E; Figgie, Mark P; D'Apuzzo, Michele R

    2015-09-01

    Little data exists comparing acute post-operative outcomes in patients with different types of inflammatory arthritis (IA) after undergoing a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Our objectives were to compare perioperative complications and determine the most common complications between the different IA subtypes compared with patients with osteoarthritis undergoing primary TKA. We found significant differences when comparing complications within the different subtypes of IA. RA patients, despite having a greater number of comorbidities had a reduced rate of medical complications postoperatively compared to the OA cohort. All of the inflammatory subtypes had a higher rate of orthopedic complications postoperatively compared to the OA group except for patients with AS. However, ankylosing spondylitis had the highest mortality rate as well as medical complication rate among the subtypes. PMID:26111792

  13. [CT imaging features of pulmonary involvement in connective tissue disorders].

    PubMed

    Brillet, P Y; Mama, N; Nunes, H; Uzunhan, Y; Abbad, S; Brauner, M W

    2009-11-01

    Connective tissue disorders correspond to a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases characterized by abnormal immune system activity leading to connective tissue alterations in multiple parts of the body. In adults, connective tissue disorders include rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, Sjögren syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis and polymyositis, ankylosing spondylitis, and mixed connective tissue disease. Broncho-pulmonary involvement may be variable with involvement of all anatomical components of the lung. Involvement of other intrathoracic structures (pleura, respiratory muscles, heart, rib cage) is frequent. The most specific manifestations include interstitial lung diseases and pulmonary hypertension. During follow-up, progressive respiratory diseases may occur due to the treatment, infections, pulmonary embolism or neoplasms. PMID:19953077

  14. Interstitial lung diseases associated with collagen vascular diseases: radiologic and histopathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun A; Lee, Kyung Soo; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kim, Tae Sung; Suh, Gee Young; Kwon, O Jung; Han, Joungho

    2002-10-01

    Collagen vascular diseases that demonstrate features of interstitial lung disease include systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis and polymyositis, ankylosing spondylitis, Sjögren syndrome, and mixed connective tissue disease. At histopathologic analysis, interstitial lung diseases associated with collagen vascular diseases are diverse and include nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, usual interstitial pneumonia, bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP), apical fibrosis, diffuse alveolar damage, and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia. Although proportions of interstitial pneumonias vary, nonspecific interstitial pneumonia accounts for a large proportion, especially in progressive systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis and polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. The more favorable prognosis in interstitial pneumonia associated with collagen vascular diseases than in idiopathic interstitial pneumonias may be explained by the larger proportion of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia than of usual interstitial pneumonia. High-resolution computed tomography seems to help characterize and determine the extent of interstitial lung disease in collagen vascular diseases. PMID:12376608

  15. The Prevalence of Fibromyalgia in Other Chronic Pain Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yunus, Muhammad B.

    2012-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes (CSS) include fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), irritable bowel syndrome, temporomandibular disorder, restless legs syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, and other similar chronic painful conditions that are based on central sensitization (CS). CSS are mutually associated. In this paper, prevalence of FMS among other members of CSS has been described. An important recent recognition is an increased prevalence of FMS in other chronic pain conditions with structural pathology, for example, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus, ankylosing spondylitis, osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Diagnosis and proper management of FMS among these diseases are of crucial importance so that unwarranted use of such medications as corticosteroids can be avoided, since FMS often occurs when RA or SLE is relatively mild. PMID:22191024

  16. Trait emotional intelligence and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sebastiano; Petrides, K V; Tillmann, Taavi

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have become increasingly interested in the psychological aspects of inflammatory disorders. Within this line of research, the present study compares the trait emotional intelligence (trait EI) profiles of 827 individuals with various inflammatory conditions (rheumatoid arthritis [RA], ankylosing spondylitis, multiple sclerosis, and RA plus one comorbidity) against 496 healthy controls. Global trait EI scores did not show significant differences between these groups, although some differences were observed when comparisons were carried out against alternative control groups. Significant differences were found on the trait EI factors of Well-being (where the healthy group scored higher than the RA group) and Sociability (where the healthy group scored higher than both the RA group and the RA plus one comorbidity group). The discussion centers on the multifarious links and interplay between emotions and inflammatory conditions. PMID:23725416

  17. Combined Treatment of Wrist and Trapeziometacarpal Joint Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Waitzenegger, Thomas; Leclercq, Caroline; Masmejean, Emmanuel; Lenoir, Hubert; Harir, Amir; Coulet, Bertrand; Chammas, Michel

    2015-11-01

    Background?Combined thumb basal and wrist joint arthritis (excluding scaphotrapeziotrapezoid arthritis) is rare considering the frequency of arthritis of either joint alone. Combined surgical treatment has never been described in the literature. Furthermore, the scaphoidectomy common to all interventions for Watson stage 2 or 3 wrist arthritis theoretically makes it impossible to perform a trapeziectomy for thumb basal joint arthritis. Question/Purpose?The aim of this study was to present and analyze the results of two types of surgical treatment when both wrist and thumb arthritis was present. Materials and Methods?Our retrospective series included 11 patients suffering from Eaton Stage III thumb basal joint arthritis and scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) II and III-type wrist arthritis. Five patients (group A) underwent trapeziectomy and palliative surgery for their wrist with conservation of the distal pole of the scaphoid (one proximal row carpectomy [PRC] and four four-corner fusions), and six (group B) patients had a trapeziometacarpal arthroplasty either with PRC (two cases) or four-corner arthrodesis (four cases) including total scaphoidectomy. Results?The mean follow-up was 57 months. The overall visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain was 1.5 at rest, with no difference between the trapeziectomy and arthroplasty groups. The average Kapandji score was 9.3 (9 in group A and 9.5 in group B). The flexion/extension range of motion for the wrist was 64° following four-corner arthrodesis and 75° following PRC. Only one case of algodystrophy was observed. The radiological analysis revealed no complications. Discussion?This study shows that thumb basal joint arthritis and SLAC type wrist arthritis may be treated by combined treatment during the same intervention without any complications. The results of palliative surgery for the wrist, either with trapeziectomy or with a trapeziometacarpal arthroplasty, are comparable. With a trapeziectomy, the distal pole of the scaphoid must be fused to the capitate to help stabilize the thumb column. Level of Evidence?Level IV. PMID:26539328

  18. Integrated Analyses of Gene Expression Profiles Digs out Common Markers for Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Wu, Long-Fei; Lu, Xin; Mo, Xing-Bo; Tang, Zai-Xiang; Lei, Shu-Feng; Deng, Fei-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Rheumatic diseases have some common symptoms. Extensive gene expression studies, accumulated thus far, have successfully identified signature molecules for each rheumatic disease, individually. However, whether there exist shared factors across rheumatic diseases has yet to be tested. Methods We collected and utilized 6 public microarray datasets covering 4 types of representative rheumatic diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, and osteoarthritis. Then we detected overlaps of differentially expressed genes across datasets and performed a meta-analysis aiming at identifying common differentially expressed genes that discriminate between pathological cases and normal controls. To further gain insights into the functions of the identified common differentially expressed genes, we conducted gene ontology enrichment analysis and protein-protein interaction analysis. Results We identified a total of eight differentially expressed genes (TNFSF10, CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, TXN, TIA1, PRKCH, PRF1), each associated with at least 3 of the 4 studied rheumatic diseases. Meta-analysis warranted the significance of the eight genes and highlighted the general significance of four genes (CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, and PRF1). Protein-protein interaction and gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the eight genes interact with each other to exert functions related to immune response and immune regulation. Conclusion The findings support that there exist common factors underlying rheumatic diseases. For rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis and osteoarthritis diseases, those common factors include TNFSF10, CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, TXN, TIA1, PRKCH, and PRF1. In-depth studies on these common factors may provide keys to understanding the pathogenesis and developing intervention strategies for rheumatic diseases. PMID:26352601

  19. New Insights Found in Pain Processing and Sleep Disturbance Among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have lower thresholds for pain and may have deficits in a central nervous system (CNS) mechanism that helps to modulate how the ...

  20. 77 FR 4051 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

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  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  1. Involvement of 15-lipoxygenase in the inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Yueh; Lin, Tzu-Hung; Chiu, Yung-Cheng; Liou, Houng-Chi; Yang, Rong-Sen; Fu, Wen-Mei

    2012-07-01

    15-Lipoxygenase (15-LOX) is involved in many pathological processes. The aim of this study is to examine the role of 15-LOX in the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and inflammatory arthritis. It was found that treatment of 15-LOX downstream product of 15-(S)-HETE (15-S-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid) increased the mRNA and protein levels of MMP-2 in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblast (RASF) derived from rheumatoid arthritis patients. The enhancement effect of 15-(S)-HETE was antagonized by the addition of LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor) and PDTC (NF-?B inhibitor). Treatment of 15-(S)-HETE increased the phosphorylation of AKT, nuclear translocation of p65 and the breakdown of I?B?. TNF-? and IL-1? are the key cytokines involved in arthritis and also increase the activity of MMP-2 in RASF, which was antagonized by pretreatment with 15-LOX inhibitor PD146176 or knockdown of 15-LOX. It was also found that these two cytokines increased the expression of 15-LOX in RASF. Treatment of glucocorticoid but not NSAIDs inhibited 15-(S)-HETE-induced expression of MMP-2. In comparison with wild-type mice, adjuvant-induced arthritis and MMP-2 expression in synovial membrane were markedly inhibited in 15-LOX knockout (KO) mice. These results indicate that 15-LOX plays an important role in the disease progression of arthritis and may be involved in the inflammatory action induced by TNF-? and IL-1?. 15-LOX is thus a good target for developing drugs in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:22573549

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  3. Computer-aided diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis with optical tomography, Part

    E-print Network

    Hielscher, Andreas

    Computer-aided diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis with optical tomography, Part 2: image H. Hielscher #12;Computer-aided diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis with optical tomography, Part 2) for diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A comprehensive analysis of techniques for the classification of DOT

  4. Genome-wide association study meta-analysis identifies 7 novel rheumatoid arthritis risk loci

    E-print Network

    de Bakker, Paul

    ! "! Genome-wide association study meta-analysis identifies 7 novel rheumatoid arthritis risk loci. Genetics and Genomics Branch, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, US National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. 5. Arthritis Research Campaign (arc

  5. Computer-aided diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis with optical tomography, Part

    E-print Network

    Shepard, Kenneth

    Computer-aided diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis with optical tomography, Part 1: feature H. Hielscher #12;Computer-aided diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis with optical tomography, Part 1 to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are presented. Feature extraction is the focus of Part 1, while

  6. Appreciating the Predicament of Housebound Older Adults with Arthritis: Portrait of a Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nour, Kareen; Laforest, Sophie; Gignac, Monique; Gauvin, Lise

    2005-01-01

    This paper draws a socio-demographic, physical, psychosocial, and behavioural profile of housebound older adults with arthritis and compares older adults with rheumatoid arthritis to those with osteoarthritis. Data from 125 housebound older adults with osteoarthritis (65%) or rheumatoid arthritis (35%) were compared to published samples and to…

  7. Combinatorial Analysis of Disease Association and Susceptibility for Rheumatoid Arthritis SNP Data

    E-print Network

    Zelikovsky, Alexander

    Combinatorial Analysis of Disease Association and Susceptibility for Rheumatoid Arthritis SNP Data Problem Set 2) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) trying to check if it is caused by combinations of several Problem 2 (Rheumatoid Arthritis). 2 Combinatorial Methods for Disease Association Search Here we follow

  8. Evaluation of Fourier Transform Coefficients for The Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis From Diffuse Optical Tomography Images

    E-print Network

    Hielscher, Andreas

    Evaluation of Fourier Transform Coefficients for The Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis From Diffuse: Diffuse Optical Tomography, Computer-Aided Diagnosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis 1. INTRODUCTION Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder that affects 0.5-1.0% of adults in industrialized countries

  9. Preliminary Results of Severity of Illness Measures of Rheumatoid Arthritis Using Infrared Imaging

    E-print Network

    Payeur, Pierre

    Preliminary Results of Severity of Illness Measures of Rheumatoid Arthritis Using Infrared Imaging with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by a rheumatologist. The ultimate goal is to create a low cost effective method- infrared imaging; measuring temperatures; rheumatoid arthritis patients; normal subjects. I. INTRODUCTION

  10. The Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Gene, LBH, Regulates Growth in Fibroblast-like Synoviocytes

    E-print Network

    Wang, Wei

    The Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Gene, LBH, Regulates Growth in Fibroblast-like Synoviocytes Anna pathology in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Currently, no treatment specifically targets these aggressive cells@ucsd.edu) Conflict of interest: The authors have declared that no conflict of interest exists. Full Length Arthritis

  11. Divergent T-Cell Cytokine Patterns in Inflammatory Arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, A. K.; Seipelt, E.; Sieper, J.

    1994-08-01

    A major immunoregulatory mechanism in inflammatory infections and allergic diseases is the control of the balance of cytokines secreted by Th1/Th2 subsets of T helper (Th) cells. This might also be true in autoimmune diseases; a Th2 pattern that prevents an effective immune response in infections with intracellular bacteria may favor immunosuppression in autoimmune diseases. The pattern of cytokine expression was compared in the synovial tissue from patients with a typical autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and with a disorder with similar synovial pathology but driven by persisting exogenous antigen, reactive arthritis. We screened 12 rheumatoid and 9 reactive arthritis synovial tissues by PCR and in situ hybridization for their expression of T-cell cytokines. The cytokine pattern differs significantly between the two diseases; rheumatoid arthritis samples express a Th1-like pattern whereas in reactive arthritis interferon ? expression is accompanied by that of interleukin 4. Studying the expression of cytokines by in situ hybridization confirmed the results found by PCR; they also show an extremely low frequency of cytokine-transcribing cells. In a double-staining experiment, it was demonstrated that interleukin 4 is made by CD4 cells. These experiments favor the possibility of therapeutic intervention in inflammatory rheumatic diseases by means of inhibitory cytokines.

  12. Daily Symptom Management Practices for Arthritis Used by Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Sara A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Neiberg, Rebecca H.; Lang, Wei; Altizer, Kathryn; Bell, Ronny A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This article describes the daily self-management practices of older adults with arthritis and examines the association of symptom experience with the use of self-management behaviors. Method 197 African American and White participants completed a baseline interview and six sets of three follow-up daily-diary interviews at monthly intervals. Results Arthritis was reported by 63.5%. Arthritis self-management reported included complementary therapies, over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications, foods or beverages, and home remedies. Odds of implementing these self-care practices were greater on days with joint pain, swelling, and stiffness. Although, 78.0% and 72.4% of all participants reported staying in bed or cutting back on activities in response to joint symptoms, these self-management activities were not associated with having arthritis. Conclusions Focusing on daily responses to symptoms demonstrates that older adults actively manage arthritis symptoms using a wide variety of measures, including complementary therapies. PMID:22173224

  13. Epidemiology of Rheumatoid Arthritis in Southern Albania

    PubMed Central

    Koko, Vjollca; Ndrepepa, Ana; Skenderaj, Skender

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence, incidence and the burden of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the Southern Albania. Material and Methods: This is an epidemiologic observational study with cross-sectional analyses of all patients with RA who lived in Southern Albania during the 1995-2011 years. The RA prevalence, incidence and disability-adjusted life years (DALY) were assessed. Results: During the 1995-2011 years, 194 patients (154 females and 40 males) with RA living in Southern Albania were identified. The prevalence of RA in 2011 was 0.25% in general population and 0.34% in adult (>14 years) population. The incidence of RA in 2011 was 0.012% (12 new cases per 100000 inhabitants) and 0.016% (16 new cases per 100000 adults). The prevalence increased (from 0.036% in 1996 to 0.25% in 2011) and the incidence did not change over the study period. The mortality was 3.2% (n=7 deaths). The DALY due to RA was 823 years per 100000 inhabitants during 1995-2011 years. Conclusion: RA in Southern Albania has a prevalence of 0.25 % and an annual incidence of 0.012% in the general population in 2011. RA was responsible for a considerable burden on the health of population during the 1995-2011 years. PMID:26236163

  14. Fragility Fractures in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Del Puente, Antonio; Esposito, Antonella; Costa, Luisa; Benigno, Carla; Del Puente, Aurora; Foglia, Francesca; Oriente, Alfonso; Bottiglieri, Paolo; Caso, Francesco; Scarpa, Raffaele

    2015-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) can have peculiar effects on bone, including mechanisms of bone loss such as erosions, but also of bone formation, such as ankylosis or periostitis. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence of fractures in patients with PsA as compared to healthy controls and to investigate determinants of fractures among cases. For both cases and controls, radiographs were read to identify vertebral fractures (VF), and the presence of femoral neck or other nonvertebral fractures was obtained from patients' medical history. The prevalence of fragility fractures on radiographic readings did not differ between cases and controls. The number of subjects showing a VF was 33 (36%) among PsA patients and 36 (36%) among controls, with a prevalence of severe VF of 8% among cases and 4% among controls. Controlling for covariates in a logistic model, the only variables showing a significant correlation with the presence of nonvertebral fractures (NVF) were disease duration (p = 0.02), age (p = 0.03), and bone mineral density at femoral neck (inverse correlation, p = 0.04). Fractures should be carefully considered when evaluating the global picture of the patient with PsA for their contribution to the "fragility" profile. PMID:26523054

  15. T Cell Migration in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mellado, Mario; Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Cascio, Graciela; Lucas, Pilar; Pablos, José L; Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation in joints, associated with synovial hyperplasia and with bone and cartilage destruction. Although the primacy of T cell-related events early in the disease continues to be debated, there is strong evidence that autoantigen recognition by specific T cells is crucial to the pathophysiology of rheumatoid synovitis. In addition, T cells are key components of the immune cell infiltrate detected in the joints of RA patients. Initial analysis of the cytokines released into the synovial membrane showed an imbalance, with a predominance of proinflammatory mediators, indicating a deleterious effect of Th1 T cells. There is nonetheless evidence that Th17 cells also play an important role in RA. T cells migrate from the bloodstream to the synovial tissue via their interactions with the endothelial cells that line synovial postcapillary venules. At this stage, selectins, integrins, and chemokines have a central role in blood cell invasion of synovial tissue, and therefore in the intensity of the inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the mechanisms involved in T cell attraction to the joint, the proteins involved in their extravasation from blood vessels, and the signaling pathways activated. Knowledge of these processes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanism by which the systemic immune response causes local joint disorders and will help to provide a molecular basis for therapeutic strategies. PMID:26284069

  16. Immunological patterns in monoarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Agosti, E; Radillo, O; Narchi, G; Lepore, L; De Manzini, A; Vidoni, L; Gazzola, G; Tedesco, F

    1988-01-01

    Seven pediatric patients with monoarticular arthritis, three of whom had a recent onset form and the remaining four a disease of longer duration, were examined for possible modifications of their immunological parameters. The diagnosis of JRA was made on all these patients according to the ARA criteria after a follow-up of at least two years. Humoral and cellular abnormalities of the immune system were searched for in peripheral blood, synovial fluid and synovial membrane. No evidence for complement consumption and for increased levels of immune-complexes was found in the sera and in the synovial fluids of these patients, who were all seronegative. Some patients had antinuclear antibodies in their sera and synovial fluids. With regard to the lymphocyte distribution, whereas only some patients had an increased number of circulating B cells, the majority had a decreased CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the synovial fluid compared to the ratio found in the peripheral blood. A massive infiltration of CD4+ cells and macrophages and the presence of a substantial number of OKT9+ cells was found in the synovial membranes. PMID:3263241

  17. Arthritis in a glyptodont (Mammalia, Xenarthra, Cingulata).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Fernando Henrique de Souza; Porpino, Kleberson de Oliveira; Fragoso, Ana Bernadete Lima; Oliveira, Edison Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Arthritic lesions have been frequently diagnosed in the fossil record, with spondyloarthropathy (a type of erosive and pan-mammalian arthritis) being one of the most common types described to date for mammals, though not restricted to this group. Here, we identify spondyloarthropathy in fossil bones from the late Pleistocene in Brazil assignable to a large glyptodont individual. Bone erosions in the peripheral joints (viz., the ulna, radius, left femur and tibiae-fibulae) associated with osteosclerosis allow the diagnosis of spondyloarthropathy. The presence of osteophytes in seven bones of the forelimbs (viz., the ulna and radius) and hind limbs (viz., the tibiae-fibulae, left femur and patellae) and a subchondral cyst in one element (viz., the left femur) indicate secondary osteoarthritis. A calcified deposition on the articular surface of the left patella indicates the presence of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, which, like the observed osteoarthritic alterations, likely represents a complication of spondyloarthropathy. This is the first report of spondyloarthropathy for xenarthrans. PMID:24551126

  18. Arthritis in a Glyptodont (Mammalia, Xenarthra, Cingulata)

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Fernando Henrique de Souza; Porpino, Kleberson de Oliveira; Fragoso, Ana Bernadete Lima; Oliveira, Edison Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Arthritic lesions have been frequently diagnosed in the fossil record, with spondyloarthropathy (a type of erosive and pan-mammalian arthritis) being one of the most common types described to date for mammals, though not restricted to this group. Here, we identify spondyloarthropathy in fossil bones from the late Pleistocene in Brazil assignable to a large glyptodont individual. Bone erosions in the peripheral joints (viz., the ulna, radius, left femur and tibiae-fibulae) associated with osteosclerosis allow the diagnosis of spondyloarthropathy. The presence of osteophytes in seven bones of the forelimbs (viz., the ulna and radius) and hind limbs (viz., the tibiae-fibulae, left femur and patellae) and a subchondral cyst in one element (viz., the left femur) indicate secondary osteoarthritis. A calcified deposition on the articular surface of the left patella indicates the presence of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, which, like the observed osteoarthritic alterations, likely represents a complication of spondyloarthropathy. This is the first report of spondyloarthropathy for xenarthrans. PMID:24551126

  19. Prevention of Stroke in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zha, Alicia M; Di Napoli, Mario; Behrouz, Réza

    2015-12-01

    The risk of cerebrovascular disease is increased among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and remains an underserved area of medical need. Only a minor proportion of RA patients achieve suitable stroke prevention. Classical cardiovascular risk factors appear to be under-diagnosed and undertreated among patients with RA. Reducing the inflammatory burden is also necessary to lower the cardiovascular risk. An adequate control of disease activity and cerebrovascular risk assessment using national guidelines should be recommended for all patients with RA. For patients with a documented history of cerebrovascular or cardiovascular risk factors, smoking cessation and corticosteroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs at the lowest dose possible are crucial. Risk score models should be adapted for patients with RA by introducing a 1.5 multiplication factor, and their results interpreted to appropriately direct clinical care. Statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin-II receptor blockers are preferred treatment options. Biologic and non-biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs should be initiated early to mitigate the necessity of symptom control drugs and to achieve early alleviation of the inflammatory state. Early control can improve vascular compliance, decrease atherosclerosis, improve overall lipid and metabolic profiles, and reduce the incidence of heart disease that may lead to atrial fibrillation. In patients with significant cervical spine involvement, early intervention and improved disease control are necessary and may prevent further mechanical vascular injury. PMID:26486791

  20. [Exotic viral arthritis: role of alphavirus].

    PubMed

    Jeandel, P; Josse, R; Durand, J P

    2004-01-01

    Only six of the many alphavirus known to affect humans can cause articular manifestations. They are the Ross River and Barmah Forest viruses from the South Pacific, the Chikungunya, O'Nyong Nyong and Sindbis viruses from tropical Africa, and the Mayaro virus from South America. In most cases, articular manifestations involve arthralgia or transient arthritis and are usually minor. However in some cases especially involving Ross River virus acute polyarthritis may be the most prominent clinical feature and even develop before fever. Although these joint symptoms may be severe and persist for weeks or months in a subacute mode with slightly inflammatory episodes that can be relieved using analgesics, they never cause permanent damage. Differential diagnosis of alphavirsus-related polyarthritis is simple to diagnosis especially in epidemic outbreaks as is frequently the case for Ross River virus epidemics in Australia. Imported cases should be suspected in patients presenting acute or subacute polyarthritis after a recent stay of any length of time in a tropical country and can be confirmed by ordering serology from a specialized reference laboratory. PMID:15224565

  1. T Cell Migration in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mellado, Mario; Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Cascio, Graciela; Lucas, Pilar; Pablos, José L.; Rodríguez-Frade, José Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation in joints, associated with synovial hyperplasia and with bone and cartilage destruction. Although the primacy of T cell-related events early in the disease continues to be debated, there is strong evidence that autoantigen recognition by specific T cells is crucial to the pathophysiology of rheumatoid synovitis. In addition, T cells are key components of the immune cell infiltrate detected in the joints of RA patients. Initial analysis of the cytokines released into the synovial membrane showed an imbalance, with a predominance of proinflammatory mediators, indicating a deleterious effect of Th1 T cells. There is nonetheless evidence that Th17 cells also play an important role in RA. T cells migrate from the bloodstream to the synovial tissue via their interactions with the endothelial cells that line synovial postcapillary venules. At this stage, selectins, integrins, and chemokines have a central role in blood cell invasion of synovial tissue, and therefore in the intensity of the inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the mechanisms involved in T cell attraction to the joint, the proteins involved in their extravasation from blood vessels, and the signaling pathways activated. Knowledge of these processes will lead to a better understanding of the mechanism by which the systemic immune response causes local joint disorders and will help to provide a molecular basis for therapeutic strategies. PMID:26284069

  2. [Management of rheumatoid arthritis medications and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Funakubo Asanuma, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects mainly women during their childbearing years. As aging of childbirth advances in Japan, women who plan pregnancy would increase after they developed RA. Recent findings showed that high disease activity of RA might impair fertility. Planning pregnancy is preferable after female patients achive and maintain low disease activity or remission of RA. Women on methotrexate, which is the anchor drug for RA, need to discontinue the medication with a high risk of causing birth defects during conception and pregnancy. Data of RA patients exposed TNF inhibitors during pregnancy has been accumulating in recent years. These data suggest that increased risk of spontaneous abortion and congenital abnomalies has not been observed. Although there is insufficient data about safety of breastfeeding while using TNF inhibitors, the secretion of the drugs in breast milk is very little and fetal toxicity has not been observed. Since long term safety of children exposed TNF inhibitors in uterus has not been established, we should discontinue the drugs as soon as pregnancy is recognized. TNF inhibitors may be an useful tools for management of active RA resistant to conventional DMARDs in women who desire to bear children. PMID:25765688

  3. Bone remodelling markers in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fardellone, Patrice; Séjourné, Alice; Paccou, Julien; Goëb, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Bone loss in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients results from chronic inflammation and can lead to osteoporosis and fractures. A few bone remodeling markers have been studied in RA witnessing bone formation (osteocalcin), serum aminoterminal propeptide of type I collagen (PINP), serum carboxyterminal propeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), osteocalcin (OC), and bone resorption: C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (I-CTX), N-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (I-NTX), pyridinolines (DPD and PYD), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). Bone resorption can be seen either in periarticular bone (demineralization and erosion) or in the total skeleton (osteoporosis). Whatever the location, bone resorption results from activation of osteoclasts when the ratio between osteoprotegerin and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (OPG/RANKL) is decreased under influence of various proinflammatory cytokines. Bone remodeling markers also allow physicians to evaluate the effect of drugs used in RA like biologic agents, which reduce inflammation and exert a protecting effect on bone. We will discuss in this review changes in bone markers remodeling in patients with RA treated with biologics. PMID:24839355

  4. Biologicals in rheumatoid arthritis: current and future

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Ali Berkant; Feist, Eugen; Burmester, Gerd-R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the review is to highlight the current knowledge about established and new biologicals and to summarise recent advances by focusing on comparative efficacy, safety and possible discontinuation of treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Up to now, comparative analyses showed only minor differences with respect to efficacy and safety among the established biologicals. Studies confirmed the excellent drug retention rate as well as efficacy and safety of approved biologicals including their use in monotherapy. Tapering and in some instances discontinuation of biologicals is possible in disease remission. In case of relapse, patients usually show full response after reintroduction of the same compound. The development of biologicals continues fast with several new biologicals targeting different or established cytokines or cellular subsets of the immune system. With several new biologicals in the pipeline and different formulations for established compounds, treatment options for RA will become even more versatile and sophisticated. Although we get closer to the aim of decreasing the proportion of refractory patients, many questions have to be addressed in the near future regarding emerging biosimilars and biologicals with new modes of action. PMID:26535144

  5. Mechanisms involved in triggering rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Catrina, Anca I; Joshua, Vijay; Klareskog, Lars; Malmström, Vivianne

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory syndrome with a strong autoimmune component. The autoantigens in RA are neither tissue nor organ-specific, but comprise a broad collection of post-translational modified proteins, such as citrullinated proteins. These modifications are likely to be triggered by innate stimuli. In genetically susceptible hosts, they can lead to a more substantiated secondary autoimmune reaction targeting the joints and precipitating the clinical onset of RA. Both innate and adaptive mechanisms will then closely interplay to promote chronic joint inflammation in the several absence of appropriate treatment. This scenario, is shared with other autoimmune diseases where potentially pathogenic immune responses are present already before disease onset. Better understanding of these processes will allow both earlier diagnosis of RA and identification of those healthy individuals that are at risk of developing disease, opening possibilities for disease prevention. In this review, we discuss the iterative processes of innate and adaptive immunity responsible for the (longitudinal) development of immune reactions that may contribute to the development of RA. PMID:26683152

  6. The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis in radiological studies. Part II: Imaging studies in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Warczy?ska, Agnieszka; Matuszewska, Genowefa; Saied, Fadhil; Kunisz, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis followed by early initiation of treatment, prevent the destruction of joints and progression to disability in the majority of patients. A traditional X-ray fails to capture early inflammatory changes, while late changes (e.g. erosions) appear after a significant delay, once 20–30% of bone mass has been lost. Sonography and magnetic resonance imaging studies have shown that erosions are seen in the first 3 months from the appearance of symptoms in 10–26% of patients, while in 75% they are seen in the first 2 years of the disease. Power Doppler ultrasound and dynamic magnetic resonance studies allow for qualitative, semiquantitative and quantitative monitoring of the vascularization of the synovium. In addition, magnetic resonance enables assessment of the bone marrow. The ultrasonographic examination using a state-of-the-art apparatus with a high-frequency probe allows for images with great spatial resolution and for the visualization of soft tissues and bone surfaces. However, the changes seen in ultrasonography (synovial pathologies, the presence of exudate, tendons changes, cartilage and bone lesions, pathologies of tendon attachments and ligaments – enthesopathies) are not only specific for rheumatoid arthritis and occur in other rheumatic diseases. Qualitative methods are sufficient for diagnosing the disease through ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. Whereas semiquantitative and quantitative scales serve to monitor the disease course – efficacy of conservative treatment and qualification for radioisotope synovectomy or surgical synovectomy – and to assess treatment efficacy.

  7. Characterization and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis by photoacoustic imaging: a study on adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model

    PubMed Central

    Rajian, Justin R.; Shao, Xia; Chamberland, David L.; Wang, Xueding

    2013-01-01

    Neovascularity also known as angiogenesis is an early feature of inflammatory arthritis disease. Therefore, identifying the development of neovascularity is one way to potentially detect and characterize arthritis. Laser-based photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging biomedical imaging modality which may aid in the detection of both early and continued development of neovascularity. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of PAI to measure angiogenesis, for the purpose of evaluating and monitoring inflammatory arthritis and responses to treatment. The imaging results on an arthritis rat model demonstrate that 1) there is noticeable enhancement in image intensities in the arthritic ankle joints when compared to the normal joints, and 2) there is noticeable decrease in image intensities in the arthritic ankle joints after treatment when compared to the untreated arthritic joints. In order to validate the findings from PAI, we performed positron emission tomography (PET) and histology on the same joints. The diameters of the ankle joints, as a clinical score of the arthritis, were also measured at each time point. PMID:23761851

  8. Characterization and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis by photoacoustic imaging: a study on adjuvant-induced arthritis rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Rajian, Justin; Shao, Xia; Chamberland, David L.; Girish, Gandikota

    2014-03-01

    Neovascularity also known as angiogenesis is an early feature of inflammatory arthritis disease. Therefore, identifying the development of neovascularity is one way to potentially detect and characterize arthritis. Laser-based photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is an emerging biomedical imaging modality which may aid in detection of both early and continued development of neovascularity. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of PAI to measure angiogenesis, for the purpose of evaluating and monitoring inflammatory arthritis after treatment. The imaging results on an arthritis rat model demonstrate that 1) there is noticeable enhancement in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints when compared to the normal joints, and 2) there is noticeable decrease in image intensity in the arthritic ankle joints after treatment when compared to the untreated arthritic joints. In order to validate the findings from PAI, we performed positron emission tomography (PET) and histology on the same joints. The diameters of the ankle joints, as a clinical score of the arthritis, were also measured at each time point.

  9. Treatment of trapeziometacarpal arthritis: results of resection arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Dell, P C; Brushart, T M; Smith, R J

    1978-05-01

    Ninety-one thumbs with symptomatic trapeziometacarpal arthritis were studied and classified by the severity of trapeziometacarpal arthritis, as seen on the roentgenogram. Thirty-five patients with mild changes had satisfactory relief of pain after treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs and a C-splint. Operation, consisting of resection of the trapezium and shortening by 1.5 cm of the abductor pollicis longus tendon was performed on 16 thumbs. In six patients a rolled palmaris longus tendon was inserted between the metacarpal base and the scaphoid. All patients had relief of pain, improvement of pinch and grip strength, and an increased range of thumb pronation after operation. There was no difference in the results of those patients treated with or without tendon interposition. Trapezial resection was found to be an effective means of treating patients with symptomatic trapeziometacarpal arthritis who failed to improve with conservative care. PMID:659819

  10. Photoacoustic imaging: a potential new tool for arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding

    2012-12-01

    The potential application of photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technology to diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis has been explored. The feasibility of our bench-top joint imaging systems in delineating soft articular tissue structures in a noninvasive manner was validated first on rat models and then on human peripheral joints. Based on the study on commonly used arthritis rat models, the capability of PAI to differentiate arthritic joints from the normal was also examined. With sufficient imaging depth, PAI can realize tomographic imaging of a human peripheral joint or a small-animal joint as a whole organ noninvasively. By presenting additional optical contrast and tissue functional information such as blood volume and blood oxygen saturation, PAI may provide an opportunity for early diagnosis of inflammatory joint disorders, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, and for monitoring of therapeutic outcomes with improved sensitivity and accuracy.

  11. Beyond the joints: neurological involvement in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Remus, Cesar; Duran-Barragan, Sergio; Castillo-Ortiz, Jose Dionisio

    2012-01-01

    Although arthritis is the most notable component, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disorder where extra-articular manifestations are common; among them, central and peripheral nervous system involvement is frequent and associated with significant morbidity and, in some cases, reduced life span. It may produce a myriad of symptoms and signs ranging from subtle numbness in a hand, to quadriparesis and sudden death. Central and peripheral neurologic manifestations may arise from structural damage produced by RA in diarthroidal joints, by the systemic inflammatory process of the disease itself or by the drugs used to treat it. Neurologic syndromes may appear suddenly or developed slowly through months, and emerge early or after years of having RA. Neurologic manifestations may be easily overlooked or incorrectly assigned to peripheral arthritis unless the attending physician is aware of these complications. In this article, we review neurologic involvement in RA patients with emphasis on clinical approach for early detection. PMID:21932019

  12. Is yoga a suitable treatment for rheumatoid arthritis: current opinion.

    PubMed

    Telles, Shirley; Singh, Nilkamal

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed published literature regarding the use of yoga for managing rheumatoid arthritis to determine whether adequate evidence exists to suggest its usefulness as a therapy. A search for previous studies involving yoga and rheumatoid arthritis in PubMed yielded eight reports. These studies reported the benefits of yoga in the physical and mental health of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), suggesting that yoga is a useful add-on therapy for RA patients. However, all studies showed limitations with respect to sample size, study design, description and duration of yoga intervention, and assessment tools and statistical methods used. Additionally, the studies did not attempt to understand the mechanisms underlying observed benefits. Hence, evidence suggests a definite role of yoga in RA improvement, reducing pain, improving function, and creating a positive mental state. However, detailed analysis and additional studies are necessary to verify these observations. PMID:24198591

  13. Symmetrical primary cutaneous marginal zone lymphoma associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Fatma Elif; Karaduman, Ay?en; Hürmüz, Pervin; Ozyar, Enis; Bari?ta, Ibrahim; Sa?lam, Arzu

    2010-05-01

    Primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (PCMZL) is an indolent low grade B cell lymphoma of the skin, with lack of extracutaneous involvement at the time of diagnosis. Herein we report the case of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who developed symmetrical PCMZL lesions on both ear lobes. Lesions occurring symmetrically on ear lobes are more specific for cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia (CLH) and this kind of symmetrical localization hasn't been reported for PCMZL before. PCMZL is considered to arise from a background of reactive lymphoid hyperplasia and this case point out the concept of CLH and PCMZL spectrum. Association of marginal zone lymphoma with rheumatoid arthritis and resolution of lesions together with the resolution of symptoms due to rheumatoid arthritis after rituximab therapy is another interesting point for this case. To the best of our knowledge PCMZL associated with RA has not been reported previously. PMID:19674036

  14. Characterisation of uveitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, E.; Macaluso, D.; Edwards, A.; Rosenbaum, J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study is to describe the clinical characteristics of uveitis related to psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and also to compare the uveitis in PsA to the uveitis in spondyloarthropathy (SA).?METHODS—Sixteen patients with uveitis and PsA were evaluated in a tertiary care uveitis clinic. These patients were compared retrospectively to a series of 89 patients with uveitis and SA.?RESULTS—Eight (50%) of the 16 patients with uveitis had strictly peripheral arthritis, while two (12.5%) had axial only, and six (37.5%) had axial and peripheral arthritis. Patients with uveitis and axial disease were more likely to be male (100% v 38%) and HLA-B27 positive (6 of 6 typed positive v 0 of 3 typed positive) when compared with those with uveitis and peripheral arthritis only. Compared with patients with SA, those with PsA were more likely to have insidious onset (19% v 3%), simultaneously bilateral (37.5% v 7%), chronic duration (31% v 6%), or posterior (44% v 17%) uveitis. Complications of uveitis were similar in the SA and PsA groups.?CONCLUSION—Uveitis in patients with PsA was more likely to be insidious in onset, continuous, posterior, and active bilaterally compared with uveitis in patients with SA. Patients with uveitis and axial involvement were more likely to be male and HLA-B27 positive compared with patients with uveitis and peripheral arthritis alone. Patients with seronegative arthritis and uveitis that begins insidiously, lasts longer than six months, is bilateral, or is posterior, should be carefully questioned about the presence of either psoriasis or inflammatory bowel disease.?? PMID:10627431

  15. Periodontal status of rheumatoid arthritis patients in khartoum state

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Few studies have investigated the periodontal condition among Rheumatoid arthritis in Sudan. The present study described the periodontal condition among Sudanese patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and to compare them with those of non-rheumatic subjects. Methods A group of eighty rheumatoid arthritis patients was selected from Patient's Rheumatoid Clinics in Khartoum State during the period of January to May 2010. A control group of eighty patients with the same age and gender was selected for the study. Both Rheumatoid arthritis patients and the control group were examined for their plaque index, gingival index, and clinical attachment loss. Results The results revealed that there were no significant differences in plaque and gingival index among study and control groups, with mean plaque index of (1.25 ± 0.4) for patients and (1.17 ± 0.28) for the control group (p-value is 0.3597). The mean gingival index was (1.2 ± 0.24) for the patients and (1.2 ± 0.33) for the control (p = is 0.3049). The results showed statistically significant differences in clinical attachment loss between study and control groups, with mean clinical attachment loss of (1.03 ± 0.95) for the study group and (0.56 ± 0.63) for the control group (p = 0.0002). The study revealed that no association exists between the type of drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (NSAIDs & DMARDs) and the periodontal parameters (plaque index, gingival index, and clinical attachment loss). Conclusion A significant relationship between periodontal disease and Rheumatoid Arthritis does exist, but no difference between plaque and gingival index has been detected among study and control groups. PMID:22035090

  16. Triple-phase bone image abnormalities in Lyme arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.J.; Dadparvar, S.; Slizofski, W.J.; Glab, L.B.; Burger, M. )

    1989-10-01

    Arthritis is a frequent manifestation of Lyme disease. Limited triple-phase Tc-99m MDP bone imaging of the wrists and hands with delayed whole-body images was performed in a patient with Lyme arthritis. This demonstrated abnormal joint uptake in the wrists and hands in all three phases, with increased activity seen in other affected joints on delayed whole-body images. These findings are nonspecific and have been previously described in a variety of rheumatologic conditions, but not in Lyme disease. Lyme disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of articular and periarticular bone scan abnormalities.

  17. Septic Arthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Chuk, Raymond; Arvier, John; Laing, Barbara; Coman, David

    2015-01-01

    Infantile temporomandibular joint septic arthritis is an uncommon paediatric infection, but one which carries the potential for severe morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and aggressive medical and possibly surgical management is indicated for the best outcomes. The presenting clinical features are non-specific in a neonate and an infant; as such a high degree of clinical suspicion is required. We present the case of an eleven-month-old boy who has made a full recovery from an acute temporomandibular joint septic arthritis and review the relevant literature. PMID:26236452

  18. Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and the immune response

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinberg, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    The interrelationship among lymphocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils appears to be an important aspect of the synovial inflammation that is characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis. In a study comparing gold sodium aurothiomalate (GST) with auranofin (Au), an orally absorbed compound, both appeared to inhibit the disease process and no difference between parenteral and oral administration was observed. Another study involved two groups of nine patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis. One group underwent plasmapheresis. The second group underwent total lymphoid irradiation. Both agents appeared to inhibit the disease process. Plasmapheresis was better tolerated that irradiation.

  19. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: Unraveling the conundrum.

    PubMed

    Zampeli, Evangelia; Vlachoyiannopoulos, Panayiotis G; Tzioufas, Athanasios G

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a heterogeneous disease with a complex and yet not fully understood pathophysiology, where numerous different cell-types contribute to a destructive process of the joints. This complexity results into a considerable interpatient variability in clinical course and severity, which may additionally involve genetics and/or environmental factors. After three decades of focused efforts scientists have now achieved to apply in clinical practice, for patients with RA, the "treat to target" approach with initiation of aggressive therapy soon after diagnosis and escalation of the therapy in pursuit of clinical remission. In addition to the conventional synthetic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, biologics have greatly improved the management of RA, demonstrating efficacy and safety in alleviating symptoms, inhibiting bone erosion, and preventing loss of function. Nonetheless, despite the plethora of therapeutic options and their combinations, unmet therapeutic needs in RA remain, as current therapies sometimes fail or produce only partial responses and/or develop unwanted side-effects. Unfortunately the mechanisms of 'nonresponse' remain unknown and most probable lie in the unrevealed heterogeneity of the RA pathophysiology. In this review, through the effort of unraveling the complex pathophysiological pathways, we will depict drugs used throughout the years for the treatment of RA, the current and future biological therapies and their molecular or cellular targets and finally will suggest therapeutic algorithms for RA management. With multiple biologic options, there is still a need for strong predictive biomarkers to determine which drug is most likely to be effective, safe, and durable in a given individual. The fact that available biologics are not effective in all patients attests to the heterogeneity of RA, yet over the long term, as research and treatment become more aggressive, efficacy, toxicity, and costs must be balanced within the therapeutic equation to enhance the quality of life in patients with RA. PMID:26515757

  20. Stem cell transplantation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Snowden, J A; Kapoor, S; Wilson, A G

    2008-12-01

    The therapeutic potential of high dose cytotoxic therapy and stem cell transplantation (SCT) in severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was originally supported by animal studies and serendipitous clinical cases where allogeneic and autologous procedures were shown to ameliorate and potentially cure the disease. Phase I and Phase II clinical studies established the feasibility, safety and efficacy of autologous stem cell mobilisation and transplantation. Although it was clear that the effects of high dose chemotherapy and autologous SCT could safely achieve profound responses, sustained control of disease usually required the reintroduction of disease modifying agents. Responses were improved with dose escalation of the conditioning regimen, and also with post-SCT therapy, such as rituximab, but were not observed with graft manipulation. Phase III studies were attempted, but recruitment was compromised by the increasingly widespread use of biological anti-rheumatic agents. Autologous SCT is now only reasonably considered in relatively rare patients whose disease has resisted conventional and biological treatments, and small numbers of cases continue to be registered with the EBMT. Occasional patients treated with allogeneic and syngeneic SCT continue to stimulate academic interest, particularly as some appear to be cured, but significant logistical and toxicity issues mean that routine and widespread application is unrealistic. In summary, SCT continues to have a limited therapeutic potential in rare patients with RA refractory to modern therapy and sufficient fitness for the procedure. From a scientific perspective, ablation of the dysfunctional rheumatoid immune system and its reconstruction with SCT has provided useful insights into the pathophysiology of RA. PMID:18958746

  1. Emerging Roles of SUMO Modification in Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongyao; Davis, Francesca J.; Sharrocks, Andrew D; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic modification involving small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) has emerged as a new mechanism of protein regulation in mammalian biology. Sumoylation is an ATP-dependent, reversible post-translational modification which occurs under both basal and stressful cellular conditions. Sumoylation profoundly influences protein functions and pertinent biological processes. For example, sumoylation modulates multiple components in the NF?B pathway and exerts an anti-inflammatory effect. Likewise, sumoylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?) augments its anti-inflammatory activity. Current evidence suggests a role of sumoylation for resistance to apoptosis in synovial fibroblasts. Dynamic SUMO regulation controls the biological outcomes initiated by various growth factors involved in cartilage homeostasis, including basic fibroblast growth factors (bFGF or FGF-2), transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). The impact of these growth factors on cartilage are through sumoylation-dependent control of the transcription factors (e.g., Smad, Elk-1, HIF-1) that are key regulators of matrix components (e.g., aggrecan, collagen) or cartilage-degrading enzymes (e.g., MMPs, aggrecanases). Thus, SUMO modification appears to profoundly affect chondrocyte and synovial fibroblast biology, including cell survival, inflammatory responses, matrix metabolism and hypoxic responses. More recently, evidence suggests that, in addition to their nuclear roles, the SUMO pathways play crucial roles in mitochondrial activity, cellular senescence, and autophagy. With an increasing number of reports linking SUMO to human diseases like arthritis, it is probable that novel and equally important functions of the sumoylation pathway will be elucidated in the near future. PMID:20627123

  2. Prevention of cardiovascular disease in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hollan, I; Dessein, P H; Ronda, N; Wasko, M C; Svenungsson, E; Agewall, S; Cohen-Tervaert, J W; Maki-Petaja, K; Grundtvig, M; Karpouzas, G A; Meroni, P L

    2015-10-01

    The increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been recognized for many years. However, although the characteristics of CVD and its burden resemble those in diabetes, the focus on cardiovascular (CV) prevention in RA has lagged behind, both in the clinical and research settings. Similar to diabetes, the clinical picture of CVD in RA may be atypical, even asymptomatic. Therefore, a proactive screening for subclinical CVD in RA is warranted. Because of the lack of clinical trials, the ideal CVD prevention (CVP) in RA has not yet been defined. In this article, we focus on challenges and controversies in the CVP in RA (such as thresholds for statin therapy), and propose recommendations based on the current evidence. Due to the significant contribution of non-traditional, RA-related CV risk factors, the CV risk calculators developed for the general population underestimate the true risk in RA. Thus, there is an enormous need to develop adequate CV risk stratification tools and to identify the optimal CVP strategies in RA. While awaiting results from randomized controlled trials in RA, clinicians are largely dependent on the use of common sense, and extrapolation of data from studies on other patient populations. The CVP in RA should be based on an individualized evaluation of a broad spectrum of risk factors, and include: 1) reduction of inflammation, preferably with drugs decreasing CV risk, 2) management of factors associated with increased CV risk (e.g., smoking, hypertension, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, kidney disease, depression, periodontitis, hypothyroidism, vitamin D deficiency and sleep apnea), and promotion of healthy life style (smoking cessation, healthy diet, adjusted physical activity, stress management, weight control), 3) aspirin and influenza and pneumococcus vaccines according to current guidelines, and 4) limiting use of drugs that increase CV risk. Rheumatologists should take responsibility for the education of health care providers and RA patients regarding CVP in RA. It is immensely important to incorporate CV outcomes in testing of anti-rheumatic drugs. PMID:26117596

  3. Immunogenetics of rheumatoid arthritis: Understanding functional implications.

    PubMed

    Messemaker, Tobias C; Huizinga, Tom W; Kurreeman, Fina

    2015-11-01

    The last decade has seen a dramatic technological revolution. The characterisation of the majority of the common variations in our genetic code in 2003 precipitated the discovery of the genetic risk factors predisposing to Rheumatoid Arthritis development and progression. Prior to 2007, only a handful of genetic risk factors had been identified, HLA, PTPN22 and CTLA4. Since then, over 100 genetic risk loci have been described, with the prediction that an ever-increasing number of risk alleles with consistently decreasing effect sizes will be discovered in the years to come. Each risk locus harbours multiple candidate genes and the proof of causality of each of these candidates is as yet unknown. An enrichment of these RA-associated genes is found in three pathways: T-cell receptor signalling, JAK-STAT signalling and the NF-?B signalling cascade, and currently drugs targeting these pathways are available for the treatment of RA. However, the role that RA-associated genes have in these pathways and how they contribute to disease is not always clear. Major efforts in understanding the contribution of genetic risk factors are currently under way with studies querying the role of genetic variation in gene expression of coding and non-coding genes, epigenetic marks and other regulatory mechanisms yielding ever more valuable insights into mechanisms of disease. Recent work has suggested a possible enrichment of non-coding RNAs as well as super-enhancers in RA genetic loci indicating possible new insights into disease mechanism. This review brings together these emerging genetic data with an emphasis on the immunogenetic links these findings have provided and what we expect the future will bring. PMID:26215034

  4. Peripheral corneal ulceration associated with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Karampatakis, Vasileios; Konidaris, Vasileios; Michailidou, Maria; Gerofotis, Antonios; Daniilidis, Michail

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Corneal ulceration Symptoms: Blurred vision Medication: Abatacept Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Ophthalmology Objective: Management of emergency care Background: To report a case of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and associated peripheral corneal ulceration. Case Report: A 60-year-old woman with RA diagnosed 15 years ago, under immunosuppressive therapy (IV abatacept 250 mg/month), demonstrated blurring of vision in her RE (right eye). Visual acuity was 6/10 in the RE and 10/10 in the LE. Slit lamp examination revealed a paracentral superior corneal melt in the RE. Anterior chamber reaction was 2+. Laboratory investigations revealed positive anti-Ro and anti-La, anti-Extractable Nuclear Antigens (anti-ENA, ELISA), while anti-Sm, anti-Rnp, anti-Jo1 and anti-Scl70 were found negative. IgG and IgA serum immunoglobulins were found elevated, but IgE and IgM were within normal levels. Further evaluation for the underlying disease revealed highly elevated rheumatoid factor and C-reactive protein. The patient, who had been receiving anti-TNF during the last 6 months, underwent treatment with topical tobramycin and lubricants and oral prednisone 60 mg/day with tapering doses, to which methotrexate p.os. 15 mg/week was added. The condition improved within a few days after the initiation of prednisone treatment. Re-epithelization occurred 1 week after the onset of the immunosuppressive treatment. Only punctate fluorescein dye uptake was detected in the margins of the lesion. Conclusions: The effective control of the underlying disease and early diagnosis of the dry eye syndrome in RA patients may prevent serious corneal complications such as corneal ulceration. The initiation of treatment with steroids and immunosuppresants was found to halt the progression of keratolysis, and assisted re-epithelization. PMID:23986797

  5. Rheumatoid arthritis patients’ experience of climate care

    PubMed Central

    Vaks, Katrin; Sjöström, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand and examine how patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience climate care and its effects. A qualitative approach was chosen for the study. Two men and six women were interviewed according to a semistructured interview guide. The text was analyzed using a manifest content analysis. The analysis resulted in four categories and 10 subcategories. The interviewees experienced climate care positively. The training was perceived increasing gradually. The patients felt that they performed to a maximum capacity during training and were impressed by the staff’s enthusiasm and encouragement. The patients felt that they were involved in the goal setting and the choice of treatment, and the staff noticed individual needs. There was a feeling among the patients of being acknowledged by the staff. Information about the disease was perceived as individualized. The climate and beautiful surroundings were viewed as encouraging physical activity and a feeling of well-being. Patients made new friends, had fun together and also shared experiences about their disease. Furthermore, the patients described a sense of belonging to a group as well as a feeling of not being the only one that was sick among the healthy. Not having to do everyday tasks and having time to themselves were perceived positively. Several factors contributed to the positive experiences of climate care; climate, environment, physical activity, social context, staff involvement, and information about the disease were described as interacting together and resulting in a sense of well-being. A proposal for future research would be to examine if/how the various factors might interact and affect the RA patients’ illness and quality of life.

  6. Cognitive Impairment in Persons With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, So Young; Katz, Patricia; Wallhagen, Margaret; Julian, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the prevalence and possible predictors of cognitive impairment in persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Individuals from a longitudinal cohort study of RA participated in a study visit that included a range of physical, psychosocial, and biologic metrics. Cognitive function was assessed using a battery of 12 standardized neuropsychological measures yielding 16 indices. Subjects were classified as “impaired” if they performed 1 SD below age-based population norms on at least 4 of 16 indices. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify which of the following were significant predictors of cognitive impairment: sex, race, income, education, depression, disease duration, disease severity, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, glucocorticoid use, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Results A total of 115 subjects with a mean ± SD age of 58.6 ± 10.8 years were included; 64% were women and 81% were white. The proportion of persons who were classified as cognitively impaired was 31%. Education, income, glucocorticoid use, and CVD risk factors independently predicted cognitive impairment, controlling for sex, race, disease duration, disease severity, CRP level, and depression. Individuals with cognitive impairment were more likely to have low education (odds ratio [OR] 6.18, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.6 –23.87), have low income (OR 7.12, 95% CI 1.35–37.51), use oral glucocorticoids (OR 2.92, 95% CI 1.05–8.12), and have increased CVD risk factors (OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.19–2.17 per risk factor). Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that the burden of cognitive impairment in RA is significant, and future studies identifying specific etiologic contributors to cognitive impairment are warranted. PMID:23322467

  7. Discourse analysis of the written press reports regarding rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Sequeira; Pia, Drozdowski Marina; Mabel, Gimenez Rey Marcela; Adrian, Schejtman; Mariana, Nuñez

    2014-09-01

    The management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis (PS/PsA) has radically changed during the last decade modifying physicians' perception about those diseases. However, if communication and transfer of information, from doctors to patients, is not efficient, patients' perception could be influenced by other sources of information. The aim of this study is to analyze newspaper articles about RA or Ps/PsA published in the Argentinean written press between 1995 and 2010. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of all press articles that mentioned RA or Ps/PsA either on the headlines or in the text of the digital versions of the three main Argentinean newspapers from 1995 to 2010 were analyzed. A total of 166 press articles were analyzed; of these, 65.7 % of the articles were informative and the remaining were testimonials. Ninety-five articles were considered positives (57.2 %). Informative articles were positive with more frequency than the testimonials (64.2 vs. 43.9 %, p 0.02). Press articles that mentioned a new treatment were positive more frequently than those that did not mention it (78.3 vs. 49.2 %, p 0.001). Balanced articles included the opinion of, at least, one specialist in 84.2 versus the 48.1 % of the not balanced (p 0.02). Articles about RA and Ps/APs in Argentina tended to be positive all along the study period. A positive result was more frequent in those articles, which informed about a new treatment. The inclusion of the opinion of a professional is not associated with a positive result, although it is to a balanced article. PMID:24556936

  8. Tubercular spondylitis in children.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anil K; Sreenivasan, Ravi; Mukunth, R; Dhammi, Ish Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Spine of the child has unique anatomy and growth potential to grow to adult size. Tuberculosis (TB) spine results in bone loss as well as disturbed growth potential, hence spinal deformities may progress as the child grows. The growth potential is also disturbed when the disease focus is surgically intervened. Surgery is indicated for complications such as deformity, neurological deficit, instability, huge abscess, diagnostic dilemma and in suspected drug resistance to mycobacterium tuberculosis. The child on antitubercular treatment needs to be periodically evaluated for weight gain and drug dosages need to be adjusted accordingly. The severe progressive kyphotic deformity should be surgically corrected. Mild to moderate cases should be followed up until maturity to observe progression/improvement of spinal deformity. The surgical correction of kyphotic deformity in active disease is less hazardous than in a healed kyphosis. The internal kyphectomy by extra pleural approach allows adequate removal of internal salient in paraplegic patients with healed kyphotic deformity. PMID:24741133

  9. The Impact of Arthritis on Life Satisfaction of Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burckhardt, Carol S.

    Poor health has been implicated as a suppressor of the life satisfaction of older adults. To clarify the contribution of arthritis to this process, functional disability, negative affect, pain, current severity of the disease, self-esteem, perception of general health, and internal health locus of control, were placed within a causal model as…

  10. Pain Coping Strategies and Depression in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gregory K.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined role of pain episodes and active and passive pain coping strategies in predicting depression in 287 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Findings revealed pain, passive coping, and interaction between the 2 accounted for higher depression. Results also indicated that frequent use of passive pain coping strategies in face of high pain…

  11. Cognitive Distortion in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Relation to Depression and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Timothy W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined the relation between cognitive distortion, as measured by the Cognitive Error Questionnaire, and both self-reported and interview-rated depression and disability in 92 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Found cognitive distortion significantly associated with depression, and also related to physical disability. Discusses the results,…

  12. School Problems and Teacher Responsibilities in Juvenile Rheumatiod Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Janalee; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Responses of 24 children with rheumatoid arthritis, 24 of their parents, and 14 of their teachers to a survey about school problems indicated that children experienced problems most frequently with self-concept and peer relationships, while parents and teachers focused on physical health and activity-related problems. (Author/CB)

  13. Suppression of collagen induced arthritis by idiotype coupled lymphoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nagler-Anderson, C.; Gurish, M.F.; Robinson, M.E.; Thorbecke, G.J.

    1986-03-01

    Studies were initiated to evaluate the regulatory influence of idiotype (Id) networks in an experimental auto-immune disease. Collagen induced arthritis is an animal model of polyarthritis induced in susceptible mice by immunization with collagen II (CII). A humoral immune response to CII appears to be critical for the development of diseases. If subpopulations of the anti-CII abs, important for the induction of arthritis, could be identified and manipulated through the presence of a major Id, it should be possible to decrease arthritis incidence by suppressing the production of these Ids. Specifically purified anti-CII abs from arthritic DBA/1 mice were coupled to syngeneic spleen cells and administered IV prior to intradermal immunization with CII. By day 34 after 1/sup 0/ immunization, 100% of control mice and 50% of treated mice had developed arthritis. Suppression of the Id population administered to the treated group was confirmed by RIA. Sera from individual mice were tested as inhibitors of binding of /sup 125/I-labelled polyclonal DBA/1 anti-CII to a rabbit anti-Id directed against polyclonal anti-CII isolated from the sera of arthritic mice. Mean percentage of inhibition of binding of /sup 125/I-Id to rabbit anti-Id by sera from non-arthritic treated mice was found to be significantly lower than that observed in the arthritic control group (p = .045), but did not correlate with total anti-CII ab titers.

  14. Observations on Chlamydia trachomatis and other microbes in reactive arthritis.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Robinson, David; Keat, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    There are problems in attributing causality in inflammatory arthritis. So far as C. trachomatis and sexually acquired reactive arthritis are concerned, there is much in favour of a causal relationship, although there are important caveats which need to be explored before it is possible to say unreservedly that C. trachomatis plays a causative role in reactive arthritis. For example, micro-organisms have never been cultured from synovial effusions in early disease, and only once has substantial benefit of antimicrobial treatment been reported. The claim that ocular strains of C. trachomatis are of over-riding importance in pathogenesis needs confirmation before it can be accepted. No conclusion can be made about the possibility of other small intracellular bacteria in joints having a role in causing disease. However, if it can be shown that eradication of the micro-organism, which may be difficult to prove, coincides with clinical recovery, it would go some way to recognising causality. In spite of the recognised difficulties, antibiotic studies have an important role in identifying aetiology. They need to focus on very early disease and on eradication of intra-articular bacteria. Treatment of established disease is likely to be less informative. Although a combination of antibiotics might have a future in treating established disease, diagnosing and treating non-gonococcal urethritis as soon as possible should be the aim in order to prevent the development of reactive arthritis. PMID:24828551

  15. The IL-23-IL-17 axis in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubberts, Erik

    2015-10-01

    The IL-23-IL-17 axis in inflammatory arthritis. Erik Lubberts. Nat. Rev. Rheumatol. 11, 415-429 (2015); published online 28 April 2015; doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2015.53. In Figure 2a of this Review, full protection against CIA was incorrectly stated as an effect of IL-17 deficiency instead of IL-17RA deficiency. PMID:26369609

  16. Green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate: inflammation and arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rashmi; Akhtar, Nahid; Haqqi, Tariq M.

    2011-01-01

    A number of factors including inflammation and oxidative stress are believed to play a role in the development of chronic joint diseases. Green tea has become a popular drink and is consumed throughout the world. Extracts of green tea and polyphenols present therein have been shown to inhibit the inflammatory responses in vitro in different cell types and the development of arthritis in animal model studies. There is considerable evidence that (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the predominant green tea polyphenol which mimic its effects, inhibits enzyme activities and signal transduction pathways that play important roles in inflammation and joint destruction in arthritis. After oral consumption EGCG become bioavailable and proteomic studies suggest that EGCG may directly interact with a large set of protein targets and alter the physiological response of the cells. Taken together these and other studies identify and support the use of EGCG as a possible chemopreventive agent with a potential to inhibit the development of arthritis. Here we review the biological effects of EGCG in an attempt to understand its pivotal molecular targets that directly affect the inflammation and joint destruction process for prevention and/or for the development of new therapeutics for arthritis in humans. PMID:20462508

  17. Eikenella corrodens cellulitis and arthritis of the knee.

    PubMed Central

    Flesher, S A; Bottone, E J

    1989-01-01

    Severe cellulitis and septic arthritis due to Eikenella corrodens and a viridans group streptococcus developed following dental manipulation in a patient with a history of hemarthrosis. Correct diagnosis was achieved by recognition of E. corrodens on a culture of a knee aspirate. Antimicrobial (ampicillin) therapy resulted in a therapeutic response. Images PMID:2681259

  18. Hyperspectral imaging for detection of arthritis: feasibility and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanic, Matija; Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disease that frequently leads to joint destruction. It has a high incidence rate worldwide, and the disease significantly reduces patients' quality of life. Detecting and treating inflammatory arthritis before structural damage to the joint has occurred is known to be essential for preventing patient disability and pain. Existing diagnostic technologies are expensive, time consuming, and require trained personnel to collect and interpret data. Optical techniques might be a fast, noninvasive alternative. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a noncontact optical technique which provides both spectral and spatial information in one measurement. In this study, the feasibility of HSI in arthritis diagnostics was explored by numerical simulations and optimal imaging parameters were identified. Hyperspectral reflectance and transmission images of RA and normal human joint models were simulated using the Monte Carlo method. The spectral range was 600 to 1100 nm. Characteristic spatial patterns for RA joints and two spectral windows with transmission were identified. The study demonstrated that transmittance images of human joints could be used as one parameter for discrimination between arthritic and unaffected joints. The presented work shows that HSI is a promising imaging modality for the diagnostics and follow-up monitoring of arthritis in small joints.

  19. Nocardia Septic Arthritis Complicating an Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair.

    PubMed

    Yong, Elaine X L; Cheong, Elaine Y L; Boutlis, Craig S; Chen, Darren B; Liu, Eunice Y-T; McKew, Genevieve L

    2015-08-01

    Nocardia infection following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) allograft reconstruction is a rare occurrence. We report a case of Nocardia infection of an allograft ACL reconstruction and septic arthritis of the knee joint due to an organism most similar to the novel Nocardia species Nocardia aobensis. PMID:26041900

  20. Low-dose weekly oral methotrexate therapy for inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Boh, L E; Schuna, A A; Pitterle, M E; Adams, E M; Sundstrom, W R

    1986-06-01

    The efficacy and toxicity of low-dose, weekly oral methotrexate (MTX) therapy for inflammatory arthritis was evaluated. Fifty-nine patients with a diagnosis of inflammatory arthritis who had failed to respond to or developed toxicity to gold, penicillamine, or hydroxychloroquine therapy were treated with MTX 10-20 mg administered orally or intravenously once a week in divided doses. Various tests to assess arthritis were performed upon each patient's entrance into the study and at specified intervals throughout the 24-month study period. The mean duration of methotrexate therapy was 15.5 months. Patients showed significant improvement in number of swollen joints, duration of morning stiffness, amount of pain, and amount of activity during the study period. Of the 35 patients who had had roentgenographic studies of their hands performed initially and after one year of MTX therapy, 23 had no evidence of new joint erosions after one year. Biopsies of hepatic tissue from 20 patients showed no progressive changes when compared with pretreatment biopsies. Gastrointestinal symptoms, mucocutaneous lesions, or small increases in liver enzyme concentrations were observed in 31 patients; three patients developed pulmonary toxicity and had to be withdrawn from the study. MTX is an effective agent for the treatment of inflammatory arthritis in patients who do not respond to therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or slow-acting antirheumatic drugs. Short-term weekly oral MTX therapy does not appear to result in clinically important liver disease. PMID:3720217

  1. Aalborg Universitet Adherence to methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis

    E-print Network

    Schwefel, Hans-Peter

    Aalborg Universitet Adherence to methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis Bliddal, Henning; Eriksen from Aalborg University Citation for published version (APA): Bliddal, H., Eriksen, S. A., Christensen: A Danish Nationwide Cohort Study Henning Bliddal,1,2 Stine A. Eriksen,1,3 Robin Christensen,1 Tove Lorenzen

  2. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis in humans by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Bernd; Dziekan, Thomas; Weissbach, Carmen; Mahler, Marianne; Schirner, Michael; Berliner, Birgitt; Bauer, Daniel; Voigt, Jan; Berliner, Michael; Bahner, Malte L.; Macdonald, Rainer

    2010-02-01

    The blood pool agent indo-cyanine green (ICG) has been investigated in a prospective clinical study for detection of rheumatoid arthritis using fluorescence imaging. Temporal behavior as well as spatial distribution of fluorescence intensity are suited to differentiate healthy and inflamed finger joints after i.v. injection of an ICG bolus.

  3. Trapezial topography in thumb carpometacarpal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Van Nortwick, Sarah; Berger, Aaron; Cheng, Robert; Lee, Julia; Ladd, Amy L

    2013-08-01

    Objective Contradictory reported arthritic patterns of the metacarpal surface of the trapezium include preferential volar wear, radial wear, and dorsal-ulnar sparing. We investigated whether a predominant wear pattern exists in surgical trapeziectomy for advanced thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) arthritis. Methods We examined 36 intact trapezia from 34 thumb CMC arthroplasty patients over an 18-month period. The first metacarpal articular surface revealed three consistent morphology patterns: (1) saddle, (2) dish, and (3) cirque. The saddle represented cartilage loss with preservation of the normal trapezial morphology. The dish shape represented concave curvature, with loss of the normal saddle configuration. The cirque shape represented preferential volar concave wear, disrupting the convex volardorsal arc. Two surgeons classified the randomized specimens twice, blinded to patient identity and each other's categorization. Radiographic Eaton staging was correlated retrospectively for 35 of 36 of the trapezial specimens. Eight specimens were further quantified with micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Results Thirty-six trapezia were classified as follows: 17 (47%) saddle, 12 (33%) dish, and 7 (19%) cirque. Intra-rater reliability was 0.97 and 0.95; inter-rater reliability in the second round was 0.95. The 36 trapezia represented 27 female (75%) and 9 male (25%) patients; 18 (50%) represented the dominant hand. Age at surgery averaged 64 (33-76). Complete cartilage loss of the entire metacarpal surface was seen in 15 (42%) of all specimens. Osteophyte presence was typically minimal in the saddle group; the dish group had characteristic extensive rimming osteophytes in a 91% female population (11/12), and the cirque group had volar osteophytes. Radiographic severity ranged from Eaton stage II to IV; less severe radiographic staging (Eaton II) predominated in the saddle configuration; advanced Eaton III-IV disease predominated in both cirque and dish shapes. Micro-CT verified the three discrete shapes with volardorsal and radioulnar orientation measurements. Conclusion The metacarpal surface of the trapezium demonstrates three distinct patterns of wear in arthritic surgical specimens. Sex, dominance, age distribution, and Eaton stage varied across the different shapes. Level of Evidence Level 3 Study Type Observational. PMID:24436826

  4. Trapezial Topography in Thumb Carpometacarpal Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Van Nortwick, Sarah; Berger, Aaron; Cheng, Robert; Lee, Julia; Ladd, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Contradictory reported arthritic patterns of the metacarpal surface of the trapezium include preferential volar wear, radial wear, and dorsal-ulnar sparing. We investigated whether a predominant wear pattern exists in surgical trapeziectomy for advanced thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) arthritis. Methods We examined 36 intact trapezia from 34 thumb CMC arthroplasty patients over an 18-month period. The first metacarpal articular surface revealed three consistent morphology patterns: (1) saddle, (2) dish, and (3) cirque. The saddle represented cartilage loss with preservation of the normal trapezial morphology. The dish shape represented concave curvature, with loss of the normal saddle configuration. The cirque shape represented preferential volar concave wear, disrupting the convex volardorsal arc. Two surgeons classified the randomized specimens twice, blinded to patient identity and each other's categorization. Radiographic Eaton staging was correlated retrospectively for 35 of 36 of the trapezial specimens. Eight specimens were further quantified with micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Results Thirty-six trapezia were classified as follows: 17 (47%) saddle, 12 (33%) dish, and 7 (19%) cirque. Intra-rater reliability was 0.97 and 0.95; inter-rater reliability in the second round was 0.95. The 36 trapezia represented 27 female (75%) and 9 male (25%) patients; 18 (50%) represented the dominant hand. Age at surgery averaged 64 (33-76). Complete cartilage loss of the entire metacarpal surface was seen in 15 (42%) of all specimens. Osteophyte presence was typically minimal in the saddle group; the dish group had characteristic extensive rimming osteophytes in a 91% female population (11/12), and the cirque group had volar osteophytes. Radiographic severity ranged from Eaton stage II to IV; less severe radiographic staging (Eaton II) predominated in the saddle configuration; advanced Eaton III-IV disease predominated in both cirque and dish shapes. Micro-CT verified the three discrete shapes with volardorsal and radioulnar orientation measurements. Conclusion The metacarpal surface of the trapezium demonstrates three distinct patterns of wear in arthritic surgical specimens. Sex, dominance, age distribution, and Eaton stage varied across the different shapes. Level of Evidence Level 3 Study Type Observational PMID:24436826

  5. Evidence based knee injections for the management of arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Olivia T.; Souzdalnitski, Dmitri; Vrooman, Bruce; Cheng, Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Arthritis of the knee affects 46 million Americans. We aimed to determine the level of evidence of intraarticular knee injections in the management of arthritic knee pain. Methods We systematically searched PUBMED/MEDLINE and the Cochrane databases for articles published on knee injections and evaluated their level of evidence and recommendations according to established criteria. Results The evidence supports the use of intraarticular corticosteroid injections for rheumatoid arthritis (1A+ level), osteoarthritis (1A+ level), and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (2C+ level). Pain relief and functional improvement are significant for months up to one year after the injection. Triamcinolone hexacetonide offers an advantage over triamcinolone acetonide and should be the intraarticular steroid of choice (2B+ level). Intraarticular injection of hyaluronate may provide longer pain relief than steroid injection in osteoarthritis (2B+ level). It can also be effective for rheumatoid arthritis knee pain (1A+ level). However, it is only recommended for patients with significant surgical risk factors and for patients with mild radiographic disease in whom conservative treatment has failed (2B± level). Botulinum toxin Type A injection is effective in reducing arthritic knee pain (2B+ level) and so is tropisetron (2B+ level) and tanezumab (2B+ level). The new agents, such as rAAV2-TNFR:Fc, SB-210396/CE 9.1, and various radioisotopes have provided various degrees of success, but their long-term safety and efficacy remains to be determined. Conclusions We conclude that strong evidence supports the use of intraarticular knee injection as a valuable intervention in the continuum of management of arthritis between conservative treatment and knee surgeries. PMID:22621287

  6. Pulsed radio frequency therapy of experimentally induced arthritis in ponies.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, W H; Houge, J C; Neirby, D T; Di Mino, A; Di Mino, A A

    1991-01-01

    The effect of pulsed radio frequency therapy (PRFT) was evaluated on seven ponies with no arthritis and in 28 ponies in which arthritis was created using intra-articular amphotericin B to induce synovitis in the right middle carpal joint. The ponies were divided into five treatment and two control groups. Two levels of arthritis were created and two dosage levels of PRFT were evaluated. The effect of PRFT on arthritic and nonarthritic joints was measured by comparing synovial fluid parameters, the degree and duration of lameness, the range of carpal motion, and carpus circumference, for treated and untreated groups. Lesions seen radiographically, at gross pathology, and by histopathology were also compared between the treated and control groups. In the ponies with a mild form of induced arthritis, PRFT significantly (p less than 0.05) reduced the severity and duration of lameness, swelling of the carpus, and the severity of gross pathological and radiographic changes. In these ponies the synovial acid phosphatase levels were lower, the mucin clot quality was superior, and the synovial protein levels were lower for the ponies receiving PRFT as compared to the arthritic ponies receiving no treatment. A dose response effect was evident. In ponies with a slightly more severe form of arthritis, PRFT was evaluated at one dosage level. The treated ponies were significantly improved over the untreated ponies with respect to carpal range of motion, degree of lameness, carpus swelling, and radiographic lesions. No deleterious effects were noted when normal, PRFT treated, middle carpal joints were compared to contralateral untreated, normal joints. It was concluded that significant beneficial effects resulted when affected ponies were treated with PRFT. PMID:1884288

  7. Arthroscopic Treatment of Septic Arthritis of the Elbow in a 4-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Masashi; Tojo, Yuichi; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Souichi; Tanaka, Minoru; Honda, Masahito; Itoi, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric septic arthritis is uncommon and has been traditionally treated by joint aspiration or open arthrotomy. There are some reports about arthroscopic surgery in pediatric septic arthritis of the knee, hip, and shoulder. However, there is no report for the case of elbow. We report a case of pediatric septic arthritis of elbow treated with arthroscopically with good clinical condition at 3-year follow-up. This paper is based on a report first published in Japanese (Tojo (2012)). PMID:26713167

  8. 'MHC-I-opathy'-unified concept for spondyloarthritis and Behçet disease.

    PubMed

    McGonagle, Dennis; Aydin, Sibel Zehra; Gül, Ahmet; Mahr, Alfred; Direskeneli, Haner

    2015-12-01

    The spondyloarthropathies comprise ankylosing spondylitis (AS), reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel disease. In this Perspectives article, we describe how Behçet disease and several clinically distinct spondyloarthropathies-all associated with MHC class I (MHC-I) alleles such as HLA-B(*)51, HLA-C(*)0602 and HLA-B(*)27 and epistatic ERAP-1 interactions-have a shared immunopathogenetic basis. As a unifying concept, we propose that barrier dysfunction in environmentally exposed organs such as the skin, and aberrant innate immune reactions at sites of mechanical stress, can often trigger secondary adaptive immune CD8(+) T-cell responses with prominent neutrophilic inflammation that culminate in exacerbation and recurrence of these diseases. Of note, these 'MHC-I-opathies' show a differential immunopathology, probably reflecting antigenic differences within target tissues: HLA-B(*)51 is linked to ocular and mucocutaneous disease but not gut involvement, and HLA-C(*)0602 is linked to type I psoriasis but not scalp or nail disease. PMID:26526644

  9. Erythrodermic Psoriasis Treated with Golimumab: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won-Ku; Kim, Gun-Wook; Cho, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Won-Jeong; Mun, Je-Ho; Song, Margaret; Kim, Hoon-Soo; Ko, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Moon-Bum

    2015-01-01

    Erythrodermic psoriasis (EP) is a very severe variant of psoriasis whose management poses a challenge to physicians, as currently available therapies often provide unsatisfactory results. Many biologics have been used to treat chronic plaque psoriasis, the most common form of psoriasis; however, their effectiveness for EP is poorly understood. A recently developed biologic, golimumab, has been extensively studied for the treatment of moderate-to-severe active rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, active ankylosing spondylitis, and chronic plaque psoriasis. However, no clinical trials have been performed for EP. Here, we report the case of a 32-year-old man who presented with severe psoriasis that previously failed to respond satisfactorily to methotrexate, cyclosporine, retinoid, narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy, and topical agents (i.e., steroids and calcipotriol). Skin lesions worsened progressively and developed into erythroderma. Psoriatic arthritis was also detected. Conventional therapies lacked efficacy. Therefore, we administered golimumab 50 mg. The skin lesions improved significantly according to the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score after the first administration; lesions improved further throughout the treatment course. Although additional studies are required to fully evaluate the efficacy and safety of golimumab, this agent may be an alternative treatment strategy for some patients with recalcitrant EP. PMID:26273164

  10. Incidence and Risk Factors for Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy among Patients with Selected Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bharat, A; Xie, F; Baddley, JW; Beukelman, T; Chen, L; Calabrese, L; Delzell, E; Grijalva, CG; Patkar, N; Saag, K; Winthrop, K; Curtis, JR

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a large, population-based study to describe the incidence and risk factors for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), psoriasis (PsO), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) using national inpatient and outpatient administrative data from the entire Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) from 2000–2009. Suspected PML cases were identified using hospital discharge diagnosis codes. Risk factors for PML were evaluated using outpatient data >= 6 months prior to PML diagnosis. Among 2,030,578 patients with autoimmune diseases of interest, a total of 53 PML cases were identified (2.6/100,000 patients). Most PML cases had HIV and/or cancer. Nine PML cases had evidence for biologic use prior to PML hospitalization, of which 3 had neither HIV nor malignancy and were exposed to biologics within 12 (rituximab) or 6 months(all other biologics) prior to PML diagnosis. PML occurred at an estimated incidence of 0.2/100,000 patients with autoimmune diseases who did not have HIV or malignancy. PML occurs at a very low incidence among patients with rheumatic diseases but can occur even in the absence of HIV or malignancy. PMID:22162369

  11. Epidemiological studies in incidence, prevalence, mortality, and comorbidity of the rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Sherine E; Michaud, Kaleb

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of disease in human populations. Over the past decade there has been considerable progress in our understanding of the fundamental descriptive epidemiology (levels of disease frequency: incidence and prevalence, comorbidity, mortality, trends over time, geographic distributions, and clinical characteristics) of the rheumatic diseases. This progress is reviewed for the following major rheumatic diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA), juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, giant cell arteritis, polymyalgia rheumatica, gout, Sjögren's syndrome, and ankylosing spondylitis. These findings demonstrate the dynamic nature of the incidence and prevalence of these conditions – a reflection of the impact of genetic and environmental factors. The past decade has also brought new insights regarding the comorbidity associated with rheumatic diseases. Strong evidence now shows that persons with RA are at a high risk for developing several comorbid disorders, that these conditions may have atypical features and thus may be difficult to diagnose, and that persons with RA experience poorer outcomes after comorbidity compared with the general population. Taken together, these findings underscore the complexity of the rheumatic diseases and highlight the key role of epidemiological research in understanding these intriguing conditions. PMID:19519924

  12. A Rare Side Effect due to TNF-Alpha Blocking Agent: Acute Pleuropericarditis with Adalimumab.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Hakan; Cetinkaya, Ahmet Seckin; Yildiz, Tekin; Bozat, Tahsin

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonism is an important treatment strategy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, vasculitis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Adalimumab is one of the well-known tumor necrosis factor-alpha blocking agents. There are several side effects reported in patients with adalimumab therapy. Cardiac side effects of adalimumab are rare. Only a few cardiac side effects were reported. A 61-year-old man treated with adalimumab for the last 6 months due to psoriatic arthritis presented with typically acute pleuropericarditis. Chest X-ray and echocardiography demonstrated marked pericardial effusion. Patient was successfully evaluated for the etiology of acute pleuro-pericarditis. Every etiology was excluded except the usage of adalimumab. Adalimumab was discontinued, and patient was treated with 1200?mg of ibuprofen daily. Control chest X-ray and echocardiography after three weeks demonstrated complete resolution of both pleural and pericardial effusions. This case clearly demonstrated the acute onset of pericarditis with adalimumab usage. Acute pericarditis and pericardial effusion should be kept in mind in patients with adalimumab treatment. PMID:23970991

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis and work: The impact of rheumatoid arthritis on absenteeism and presenteeism.

    PubMed

    Verstappen, Suzanne M M

    2015-06-01

    For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), being in paid work is very important, and it increases self-esteem and financial independence. Although the management of RA has changed in the last 15 years to early aggressive treatment and the introduction of biologic treatments, many patients still have to take sick leave or even stop working because of their RA (i.e., absenteeism). For those remaining in paid work, patients may experience problems due to RA resulting in productivity loss while at work (i.e., presenteeism). The costs attributed to absenteeism and presenteeism (i.e., indirect costs) have been estimated to be very high, and they even exceed direct costs. However, there is no consensus on how to calculate these costs. This manuscript examines the relationship between the use of biologic therapy and absenteeism, with a focus on sick leave, and on presenteeism, and it provides an overview of indirect costs of absenteeism and presenteeism in those treated with biologic therapies. PMID:26612244

  14. The use, safety, and effectiveness of herpes zoster vaccination in individuals with inflammatory and autoimmune diseases: a longitudinal observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Zostavax, a live attenuated vaccine, has been approved in the United States for use in older individuals to reduce the risk and severity of herpes zoster (HZ), also known as shingles. The vaccine is contraindicated in individuals taking anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF) therapies or other biologics commonly used to treat autoimmune diseases because of the safety concern that zoster vaccine may be associated with a short-term HZ risk. The objective of the study was to examine the use, safety (short-term HZ risk after vaccination), and effectiveness of zoster vaccine in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and/or inflammatory bowel diseases. Methods We conducted a cohort study of patients aged 50 years and older with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and/or inflammatory bowel diseases by using administrative claims data from a nationwide health plan from January 1, 2005, to August 31, 2009. We examined the extent to which zoster vaccine was used; assessed factors associated with vaccine use (Cox proportional hazards regression); and compared the incidence rates of herpes zoster (HZ) between vaccinated and unvaccinated patients. Results Among 44,115 patients with the autoimmune diseases, 551 (1.2%) received zoster vaccine, and 761 developed HZ. Zoster vaccine use increased continuously after approval in 2006. Younger and healthier patients, those who had an HZ infection within the past 6 months, and those who were not using anti-TNF therapies were more likely to receive the vaccine. Approximately 6% of vaccinated patients were using anti-TNF therapies at the time of vaccination. The incidence rates of HZ were similar in vaccinated and unvaccinated patients (standardized incidence ratio, 0.99; 95% confidence interval, 0.29 to 3.43). Conclusions Use of the zoster vaccine was uncommon among older patients with autoimmune diseases, including those not exposed to immunosuppressive medications. The short-term risk of HZ did not appear to be increased in vaccinated patients, even among those using immunosuppressive therapies (for example, biologics) at the time of vaccination. However, our study was limited by the small number of vaccinated patients, and further evidence is needed to confirm the vaccine's safety and efficacy in this population. PMID:22024532

  15. Proteome-wide Analysis and CXCL4 as a Biomarker in Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    van Bon, L.; Affandi, A.J.; Broen, J.; Christmann, R.B.; Marijnissen, R.J.; Stawski, L.; Farina, G.A.; Stifano, G.; Mathes, A.L.; Cossu, M.; York, M.; Collins, C.; Wenink, M.; Huijbens, R.; Hesselstrand, R.; Saxne, T.; DiMarzio, M.; Wuttge, D.; Agarwal, S.K.; Reveille, J.D.; Assassi, S.; Mayes, M.; Deng, Y.; Drenth, J.P.H.; de Graaf, J.; den Heijer, M.; Kallenberg, C.G.M.; Bijl, M.; Loof, A.; van den Berg, W.B.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Smith, V.; de Keyser, F.; Scorza, R.; Lunardi, C.; van Riel, P.L.C.M.; Vonk, M.; van Heerde, W.; Meller, S.; Homey, B.; Beretta, L.; Roest, M.; Trojanowska, M.; Lafyatis, R.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasmacytoid dendritic cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis through mechanisms beyond the previously suggested production of type I interferon. Methods We isolated plasmacytoid dendritic cells from healthy persons and from patients with systemic sclerosis who had distinct clinical phenotypes. We then performed proteome-wide analysis and validated these observations in five large cohorts of patients with systemic sclerosis. Next, we compared the results with those in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, and hepatic fibrosis. We correlated plasma levels of CXCL4 protein with features of systemic sclerosis and studied the direct effects of CXCL4 in vitro and in vivo. Results Proteome-wide analysis and validation showed that CXCL4 is the predominant protein secreted by plasmacytoid dendritic cells in systemic sclerosis, both in circulation and in skin. The mean (±SD) level of CXCL4 in patients with systemic sclerosis was 25,624±2652 pg per milliliter, which was significantly higher than the level in controls (92.5±77.9 pg per milliliter) and than the level in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (1346±1011 pg per milliliter), ankylosing spondylitis (1368±1162 pg per milliliter), or liver fibrosis (1668±1263 pg per milliliter). CXCL4 levels correlated with skin and lung fibrosis and with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Among chemokines, only CXCL4 predicted the risk and progression of systemic sclerosis. In vitro, CXCL4 downregulated expression of transcription factor FLI1, induced markers of endothelial-cell activation, and potentiated responses of toll-like receptors. In vivo, CXCL4 induced the influx of inflammatory cells and skin transcriptome changes, as in systemic sclerosis. Conclusions Levels of CXCL4 were elevated in patients with systemic sclerosis and correlated with the presence and progression of complications, such as lung fibrosis and pulmonary arterial hypertension. (Funded by the Dutch Arthritis Association and others.) PMID:24350901

  16. Clostridium difficile-associated reactive arthritis in two children.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Helga A; Pron, Benedicte; Mouy, Richard; Wulffraat, Nico M; Prieur, Anne-Marie

    2004-01-01

    In adults, reactive arthritis (ReA) following Clostridium difficile-enterocolitis has been documented. In children, only one case of C. difficile-associated ReA has been reported. We now describe two other cases of ReA associated with C. difficile in children. The characteristics of ReA due to C. difficile appear to be similar in adults and children. Both children show polyarthritis after an episode of diarrhoea with positive stool cultures for C. difficile. Arthritis is asymmetrical with a self-limiting course. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) therapy is sufficient. One case is remarkable because of its prolonged course of ReA despite NSAID therapy, and its association with the presence of HLA-B27 antigen. PMID:14769523

  17. Lyme disease and the orthopaedic implications of lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian G; Cruz, Aristides I; Milewski, Matthew D; Shapiro, Eugene D

    2011-02-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in the United States and Europe. Increased awareness of the clinical manifestations of the disease is needed to improve detection and treatment. In the acute and late stages, Lyme disease may be difficult to distinguish from other disease processes. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of Lyme disease are directly related to the Borrelia burgdorferi spirochete and its effects on the integumentary, neurologic, cardiac, and musculoskeletal systems. Lyme arthritis is a common clinical manifestation of Lyme disease and should be considered in the evaluation of patients with monoarticular or pauciarticular joint complaints in a geographic area in which Lyme disease is endemic. Management of Lyme arthritis involves eradication of the spirochete with antibiotics. Generally, the prognosis is excellent. Arthroscopic synovectomy is reserved for refractory cases that do not respond to antibiotics. PMID:21292932

  18. [Physiopathology of chronic arthritis following chikungunya infection in man].

    PubMed

    Jaffar-Bandjee, M C; Gasque, P

    2012-03-01

    Chronic arthritis following chikungunya infection has no specific treatment. Studies on mice have confirmed involvement of fibroblasts and myoblasts as target cells replicating the virus and shown that macrophages play a key role in the innate immune response involving multiple cytokines and chimiokines. Paradoxically, TH1 and TH2 cytokine levels do not increase significantly during the acute and chronic phases, with the exception of interferon-gamma and IL12 that rise dramatically during the acute phase. The level of IL12 returns to normal in patients who recover. In contrast, patients who develop chronic arthritis show persistently high IL12 levels along with IFN-alpha within PBMC. Histologic examination of synovia reveals joint inflammation due to macrophages containing viral material. Metallo-protease (MMP2) also contributes to tissue damage. Chikungunya virus leads to apoptosis by both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. PMID:22693936

  19. The molecular mechanism of osteoclastogenesis in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Kotake, Shigeru; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Suda, Tatsuo

    2002-01-01

    Bone-resorbing osteoclasts are formed from hemopoietic cells of the monocyte–macrophage lineage under the control of bone-forming osteoblasts. We have cloned an osteoblast-derived factor essential for osteoclastogenesis, the receptor activator of NF-?B ligand (RANKL). Synovial fibroblasts and activated T lymphocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis also express RANKL, which appears to trigger bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis as well. Recent studies have shown that T lymphocytes produce cytokines other than RANKL such as IL-17, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor and IFN-?, which have powerful regulatory effects on osteoclastogenesis. The possible roles of RANKL and other cytokines produced by T lymphocytes in bone destruction are described. PMID:12223101

  20. Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis as a Complication of Neonatal Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saadi, Noor J.; Bakathir, Abdulaziz A.; Al-Hashmi, Ahmed K.; Al-Ismaili, Mohammad I.

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis as a complication of neonatal septic arthritis is rarely reported in the literature. We report two clinical cases of unilateral TMJ ankylosis occurring in paediatric patients subsequent to neonatal septic arthritis. The first case was a 15-month-old male infant who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in May 2010. According to the published English scientific literature, he is the youngest person yet to be diagnosed with this condition. The second case was a five-year-old female who presented to the Al-Nahda Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in October 2011. Both cases presented with facial asymmetry and trismus. They subsequently underwent gap arthroplasty and interpositional temporalis muscle and fascia grafts which resulted in an immediate improvement in mouth opening. Postoperatively, the patients underwent active jaw physiotherapy which was initially successful. Both patients were followed up for a minimum of two years following their surgeries. PMID:26629387